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Sample records for antenna straps design

  1. Simulation Results for the New NSTX HHFW Antenna Straps Design by Using Microwave Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C C; Brunkhorst, C; Greenough, N; Fredd, E; Castano, A; Miller, D; D'Amico, G; Yager, R; Hosea, J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P

    2009-05-26

    Experimental results have shown that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) at 30 MHz can provide substantial plasma heating and current drive for the NSTX spherical tokamak operation. However, the present antenna strap design rarely achieves the design goal of delivering the full transmitter capability of 6 MW to the plasma. In order to deliver more power to the plasma, a new antenna strap design and the associated coaxial line feeds are being constructed. This new antenna strap design features two feedthroughs to replace the old single feed-through design. In the design process, CST Microwave Studio has been used to simulate the entire new antenna strap structure including the enclosure and the Faraday shield. In this paper, the antenna strap model and the simulation results will be discussed in detail. The test results from the new antenna straps with their associated resonant loops will be presented as well.

  2. First results with 3-strap ICRF antennas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Herrmann, A.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ochoukov, R.; Pütterich, Th.; Tuccilo, A.; Tudisco, O.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    The 3-strap antennas in ASDEX Upgrade allow ICRF operation with low tungsten (W) content in the confined plasma with W-coated antenna limiters. With the 3-strap antenna configuration, the local W impurity source at the antenna is drastically reduced and the core W concentration is similar to that of the boron coated 2-strap antenna at a given ICRF power. Operation of the 3-strap antennas with the power ratio between the central and the outer straps of 1.5:1 and 2:1 is adopted to minimize the ICRF-specific W release.

  3. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF Antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; W. Beck; R.L. Boivin; P.T. Bonoli; D. Gwinn; W.E. Lee; E. Nelson-Melby; M. Porkolab; R. Vieira; S.J. Wukitch; and J.A. Goetz

    2001-06-12

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in February 2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low-heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in July 2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radio- frequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in February 2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented.

  4. Analysis of 4-strap ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; S.J. Wukitch; R.L. Boivin; J.A. Goetz; J.C. Hosea; J.H. Irby; Y. Lin; A. Parisot; M. Porkolab; J.R. Wilson; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2003-07-31

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna was designed and fabricated for plasma heating and current drive in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial upgrades were carried out in 2000 and 2001, which eliminated surface arcing between the metallic protection tiles and reduced plasma-wall interactions at the antenna front surface. A boron nitride septum was added at the antenna midplane to intersect electric fields resulting from radio-frequency sheath rectification, which eliminated antenna corner heating at high power levels. The current feeds to the radiating straps were reoriented from an E||B to E parallel B geometry, avoiding the empirically observed {approx}15 kV/cm field limit and raising antenna voltage holding capability. Further modifications were carried out in 2002 and 2003. These included changes to the antenna current strap, the boron nitride tile mounting geometry, and shielding the BN-metal interface from the plasma. The antenna heating efficiency, power, and voltage characteristics under these various configurations will be presented.

  5. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  6. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  7. Field-aligned ICRF antenna design for EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Qin, C.; Zhang, X.; Beck, W.; Koert, P.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    For ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF), a number of physics and technological challenges remain for steady state, toroidal devices. Among the most critical is maintaining good coupling and maximizing the coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. As pulse length increases, enhanced localized heat loads associated with antenna operation can challenge antenna integrity. In addition, ICRF impurity sources and contamination need to be minimized to enable effective plasma heating. Here, we report on a four strap field aligned (FA) antenna design for the EAST tokamak. A FA antenna is an antenna where the current straps and antenna side enclosure are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In C-Mod, a FA antenna has been shown to be inherently load tolerant which allows for robust power delivery to the plasma. Furthermore, the RF enhanced heat flux and antenna impurity source were nearly eliminated. For both L and H-mode discharges, the core impurity contamination is 20-30% lower but not eliminated. The emerging physics understanding is that the local RF impurity sources and RF enhanced heat flux is reduced due to the geometric alignment of the FA antenna while impurity contamination is a result of far field sheaths. An important aspect of antenna design is to identify a core absorption scenario that is characterized by strong single pass absorption for a broad range of target discharges. To maximize power coupling, the antenna spectrum needs to balance the k|| needed for strong single pass absorption and high coupling efficiency through evanescent layer. The latest design for a FA four strap adapted to EAST device is balance between geometrical constraints and physics requirements.

  8. Physics Basis for NSTX Antenna Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Strickler, D. J.; Majeski, R.

    1997-11-01

    The PICES(E.F. Jaeger, D.B. Batchelor, D.C. Stallings, Nucl. Fus. 33)(1993) 179 and RANT3D(M.D. Carter et.al., Nucl. Fus. 36) (1996) 209 codes have been used to study a phased array antenna system using 30 MHz fast waves for current drive in NSTX. Accurate finite β equilibria, such as provided by EQDSK, were needed in PICES to accurately calculate the RF current drive efficiency; a Solov'ev model gave significantly different results. The PICES code was modified to use pressure profiles consistent with the EQDSK magnetic input. Reasonable RF modes for various plasma scenarios were found to range from n_φ=3--10 for EQDSK equilibria with β=25%--5%. Substantially different total current profiles could be generated using different combinations of RF, bootstrap, and ohmic currents, with possible application for transport experiments. The RANT3D code was used to determine the RF near fields of the antenna for a boundary condition in the PICES code. Individual strap loading information required to design stable phase control for the antenna is presented. RF near fields from RANT3D provide an indicator of RF edge phenomena that may affect the antenna performance.

  9. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Modeling of the ITER ICRF Antenna (External Matching Design)

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P.U.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.M.

    2005-09-26

    The present work reports on 3D radio-frequency (RF) analysis of a design for the ITER antenna with the CST Microwave Studio registered software. The four-port junctions which connect the straps in triplets have been analyzed. Non-TEM effects do not play any significant role in the relevant frequency domain, and a well-balanced splitting of current between the straps inside a triplet is achieved. The scattering matrix has also been compared with RF measurements on a scaled antenna mockup, and the agreement is very good. Electric field patterns along the system have been obtained, and the RF optimization of the feeding sections is under way.

  10. Overview on Experiments On ITER-like Antenna On JET And ICRF Antenna Design For ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nightingale, M. P. S.; Blackman, T.; Edwards, D.; Fanthome, J.; Graham, M.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hancock, D.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Nicholls, K.; Stork, D.; Whitehurst, A.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.

    2009-11-26

    Following an overview of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) system, the JET ITER-like antenna (ILA) will be described. The ILA was designed to test the following ITER issues: (a) reliable operation at power densities of order 8 MW/m{sup 2} at voltages up to 45 kV using a close-packed array of straps; (b) powering through ELMs using an internal (in-vacuum) conjugate-T junction; (c) protection from arcing in a conjugate-T configuration, using both existing and novel systems; and (d) resilience to disruption forces. ITER-relevant results have been achieved: operation at high coupled power density; control of the antenna matching elements in the presence of high inter-strap coupling, use of four conjugate-T systems (as would be used in ITER, should a conjugate-T approach be used); operation with RF voltages on the antenna structures up to 42 kV; achievement of ELM tolerance with a conjugate-T configuration by operating at 3{omega} real impedance at the conjugate-T point; and validation of arc detection systems on conjugate-T configurations in ELMy H-mode plasmas. The impact of these results on the predicted performance and design of the ITER antenna will be reviewed. In particular, the implications of the RF coupling measured on JET will be discussed.

  11. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  12. Design and implementation of interactive strap-down inertial navigation simulation system for UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuan-qi; Cheng, Xiang; Hao, Xiang-yang; Zhao, Man-dan

    2016-01-01

    Strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) is widely used in military field, to facilitate the study of SINS algorithms and various coupled navigation algorithms, a simulation system of SINS is designed. Based on modular design, with good portability and expansibility, the system consists of four independent modules: analysis module of motion state, trajectory simulator, IMU simulation module and SINS calculation module. With graphical interface, the system can control every motion state of the trajectory, which is convenient to generate various trajectories efficiently. Using rotation vector attitude algorithm to process simulation data, experiment results show that the attitude, velocity and position error is consistent with the theoretical value, which verifies the rationality of the simulation model and the availability of the simulation system.

  13. Designing Rectangular RHCP Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    RHCP, Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in design of rectangular microstrip-antenna element, given desired frequency of operation and characteristics of substrate. Begins design calculations on basis of square element with linear polarization. Effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at edges of radiating element taken into account. Coaxial feed inset with 50 ohms input impedance. Placement of feed such that two orthonormal modes produced in antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization obtained. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Design aspects of commercial satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. C.; Taormina, F. A.

    General design considerations for commercial satellite antennas are reviewed, and design factors of shaped beam reflector antennas are described, including shaped beam efficiency, flat-topping and boundary matching, and analysis by Fourier transforms. Attention is then given to the design of the Telesat Anik 17/Westar/Palapa communications antenna, the Comstar I communications antenna, the SBS communications antenna, and Intelsat IV A communications antenna.

  15. Support system design incorporating carbon/epoxy tension straps for a four tesla, one meter bore, MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, L.C.; Boulios, K.; Hartwig, K.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) constructed a four tesla, one meter bore, MRI magnet. Graphite/epoxy tension straps with thermal intercepts at 77 K and 20 K were used for a safe, efficient, and cost effective support system. Sixteen straps were used to support the 10,400 kg cold mass. TAC used a superferric concept to restrict the fringe field. With proper alignment the attractive forces between the magnet and iron are designed to cancel. Therefore, easy adjustment for proper positioning of the magnet, and strength to withstand the magnetic forces due to any misalignment are requirements of the support system. Since the MRI magnet was shipped by truck, the support system had to withstand dynamic loads. The design conduction heat load to the cold mass is 0.05 W. Details of the support system are presented.

  16. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hosea, J.; Greenough, Nevell; Nagy, Alex; Pinsker, R.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  17. Head Strap Double Fluid Level Device: An Innovative and User Friendly Design to Record Natural Head Position (NHP)

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Nidhin Philip; Shetty, Siddarth

    2015-01-01

    Head positions can be oriented in a standardized position when the patient stands upright and focusses his/her eyes into a point in infinity. This is the natural head position. This position offers the maximum reproducibility and correlates well with the clinical picture offered to the diagnostician. This article describes an innovative and user friendly method to record natural head position using the head strap double fluid level device, a design modified from the popular fluid level device by Showfety, Vig and Matteson. PMID:25738103

  18. Head Strap Double Fluid Level Device: An Innovative and User Friendly Design to Record Natural Head Position (NHP).

    PubMed

    John, Lijo; Jose, Nidhin Philip; Shetty, Siddarth

    2015-01-01

    Head positions can be oriented in a standardized position when the patient stands upright and focusses his/her eyes into a point in infinity. This is the natural head position. This position offers the maximum reproducibility and correlates well with the clinical picture offered to the diagnostician. This article describes an innovative and user friendly method to record natural head position using the head strap double fluid level device, a design modified from the popular fluid level device by Showfety, Vig and Matteson.

  19. Design of broadband single polarized antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Phoo Kho; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize Bin; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd

    2015-05-01

    In practical wireless communication application, bandwidth enhancement becomes one of the major design considerations. At the same time, circular polarized (CP) antenna received much attention for the applications of modern wireless communication system when compared to linear polarized (LP) antenna. This is because CP antenna can reduce the multipath effect. Hence, broadband antenna with operating frequency at 2.4GHz for WLAN application is proposed. The proposed antenna is done by using L-probe amendment with rectangular patch. The rectangular patch and copper ground plane is separated with 10mm air gap. This approach is used to enhance the bandwidth and the gain of the proposed antenna. The bandwidth of the designed antenna is more than 200MHz which meet broadband application. The return loss for the antenna is below -10dB to achieved 90% matching efficiency. The position of L-probe feed is altered in order to obtained different polarizations. The broadband antenna had been designed and simulated by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. In this paper, the comparison for single polarized antenna with the design of non-inverted patch and inverted patch is discussed. The characteristics of the S-parameter, axial ratio, gain, surface current for each designed antenna are analyzed.

  20. Microfluidic serpentine antennas with designed mechanical tunability.

    PubMed

    Huang, YongAn; Wang, Yezhou; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Huimin; Dong, Wentao; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of microfluidic serpentine antennas with reversible stretchability and designed mechanical frequency modulation (FM). The microfluidic antennas are designed based on the Poisson's ratio of the elastomer in which the liquid alloy antenna is embedded, to controllably decrease, stabilize or increase its resonance frequency when being stretched. Finite element modelling was used in combination with experimental verification to investigate the effects of substrate dimensions and antenna aspect ratios on the FM sensitivity to uniaxial stretching. It could be designed within the range of -1.2 to 0.6 GHz per 100% stretch. When the aspect ratio of the serpentine antenna is between 1.0 and 1.5, the resonance frequency is stable under stretching, bending, and twisting. The presented microfluidic serpentine antenna design could be utilized in the field of wireless mobile communication for the design of wearable electronics, with a stable resonance frequency under dynamic applied strain up to 50%.

  1. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  2. Baseline antenna design for space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Nasir, M. A.; Lee, S. W.; Zaman, Afroz

    1993-01-01

    A key element of the future NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) mission is the lunar and Mars telecommunication system. This system will provide voice, image, and data transmission to monitor unmanned missions to conduct experiments, and to provide radiometric data for navigation. In the later half of 1991, a study was conducted on antennas for the Mars Exploration Communication. Six antenna configurations were examined: three reflector and three phased array. The conclusion was that due to wide-angle scan requirement, and multiple simultaneous tracking beams, phased arrays are more suitable. For most part, this report studies phased array antenna designs for two different applications for Space Exploration Initiative. It also studies one design for a tri-reflector type antenna. These antennas will be based on a Mars orbiting satellite.

  3. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Derek; Hornby, Greg; Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Krishunkumor, K.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  4. Design of the ITER ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, D.; Nightingale, M.; Bamber, R.; Dalton, N.; Durodie, F.; Firdaouss, M.; Lister, J.; Porton, M.; Shannon, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.; Wooldridge, E.

    2011-12-01

    The CYCLE consortium has been designing the ITER ICRF antenna since March 2010, supported by an F4E grant. Following a brief introduction to the consortium, this paper: describes the present status and layout of the design; highlights the key mechanical engineering features; shows the expected impact of cooling and radiation issues on the design and outlines the need for future R&D to support the design process. A key design requirement is the need for the mechanical design and analysis to be consistent with all requirements following from the RF physics and antenna layout optimisation. As such, this paper complements that of Durodie et al [1].

  5. Study of wrap-rib antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. D.; Sinha, A.; Singh, R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a parametric design study conducted to develop the significant characteristics and technology limitations of space deployable antenna systems with aperture sizes ranging from 50 up to 300 m and F/D ratios between 0.5 and 3.0 are presented. Wrap/rib type reflectors of both the prime and offset fed geometry and associated feed support structures were considered. The significant constraints investigated as limitations on achievable aperture were inherent manufacturability, orbit dynamic and thermal stability, antenna weight, and antenna stowed volume. A data base, resulting in the defined maximum achievable aperture size as a function of diameter, frequency and estimated cost, was formed.

  6. Efficient Thermally Conductive Strap Design for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Supports and Plumbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.; Christie, R.; Gebby, P.; Kashani, A.

    2012-01-01

    After evalu1ating NASA space architecture goals, the Office of Chief Technologist identified the need for developing enabling technology for long term loiters in space with cryogenic fluids. One such technology is structural heat interception. In this prototype, heat interception at the tank support strut was accomplished using a thermally conductive link to the broad area cooled shield. The design methodology for both locating the heat intercept and predicting the reduction in boil-off heat leak is discussed in detail. Results from the chosen design are presented. It was found that contact resistance resulting from different mechanical attachment techniques played a significant role in the form and functionality of a successful design.

  7. Design considerations for MST radar antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design of antenna systems for radar capable of probing the mesosphere are discussed. The spatial wavelength dependency of turbulent advected ionization are cut off rapidly below wavelengths of about 3 m, imply frequencies of 100 MHz and below. The frequency and aperture requirements point to an array antenna of some kind as the most economical solution. Such an array could consist of dipoles or more directive elements; these elements can be either active or passive.

  8. Design of microstrip disk antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Parks, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    The radio frequency characteristics and design parameters for microstrip disk antenna elements and planar arrays are presented. Two C-band model arrays (an 8 element linear and an 8 by 8 planar) were designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the technique of using microstrip elements for array applications. These arrays were designed with a cosine amplitude distribution.

  9. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  10. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  11. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  12. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  13. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  14. Thermal Strap Increases Cryocooling Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Johnson, Dean L.; Green, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses concept for decreasing compressor power consumed by spacecraft mechanical cryocooler providing 0.5 W of refrigeration at temperature of 61 K at tip of cold finger. Involves connecting thermal strap between radiator or other heat sink at intermediate temperature and stiffening ring located on cold finger about one-third way from base to tip and attains temperature of about 250 K during normal operation. Depending upon specific design, electrical power consumed by mechanical cryocooler reduced by half.

  15. Microwave Antennas: Design. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design of microwave antennas. Topics include a discussion of the recent developments in microwave antennas, and in design techniques such as computer-aided design (CAD). Various types of antenna configurations are covered, including rectangular, elliptical, and reflectarray microstrip antennas, multibeam, circular-disc, Yagi-Uda, and horn reflectors. Applications include microwave antennas for satellite communication systems, telemetry links, and solid state microwave power transmission systems.

  16. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  17. Cassegrain dual reflector antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-02-01

    A folded optics reflector system could mitigate problems associated with the pointability and controllability of the large UHF antenna for MSAT. Such a system is comprised of a parabolic main reflector and a hyperboloidal subreflector (Cassegrain arrangement) or an ellipsoidal subreflector (Gregorian arrangement), either of which brings the feed closer to the main reflector. By shaping the subreflector and the main reflector, an improved scan capability might be achieved and the size of the required feed aperture-per-beam could be reduced. In such a shaped dual reflector system, the need for overlapping cluster feed arrangement and its concomitant beam forming network could be removed. In this system, a relatively low gain feed element together with the shaped subreflector would be sufficient to produce the required high illumination taper that at the main reflector.

  18. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    SciTech Connect

    Rohweller, D.J.; Butler, T.Af.

    1995-02-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  19. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohweller, David J.; Butler, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  20. Design concepts for large reflector antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Practical approaches for establishing large, precise antenna reflectors in space are described. Reflector surfaces consisting of either solid panels or knitted mesh are considered. The approach using a deep articulated truss structure to support a mesh reflector is selected for detailed investigations. A new sequential deployment concept for the tetrahedral truss is explained. Good joint design is discussed, and examples are described both analytically and by means of demonstration models. The influence of curvature on the design and its vibration characteristics are investigated.

  1. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  2. Design considerations for millimetre wave lens antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. J.

    1982-12-01

    Attention is given to the operational background and some of the possible single and dual lens antenna options for use in a millimetric sensor with a beamwidth of approximately 3 deg. A particular single lens antenna design is found to give a scan of more than + or - 3 beamwidths and to be compatible with conical scan, beam broadening, and monopulse operation. A dual lens antenna design is operated both with a single feed horn and with a rectangular matrix of plain waveguide radiators (with potential application in real-time imaging). Good scan characteristics are obtained out to + or - 6 beam-widths with the single feed horn, although it is found that the matrix feed assembly needs a group of elements to be fed in phase before equivalent performance can be obtained. The goal of the study presented here is to simulate feeding the lens antenna with a monolithic array, and whereas an array of waveguides cannot accurately model all the properties of a monolithic array, they are considered sufficiently representative to indicate some of the compromises that may have to be made.

  3. Evolutionary design of corrugated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoorfar, F.; Manshadi, V.; Jamnejad, A.

    2002-01-01

    An evolutionary progranirnitzg (EP) algorithm is used to optimize pattern of a corrugated circularhorn subject to various constraints on return loss and antenna beamwidth and pattern circularity and low crosspolarization. The EP algorithm uses a Gaussian mutation operator. Examples on design synthesis of a 45 section corrugated horn, with a total of 90 optimization parameters, are presented. The results show excellent and efficient optimization of the desired horn parameters.

  4. Using EIGER for Antenna Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champagne, Nathan J.; Khayat, Michael; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    EIGER (Electromagnetic Interactions GenERalized) is a frequency-domain electromagnetics software package that is built upon a flexible framework, designed using object-oriented techniques. The analysis methods used include moment method solutions of integral equations, finite element solutions of partial differential equations, and combinations thereof. The framework design permits new analysis techniques (boundary conditions, Green#s functions, etc.) to be added to the software suite with a sensible effort. The code has been designed to execute (in serial or parallel) on a wide variety of platforms from Intel-based PCs and Unix-based workstations. Recently, new potential integration scheme s that avoid singularity extraction techniques have been added for integral equation analysis. These new integration schemes are required for facilitating the use of higher-order elements and basis functions. Higher-order elements are better able to model geometrical curvature using fewer elements than when using linear elements. Higher-order basis functions are beneficial for simulating structures with rapidly varying fields or currents. Results presented here will demonstrate curren t and future capabilities of EIGER with respect to analysis of installed antenna system performance in support of NASA#s mission of exploration. Examples include antenna coupling within an enclosed environment and antenna analysis on electrically large manned space vehicles.

  5. Advanced ICRF antenna design for R-TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kako, E.; Ando, R.; Ichimura, M.; Ogawa, Y.; Amano, T.; Watari, T.

    1986-01-01

    The advanced ICRF antennas designed for the R-TOKAMAK (a proposal in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University) are described. They are a standard loop antenna and a panel heater antenna for fast wave heating, and a waveguide antenna for ion Bernstein wave heating. The standard loop antenna is made of Al-alloy and has a simple structure to install because of radioactivation by D-T neutrons. For high power heating, a new type antenna called Panel heater antenna is proposed. It has a wide radiation area and is able to select a parallel wave number k. The field pattern of the panel heater antenna is measured. The feasibility of the waveguide antenna is discussed for ion Bernstein wave heating. The radiation from the aperture of the double ridge waveguide is experimentally estimated with a load simulating the plasma.

  6. OCH Strap Model Test

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-26

    The OCH Model was stacked using the appropriate spacers between each absorber plate. Steel bars measuring 3-inch wide by 1/4-inch thick were welded, using 1/8-inch fillet weld, along all the corner edges, except the outer radius edges. On the outer radius, the straps were bolted to the end plates and to plates 9 and 17. The straps on the outer radius were also set in towards the center by approximately 3-inches. The spacers were then knocked out. Twelve strain gauges were mounted on the model. See figure 1 and the OCH strap Model log book for locations. Each rosette was centered in the gap between two absorber plates. The finite element plate model can predict the primary deformations of the OH module in both the cantilever and crushing modes to within 11% of the measured values. The primary stresses away from the support plate for the cantilever mode can be predicted to within 13% by this model. Near the support plate where large shear stresses exists, ANSYS will overpredict the measured stresses substantially. This is probably due to the models inherent inability to allow for shear stress concentrations at the welds. The same over-prediction was seen in the side straps during the OH crush test comparison and is probably attributable to the high shear force in this mode. The simple finite element plate model will provide suitable model of OH module stiffness for use in the analysis of the module assembly. The calculation of shear stresses can be improved by applying the ANSYS calculated inter-element forces to traditional weld strength calculations

  7. Two-Arm Flexible Thermal Strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquiza, Eugenio; Vasquez, Cristal; Rodriquez, Jose I.; Leland, Robert S.; VanGorp, Byron E.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne and space infrared cameras require highly flexible direct cooling of mechanically-sensitive focal planes. A thermal electric cooler is often used together with a thermal strap as a means to transport the thermal energy removed from the infrared detector. While effective, traditional thermal straps are only truly flexible in one direction. In this scenario, a cooling solution must be highly conductive, lightweight, able to operate within a vacuum, and highly flexible in all axes to accommodate adjustment of the focal plane while transmitting minimal force. A two-armed thermal strap using three end pieces and a twisted section offers enhanced elastic movement, significantly beyond the motion permitted by existing thermal straps. This design innovation allows for large elastic displacements in two planes and moderate elasticity in the third plane. By contrast, a more conventional strap of the same conductance offers less flexibility and asymmetrical elasticity. The two-arm configuration reduces the bending moment of inertia for a given conductance by creating the same cross-sectional area for thermal conduction, but with only half the thickness. This reduction in the thickness has a significant effect on the flexibility since there is a cubic relationship between the thickness and the rigidity or bending moment of inertia. The novelty of the technology lies in the mechanical design and manufacturing of the thermal strap. The enhanced flexibility will facilitate cooling of mechanically sensitive components (example: optical focal planes). This development is a significant contribution to the thermal cooling of optics. It is known to be especially important in the thermal control of optical focal planes due to their highly sensitive alignment requirements and mechanical sensitivity; however, many other applications exist including the cooling of gimbal-mounted components.

  8. An Optimal Design For Steerable Dish Antenna With BWG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, K. L.; Lansing, F. L.

    1990-01-01

    New design proposed for highly-efficient 34-m-diameter millimeter-wavelength antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network. Incorporates axial beam waveguide, BWG, and improved structure to maintain shape and alignment of reflecting surfaces. General approach to conceptual construction of structure to modularize overall system so critical constraint conditions pertaining to microwave optics and structural performance satisfied. Design retrofitted to existing NASA Deep Space Network 34-m antennas, or used as basis to build large ground-based steerable antennas. Engineering concepts involved in design adapted to design of other large, steerable antennas for telecommunications, radio astronomy, and military uses.

  9. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  10. Zeroth order resonator (ZOR) based RFID antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Muhammad Mubeen

    Meander-line and multi-layer antennas have been used extensively to design compact UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) tags; however the overall size reduction of meander-line antennas is limited by the amount of parasitic inductance that can be introduced by each meander-line segment, and multi-layer antennas can be too costly. In this study, a new compact antenna topology for passive UHF RFID tags based on zeroth order resonant (ZOR) design techniques is presented. The antenna consists of lossy coplanar conductors and either inter-connected inter-digital capacitor (IDC) or shunt inductor unit-cells with a ZOR frequency near the operating frequency of the antenna. Setting the ZOR frequency near the operating frequency is a key component in the design process because the unit-cells chosen for the design are inductive at the operating frequency. This makes the unit-cells very useful for antenna miniaturization. These new designs in this work have several benefits: the coplanar layout can be printed on a single layer, matching inductive loops that reduce antenna efficiency are not required and ZOR analysis can be used for the design. Finally, for validation, prototype antennas are designed, fabricated and tested.

  11. Electromagnetic design of a microwave radiometer antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Cockrell, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary electromagnetic (EM) design of a radiometric antenna system was developed for the microwave radiometer spacecraft mission. The antenna system consists of a large spherical reflector and an array of feed horns along a concentric circular arc in front of the reflector. The reflector antenna was sized to simultaneously produce 200 contiguous 1 km diameter footprints with an overall beam efficiency of 90 percent, and the feed horns and feed horn array were designed to monitor the radiation from the footprints.

  12. Cryogenic container compound suspension strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A support strap for use in a cryogenic storage vessel for supporting the inner shell from the outer shell with a minimum heat leak is presented. The compound suspension strap is made from a unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite material with an ultimate tensile strength and fatigue strength which are approximately doubled when the material is cooled to a cryogenic temperature.

  13. Progress in integrated-circuit horn antennas for receiver applications. Part 1: Antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleftheriades, George V.; Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a systematic method for the design of multimode quasi-integrated horn antennas. The design methodology is based on the Gaussian beam approach and the structures are optimized for achieving maximum fundamental Gaussian coupling efficiency. For this purpose, a hybrid technique is employed in which the integrated part of the antennas is treated using full-wave analysis, whereas the machined part is treated using an approximate method. This results in a simple and efficient design process. The developed design procedure has been applied for the design of a 20, a 23, and a 25 dB quasi-integrated horn antennas, all with a Gaussian coupling efficiency exceeding 97 percent. The designed antennas have been tested and characterized using both full-wave analysis and 90 GHz/370 GHz measurements.

  14. Design and verification of mechanisms for a large foldable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, Hans Jurgen; Etzler, Carl Christian; Wagner, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna aboard the ESA Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) are presented. The antenna is folded into a dense package for launch and is deployed in orbit. The design requirements and constraints, their impact on the design, and the resulting features of the mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Design of AM/FM mobile telephone triband antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takayuki; Sakitani, Akihide

    1994-04-01

    In vehicles, antennas for AM/FM broadcasting (BC) and cellular mobile telephone (MT) are usually mounted on the car's body. However, a triband antenna which can be used for both AM/FM BC and MT is more desirable to decrease the number of antennas. An outline of the general design for the AM/FM MT triband antenna with coils is described. Next, the design of a new triband antenna with double sleeves instead of coils is presented. The double sleeves consist of two coaxial lines connected in series. It is shown that the triband antenna with double sleeves has good characteristics, including radiation patterns and voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR).

  16. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  17. Whip antenna design for portable rf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnapalli, Saila; Canora, Frank J.

    1995-12-01

    Whip type antennas are probably the most commonly used antennas in portable rf systems, such as cordless and cellular phones, rf enabled laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and handheld computers. Whip antennas are almost always mounted on the chassis which contains the radio and other electronics. The chassis is usually a molded plastic which is coated with a conducting paint for EMI purposes. The chassis which appears as a lossy conductor to the antenna, has several effects -- detuning, altering the gain of the antenna, and shadowing its radiation pattern. Extensive modeling and measurements must be performed in order to fully characterize the affects of the chassis on the whip antenna, and to optimize antenna type, orientation and position. In many instances, modeling plays a more important role in prediction of the performance of whip antennas, since measurements become difficult due to the presence of common mode current on feed cables. In this paper models and measurements are used to discuss the optimum choice of whip antennas and the impact of the chassis on radiation characteristics. A modeling tool which has been previously described and has been successfully used to predict radiated field patterns is used for simulations, and measured and modeled results are shown.

  18. Cassegrain dual reflector antenna design. [MSAT UHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A folded optics reflector system could mitigate problems associated with the pointability and controllability of the large UHF antenna for MSAT. Such a system is comprised of a parabolic main reflector and a hyperboloidal subreflector (Cassegrain arrangement) or an ellipsoidal subreflector (Gregorian arrangement), either of which brings the feed closer to the main reflector. By shaping the subreflector and the main reflector, an improved scan capability might be achieved and the size of the required feed aperture-per-beam could be reduced. In such a shaped dual reflector system, the need for overlapping cluster feed arrangement and its concomitant beam forming network could be removed. In this system, a relatively low gain feed element together with the shaped subreflector would be sufficient to produce the required high illumination taper that at the main reflector.

  19. ORNL compact loop antenna design for TFTR and Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Hoffman, D.J.; McIlwain, R.L. ); Ray, J.M. )

    1987-01-01

    The goal supplemental ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of fusion plasma is to deliver power at high efficiencies deep within the plasma. The technology for fast-wave ICRH has reached the point of requiring proof-of-performance'' demonstration of specific antenna configurations of specific antenna configurations and their mechanical adequacy for operating in a fusion environment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the compact loop antenna concept based on a resonant double loop (RDL) configuration for use in both Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Tore Supra ICRH programs. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments result in substantial differences in the design of specific components. The ORNL TFTR antenna is designed to deliver 4 MW over a 2-s pulse, and the ORNL Tore Supra antenna is designed for 4 MW and essentially steady-state conditions. The TFTR design embodies the first operations compact RDL antenna, and the Tore Supra antenna extends the technology to an operational duty cycle consistent with reactor-relevant applications. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Electrical optimization of the ICH antenna array for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Swain, D.W.; Carter, M.D.; Taylor, D.J.; Bosia, G.

    1997-08-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports.Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on either end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40--70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes (1) strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines and (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control. For the ignited plasma parameters, the optimized array design delivers full power over the ranges of 40--80 MHz in frequency and 0{degree} to 180{degree} in phase. The maximum strap voltage is 41 kV and the maximum parallel E-field is 16 kV/cm for the worst case over these ranges. The array directivity for current drive operation is calculated to be close to 80%.

  1. Effect of backpack shoulder straps length on cervical posture and upper trapezius pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Abdelraouf, Osama Ragaa; Hamada, Hamada Ahmed; Selim, Ali; Shendy, Wael; Zakaria, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the effect of the length of backpack shoulder straps on upper trapezius muscle pain threshold and craniovertebral angle. [Subjects and Methods] There were 25 participants, with ages from 15 to 23 years old. Upper trapezius pain threshold and craniovertebral angle were measured for all subjects without the backpack then re-measured after walking on a treadmill for 15 min under 2 conditions: 1) wearing a backpack with short straps; and 2) wearing a backpack with long straps. [Results] there was a significant reduction in upper trapezius pain threshold and craniovertebral angle while carrying a backpack with long shoulder straps, compared to use of a backpack with short shoulder straps or no backpack. [Conclusion] A backpack with short straps is less harmful than a backpack with long straps. This result should be considered in ergonomic design of backpacks to reduce the incidence of various physiological and biomechanical disorders. PMID:27799665

  2. Tri-band microstrip antenna design for wireless communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohamed L.

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel rectangular tri-band patch antenna that is fabricated and measured for wireless communication systems. The introduced antenna is designed for WLAN and WiMAX applications. The desired tri-band operation was obtained by proper loading for a rectangular patch antenna using slots and shorting pins. The optimal location and dimension for the loaded elements were obtained with the aid of interfacing a Genetic Algorithm (GA) model with an Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS). The results obtained from our simulated antenna show 5.8% impedance matching band width at 2.4 GHz, 3.7% at 3.5 GHz and 1.57% at 5.7 GHz. In addition, an equivalent circuit of the proposed antenna is introduced using the least square curve fitting optimization technique.

  3. Silicone Rubber Superstrate Loaded Patch Antenna Design Using Slotting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Saini, Garima; Saini, Ashish

    2016-09-01

    For the protection of antenna from external environmental conditions, there is a need that antenna should be covered with a stable, non-reactive, highly durable and weather resistive material which is insensitive to changing external environment. Hence, in this paper silicone rubber is proposed as a superstrate layer for patch antenna for its protection. The electrical properties of silicon rubber sealant are experimentally found out and its effect of using as superstrate on coaxial fed microstrip patch antenna using transmission line model is observed. The overall performance is degraded by slightly after the use of superstrate. Further to improve the performance of superstrate loaded antenna, patch slots and ground defects have been proposed. The proposed design achieves the wideband of 790 MHz (13.59 %), gain of 7.12 dB, VSWR of 1.12 and efficiency of 83.02 %.

  4. Effects of strapping field profiles on plasma loop expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao Nguyen Quoc; Bellan, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Tokamak-like forces may explain fundamental behaviors of solar plasma arches. The hoop force causes arched, current-carrying plasma loops to expand unless additional forces are applied. This expansion was slowed and even inhibited by a magnetic field of proper polarity in previous solar loop experiments at Caltech but there was no attempt to characterize the strapping field's spatial profile. Kliem and Torok predicted an explosive-like transition from slow expansion to fast eruption if the vertical decay rate of the strapping field exceeds an instability threshold. We have constructed a new set of independently powered auxiliary coils designed to be placed inside the vacuum chamber and closer to the plasma source. The resulting strapping field has a sharper decay rate than with our previous coils and is expected to exceed the instability threshold. Progress on the interaction between arched plasma loops and strapping magnetic fields will be presented. Supported by the NSF and AFOSR.

  5. Design and construction of CPW fed circular microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Kirti; Singhal, P. K.; Sharma, A. K.; Pal, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present feeding approaches of coplanar waveguide fed (CPW) circular microstrip patch antennas, with and without defected ground structure (DGS)`. The antenna feeding impedance is proposed as 50 ohms, built over FR4, a high dielectric constant substrate to obtain broad impedance bandwidth along with stability of the radiation patterns. The antenna with defected ground structure is designed to have band-notched characteristics at 3.5 GHz (for Wi-MAX band-3.3 to 3.7 GHz), at 8.2 GHz (for ITU band-8.025 GHz to 8.4 GHz) so as to avoid interference from these. The FR4 is used as dielectric with value of dielectric loss tangent constant as 0.002 and relative permittivity with 4.4. After applying DGS in ground of the proposed antenna there were improvements concerning bandwidth, and also a small increase in gain was noticed. These antennas are of small sizes with dimensions; 30 mm X 43 mm X 1.6 mm, cheap, compact and easy to fabricate, and achieve good radiation characteristics with higher return loss. This first antenna can have wide application in a great variety of wireless communication and second can operate well as UWB antenna with band notched characteristics. The performance of two antennas is compared in respect to gain, VSWR, return loss and impedance matching.

  6. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  7. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Huygen, S.; Lockley, D.; Louche, F.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-01

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517-520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF

  8. Preliminary design of a redundant strapped down inertial navigation unit using two-degree-of-freedom tuned-gimbal gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This redundant strapdown INS preliminary design study demonstrates the practicality of a skewed sensor system configuration by means of: (1) devising a practical system mechanization utilizing proven strapdown instruments, (2) thoroughly analyzing the skewed sensor redundancy management concept to determine optimum geometry, data processing requirements, and realistic reliability estimates, and (3) implementing the redundant computers into a low-cost, maintainable configuration.

  9. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25–38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  10. A finite difference approach to microstrip antenna design

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.J.; Bevensee, R.M.; Pennock, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    Microstrip antennas have received increased attention in recent years, due to their size and cost advantages. Analysis of the microstrip structure has proved difficult due to the presence of the dielectric substrate, particularly for complex geometries. One possible approach to a solution is the use of a finite difference computer code to model a proposed microstrip antenna design. The models are easily constructed and altered, and code versions are available which allow input impedance or far-field patterns to be calculated. Results for some simple antenna geometries will be presented.

  11. Design considerations for an archimedean slot spiral antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurnberger, Michael W.; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The design goal is to develop a 118-157 MHz, vertically polarized, low-profile (or conformal) antenna as a replacement for VHF AM blade antennas on aircraft. This design is to be arrived at by scaling the dimensions of an antenna designed for a center frequency of 1.1 GHz. The design prior to scaling may have the following maximum dimensions: diameter less than 3.70 in. and thickness less than 0.50 in. Although a four-arm spiral design was originally suggested, a two-arm spiral may also be used, as both mode-1 and mode-2 (sum and difference) radiation patterns aren't required. While a four-arm spiral can easily be designed should both sum and difference patterns be required, the two-arm design will provide the required sum pattern and simplify the design problem somewhat: only one feed is required, and the feed area geometry is more straightforward. Polarization requirements dictate that a slot spiral be used, as opposed to a wire spiral. Two similar radiating structures were considered. The first is the standard archimedean spiral antenna. The second is a hollow archimedean spiral antenna, essentially a standard archimedean spiral with the inner portion removed.

  12. Interdisciplinary design analysis of a precision spacecraft antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbach, R. E.; Winegar, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) will operate in the 20/30 GHz range (Ka Band), and will include a multi-beam antenna (MBA) capable of 0.3 degree scanning spot beams with very high beam-to-beam isolation. The antenna Radio Frequency (RF) performance requirements lead to stringent requirements on the antenna reflector surface shape. A prediction of RF performance of a potential flight model antenna reflector operating under space environmental conditions is made using a radiant heat input model (TRASYS), a thermal analyzer (SINDA), a structural model (NASTRAN), and RF far field pattern simulation. Interfacing software has been written to pass thermal model temperature results to the structural model, and structural model thermal deformation results to the RF far field pattern simulation. A complete analysis can be performed in a single computer run, and potential changes in design can be quickly and easily evaluated using this interdisciplinary design analysis tool.

  13. Textile materials for the design of wearable antennas: a survey.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-11-15

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented.

  14. Textile materials for the design of wearable antennas: a survey.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

  15. RHCP- DESIGNING RECTANGULAR RIGHT-HANDED CIRCULARLY POLARIZED MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    RHCP, the Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in the design of a rectangular antenna element, given the desired frequency of operation and substrate characteristics. RHCP begins the design calculations based on a square element with linear polarization. The effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at the radiating element edges are taken into account. A coaxial feed is inset with 50 ohms input impedance. By placing the feed such that two orthonormal modes are produced in the antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization is obtained. Input to RHCP consists of desired frequency, dielectric constant, and substrate thickness. Output consists of the final rectangular geometry, the proposed feed inset placement, and actual input impedance. RHCP has been used successfully for frequencies between 2 and 15 GHz for thin substrates. This program was used to fabricate antenna elements for the S-band quad antennas on board the Space Shuttle, and is a part of the design project for the S-band phased array antenna radiating aperture. RHCP is written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer operating under VMS. This program was developed in 1985.

  16. Analysis and design of low profile multiband multifunctional antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsicker, Walker F.

    Light-weight phased array antennas for aerospace and mobile applications require utilizing the same antenna aperture to provide multiple functions with dissimilar radiation pattern specifications (e.g., multiband operation for communications and tracking). Multi-functional antennas provide advantages over aggregate antenna clusters by reducing space requirements, and can aid in the optimal placement of all required apertures to provide adequate isolation between channels. Furthermore, the combination of antenna apertures into a common geometry mitigates co-site installation issues by addressing interference within the integrated radiator design itself as opposed to the extensive analysis which is required to configure multiple radiators in close proximity. The combination of multiple radiators into a single aperture can only be achieved with the proper selection of antenna topology and accompanying feed network design. This research proposes a new technique for the design of multiband arrays in which a common aperture is used. Highlighted by this method is the integration of a tri-band array comprised of an X-band (12 GHz) microstrip patch array on a superstrate above printed dual-band (1 and 2 GHz) slot loop antenna arrays in an octave-spaced lattice. The selection of a ground backing reflector is considered for improved gain and system packaging, but restricts the utility of the design principally due to the lambda/4 depth of the ground plane. Therefore, a novel multiband high impedance surfaces (HIS) is proposed to load the slot apertures for reduced height. The novel techniques proposed here will enable the design of a low profile and conformal single aperture supporting multi-band and multi-functional operations.

  17. Design concepts for large antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-02-01

    A type of antenna reflector was studied in which a stiff structure is constructed to hold a membrane like reflector mesh in the correct position. An important basic restriction is that the mesh be controlled only by the structure and that no additional local shaping be employed. Furthermore, attention is confined to structures in which no adjustments would be made on assembly. Primary attention is given to the tetrahedral truss configuration because of its outstanding stiffness and dimensional stability.

  18. Design and control of phased ICRF antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    Phased antenna arrays operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are used to produce highly directional wave spectra, primarily for use in current drive experiments. RF current drive using phased antennas has been demonstrated in both the JET and DIII-D tokamaks, and both devices are planning to operate new four-element arrays beginning early next year. Features of antenna design that are relevant to phased operation and production of directional spectra are reviewed. Recent advances in the design of the feed circuits and the related control systems for these arrays should substantially improve their performance, by reducing the coupling seen by the matching networks and rf power supplies caused by the mutual impedance of the array elements. The feed circuit designs for the DIII-D and JET phased antenna arrays are compared. The two configurations differ significantly due to the fact that one power amplifier is used for the entire array in the former case, and one per element in the latter. The JET system uses automatic feedback control of matching, phase and amplitude of antenna currents, and the transmitter power balance. The design of this system is discussed, and a time dependent model used to predict its behavior is described.

  19. ICRF antenna matching system with ferrite tuners for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Binus, A.; Wukitch, S. J.; Koert, P.; Murray, R.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time fast ferrite tuning (FFT) has been successfully implemented on the ICRF antennas on Alcator C-Mod. The former prototypical FFT system on the E-port 2-strap antenna has been upgraded using new ferrite tuners that have been designed specifically for the operational parameters of the Alcator C-Mod ICRF system (˜ 80 MHz). Another similar FFT system, with two ferrite tuners and one fixed-length stub, has been installed on the transmission line of the D-port 2-strap antenna. These two systems share a Linux-server-based real-time controller. These FFT systems are able to achieve and maintain the reflected power to the transmitters to less than 1% in real time during the plasma discharges under almost all plasma conditions, and help ensure reliable high power operation of the antennas. The innovative field-aligned (FA) 4-strap antenna on J-port has been found to have an interesting feature of loading insensitivity vs. plasma conditions. This feature allows us to significantly improve the matching for the FA J-port antenna by installing carefully designed stubs on the two transmission lines. The reduction of the RF voltages in the transmission lines has enabled the FA J-port antenna to deliver 3.7 MW RF power to plasmas out of the 4 MW source power in high performance I-mode plasmas.

  20. Antenna Design Considerations for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakula, Casey J.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2015-01-01

    NASA is designing an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU)to support future manned missions beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A key component of the AEMU is the communications assembly that allows for the wireless transfer of voice, video, and suit telemetry. The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) currently used on the International Space Station (ISS) contains a radio system with a single omni-directional resonant cavity antenna operating slightly above 400 MHz capable of transmitting and receiving data at a rate of about 125 kbps. Recent wireless communications architectures are calling for the inclusion of commercial wireless standards such as 802.11 that operate in higher frequency bands at much higher data rates. The current AEMU radio design supports a 400 MHz band for low-rate mission-critical data and a high-rate band based on commercial wireless local area network (WLAN) technology to support video, communication with non-extravehicular activity (EVA) assets such as wireless sensors and robotic assistants, and a redundant path for mission-critical EVA data. This paper recommends the replacement of the existing EMU antenna with a new antenna that maintains the performance characteristics of the current antenna but with lower weight and volume footprints. NASA has funded several firms to develop such an antenna over the past few years, and the most promising designs are variations on the basic patch antenna. This antenna technology at UHF is considered by the authors to be mature and ready for infusion into NASA AEMU technology development programs.

  1. Design optimization of the 34-meter DSN-NCP antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1984-01-01

    The new NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m-diameter azimuth-elevation (Az-El) antenna structure is an example of an essentially computer-automated design. In addition to pivotal comptuer Lagrange multiplier design optimization software, much of the associated pre- and post-processing was also performed by computer. The construction of one of these antennas at Goldstone, California, is well advanced and will be completed this summer. A second installation is in progress in Australia. Both atennas will be used primarily for spacecraft tracking and will operate in the 8.5-GHz, 3.5-cm (1.4-in.) wavelength microwave frequency.

  2. Design of a Foldable Low-loss Microstrip Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C. G.; Wahid, P. F.; Haque, M. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, foldable microstrip array antenna for radiometer applications is presented. The array antenna is composed of two equal sub arrays. Each sub array consists of a series of patches connected together through segments of microstrip lines. The sub arrays are fed 180 degree out of phase to ensure a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  3. Antenna servo design for tracking low-earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    The upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep-space missions. This paper investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, monopulse controller design, and tracking error reduction either through proper choice of elevation pinion location or through application of a notch filter or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the oversampled monopulse signal is described.

  4. Magneto-Dielectric Wire Antennas Theory and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Tom

    supported by the magneto-dielectric structure and leads to useful design rules connecting the permeability of the material to the cross sectional area of the antenna in relation to the desired frequency of operation. The Green function problem of the permeable prolate spheroidal antenna is also solved as a good approximation to a finite cylinder.

  5. Next-generation tension strap supports for spaceborne dewars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Payne, D. A.; Kriz, R. D.; Morris, E. E.

    1987-06-01

    In the design of long-life, spaceborne dewars the supports must be considered not only as a structural member, but also as part of the thermal isolation of the cold assembly. Filament-wound composite tension straps provide the strength needed for the launch environment while minimizing heat conduction into the dewar. The optimum material for this application has a large ratio of fatigue strength to thermal conductivity to miminize heat input and a high modulus of elasticity to maximize the system resonant frequency. The material that exhibits the best combination of these properties and has been used in numerous spaceborne dewars is fiberglass/epoxy. This paper presents measurements of mechanical and thermal properties of straps made of a newly-developed alumina fiber with epoxy resin. This composite has significantly higher fatigue strength and modulus of elasticity than fiberglass/epoxy and similar thermal conductivity. This material therefore appears to be the best available choice in the future for dewar tension strap supports. Heat input through the tension straps is also minimized by proper orientation within the dewar. Predictions of dewar thermal performance using lumina/epoxy straps and the improvement compared to a system using fiberglass/epoxy are presented for several relevant dewar applications. This new composite will likely become the material of choice for many future applications requiring structural support with maximum thermal isolation.

  6. Design of compact electromagnetic impulse radiating antenna for melanoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Arockiasamy, Petrishia; Mohan, Sasikala

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapy is one of the several new applications which use nanosecond and subnanosecond high voltage pulses. New treatment based on electromagnetic (EM) fields have been developed as non-surgical and minimally invasive treatments of tumors. In particular, subnanosecond pulses can introduce important non-thermal changes in cell biology, especially the permeabilization of the cell membrane. The motivation behind this work is to launch intense subnanosecond pulses to the target (tumors) non-invasively. This works focuses on the design of a compact intense pulsed EM radiating antenna. In tense EM waves radiated at the first focal point of the Prolate Spheroidal Reflector (PSR) are focused at the second focal point where the target (tumor) is present. Two antennas with PSR but fed with different compact wave radiator are designed to focus pulsed field at the second focal point. The PSR with modified bicone antenna feed and PSR with elliptically tapered horn antenna feed are designed. The design parameters and radiation performance are discussed.

  7. Structural design of hexa-link truss deployable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisui, Takashi; Okamoto, Teruki; Ookawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanizawa, Kazuo; Tabata, Masaki; Taniai, Hitoshi

    1993-03-01

    Structure of a 6 m deployable antenna mirror surface for communications satellite is designed paying attention to the following sections: the back structure section composed of 19 basic modules of hexagonal trapezoid shape, mirror mesh section composed of a cable net made from Al amide fiber with gold plated molybdenum mesh hung on it, and a deployment mechanism (sliding type and flexible type) of the deployable section for the offset parabolic antenna scale model of 6 m in aperture diameter. Deployment motion analysis was conducted with a hexagonal trapezoidal model of one module using the ADAMS (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System).

  8. Array antennas design in dependence of element-phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, R.; Chandra, M.

    2009-05-01

    Array antennas are used in science as well as for commercial and military purposes. The used element antennas act in accordance to their desired uses, for example radars or stationer GPS satellites. Typical components are for example slotted waveguides, patches, yagi-antennas and helix-antennas. All these elements do stand out with their own characteristics based on their special applications. If these elements are formed into an array configuration, the effectiveness can be improved immensely. There is a relation between the array functions and the physical array properties like the element alignment (linear, planar, circular), distances between the elements and so on. Among the physical properties there are other attributes like phase or amplitude coefficients, which are of great significance. The aim of this study was to provide an insight into the problem of array design, as far as the antenna element phase is concerned. Along with this, array radiation characteristics effects are presented. With the help of the extracted cognitions beam forming behaviour can be shown and the array phase behaviour can be analysed. One of the main applications is to simulate the array characteristics, like the radiation characteristic or the gain, for displacements of the array feeding point. A software solution that simulates the phase shift of a given array pattern is sought to adjust the feeding point.

  9. Miniaturization design and implementation of magnetic field coupled RFID antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tiling

    2013-03-01

    The development of internet of things has brought new opportunities and challenges to the application of RFID tags. Moreover, the Miniaturization application trend of tags at present has become the mainstream of development. In this paper, the double-layer design is to reduce the size of HF antenna, and the magnetic null point of magnetic reconnection region between the RLC resonant circuit and the reader provides sufficient energy to the miniaturization of antenna. The calculated and experimental results show that the miniaturization of HF antennas can meet the reading and writing requirement of the international standard ISO/IEC14443 standard. The results of this paper may make a positive contribution to the applications of RFID technology.

  10. An alternative feed design for the MRO antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), scheduled for launch in 2005, will study the history of water on Mars. The current feed design for the 3-meter reflector antenna uses a dielectrically supported disk-on-rod Kaband (32 GHz) feed in the center of an X-band (7.2, 8.4 GHz) corrugated horn. As a potential backup design in case of problems, an alternate feed design for the MRO antenna that does not use any dielectric materials or a disc-on-rod was developed. The design uses a Ka-band Potter Horn in the center of the current Xband MRO corrugated horn. Using the same High-gain reflector assembly, the new feed provides virtually the same X-band gain (within 0.1 db) and more than 1 dB improvement at Ka-band.

  11. Systems design and comparative analysis of large antenna concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual designs are evaluated and comparative analyses conducted for several large antenna spacecraft for Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) communications missions. Structural configurations include trusses, hoop and column and radial rib. The study was conducted using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system. The current capabilities, development status, and near-term plans for the IDEAS system are reviewed. Overall capabilities are highlighted. IDEAS is an integrated system of computer-aided design and analysis software used to rapidly evaluate system concepts and technology needs for future advanced spacecraft such as large antennas, platforms, and space stations. The system was developed at Langley to meet a need for rapid, cost-effective, labor-saving approaches to the design and analysis of numerous missions and total spacecraft system options under consideration. IDEAS consists of about 40 technical modules efficient executive, data-base and file management software, and interactive graphics display capabilities.

  12. Design of an inflatable, optically controlled and fed, phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Sharp, G. R.

    1991-09-01

    Initial studies on the antenna requirements of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) system architecture have indicated the need for large, lightweight antennas. This paper discusses the design of a modular, inflatable, optically controlled and fed phased array antenna suitable for SEI aplications. When high gain antennas are required for space applications, large aperture mesh or collapsible solid antenna reflectors are considered. However, these designs are generally not lightweight, and have complicated deployment mechanisms. Alternatively, the modular, inflatable antenna design discussed here is a lightweight, modular design that incorporates a simple deployment scheme, and after deployment, can be rigidized to enhance its structural integrity. Further, the design features the fiberoptic distribution of both RF and control signals to individual microwave integrated circuit/reflector modules in each of the inflatable, phased array antenna cells. The result of combining these two technologies is a modular, phased array antenna design that is both mechanically and electrically agile and robust.

  13. Design of an ICRF plasma thruster antenna by TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Giuseppe; Lancellotti, Vito; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2006-10-01

    A typical RF plasma thruster is comprised of an RF plasma source, an open-ended magnetic confinement device, an RF acceleration unit and a magnetic nozzle. The usual choice for the acceleration is to employ the Ion-Cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF), a well established technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers to magnetized plasmas. To help design RF thruster ICRF antennas, TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code [1] has been recently extended to handle cylindrically symmetric plasmas. The latter entailed developing a wholly new module of TOPICA charged with the task of solving Maxwell's equations in cylindrical magnetized warm plasmas and yielding the Green's functionY (m,kz), i.e. the relationship at the air-plasma interface between the transverse magnetic and electric fields in the spectral (wavenumber) domain. The approach to the problem of determining the antenna input impedance relies on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. This work reports on TOPICA evolution and presents the design of an RF thruster ICRF antenna. *V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  14. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Stallings, D. C.

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (RF) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven RF current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  15. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Stallings, D. C.

    1994-10-01

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  16. An experimental and analytical evaluation of the tapered tension-torsion strap concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    A new free-tip rotor moment controller designed to increase torque output (a restoring moment) was proposed. The controller would be used as a retention device for the freely pitching tip of a helicopter rotor. The new design featured a tapered tension-torsion strap instead of the previously used parellel strap. A tapered strap has a larger separation between the tension wires at the retention end than at the oscillating end; separation is equal at both ends for a parallel strap. A simple dynamic analysis was developed and an experiment performed to evaluate this tapered strap concept. The test results indicated that the torsional spring stiffness of the strap, represented by a torsional pendulum, increased with the amount of taper. The predicted dynamic characteristics of the pendulum also confirmed this observation and correlated reasonably well with the experimental results. It could be concluded from the experimental and analytical results that the tapered strap accomplished increased torque output when compared to the parellel strap.

  17. Design and fabrication of microstrip antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A microstrip array project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating simple, low cost, low sidelobe phased arrays with circular disk microstrip radiating elements. Design data were presented for microstrip elements and arrays including the effects of the protective covers, the mutual interaction between elements, and stripline feed network design. Low cost multilayer laminate fabrication techniques were also investigated. Utilizing this design data two C-band low sidelobe arrays were fabricated and tested: an eight-element linear and a sixty-four element planar array. These arrays incorporated stripline Butler matrix feed networks to produce a low sidelobe broadside beam.

  18. Shuttle antenna radome technology test program. Volume 2: Development of S-band antenna interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.; Baranowski, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Thermal Protection Subsystem (TPS) contamination on the space shuttle orbiter S band quad antenna due to multiple mission buildup are discussed. A test fixture was designed, fabricated and exposed to ten cycles of simulated ground and flight environments. Radiation pattern and impedance tests were performed to measure the effects of the contaminates. The degradation in antenna performance was attributed to the silicone waterproofing in the TPS tiles rather than exposure to the contaminating sources used in the test program. Validation of the accuracy of an analytical thermal model is discussed. Thermal vacuum tests with a test fixture and a representative S band quad antenna were conducted to evaluate the predictions of the analytical thermal model for two orbital heating conditions and entry from each orbit. The results show that the accuracy of predicting the test fixture thermal responses is largely dependent on the ability to define the boundary and ambient conditions. When the test conditions were accurately included in the analytical model, the predictions were in excellent agreement with measurements.

  19. Method of making steel strapping and strip

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Reilly

    2000-02-16

    The technical progress obtained for this time frame consisted of the awarding of two contracts for determination of metallurgical parameters for heat treatment of strapping and strip which are unavailable from current technology and/or published data in this field. The two contractors were Bricmont, Inc. and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Technological Institute of Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Phase 1 of the two stage contract with Bricmont, Inc. which provided a computer analysis of the cooling rates of a typical range of thickness' of strapping was completed. This study was developed for the purpose of determining the time parameters for quenching low carbon steels to a martensitic microstructure within the time frame of the design of the proposed process. It also provides design criteria for cooling to ambient for the total process. This data is required for Phase 2 of the Bricmont proposal which completes the design and specifications of the total heat treating and cooling system for the process. This becomes the basis for developing the cost and space requirements for this component of the production line. The authors do not intend to award Phase 2 until the work done at Northwestern University discussed hereafter is completed. On or about May 1, 1999 a contract for a project entitled ``Effects of Steel Composition and Quench Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Strapping'' to be performed at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering was awarded. The delay in initiating this project was due to the legal interpretation and final agreement of the intellectual provisions of the award by the author's attorneys, Northwestern's attorneys and the legal representative in the Chicago office of the DOE. The work to date includes rapid quenching of a number of different steel compositions and microstructure on an existing drop quench test apparatus. It was initially assumed that this procedure would simulate

  20. A simplified approach to axisymmetric dual-reflector antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure is described for designing dual reflector antennas. The analysis is developed by taking each reflector to be the envelope of its tangent planes. Rather than specifying the phase distribution in the emitted beam, the slopes of the emitted rays were specified. Thus, both the output wave shape and angular distribution of intensity can be specified. Computed examples include variations from both Cassegrain and Gregorian systems, permitting deviation from uniform source distributions and from parallel beam property of conventional systems.

  1. On the design and analysis of ultrabroadband antenna windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara Prasad, R. V.; Lakshminarayana, D.

    1993-09-01

    Accounts are given of the design principles, analytical results, and experimental performance of two ultrawideband antenna windows operating in the 2-18 GHz range; the windows are of A-sandwich and C-sandwich construction. Curves are obtained for the theoretical and the practically obtainable power-transmission characteristics; while maximum A-sandwich transmission loss is below 1 dB, that of the C-sandwich is below 1.5 dB, over the complete band.

  2. Design and Thermal Analysis for Space Deployable Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fu-Ling; Huang, Jiang; Zhang, Shu-Jie

    2002-01-01

    sensibility and thermal stability. But deployable antenna always enters into and leaves the earth shadow periodically when it orbits the earth, and it is affected by the shadows of itself Thus a key design for the antenna structure is to control its deformation in a limited range. Obviously, thermal analysis is very important for such structure to maintain its high thermal stability. of a supported backbone (deployable truss) and a reflector surface (flexible mesh). All analysis in this dissertation is based on this model, such as temperature field analysis, thermal deformation analysis, thermal stress analysis, thermal vibration analysis, and so on. tetrahedral element, is discussed. And the mechanism of spider nodes, middle nodes and torsion springs in these nodes are also illustrated. 6-node triangular membrane element are deduced. A temperature analysis procedure has been programmed. The obvious change in temperature happens when the antenna enter into the earth shadow, so this case should be studied to decide whether the temperature of the structure and its components are in the limited range or not. membrane element are put forward. According to the stiffness matrix of these elements and the structural equilibrium equations, thermal deformation and thermal stress of the structure can be computed. The results show that either the thermal deformation or the thermal stress is in the desired range, they have little effect on the shape and stiffness of the entire structure. vibration. The thermally vibration responses of the antenna are studied when it enters into the earth shadow from sunshine and when it enters into sunshine from the earth shadow. The results show that in both cases, there is no vibration in Y direction. The velocity and acceleration in X direction and Z direction are both small, but the displacement in X direction is large, the maximum is 6.5mm. Keyword: Deployable antenna; self-shadow; thermal deformation; thermal stress

  3. Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    The MAntIS code was developed as an aid to the design of radio frequency (RF) antennas for fusion applications. The code solves for the electromagnetic fields in three dimensions near the antenna structure with a realistic plasma load. Fourier analysis is used in the two dimensions that are tangential to the plasma surface and backwall. The third dimension is handled analytically in a vacuum region with a general impedance match at the plasma-vacuum interface. The impedance tensor is calculated for a slab plasma using the ORION-lD code with all three electric field components included and warm plasma corrections. The code permits the modeling of complicated antenna structures by superposing currents that flow on the surfaces of rectangular parallelepipeds. Specified current elements have feeders that continuously connect the current flowing from the ends of the strap to the feeders. The elements may have an arbitrary orientation with respect to the static magnetic field. Currents are permitted to vary along the length of the current strap and feeders. Parameters that describe this current variation can be adjusted to approximately satisfy boundary conditions on the current elements. The methods used in MAntIS and results for a primary loop antenna design are presented.

  4. [Microstrip antenna design and system research of radio frequency identification temperature sensor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Yang, Xiaohe; Chen, Yuquan; Pan, Min

    2008-12-01

    Radio frequency identification sensor network, which is a product of integrating radio frequency identification (RFID) with wireless sensor network (WSN), is introduced in this paper. The principle of radio frequency identification sensor is analyzed, and the importance of the antenna is emphasized. Then three kinds of common antennae, namely coil antenna, dipole antenna and microstrip antenna, are discussed. Subsequently, according to requirement, we have designed a microstrip antenna in a wireless temperature-monitoring and controlling system. The measurement of factual effect showed the requirement was fulfilled. PMID:19166222

  5. Computer-aided design of antenna structures and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses computer-aided design procedures for antenna reflector structures and related components. The primary design aid is a computer program that establishes cross sectional sizes of the structural members by an optimality criterion. Alternative types of deflection-dependent objectives can be selected for designs subject to constraints on structure weight. The computer program has a special-purpose formulation to design structures of the type frequently used for antenna construction. These structures, in common with many in other areas of application, are represented by analytical models that employ only the three translational degrees of freedom at each node. The special-purpose construction of the program, however, permits coding and data management simplifications that provide advantages in problem size and execution speed. Size and speed are essentially governed by the requirements of structural analysis and are relatively unaffected by the added requirements of design. Computation times to execute several design/analysis cycles are comparable to the times required by general-purpose programs for a single analysis cycle. Examples in the paper illustrate effective design improvement for structures with several thousand degrees of freedom and within reasonable computing times.

  6. JPL-IDEAS - ITERATIVE DESIGN OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Iterative DEsign of Antenna Structures (IDEAS) program is a finite element analysis and design optimization program with special features for the analysis and design of microwave antennas and associated sub-structures. As the principal structure analysis and design tool for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Ground Antenna and Facilities Engineering section of NASA's Deep Space Network, IDEAS combines flexibility with easy use. The relatively small bending stiffness of the components of large, steerable reflector antennas allows IDEAS to use pinjointed (three translational degrees of freedom per joint) models for modeling the gross behavior of these antennas when subjected to static and dynamic loading. This facilitates the formulation of the redesign algorithm which has only one design variable per structural element. Input data deck preparation has been simplified by the use of NAMELIST inputs to promote clarity of data input for problem defining parameters, user selection of execution and design options and output requests, and by the use of many attractive and familiar features of the NASTRAN program (in many cases, NASTRAN and IDEAS formatted bulk data cards are interchangeable). Features such as simulation of a full symmetric structure based on analyses of only half the structure make IDEAS a handy and efficient analysis tool, with many features unavailable in any other finite element analysis program. IDEAS can choose design variables such as areas of rods and thicknesses of plates to minimize total structure weight, constrain the structure weight to a specified value while maximizing a natural frequency or minimizing compliance measures, and can use a stress ratio algorithm to size each structural member so that it is at maximum or minimum stress level for at least one of the applied loads. Calculations of total structure weight can be broken down according to material. Center of gravity weight balance, static first and second moments about the center of

  7. GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE): Receiver Design and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martzen, Phillip; Highsmith, Dolan E.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE) is a research collaboration between Aerospace and NASA Goddard to characterize the gain patterns of the GPS L1 transmit antennas. High altitude GPS observations are collected at a ground station through a transponder-based or "bent-pipe" architecture where the GPS L1 RF spectrum is received at a platform in geosynchronous orbit and relayed to the ground for processing. The focus of this paper is the unique receiver algorithm design and implementation. The high-sensitivity GPS C/A-code receiver uses high fidelity code and carrier estimates and externally supplied GPS message bit data in a batch algorithm with settings for a 0 dB-Hz threshold. The resulting carrier-to-noise measurements are used in a GPS L1 transmit antenna pattern reconstruction. This paper shows initial transmit gain patterns averaged over each block of GPS satellites, including comparisons to available pre-flight gain measurements from the GPS vehicle contractors. These results provide never-before-seen assessments of the full, in-flight transmit gain patterns.

  8. On-glass automotive diversity antenna and LNA design for S-band satellite digital radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeğin, Korkut

    2015-11-01

    Selection combining diversity system with antennas mounted on windshield and backlite of a vehicle is proposed for satellite digital audio radio applications. Standalone exterior mount antennas on metallic vehicles perform well for satellite digital audio radio applications, but for composite body vehicles or interior mount antennas, antenna performance becomes a real issue. Proposed on-glass two-antenna diversity is one solution for such applications. The antenna correlation is calculated using the S-parameters of the antennas and found to be very low due to many wavelengths separation between the antennas. Design of low noise amplifier, which has sub 1 dB noise figure and good P1dB due to strong cellular signals, is also detailed. A diversity receiver is described and ride tests are performed to assess the performance of the diversity system in real-time, under weak satellite signal environment which is regarded as the most challenging reception condition.

  9. Design and construction of prototype radio antenna for shortest radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A paraboloid radio antenna of 10.4 meters diameter, 0.41 meter focal length was constructed and its successful completion is described. The surface accuracy of the antenna is at least four times better than any existing antenna in its class size (50 micrometers rms). Antenna design specifications (i.e., for mounting, drive motors, honeycomb structures) are discussed and engineering drawings and photographs of antenna components are shown. The antenna will be used for millimeter-wave interferometry and sub-millimeter wave radiometry over a full frequency range (up to approximately 860 GHz). The antenna will also be moveable (for interferometric use) between reinforced concrete pads by rail. The effects of the weather and gravity on antenna performance are briefly discussed.

  10. Optics Design for the U.S. SKA Technology Development Project Design Verification Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Baker, L.; Cortes-Medellin, G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. design concept for the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) program is based on utilizing a large number of 15 meter dish antennas. The Technology Development Project (TDP) is planning to design and build the first of these antennas to provide a demonstration of the technology and a solid base on which to estimate costs. This paper describes the performance of the selected optics design. It is a dual-shaped offset Gregorian design with a feed indexer that can accommodate corrugated horns, wide band single pixel feeds or phased array feeds.

  11. The design of the fine antenna pointing system for Italsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaurchi, A.; Losquadro, G.; Perrotta, G.

    Italsat's baseline design employs communications antennae-integrated RF sensors, in order to satisfy beam-pointing accuracy requirements of 0.03 deg at 3-sigma. These RF sensors are of the lobe-switching types. The system enters its autotracking mode only upon the receipt of a command sent from the ground station; it then goes through various submodes autonomously, performing verifications and making decisions. Tracking accuracy depends on the law of signal combination and the noise sensitivity of the measurements made.

  12. Design study of TDRS antenna gimbal system for LANDSAT-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design studies of a two axis antenna drive assembly for the TDRSS link communications subsystem for LANDSAT D are presented. The recommended antenna drive assembly is a simple and reliable design substantially similar to the antenna and solar array drives developed and space qualified for programs such as DSCS 2 and FltSatCom. The gimbal design tradeoff is presented, along with drive electronics.

  13. Microstrip-antenna design for hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, F

    1992-06-01

    Microstrip antennas have many different advantages over other RF/MW radiative applicators employed for superficial hyperthermia treatment. This is mainly due to their compact and body-conformable structure as well as to printed circuit board techniques, both of which allow a wide design flexibility for superficial tumor heating. Among the wide variety of radiator configurations, three microstrip antennas of increasing complexity with electromagnetic and heating characteristics potentially suitable as applicators for superficial hyperthermia have been designed, developed, and tested in different radiative conditions: a microstrip disk, a microstrip annular-slot, and a microstrip spiral. Electromagnetic design criteria are presented together with the determinations of the applicator return loss versus frequency and thermograms of the near-field heating pattern in muscle-like phantom. The results are in good agreement with theory and indicate that: i) the operating frequency is either single or multiple according to the applicator-mode, "resonant" or "traveling-wave," and can be chosen in the useful frequency range for hyperthermia (200-1000 MHz) according to the tumor cross-section and depth; ii) the heating pattern flexibility increases going from the simple geometry disk to the annular-slot and spiral applicators; iii) a distilled-water bolus is required; iv) the annular-slot applicator exhibits the highest efficiency, while the spiral applicator provides the best performance. PMID:1601439

  14. Microstrip-antenna design for hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, F

    1992-06-01

    Microstrip antennas have many different advantages over other RF/MW radiative applicators employed for superficial hyperthermia treatment. This is mainly due to their compact and body-conformable structure as well as to printed circuit board techniques, both of which allow a wide design flexibility for superficial tumor heating. Among the wide variety of radiator configurations, three microstrip antennas of increasing complexity with electromagnetic and heating characteristics potentially suitable as applicators for superficial hyperthermia have been designed, developed, and tested in different radiative conditions: a microstrip disk, a microstrip annular-slot, and a microstrip spiral. Electromagnetic design criteria are presented together with the determinations of the applicator return loss versus frequency and thermograms of the near-field heating pattern in muscle-like phantom. The results are in good agreement with theory and indicate that: i) the operating frequency is either single or multiple according to the applicator-mode, "resonant" or "traveling-wave," and can be chosen in the useful frequency range for hyperthermia (200-1000 MHz) according to the tumor cross-section and depth; ii) the heating pattern flexibility increases going from the simple geometry disk to the annular-slot and spiral applicators; iii) a distilled-water bolus is required; iv) the annular-slot applicator exhibits the highest efficiency, while the spiral applicator provides the best performance.

  15. Microstrip-antenna design for hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Montecchia, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Microstrip antennas have many different advantages over other RF/MW radiative applicators employed for superficial hyperthermia treatment. This is mainly due to their compact and body-conformable structure as well as to printed circuit board techniques, both of which allow a wide design flexibility for superficial tumor heating. Among the wide variety of radiator configurations, three microstrip antennas of increasing complexity with electromagnetic and heating characteristics potentially suitable as applicators for superficial hyperthermia have been designed, developed, and tested in different radiative condition: a microstrip disk, a microstrip annular-slot, and a microstrip spiral. Electromagnetic design criteria are presented together with the determinations of the applicator return loss versus frequency and thermograms of the near-field heating pattern in muscle-like phantom. The results are in good agreement with theory and indicated that: the operating frequency is either single or multiple according to the applicator-mode, 'resonant' or 'traveling-wave', and can be chosen in the useful frequency range for hyperthermia according to the tumor cross-section and depth; the heating pattern flexibility increases going form the simple geometry disk to the annular-slot and spiral applicators; a distilled-water bolus is required; the annular-slot applicator exhibits the highest efficiency, while the spiral applicator provides the best performance.

  16. Evolutionary Design of an X-Band Antenna for NASA's Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Hornby, Gregory S.; Rodriguez-Arroyo, Adan; Linden, Derek S.; Kraus, William F.; Seufert, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    We present an evolved X-band antenna design and flight prototype currently on schedule to be deployed on NASA s Space Technology 5 spacecraft in 2004. The mission consists of three small satellites that wall take science measurements in Earth s magnetosphere. The antenna was evolved to meet a challenging set of mission requirements, most notably the combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide bandwidth. Two genetic algorithms were used: one allowed branching an the antenna arms and the other did not. The highest performance antennas from both algorithms were fabricated and tested. A handdesigned antenna was produced by the contractor responsible for the design and build of the mission antennas. The hand-designed antenna is a quadrifilar helix, and we present performance data for comparison to the evolved antennas. As of this writing, one of our evolved antenna prototypes is undergoing flight qualification testing. If successful, the resulting antenna would represent the first evolved hardware in space, and the first deployed evolved antenna.

  17. Thermo-structural development of the ITER ICRF strap housing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, K.; Shannon, M.; Lockley, D.

    2014-02-01

    Since March 2010 the preliminary design of the ITER ICRF Antennas have been developed by CYCLE, a consortium consisting of IPP (Garching), CCFE (Culham), CEA (Cadarache), Politecnico di Torino (Torino) and LPPERM/KMS (Brussels). This paper describes the steps taken to develop the present geometry of the triplet pair Strap Housing Module from a thermal and structural perspective, and shows the critical areas of the structure. Key issues are the manufacturability, (achieved by HIPing - Hot Isostatic Pressing), the ability to handle the radiating plasma thermal flux of 0.35 MW/m2, the RF losses and the neutronic radiation. HIPing is necessary to achieve the complicated system of cooling channels inside the structure, which divides the coolant equally in order to supply each strap in the triplet with 1 l/s of water. The components have also to withstand the strong mechanical forces generated by plasma disruptions affecting all internal structures and the elevated design cooling water pressure of 5MPa. In order to maximise reliability, joints between different materials in the cooling water system have been kept to a minimum. Therefore, in the interests of fabricability and availability, the whole structure is manufactured out of stainless steel (316L(N)IG). The low conductivity of 316L(N)IG demands small wall thicknesses to avoid hot spots; however this reduces the mechanical strength. Consequently an in depth FEM analysis is presented, which was used to find and to improve the critical aspects of this important component and was the best means of finding the optimum between thermal and mechanical performance.

  18. Design and optimization of LTE 1800 MIMO antenna.

    PubMed

    Wong, Huey Shin; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Kibria, Salehin

    2014-01-01

    A multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) antenna that comprises a printed microstrip antenna and a printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna for LTE 1800 wireless application is presented. The printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna is fed by a 50 ohm coplanar waveguide (CPW). A novel T-shaped microstrip feedline printed on the other side of the PCB is used to excite the waveguide's outer shell. Isolation characteristics better than -15 dB can be obtained for the proposed MIMO antenna. The proposed antenna can operate in LTE 1800 (1710 MHz-1880 MHz). This antenna exhibits omnidirectional characteristics. The efficiency of the antenna is greater than 70% and has high gain of 2.18 dBi.

  19. Design and analysis of coupled-resonator reconfigurable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a coupled resonator with the microstrip patch antenna is proposed as a frequency reconfigurable antenna. The ground plane of the proposed microstrip patch antenna is modified with the proposed resonator structure to obtain reconfigurable characteristics. The resonator structure consists of two square split rings. The incorporation of proposed resonator structure with antenna makes it single-band antenna. The characteristics of proposed resonator structure can effectively deactivate by closing the splits of rings using switches, and hence, the dual-band characteristics of the antenna are recovered. The finite integration technique of computer simulation technology microwave studio is used throughout the investigation. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber. The measured and simulated performances of proposed reconfigurable antenna show very good agreement.

  20. Design and optimization of LTE 1800 MIMO antenna.

    PubMed

    Wong, Huey Shin; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Kibria, Salehin

    2014-01-01

    A multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) antenna that comprises a printed microstrip antenna and a printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna for LTE 1800 wireless application is presented. The printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna is fed by a 50 ohm coplanar waveguide (CPW). A novel T-shaped microstrip feedline printed on the other side of the PCB is used to excite the waveguide's outer shell. Isolation characteristics better than -15 dB can be obtained for the proposed MIMO antenna. The proposed antenna can operate in LTE 1800 (1710 MHz-1880 MHz). This antenna exhibits omnidirectional characteristics. The efficiency of the antenna is greater than 70% and has high gain of 2.18 dBi. PMID:24967440

  1. Review of cast-on-strap joints and strap alloys for lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, C. S.

    This review examines the influence of the various parameters involved in the cast-on-strap (COS) process on the quality of the resulting lug-strap joints. In addition, it provides the findings of an investigation on the macroscopic and microscopic features of COS joints in commercial lead-acid batteries. Some examples of the most common defects that can affect the performance and life of batteries are presented. The nature of the fusion at the lug-strap interface for the various lugs and strap alloy compositions used in conventional, hybrid and valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are also discussed.

  2. Application Of High Conductivity Carbon Fibre Materials For Flexible Thermal Straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usinger, R.; Delouard, P.; Miller, G.

    2012-07-01

    In a recently completed ESA GSTP project RUAG Space successfully demonstrated that thermal straps made from high conductivity carbon fibres can provide larger heat transport capability than conventional metallic designs at reduced mass. To prove the feasibility of the concept, breadboard models of flexible carbon fibre straps were manufactured and tested in laboratory environment. The end- to-end conductance measured in a thermal vacuum test correlated well with the prediction made with a simple thermal mathematical model. Mechanical tests were performed on the straps to check whether and to which extent the thermal performance is degraded by mechanical loads. The results from these tests indicate that the selected strap design is surprisingly tolerant against mechanical damage.

  3. Multiple-Feed Design For DSN/SETI Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency bands changed with little interruption of operation. Modification of feedhorn mounting on existing 34-m-diameter antenna in Deep Space Network (DSN) enables antenna to be shared by Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SET) program with minimal interruption of DSN spacecraft tracking. Modified antenna useful in terrestrial communication systems requiring frequent changes of operating frequencies.

  4. Design and Measurement of Self-Matched, Dual-Frequency Coplanar-Waveguide-Fed Slot Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Amjad A.; Scardelletti, Maxmilian C.; Hejazi, Zuhair M.; Dib, Nihad

    2007-01-01

    This report presents two new designs of dual-frequency, coplanar-waveguide-fed, double-folded slot antennas. An important advantage of these antennas is that, because they are self-matched to the feeding coplanar waveguide, they do not need an external matching circuit. This reduces the antenna size and simplifies its design. To verify the designs, the authors measured and compared the return loss and radiation patterns with those obtained using available commercial software with good agreement. Dual-frequency slot antennas;

  5. The Study and Implementation of Electrically Small Printed Antennas for an Integrated Transceiver Design

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, Pete

    2009-04-28

    This work focuses on the design and evaluation of the inverted-F, meandering-monopole, and loop antenna geometries. These printed antennas are studied with the goal of identifying which is suitable for use in a miniaturized transceiver design and which has the ability to provide superior performance using minimal Printed Circuit Board (PCB) space. As a result, the main objective is to characterize tradeoffs and identify which antenna provides the best compromise among volume, bandwidth and efficiency. For experimentation purposes, three types of meandering-monopole antenna are examined resulting in five total antennas for the study. The performance of each antenna under study is evaluated based upon return loss, operational bandwidth, and radiation pattern characteristics. For our purposes, return loss is measured using the S11-port reflection coefficient which helps to characterize how well the small antenna is able to be efficiently fed. Operational bandwidth is measured as the frequency range over which the antenna maintains 2:1 Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) or equivalently has 10-dB return loss. Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) is used to simulate expected resonant frequency, bandwidth, VSWR, and radiation pattern characteristics. Ansoft HFSS simulation is used to provide a good starting point for antenna design before actual prototype are built using an LPKF automated router. Simulated results are compared with actual measurements to highlight any differences and help demonstrate the effects of antenna miniaturization. Radiation characteristics are measured illustrating how each antenna is affected by the influence of a non-ideal ground plane. The antenna with outstanding performance is further evaluated to determine its maximum range of communication. Each designs range performance is evaluated using a pair of transceivers to demonstrate round-trip communication. This research is intended to provide a knowledge base which will help

  6. A novel design for high gain lens antennas with homogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lujun; Wang, Ziqian; Zhou, Shutong; Li, Guanhai; Ni, Bo; Wang, Xiaofang; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2012-10-01

    A high gain lens antenna is designed by using a new transformation different from the discrete optical transformation. The antenna is composed of two blocks. Each block is made of homogenous and anisotropic materials, and thus can be easily achieved by metamaterial. The numerical results based on full wave simulation indicate that the antenna can be used to realize highly directive radiation beam, and the direction of radiation beam can be controlled artificially by changing the geometry parameters of the device. The electromagnetic field in the transformation region can be either stretched or compressed along both transverse and longitudinal directions by varying the geometry parameters in the virtual space while the distribution of electromagnetic field outside the antenna is little influenced. Moreover, effective medium theory is applied to realize such an antenna with isotropic materials. Also, the multi-beams antenna is investigated. It is indicated that this antenna can generate multi-collimated beams radiating at the desired angles.

  7. Conceptual Design of the Aluminum Reflector Antenna for DATE5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuan; Kan, Frank W.; Sarawit, Andrew T.; Lou, Zheng; Cheng, Jing-Quan; Wang, Hai-Ren; Zuo, Ying-Xi; Yang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    DATE5, a 5 m telescope for terahertz exploration, was proposed for acquiring observations at Dome A, Antarctica. In order to observe the terahertz spectrum, it is necessary to maintain high surface accuracy in the the antenna when it is exposed to Antarctic weather conditions. Structural analysis shows that both machined aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels can meet surface accuracy requirements. In this paper, one design concept based on aluminum panels is introduced. This includes panel layout, details on panel support, design of a CFRP backup structure, and detailed finite element analysis. Modal, gravity and thermal analysis are all performed and surface deformations of the main reflector are evaluated for all load cases. At the end of the paper, the manufacture of a prototype panel is also described. Based on these results, we found that using smaller aluminum reflector panels has the potential to meet the surface requirements in the harsh Dome A environment.

  8. Design and Performance of the H_infinity Controller for the Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2011-02-01

    The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers are currently implemented at the beam-waveguide (BWG) antennas. Each BWG antenna has a different set of LQG coefficients, obtained by tuning and testing each controller individually. Individual coefficients for each antenna are necessary, since the antenna dynamics are not identical and the derivation of the LQG coefficients is a labor-intensive process. Hence, the process could be simplified by using single set of coefficients for all BWG antennas. The purpose of the work reported here is to develop a single set of servo coefficients for all BWG antennas. This is achieved by using the H_infinity controller approach and a robust design technique. In this article, the analysis of the H_infinity controller was performed, and the results obtained (by executing over 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations) showed that it is feasible to use a single set of the H_infinity controller coefficients at all BWG antennas, and that the H_infinity controller performance is similar to or exceeds the "standard" LQG controller performance, i.e., except for the DSS-25 antenna controller performance. Note that the latter controller was derived exceptionally strong. At the remaining antennas, the controller coefficients are weaker, and they represent the "standard" LQG performance. This approach simplifies the development of the controller coefficients for BWG antennas, and simplifies the servo performance evaluation, since the performance should be similar for all six BWG antennas.

  9. Design of highly efficient metallo-dielectric patch antennas for single-photon emission.

    PubMed

    Bigourdan, F; Marquier, F; Hugonin, J-P; Greffet, J-J

    2014-02-10

    Quantum emitters such as NV-centers or quantum dots can be used as single-photon sources. To improve their performance, they can be coupled to microcavities or nano-antennas. Plasmonic antennas offer an appealing solution as they can be used with broadband emitters. When properly designed, these antennas funnel light into useful modes, increasing the emission rate and the collection of single-photons. Yet, their inherent metallic losses are responsible for very low radiative efficiencies. Here, we introduce a new design of directional, metallo-dielectric, optical antennas with a Purcell factor of 150, a total efficiency of 74% and a collection efficiency of emitted photons of 99%.

  10. Design of Miniaturized Dual-Band Microstrip Antenna for WLAN Application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachen; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Zhihan; Wang, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Wireless local area network (WLAN) is a technology that combines computer network with wireless communication technology. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands in the Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band can be used in the WLAN environment. Because of the development of wireless communication technology and the use of the frequency bands without the need for authorization, the application of WLAN is becoming more and more extensive. As the key part of the WLAN system, the antenna must also be adapted to the development of WLAN communication technology. This paper designs two new dual-frequency microstrip antennas with the use of electromagnetic simulation software-High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The two antennas adopt ordinary FR4 material as a dielectric substrate, with the advantages of low cost and small size. The first antenna adopts microstrip line feeding, and the antenna radiation patch is composed of a folded T-shaped radiating dipole which reduces the antenna size, and two symmetrical rectangular patches located on both sides of the T-shaped radiating patch. The second antenna is a microstrip patch antenna fed by coaxial line, and the size of the antenna is diminished by opening a stepped groove on the two edges of the patch and a folded slot inside the patch. Simulation experiments prove that the two designed antennas have a higher gain and a favourable transmission characteristic in the working frequency range, which is in accordance with the requirements of WLAN communication. PMID:27355954

  11. Design of Miniaturized Dual-Band Microstrip Antenna for WLAN Application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachen; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Zhihan; Wang, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Wireless local area network (WLAN) is a technology that combines computer network with wireless communication technology. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands in the Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band can be used in the WLAN environment. Because of the development of wireless communication technology and the use of the frequency bands without the need for authorization, the application of WLAN is becoming more and more extensive. As the key part of the WLAN system, the antenna must also be adapted to the development of WLAN communication technology. This paper designs two new dual-frequency microstrip antennas with the use of electromagnetic simulation software-High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The two antennas adopt ordinary FR4 material as a dielectric substrate, with the advantages of low cost and small size. The first antenna adopts microstrip line feeding, and the antenna radiation patch is composed of a folded T-shaped radiating dipole which reduces the antenna size, and two symmetrical rectangular patches located on both sides of the T-shaped radiating patch. The second antenna is a microstrip patch antenna fed by coaxial line, and the size of the antenna is diminished by opening a stepped groove on the two edges of the patch and a folded slot inside the patch. Simulation experiments prove that the two designed antennas have a higher gain and a favourable transmission characteristic in the working frequency range, which is in accordance with the requirements of WLAN communication.

  12. Investigation into the thermal distribution of microwave helical antennas designed for the treatment of Barrett's oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Birch, M.; Munro, K.; Collier, R.

    2002-10-01

    A set of helical microwave antennas was designed to investigate their potential use in thermal therapy of Barrett's oesophagus. The antennas had a diameter of up to 3.3 mm and various lengths between 20 and 37 mm; these were designed to operate at 915 MHz. Sets of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) formers were constructed to improve the repeatability and reproducibility of the helix manufacture. Small diameter copper wire was wound over the formers and connected to the coaxial cable at the inner and outer conductor junctions. The power deposition profiles of the antennas were measured in a muscle-equivalent phantom using an infrared camera. The effects of antenna length and coil spacing were characterized. It was observed that uniform temperature profiles along the antenna length were achieved with a length of wire of 99 mm +/- 2 mm. The effective heating length (length of the antenna that exhibits >50% of the maximum temperature rise) was comparable to the antenna length. The radial penetration depth of 50% of the antenna surface temperature for the optimum 20 mm antenna was 2.5 mm from the antenna outer surface.

  13. Design of Miniaturized Dual-Band Microstrip Antenna for WLAN Application

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiachen; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Zhihan; Wang, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Wireless local area network (WLAN) is a technology that combines computer network with wireless communication technology. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands in the Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band can be used in the WLAN environment. Because of the development of wireless communication technology and the use of the frequency bands without the need for authorization, the application of WLAN is becoming more and more extensive. As the key part of the WLAN system, the antenna must also be adapted to the development of WLAN communication technology. This paper designs two new dual-frequency microstrip antennas with the use of electromagnetic simulation software—High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The two antennas adopt ordinary FR4 material as a dielectric substrate, with the advantages of low cost and small size. The first antenna adopts microstrip line feeding, and the antenna radiation patch is composed of a folded T-shaped radiating dipole which reduces the antenna size, and two symmetrical rectangular patches located on both sides of the T-shaped radiating patch. The second antenna is a microstrip patch antenna fed by coaxial line, and the size of the antenna is diminished by opening a stepped groove on the two edges of the patch and a folded slot inside the patch. Simulation experiments prove that the two designed antennas have a higher gain and a favourable transmission characteristic in the working frequency range, which is in accordance with the requirements of WLAN communication. PMID:27355954

  14. Transformation of design formulae for feed line of triangular microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Monika; Singh, Ghanshyam; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Swami, Swati; Vats, Abhijat

    2016-03-01

    In wireless communication system microstrip antenna is the key component. Popular shapes of patch for microstrip are rectangular, triangular and circular. A new transformation design formulae for feed line of rectangular microstrip antenna by using equivalent design concept were presented by the authors. That says one designed antenna for a given frequency on any substrate can be transformed into another substrate material for the same design frequency by simply multiply a factor ψ to the all dimensions of patch, length of feed line and some power of ψ for feed line width (where ψ is the square root of the ratio of dielectric constants of those two designs). This paper presents that the same formulae of that rectangular transformation feed line can also be applicable for triangular shape microstrip antenna transformation. The process was repeated for the triangular shape patch microstrip antenna as applied for rectangular shape and the simulation results were surprisingly the same for it by applying the same transformation formulae.

  15. Development and design of multilayer antennas based on liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missaoui, S.; Kaddour, M.; Gharbi, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present a conception and design of microwave circuit based on liquid crystal. The conception will be made of a manner to have a device that functions with a dual frequency and dual polarization. The goal of the dual frequency and dual polarization is to provide a multi-dimensional picture of meteorological phenomena to get more complete data of survey climatic long term and also for the use precipitation of the pictures in the radars. The whole system required in the broadcasts of space as in satellite imaging systems. The liquid crystal polymer has unique features: electric, mechanical, chemical; its extremely flexible nature and the capacity to be laminated with a low cost and a lightweight, to return an appropriate substrate for the big applications of the multilayer antennas.

  16. Decentralized adaptive control designs and microstrip antennas for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Farshad; Jain, Sandeep; Das, Nirod K.

    1996-05-01

    Smart structures lend themselves naturally to a decentralized control design framework, especially with adaptation mechanisms. The main reason being that it is highly undesirable to connect all the sensors and actuators in a large structure to a central processor. It is rather desirable to have local decision-making at each smart patch. Furthermore, this local controllers should be easily `expandable' to `contractible.' This corresponds to the fact that addition/deletion of several smart patches should not require a total redesign of the control system. The decentralized control strategies advocated in this paper are of expandable/contractible type. On another front, we are considering utilization of micro-strip antennas for power transfer to and from smart structures. We have made preliminary contributions in this direction and further developments are underway. These approaches are being pursued for active vibration damping and noise cancellation via piezoelectric ceramics although the methodology is general enough to be applicable to other type of active structures.

  17. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  18. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna Design via Element Collocation and Inductive Feed Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. P.

    2012-09-12

    In a FY09 SDRD project, four separate antennas were designed to receive signals of interest covering a broad range of frequencies. While the elements exceeded specifications, the array footprint is substantial. Research performed by the CU Microwave Active Antenna Group in collaboration with RSL, showed promise in realizing a reduced structure. This work will expand upon this previous research. This project will result in a prototype quad-band antenna.

  19. The L-/C-band feed design for the DSS 14 70-meter antenna (Phobos mission)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P. H.; Reilly, H. F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A dual-frequency (1.668 and 5.01 GHz) feed was designed for the Deep Space Station (DSS) 14 70-m antenna to support the Soviet Phobos Mission. This antenna system was capable of supporting telemetry, two-way Doppler, and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). VLBI and two-way Doppler information on the Phobos spacecraft was acquired with this antenna in 1989.

  20. Design and development of a deployable mesh antenna for MUSES-B spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, M. C.; Takano, Tadashi; Inoue, Toshio; Noda, Takahiko

    1993-04-01

    A precise deployable antenna structure is necessary in relatively near future for various missions. Requirement of high accuracy of antenna surface conflicts with that of good packaging efficiency, and to solve this conflict is important. Design and development of a mesh antenna system with six extendible masts is introduced to provide well balanced performance for both simple deployment and good surface accuracy. Various error sources affected to surface accuracy are studied both analytically and experimentally.

  1. Prototype 10-meter radio telescope antenna and mount design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype radio antenna of 10.4 meters diameter and 0.41 meter focal length, intended for use at the shortest radio wavelengths transmitted by the atmosphere, was successfully completed. The surface accuracy is at least four times better than that of any existing antenna in this size class: 50 micrometer rms. A prototype mount is being constructed and will be ready by early 1976. The development of an improved antenna of identical size, but heavier weight has been continued.

  2. Implanted Miniaturized Antenna for Brain Computer Interface Applications: Analysis and Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Rennaker, Robert L.; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are designed to provide real-time control signals for prosthetic devices, study brain function, and/or restore sensory information lost as a result of injury or disease. Using Radio Frequency (RF) to wirelessly power a BCI could widely extend the number of applications and increase chronic in-vivo viability. However, due to the limited size and the electromagnetic loss of human brain tissues, implanted miniaturized antennas suffer low radiation efficiency. This work presents simulations, analysis and designs of implanted antennas for a wireless implantable RF-powered brain computer interface application. The results show that thin (on the order of 100 micrometers thickness) biocompatible insulating layers can significantly impact the antenna performance. The proper selection of the dielectric properties of the biocompatible insulating layers and the implantation position inside human brain tissues can facilitate efficient RF power reception by the implanted antenna. While the results show that the effects of the human head shape on implanted antenna performance is somewhat negligible, the constitutive properties of the brain tissues surrounding the implanted antenna can significantly impact the electrical characteristics (input impedance, and operational frequency) of the implanted antenna. Three miniaturized antenna designs are simulated and demonstrate that maximum RF power of up to 1.8 milli-Watts can be received at 2 GHz when the antenna implanted around the dura, without violating the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) limits. PMID:25079941

  3. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Stallings, D. C.

    1993-09-01

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (RF) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. Comparisons with experiments indicate that these 2-D calculations can overestimate the loading of the antenna and fail to give the correct reactive behavior. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform 3-D modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap, conducting sidewalls, and finite phase velocity are considered. The plasma impedance matrix for the loading calculation is generated by use of the ORION-1D code. The 3-D model is benchmarked with the 2-D model in the 2-D limit. For finite-length antennas, inductance calculations are found to be in much more reasonable agreement with experiments for 3-D modeling than for the 2-D estimates. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven RF current to return in the antenna sidewalls rather than in the plasma as in the 2-D model. Thus, the feeders have much more influence than the plasma on the currents that return in the sidewall. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model.

  4. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Stallings, D.C.

    1993-09-01

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. Comparisons with experiments indicate that these 2-D calculations can overestimate the loading of the antenna and fail to give the correct reactive behavior. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform 3-D modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap, conducting sidewalls, and finite phase velocity are considered. The plasma impedance matrix for the loading calculation is generated by use of the ORION-1D code. The 3-D model is benchmarked with the 2-D model in the 2-D limit. For finite-length antennas, inductance calculations are found to be in much more reasonable agreement with experiments for 3-D modeling than for the 2-D estimates. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna sidewalls rather than in the plasma as in the 2-D model. Thus, the feeders have much more influence than the plasma on the currents that return in the sidewall. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model.

  5. Design, development and testing of the x-ray timing explorer High Gain Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecha, Javier; Woods, Claudia; Phan, Minh

    1995-01-01

    The High Gain Antenna System (HGAS), consisting of two High Gain Antenna Deployment Systems (HGADS) and two Antenna Pointing Systems (APS), is used to position two High Gain Antennas (HGA) on the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE). A similar APS will be used on the upcoming Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Both XTE and TRMM are NASA in-house satellites. The salient features of the system include the two-axis gimbal and control electronics of the APS and the spring deployment and latch/release mechanisms of the HGADS. This paper describes some of the challenges faced in the design and testing of this system and their resolutions.

  6. The design and fabrication of microstrip omnidirectional array antennas for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; Appleton, M. W.; Lusby, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    A microstrip antenna design concept was developed that will provide quasi-omnidirectional radiation pattern characteristics about cylindrical and conical aerospace structures. L-band and S-band antenna arrays were designed, fabricated, and, in some cases, flight tested for rocket, satellite, and aircraft drone applications. Each type of array design is discussed along with a thermal cover design that was required for the sounding rocket applications.

  7. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  8. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  9. Performance and operational considerations in the design of vehicle antennas for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the vehicle antenna requirements for mobile satellite systems. The antenna parameters are discussed in the light of the requirements and the limitations in performance imposed by the physical constraints of antenna and by vehicle geometries. Measurements of diffraction and antenna noise temperature in an operational environment are examined, as well as their effects on system margins. Mechanical versus electronic designs are compared with regards to performance, cost, reliability, and design complexity. Comparisons between open-loop and close-loop tracking systems are made and the effects of bandwidth, sidelobe levels, operational constraints, vehicle angular velocity, and acceleration are discussed. Some consideration is given to the use of hybrid systems employing both open and closed-loop tracking. Changes to antenna/terminal specifications are recommended which will provide greater design flexibility and increase the likelihood of meeting the performance and operational requirements.

  10. System and antenna design considerations for highly elliptical orbits as applied to the proposed Archimedes Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, C.; Cuchanski, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses various aspects of the system design for a satellite in a highly elliptical inclined orbit, and presents a number of antenna design options for the proposed Archimedes mission. A satellite constellation was studied for the provision of multi media communication services in the L and S Band for northern latitudes. The inclined elliptical orbit would allow coverage of Europe, America, and East Asia. Using Canada and North America as the baseline coverage area, this paper addresses system considerations such as the satellite configuration and pointing, beam configuration, and requirements for antennas. A trade-off is performed among several antenna candidates including a direct radiating array, a focal-fed reflector, and a single reflector imaging system. Antenna geometry, performance, and beam forming methods are described. The impact of the designs on the antenna deployment is discussed.

  11. High-gain backup antenna design for Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The development and performance is described of a high-gain antenna designed to serve on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft as a backup to the principal high-gain antenna unit in the unlikely event the mechanically despun antenna mechanism malfunctioned. The final design, a center-fed standing wave array of six sleeve dipoles enclosed in a fiber glass radome, performed successfully, as did all the antennas, on the Pioneer Orbiter spacecraft which was launched on May 20, 1978, as part of the Pioneer Venus mission. Photographs of experimental models giving details of design and construction are included, as well as graphs showing measured pattern and impedance matching characteristics of the subject antenna.

  12. Field antenna handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuch, J. A.

    1984-06-01

    This handbook presents basic propagation theory, the fundamentals concerning antennas, and the design and use of tactical high frequency and very high frequency antennas. It is a field reference for basic antenna facts and a usage guide for antennas.

  13. Development and design of dual-band, multi-function remote sensing antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creticos, Justin P.

    This dissertation details the theoretical development, design, fabrication, and testing of two remote sensing antennas. The antennas operate in Ku and Ka bands and must support multiple beams, polarizations, and frequencies with a single aperture. The first antenna, developed for NASA's High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler, is a single, offset-fed reflector that supports dual-band beams incident at 30° and 40° off-nadir. The antenna uses two compact, dual-band feeds moved away from the reflector's focal point to meet the dual beam requirement. The radar is to be flown on the Global Hawk Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle which has a small payload bay requiring the feeds to be both rugged and compact. The second antenna, developed for Remote Sensing Solutions' Dual-Wavelength Precipitation Radar, is a dual-offset Gregorian reflector. The antenna supports a single, dual-band, beam with dual-polarization at each band. Additionally, the antenna has high polarization purity and matched half power beamwidths at Ku and Ka bands. The strict requirements of the antenna are met by precisely controlling feed radiation characteristics. The two antennas necessitated several advances in feed design. A foam sleeve is demonstrated as an effective method to reduce the beamwidth of a tapered dielectric rod antenna. The foam sleeve is an attractive design because it allows dual-band feeds where a corrugated horn is used to control radiation at lower frequencies and the sleeve corrected rod is used to control the upper band. By judiciously choosing sleeve material, independent control of the radiation pattern and phase center at each band is achieved allowing higher performance feeds. This dissertation also focuses on new developments in the backend design of feeds. Specifically, the use of tuning arms in the feed backend and double ridged waveguide to couple the signal into the feed allow more compact designs with greater bandwidth.

  14. Design of dual band wearable antenna using metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Adeel; Ullah, Sadiq; Khan, Shahbaz; Ahmed, Aziz; Khalil, Akhtar Hussain; Tarar, Munir Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents two types of dual band (2.4 and 5.8 GHz) wearable planar dipole antennas, one printed on a conventional substrate and the other on a two-dimensional metamaterial surface (Electromagnetic Bandgap (EBG) structure). The operation of both antennas is investigated and compared under different bending conditions (in E and H-planes) around human arm and leg of different radii. A dual band, Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG) structure on a wearable substrate is used as a high impedance surface to control the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) as well as to improve the antenna gain up to 4.45 dBi. The EBG inspired antenna has reduced the SAR effects on human body to a safe level (< 2W/Kg). I.e. the SAR is reduced by 83.3% for lower band and 92.8% for higher band as compared to the conventional antenna. The proposed antenna can be used for wearable applications with least health hazard to human body in Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (2.4 GHz, 5.2 GHz) applications. The antennas on human body are simulated and analyzed in CST Microwave Studio (CST MWS). PMID:24779146

  15. Project Report: Design and Analysis for the Deep Space Network BWG Type 2 Antenna Feed Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The following report explains in detail the solid modeling design process and structural analysis of the LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) feed platform to be constructed and installed on the new BWG (Beam Wave Guide) Type-2 tracking antenna in Canberra, Australia, as well as all future similar BWG Type-2 antennas builds. The Deep Space Networks new BWG Type-2 antennas use beam waveguides to funnel and 'extract' the desired signals received from spacecraft, and the feed platform supports and houses the LNA(Low Noise Amplifier) feed-cone and cryogenic cooling equipment used in the signal transmission and receiving process. The mandated design and construction of this platform to be installed on the new tracking antenna will be used and incorporated on all future similar antenna builds.

  16. Design of a Miniaturized Meandered Line Antenna for UHF RFID Tags

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Rowe, Wayne S. T.; Kibria, Salehin; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2016-01-01

    A semi-circle looped vertically omnidirectional radiation (VOR) patterned tag antenna for UHF (919–923 MHz for Malaysia) frequency is designed to overcome the impedance mismatch issue in this paper. Two impedance matching feeding strips are used in the antenna structure to tune the input impedance of the antenna. Two dipole shaped meandered lines are used to achieve a VOR pattern. The proposed antenna is designed for 23-j224 Ω chip impedance. The antenna is suitable for ‘place and tag’ application. A small size of 77.68×35.5 mm2 is achieved for a read range performance of 8.3 meters using Malaysia regulated maximum power transfer of 2.0 W effective radiated power (ERP). PMID:27533470

  17. Design of a Miniaturized Meandered Line Antenna for UHF RFID Tags.

    PubMed

    Rokunuzzaman, Md; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Rowe, Wayne S T; Kibria, Salehin; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2016-01-01

    A semi-circle looped vertically omnidirectional radiation (VOR) patterned tag antenna for UHF (919-923 MHz for Malaysia) frequency is designed to overcome the impedance mismatch issue in this paper. Two impedance matching feeding strips are used in the antenna structure to tune the input impedance of the antenna. Two dipole shaped meandered lines are used to achieve a VOR pattern. The proposed antenna is designed for 23-j224 Ω chip impedance. The antenna is suitable for 'place and tag' application. A small size of 77.68×35.5 mm2 is achieved for a read range performance of 8.3 meters using Malaysia regulated maximum power transfer of 2.0 W effective radiated power (ERP). PMID:27533470

  18. Consequences of antenna design in telemetry studies of small passerines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dougill, Steve J.; Johnson, Luanne; Banko, Paul C.; Goltz, Dan M.; Wiley, Michael R.; Semones, John D.

    2000-01-01

    Entanglement and mortality of Palila (Loxioides bailleui), an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper, occurred when birds were radio-tagged with transmitters equipped with a long, limp, solder-tipped antenna. Birds were found suspended in trees by their transmitter antenna on eight occasions. Although these birds eventually freed themselves or were freed by us, at least one bird died afterwards. For radio telemetry studies of small passerine species we recommend avoiding transmitters equipped with an antenna that is bulbous at the tip, >16 cm in length, limp, and shiny.

  19. Tapered slot antenna design for vehicular GPR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıçak, Emrullah; Yeǧin, Korkut; Nazlı, Hakki; Daǧ, Mahmut

    2014-05-01

    Vehicular applications of UWB GPR demand multiple GPR sensors operating in a harsh environment. One of the key elements of in the sensor is its UWB antenna which has minimal inter-element coupling, low group delay, high directivity and less prone to environmental conditions. Tapered slot antennas (TSA's) provide good impedance match, but they need to be modified for above specifications. Parasitic slot loaded TSA with balanced feed is proposed and a multi-channel antenna array structure is formed. Structural parameters are numerically analyzed and a prototype is built. Measurements show good performance for UWB GPR applications.

  20. Design and synthesis of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array on Kapton substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges Rabobason, Yvon; Rigas, Grigorios; Swaisaenyakorn, Srijittar; Mirkhaydarov, Bobur; Ravelo, Blaise; Shkunov, Maxim; Young, Paul; Benjelloun, Nabil

    2016-06-01

    Flexible front- and back-end RF/analogue system antennas were recently emerged. However, little flexible antenna system design is available so far, in planar hybrid technology with surface mounted components. This paper describes the design feasibility of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array system. It acts as a switching antenna implemented in hexapole configuration. The system is comprised of a key element RF switch terminated by two identical patch antennas associated to half-wave elementary transmission lines (TLs). A detailed theory illustrating the global S-parameter model determination in function of the given RF-switch return and insertion losses is established. In difference to the conventional microwave circuit theory, the proposed equivalent S-parameter model is originally built with the non-standard optimized antenna load. Thus, the synthesis method of the terminal antenna input impedance and the output access line characteristic impedance is formulated in function of the specified return and optimal transmission losses. The design method and theoretical approach feasibility is verified with the demonstrator of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array printed on Kapton substrate. The circuit prototype is implemented in hybrid planar technology integrating patch antenna operating at about 6 GHz and a packaged GaAs RF switch associated to the RF/DC signal decoupling accessory mounted surface components. Simulations of the designed circuit transmission and isolation losses from 5.5 GHz to 7 GHz were carried out by using the commercial RF switch S-parameter touchstone model provided by the manufacturer. The simulated and measured return losses are compared and discussed. Then, the measured radiation patterns confirm the proposed switched antenna concept feasibility.

  1. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  2. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  6. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  7. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  8. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  9. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  10. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  11. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  12. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  13. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  14. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  15. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-11-12

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric-femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology.

  16. Design of a 60 GHz beam waveguide antenna positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerick, Kenneth S.

    1989-01-01

    A development model antenna positioner mechanism with an integral 60 GHz radio frequency beam waveguide is discussed. The system features a 2-ft diameter carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy antenna reflector and support structure, and a 2-degree-of-freedom elevation over azimuth mechanism providing hemispherical field of view. Emphasis is placed on the constraints imposed on the mechanism by the radio frequency subsystems and how they impacted the mechanical configuration.

  17. Present Status of the ITER-like ICRF Antenna on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Durodie, F.; Huygen, S.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Vrancken, M.; Gauthier, M.; Goulding, R.

    2009-11-26

    The commissioning of the ITER-Like ICRF Antenna (ILA) on JET plasmas from May 2008 to April 2009 in various conditions (33, 42 and 47 MHz, L- and H-mode, antenna strap-plasma separatrix distances of {approx}9 to 17 cm) has provided relevant information for future antenna design and operation. The maximum power density achieved was 6.2 MW/m{sup 2} in L-mode with strap to plasma separatrix distance of {approx}9-10 cm at 42 MHz on the lower half of the ILA extrapolating to 8 MW/m{sup 2} if the full generator power had been available. Efficient (trip-free operation) ELM tolerance was obtained both at 33 and 42 MHz on a large range of ELMs with strap voltages up to 42 kV and a maximum power density of 4.1 MW/m{sup 2}. The paper reviews these achievements as well as remaining issues.

  18. Design optimization studies for large-scale contoured beam deployable satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    Satellite communications systems over the past two decades have become more sophisticated and evolved new applications that require much higher flux densities. These new requirements to provide high data rate services to very small user terminals have in turn led to the need for large aperture space antenna systems with higher gain. Conventional parabolic reflectors constructed of metal have become, over time, too massive to support these new missions in a cost effective manner and also have posed problems of fitting within the constrained volume of launch vehicles. Designers of new space antenna systems have thus begun to explore new design options. These design options for advanced space communications networks include such alternatives as inflatable antennas using polyimide materials, antennas constructed of piezo-electric materials, phased array antenna systems (especially in the EHF bands) and deployable antenna systems constructed of wire mesh or cabling systems. This article updates studies being conducted in Japan of such deployable space antenna systems [H. Tanaka, M.C. Natori, Shape control of space antennas consisting of cable networks, Acta Astronautica 55 (2004) 519-527]. In particular, this study shows how the design of such large-scale deployable antenna systems can be optimized based on various factors including the frequency bands to be employed with such innovative reflector design. In particular, this study investigates how contoured beam space antennas can be effective by constructed out of so-called cable networks or mesh-like reflectors. This design can be accomplished via "plane wave synthesis" and by the "force density method" and then to iterate the design to achieve the optimum solution. We have concluded that the best design is achieved by plane wave synthesis. Further, we demonstrate that the nodes on the reflector are best determined by a pseudo-inverse calculation of the matrix that can be interpolated so as to achieve the minimum

  19. Preliminary design of a 15 m diameter mechanically scanned deployable offset antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary design of a 15 meter diameter mechanically scanned, offset rotating, fed parabolic reflector antenna system is reported and the results of preliminary performance, structural and thermal analyses are presented.

  20. System and method of designing a load bearing layer that interfaces to a structural pass-through of an inflatable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for determining a design of an inflatable module including a rigid member disposed in a restraint layer, wherein the restraint layer includes orthogonal straps, includes modeling a strap adjacent to the rigid member and a strap connected to the rigid member. The adjacent strap and the member strap extend in a first direction. The method further includes selecting a first length of the member strap such that the adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module, modeling tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap during pressurization of the inflatable model, and outputting the modeled tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap. An inflatable module includes a member strap having a length such that an adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module.

  1. Design and performance analysis of the DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, T.; Imbriale, W.; Bathker, D.

    1990-01-01

    A new 34 m research and development antenna is currently being constructed prior to introducing beam waveguide (BWG) antennas and Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies into the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network. The new 34 m antenna, fed with either a center or bypass BWG, will lose less than 0.2 dB (excluding surface root mean square and mirror misalignment losses), as compared with a standard-fed Cassegrain antenna a X- (8.4 GHz) and Ka-bands. The antenna is currently under construction and is scheduled to be completed July 1990. Phase 1 of the project is for independent X- and Ka-band receive-only tests. Phase 2 of the project is for simultaneous S- (2.3 GHz) and X-band or X- and Ka-band operation, and the design is currently under way.

  2. Design and performance analysis of the DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veruttipong, T.; Imbriale, W.; Bathker, D.

    1990-05-01

    A new 34 m research and development antenna is currently being constructed prior to introducing beam waveguide (BWG) antennas and Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies into the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network. The new 34 m antenna, fed with either a center or bypass BWG, will lose less than 0.2 dB (excluding surface root mean square and mirror misalignment losses), as compared with a standard-fed Cassegrain antenna a X- (8.4 GHz) and Ka-bands. The antenna is currently under construction and is scheduled to be completed July 1990. Phase 1 of the project is for independent X- and Ka-band receive-only tests. Phase 2 of the project is for simultaneous S- (2.3 GHz) and X-band or X- and Ka-band operation, and the design is currently under way.

  3. Testing a Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapeutic versus Placebo Shoulder Strapping as an Adjuvant Intervention Early after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Appel, Caroline; Perry, Lin; Jones, Fiona

    2015-06-01

    This study tested a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapeutic versus placebo shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention early after stroke. Despite widespread use, there is little evidence of the efficacy or acceptability of shoulder strapping to improve arm function in patients with shoulder paresis following stroke. This study tested a protocol designed to trial shoulder strapping as an adjuvant therapy in patients with shoulder paresis after stroke and tested its acceptability for patients and clinical staff. A multiple-method design comprised one quantitative randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and two qualitative exploratory investigations entailing patient interviews and staff surveys. Seventeen sub-acute stroke patients with shoulder paresis were recruited in London stroke service settings between November 2007 and December 2009. Outcomes from a 4-week therapeutic strapping protocol were compared with those of placebo strapping as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation. Minimal adverse events and greater improvement in arm function (Action Research Arm Test) were seen with therapeutic compared with placebo strapping (effect size 0.34). Patients and staff found the strapping acceptable with minimal adverse effects. This study provided data for sample size calculation and demonstrated a workable research protocol to investigate the efficacy of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention to routine rehabilitation for stroke patients. Small-scale findings continue to flag the importance of investigating this topic. The protocol is recommended for a definitive trial of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention. PMID:25664993

  4. A Novel Design of Circular Edge Bow-Tie Nano Antenna for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Ahasanul; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kumar, Narendra

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel nano antenna is designed in order to convert the high frequency solar energy, thermal energy or earth re-emitted sun's energy into electricity. The proposed antenna is gold printed on a SiO2 layer, designed as a circular edge bow-tie with a ground plane at the bottom of the substrate. The Lorentz-Drude model is used to analyze the behavior of gold at the infrared band of frequencies. The proposed antenna is designed by 3D-electromagnetic solver, and analyzed for optimization of metal thickness, gap size, and antenna's geometrical length. Simulations are conducted in order to investigate the behavior of the antenna illuminated by the circularly polarized plane wave. The numerical simulations are studied for improving the harvesting E-field of the antenna within 5 THz-40 THz frequency range. The proposed antenna offers multiple resonance frequency and better return loss within the frequency bands of 23.2 THz to 27 THz (bandwidth 3.8 THz) and 31 THz to 35.9 THz (bandwidth 4.9 THz). An output electric field of 0.656 V/µm is simulated at 25.3 THz. The best fitted gap size at the feed point is achieved as 50 nm with the substrate thickness of 1.2 µm.

  5. Analysis and verification of a proposed antenna design for an implantable RFID Tag at 915 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakore, Rahul

    This work focused on design and analysis of an antenna to be used with an RFID tag that is implanted in human brain tissue. The goal is to maximize the power transferred between the external RFID measurement system and the implanted RFID tag while minimizing the power dissipated within the surrounding tissue. The commercial computational electromagnetics software package COMSOL, based on finite element method (FEM) has been used for design process. The COMSOL models have been validated against additional simulations using the FEKO commercial package based on method of moments (MOM) as well as against measurement of test antenna structures radiating in bulk homogeneous medium. The proposed antenna geometry is compatible with the human tissue and viable for use in implantable RFID Tag. The proposed antenna is a planar folded dipole made from a gold conductor that acts as a biocompatible material. The metal thickness is 1 micrometer and the overall antenna dimensions are 22 mm × 3.5 mm. The antenna structure also includes a dielectric substrate and an acrylic coating. The antenna impedance is 28 + j201.5 Ω at 915 MHz. The inductive reactance is high enough to compensate the capacitive reactance of RFID tag and the antenna resistance is close to effective chip resistance providing a conjugate match. This antenna fulfills the criteria for minimizing the power dissipation within the human tissue. Also, a radiation efficiency of 87% is achieved with this antenna at 915 MHz. The quality factor of greater than 10 is achieved which is sufficient to turn on the diodes in the electronic circuit of the RFID tag due to the high D.C voltage obtained.

  6. Properties of cold-to-warm support straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Golda, M.

    In cryogenic equipment, composite straps are sometimes used for structural support and thermal isolation of the cryogenic system from the warm structure. Composite straps reinforced with unidirectional fibres are loaded in tension. In straps with carbon fibre reinforcement, very strong tensile strengths (up to 3.5 GPa) have been reported. Recent studies, at 295, 76, and 4 K, have clarified the effects of spool diameter on the strengths of carbon fibre reinforced straps. For straps reinforced with E- and S-glass, carbon, and alumina fibres, this paper reviews the relevant mechanical and thermal properties from 295 to 4 K: elastic, tensile, fatigue, thermal contraction, and thermal conductivity.

  7. ARISE: A Challenging 25-m Space Antenna Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Hoferer, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    ARISE (Advanced Radio Interferometry between Space and Earth). Future scientific and communications missions are conceptualizing using very large reflector antennas in space. The antenna dimensions are targeted from lOm to 25m beyond. Frequencies coveting L-band through W-band are being considered. these challenging missions, one may refer to ARISE (Advanced Radio Interferometry between Space and Earth), which is projected to utilize a 25-m dual Gregorian optics operating from 8 GHz to 86 Gl-lz . An artist's renditions Gregorian antenna concept is shown . The objective of this mission is to create a space-based VLBI system (integrated with ground based antennas) for high resolution mapping of black holes. Successful realization of ARISE necessitates development of several technologies . The most crucial technology is that of the deployable 25-m reflector that must work at frequencies as high as 43 and 86 GHz. The current baseline selection for ARISE is an inflatable antenna, under development for several other applications in communications and remote sensing.

  8. Antennas Designed for Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is to enable a communications infrastructure that provides the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize a mature free-flight environment. The technical thrust of the AC/ATM Project is targeted at the design, development, integration, test, and demonstration of enabling technologies for global broadband aeronautical communications. Since Ku-band facilities and equipment are readily available, one of the near-term demonstrations involves a link through a Kuband communications satellite. Two conformally mounted antennas will support the initial AC/ATM communications links. Both of these are steered electronically through monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers and phase shifters. This link will be asymmetrical with the downlink to the aircraft (mobile vehicle) at a throughput rate of greater than 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), whereas the throughput rate of the uplink from the aircraft will be greater than 100 kilobits per second (kbps). The data on the downlink can be narrow-band, wide-band, or a combination of both, depending on the requirements of the experiment. The AC/ATM project is purchasing a phased-array Ku-band transmitting antenna for the uplink from the test vehicle. Many Ku-band receiving antennas have been built, and one will be borrowed for a short time to perform the initial experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Ku-band transmitting antenna is a 254-element MMIC phased-array antenna being built by Boeing Phantom Works. Each element can radiate 100 mW. The antenna is approximately 43-cm high by 24-cm wide by 3.3-cm thick. It can be steered beyond 60 from broadside. The beamwidth varies from 6 at broadside to 12 degrees at 60 degrees, which is typical of phased-array antennas. When the antenna is steered to 60 degrees, the beamwidth will illuminate

  9. Analysis and design of printed antennas for wireless communications using finite difference time domain technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Wen Paul

    Small printed antennas are becoming one of the most popular designs in personal wireless communication systems, because these antennas feature light weight, small size, high frequency operation, and high transmission efficiency. Recently, a new type of printed meander line antenna was introduced. In this dissertation, the characteristics of a class of novel meander line antennas are presented and analyzed in detail using the finite difference time domain technique. The presented designs of the meander line antennas feature small dimensions (less than 77 x 11 x 3.17 mm3), approximately 50 Ω input impedance, dual or multiple frequency bands, and operate within the 0.9-3.0 GHz range on a comparably small ground plane (59 x 25.4 mm 2). Empirical design equations and the analysis for the input impedance and operating frequencies of different designs of meander line antennas are also provided. Validations of the numerical codes used in this investigation are made by comparing the computed FDTD results for known geometries with numerical results by other methods and measurements. Prototypes of optimized printed taper meander line antennas are built, and measurements of their return loss are compared with the computational results obtained using the FDTD technique. Very good agreement is found between FDTD numerical analysis and comparison results by other numerical methods and measurements. Optimal designs are achieved by applying dual printed sleeve tuners to equal segment ratio and taper meander line antennas, which cover the frequency range 1.25 GHz to 3.0 GHz with VSWR less than 1.4 and bandwidth varied within 120-340 MHz These optimal designs may effectively support the upper PCS bands and the future 3 rd generation cellular applications.

  10. A Novel Design of Frequency Reconfigurable Antenna for UWB Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolin; Yu, Ziliang; Wu, Zheng; Shen, Huajiao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel frequency reconfigurable antenna which could be easily operate in a single notched-band (WiMAX (3.3-3.6 GHz)) UWB frequency band, another single notched-band (WLAN (5-6 GHz)) UWB frequency band and the dual band-notched UWB frequency band (the stopband covers the WiMAX (3.3-3.6 GHz) and WLAN (5-6 GHz)). The reconfigurability is achieved by changing the states of PIN diodes. The simulated results are in agreement well with the measured results. And the measured patterns are slightly changed with antenna reconfiguration. The proposed antenna is a good candidate for various UWB applications.

  11. Concepted design of a surface measurement system for large deployable space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The sensor system is in essence a point design, specifically interfacing with the Harris, Inc., 1000 meter deployable mesh communication antenna. The design can, without large modification, be adapted to other large deployable antennas such as the Lockheed Wrap-rib, the General Dynamics Precision Erectable Truss and the TRW Advanced Sunflower antennas. Measurements are optical displacements. The elements of the system are a central cluster of receivers near the apex of the antenna and active bright targets at the antenna. The cluster defines a single coordinate frame from which all surface positions are referenced. The receivers continuously observe an extended array of sample points located throughout the reflecting surface and its supporting structure. For the Harris antenna, the surface samples are at the mesh gore lines and at the supporting hoop. Output data is in real-time, compatible with on-board processing and active control of antenna figure. Lifetime of the system is at least 10 years continuous operation in space.

  12. Design optical antenna and fiber coupling system based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Yang, Huajun; Mao, Shengqian

    2015-10-01

    A Cassegrain antenna system and an optical fiber coupling system which consists of a plano-concave lens and a plano-convex lens are designed based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction, so as to improve the transmission performance of the optical antenna and fiber coupling system. Three-dimensional ray tracing simulation are performed and results of the optical aberrations calculation and the experimental test show that the aberrations caused by on-axial defocusing, off-axial defocusing and deflection of receiving antenna can be well corrected by the optical fiber coupling system. PMID:26480125

  13. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  14. MoM-based topology optimization method for planar metallic antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shutian; Wang, Qi; Gao, Renjing

    2016-09-01

    The metallic antenna design problem can be treated as a problem to find the optimal distribution of conductive material in a certain domain. Although this problem is well suited for topology optimization method, the volumetric distribution of conductive material based on 3D finite element method (FEM) has been known to cause numerical bottlenecks such as the skin depth issue, meshed "air regions" and other numerical problems. In this paper a topology optimization method based on the method of moments (MoM) for configuration design of planar metallic antenna was proposed. The candidate structure of the planar metallic antenna was approximately considered as a resistance sheet with position-dependent impedance. In this way, the electromagnetic property of the antenna can be analyzed easily by using the MoM to solve the radiation problem of the resistance sheet in a finite domain. The topology of the antenna was depicted with the distribution of the impedance related to the design parameters or relative densities. The conductive material (metal) was assumed to have zero impedance, whereas the non-conductive material was simulated as a material with a finite but large enough impedance. The interpolation function of the impedance between conductive material and non-conductive material was taken as a tangential function. The design of planar metallic antenna was optimized for maximizing the efficiency at the target frequency. The results illustrated the effectiveness of the method.

  15. On the Practical Design of Small Terminal Antennas for Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrivervik, Anja K.; Martínez-Vázquez, Marta; Mosig, Juan R.

    Mobile communication have become an important part of telecommunications. Original applications like paging, mobile phones or GPS have shown a tremendous growth, and new applications are emerging every day: tagging, wireless computer links, wireless microphones, remote control, wireless multimedia links, satellite mobile phones, wireless internet. Mobile means light, small, with low energy consumption and appealing designs. Technology has evolved very fast to satisfy these needs in rapidly growing markeds: chips are becoming smaller, consume less current, are more efficient and perform more complex operations. The antennas however have not experienced the same evolution, as the size of an antenna is mainly dictated by the frequency band it has to transmit or receive. Thus, the art of antenna miniaturization is an art of compromise: one has to design the smallest possible antenna, which is still suitable for a given application regarding its radiation characteristics. Or in other words, one looks for the best compromise between volume, bandwidth and efficiency. In this paper, we will go through classical design techniques, starting from ultra small antennas and going UWB antennas over multiband designs.

  16. Designing Ground Antennas for Maximum G/T: Cassegrain or Gregorian?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    For optimum performance, a ground antenna system must maximize the ratio of received signal to the receiving system noise power, defined as the ratio of antenna gain to system-noise temperature (G/T). The total system noise temperature is the linear combination of the receiver noise temperature (including the feed system losses) and the antenna noise contribution. Hence, for very low noise cryogenic receiver systems, antenna noise-temperature properties are very significant contributors to G/T.It is well known that, for dual reflector systems designed for maximum gain, the gain performance of the antenna system is the same for both Cassegrain and Gregorian configurations. For a12-meter antenna designed to be part of the large array based Deep Space Network, a Cassegrain configuration designed for maximum G/T at X-band was 0.7 dB higher than the equivalent Gregorian configuration. This study demonstrates that, for maximum GIT, the dual shaped Cassegrain design is always better than the Gregorian.

  17. Traveling wave antenna for fast wave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezi, H.; Phelps, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The traveling wave antenna for heating and current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is shown theoretically to have loading and wavenumber spectrum which are largely independent of plasma conditions. These characteristics have been demonstrated in low power experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, in which a standard four-strap antenna was converted to a traveling wave antenna through use of external coupling elements. The experiments indicate that the array maintains good impedance matching without dynamic tuning during abrupt changes in the plasma, such as during L- to H-mode transitions, edge localized mode activity, and disruptions. An analytic model was developed which exhibits the features observed in the experiments. Guidelines for the design of traveling wave antennas are derived from the validated model.

  18. LQG controller design using GUI: application to antennas and radio-telescopes

    PubMed

    Maneri; Gawronski

    2000-01-01

    The Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) algorithm has been used to control the JPL's beam wave-guide, and 70-m antennas. This algorithm significantly improves tracking precision in a wind disturbed environment. Based on this algorithm and the implementation experience a Matlab based Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to design the LQG controllers applicable to antennas and radiotelescopes. The GUI is described in this paper. It consists of two parts the basic LQG design and the fine-tuning of the basic design using a constrained optimization algorithm. The presented GUI was developed to simplify the design process, to make the design process user-friendly, and to enable design of an LQG controller for one with a limited control engineering background. The user is asked to manipulate the GUI sliders and radio buttons to watch the antenna performance. Simple rules are given at the GUI display.

  19. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A LOW-FREQUENCY CROSS-POLARIZED LOG-PERIODIC DIPOLE ANTENNA

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, K. Sasikumar; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Rajalingam, M.; Barve, Indrajit V.

    2013-07-01

    We report the design and performance of a cross-polarized log-periodic dipole (CLPD) antenna for observations of polarized radio emission from the solar corona at low frequencies. The measured isolation between the two mutually orthogonal log-periodic dipole antennas was as low as Almost-Equal-To - 43 dBm in the 65-95 MHz range. We carried out observations of the solar corona at 80 MHz with the above CLPD and successfully recorded circularly polarized emission.

  20. Design of a compact tuning fork-shaped notched ultrawideband antenna for wireless communication application.

    PubMed

    Shakib, M N; Moghavvemi, M; Mahadi, W N L

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33-13.8 GHz (at -10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28-6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size. PMID:24723835

  1. Design of a Compact Tuning Fork-Shaped Notched Ultrawideband Antenna for Wireless Communication Application

    PubMed Central

    Shakib, M. N.; Moghavvemi, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33–13.8 GHz (at −10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28–6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size. PMID:24723835

  2. Design of a compact tuning fork-shaped notched ultrawideband antenna for wireless communication application.

    PubMed

    Shakib, M N; Moghavvemi, M; Mahadi, W N L

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33-13.8 GHz (at -10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28-6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size.

  3. Design of Compact Penta-Band and Hexa-Band Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kunal; Kumar, Ashwani; Kanaujia, Binod K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design of two multi-band microstrip antennas. The antenna-1 gives Penta-Band and antenna-2 gives Hexa-band in the WLAN band. The frequency bands of the antenna-1 are Bluetooth 2.47 GHz (2.43 GHz-2.54 GHz), WiMax band 3.73 GHz (3.71 GHz-3.77 GHz), WLAN 5.1 GHz (4.99 GHz-5.13 GHz), upper WLAN 6.36 GHz (6.29 GHz-6.43 GHz), C band band 7.42 GHz (7.32 GHz-7.50 GHz) and the antenna-2 are WLAN band 2.6 GHz (2.56 GHz-2.63 GHz), 3.0 GHz (2.94 GHz-3.05 GHz), WiMax band 3.4 GHz (3.34 GHz-3.55 GHz), 4.85 GHz (4.81 GHz-4.92 GHz), WLAN 5.3 GHz (5.27 GHz-5.34 GHz) and upper WLAN 6.88 GHz. Both the antennas are fabricated and their measured results are presented to validate the simulated results. Proposed antennas have compact sizes and good radiation performances.

  4. Design and Optimization of Passive UHF RFID Tag Antenna for Mounting on or inside Material Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    There is great desire to employ passive UHF RFID tags for inventory tracking and sensing in a diversity of applications and environments. Owing to its battery-free operation, non-line-of sight detection, low cost, long read range and small form factor, each year billions of RFID tags are being deployed in retail, logistics, manufacturing, biomedical inventories, among many other applications. However, the performance of these RFID systems has not met expectations. This is because a tag's performance deteriorates significantly when mounted on or inside arbitrary materials. The tag antenna is optimized only for a given type of material at a certain location of placement, and detuning takes place when attached to or embedded in materials with dielectric properties outside the design range. Thereby, different customized tags may be needed for identifying objects even within the same class of products. This increases the overall cost of the system. Furthermore, conventional copper foil-based RFID tag antennas are prone to metal fatigue and wear, and cannot survive hostile environments where antennas could be deformed by external forces and failures occur. Therefore, it is essential to understand the interaction between the antenna and the material in the vicinity of the tag, and design general purpose RFID tag antennas possessing excellent electrical performance as well as robust mechanical structure. A particularly challenging application addressed here is designing passive RFID tag antennas for automotive tires. Tires are composed of multiple layers of rubber with different dielectric properties and thicknesses. Furthermore, metallic plies are embedded in the sidewalls and steel belts lie beneath the tread to enforce mechanical integrity. To complicate matters even more, a typical tire experiences a 10% stretching during the construction process. This dissertation focuses on intuitively understanding the interaction between the antenna and the material in the

  5. Design of transmitting optical antenna of a terrestrial line-sight optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-wen; Liu, Zi-li; Huang, Zai-lu

    2006-02-01

    By using the Gaussian light beam approximation and from the viewpoint of mode matching, the optical coupling theory between single mode fiber and optical antenna, which is based on the matrix optical theory and the ABCD law, is employed to present a universal designing method for transmitting optical antenna of a terrestrial line-sight optical communication system .The physical meaning and choosing method with its relative parameter are also discussed in detail, and an experimental example of the transmitting optical antenna for a terrestrial line-sight optical communication system is given as well. Through the testing of the designed transmitting optical antenna with the help of a laser light beam analysis instrument, the incident Gaussian light beam waist spot radius is 4.7μm, while the divergence angles of the transmitting Gaussian light beam in the two perpendicular directions are 1.9mrad and 1.5mrad, respectively, which can almost agree with the parameters of the designing theory above. In the end, the possibility of improving the quality of transmitting optical antenna and the reliability of space optical communication through applying technologies such as converting the elliptical Gaussian light beam into the round Gaussian light beam, the plane coupling into the spherical coupling and film-plating the optical antenna etc is discussed.

  6. Design and investigation of planar technology based ultra-wideband antenna with directional radiation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, M. L.; Parmar, Girish; Kumar, Mithilesh

    2016-03-01

    A novel design technique based on planar technology for ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas with different ground shape having directional radiation pattern is being presented here. Firstly, the L-shape corner reflector ground plane antenna is designed with microstrip feed line in order to achieve large bandwidth and directivity. Thereafter, for the further improvement in the directivity as well as for better impedance matching the parabolic-shape ground plane has been introduced. The coaxial feed line is given for the proposed directional antenna in order to achieve better impedance matching with 50 ohm transmission line. The simulation analysis of the antenna is done on CST Microwave Studio software using FR-4 substrate having thickness of 1.6 mm and dielectric constant of 4.4. The simulated result shows a good return loss (S11) with respect to -10 dB. The radiation pattern characteristic, angular width, directivity and bandwidth performance of the antenna have also been compared at different resonant frequencies. The designed antennas exhibit low cost, low reflection coefficient and better directivity in the UWB frequency band.

  7. Design of CPW fed printed slot antenna with circular polarization for UWB application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, N.; Tiwari, A.; Jangid, K. G.; Sharma, B. R.; Saini, J. S.; Kulhar, V. S.; Bhatnagar, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the design and performance of a CPW-fed circularized polarized elliptical slot antenna for UWB (ultra wide band) applications. The circular polarization is achieved by applying triangular stubs in the ground plane. The overall volume of this antenna is 40mm × 40 mm × 1.59 mm. The proposed antenna is simulated by applying CST Microwave Studio simulator. This elliptical patch slot antenna provides broad impedance bandwidth (3.1GHz to 10.6 GHz) with maximum gain 4.31dB at 4.45GHz. The simulated 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth is close to 2.51GHz (from 4.76GHz to 7.27GHz) which is 41.76% with respect to the central frequency 6.01GHz.

  8. Antennas for the array-based Deep Space Network: current status and future designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Gama, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Development of very large arrays1,2 of small antennas has been proposed as a way to increase the downlink capability of the NASA Deep Space Network DSN) by two or three orders of magnitude thereby enabling greatly increased science data from currently configured missions or enabling new mission concepts. The current concept is for an array of 400 x 12-m antennas at each of three longitudes. The DSN array will utilize radio astronomy sources for phase calibration and will have wide bandwidth correlation processing for this purpose. NASA has undertaken a technology program to prove the performance and cost of a very large DSN array. Central to that program is a 3-element interferometer to be completed in 2005. This paper describes current status of the low cost 6-meter breadboard antenna to be used as part of the interferometer and the RF design of the 12-meter antenna.

  9. Design, dynamic modelling and experimental validation of a 2DOF flexible antenna sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Claudia F.; Naci Engin, Seref; Feliu Batlle, Vicente

    2014-04-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom flexible antenna sensor platform was designed to physically simulate the ability of a robotic arm, which rapidly reorients and targets itself towards specific surfaces from different approachable angles. An accurate antenna model involves non-linear expressions that represent the system dynamics. Therefore, a comprehensive study along with experimental work has been carried out in order to achieve accurate system identification and validate the dynamic model. The model developed has proven useful in controlling the antenna tip, minimising the effects of the non-linear flexural dynamics and the Coulomb friction. The system was driven by servo motors. Algebraic controllers were developed for the antenna tip to track the reference trajectory. The platform system used encoders to measure the joint angles and a loadcell sensor to obtain the flexible link tip position. To validate the sensory information, the results obtained by the integrated sensors were compared to that of an external camera system.

  10. Design of an omnidirectional optical antenna for ultraviolet communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebin; Tang, Yi; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Lijun; Bai, Tingzhu

    2014-05-20

    In this paper we propose an omnidirectional large field-optical antenna with a dual-mirror structure and field devices and demonstrate its utilization in ultraviolet (UV) communications. Theoretical analysis shows that it is suitable for short-range UV communication. Simulation indicates that the optical gain is 32, and the system has a good spot uniformity. Additionally, incident angles of incident ray meet the requirement of the interference filter (±10°). Outdoor experiments show that the angle of FOV is in the range of ±20°~±80° and a SNR increase of 31 dB compared with bare tube is observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the omnidirectional optical antenna structure for free-space UV communication.

  11. Implications of Antenna System Calibration on Spacecraft Design and Radio Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Sampl, M.; Panchenko, M.; Oswal, T.; Plettemeier, D.; Maksimovic, M.; Macher, W.

    Currents on the conducting surfaces of the spacecraft hull, induced by electric fields of radio waves, strongly influence the reception properties of spacecraft antenna systems. This influence is visualized by the so-called ”effective antenna length” (h_eff ), representing the electric antenna, which differs from the physical antenna rod. Knowledge on these effective antenna vectors can be yielded by several different methods: (1) Experimental rheometry, (2) Numerical computer simulations,(3) In-flight calibration, and (4) Experimental anechoic chamber measurements. The paper addresses these methods and shows in the case of preliminary design studies of Solar Orbiter spacecraft the possibilities of numerical computer simulations, in particular the change of h_eff by design variations. The combined use of the above mentioned methods enables the determination of h_eff over a wide frequency range, the correct information on wave polarisation, and in specific cases helps to improve the performance of direction finding. So the calibration results may also be used to re-evaluate structure and position of antennas (and even positions of instruments) on board a spacecraft.

  12. Design and analysis of inverted H shape dual band patch antenna for microwave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.; Reaz, M. B. I.

    2013-04-01

    Design and analysis of an inverted H shape printed dual band patch antenna has been presented in this paper. The proposed antenna has designed by 3-D full wave high frequency electromagnetic simulator HFSS and printed in low cost, durable epoxy polymer resin composite material substrate. The printed antenna prototype has been measured in a standard far field anechoic electromagnetic field measurement chamber. The measured results have analyzed by using computer aided plotting tool OriginPro 8.5. Measured -10 dB return loss bandwidth 3.25 GHz from 9.75 GHz to 13 GHz with peak gain 8.5 dBi have been achieved. The proposed antenna has obtained 0.63 dBi gain with 96% efficiency at lower band 10.3 GHz and 6.03 dBi gain with 84.2% efficiency at upper band 12.5 GHz. The almost steady radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna appropriate for part of X and Ku band applications. Moreover, the input impedance and current distribution along the radiating patch of the proposed antenna have also been analyzed in this paper.

  13. Analysis and design of a wideband dual-polarized antenna based on the principle of Huygens' source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyukjun

    Analysis and designs of wideband dual-polarized antennas for mobile wireless communication systems are presented. The concept for Huygens' sources, which are combinations of electric and magnetic dipoles, is used. As a result a wideband unidirectional antenna, which consists of a planar dipole and a slot, is selected for the antenna element. This study aims at designing a dually polarized antenna with wideband performance. The first part of the study discusses the performance of the linearly polarized antenna element at 2.5 GHz. Several design parameters associated with the antenna element are addressed. To improve the performance and increase the bandwidth, a twin-fed hook-shaped probe feeding technique is applied. Prototype antennas are fabricated and tested, and good agreement between the simulated and measured results is obtained. The second part of this study is extended to design the wideband dual-polarized patch antenna. Problems associated with the practical implementation of the dual-polarized antenna in printed form are discussed. The wideband performance of the present antenna is examined by shielding the dielectric substrate from the radiating region. The proposed antenna is fabricated and tested. In addition, a metallic side wall is adopted for suppressing the back radiation. The study for designing a possible candidate for a novel dual-polarized antenna by embedding an electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure is investigated. Analysis for unit-cells of mushroom-like and wideband uniplanar EBG structures is performed, and simple monopoles are used for exciting the EBG embedded antenna. The presented antennas find many possible applications in many recent wireless communication systems like 3G, 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE), 4G, Wi-MAX, and Wi-Bro.

  14. Design of an offset fed scanning antenna for the shuttle imaging microwave system. [performance prediction parabolic reflectors and microwave antennas for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A design study is described for a mechanically scanned offset fed parabolic torus reflector antenna having a 4m x 2m aperture for simultaneous use at eleven frequency channels from UHF to millimeter wavelengths. A design for the antenna is presented utilizing dipole and horn feeds at the low frequencies and a Gregorian aberration correcting subreflector system for feeding the torus at the high frequencies. The results and details of a theroetical study based on geometrical optics performed to evaluate the high frequency design and the results of an experimental study involving a one-tenth scale model for evaluation of the low-frequency behavior are given. Beam efficiencies, antenna patterns, beamwidths and cross polarization levels are presented and these results demonstrate that the antenna concept is viable for the Shuttle Imaging Microwave System requirement.

  15. Design and analysis of a conformal patch antenna for a wearable breast hyperthermia treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, Sergio; Ramasamy, Manoshika; Suh, Minyoung; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    To overcome the limitations of currently available clinical hyperthermia systems which are based on rigid waveguide antennas, a wearable microwave hyperthermia system is presented. A light wearable system can improve patient comfort and be located in close proximity to the breast, thereby enhancing energy deposition and reducing power requirements. The objective of this work was to design and assess the feasibility of a conformal patch antenna element of an array system to be integrated into a wearable hyperthermia bra. The feasibility of implementing antennas with silver printed ink technology on flexible substrates was evaluated. A coupled electromagnetic-bioheat transfer solver and a hemispheric heterogeneous numerical breast phantom were used to design and optimize a 915 MHz patch antenna. The optimization goals were device miniaturization, operating bandwidth, enhanced energy deposition pattern in targets, and reduced Efield back radiation. The antenna performance was evaluated for devices incorporating a hemispheric conformal groundplane and a rectangular groundplane configuration. Simulated results indicated a stable -10 dB return loss bandwidth of 88 MHz for both the conformal and rectangular groundplane configurations. Considering applied power levels restricted to 15 W, treatment volumes (T>410C) and depth from the skin surface were 11.32 cm3 and 27.94 mm, respectively, for the conformal groundplane configuration, and 2.79 cm3 and 19.72 mm, respectively, for the rectangular groundplane configuration. E-field back-radiation reduced by 85.06% for the conformal groundplane compared to the rectangular groundplane configuration. A prototype antenna with rectangular groundplane was fabricatd and experimentally evaluated. The groundplane was created by printing silver ink (Metalon JS-B25P) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface. Experiments revealed stable antenna performance for power levels up to 15.3 W. In conclusion, the proposed patch antenna with

  16. Solar-relevant plasma loop expansion in strapping field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao; Bellan, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Tokamak-like forces may explain fundamental behaviors of solar plasma arches. The hoop force causes arched, current-carrying plasma loops to expand. This expansion was slowed and even inhibited by a magnetic ``strapping'' field in previous solar loop experiments at Caltech but no attempt was made to control the field's spatial profile. Kliem and Torok predicted an explosive-like transition from slow expansion to fast eruption if the spatial decay rate of the strapping field exceeds a threshold. Smaller, independently-powered auxiliary coils placed inside the vacuum chamber produce strapping fields with above-threshold decay rate and strong enough to act on the plasma. The plasma is observed, however, to bypass regions of stronger strapping field and expand into regions of weaker field. Added external inductance slows plasma expansion allowing the strapping coils to hold down the plasma. Different interactions between arched plasma loops and strapping magnetic fields will be presented. Supported by the NSF and AFOSR.

  17. Design options for an ITER ion cyclotron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, D. W.; Baity, F. W.; Bigelow, T. S.; Ryan, P. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Carter, M. D.; Stallings, D. C.; Batchelor, D. B.; Hoffman, D. J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent changes have occurred in the design requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron system, requiring in-port launchers in four main horizontal ports to deliver 50 MW of power to the plasma. The design is complicated by the comparatively large antenna-separatrix distance of 10-20 cm. Designs of a conventional strap launcher and a folded waveguide launcher that can meet the new requirements are presented.

  18. Design of Dual band Modified Inverted F-Antenna for Military and Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Applications by Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Robiul; Karmokar, Debabrata Kumar

    2012-11-01

    A design of single feed Dual Band Modified Inverted F-Antenna (IFA) operating at 4.45 GHz (4.4-4.7GHz) and 5.9 GHz (5.850-5.925 GHz) has been proposed in this paper. The design is initiated by trial and error method of Numerical Analysis and method of moments (MoMís) in Numerical Electromagnetic code (NEC) is used to design, simulate and analyze this antenna. The results exhibit a proper operation of the antenna in terms of return loss, bandwidth, efficiency, VSWR, and gain at both bands. Proposed antenna is designed to achieve multi-serving purposes. Military applications and applications in the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are the most important applications within the above mentioned frequency bands respectively. The simulated results including performance parameters of antenna are presented and all are acceptable for the standard antennas.

  19. Scattering from thin dielectric straps surrounding a perfectly conducting structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hekail, Zeyad; Gupta, Inder J.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the electromagnetic scattered fields from a dielectric strap wrapped around convex, conducting structure is presented. A moment method technique is used to find the current excited within the strap by the incident plane wave. Then, Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) is used to compute the fields scattered by the strap. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the computed and the measured results. The results found in this study are useful in evaluating straps as a target support structure for scattering measurements.

  20. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  1. Design & Performance of Wearable Ultra Wide Band Textile Antenna for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nikhil; Singh, Ashutosh Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-02-01

    The concept of wearable products such as textile antenna are being developed which are capable of monitoring, alerting and demanding attention whenever hospital emergency is needed, hence minimizing labour and resource. In the proposed work by using textile material as a substrate the ultra wideband antenna is designed especially for medical applications.Simulated and measured results here shows that the proposed antenna design meets the requirements of wide working bandwidth and provides 13.08 GHz bandwidth with very small size, washable (if using conductive thread for conductive parts) and flexible materials. Results in terms of bandwidth, radiation pattern, return loss as well as gain and efficiency are presented to validate the usefulness of the current proposed design. The work done here has many implications for future research and it could help patients with such flexible and comfortable medical monitoring techniques.

  2. Design and fabrication of a microstrip patch antenna with a low radar cross section in the X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Won-Jun; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed a radar absorbing method to reduce the antenna radar cross section (RCS) without any loss of antenna performance. The new method was based upon an electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) absorber using conducting polymer (CP). First, a microstrip patch antenna was made by using a copper film and glass/epoxy composite materials, which are typically used for load-bearing structures, such as aircraft and other vehicles. Then, CP EBG patterns were also designed that had a 90% electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbing performance within the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). Finally, the CP EBG patterns were printed on the top surface of the microstrip patch antenna. The measured radar absorbing performance of the fabricated patch antenna showed that the frontal RCS of the antenna declined by nearly 95% at 10 GHz frequency while the CP EBG patterns had almost no effect on the antenna's performance.

  3. Design of 4x1 microstrip patch antenna array for 5.8 GHz ISM band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valjibhai, Gohil Jayesh; Bhatia, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the new design of four element antenna array using corporate feed technique. The proposed antenna array is developed on the Rogers 5880 dielectric material. The antenna array works on 5.8 GHz ISM band. The industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands are radio bands (portions of the radio spectrum) reserved internationally for the use of radio frequency (RF) energy for industrial, scientific and medical purposes other than communications. The array antennas have VSWR < 1.6 from 5.725 - 5.875 GHz. The simulated return loss characteristic of the antenna array is - 39.3 dB at 5.8 GHz. The gain of the antenna array is 12.3 dB achieved. The directivity of the broadside radiation pattern is 12.7 dBi at the 5.8 GHz operating frequency. The antenna array is simulated using High frequency structure simulation software.

  4. Taming the ICRF Antenna - Plasma Edge Interaction using Novel Field-Aligned ICRF Antenna on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yijun

    2014-10-01

    For ICRF antenna utilization in future fusion reactors, taming the antenna-plasma edge interaction while robustly coupling RF power is a critical challenge. Using a novel field-aligned (FA) ICRF antenna where the antenna straps are perpendicular to the total magnetic field, we have shown dramatically improved ICRF antenna performance. The FA antenna has significantly reduced antenna impurity sources, core impurity contamination and radiated power compared to conventional toroidally aligned antennas. The FA antenna also has load tolerance to plasma transients and significantly reduced RF-enhanced heat flux. The emerging physics picture is that the FA antenna minimizes generation of slow wave fields (E//B polarization). This reduction in slow wave lowers the local RF sheath around the ICRF antenna, and thus lowers the impurity source at local antenna structure. Simplified antenna simulations show a strong reduction in slow wave fields. The reduction of the slow wave field also impacts the antenna load tolerance. With the slow wave present, the antenna impedance is strongly modified by the slow wave coupling between antenna straps and this coupling is dependent upon the local density. With reduced slow wave coupling, the antenna reactive impedance is defined by the strap geometry and independent of the plasma whereas the real impedance is determined by the fast wave coupling. Experimentally we have found that the FA antenna loading has similar trends versus plasma current and densities to TA antennas, but the FA antenna reflection coefficient has significantly reduced variation, particularly during L-H and H-L transitions, and ELMs. Further comparisons of the FA and TA antennas are underway with an extensive array of diagnostics to characterize the RF plasma edge interaction and the latest results will be presented. Supported by US DoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 at MIT.

  5. Design of a low-loss series-fed microstrip array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahbub, M. R.; Christodoulou. C. G.; Bailey, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, low-loss, inverted microstrip array antenna, operating at 1.413 GHz is presented. The array antenna is composed of two sub arrays. Each sub array consists of an equal number of microstrip patches all connected together through a series microstrip line. The first element of each sub array is coaxially fed but 180 degree out of phase. This approach ensures a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  6. Beam-waveguide antenna servo design issues for tracking low earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and reducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the over-sampled monopulse signal is described.

  7. Beam-waveguide antenna servo design issues for tracking low earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-11-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and reducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the over-sampled monopulse signal is described.

  8. Beam-Waveguide Antenna Servo Design Issues for Tracking Low-Earth-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-07-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and treducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the oversampled monopulse signal is described.

  9. Conceptual design and analysis of a large antenna utilizing electrostatic membrane management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Coyner, J. V.; Gardner, W. J.; Mihora, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Conceptual designs and associated technologies for deployment 100 m class radiometer antennas were developed. An electrostatically suspended and controlled membrane mirror and the supporting structure are discussed. The integrated spacecraft including STS cargo bay stowage and development were analyzed. An antenna performance evaluation was performed as a measure of the quality of the membrane/spacecraft when used as a radiometer in the 1 GHz to 5 GHz region. Several related LSS structural dynamic models differing by their stiffness property (and therefore, lowest modal frequencies) are reported. Control system whose complexity varies inversely with increasing modal frequency regimes are also reported. Interactive computer-aided-design software is discussed.

  10. Design and Development of Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace Applications: A Final Report to the NARI Seedling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    As highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties, polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aircraft antenna systems. While they have been aggressively explored for thermal insulation, barely any effort has been made to leverage these materials for antennas or other applications that take advantage of their aforementioned attributes. In Phase I of the NARI Seedling Project, we fabricated PI aerogels with properties tailored to enable new antenna concepts with performance characteristics (wide bandwidth and high gain) and material properties (low density, environmental stability, and robustness) superior to the state of practice (SOP). We characterized electromagnetic properties, including permittivity, reflectivity, and propagation losses for the aerogels. Simple, prototype planar printed circuit patch antennas from down-selected aerogel formulations were fabricated by molding the aerogels to net shapes and by gold-metalizing the pattern onto the templates via electron beam evaporation in a clean room environment. These aerogel based antennas were benchmarked against current antenna SOP, and exhibited both broader bandwidth and comparable or higher gain performance at appreciably lower mass. Phase II focused on the success of the Phase I results pushing the PI aerogel based antenna technology further by exploring alternative antenna design (i.e., slot coupled antennas) and by examining other techniques for fabricating the antennas including ink jet printing with the goal of optimizing antenna performance and simplifying production. We also examined new aerogel formulations with better moisture and solvent resistance to survive processing conditions. In addition, we investigated more complex antenna designs including passive phased arrays such as 2x4 and 4x8 element arrays to assess the scalability of the aerogel antenna concept. Furthermore, we

  11. Recent developments in ICRF antenna modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Dumortier, P.; Louche, F.

    2006-04-01

    The antennas presently developed for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating of the ITER plasma consist of a tightly packed array of a large number of radiating straps, in order to deliver a high power density without exceeding radio-frequency voltage standoffs. A recently developed three-dimensional electromagnetic commercial software has enabled important progress in the coupling analysis and optimization of such demanding systems. Approximations allowing these codes to convincingly model the effect of antenna loading by a magnetized plasma are discussed. It is shown that, for the purpose of antenna design calculations, a slab of ordinary dielectric with a high relative permittivity, KD, of the order of (c/VA)2, where VA is the plasma Alfvén velocity, can reproduce the main features of wave reflection and refraction by the plasma edge. Multi-layered dielectrics permit more refined approximations. The numerical application of the approximation is illustrated by a simulation of the JET 'A2' ICRF arrays, which fairly qualitatively reproduces the experimental frequency dependence of the coupling resistance. The same loading approximation is applied to the design of realistic experimental test-bed conditions for antenna prototypes or mock-ups, using water as a means of creating plasma-relevant antenna loading. Application to a scaled mockup of the ITER antenna is briefly presented. This paper is an expanded version of material originally presented at the 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Vilamoura, Portugal, 1-6 November 2004 (Vienna: IAEA), CD-ROM file FT/PT-18.

  12. BROADBAND ANTENNA MATCHING NETWORK DESIGN AND APPLICATION FOR RF PLASMA ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki; Kang, Yoon W; Piller, Chip; Fathy, Aly

    2011-01-01

    The RF ion source at Spallation Neutron Source has been upgraded to meet higher beam power requirement. One important subsystem for efficient operation of the ion source is the 2MHz RF impedance matching network. The real part of the antenna impedance is very small and is affected by plasma density for 2MHz operating frequency. Previous impedance matching network for the antenna has limited tuning capability to cover this potential variation of the antenna impedance since it employed a single tuning element and an impedance transformer. A new matching network with two tunable capacitors has been built and tested. This network can allow precision matching and increase the tunable range without using a transformer. A 5-element broadband matching network also has been designed, built and tested. The 5-element network allows wide band matching up to 50 kHz bandwidth from the resonance center of 2 MHz. The design procedure, simulation and test results are presented.

  13. Design and performance of a broadband circularly polarized modified semi-elliptical microstrip patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Brajraj; Sharma, Vijay; Tiwari, Ajay; Sharma, K. B.; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    In this communication design and performance of a modified semi elliptical microstrip patch antenna is proposed to achieve circularly polarized broadband performance. The proposed structure consists of a semi-elliptical patch having a D-shaped slot designed on three layered substrate material. The structure has two FR-4 substrates separated by a foam material having 1 mm thickness. The simulation analysis is carried out by using IE3D simulation software. The proposed antenna covers entire median band (3.4 to 3.69 GHz) allocated for Wi-Max communication systems. Two modes having resonance frequencies very close to each other (3.36 GHz and 3.66 GHz) are excited to achieve broadband performance. The impedance bandwidth of proposed antenna is close to 21%. The minimum axial ratio is close to 1.8dB while axial ratio bandwidth is close to 4.63%. The radiation patterns within bandwidth are almost identical in shape.

  14. Implementation of the new multichannel X-mode edge density profile reflectometer for the ICRF antenna on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiam, D. E.; Silva, A.; Bobkov, V.; Carvalho, P. J.; Carvalho, P. F.; Cavazzana, R.; Conway, G. D.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Fattorini, L.; Faugel, H.; Fernandes, A.; Fünfgelder, H.; Gonçalves, B.; Guimarais, L.; De Masi, G.; Meneses, L.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Rocchi, G.; Santos, J. M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2016-11-01

    A new multichannel frequency modulated continuous-wave reflectometry diagnostic has been successfully installed and commissioned on ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma edge electron density profile evolution in front of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna. The design of the new three-strap ICRF antenna integrates ten pairs (sending and receiving) of microwave reflectometry antennas. The multichannel reflectometer can use three of these to measure the edge electron density profiles up to 2 × 1019 m-3, at different poloidal locations, allowing the direct study of the local plasma layers in front of the ICRF antenna. ICRF power coupling, operational effects, and poloidal variations of the plasma density profile can be consistently studied for the first time. In this work the diagnostic hardware architecture is described and the obtained density profile measurements were used to track outer radial plasma position and plasma shape.

  15. Design and realization of a planar ultrawideband antenna with notch band at 3.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Azim, Rezaul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31-3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band. PMID:25133245

  16. Design and realization of a planar ultrawideband antenna with notch band at 3.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Azim, Rezaul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31-3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band.

  17. Study of shuttle imaging microwave system antenna. Volume 1: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesley, R. W.; Waineo, D. K.; Barton, C. R.; Love, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed preliminary design and complete performance evaluation are presented of an 11-channel large aperture scanning radiometer antenna for the shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS) program. Provisions for interfacing the antenna with the space shuttle orbiter are presented and discussed. A program plan for hardware development and a rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost are also included. The conceptual design of the antenna is presented. It consists of a four-meter diameter parabolic torus main reflector, which is a graphite/epoxy shell supported by a graphite/epoxy truss. A rotating feed wheel assembly supports six Gregorian subreflectors covering the upper eight frequency channels from 6.6 GHz through 118.7 GHz, and two three-channel prime forms feed assemblies for 0.6, 1.4, and 2.7 GHz. The feed wheel assembly also holds the radiometers and power supplies, and a drive system using a 400 Hz synchronous motor is described. The RF analysis of the antenna is performed using physical optics procedures for both the dual reflector Gregorian concept and the single reflector prime focus concept. A unique aberration correcting feed for 2.7 GHz is analyzed. A structural analysis is also included. The analyses indicate that the antenna will meet system requirements.

  18. A new design of an S/X dual band circular slot antenna for radar applications.

    PubMed

    Ghnimi, Said; Wali, Rawia; Gharsallh, Ali; Razban, Tchanguiz

    2013-01-01

    A novel design of dual-band slot antenna with a circular patch for radar applications is presented and studied. It is fed by a micro-strip line and built on a FR-4 substrate with a whole size of 18 x 30 mm2. A dual band printed antenna is created by introducing slots on the radiating element. By this, two bandwidth, covering C and X band, are achieved. In order to obtain a good fundamental antenna design, the initial studies were carried out theoretically, using CST Microwave Studio simulation software. In this case, the frequency range at return loss < 10 dB is 5.24 - 6.16 GHz for low frequency and is 7.9 -11.7 GHz for high frequency. In addition, the proposed antenna has good radiation characteristics and stable gains over the whole operating bands. A prototype of antenna is fabricated and tested. Experimental data show good agreement between simulated and measured results. PMID:24779147

  19. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  1. A strap-on monitoring system for rail car applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.; Rey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Breeding, R.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-12-01

    A joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work examines a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and a consequence of hazardous materials incidents. Product requirements are based on a cost-benefit analysis of operating losses. Results of a concept validation experiment conducted on a revenue generating train are reported.

  2. Metasurface Reflector (MSR) Loading for High Performance Small Microstrip Antenna Design

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Md Rezwanul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-01-01

    A meander stripline feed multiband microstrip antenna loaded with metasurface reflector (MSR) structure has been designed, analyzed and constructed that offers the wireless communication services for UHF/microwave RFID and WLAN/WiMAX applications. The proposed MSR assimilated antenna comprises planar straight forward design of circular shaped radiator with horizontal slots on it and 2D metasurface formed by the periodic square metallic element that resembles the behavior of metamaterials. A custom made high dielectric bio-plastic substrate (εr = 15) is used for fabricating the prototype of the MSR embedded planar monopole antenna. The details of the design progress through numerical simulations and experimental results are presented and discussed accordingly. The measured impedance bandwidth, radiation patterns and gain of the proposed MSR integrated antenna are compared with the obtained results from numerical simulation, and a good compliance can be observed between them. The investigation shows that utilization of MSR structure has significantly broadened the -10dB impedance bandwidth than the conventional patch antenna: from 540 to 632 MHz (17%), 467 to 606 MHz (29%) and 758 MHz to 1062 MHz (40%) for three distinct operating bands centered at 0.9, 3.5 and 5.5 GHz. Additionally, due to the assimilation of MSR, the overall realized gains have been upgraded to a higher value of 3.62 dBi, 6.09 dBi and 8.6 dBi for lower, middle and upper frequency band respectively. The measured radiation patterns, impedance bandwidths (S11<-10 dB) and gains from the MSR loaded antenna prototype exhibit reasonable characteristics that can satisfy the requirements of UHF/microwave (5.8 GHz) RFID, WiMAX (3.5/5.5 GHz) and WLAN (5.2/5.8 GHz) applications. PMID:26018795

  3. Metasurface Reflector (MSR) Loading for High Performance Small Microstrip Antenna Design.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Md Rezwanul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-01-01

    A meander stripline feed multiband microstrip antenna loaded with metasurface reflector (MSR) structure has been designed, analyzed and constructed that offers the wireless communication services for UHF/microwave RFID and WLAN/WiMAX applications. The proposed MSR assimilated antenna comprises planar straight forward design of circular shaped radiator with horizontal slots on it and 2D metasurface formed by the periodic square metallic element that resembles the behavior of metamaterials. A custom made high dielectric bio-plastic substrate (εr = 15) is used for fabricating the prototype of the MSR embedded planar monopole antenna. The details of the design progress through numerical simulations and experimental results are presented and discussed accordingly. The measured impedance bandwidth, radiation patterns and gain of the proposed MSR integrated antenna are compared with the obtained results from numerical simulation, and a good compliance can be observed between them. The investigation shows that utilization of MSR structure has significantly broadened the -10 dB impedance bandwidth than the conventional patch antenna: from 540 to 632 MHz (17%), 467 to 606 MHz (29%) and 758 MHz to 1062 MHz (40%) for three distinct operating bands centered at 0.9, 3.5 and 5.5 GHz. Additionally, due to the assimilation of MSR, the overall realized gains have been upgraded to a higher value of 3.62 dBi, 6.09 dBi and 8.6 dBi for lower, middle and upper frequency band respectively. The measured radiation patterns, impedance bandwidths (S11<-10 dB) and gains from the MSR loaded antenna prototype exhibit reasonable characteristics that can satisfy the requirements of UHF/microwave (5.8 GHz) RFID, WiMAX (3.5/5.5 GHz) and WLAN (5.2/5.8 GHz) applications. PMID:26018795

  4. Metasurface Reflector (MSR) Loading for High Performance Small Microstrip Antenna Design.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Md Rezwanul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-01-01

    A meander stripline feed multiband microstrip antenna loaded with metasurface reflector (MSR) structure has been designed, analyzed and constructed that offers the wireless communication services for UHF/microwave RFID and WLAN/WiMAX applications. The proposed MSR assimilated antenna comprises planar straight forward design of circular shaped radiator with horizontal slots on it and 2D metasurface formed by the periodic square metallic element that resembles the behavior of metamaterials. A custom made high dielectric bio-plastic substrate (εr = 15) is used for fabricating the prototype of the MSR embedded planar monopole antenna. The details of the design progress through numerical simulations and experimental results are presented and discussed accordingly. The measured impedance bandwidth, radiation patterns and gain of the proposed MSR integrated antenna are compared with the obtained results from numerical simulation, and a good compliance can be observed between them. The investigation shows that utilization of MSR structure has significantly broadened the -10 dB impedance bandwidth than the conventional patch antenna: from 540 to 632 MHz (17%), 467 to 606 MHz (29%) and 758 MHz to 1062 MHz (40%) for three distinct operating bands centered at 0.9, 3.5 and 5.5 GHz. Additionally, due to the assimilation of MSR, the overall realized gains have been upgraded to a higher value of 3.62 dBi, 6.09 dBi and 8.6 dBi for lower, middle and upper frequency band respectively. The measured radiation patterns, impedance bandwidths (S11<-10 dB) and gains from the MSR loaded antenna prototype exhibit reasonable characteristics that can satisfy the requirements of UHF/microwave (5.8 GHz) RFID, WiMAX (3.5/5.5 GHz) and WLAN (5.2/5.8 GHz) applications.

  5. Miniaturized differentially fed dual-band implantable antenna: Design, realization, and in vitro test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wen; Guo, Yong-Xin

    2015-10-01

    A differentially fed dual-band implantable antenna is designed in this paper, with an additional shorting strip to achieve a size reduction. The antenna has been simulated by using one-layer and multilayer tissue models and a human anatomical model. The prototype model is fabricated and in vitro demonstrated with skin-mimicking phantoms, which experimentally achieves impedance bandwidths of 32 MHz at 401-406 MHz Medical Device Radiocommunications Service band and 151 MHz at 2.4-2.48 GHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical band. Radiation characteristic has been evaluated in Computer Simulation Technology (CST) human voxel model.

  6. Operating the Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array in an Environment with Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B; Pinsker, R.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; NSTX Team,

    2011-01-01

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing Hmode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound dust was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  7. Operating The Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array In An Environment With Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P. M.; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J. C.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2011-12-23

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing H-mode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound 'dust' was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  8. Low-cost dielectric substrate for designing low profile multiband monopole microstrip antenna.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Arshad, H; Mansor, M F

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm(2) radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53-2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47-3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28-7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  9. Low-Cost Dielectric Substrate for Designing Low Profile Multiband Monopole Microstrip Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, M. R.; Islam, M. T.; Habib Ullah, M.; Arshad, H.; Mansor, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm2 radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53–2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47–3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28–7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  10. Low-cost dielectric substrate for designing low profile multiband monopole microstrip antenna.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Arshad, H; Mansor, M F

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm(2) radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53-2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47-3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28-7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively.

  11. A Hybrid Antenna Array Design for 3-D Direction of Arrival Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Saqib, Najam-Us; Khan, Imdad

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D beam scanning antenna array design is proposed that gives a whole 3-D spherical coverage and also suitable for various radar and body-worn devices in the Body Area Networks applications. The Array Factor (AF) of the proposed antenna is derived and its various parameters like directivity, Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) and Side Lobe Level (SLL) are calculated by varying the size of the proposed antenna array. Simulations were carried out in MATLAB 2012b. The radiators are considered isotropic and hence mutual coupling effects are ignored. The proposed array shows a considerable improvement against the existing cylindrical and coaxial cylindrical arrays in terms of 3-D scanning, size, directivity, HPBW and SLL. PMID:25790103

  12. Computer-aided design of reflector antennas - The Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Marco A. B.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) reflector antenna, operating as single- and dual-offset configurations, as well as a general overview of the GBT system. The GBT dual-offset Gregorian configuration is designed for low cross polarization (XPOL) using the dual-offset reflector antenna (DORA) synthesis package code. The procedure implemented in DORA to upgrade an existing main reflector to a low cross-polarized dual-offset Gregorian reflector antenna is also described. All computed patterns were obtained with the parabolic reflector analysis code (PRAC) program, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The GBT radiation patterns and performance values indicate that low XPOL performance can be achieved with a dual-offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is used. The GBT configuration is employed as a case example for the aforementioned procedure.

  13. Design of modified pentagonal patch antenna on defective ground for Wi-Max/WLAN application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Sanyog; Sharma, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and performance of a modified pentagonal patch antenna with defective ground plane. A pentagonal slot is inserted in the pentagonal patch and slot loaded ground through optimized dimensions is used in the antenna to resonate it at dual frequency. The geometry operates at two resonant frequencies (2.5 GHz and 5.58 GHz) and offers impedance bandwidth of 864 MHz and 554 MHz in the two bands of interest. The proposed antenna covers the lower band (2.45 to 2.484/2.495 to 2.695 GHz) and upper band (5.15 to 5.825 GHz/5.25 to 5.85 GHz) allocated for Wi-Max and WLAN communication systems.

  14. A hybrid antenna array design for 3-d direction of arrival estimation.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najam-Us; Khan, Imdad

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D beam scanning antenna array design is proposed that gives a whole 3-D spherical coverage and also suitable for various radar and body-worn devices in the Body Area Networks applications. The Array Factor (AF) of the proposed antenna is derived and its various parameters like directivity, Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) and Side Lobe Level (SLL) are calculated by varying the size of the proposed antenna array. Simulations were carried out in MATLAB 2012b. The radiators are considered isotropic and hence mutual coupling effects are ignored. The proposed array shows a considerable improvement against the existing cylindrical and coaxial cylindrical arrays in terms of 3-D scanning, size, directivity, HPBW and SLL.

  15. Analysis and design of antennas for air traffic collision avoidance systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Cockrell, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    The analysis and design procedure of an antenna for a CW Doppler radar system being developed for pilot warning of midair collision hazards is presented. The antenna consists of two vertical arrays of half-wavelength dipoles mounted near a circular conducting cylinder. Each vertical array is composed of three vertical dipoles. Each array provides relatively uniform illumination (2.3 dB) in the forward 180-deg angular segment of the horizontal plane and approximately plus or minus 10 to 15 deg coverage in the vertical plane. The antenna could be used in a two-mode operation, either in a standard monopulse radar system (sum and difference amplitude patterns) or in a system where amplitude and phase are the measurable quantities.

  16. Wideband On-ground Monostatic Radar Antenna for Water Content Soil Evaluation: Modeling, Design and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Q.; Rejiba, F.; Guérin, R.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of soil's hydraulic properties spatial distribution is important in agricultural practice optimization and hydrological studies. Non-invasive methods of measurement of the dielectric permittivity such as time domain reflectometry (TDR) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) are increasingly used in order to asses soil water content at the field scale. In order to acquire radar data over a wide frequency range, we designed a simple on-ground radar antenna operating on the frequency range 350 MHz - 2GHz. The antenna was designed using a powerful commercial three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic field solver. A prototype of the frequency type radar transmission link was constructed and laboratory measurements were first performed with calibration purpose (the antenna was placed on a 13 cm-thick sand layer of known dielectric permittivity). The antenna is used in monostatic configuration and associated with a vector network analyzer to perform measurements of the antenna-soil reflection coefficients (S11) in the frequency domain. Those measurements are compared to FDTD simulations using the root mean square criterion in order to assess the sand dielectric properties. The use of full-wave FDTD software allows simulation of the whole antenna components, thus all potential influence on the reflection coefficient are recorded. The estimated permittivity with this procedure was close to the real one. In order to test the prototype in real field conditions measurements were performed on a single profile characterized by several agricultural practices (wheat crop, vegetative buffer strip and corn crop). Reflection coefficient (S11) measurements acquired with the prototype are compared to TDR measurements and DC electrical soundings in order to validate the soil apparent dielectric permittivity as well as its apparent electrical conductivity.

  17. Conceptual design studies of the 5 m terahertz antenna for Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji; Zuo, Ying-Xi; Lou, Zheng; Cheng, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Qi-Zhou; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Yao, Qi-Jun; Wang, Zhong

    2013-12-01

    As the highest, coldest and driest place in Antarctica, Dome A provides exceptionally good observing conditions for ground-based observations over terahertz wavebands. The 5 m Dome A Terahertz Explorer (DATE5) has been proposed to explore new terahertz windows, primarily over wavelengths between 350 and 200 μm. DATE5 will be an open-air, fully-steerable telescope that can function by unmanned operation with remote control. The telescope will be able to endure the harsh polar environment, including high altitude, very low temperature and very low air pressure. The unique specifications, including high accuracies for surface shape and pointing and fully automatic year-around remote operation, along with a stringent limit on the periods of on-site assembly, testing and maintenance, bring a number of challenges to the design, construction, assembly and operation of this telescope. This paper introduces general concepts related to the design of the DATE5 antenna. Beginning from an overview of the environmental and operational limitations, the design specifications and requirements of the DATE5 antenna are listed. From these, major aspects on the conceptual design studies, including the antenna optics, the backup structure, the panels, the subreflector, the mounting and the antenna base structure, are explained. Some critical issues of performance are justified through analyses that use computational fluid dynamics, thermal analysis and de-icing studies, and the proposed approaches for test operation and on-site assembly. Based on these studies, we conclude that the specifications of the DATE5 antenna can generally be met by using enhanced technological approaches.

  18. Design considerations for the beam-waveguide retrofit of a ground antenna station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, T.; Withington, J.; Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Bathker, D.

    1986-01-01

    Retrofitting an antenna that was originally designed without a beam waveguide introduces special difficulties because it is desirable to minimize alteration of the original mechanical truss work and to image the actual feed without distortion at the focal point of the dual-shaped reflector. To obtain an acceptable image, certain Geometrical Optics (GO) design criteria are followed as closely as possible. The problems associated with applying these design criteria to a 34-meter dual-shaped DSN (Deep Space Network) antenna are discussed. The use of various diffraction analysis techniques in the design process is also discussed. GTD and FFT algorithms are particularly necessary at the higher frequencies, while Physical Optics and Spherical Wave Expansions proved necessary at the lower frequencies.

  19. Design of On-Chip N-Fold Orbital Angular Momentum Multicasting Using V-Shaped Antenna Array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We design a V-shaped antenna array to realize on-chip multicasting from a single Gaussian beam to four orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams. A pattern search assisted iterative (PSI) algorithm is used to design an optimized continuous phase pattern which is further discretized to generate collinearly superimposed multiple OAM beams. Replacing the designed discrete phase pattern with corresponding V-shaped antennas, on-chip N-fold OAM multicasting is achieved. The designed on-chip 4-fold OAM multicasting exploiting V-shaped antenna array shows favorable operation performance with low crosstalk less than -15 dB. PMID:25951325

  20. The design, development and qualification of a lightweight antenna pointing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmulevitz, M.; Halsband, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development, and qualification of a new lightweight and compact Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM). The APM was specially designed to meet the stringent mass, envelope, and environmental requirements of OFFEQ experimental satellite. During the development phase, some problems were encountered with the brushless DC motors, slip ring contact resistance, and bearing drag torque. All of these problems were resolved, and two APM units have been operating successfully in orbit since April, 1995.

  1. Electromyographic activity of strap and cricothyroid muscles in pitch change.

    PubMed

    Roubeau, B; Chevrie-Muller, C; Lacau Saint Guily, J

    1997-05-01

    The EMG activity of the cricothyroid muscle (CT) and the three extrinsic laryngeal muscles (thyohyoid, TH; sternothyroid, ST, and sternohyoid, SH) were recorded throughout the voice range of one female and one male subject, both untrained singers. The voice range was examined using rising and falling glissandos (production of a sustained sound with progressive and continuous variation of fundamental frequency). Muscle activity was observed at various pitches during the glissandos. The strap muscle activity during the production of glissandos appears to be synergistic. At the lowest frequency, the CT is inactive but strap muscles (TH, ST, SH) are active. As frequency increases, strap muscle activity decreases while the CT controls frequency in the middle of the range. At higher frequencies the strap muscles once again become active. This activity might depend on the vocal vibratory mechanism involved. The role of the strap muscles at high pitches is a widely debated point but it seems that in some way they control the phenomena relevant to the rising pitch. The phasic-type strap muscle activity contrasts with the tonic-type activity of the CT. The CT closely controls the frequency, while the straps are not directly linked to the pitch but rather to the evolution of the frequency of voice production (speaking voice, singing voice, held notes, glissandos, trillo, vibrato, etc.). PMID:9199535

  2. Concept Design of a Multi-Band Shared Aperture Reflectarray/Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Thomas; Cooley, Michael; Stenger, Peter; Park, Richard; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gerald; Mclinden, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A scalable dual-band (KaW) shared-aperture antenna system design has been developed as a proposed solution to meet the needs of the planned NASA Earth Science Aerosol, Clouds, and Ecosystem (ACE) mission. The design is comprised of a compact Cassegrain reflector/reflectarray with a fixed pointing W-band feed and a cross track scanned Ka-band Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA). Critical Sub-scale prototype testing and flight tests have validated some of the key aspects of this innovative antenna design, including the low loss reflector/reflectarray surface.More recently the science community has expressed interest in a mission that offers the ability to measure precipitation in addition to clouds and aerosols. In this paper we present summaries of multiple designs that explore options for realizing a tri-frequency (KuKaW), shared-aperture antenna system to meet these science objectives. Design considerations include meeting performance requirements while emphasizing payload size, weight, prime power, and cost. The extensive trades and lessons learned from our previous dual-band ACE system development were utilized as the foundation for this work.

  3. A Simple Tool for the Design and Analysis of Multiple-reflector Antennas in a Multi-disciplinary Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel, S.; Borgioli, Andrea; Cwik, Tom; Fu, Chuigang; Imbriale, William A.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Springer, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    The process of designing and analyzing a multiple-reflector system has traditionally been time-intensive, requiring large amounts of both computational and human time. At many frequencies, a discrete approximation of the radiation integral may be used to model the system. The code which implements this physical optics (PO) algorithm was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It analyzes systems of antennas in pairs, and for each pair, the analysis can be computationally time-consuming. Additionally, the antennas must be described using a local coordinate system for each antenna, which makes it difficult to integrate the design into a multi-disciplinary framework in which there is traditionally one global coordinate system, even before considering deforming the antenna as prescribed by external structural and/or thermal factors. Finally, setting up the code to correctly analyze all the antenna pairs in the system can take a fair amount of time, and introduces possible human error.

  4. Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms. Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane

  5. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  6. Design of broadband antenna elements for a low-frequency radio telescope using Pareto genetic algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhoff, A.; Ling, H.

    2009-12-01

    We apply Pareto genetic algorithm (GA) optimization to the design of antenna elements for use in the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a large, low-frequency radio telescope currently under development. By manipulating antenna geometry, the Pareto GA simultaneously optimizes the received Galactic background or “sky” noise level and radiation patterns of the antenna over all frequencies. Geometrical constraints are handled explicitly in the GA in order to guarantee the realizability, and to impart control over the monetary cost of the generated designs. The antenna elements considered are broadband planar dipoles arranged horizontally over the ground. It is demonstrated that the Pareto GA approach generates a set of designs, which exhibit a wide range of trade-offs between the two design objectives, and satisfy all constraints. Multiple GA executions are performed to determine how antenna performance trade-offs are affected by different geometrical constraint values, feed impedance values, radiating element shapes and orientations, and ground conditions. Two different planar dipole antenna designs are constructed, and antenna input impedance and sky noise drift scan measurements are performed to validate the results of the GA.

  7. Structural design options for the new 34 meter beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katow, S.; Cucchissi, J. J.; Chuang, K. L.; Levy, R.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.; Menninger, F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to the successful network of 34 m High Efficiency antennas recently built by JPL, the Deep Space Network (DSN) is embarking on the construction of a 34 m high performance, research and development antenna with beam waveguide optics at the Venus site. The construction of this antenna presents many engineering challenges in the area of structural, mechanical, RF, and pointing system design. A set of functional and structural design requirements is outlined to guide analysts in the final configuration selection. Five design concepts are presented covering both the conventional center-fed beam optics as well as the nonconventional, by-pass beam configuration. The merits of each concept are discussed with an emphasis on obtaining a homologous design. The preliminary results of structural optimization efforts, currently in progress, are promising, indicating the feasibility of meeting, as a minimum, all X-band (8.4 GHz) requirements, with a goal towards meeting Ka-band (32 GHz) quality performance, at the present budget constraints.

  8. Lock 6 Detail of hinge stone with iron straps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 6 - Detail of hinge stone with iron straps and carved completion date (1830) located on ground at southeast corner of lock - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  9. Design of the 0.5 - 1 GHz Planar Recycler Pickup and Kicker Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Fermilab

    1999-01-01

    The stochastic cooling system in the Recycler ring at Fermilab required the addition of a 0.5-1 GHz cooling system. This requirement dictated the design of a new antenna for this band of the system. The design problem is defined, method of design is illustrated, and the measurement data are reported. The Recycler is a storage ring comprised of mostly permanent magnets located in the tunnel of the Main Injector at Fermilab. The goal for the construction of the Recycler is to collect and store unused antiprotons from collisions in the Tevatron for use in future collisions in the Tevatron. It will both stochastically and electron cool these unused antiprotons before another collision experiment is possible in the Tevatron. By reusing the antiprotons the luminosity of the experiment can be increased faster. The Recycler will use three bands for its stochastic cooling system. It will reuse the existing designs from the Antiproton Source for the 1-2 GHz and 2-4 GHz systems, and it requires a new design for an additional lower frequency band for the 0.5-1 GHz system. Since the existing designs were fabricated using a microstrip topology it was desired that the new design use a similar topology so that the vacuum tank designs and supporting hardware be identical for all three bands. A primary difference between the design of the pickups/kickers of the Antiproton Source and the Recycler is a different aperture in the machine itself. The Recycler has a bigger aperture and consequently reusing the designs for the existing Antiproton Source pickups/kickers is not electrically optimal but is cost efficient. Measurements will be shown later in this paper for the design of the 0.5-1 GHz system showing the effect of the aperture on the antenna performance. A mockup of the Recycler tank was manufactured for designing and testing the 0.5-1 GHz pickups/kickers. The design procedure was an iterative process and required both a constant dialogue and also a strong relationship with a

  10. Design and Optimization of a Compact Wideband Hat-Fed Reflector Antenna for Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geterud, Erik G.; Yang, Jian; Ostling, Tomas; Bergmark, Pontus

    2013-01-01

    We present a new design of the hat-fed reflector antenna for satellite communications, where a low reflection coefficient, high gain, low sidelobes and low cross-polar level are required over a wide frequency band. The hat feed has been optimized by using the Genetic Algorithm through a commercial FDTD solver, QuickWave-V2D, together with an own developed optimization code. The Gaussian vertex plate has been applied at the center of the reflector in order to improve the reflection coefficient and reduce the far-out sidelobes. A parabolic reflector with a ring-shaped focus has been designed for obtaining nearly 100% phase efficiency. The antenna's reflection coefficient is below -17 dB and the radiation patterns satisfy the M-x standard co- and cross-polar sidelobe envelopes for satellite ground stations over a bandwidth of 30%. A low-cost monolayer radome has been designed for the antenna with satisfactory performance. The simulations have been verified by measurements; both of them are presented in the paper.

  11. Vibration control experiment design for the 15-m hoop/column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, F. M.; Hyland, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    A test program is designed for a ground-based vibration control experiment utilizing as the test article the 15-M Hoop/Column Antenna. Overall objectives of the designed ground-based test program include: (1) the validation of large space structure (LSS) control systemm techniques; (2) the validation of LSS parameter identification techniques: (3) the evaluation of actuator of actuator and sensor placement methodology; and (3) the validation of LSS computer models. Critical concerns in LSS Controls and Dynamics are: low frequency vibrational modes, close modal spacing, parameter uncertainties, controller software limitations, nonlinearities and coupling of modes through damping. Analytical results are presented which include compensator designs for varying compensator order.

  12. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  13. Energy harvesting from a backpack instrumented with piezoelectric shoulder straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Jonathan; Feenstra, Joel; Sodano, Henry A.; Farinholt, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    Over the past few decades the use of portable and wearable electronics has grown steadily. These devices are becoming increasingly more powerful. However, the gains that have been made in the device performance have resulted in the need for significantly higher power to operate the electronics. This issue has been further complicated due to the stagnant growth of battery technology over the past decade. In order to increase the life of these electronics, researchers have begun investigating methods of generating energy from ambient sources such that the life of the electronics can be prolonged. Recent developments in the field have led to the design of a number of mechanisms that can be used to generate electrical energy, from a variety of sources including thermal, solar, strain, inertia, etc. Many of these energy sources are available for use with humans, but their use must be carefully considered such that parasitic effects that could disrupt the user's gait or endurance are avoided. These issues have arisen from previous attempts to integrate power harvesting mechanisms into a shoe such that the energy released during a heal strike could be harvested. This study develops a novel energy harvesting backpack that can generate electrical energy from the differential forces between the wearer and the pack. The goal of this system is to make the energy harvesting device transparent to the wearer such that his or her endurance and dexterity is not compromised. This will be accomplished by replacing the traditional strap of the backpack with one made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Piezoelectric materials have a structure such that an applied electrical potential results in a mechanical strain. Conversely, an applied stress results in the generation of an electrical charge, which makes the material useful for power harvesting applications. PVDF is highly flexible and has a high strength, allowing it to effectively act as the load bearing

  14. Advancements in artificial magnetic conductor design for improved performance and antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Douglas John

    for many different design constraints. A unique application of AMC surfaces will be investigated which demonstrates the equivalence between a high impedance AMC structure and a magnetic substrate backed by a PEC ground plane. This structure is called a metamaterial ferrite, or metaferrite for short. This procedure allows for a means of creating an equivalent structure to a magnetic substrate without using any magnetic materials whatsoever. In fact, the metaferrite can be optimized, much like a conventional AMC, to achieve a desired magnetic permeability for one or more frequencies. The uses for such structures are as lightweight, thin absorbers for electromagnetic radiation. Both conventional, high loss absorbers and low loss magnetic materials can be created via the metaferrite equivalence. Further research into metasurfaces resulted in the ability to design a matched impedance metamaterial to act as a magneto-dielectric substrate without using magnetic materials. The metamaterial is optimized by a GA to obtain an equivalent low-loss dielectric and magnetic constant, as a lossy substrate is not beneficial to antenna performance. The primary application of this magneto-dielectric metastructure reduces the aperture size without negatively impacting antenna operating bandwidth. Since no magnetic materials are used in this metastructure, a thin, lightweight, low-profile antenna system could be developed. Finally, the combination of electromagnetic bandgap AMC surfaces and low-profile antennas will be examined to obtain improved antenna performance over the desired frequency band. The result, when optimized correctly, is an antenna system that achieves improved realized gain compared to the conventional antenna. This increase in performance is directly related to the fact that the antenna is placed above an AMC rather than the conventional PEC ground plane, thus improving the antenna gain and pattern shape.

  15. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1-10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  16. Wide-band antenna design for use in minimal-scan, microwave tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaser, Jacob

    Microwave tomography is widely used in biomedical imaging and nondestructive evaluation of dielectric materials. A novel microwave tomography system that uses an electrically-conformable mirror to steer the incident energy for producing multi-view projection data is being developed in the Non-Destructive Evaluation Laboratory (NDEL). Such a system will have a significant advantage over existing tomography systems in terms of simplicity of design and operation, particularly when there is limited-access of the structure that is being imaged. The major components of a mirror-based tomography system are the source mirror assembly, and a receiver array for capturing the multi-view projection data. This thesis addresses the design and development of the receiver array. This imaging array features balanced, anti-podal Vivaldi antennas, which offer large bandwidth, high gain and a compact size. From the simulations, as well as the experimental results for the antenna, the return loss (S 11) is below -10dB for the range from 2.2GHz to 8.2GHz, and the gain is measured to be near 6dB. The data gathered from the receiver array is then run through MATLAB code for tomographic reconstruction using the Filtered Back-Propagation algorithm from limited-view projections. Initial results of reconstruction from the measured data shows the feasibility of the approach, but a significant challenge remains in interpolating the data for a limited number of receiving antenna elements and removing noise from the reconstructed image.

  17. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1-10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  18. Design of high-gain, wideband antenna using microwave hyperbolic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we apply hyperbolic metasurfaces (HMSs) to design high-gain and wideband antennas. It is shown that HMSs formed by a single layer of split-ring resonators (SRRs) can be excited to generate highly directive beams. In particular, we suggest two types of the SRR-HMS: a capacitively loaded SRR (CLSRR)-HMS and a substrate-backed double SRR (DSRR)-HMS. Both configurations ensure that the periodicity of the structures is sufficiently small for satisfying the effective medium theory. For the antenna design, we propose a two-layer-stacked configuration for the 2.4 GHz frequency band based on the DSRR-HMS excited by a folded monopole. Measurement results confirm numerical simulations and demonstrate that an antenna gain of more than 5 dBi can be obtained for the frequency range of 2.1 - 2.6 GHz, with a maximum gain of 7.8 dBi at 2.4 GHz.

  19. Validation of space/ground antenna control algorithms using a computer-aided design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1995-01-01

    The validation of the algorithms for controlling the space-to-ground antenna subsystem for Space Station Alpha is an important step in assuring reliable communications. These algorithms have been developed and tested using a simulation environment based on a computer-aided design tool that can provide a time-based execution framework with variable environmental parameters. Our work this summer has involved the exploration of this environment and the documentation of the procedures used to validate these algorithms. We have installed a variety of tools in a laboratory of the Tracking and Communications division for reproducing the simulation experiments carried out on these algorithms to verify that they do meet their requirements for controlling the antenna systems. In this report, we describe the processes used in these simulations and our work in validating the tests used.

  20. Novel Dual-band Slot Antenna Design for Bluetooth and UWB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Shao, Wei; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Ma, Xiao-Liang

    2014-05-01

    A novel technique to introduce an additional low frequency band to compact ultra wideband (UWB) slot antennas is proposed in this paper. To get an additional Bluetooth band, a parasitic strip is mounted on the back side of the slot edge. Because of the interaction of the strip and the slot edge, the Bluetooth band can be obtained while a notch band between the Bluetooth band and UWB band also appears. Two types of feeding, coplanar waveguide and microstrip line, are investigated. The proposed antennas are both fabricated on a low-cost FR4 substrate and have compact size (24 mm × 28 mm × 1 mm). The good agreement between measured and simulated results verifies our design.

  1. Front-end antenna system design for the ITER low-field-side reflectometer system using GENRAY ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    A monostatic antenna array arrangement has been designed for the microwave front-end of the ITER low-field-side reflectometer (LFSR) system. This paper presents details of the antenna coupling coefficient analyses performed using GENRAY, a 3-D ray tracing code, to evaluate the plasma height accommodation capability of such an antenna array design. Utilizing modeled data for the plasma equilibrium and profiles for the ITER baseline and half-field scenarios, a design study was performed for measurement locations varying from the plasma edge to inside the top of the pedestal. A front-end antenna configuration is recommended for the ITER LFSR system based on the results of this coupling analysis.

  2. Development of a 14-vane, double-strapped, 5.8-GHz magnetron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Joo; Lee, Han Seoul; Jang, Kwang Ho; Sim, Sung Hun; Choi, Heung Sik

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on a 14-vane, double-strapped magnetron oscillator were performed to demonstrate high-power, high-efficiency coherent radiation at 5.8 GHz. The double-strapped magnetron was designed by using the Buneman-Hatree resonance condition, electromagnetic simulations and non-linear three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Experiments showed an oscillation output power of 5.3 kW at 5.79 GHz, corresponding to a DC-RF conversion efficiency of 57%. The cathode voltage was 9.2 kV, the collected anode current was 1 A, and the external magnetic field is 7.5 kG. Experimental results for the RF power, oscillation frequency, and efficiency were in good agreement with the corresponding values from non-linear three-dimensional PIC simulations.

  3. A graph-theory approach to designing deployable mechanism of reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an exhaustive search method for designing new deployable mechanisms of reflector antennas. The procedure is based on the graph theory and a flow value method. The mechanism is composed of links and joints. Connections between links are represented by using the graph theory. Rules representing design criteria and the flow value method based on load flow are taken into account to evaluate and select mechanisms among those that are enumerated in the database. Finally, this study presents a deployable mechanism that transmits load the most efficiently.

  4. Design of a Class of Antennas Utilizing MEMS, EBG and Septum Polarizers including Near-field Coupling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilkyu

    Recent developments in mobile communications have led to an increased appearance of short-range communications and high data-rate signal transmission. New technologies provides the need for an accurate near-field coupling analysis and novel antenna designs. An ability to effectively estimate the coupling within the near-field region is required to realize short-range communications. Currently, two common techniques that are applicable to the near-field coupling problem are 1) integral form of coupling formula and 2) generalized Friis formula. These formulas are investigated with an emphasis on straightforward calculation and accuracy for various distances between the two antennas. The coupling formulas are computed for a variety of antennas, and several antenna configurations are evaluated through full-wave simulation and indoor measurement in order to validate these techniques. In addition, this research aims to design multi-functional and high performance antennas based on MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) switches, EBG (Electromagnetic Bandgap) structures, and septum polarizers. A MEMS switch is incorporated into a slot loaded patch antenna to attain frequency reconfigurability. The resonant frequency of the patch antenna can be shifted using the MEM switch, which is actuated by the integrated bias networks. Furthermore, a high gain base-station antenna utilizing beam-tilting is designed to maximize gain for tilted beam applications. To realize this base-station antenna, an array of four dipole-EBG elements is constructed to implement a fixed down-tilt main beam with application in base station arrays. An improvement of the operating range with the EBG-dipole array is evaluated using a simple linkbudget analysis. The septum polarizer has been widely used in circularly polarized antenna systems due to its simple and compact design and high quality of circularity. In this research, the sigmoid function is used to smoothen the edge in the septum design, which

  5. Analysis and Design of Multiple-Antenna Cognitive Radios With Multiple Primary User Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Jimenez, David; Louie, Raymond H. Y.; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We consider multiple-antenna signal detection of primary user transmission signals by a secondary user receiver in cognitive radio networks. The optimal detector is analyzed for the scenario where the number of primary user signals is no less than the number of receive antennas at the secondary user. We first derive exact expressions for the moments of the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) statistic, yielding approximations for the false alarm and detection probabilities. We then show that the normalized GLRT statistic converges in distribution to a Gaussian random variable when the number of antennas and observations grow large at the same rate. Further, using results from large random matrix theory, we derive expressions to compute the detection probability without explicit knowledge of the channel, and then particularize these expressions for two scenarios of practical interest: 1) a single primary user sending spatially multiplexed signals, and 2) multiple spatially distributed primary users. Our analytical results are finally used to obtain simple design rules for the signal detection threshold.

  6. Antenna design for fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostic for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Leipold, F; Furtula, V; Salewski, M; Bindslev, H; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Moseev, D; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M

    2009-09-01

    Fast ion physics will play an important role for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where confined alpha particles will affect and be affected by plasma dynamics and thereby have impacts on the overall confinement. A fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic using gyrotrons operated at 60 GHz will meet the requirements for spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the velocity distributions of confined fast alphas in ITER by evaluating the scattered radiation (CTS signal). While a receiver antenna on the low field side of the tokamak, resolving near perpendicular (to the magnetic field) velocity components, has been enabled, an additional antenna on the high field side (HFS) would enable measurements of near parallel (to the magnetic field) velocity components. A compact design solution for the proposed mirror system on the HFS is presented. The HFS CTS antenna is located behind the blankets and views the plasma through the gap between two blanket modules. The viewing gap has been modified to dimensions 30x500 mm(2) to optimize the CTS signal. A 1:1 mock-up of the HFS mirror system was built. Measurements of the beam characteristics for millimeter-waves at 60 GHz used in the mock-up agree well with the modeling.

  7. A comparison of reflector antenna designs for wide-angle scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Acosta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional reflector antennas are typically designed for up to + or - 20 beamwidths scan. An attempt was made to stretch this scan range to some + or - 300 beamwidths. Six single and dual reflector antennas were compared. It is found that a symmetrical parabolic reflector with f/D = 2 and a single circular waveguide feed has the minimum scan loss (only 0.6 dB at Theta sub 0 = 8 deg, or a 114 beamwidths scan). The scan is achieved by tilting the parabolic reflector by an angle equal to the half-scan angle. The f/D may be shortened if a cluster 7 to 19 elements instead of one element is used for the feed. The cluster excitation is adjusted for each new beam scan direction to compensate for the imperfect field distribution over the reflector aperture. The antenna can be folded into a Cassegrain configuration except that, due to spillover and blockage considerations, the amount of folding achievable is small.

  8. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  9. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  10. Thermal Resistance Measurements for Flexible Straps at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, G. F.; Lachner, B. F.; Lokken, O. D.; Stahl, B. L.; Crawford, L. D.

    2004-06-01

    An experimental test facility is described that is capable of accurately measuring the total thermal resistance of a flexible strap and decomposing this total resistance into components that correspond to heat transfer through each bolted interface and heat transfer by conduction through the strap. The experimental procedure, data reduction technique, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measurements are described. The thermal resistance values of conductive straps fabricated by joining many, thin copper laminations were measured. A test matrix was used to investigate several potentially important factors, including: total strap thickness, individual foil thickness, metal foil alloy, interface clamping force, interface surface finish, and the presence of indium foil in the interface. Each test was run at nominal temperatures of 35 K, 60 K, 77 K, and 110 K. The results of the testing indicate that the two most important factors that determine the thermal resistance of the flexible strap are its thickness and the presence of indium in the interface. Clamping force and surface finish are also found to be important, although less so when indium is used in the interface.

  11. Effects of different strapping field profiles on plasma loop expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao Nguyen Quoc; Bellan, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The hoop force causes arched, current-carrying plasma loops to expand unless additional forces are applied. This expansion was slowed and even inhibited by a magnetic field of proper polarity in previous solar coronal loop experiments [1] but there was no attempt to characterize the strapping field's spatial profile. We have reproduced the Hansen results by mounting the coils producing the strapping field on two ports of the vacuum chamber. We plan to enhance the setup by mounting coils on 3 axis adjustable stands that provide precision placement of the coil relative to the plasma. This precise placement allows us to adjust the altitude decay profile of the strapping field which is predicted to determine the slow rise to fast eruption behavior of plasma loops on the sun [2]. Preliminary data on the interaction between the plasma and specified strapping field profiles will be presented. We have also developed 3-axis Hall sensors capable of generating vector maps of the strapping field. [4pt] [1] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J. Lett. 563, L183 (2001)[0pt] [2] B. Kliem and T. Torok, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 255002 (2006)

  12. Radio Frequency Optics Design of the 12-Meter Antenna for the Array-Based Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    2005-02-01

    Development of very large arrays of small antennas has been proposed as a way to increase the downlink capability of the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) by two or three orders of magnitude, thereby enabling greatly increased science data from currently configured missions or enabling new mission concepts. The current concept is for an array of 400 x 12-meter antennas at each of three longitudes. The DSN array will utilize radio astronomy sources for phase calibration and will have wide bandwidth correlation processing for this purpose. JPL currently is building a 3-element interferometer composed of 6-meter antennas to prove the performance and cost of the DSN array. This article describes the radio frequency (RF) design of the 12-meter reflector that will use the same feed and electronics as the 6-meter antenna. The 6-meter antenna utilized Gregorian optics to enable tests with a low-frequency prime focus feed without removing the subreflector. However, for the 12-meter antenna, maximum gain divided by noise temperature (G/T) is the overriding requirement, and a trade-off study demonstrated that Cassegrain optics is far superior to Gregorian optics for maximum G/T. Hence, the 12-meter antenna utilizes Cassegrain optics.

  13. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Ö.; Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Luijten, P. R.; van den Berg, C. A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (⩾7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B+1, local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B+1 and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR10g avg/(B+1)2 ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable.

  14. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip.

    PubMed

    Ipek, O; Raaijmakers, A J E; Klomp, D W J; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2012-01-21

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (≥7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B(+)(1), local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B(+)(1) and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR(10g avg)/(B(+)(1))(2) ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable. PMID:22170777

  15. Design and optimization of an ultra-wideband and compact microwave antenna for radiometric monitoring of brain temperature

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Snow, Brent W.; Reudink, Doug; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design and frequency selection to monitor brain temperature during prolonged surgery using non-invasive microwave radiometry. A tapered log-spiral antenna design is chosen for its wideband characteristics that allow higher power collection from deep brain. Parametric analysis with HFSS is used to optimize antenna performance for deep brain temperature sensing. Radiometric antenna efficiency (η) is evaluated in terms of the ratio of power collected from brain to total power received by the antenna. Anatomical information extracted from several adult computed tomography (CT) scans is used to establish design parameters for constructing an accurate layered 3D tissue phantom. This head phantom includes separate brain and scalp regions, with tissue equivalent liquids circulating at independent temperatures on either side of an intact skull. The optimized frequency band is 1.1–1.6 GHz producing an average antenna efficiency of 50.3% from a 2 turn log-spiral antenna. The entire sensor package is contained in a lightweight and low profile 2.8 cm diameter by 1.5 cm high assembly that can be held in place over the skin with an electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding adhesive patch. The calculated radiometric equivalent brain temperature tracks within 0.4°C of measured brain phantom temperature when the brain phantom is lowered 10°C and then returned to original temperature (37°C) over a 4.6-hour experiment. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the optimized 2.5 cm log-spiral antenna is well suited for the non-invasive radiometric sensing of deep brain temperature. PMID:24759979

  16. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher R.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes the implementation of a 6x6 element, dual linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from about 8-40 GHz. It is implemented using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process. The beamformer includes baluns that feed dual-polarized differential antenna elements and reactive splitters that cover the full frequency range of operation. This fixed beam array (FBA) serves as the feed for a multi-band instrument designed to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from an airborne platform known as the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM).

  17. An antenna for limited scan in one plane - Design criteria and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgiotti, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    Aperture illumination is synthesized through the use of overlapping subarrays with independently controlled excitations. Detailed analysis and design criteria are provided for a specific limited-scan antenna configuration scanning in one plane. The number of phase shifts is the theoretical minimum corresponding to specified aperture size and field of view. Beam pointing and width are approximately constant for moderate frequency variation, and ultralow sidelobes outside the field of view can be produced at the cost of a slight loss of illumination efficiency. Accurate aperture illumination control makes for excellent independently specified sum and difference patterns in beamforming.

  18. Design and Performance of the Monopulse Pointing System of the DSN 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudim, M. A.; Gawronski, W.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, P. R.; Strain, D. M.

    1999-04-01

    This article describes the design, analysis, and performance prediction of a monopulse pointing system in a 34-m beam-waveguide antenna of the Deep Space Network (DSN). While the basic concept of monopulse pointing is not new, its application in the DSN is novel in two ways: first, the large antenna structure made necessary by the extremely weak signal environment; and second, the use of the single monopulse feed at 31.8 to 32.3 GHz (Ka-band) frequencies. The conventional aircraft radar application has a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with a fast, hostile tracking scenario. The DSN application requires precise antenna pointing to minimize pointing loss, maximize amplitude stability, and track very low-SNR signals from a very distant spacecraft with a well-predicted trajectory. The combination of the large antenna size, the low SNR, and the precise pointing requirements makes the monopulse implementation in the DSN a challenging task.

  19. STRAP regulates c-Jun ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Jennifer; Ye, Fei; Kashikar, Nilesh D.; Datta, Pran K.

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} STRAP is specifically correlated with c-Jun expression and activation in fibroblasts. {yields} STRAP inhibits c-Jun ubiquitylation in vivo and prolongs the half-life of c-Jun. {yields} STRAP expression increases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, and promotes cell autonomous growth. -- Abstract: STRAP is a ubiquitous WD40 protein that has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Previous studies suggest that STRAP imparts oncogenic characteristics to cells by promoting ERK and pRb phosphorylation. While these findings suggest that STRAP can activate mitogenic signaling pathways, the effects of STRAP on other MAPK pathways have not been investigated. Herein, we report that STRAP regulates the expression of the c-Jun proto-oncogene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of STRAP expression results in reduced phospho-c-Jun and total c-Jun but does not significantly reduce the level of two other early response genes, c-Myc and c-Fos. STRAP knockout also decreases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, which is accompanied by a reduction in cell growth. No significant differences in JNK activity or basal c-Jun mRNA levels were observed between wild type and STRAP null fibroblasts. However, proteasomal inhibition markedly increases c-Jun expression in STRAP knockout MEFs and STRAP over-expression decreases the ubiquitylation of c-Jun in 293T cells. Loss of STRAP accelerates c-Jun turnover in fibroblasts and ectopic over-expression of STRAP in STRAP null fibroblasts increases c-Jun expression. Collectively, our findings indicate that STRAP regulates c-Jun stability by decreasing the ubiquitylation and proteosomal degradation of c-Jun.

  20. Architectural design of a ground-based deep-space optical reception antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    An architectural design of a ground-based antenna (telescope) for receiving optical communications from deep space is presented. Physical and optical parameters, and their effect on the performance and cost considerations, are described. The channel capacity of the antenna is 100 kbits/s from Saturn and 5 Mbits/s from Mars. A novel sunshade is designed to permit optical communication even when the deep-space laser source is as close to the sun as 12 deg. Inserts in the tubes of the sunshade permit operations at solar elongations as small as 6 or 3 deg. The Nd:YAG source laser and the Fraunhofer filter (a narrow-band predetection optical filter) are tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. A typical Saturn-to-earth data link can reduce its source power requirement from 8.2 W to 2 W of laser output by employing a Fraunhofer filter instead of a conventional multilayer dielectric filter.

  1. Printed Wide-Slot Antenna Design with Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement on Low-Cost Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Samsuzzaman, M.; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  2. Printed wide-slot antenna design with bandwidth and gain enhancement on low-cost substrate.

    PubMed

    Samsuzzaman, M; Islam, M T; Mandeep, J S; Misran, N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  3. On the cross-polarization characteristics of crooked wire antennas designed by genetic-algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, S. R.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In many modern communication applications there is a need for simple circularly polarized antennas for hemispherical coverage with good axial ratio or low value of cross polarization. We revisited the crooked wire antenna because of its simplicity. This paper presents results of our investigation on the crooked wire antennas and other elements.

  4. Application of the moment method to the design of slotted waveguide array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, A. H. I.

    1988-12-01

    Slotted waveguide array antennas, which are widely used in radar systems, are becoming increasingly more amenable to computer aided design/synthesis procedures, since the scattering characteristics of a slot in a waveguide can be predicted to a high degree of accuracy. An improved theoretical CAD package is presented to design arrays of this type. It differs from earlier such packages in that the reliance on measured data was avoided with a theoretical technique termed the moment method being used to provide the self admittance data for the slots. The efficient implementation of this package and in particular the incorporation of the moment method into it was aided considerably by using this method to make a prior study of nature of certain critical slot characteristics. Most of the more significant waveguide slot relationships were discussed in literature in one form or another except for those relating to slot width. A study employing the moment method was performed to eliminate this oversight and the functional relationship between this parameter and the slot resonance was determined. The moment method solution was also extended to permit the examination of round end slots, which are commonly used in practice, by developing a novel axis sectioning procedure. The evolution of the computer aided array design package is described in detail. The package was subsequently employed to design array examples, one of which was constructed. The experimental and theoretical results for this antenna were presented to demonstrate the plausibility of this technique. Some less conventional array configurations were also synthesized to demonstrate design flexibility.

  5. 15. DETAIL OF IRON STRAP AT JUNCTURE OF CENTRAL ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF IRON STRAP AT JUNCTURE OF CENTRAL ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS LOWER CHORD AND INCLINED END POST. BOLTING FOR LAMINATED WOODED TRUSS ELEMENTS ALSO VISIBLE. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, NY

  6. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.; Mitteau, R.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bosia, G.; Gunn, J.P.

    2005-09-26

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20sx8MW and 60sx4MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved : convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed.

  7. Design of a 4-element Antenna Array for BDS Anti-jamming Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianxing; Shi, Hongyu; Li, Hang; Zhang, Anxue

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a compact 4-element antenna array with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm is proposed for BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) anti-jamming applications. The proposed antenna array comprises of four identical microstrip right-handed circularly polarized (RHCP) antenna elements. The four microstrip antenna elements are placed in the same polarity with a distance of 80 mm between adjacent elements. The antenna element which employs dual probe-fed structure has a relatively small volume of 45 mm × 45 mm × 5 mm. The antenna array has been fabricated and measured. The experimental results show that the proposed antenna array is quite suitable for BDS anti-jamming application.

  8. Design of a radar system based on compact cavity-backed ultra wide band slot antennas for ground penetrating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, F.

    2012-04-01

    Antennas with broadband characteristics have recently found various applications in modern ultra wide band (UWB) communication systems and in ground penetrating radar (GPR). Our applications are focused on imaging the subsurface of a large range of civil engineering structures at several depths using a bistatic GPR positioned on or close to the ground surface. The development of a compact (34*29 cm2) broadband pair of antennas operating in the frequency band from 0.27 to 3.1 GHz, whose radiation characteristics have been preliminary studied theoretically in details in different configurations, is to allow the probing of the subsurface in several frequency sub-bands using a step frequency (SF-GPR) acquisition mode. Microstrip patch antennas (MPAs) are one of the most basic and important types of planar antennas because they offer many advantages such as compact size, low-cost, ease of fabrication, light weight, and various shapes design. However, a low bandwidth and a low gain are the main shortcomings for such planar structure. The microstrip antenna has now reached maturity and many techniques have been suggested for achieving a high bandwidth such as using more complex shapes, parasitic elements, multilayer configurations and the tuning of the feed line. In this paper, an original printed rectangular slot antenna fed by a 50 Ohms CPW (coplanar waveguide) transmission line tuned by a E-shaped patch is presented. Presently, little work has been made to lower the operating frequency band of microstrip antennas at frequencies less than 0.8 MHz and to reduce the antenna size at these frequencies because major applications concern UWB wireless communications. By choosing a relative combination of a E-shaped patch, a linear feed line and a rectangular slot, we have designed an antenna structure on a FR4 substrate (h=1.5mm) with a very wide operating bandwidth whose nearly half of the spectrum covers frequencies lower than 1 GHz. A partial shield, only opened towards the

  9. Design and Realization of a Planar Ultrawideband Antenna with Notch Band at 3.5 GHz

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31–3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band. PMID:25133245

  10. A Simple Tool for the Design and Analysis of Multiple-Reflector Antennas in a Multi-Disciplinary Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel S.; Cwik, Tom; Fu, Chuigang; Imbriale, William A.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Springer, Paul L.; Borgioli, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    The process of designing and analyzing a multiple-reflector system has traditionally been time-intensive, requiring large amounts of both computational and human time. At many frequencies, a discrete approximation of the radiation integral may be used to model the system. The code which implements this physical optics (PO) algorithm was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It analyzes systems of antennas in pairs, and for each pair, the analysis can be computationally time-consuming. Additionally, the antennas must be described using a local coordinate system for each antenna, which makes it difficult to integrate the design into a multi-disciplinary framework in which there is traditionally one global coordinate system, even before considering deforming the antenna as prescribed by external structural and/or thermal factors. Finally, setting up the code to correctly analyze all the antenna pairs in the system can take a fair amount of time, and introduces possible human error. The use of parallel computing to reduce the computational time required for the analysis of a given pair of antennas has been previously discussed. This paper focuses on the other problems mentioned above. It will present a methodology and examples of use of an automated tool that performs the analysis of a complete multiple-reflector system in an integrated multi-disciplinary environment (including CAD modeling, and structural and thermal analysis) at the click of a button. This tool, named MOD Tool (Millimeter-wave Optics Design Tool), has been designed and implemented as a distributed tool, with a client that runs almost identically on Unix, Mac, and Windows platforms, and a server that runs primarily on a Unix workstation and can interact with parallel supercomputers with simple instruction from the user interacting with the client.

  11. Optical antenna gain. I - Transmitting antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The gain of centrally obscured optical transmitting antennas is analyzed in detail. The calculations, resulting in near- and far-field antenna gain patterns, assume a circular antenna illuminated by a laser operating in the TEM-00 mode. A simple polynomial equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn that display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the beam in the far field as a function of antenna aperture size and its central obscuration. The results are presented in a series of graphs that allow the rapid and accurate evaluation of the antenna gain which may then be substituted into the conventional range equation.

  12. Joint Time/Frequency Analysis and Design of Spiral Antennas and Arrays for Ultra-Wideband Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmansouri, Mohamed Ali

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) systems transmit and receive extremely short pulses, permitting the corresponding antennas to distort their shape. Thus the design of an antenna for a UWB system plays an important role for the reliability and quality of communication. A UWB antenna design coalesces both the determination of conventional frequency domain parameters and the analysis of time domain response into a single overarching system requirement. While the former is needed to ensure system's sensitivity, the later is critical to minimize pulse distortion. Well-designed spiral antennas are known for their almost frequency independent characteristics; thus they are viable candidates for UWB systems from the frequency-domain side. However, due to their fundamental principles of operation, they are dispersive and arguments were made they should not be used for pulsed UWB applications (time-domain side). The presented research unequivocally proves that spiral antennas and various derivatives thereof, including arrays, can be excellent candidates for multi-functional time/frequency domain systems. A complete framework for joint frequency and time domain characterization of planar spiral antennas in UWB communication systems is developed first. By utilizing theory, simulations, and experiments, all essential to the analysis frameworks, the various hypotheses are comprehensively treated and relevant conclusions are established. The dispersion and pulse distortion of the conventional spiral antennas are characterized in the radiation and system modes and conclusions regarding the effects of geometrical parameters such as number of arms, mode of operations, etc., on time- and frequency-domain performance are derived for the first time. A method based on controlling the spiral's growth rate and input pulse shape is demonstrated as an effective approach to reduce the pulse distortion. Theoretical pre-distortion compensation method based on a frequency-dependent delay removal technique

  13. Special features of the CLUSTER antenna and radial booms design, development and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianfiglio, G.; Yorck, M.; Luhmann, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    CLUSTER is a scientific space mission to in-situ investigate the Earth's plasma environment by means of four identical spin-stabilized spacecraft. Each spacecraft is provided with a set of four rigid booms: two Antenna Booms and two Radial Booms. This paper presents a summary of the boom development and verification phases addressing the key aspects of the Radial Boom design. In particular, it concentrates on the difficulties encountered in fulfilling simultaneously the requirements of minimum torque ratio and maximum allowed shock loads at boom latching for this two degree of freedom boom. The paper also provides an overview of the analysis campaign and testing program performed to achieve sufficient confidence in the boom performance and operation.

  14. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of land surface snow remains a significant challenge in the remote sensing arena. Developing the tools needed to remotely measure Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is an important priority. The Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM) is being developed to address this need. WISM is an airborne instrument comprised of a dual-frequency (X- and Ku-bands) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and dual-frequency (K- and Ka-bands) radiometer. A unique feature of this instrument is that all measurement bands share a common antenna aperture consisting of an array feed reflector that covers the entire bandwidth. This paper covers the design and fabrication of the wideband array feed which is based on tightly coupled dipole arrays. Implementation using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process results in a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from 8 to 40 gigahertz.

  15. Design of smoothed multi-flared antenna for multi-frequency reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Thawait, Prateek

    2016-07-01

    The direct radiance data assimilation is found to be advantageous for the numerical weather prediction over short and medium range. Therefore reception of satellite radiance in real time is important. Satellite earth station is the preferred choice for direct reception of this data, which is voluminous. High Rate Information being transmitted from these satellites operating in L, S, C and X bands needs to be received. A commercial wide band antenna is not preferred for such application, as it operates uniformly over the entire frequency range in these bands and may create interference over the unwanted frequencies. As the frequencies of interest occupy only a small portion of these bands, it is essential to design a horn antenna, which receives only specified frequencies and filter other frequencies. In this work, we have designed a multi-flare multi-frequency cylindrical horn antenna for reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites. This earth station antenna tracks selected satellites working over specified frequency ranges, which are 1.694-1.703 GHz, 2.0-2.06 GHz, 4.5-4.6 GHz and 7.8-7.9 GHz in L, S, C and X bands respectively. Cylindrical waveguides for the frequencies, 1.6, 2, 4.5 and 8 GHz are designed and they are joined in the increasing order of radius with suitable conical shapes. The slope of the cones is adjusted experimentally. With this design, the return loss is simulated and found to be better than 20 dB upto 4.5 GHz and later it became poor. To overcome this difficulty, the abrupt transitions at the joints of the conical and cylindrical waveguides are made smoothen by increasing the diameter of one mouth of the cylinder and reducing the other mouth to match with the cylinders corresponding to next higher and lower frequency respectively. As a result, a smooth flared antenna is obtained and the simulated results are satisfactory. A parabolic reflector of 4 m diameter is designed and the smooth multi-flared antenna is kept at the

  16. Novel Antenna Coupler Design for Production of Meter-Scale High-Density Planar Surface Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishijima, Tatsuo; Nojiri, Yasunori; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sugai, Hideo

    2010-08-01

    A vacuum-sealed antenna coupler was newly developed for excitation of meter-scale high-density surface wave plasma for manufacturing giant microelectronics devices such as liquid crystal displays and thin-film solar cells. To produce large-area uniform plasma, various multislot antenna designs at 2.45 GHz were investigated by slot antenna analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Optical emission images of the plasma observed using a wide-angle charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and Langmuir probe measurements revealed the production of a very uniform and high-density plasma of 1 m length and 0.3 m width whose dimensions can easily be expanded to a much larger scale. Furthermore, the production of a large-area sheetlike plasma of 2 cm thickness and 1 m length has been demonstrated to reduce the discharge power, heat load, gas consumption, and pumping load.

  17. Relay-and-antenna selection and digital transceiver design for two-way AF-MIMO multiple-relay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Chang; Su, Hao-Hsian; Tang, Kang-Tsao

    2014-09-01

    This paper considers a two-way multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) relaying system with multiple relays between two terminals nodes. The relay antenna selection scheme based on channel singular valued decomposition (SVD) is used to reduce energy consumption. To enhance the system performance, we apply a SVD-based algorithm with MSE criterion which calculates optimal linear transceivers precoding jointly at the source nodes and relay nodes for amplify-and-forward (AF) protocols. In computer simulations, we use an iteration method to compute the non-convex function of joint source and relays power allocation. The simulation results show the SVD-based precoding design with SVD-based relay and antenna selection scheme can achieve a superior system bit error rate (BER) performance and reduce the power consume of relay antennas.

  18. Analysis and design of terahertz antennas based on plasmonic resonant graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tamagnone, M.; Gomez-Diaz, J. S.; Perruisseau-Carrier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Resonant graphene antennas used as true interfaces between terahertz (THz) space waves and a source/detector are presented. It is shown that in addition to the high miniaturization related to the plasmonic nature of the resonance, graphene-based THz antenna favorably compare with typical metal implementations in terms of return loss and radiation efficiency. Graphene antennas will contribute to the development of miniature, efficient, and potentially transparent all-graphene THz transceivers for emerging communication and sensing application.

  19. Microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. Q.

    1973-01-01

    It is possible to design and construct simple, efficient microwave antenna, either linearly or circularly polarized, which should be useful in phased arrays. Mounted on thin dielectric substrate, it extends slightly above ground plane. Space behind ground plane is required for feed line and mounting hardware.

  20. Design and fabrication of a large airborne phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William P.; Harris, Joseph M.; Jameson, Calvin R.

    1989-01-01

    A large phased-array antenna has been developed and mounted for missile test range trials on the Dash 8 aircraft, with a view to eventual installation on the E-9A Airborne Platform. The antenna is a one-dimensional scan, multiple-channel phased array of 30-ft length and 30-in height. This polarization-insensitive antenna operates in the 2.2-2.4 range, and uses modular parts to improve reliability and reduce maintenance time; being electronically steerable, the phased-array antenna is able to simultaneously receive five independent telemetry signals within its field-of-view.

  1. Design of long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bills, K. C.; Fogelman, C. H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ping, J. L.; Riemer, B. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. C.; Taylor, D. J.; Yugo, J. J.

    1994-10-01

    Two new long-pulse fast wave current drive (FWCD) antennas will be installed on DIII-D in early 1994. These antennas will increase the available FWCD power from 2 MW to 6 MW for pulse lengths of up to 2 s, and to 4 MW for up to 10 s. Power for the new antennas is from two ASDEX-type 30- to 120-MHz transmitters. When operated at 90° phasing into a low-density plasma (˜4×1019m-3) with hot electrons (˜10 keV), these two new antennas are predicted to drive approximately 1 MA of plasma current.

  2. Hyperband Bi-Conical Antenna Design Using 3D Printing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambeloson, J. A.; Wiid, P. G.

    2016-03-01

    We combined a 3D printing technique with conductive paint for an antenna manufacturing methodology. The performance of the approach is evaluated through a 3D- printed and coated bi-cone antenna. The antenna far-field pattern and efficiency are measured using near-field spherical scan and reverberation chamber techniques. Good agreement is seen between measurements and simulations and an impedance bandwidth of at least 34:1 is achieved. An extruded bi-conical antenna geometry is also studied for bandwidth extension to lower frequency and an impedance bandwidth of 58:1 is realised.

  3. Lightning tests and analyses of tunnel bond straps and shielded cables on the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druen, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of the tests and analyses described in this report are as follows: (1) determine the lightning current survivability of five alternative changed designs of the bond straps which electrically bond the solid rocket booster (SRB) systems tunnel to the solid rocket motor (SRM) case; (2) determine the amount of reduction in induced voltages on operational flight (OF) tunnel cables obtained by a modified design of tunnel bond straps (both tunnel cover-to-cover and cover-to-motor case); (3) determine the contribution of coupling to the OF tunnel cables by ground electrical and instrumentation (GEI) cables which enter the systems tunnel from unshielded areas on the surfaces of the motor case; and (4) develop a model (based on test data) and calculate the voltage levels at electronic 'black boxes' connected to the OF cables that run in the systems tunnel.

  4. Real-time strap pressure sensor system for powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Cobian-Ugalde, Rebeca; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Soto, Rogelio; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2015-02-16

    Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life.

  5. Real-Time Strap Pressure Sensor System for Powered Exoskeletons

    PubMed Central

    Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Cobian-Ugalde, Rebeca; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Soto, Rogelio; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life. PMID:25690551

  6. Real-time strap pressure sensor system for powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Cobian-Ugalde, Rebeca; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Soto, Rogelio; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life. PMID:25690551

  7. Design study of a miniaturized multi-layered metamaterial-inspired dynamically tunable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Joshua C.

    A multi-layered metamaterial inspired minaturized antenna with a pixel grid loading structure is introduced in this work. The antenna consists of two layers separated by a thin dielectric substrate. The first layer contains a folded monopole antenna surrounded by a metal pixel based loading structure, while the second layer is envisioned to consist of a photo conductive pixel grid utilized to tune the antenna. The state of each pixel is controlled by a binary genetic algorithm, which is implemented with a Matlab-HFSS interface. As a proof of concept, the pixel grid on the second layer is initially made of a metal conductor. HFSS simulations show that the second layer has a wide tuning ability with the appropriate state formed through optimization. A wide range of other conductivities are also shown to provide pixel combinations that meet the required antenna characteristics. The radiation efficiency of the antenna with the second layer is also examined and optimized, and the theoretical tuning range is investigated. The fabrication of multiple antenna configurations with the pixels made of a metal conductor are explored. Thin PET films are first investigated to be used as simple loading elements that can be placed directly on the antenna. However, the airgap and misalignment between the layers caused by this method is shown to be too large to overcome. A novel multi layer fabrication technique is then investigated which uses a SU-8 photoresist as the dielectric layer. This layer can be spun directly onto the antenna, essentially eliminating any airgap problems. The alignment with this process is also much better than the previews method. Multiple antenna configurations corresponding to a wide frequency range are constructed using this fabrication method. The measured reflection coefficients and radiation patterns are shown to be in good agreement with HFSS simulations, successfully demonstrating the ability to dramatically tune the antenna with a second pixel grid.

  8. The Enhanced Performance Launcher Design For The ITER Upper Port ECH Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M. A.; Chavan, R.; Bertizzolo, R.; Duron, J.; Landis, J.-D.; Sauter, O.; Sanchez, F.; Shidara, H.; Udintsev, V. S.; Zucca, C.; Bruschi, A.; Criant, S.; Farina, D.; Ramponi, G.; Heidinger, R.; Poli, E.; Zohm, H.; Saibene, G.

    2007-09-28

    The ITER ECH heating and current drive system delivers 24 MW (170 GHz), which can be directed to either the equatorial (EL) or upper (UL) port launching antennas depending on the desired physics application. The UL design uses two front steering (FS) mirrors that sweep eight beams in a poloidal plane providing co-ECCD over the outer half of the plasma cross section. A novel frictionless, backlash-free steering mechanism has been developed for an increased reliability and providing a steering mirror rotation of up to {+-}7 deg. ({+-}14 deg. for RF beam). The principle aim of the UL is to stabilize the neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) and (by extending the steering range) access the q = 1 flux surface for control of the sawtooth oscillation. Increasing the range of the UL can relax the EL steering range, and optimize the EL for enhanced performance with an optimized central deposition and potential for counter ECCD. This paper will summarize the present UL design status along with the proposed design modifications to the UL for enhanced performance and increased reliability.

  9. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  10. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  11. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-07-26

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor.

  12. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-02-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  13. Horn antenna design studies. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstract data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature describe the antenna radiation patterns, polarization characteristics, wave propagation, noise temperature, wave diffraction, and wideband communication of various horn antennas. This updated bibliography contains 217 citations, 63 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  14. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high {beta} VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  15. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. ); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. ); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. )

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high [beta] VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  16. Design and analysis of an electronically steerable microstrip patch and a novel Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) fed slot antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldossary, Hamad

    Conformal Phased Array Antennas (CPAAs) are very attractive for their high gain, low profile, and beam scanning ability while being conformal to their mounting surface. Among them are microstrip patch phased arrays and wideband slot phased arrays which are of particular significance. In this work, first the study, design, and implementation of a conformal microstrip patch phased array is presented which consists of a high gain beam scanning array implemented using microstrip delay lines controlled using GaAs SPDT switches. Then the study and design of a wideband Coplanar Waveguide (CPW)-fed slot phased array antenna is presented. In both cases the array beam scanning properties are elucidated by incorporating the measured delay line scattering parameters inside Ansys Designer simulation models and then computing and presenting their full-wave radiation characteristics.

  17. The design of RFID convey or belt gate systems using an antenna control unit.

    PubMed

    Park, Chong Ryol; Lee, Seung Joon; Eom, Ki Hwan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient management system utilizing a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna control unit which is moving along with the path of boxes of materials on the conveyor belt by manipulating a motor. The proposed antenna control unit, which is driven by a motor and is located on top of the gate, has an array structure of two antennas with parallel connection. The array structure helps improve the directivity of antenna beam pattern and the readable RFID distance due to its configuration. In the experiments, as the control unit follows moving materials, the reading time has been improved by almost three-fold compared to an RFID system employing conventional fixed antennas. The proposed system also has a recognition rate of over 99% without additional antennas for detecting the sides of a box of materials. The recognition rate meets the conditions recommended by the Electronic Product Code glbal network (EPC)global for commercializing the system, with three antennas at a 20 dBm power of reader and a conveyor belt speed of 3.17 m/s. This will enable a host of new RFID conveyor belt gate systems with increased performance. PMID:22164119

  18. Design and Performance Evaluation of a Dual Antenna Joint Carrier Tracking Loop.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenfei; Lin, Tao; Niu, Xiaoji; Shi, Chuang; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-10-01

    In order to track the carrier phases of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals in signal degraded environments, a dual antenna joint carrier tracking loop is proposed and evaluated. This proposed tracking loop processes inputs from two antennas, namely the master antenna and the slave antenna. The master antenna captures signals in open-sky environments, while the slave antenna capture signals in degraded environments. In this architecture, a Phase Lock Loop (PLL) is adopted as a master loop to track the carrier phase of the open-sky signals. The Doppler frequency estimated by this master loop is utilized to assist weak carrier tracking in the slave loop. As both antennas experience similar signal dynamics due to satellite motion and clock frequency variations, a much narrower loop bandwidth and possibly a longer coherent integration can be adopted to track the weak signals in slave channels, by utilizing the Doppler aid from master channels. PLL tracking performance is affected by the satellite/user dynamics, clock instability, and thermal noise. In this paper, their impacts on the proposed phase tracking loop are analyzed and verified by both simulation and field data. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed loop structure can track degraded signals (i.e., 18 dB-Hz) with a very narrow loop bandwidth (i.e., 0.5 Hz) and a TCXO clock.

  19. The Design of RFID Convey or Belt Gate Systems Using an Antenna Control Unit

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Ryol; Lee, Seung Joon; Eom, Ki Hwan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient management system utilizing a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna control unit which is moving along with the path of boxes of materials on the conveyor belt by manipulating a motor. The proposed antenna control unit, which is driven by a motor and is located on top of the gate, has an array structure of two antennas with parallel connection. The array structure helps improve the directivity of antenna beam pattern and the readable RFID distance due to its configuration. In the experiments, as the control unit follows moving materials, the reading time has been improved by almost three-fold compared to an RFID system employing conventional fixed antennas. The proposed system also has a recognition rate of over 99% without additional antennas for detecting the sides of a box of materials. The recognition rate meets the conditions recommended by the Electronic Product Code glbal network (EPC)global for commercializing the system, with three antennas at a 20 dBm power of reader and a conveyor belt speed of 3.17 m/s. This will enable a host of new RFID conveyor belt gate systems with increased performance. PMID:22164119

  20. Design and Performance Evaluation of a Dual Antenna Joint Carrier Tracking Loop.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenfei; Lin, Tao; Niu, Xiaoji; Shi, Chuang; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    In order to track the carrier phases of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals in signal degraded environments, a dual antenna joint carrier tracking loop is proposed and evaluated. This proposed tracking loop processes inputs from two antennas, namely the master antenna and the slave antenna. The master antenna captures signals in open-sky environments, while the slave antenna capture signals in degraded environments. In this architecture, a Phase Lock Loop (PLL) is adopted as a master loop to track the carrier phase of the open-sky signals. The Doppler frequency estimated by this master loop is utilized to assist weak carrier tracking in the slave loop. As both antennas experience similar signal dynamics due to satellite motion and clock frequency variations, a much narrower loop bandwidth and possibly a longer coherent integration can be adopted to track the weak signals in slave channels, by utilizing the Doppler aid from master channels. PLL tracking performance is affected by the satellite/user dynamics, clock instability, and thermal noise. In this paper, their impacts on the proposed phase tracking loop are analyzed and verified by both simulation and field data. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed loop structure can track degraded signals (i.e., 18 dB-Hz) with a very narrow loop bandwidth (i.e., 0.5 Hz) and a TCXO clock. PMID:26437415

  1. Strapping field profile to reproduce transition from slow rise to fast eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao Nguyen Quoc; Bellan, Paul

    2009-11-01

    In solar coronal loop experiments at Caltech, the hoop force causes plasma loops to expand unless additional forces are applied. By applying a strapping magnetic field of proper polarity, Hansen and Bellan [1] slowed and even inhibited this expansion. Kliem and Torok [2] predicted that a transition from slow rise to fast eruption occurs if the magnetic field's rate of decay with increasing altitude meets an instability criterion. If the restoring force due to the strapping field decays faster than the hoop force, then the plasma will move from a region where its expansion is decelerated to one where its expansion is accelerated. We have calculated magnetic profiles which attain the instability criterion within the length scale of the Caltech experiment and are constructing an auxiliary coil with independent power supply designed to match the calculated profiles. [4pt] [1] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J. Lett. 563, L183 (2001)[0pt] [2] B. Kleim and T. Torok, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 255002 (2006)

  2. Design characterization of an electronic steerable Ka-band antenna using liquid crystal phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, A.; Hager, P. B.; Harder, J. T.

    Modern high data rate satellite communication systems increasingly utilize the Ka-band due to its ability to support higher bandwidth. Prior research work presented a copper-galvanically produced Ka-band horn array antenna and associated waveguide distribution network, mounted on a two axes mechanical steerable mechanism (LISAMS) for use aboard fast, low earth orbiting satellites. The current project, LISAES, investigates the feasibility of a similar horn array antenna, but fitted with liquid crystal phase shifters in the transmission path of each horn, which now allow steering of the antenna boresight through beam forming without the use of mechanically moving parts.

  3. Cofactor Strap regulates oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial p53 activity through ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, S; Coutts, A S; Stratford, M R; McGouran, J; Kessler, B; La Thangue, N B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is a novel TPR motif OB-fold protein that contributes to p53 transcriptional activation. We show here that, in addition to its established transcriptional role, Strap is localised at mitochondria where one of its key interaction partners is ATP synthase. Significantly, the interaction between Strap and ATP synthase downregulates mitochondrial ATP production. Under glucose-limiting conditions, cancer cells are sensitised by mitochondrial Strap to apoptosis, which is rescued by supplementing cells with an extracellular source of ATP. Furthermore, Strap augments the apoptotic effects of mitochondrial p53. These findings define Strap as a dual regulator of cellular reprogramming: first as a nuclear transcription cofactor and second in the direct regulation of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25168243

  4. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation: High gain antenna/widebeam horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.; Dodds, J. G.; Broad, P.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the high gain antenna reflector and feed elements are described. Deficiencies in the sum feed are discussed, and lack of atmospheric venting is posed as a potential problem area. The measured RF performance of the high gain antenna is examined and the high sidelobe levels measured are related to the physical characteristics of the antenna. An examination of the attributes of the feed which might be influenced by temperature extremes shows that the antenna should be insensitive to temperature variations. Because the feed support bipod structure is considered a significant contributor to the high sidelobe levels measured in the azimuth plane, pod relocation, material changes, and shaping are suggested as improvements. Alternate feed designs are presented to further improve system performance. The widebeam horn and potential temperature effects due to the polarizer are discussed as well as in the effects of linear polarization on TDRS acquisition, and the effects of circular polarization on radar sidelobe avoidance. The radar detection probability is analyzed as a function of scan overlap and target range.

  5. Gain enhancement for wideband end-fire antenna design with artificial material.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Sun, Yuanhua; Wu, Xi; Wen, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Gain enhancement wideband end-fire antenna is proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna can achieve gain enhancement by loading novel artificial materials structures (Split-ring Resonators) in the end-fire direction while broad bandwidth is realized by using elliptic dipole elements and a microstrip to coplanar balun. The measurements show that the proposed antenna have around 5-8 dB gain in the working band (5-11 GHz), which is around 2 dB more than the unloaded one. This antenna can be used in target recognition systems for its advantages of end-fire radiation broad bandwidth and high gain. PMID:27652144

  6. Antenna and coil design for wireless signal detection and charging of embedded power active contact lens.

    PubMed

    Ng, Benny; Heckler, Paul; Do, Alex; Azar, Phillip; Leon, Errol; Smilkstein, Tina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a screen printed 2.4 GHz antenna and induction charging coil for an active contact lens with a single large pixel user display and on-board 3.8 V 5 uAh rechargeable battery. The antenna traces are printed using silver conductive paste on a 25 um polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The incoming signal from the antenna feeds into an IC that amplifies and rectifies the signal. The coil provides wireless energy transfer to inductively charge a thin film battery [1] located on the contact lens. The printed antenna achieved a S11 of -4 dB at 2.4 GHz and a gain of -13 dB. PMID:25571353

  7. Design and implementation of a beam-waveguide mirror control system for vernier pointing of the DSS-13 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Moore, M.; Veruttipong, W.; Andres, E.

    1994-01-01

    The design and implementation of an antenna beam-waveguide (BWG) mirror position control system at the DSS-13 34-m antenna is presented. While it has several potential applications, a positioner on the last flat-plate BWG mirror (M6) at DSS 13 is installed to demonstrate the conical scan (conscan) angle-tracking technique at the Ka-band (32-GHz) operating frequency. Radio frequency (RF) beam-scanning predictions for the M6 mirror, computed from a diffraction analysis, are presented. From these predictions, position control system requirements are then derived. The final mechanical positioner and servo system designs, as implemented at DSS 13, are illustrated with detailed design descriptions given in the appendices. Preliminary measurements of antenna Ka-band beam scan versus M6 mirror tilt made at DSS 13 in December 1993 are presented. After reduction, the initial measurements are shown to be in agreement with the RF predicts. Plans for preliminary conscan experimentation at DSS 13 are summarized.

  8. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  9. Quadrature transmit array design using single-feed circularly polarized patch antenna for parallel transmission in MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-02-01

    Quadrature coils are often desired in MR applications because they can improve MR sensitivity and also reduce excitation power. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a quadrature array design strategy for parallel transmission at 298 MHz using single-feed circularly polarized (CP) patch antenna technique. Each array element is a nearly square ring microstrip antenna and is fed at a point on the diagonal of the antenna to generate quadrature magnetic fields. Compared with conventional quadrature coils, the single-feed structure is much simple and compact, making the quadrature coil array design practical. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the decoupling between elements is better than -35 dB for all the elements and the RF fields are homogeneous with deep penetration and quadrature behavior in the area of interest. Bloch equation simulation is also performed to simulate the excitation procedure by using an 8-element quadrature planar patch array to demonstrate its feasibility in parallel transmission at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla. PMID:24649430

  10. A design study for the use of a multiple aperture deployable antenna for soil moisture remote sensing satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foldes, P.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation problems associated with the measurement of soil moisture with a meaningful spatial and temperature resolution at a global scale are addressed. For this goal only medium term available affordable technology will be considered. The study while limited in scope, will utilize a large scale antenna structure, which is being developed presently as an experimental model. The interface constraints presented by a singel Space Transportation System (STS) flight will be assumed. Methodology consists of the following steps: review of science requirements; analyze effects of these requirements; present basic system engineering considerations and trade-offs related to orbit parameters, number of spacecraft and their lifetime, observation angles, beamwidth, crossover and swath, coverage percentage, beam quality and resolution, instrument quantities, and integration time; bracket the key system characteristics and develop an electromagnetic design of the antenna-passive radiometer system. Several aperture division combinations and feed array concepts are investigated to achieve maximum feasible performacne within the stated STS constraints.

  11. Design of a planar multiband Sierpinski E-shaped carpet antenna with CPW fed for multi standard wireless terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, K. Satyabrat; Panda, Asit K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper Sierpinski E-Carpet antenna based on the implementation of fractal technique is proposed for multiband applications in 2-10 GHz band. There appeared 5 resonant frequencies at 2.35 GHz, 3.5 GHz, 5.503 GHz, 7.248GHz, and 8.79GHz for 2nd iteration. From the return loss plot it is seen that antenna achieved the IEEE Bluetooth/WLAN (2.4-2.484 GHz), WiMAX (3.4-3.69 GHz) and WIFI (5.1-5.825 GHz) frequency band with -10dB return loss. Also nearly omni-directional radiation pattern is observed. A prototype of the design is successfully implemented with close agreement between measurement and simulation result.

  12. Integrated design and analysis of RF heating and current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.; Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; Stallings, D. C.; Wang, C. Y.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Bigelow, T. S.; England, A. C.; Hanson, G. R.; Haste, G. R.; Hoffman, D. J.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Rogers, J. H.; Majeski, R.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bures, M.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.; Wade, T.; Ho, Y. L.; Kruger, W.

    1996-02-01

    The design, analysis, and performance evaluation of rf power systems ultimately requires accurate modeling of a chain of subsystems starting with the rf transmitter and ending with the power absorption in the plasma. A collection of computer codes is used at ORNL to calculate the plasma loading and wave spectrum for a three-dimensional rf antenna, the transmission/reflection properties of the Faraday shield and its effect on the electrical characteristics and phase velocity of the antenna, the internal coupling among antenna array components and the incorporation of the antenna array into a transmission line model of the phase control, tuning, matching, and power distribution system. Some codes and techniques are more suited for the rapid evaluation of system design progressions, while others are more applicable to the detailed analysis of final designs or existing hardware. The interaction of codes and the accuracy of calculations will be illustrated by the process of determining the plasma loading as a function of phasing and density profiles for the TFTR ICRH antennas and comparing the results to measurements. An example of modeling a complex antenna geometry will be the comparison of calculations with the measured electrical response of a four-strap mockup of the JET A2 antenna array which was loaned to ORNL by the JET ICRH team.

  13. Dual-mode antenna design for microwave heating and noninvasive thermometry of superficial tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G

    2000-11-01

    Hyperthermia therapy of superficial skin disease has proven clinically useful, but current heating equipment is somewhat clumsy and technically inadequate for many patients. The present effort describes a dual-purpose, conformal microwave applicator that is fabricated from thin, flexible, multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) material to facilitate heating of surface areas overlaying contoured anatomy. Preliminary studies document the feasibility of combining Archimedean spiral microstrip antennas, located concentrically within the central region of square dual concentric conductor (DCC) annular slot antennas. The motivation is to achieve homogeneous tissue heating simultaneously with noninvasive thermometry by radiometric sensing of blackbody radiation from the target tissue under the applicator. Results demonstrate that the two antennas have complimentary regions of influence. The DCC ring antenna structure produces a peripherally enhanced power deposition pattern with peaks in the outer corners of the aperture and a broad minimum around 50% of maximum centrally. In contrast, the Archimedean spiral radiates (or receives) energy predominantly along the boresight axis of the spiral, thus confining the region of influence to tissue located within the central broad minimum of the DCC pattern. Analysis of the temperature-dependent radiometer signal (brightness temperature) showed linear correlation of radiometer output with test load temperature using either the spiral or DCC structure as the receive antenna. The radiometric performance of the broadband Archimedean antenna was superior compared to the DCC, providing improved temperature resolution (0.1 degree C-0.2 degree C) and signal sensitivity (0.3 degree C-0.8 degree C/degree C) at all four 500 MHz integration bandwidths tested within the frequency range from 1.2 to 3.0 GHz. PMID:11077744

  14. Dual-mode antenna design for microwave heating and noninvasive thermometry of superficial tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G

    2000-11-01

    Hyperthermia therapy of superficial skin disease has proven clinically useful, but current heating equipment is somewhat clumsy and technically inadequate for many patients. The present effort describes a dual-purpose, conformal microwave applicator that is fabricated from thin, flexible, multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) material to facilitate heating of surface areas overlaying contoured anatomy. Preliminary studies document the feasibility of combining Archimedean spiral microstrip antennas, located concentrically within the central region of square dual concentric conductor (DCC) annular slot antennas. The motivation is to achieve homogeneous tissue heating simultaneously with noninvasive thermometry by radiometric sensing of blackbody radiation from the target tissue under the applicator. Results demonstrate that the two antennas have complimentary regions of influence. The DCC ring antenna structure produces a peripherally enhanced power deposition pattern with peaks in the outer corners of the aperture and a broad minimum around 50% of maximum centrally. In contrast, the Archimedean spiral radiates (or receives) energy predominantly along the boresight axis of the spiral, thus confining the region of influence to tissue located within the central broad minimum of the DCC pattern. Analysis of the temperature-dependent radiometer signal (brightness temperature) showed linear correlation of radiometer output with test load temperature using either the spiral or DCC structure as the receive antenna. The radiometric performance of the broadband Archimedean antenna was superior compared to the DCC, providing improved temperature resolution (0.1 degree C-0.2 degree C) and signal sensitivity (0.3 degree C-0.8 degree C/degree C) at all four 500 MHz integration bandwidths tested within the frequency range from 1.2 to 3.0 GHz.

  15. 3D modeling and optimization of the ITER ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Messiaen, A.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.

    2011-12-01

    The prediction of the coupling properties of the ITER ICRH antenna necessitates the accurate evaluation of the resistance and reactance matrices. The latter are mostly dependent on the geometry of the array and therefore a model as accurate as possible is needed to precisely compute these matrices. Furthermore simulations have so far neglected the poloidal and toroidal profile of the plasma, and it is expected that the loading by individual straps will vary significantly due to varying strap-plasma distance. To take this curvature into account, some modifications of the alignment of the straps with respect to the toroidal direction are proposed. It is shown with CST Microwave Studio® [1] that considering two segments in the toroidal direction, i.e. a "V-shaped" toroidal antenna, is sufficient. A new CATIA model including this segmentation has been drawn and imported into both MWS and TOPICA [2] codes. Simulations show a good agreement of the impedance matrices in vacuum. Various modifications of the geometry are proposed in order to further optimize the coupling. In particular we study the effect of the strap box parameters and the recess of the vertical septa.

  16. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  17. Conical-reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical advantages of a singly curved conical reflector are demonstrated by the experimental test of a furlable 1.83 m conical-Gregorian antenna at 16.33 GHz. The measured gain of 47.5 dB corresponds to a net efficiency of over 57%. A ray-optics analysis of conical-reflector antennas is presented, and data useful in the design of conical antennas are given. The conical-Gregorian antenna, in which a subreflector is used in conjunction with a conventional horn feed, is considered in detail. A physical-optics analysis of the conical-Gregorian antenna is used to investigate diffraction and other effects, and to analytically confirm the high performance of the antenna.

  18. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  19. Design of a stacked array antenna system integrated with low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Taeksoo; Yoon, Hargsoon; Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we presents a 4×4 stacked phased array antenna system operating at 15GHz, which can be used for commercial as well as military applications including low earth orbiting (LEO) satellites communications and airborne defense system. The phased array antenna consists of 4 subarrays having 4 tapered slot antennas, phase shifters, power dividers, and high voltage controllers. Each component is constructed on low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) that is a multilayer electronic packaging technology and has a unique ability to integrate passive components such as resistors, capacitors and inductors in to a monolithic package. The phase shifter we have developed herein using barium strontium titanate (BST) thin films shows continuous phase shifts of 0°~90° at 15GHz when DC bias voltages are applied up to 300 V between the ground and signal line. By controlling the voltages independently applied to each phase shifters, the beam shape and direction radiated from the array antenna can be changed and steered.

  20. Dielectric covered microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Lisa M.

    1988-11-01

    Microstrip antennas have many properties that make them suitable for airborne and satellite communications systems. These antennas are low in cost and lightweight. For these reasons, Rome Air Development Center is interested in verifying and augmenting existing design models for these antennas. The theory and results are presented for modeling microstrip antennas that are covered with a sheet of dielectric material. There are several reasons for designing a microstrip antenna covered with a dielectric material. This configuration would allow the modeling of antennas with an integrated radome. A cover layer could possibly be used to support a polarizer; to mount additional antenna elements on top of the cover layer to provide bandwidth enhancements; or to be used as a dual frequency antenna.

  1. RF Measurements and Modeling from the JET-ITER Like Antenna Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Vrancken, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Huygen, S.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Vervier, M.; Argouarch, A.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Nicholls, K.; Nightingale, M.

    2007-09-28

    The RF characteristics of the JET-ITER Like (JET-IL) antenna relevant for operation on plasma have been assessed using full wave three Dimensional (3D) electromagnetic CST registered Microwave Studio (MWS) simulations, measurements of the full 8-port antenna strap array S/Z-matrix, and RF circuit modeling. These efforts are made in parallel with the high voltage testing of the antenna inside a vacuum tank and the hardware implementation of a RF (Radio Frequency) matching feedback control system prior to installation of the antenna on the JET tokamak.

  2. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E∥ (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  3. 24 CFR 3285.403 - Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and shear wall straps. 3285.403 Section 3285.403 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.403 Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps. If sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, or shear wall straps are installed on the home, they must be connected to...

  4. Cassegrain-Antenna Gain Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, V.; Cha, A. G.; Mittra, R.

    1986-01-01

    Modified antenna feed with dual-shaped subreflectors yields 10-to20-percent improvement in efficiency of existing large-aperture paraboloidal or Cassegrainian antennas. Such offset dual-shaped subreflector (DSS) feed brings gain of existing paraboloid or Cassegrain antennas up to that of reflector antennas of more recent design at cost considerably lower than for reshaping existing reflecting surfaces. Mathematical procedures developed for synthesizing nearly optimum shapes for DSS elements of new feeds.

  5. Design of an ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yugo, J.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Vesey, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires 10-20 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to raise the plasma temperature to ignition. The initial ICRH system will provide 10 MW of power to the plasma, utilizing a total of six rf power units feeding six current straps in three ports. The systems may be expanded to 20 MW with additional rf power units, antennas, and ports. Plasma heating will be achieved through coupling to the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance of a /sup 3/He minority species (also the second harmonic of tritium). The proposed antenna is a resonant double loop (RDL) structure with vacuum, shorted stubs at each end for tuning and impedance matching. The antennas are of modular, compact construction for installation and removal through the midplane port. Remote maintainability and the reactorlike operating environment have a major impact on the design of the launcher for this machine. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. A design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. H.; Lin, Z. Y.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-10-21

    Visible light communication has been widely investigated due to its larger bandwidth and higher bit rate, and it can combine with the indoor illumination system that makes it more convenient to carry out. Receiving and processing the visible light signal on chip request for nanophotonics devices performing well. However, conventional optical device cannot be used for light-on-chip integration at subwavelength dimensions due to the diffraction limit. Herein, we propose a design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication based on the interaction between Si nanoparticle and Au nanorod. This device integrates the unique scattering property of high-refractive index dielectric Si nanoparticles, whose scattering spectrum is dependent on the particle size, with the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorod. We calculated the spectra collected by plane detector and near field distribution of nanostructure, and theoretically demonstrate that the proposed device can act as good receiver, amplifier and superlens during the visible light signal receiving and processing. Besides, unlike some other designs of nanoantenna devices focused less on how to detect the signals, our hybrid nanoantenna can realize the transfer between the scattering source and the detector effectively by Au nanorod waveguides. These findings suggest that the designed nanoplasmonic structure is expected to be used in on-chip nanophotonics as antenna, spectral splitter and demultiplexer for visible light communication.

  7. Design, fabrication, test and delivery of a K-band antenna breadboard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results of a research effort to develop a Ku-Band single channel monopulse antenna with significant improvements in efficiency and bandwidth are reported. A single aperture, multimode horn, utilized in a near field Cassegrainian configuration, was the technique selected for achieving the desired efficiency and bandwidth performance. In order to provide wide polarization flexibility, a wire grid, space filter polarizer was developed. A solid state switching network with appropriate driving electronics provides the receive channel sum and difference signal interface with an existing Apollo type tracking electronics subsystem. A full scale breadboard model of the antenna was fabricated and tested. Performance of the model was well within the requirements and goals of the contract.

  8. Composite materials design for the APG-68 fire control radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. C.

    1989-08-01

    The use of matrix composite materials to reduce the weight of the APG-68 fire control radar antenna is studied. The structure and weight of the antenna are analyzed. Attention is given to material property selection. The costs of the materials, fabrication, and tooling are evaluated. The data reveal that: elevation arms, azimuth gimbal, and a base composed of chopped graphite/epoxy composite would weigh 17 pct less, but cost two to four times more than metal components; the elevation cover, elevation stop, and guides could be composed of polyetherimide or polyamide-imide and their cost would be reduced by 30-45 pct and their weight by 25 pct compared to metal parts; and the use of long discontinuous fibers would increase the elastic modulus to about 138 GPa and reduce the weight relative to metal parts by 25 pct.

  9. A Study on the Design Methodology for an Ultra-Light Large Deployable Antenna Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Harada, Satoshi; Ueba, Masazumi

    We have proposed an ultra-light reflector antenna whose aperture diameter is larger than 20m and whose weight is less than 80kg. Our target is an areal density of 0.25kg/m2 or less. To realize this new reflector antenna, we propose a geodesic cable network system supported by a tendon-reinforced structure. To confirm this concept, we fabricated and tested a scale model of the support structure. The scale model, which is around 3m in diameter and deployable, consists of spoke-wise framing, tendon cables and dummy tension cables. Static load responses were measured by using strain gauges and load cells. Deformation modes were also captured by a videogrametry system. We can conclude that the tendon-reinforced deployable frame structure can support six times the tension possible with the bare structure, and analytical results show good agreement with experimental results by considering the initial imperfection in the scale model.

  10. The effects of geometrical and process variables on the quality of cast-on-strap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. M.; Lakshmi, C. S.; See, J. B.; Rice, D. M.

    An automated laboratory-scale, cast-on-strap joining process for lead/acid batteries has been developed. This allows tight control of relevant casting parameters such as strap mould and metal temperature, lug immersion speed, and the time between strap filling and lug entry into the molten strap. The joining of lead-antimony or lead-tin strap alloys with lead-antimony or lead-calcium-tin lugs is studied. It is found that lead-tin is not suitable as a strap alloy for the alloy combinations and joining conditions that have been investigated. Penetration depth of the lug into the strap is found to be critical and may be optimized for a given lug thickness under fixed process conditions. The joint quality improves with a deeper penetration of the thicker lugs for the geometrical configurations studied in this work. It is far easier to form a sound joint with thin lugs as these are not as sensitive as thick lugs to variations in the joining conditions.

  11. Copper Bracelets and Magnetic Wrist Straps for Rheumatoid Arthritis – Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects: A Randomised Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Stewart J.; Gunadasa, Shalmini; Bland, Martin; MacPherson, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Background Folklore remedies for pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis include the application of magnets and copper to the skin. Despite the popular use of devices containing magnets or copper for this purpose, little research has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of such treatments. Objective To investigate whether the practice of wearing magnetic wrists straps, or copper bracelets, offers any specific therapeutic benefit for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial. Methods 70 patients, aged 33 to 79 years and predominantly female (n = 52), with painful rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from general practices within Yorkshire. Participants were randomly allocated to wear four devices in a different order. Devices tested were: a standard (1502 to 2365 gauss) magnetic wrist strap, a demagnetised (<20 gauss) wrist strap, an attenuated (250 to 350 gauss) magnetic wrist strap, and a copper bracelet. Devices were each worn for five weeks, with treatment phases being separated by one week wash-out periods. The primary outcome measured was pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Secondary pain measures were the McGill Pain Questionnaire and tender joint count. Inflammation was assessed using C-reactive protein and plasma viscosity blood tests and by swollen joint count. Physical function was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (Disability Index). Disease activity and medication use was also measured. Results 65 participants provided complete self-report outcome data for all devices, four participants provided partial data. Analysis of treatment outcomes did not reveal any statistically significant differences (P>0.05) between the four devices in terms of their effects on pain, inflammation, physical function, disease activity, or medication use. Conclusions Wearing a magnetic wrist strap or a copper bracelet did not appear to have any meaningful therapeutic effect, beyond

  12. Apparatus and methods for packaging integrated circuit chips with antenna modules providing closed electromagnetic environment for integrated antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaucher, Brian P. (Inventor); Grzyb, Janusz (Inventor); Liu, Duixian (Inventor); Pfeiffer, Ullrich R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are provided for packaging IC chips together with integrated antenna modules designed to provide a closed EM (electromagnetic) environment for antenna radiators, thereby allowing antennas to be designed independent from the packaging technology.

  13. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  14. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  15. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  16. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  17. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  18. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  19. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  20. Intelsat VI antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  1. Design of antenna-coupled lumped-element titanium nitride KIDs for long-wavelength multi-band continuum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.; Beyer, A.; Golwala, S.; Sayers, J.

    2014-07-01

    Many applications in cosmology and astrophysics at millimeter wavelengths — CMB polarization, studies of galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, studies of star formation at high redshift and in our local universe and our galaxy— require large-format arrays of millimeter-wave detectors. Feedhorn, lens-coupled twinslot antenna, and phased-array antenna architectures for receiving mm-wave light present numerous advantages for control of systematics and for simultaneous coverage of both polarizations and/or multiple spectral bands. Simultaneously, kinetic inductance detectors using high-resistivity materials like titanium nitride are an attractive sensor option for large-format arrays because they are highly multiplexable and because their high responsivity can render two-level-system noise subdominant to photon and recombination noise. However, coupling the two is a challenge because of the impedance mismatch between the microstrip exiting these architectures and the high resistivity of titanium nitride. Mitigating direct absorption in the KID is also a challenge. We present a detailed titanium nitride KID design that addresses these challenges. The KID inductor is capacitively coupled to the microstrip in such a way as to form a lossy termination without creating an impedance mismatch. A parallelplate capacitor design mitigates direct absorption, uses hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and yields acceptable two-level-system noise. We show that an optimized design can yield expected sensitivities very close to the fundamental limit from photon and recombination noises for two relevant examples: single spectral band designs appropriate for 90 and 150 GHz for CMB polarization and a multi-spectral-band design that covers 90 GHz to 405 GHz in six bands for SZ effect studies.

  2. Design of a Dielectric Rod Waveguide Antenna Array for Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Lavado, Alejandro; García-Muñoz, Luis-Enrique; Generalov, Andrey; Lioubtchenko, Dmitri; Abdalmalak, Kerlos-Atia; Llorente-Romano, Sergio; García-Lampérez, Alejandro; Segovia-Vargas, Daniel; Räisänen, Antti V.

    2016-09-01

    In this manuscript, the use of dielectric rod waveguide (DRW) antennas in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wave range is presented as a solution for covering two issues: getting more radiated power and filling a technological gap problem in the terahertz band, namely a fully electronic beam steering. A 4x4 element array working at 100 GHz fed by a rectangular waveguide is manufactured and measured for showing its capabilities. This topology can be used as a cost-affordable alternative to dielectric lenses in photomixer-based terahertz sources.

  3. DSN 100-meter X and S band microwave antenna design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The RF performance is studied for large reflector antenna systems (100 meters) when using the high efficiency dual shaped reflector approach. An altered phase was considered so that the scattered field from a shaped surface could be used in the JPL efficiency program. A new dual band (X-S) microwave feed horn was used in the shaping calculations. A great many shaping calculations were made for various horn sizes and locations and final RF efficiencies are reported. A conclusion is reached that when using the new dual band horn, shaping should probably be performed using the pattern of the lower frequency

  4. Full scale LANDSAT-D antenna pattern measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design verification of the LANDSAT-D antenna subsystem is addressed. In particular, the analysis of the antenna radiation patterns utilizing a full scale mockup of the LANDSAT-D satellite is discussed. Test antennas included two S-Band shaped beam antennas, two S-Band omni unit radiators (to operate in array), a GPS antenna, an X-Band shaped beam antenna, and one S-Band high-gain parabolic antenna.

  5. Gimbals Drive and Control Electronics Design, Development and Testing of the LRO High Gain Antenna and Solar Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyakov, Boris; Thakore, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Launched June 18, 2009 on an Atlas V rocket, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is the first step in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration program and for a human return to the Moon. The spacecraft (SC) carries a wide variety of scientific instruments and provides an extraordinary opportunity to study the lunar landscape at resolutions and over time scales never achieved before. The spacecraft systems are designed to enable achievement of LRO's mission requirements. To that end, LRO's mechanical system employed two two-axis gimbal assemblies used to drive the deployment and articulation of the Solar Array System (SAS) and the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS). This paper describes the design, development, integration, and testing of Gimbal Control Electronics (GCE) and Actuators for both the HGAS and SAS systems, as well as flight testing during the on-orbit commissioning phase and lessons learned.

  6. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  7. Development and Testing of an Innovative Two-Arm Focal-Plane Thermal Strap (TAFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquiza, E.; Vasquez, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Van Gorp, B.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining temperature stability in optical focal planes comes with the intrinsic challenge of creating a pathway that is both extremely flexible mechanically and highly conductive thermally. The task is further complicated because science-caliber optical focal planes are extremely delicate, yet their mechanical resiliency is rarely tested and documented. The mechanical engineer tasked with the thermo-mechanical design must then create a highly conductive thermal link that minimizes the tensile and shear stresses transmitted to the focal plane without design parameters on an acceptable stiffness. This paper will describe the development and testing of the thermal link developed for the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) instrument. It will provide experimentally determined mechanical stiffness plots in the three axes of interest. Analytical and experimental thermal conductance results for the two-arm focal-plane thermal strap (TAFTS), from cryogenic to room temperatures, are also presented. The paper also briefly describes some elements of the fabrication process followed in developing a novel design solution, which provides high conductance and symmetrical mechanical loading, while providing enhanced flexibility in all three degrees of freedom.

  8. Design of a plasmonic-organic hybrid slot waveguide integrated with a bowtie-antenna for terahertz wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Chung, Chi-Jui; Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Chen, Chin-Ta; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wave detection over a large spectrum has recently attracted significant amount of attention. Traditional electronic EM wave sensors use large metallic probes which distort the field to be measured and also have strict limitations on the detectable RF bandwidth. To address these problems, integrated photonic EM wave sensors have been developed to provide high sensitivity and broad bandwidth. Previously we demonstrated a compact, broadband, and sensitive integrated photonic EM wave sensor, consisting of an organic electro-optic (EO) polymer refilled silicon slot photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) modulator integrated with a gold bowtie antenna, to detect the X band of the electromagnetic spectrum. However, due to the relative large RC constant of the silicon PCW, such EM wave sensors can only work up to tens of GHz. In this work, we present a detailed design and discussion of a new generation of EM wave sensors based on EO polymer refilled plasmonic slot waveguides in conjunction with bowtie antennas to cover a wider electromagnetic spectrum from 1 GHz up to 10THz, including the range of microwave, millimeter wave and even terahertz waves. This antennacoupled plasmonic-organic hybrid (POH) structure is designed to provide an ultra-small RC constant, a large overlap between plasmonic mode and RF field, and strong electric field enhancement, as well as negligible field perturbation. A taper is designed to bridge silicon strip waveguide to plasmonic slot waveguide. Simulation results show that our device can have an EM wave sensing ability up to 10 THz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first POH device for photonic terahertz wave detection.

  9. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  10. Three-dimensional antenna models for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Hogan, J. T.; Harris, J. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. S.; Batchelor, D. B.; Beaumont, B.; Hutter, T.; Saoutic, B.

    1996-02-01

    The development of the RANT3D code has permitted the systematic study of the effect of three-dimensional structures on the launched power spectrum for antennas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code allows the septa between current straps to be modeled with arbitrary heights and permits the antenna to interact with other structures in the tokamak. In this paper we present comparisons of calculated loading with the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and Tore Supra experiments, demonstrate the effects on loading caused by positioning uncertainties for an antenna in Tore Supra, and show electric field patterns near the Tore Supra antenna. A poloidal component in the static magnetic field for the plasma response is included in the near-field calculations using the warm plasma code, GLOSI. Preliminary estimates for the heat flux on the bumper limiters during typical operation in Tore Supra are also presented.

  11. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. . Plasma Fusion Center); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  12. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx_equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  13. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  14. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  15. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  16. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  17. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  18. The design and synthesis of artificial photosynthetic antennas, reaction centres and membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T A; Moore, A L; Gust, D

    2002-01-01

    Artificial antenna systems and reaction centres synthesized in our laboratory are used to illustrate that structural and thermodynamic factors controlling energy and electron transfer in these constructs can be modified to optimize performance. Artificial reaction centres have been incorporated into liposomal membranes where they convert light energy to vectorial redox potential. This redox potential drives a Mitchellian, quinone-based, proton-transporting redox loop that generates a Deltamu H(+) of ca. 4.4 kcal mol(-1) comprising DeltapH ca. 2.1 and Deltapsi ca. 70 mV. In liposomes containing CF(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, this system drives ATP synthesis against an ATP chemical potential similar to that observed in natural systems. PMID:12437888

  19. Harvesting of electrical energy from a backpack using piezoelectric shoulder straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodano, Henry A.; Granstrom, Jonathan; Feenstra, Joel; Farinholt, Kevin

    2007-04-01

    Over the past few decades the use of portable and wearable electronics has grown steadily. These devices are becoming increasingly more powerful, however, the gains that have been made in the device performance has resulted in the need for significantly higher power to operate the electronics. This issue has been further complicated due to the stagnate growth of battery technology over the past decade. In order to increase the life of these electronics, researchers have begun investigating methods of generating energy from ambient sources such that the life of the electronics can be prolonged. Recent developments in the field have led to the design of a number of mechanisms that can be used to generate electrical energy, from a variety of sources including thermal, solar, strain, inertia, etc. Many of these energy sources are available for use with humans, but their use must be carefully considered such that parasitic effects that could disrupt the user's gait or endurance are avoided. These issues have arisen from previous attempts to integrate power harvesting mechanisms into a shoe such that the energy released during a heal strike could be harvested. This study develops a novel energy harvesting backpack that can generate electrical energy from the differential forces between the wearer and the pack. The goal of this system is to make the energy harvesting device transparent to the wearer such that his or her endurance and dexterity is not compromised. This will be accomplished by replacing the traditional strap of the backpack with one made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Piezoelectric materials have a structure such that an applied electrical potential results in a mechanical strain. Conversely, an applied stress results in the generation of an electrical charge, which makes the material useful for power harvesting applications. PVDF is highly flexible and has a high strength allowing it to effectively act as the load bearing

  20. Designing dye-nanochannel antenna hybrid materials for light harvesting, transport and trapping.

    PubMed

    Calzaferri, Gion; Méallet-Renault, Rachel; Brühwiler, Dominik; Pansu, Robert; Dolamic, Igor; Dienel, Thomas; Adler, Pauline; Li, Huanrong; Kunzmann, Andreas

    2011-02-25

    We discuss artificial photonic antenna systems that are built by incorporating chromophores into one-dimensional nanochannel materials and by organizing the latter in specific ways. Zeolite L (ZL) is an excellent host for the supramolecular organization of different kinds of molecules and complexes. The range of possibilities for filling its one-dimensional channels with suitable guests has been shown to be much larger than one might expect. Geometrical constraints imposed by the host structure lead to supramolecular organization of the guests in the channels. The arrangement of dyes inside the ZL channels is what we call the first stage of organization. It allows light harvesting within the volume of a dye-loaded ZL crystal and also the radiationless transport of energy to either the channel ends or center. One-dimensional FRET transport can be realized in these guest-host materials. The second stage of organization is realized by coupling either an external acceptor or donor stopcock fluorophore at the ends of the ZL channels, which can then trap or inject electronic excitation energy. The third stage of organization is obtained by interfacing the material to an external device via a stopcock intermediate. A possibility to achieve higher levels of organization is by controlled assembly of the host into ordered structures and preparation of monodirectional materials. The usually strong light scattering of ZL can be suppressed by refractive-index matching and avoidance of microphase separation in hybrid polymer/dye-ZL materials. The concepts are illustrated and discussed in detail on a bidirectional dye antenna system. Experimental results of two materials with a donor-to-acceptor ratio of 33:1 and 52:1, respectively, and a three-dye system illustrate the validity and challenges of this approach for synthesizing dye-nanochannel hybrid materials for light harvesting, transport, and trapping.

  1. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  2. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Learned, J. G.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  3. E-Textile Antennas for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to integrate antennas and other radio frequency (RF) devices into wearable systems is increasingly important as wireless voice, video, and data sources become ubiquitous. Consumer applications including mobile computing, communications, and entertainment, as well as military and space applications for integration of biotelemetry, detailed tracking information and status of handheld tools, devices and on-body inventories are driving forces for research into wearable antennas and other e-textile devices. Operational conditions for military and space applications of wireless systems are often such that antennas are a limiting factor in wireless performance. The changing antenna platform, i.e. the dynamic wearer, can detune and alter the radiation characteristics of e-textile antennas, making antenna element selection and design challenging. Antenna designs and systems that offer moderate bandwidth, perform well with flexure, and are electronically reconfigurable are ideally suited to wearable applications. Several antennas, shown in Figure 1, have been created using a NASA-developed process for e-textiles that show promise in being integrated into a robust wireless system for space-based applications. Preliminary characterization of the antennas with flexure indicates that antenna performance can be maintained, and that a combination of antenna design and placement are useful in creating robust designs. Additionally, through utilization of modern smart antenna techniques, even greater flexibility can be achieved since antenna performance can be adjusted in real-time to compensate for the antenna s changing environment.

  4. Design, development and microwave inter-comparison of dual slot antenna configurations for localized hepatic tumor management.

    PubMed

    Zafa, J; Zafa, T; Zafa, H; Sharif, F

    2015-12-01

    Slot antennas are generally preferred for localized liver cancer treatment modalities due to desired radiation characteristics. An iterative thermal/microwave numerical routine is used to analyze regular and miniature slot antenna configurations at 5.8 GHz. A thermal/microwave solver determines the specific absorption rate to malignant tissues as a pre- processing step to compute microwave solution in terms of propagation wave number, return loss and insertion loss. The regular and miniature dual slots antenna geometries were then developed to estimate the return loss characteristics against antennas slot lengths at a constant frequency of 5.8 GHz. Results reveal that the regular geometry has return loss less than -5 dB as compared to <-25 dB return loss for miniature slot antenna configuration. Furthermore, 5.8 GHz antenna geometry provides physical size reduction up to 50 %, lower fabrication cost and is a better minimally invasive choice due to further packed thermal ablation spots. PMID:26467919

  5. Measurement of rf voltages on the plasma-touching surfaces of ICRF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bell, G.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Zhang, H.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements of the rf voltages on Faraday shields and protection bumpers have been made for several loop antennas, including the mock-up antenna and Al for JET, the original antenna for Tore Supra, the present ASDEX-U antenna, and the folded waveguide. The loop antennas show voltages that scale to {approx}12 kV for a maximum input voltage of 30 kV with 0/0 phasing. The voltages are dramatically reduced for 0/{pi} phasing. These voltages are significant in that they can substantially increase the rf sheath potential beyond the levels associated with the simple electromagnetic field linkage from the current straps that results in plasma heating. In this paper, we investigate and measure the source of these voltages, their scaling with antenna impedance, and the differences between the loop arrays.

  6. System consideration, design approach and test of a low gain spherical coverage antenna for large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, R. E.; Patterson, T. D.; Moreno, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A fixed beam array antenna approach is proposed to meet the omnidirectional receiving and transmitting requirements of LST (Large Space Telescope). The proposed method uses an antenna of known performance and scales the size and frequency to conform with the LST 1/5-th scale model. The simplification that the approach provides over switching antenna elements on board the LST or switching from the ground by frequency diversity makes it worthy of consideration against the factors of performance, cost, reliability, and operations complexity. For LST applications, the system capabilities, requirements, and margins are summarized. The areas to be covered by further investigations into the proposed LST antenna are noted.

  7. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  8. Performance Enhancement of Space-Time Adaptive Processing for GPS and Microstrip Antenna Design Using Ferrite Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Albino, Alix

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is a navigation system widely used in civilian and military application, but its accuracy is highly impacted with consequential fading, and possible loss of communication due to multipath propagation and high power interferences. This dissertation proposes alternatives to improve the performance of the GPS receivers to obtain a system that can be reliable in critical situations. The basic performance of the GPS receiver consists of receiving the signal with an antenna array, delaying the signal at each antenna element, weighting the delayed replicas, and finally, combining the weighted replicas to estimate the desired signal. Based on these, three modifications are proposed to improve the performance of the system. The first proposed modification is the use of the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm with two variations to decrease the convergence time of the classic LMS while achieving good system stability. The results obtained by the proposed LMS demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve the same stability as the classic LMS using a small step size, and its convergence rate is better than the classic LMS using a large step size. The second proposed modification is to replace the uniform distribution of the time delays (or taps) by an exponential distribution that decreases the bit-error rate (BER) of the system without impacting the computational efficiency of the uniform taps. The results show that, for a BER of 0.001, the system can operate with a 1 to 2 dB lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when an exponential distribution is used rather than a uniform distribution. Finally, the third modification is implemented in the design of the antenna array. In this case, the gain of each microstrip element is enhanced by embedding ferrite rings in the substrate, creating a hybrid substrate. The ferrite rings generates constructive interference between the incident and reflected fields; consequently, the gain of a single microstrip element

  9. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A.; Swain, D.; Ongena, J.; Vervier, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode Vmax amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of Vmax of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k// computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  10. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A. Ongena, J.; Vervier, M.; Swain, D.

    2015-12-10

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V{sub max} amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V{sub max} of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k{sub //} computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  11. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, Andre; Swain, David W; Ongena, Jef; Vervier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V-max amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V-max of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is +/- 20 degrees, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k//computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases. [GRAPHICS] .

  12. Multiband small zeroth-order metamaterial antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakhli, Nabil; Choubani, Fethi; David, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    A novel resonant metamaterial antenna based on the Composite Right/Left-Handed (CRLH) transmission line (TL) model is presented. The proposed small antenna is designed to operate simultaneously over multiple wireless services (UMTS-WLAN-WIMAX)

  13. STRAP PTM: Software Tool for Rapid Annotation and Differential Comparison of Protein Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jean L.; Bhatia, Vivek N.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is an increasingly important component of proteomics and biomarker discovery, but very few tools exist for performing fast and easy characterization of global PTM changes and differential comparison of PTMs across groups of data obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry experiments. STRAP PTM (Software Tool for Rapid Annotation of Proteins: Post-Translational Modification edition) is a program that was developed to facilitate the characterization of PTMs using spectral counting and a novel scoring algorithm to accelerate the identification of differential PTMs from complex data sets. The software facilitates multi-sample comparison by collating, scoring, and ranking PTMs and by summarizing data visually. The freely available software (beta release) installs on a PC and processes data in protXML format obtained from files parsed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. The easy-to-use interface allows examination of results at protein, peptide, and PTM levels, and the overall design offers tremendous flexibility that provides proteomics insight beyond simple assignment and counting. PMID:25422678

  14. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  15. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral VRF = ∫E//ṡdl where the parallel RF field E// is linked with the slow wave. On "long open field lines" with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that VRF is excited by parallel RF currents j// flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |VRF| by acting on j// on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j// circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j// of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, π] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j// to reduce substantially |VRF| over the whole antenna height.

  16. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  17. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  18. Active antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, John F.

    1994-05-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  19. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  20. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat.

  1. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat. PMID:25626113

  2. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  3. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  4. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  5. Conformational Fixation of a Rectangular Antiaromatic [28]Hexaphyrin Using Rationally Installed Peripheral Straps.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Tomoki; Kim, Taeyeon; Soya, Takanori; Neya, Saburo; Oh, Juwon; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-03-18

    A rectangular [28]hexaphyrin bearing outer straps at the long side has been synthesized by SN Ar reaction of [26]hexaphyrin with allyl alcohol, intramolecular olefin metathesis by using Hoveyda-Grubbs second-generation catalyst, and reduction with NaBH4 . The peripheral straps enforce a rectangular conformation for the [28]hexaphyrin, which shows Hückel antiaromatic character, as confirmed by its planar X-ray structure, a strong paratropic ring current, characteristic UV/Vis/NIR absorption features, small electrochemical HOMO-LUMO gap, and very fast S1 decay. PMID:26870921

  6. Positioning Fixture For Survey Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinardo, Steven J.; Smith, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Improved positioning fixture designed to simplify and accelerate accurate alignment of antenna for use in land survey aided by satellites of Global Positioning System. Holds antenna at fixed height and orientation over station monument so survey measurements made with accuracy and precision.

  7. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  8. 24 CFR 3285.403 - Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and shear wall straps. 3285.403 Section 3285.403 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.403 Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps. If...

  9. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  10. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  11. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  12. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  13. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  14. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  15. Lightweight S-band helix antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Pyrotechnically operated S-band helical antenna is developed in which helix is deployed subsequent to antenna placement. Antenna is small, lightweight, and novel in that deployable helix is used in place of fixed dish or horn. It can be designed to cover L- and X-band frequencies.

  16. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  17. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  18. Effect of the Spacing of Backpack Shoulder Straps on Cervical Muscle Activity, Acromion and Scapular Position, and Upper Trapezius Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the spacing of backpack shoulder straps on cervical muscle activity, acromion and scapular position, and upper trapezius (UT) pain. [Subjects] Fourteen males aged 20–32 years, were recruited. [Methods] We measured the MPS (midcervical paraspinal) activity, acromial angle, scapular distance, and UT pain after gait carrying a backpack with different shoulder strap spacings. [Results] The MPS, scapular inferior distance, and UT pressure pain threshold was significantly decreased and the acromion angle was significantly increased when carrying a backpack with wide shoulder straps compared to narrow shoulder straps. [Conclusion] A backpack with wide shoulder straps may cause scapular depression syndrome and chronic UT pain. PMID:24259829

  19. Telecommunications Antennas for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacchione, Joseph D.; Kruid, Ronald C.; Prata, Aluizio, Jr.; Amaro, Luis R.; Mittskus, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    The Juno Mission to Jupiter requires a full sphere of coverage throughout its cruise to and mission at Jupiter. This coverage is accommodated through the use of five (5) antennas; forward facing low gain, medium gain, and high gain antennas, and an aft facing low gain antenna along with an aft mounted low gain antenna with a torus shaped antenna pattern. Three of the antennas (the forward low and medium gain antennas) are classical designs that have been employed on several prior NASA missions. Two of the antennas employ new technology developed to meet the Juno mission requirements. The new technology developed for the low gain with torus shaped radiation pattern represents a significant evolution of the bicone antenna. The high gain antenna employs a specialized surface shaping designed to broaden the antenna's main beam at Ka-band to ease the requirements on the spacecraft's attitude control system.

  20. An Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center's Antenna R&D and Technology Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of antenna research and design efforts being performed at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The following type of antenna research projects are discussed: phased array antennas, thin film ferroelectric reflectarray antenna, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) based antennas and multi-beam antennas. Project overviews, design issues and research problems for each type of antenna system are covered. Additional topics reviewed included: communication systems of the future and a facility description.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.959 - Lineman's body belts, safety straps, and lanyards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lineman's body belts, safety straps, and lanyards. 1926.959 Section 1926.959 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power...

  2. Kinematics and Kinetics of Multiple Sets Using Lifting Straps During Deadlift Training.

    PubMed

    Coswig, Victor S; Machado Freitas, Diogo Felipe; Gentil, Paulo; Fukuda, David H; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-12-01

    The deadlift is a fundamental exercise used in the development of whole body strength and a common element in resistance training programs for all levels. However, many practitioners report the fatigue of forearm muscles and possibly a lack of grip strength as obstacles to exercise performance, which may lead to the use of ergogenic aids, such as lifting straps. The objective of this study was to evaluate kinematic variables during the execution of multiple sets of deadlift with (WS) and without (NS) lifting straps. Eleven subjects (25 ± 3.3 years) with an average of 4 ± 2.6 years of resistance training experience were enrolled in the study. After the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test WS and NS, subjects performed separate trials of 3 sets to failure at 90% of 1RM in a counterbalanced fashion. With straps resulted in lower speed (0 to -25%) (-3 to -10%) and greater force (20-28%) and duration (concentric phase: 0-13%) when compared with NS. Therefore, it is concluded that the use of straps directly influences exercise performance that requires manual grip strength, increasing the amount of work performed by the target muscles. PMID:26595133

  3. Electromyographic Control of a Hands-Free Electrolarynx Using Neck Strap Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubert, Heather L.; Stepp, Cara E.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Gooey, John E.; Walsh, Michael J.; Prakash, S. R.; Hillman, Robert E.; Heaton, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Three individuals with total laryngectomy were studied for their ability to control a hands-free electrolarynx (EL) using neck surface electromyography (EMG) for on/off and pitch modulation. The laryngectomy surgery of participants was modified to preserve neck strap musculature for EMG-based EL control (EMG-EL), with muscles on one side…

  4. The mechanical design of a high-power, dual frequency, millimeter-wave antenna feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and fabrication of a high power, dual-frequency, millimeter-wave feed system. The feed system consists of a 35 GHz circularly polarized monopulse subsystem and a 95 GHz circularly polarized feed. The 35 GHz feed is designed to handle 5.0 kW average and 50 kW peak power and the 95 GHz 1.2 kW average and 12 kW peak power. A Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) is incorporated to provide dual frequency capability. Each feed is liquid cooled to provide suitable cooling during high power operation. The two feeds and FSS assembly are mounted in a supporting space frame to provide an optically integral assembly ready to be mounted at the vertex of a reflector. The paper addresses three main areas: the general feed design, which includes the manufacturing processes, flange considerations and waveguide cooling; the FSS fabrication; and beam alignment for both the primary and secondary field.

  5. Low profile antennas for MSAT applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, L.; Moheb, H.; Chamma, W.; Barakat, M.

    1995-01-01

    For MSAT applications, a number of different antennas have been designed and investigated. They include low gain omnidirectional antennas and medium gain to high gain directional antennas. The latter include both portable and vehicular antennas. While portable units are desirable to be low profile and low cost, the vehicular antennas have proved to be the most challenging antenna types for the mobile satellite application. The results of our efforts in design of such antennas are described briefly. Low profile designs are emphasized in most cases, and microstrip type radiators are therefore selected. The single radiator provides low gain omnidirectional patterns and is optimized for low cost applications. It provides low gains around 2-6 dBic and is useful mostly for the data transmission. Medium to high gain antennas are developed as arrays of omnidirectional elements. Again, different designs are optimized to meet the needs of different applications. For portable units, the array configuration can be flexible and is optimized for maximum broadside gains. For vehicular units, however the configurations are desirable to be low profile, or compact, and have means for scanning the antenna beam. For simplicity, fixed beam antennas with mechanical beam scan are selected. For these antennas, as well, different designs, having low profile or compact size, are selected and optimized to meet the MSAT gain and G/T requirements.

  6. Face-Mask Removal: Movement and Time Associated With Cutting of the Loop Straps

    PubMed Central

    Norkus, Susan A.; Armstrong, Charles W.; Kleiner, Douglas M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the amount of helmet movement, time for task completion, tool satisfaction, and overall efficiency for various face-mask removal tools during football helmet face-mask removal. Design and Setting: Each subject performed one trial with the anvil pruner (AP), Face Mask Extractor (FME), PVC pipe cutter (PVC), and Trainer's Angel (TA). Each subject cut through 4 loop straps and removed the face mask while kneeling behind the athlete's head. Subjects: Twenty-nine certified athletic trainers (age = 29.5 ± 6.2 years, athletic training experience = 6.3 ± 5.0 years). Measurements: Time to complete the task was recorded. Total range of motion and total movement of the helmet were assessed using a 6-camera, 3-dimensional motion-capture system. Satisfaction scores were measured for each subject for each tool. Efficiency scores were calculated using time and total helmet-movement data. Results: When using the FME, subjects were significantly faster than with all other tools (P < .05), and when using the AP and TA, they were significantly faster than with the PVC. No differences were noted between tools in either movement variable. Significant differences were noted for satisfaction (P < .05) for all comparisons except TA versus AP. Efficiency scores were FME, 11.6; AP, 14.3; TA, 14.5; and PVC, 22.9, with lower scores identifying increased efficiency. Conclusions: In general, subjects using the FME were superior in all variables except the movement variables. Future researchers should assess the removal task using specific protocols to determine whether the tools truly differ in terms of the movement created. PMID:12937522

  7. A cephalometric evaluation of high-pull molar headgear and face-bow neck strap therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, P

    1978-12-01

    The effects of two different extraoral appliances were evaluated over a 1-year period. Of the thirty-seven cases selected for study, twenty were treated with a face-bow neck strap and seventeen were treated with a high-pull molar headgear. Patients ranged in age from 10.10 to 16.6 years and averaged 13.4 years. The appliances exerted less than 600 Gm. of force per side and were worn for 12 to 16 hours per day. All cases were fully banded, and extraction and nonextraction treatment were included. An analysis of pretreatment data revealed a high degree of selection. Patients selected for high-pull treatment generally exhibited larger anterior face heights, steeper mandibular plane angles, and a greater amount of tooth eruption of the upper first molars than the patients selected for neck strap therapy. A control group of ten untreated subjects was matched to each treatment group to permit assessment of the impact of treatment on growth. Relative to normal growth, treatment with face-bow neck strap traction tended to direct the maxilla and mandible downward and backward. The palatal plane was lowered anteriorly and point A was retracted. The maxillary molars were extruded, and concomitantly an increase in anterior face height and mandibular plane angle was observed. On the other hand, the high-pull molar headgear traction resulted only in increased mandibular molar eruption. However, there was also a nonsignificant tendency for point A to be held back and for lower anterior face height to increase. The comparison of the two treatment samples revealed that the functional occlusal plane was tipped down at the back as the maxillary molars were more extruded in the neck strap sample. In the high-pull sample, the functional occlusal plane was unchanged and the mandibular molars were more extruded than they were in the neck strap group.

  8. Variable-beamwidth antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Two effective designs have been developed for Cassegrain and Gregorian antenna configurations. Each provides for both high-gain and low-gain operations. Cassegrain system sacrifices some efficiency due to small amount of increased spillover loss. Gregorian system provides for independent spillover control with two feeds.

  9. Coupling and matching study of the ICRF antenna for W7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.; Krivska, A.; Louche, F.; Ongena, J.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Van Eester, D.; Vervier, M.

    2014-02-12

    A tight antenna plug consisting in a pair of straps with strong pre-matching covers the first selected frequency band (25-38MHz) for W7-X and provides the toroidal phasings for heating, current drive and wall conditioning. Another plug-in with two short strap triplets is devoted for operation around 76MHz. The antenna coupling to a reference plasma profile is first analyzed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II. It shows the radiation power spectra for the different phasing cases and indicates the problem of the edge power deposition through the Alfven resonance occurring when the operating frequency is lower than the majority cyclotron frequency. Matrices provided by the TOPICA code are used for the matching-decoupling study of the first antenna plug. The large mutual coupling between the 2 straps is counterbalanced by the use of a decoupler. Finally the tunable 5-port junction used to feed in parallel each triplet of the second plug-in is analyzed by means of MWS simulation together with its decoupling-matching system.

  10. Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace and Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann (Inventor); Miranda, Felix (Inventor); Van Keuls, Frederick (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for lightweight, customizable antenna with improved performance and mechanical properties are disclosed. In some aspects, aerogels can be used, for example, as a substrate for antenna fabrication. The reduced weight and expense, as well as the increased ability to adapt antenna designs, permits a systems to mitigate a variety of burdens associated with antennas while providing added benefits.

  11. Design and realisation of tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators for dosimetric studies on microwave antennas for interstitial ablation.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, V; Pinto, R; Lodato, R; Lovisolo, G A; Cavagnaro, M

    2012-07-01

    Thermal ablation therapies, based on electromagnetic field sources (interstitial or intracavitary antennas) at radio and microwave frequencies, are increasingly used in medicine due to their proven efficacy in the treatment of many diseases (tumours, stenosis, etc). Such techniques need standardized procedures, still not completely consolidated, as to analyze the behaviour of antennas for treatment optimisation. Several tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators (also named phantoms) have been developed to represent human head tissues, and extensively used in the analysis of human exposure to the electromagnetic emissions from hand-held devices; yet, very few studies have considered other tissues, as those met in ablation therapies. The objective of this study was to develop phantoms of liver and kidney tissue to experimentally characterise interstitial microwave antennas in reference conditions. Phantom properties depend on the simulated target tissue (liver or kidney) and the considered frequency (2.45 GHz in this work), addressing the need for a transparent liquid to easily control the positioning of the probe with respect to the antenna under test. An experimental set-up was also developed and used to characterise microwave ablation antenna performances. Finally, a comparison between measurements and numerical simulations was performed for the cross-validation of the experimental set-up and the numerical model. The obtained results highlight the fundamental role played by dielectric simulators in the development of microwave ablation devices, representing the first step towards the definition of a procedure for the ablation treatment planning.

  12. Circuit model of the ITER-like antenna for JET and simulation of its control algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, Frédéric; Dumortier, Pierre; Helou, Walid; Křivská, Alena; Lerche, Ernesto

    2015-12-01

    The ITER-like Antenna (ILA) for JET [1] is a 2 toroidal by 2 poloidal array of Resonant Double Loops (RDL) featuring in-vessel matching capacitors feeding RF current straps in conjugate-T manner, a low impedance quarter-wave impedance transformer, a service stub allowing hydraulic actuator and water cooling services to reach the aforementioned capacitors and a 2nd stage phase-shifter-stub matching circuit allowing to correct/choose the conjugate-T working impedance. Toroidally adjacent RDLs are fed from a 3dB hybrid splitter. It has been operated at 33, 42 and 47MHz on plasma (2008-2009) while it presently estimated frequency range is from 29 to 49MHz. At the time of the design (2001-2004) as well as the experiments the circuit models of the ILA were quite basic. The ILA front face and strap array Topica model was relatively crude and failed to correctly represent the poloidal central septum, Faraday Screen attachment as well as the segmented antenna central septum limiter. The ILA matching capacitors, T-junction, Vacuum Transmission Line (VTL) and Service Stubs were represented by lumped circuit elements and simple transmission line models. The assessment of the ILA results carried out to decide on the repair of the ILA identified that achieving routine full array operation requires a better understanding of the RF circuit, a feedback control algorithm for the 2nd stage matching as well as tighter calibrations of RF measurements. The paper presents the progress in modelling of the ILA comprising a more detailed Topica model of the front face for various plasma Scrape Off Layer profiles, a comprehensive HFSS model of the matching capacitors including internal bellows and electrode cylinders, 3D-EM models of the VTL including vacuum ceramic window, Service stub, a transmission line model of the 2nd stage matching circuit and main transmission lines including the 3dB hybrid splitters. A time evolving simulation using the improved circuit model allowed to design and

  13. Circuit model of the ITER-like antenna for JET and simulation of its control algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, Frédéric Křivská, Alena; Helou, Walid; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium

    2015-12-10

    The ITER-like Antenna (ILA) for JET [1] is a 2 toroidal by 2 poloidal array of Resonant Double Loops (RDL) featuring in-vessel matching capacitors feeding RF current straps in conjugate-T manner, a low impedance quarter-wave impedance transformer, a service stub allowing hydraulic actuator and water cooling services to reach the aforementioned capacitors and a 2nd stage phase-shifter-stub matching circuit allowing to correct/choose the conjugate-T working impedance. Toroidally adjacent RDLs are fed from a 3dB hybrid splitter. It has been operated at 33, 42 and 47MHz on plasma (2008-2009) while it presently estimated frequency range is from 29 to 49MHz. At the time of the design (2001-2004) as well as the experiments the circuit models of the ILA were quite basic. The ILA front face and strap array Topica model was relatively crude and failed to correctly represent the poloidal central septum, Faraday Screen attachment as well as the segmented antenna central septum limiter. The ILA matching capacitors, T-junction, Vacuum Transmission Line (VTL) and Service Stubs were represented by lumped circuit elements and simple transmission line models. The assessment of the ILA results carried out to decide on the repair of the ILA identified that achieving routine full array operation requires a better understanding of the RF circuit, a feedback control algorithm for the 2nd stage matching as well as tighter calibrations of RF measurements. The paper presents the progress in modelling of the ILA comprising a more detailed Topica model of the front face for various plasma Scrape Off Layer profiles, a comprehensive HFSS model of the matching capacitors including internal bellows and electrode cylinders, 3D-EM models of the VTL including vacuum ceramic window, Service stub, a transmission line model of the 2nd stage matching circuit and main transmission lines including the 3dB hybrid splitters. A time evolving simulation using the improved circuit model allowed to design and

  14. Effect of upper strap downward displacement on n95 filtering facepiece respirator fit factors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Raymond J; Palmiero, Andrew J; Liu, Yuewei; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Zhuang, Ziqing

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen subjects underwent three replicates of quantitative respirator fit-testing with N95 filtering facepiece respirators that were donned with the upper strap high on the occiput, as per the manufacturers' donning instructions. Each fit-test was immediately followed by repeat fit-testing with the upper strap downwardly displaced to the level of the ear sulcus to determine any change in fit factors that might occur with upper strap downward slippage. A total of 35/45 (78%) initial fit-tests had a passing score (fit factor ≥ 100) with the top strap high on the occiput and 33/35 (94%) of these passed subsequent fit-testing after the top strap was displaced downward to the ear sulcus. Geometric mean fit factors for the initial passed fit-tests, and following downward strap displacement, were 217 ± 1.6 and 207 ± 1.9, respectively (p = 0.64). Downward displacement of the top strap did not significantly impact fit factors of N95 FFRs that had previously passed fit-testing. PMID:24274974

  15. Does p49/STRAP, a SRF-binding protein (SRFBP1), modulate cardiac mitochondrial function in aging?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Williams, Emmanuel D; Azhar, Gohar; Rogers, Steven C; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2016-09-01

    p49/STRAP (SRFBP1) is a transcriptional regulator that has been implicated in cardiac aging. p49/STRAP has a SRF binding domain and a BUD22 domain (which modulates cellular growth rate and cell size). We have observed that p49/STRAP alters the intracellular NAD/NADH ratio and induces protein deacetylation. Here we report that p49/STRAP overexpression caused the deacetylation of histone H4 on lysine 16 (H4K16) and suppressed the expression of PGC-1α as well as mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 at both the mRNA and protein levels. P49/STRAP also reduced mitochondrial size, mitochondrial membrane potential and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate. We noted that P49/STRAP expression was increased in the old versus young adult mouse hearts and also increased with advancing population doubling levels in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). It is therefore very plausible that increased expression of p49/STRAP in late life may alter the status of histone acetylation and impact mitochondrial dynamics and thereby reduce mitochondrial function and cardiac performance during mammalian senescence. PMID:27337995

  16. Antenna system analysis and design for automatic detection and real-time tracking of electron Bernstein waves in FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, W.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Figini, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Granucci, G.; Moro, A.

    2014-05-01

    The algorithm for the automatic control of the new front steering antenna of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade device has been improved, in view of forthcoming experiments aimed at testing the mode conversion of electron cyclotron waves at a frequency of 140 GHz. The existing antenna system has been prepared to provide two-point real-time measurements of electron Bernstein waves and to allow real-time tracking of the optimal conversion region. This required an accurate analysis of the antenna to minimize the risk of a mechanical damage of the movable launching mirrors, when accessing the high toroidal launching angles needed for this kind of experiment. A detailed description is presented of the work carried out to safely reach and validate the desired range of steering angles, which include the region of interest, and a technique is proposed to track and chase the correct line of sight for electron Bernstein waves detection during the shot.

  17. The effect of simulated school load carriage configurations on shoulder strap tension forces and shoulder interface pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Hamish W; Stevenson, Joan M; Reid, Susan A; Legg, Stephen J

    2005-03-01

    Recently, several studies have addressed the physical demands of school student's load carriage, in particular the load weight carried, using physical demands indicators such as oxygen consumption, gait, and posture. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different load carriage configurations on shoulder strap tension forces and shoulder interface pressure during simulated school student's load carriage. A load carriage simulator was used to compare shoulder strap forces and shoulder pressure for 32 combinations of gait speed, backpack weight, load distribution, shoulder strap length and use of a hip-belt. The results showed that the manipulation of backpack weight, hip-belt use and shoulder strap length had a strong effect on shoulder strap tension and shoulder pressure. Backpack weight had the greatest influence on shoulder strap tension and shoulder pressure, whereas hip-belt use and then shoulder strap adjustment had the next greatest effects, respectively. While it is clear that researchers and practitioners are justified in focusing on load magnitude in backpack studies as it has the greatest effect on shoulder forces, hip-belt use and shoulder strap adjustment should also be examined further as they too may have significant effects on the demands placed on backpack users. Based on the present findings, school students should wear their backpacks with the least weight possible, use the hip-belt if present, allow a reasonable amount of looseness in the shoulder straps and should position the heaviest items closest to their back. However, more detailed work using human participants needs to be undertaken before these recommendations can be confirmed. PMID:15694074

  18. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  19. The effect of ICRF antenna phasing on metal impurities in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; Bush, C.; Colestock, P.L.; Greene, G.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Stratton, B.; von Goeler, S.; Wilson, J.R.; Gardner, W.; Hoffman, D.; Lysojvan, A.

    1989-07-01

    ICRF power levels of up to 2.8 MW were achieved during the 1988 experimental run on TFTR. Metal impurity concentrations (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni) and Z/sub eff/ were monitored during ICRF heating by x-ray pulse height analysis and uv spectroscopy. Antenna phasing was the key variable affecting ICRF performance. No increase in metallic impurities was observed for P/sub rf//approx lt/ 2.8 MW with the antenna straps 0-/Pi/, while a measurable increase in titanium (Faraday screen material) was observed for P/sub rf/ /approx gt/ 1.0 MW with 0-0 phasing. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  20. The Radarsat SAR multi-beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins-Camelo, L.; Cooper, R. T.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1984-10-01

    Radarsat, the Canadian radar imaging satellite, will have a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna as one of its sensors. The requirements on the performance of the SAR antenna are such as to make it a complex system. Radarsat is required to have some unique characteristics which present some new challenges to the antenna designers. The requirements for switchability among 4 shaped beams and high power of transmit operation are major design constraints which strongly impact on the antenna complexity, weight, and cost. A trade-off study was carried out to select the preferred antenna type for the Radarsat SAR function. The antenna types analyzed were planar-array and array-fed reflector. A set of comparison criteria was developed. The antenna concepts studied were then compared against these criteria, and a final decision was reached.

  1. Integrated broadband bowtie antenna on transparent substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Shiyi; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhan, Qiwen; Pan, Zeyu; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent glass substrate. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on glass substrates utilizing CMOS compatible processes and measuring their resonance frequencies. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. The far-field radiation pattern of the bowtie antenna is measured, and it shows dipole-like characteristics with large beam width. Such a broadband antenna will be useful for a myriad of applications, ranging from wireless communications to electromagnetic wave detection.

  2. Land vehicle antennas for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.; Paschen, D.; Pieper, B. V.

    1985-01-01

    Antenna designs applicable to future satellite mobile vehicle communications are examined. Microstrip disk, quadrifilar helix, cylindrical microstrip, and inverted V and U crossed-dipole low gain antennas (3-5 dBic) that provide omnidirectional coverage are described. Diagrams of medium gain antenna (9-12 dBic) concepts are presented; the antennas are classified into three types: (1) electronically steered with digital phase shifters; (2) electronically switched with switchable power divider/combiner; and (3) mechanically steered with motor. The operating characteristics of a conformal antenna with electronic beam steering and a nonconformal design with mechanical steering are evaluated with respect to isolation levels in a multiple satellite system. Vehicle antenna pointing systems and antenna system costs are investigated.

  3. Shuttle Millimeter Wave Communications Experiment (MWCE) antenna system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An antenna system requirements report is presented. Topics reported include: (1) antenna system specifications; (2) waveguide circuitry; (3) feed horn design; (4) dish reflectors; (5) gimbal systems; and (6) summary of system design.

  4. An antenna-pointing mechanism for the ETS-6 K-band Single Access (KSA) antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Noboru; Amano, Takahiro; Ohhashi, Toshiro; Wachi, Shigeo

    1991-01-01

    Both the design philosophy for the Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM) to be used for the K-band Single Access (KSA) antenna system and experimental results of the APM Engineering Model (EM) tests are described. The KSA antenna system will be flown on the Engineering Test Satellite 6 (ETS-6).

  5. A detailed comparison of antenna impedance measurements on ASDEX Upgrade with the ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna code TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Coster, D.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Siegl, G.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Verdoolaege, G.; Braun, F.; Fünfgelder, H.; D'Inca, R.; Suttrop, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Schweinzer, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Mlynek, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-09-01

    New antenna diagnostics on the ASDEX Upgrade, in the form of voltage and current probe pairs on the feeding lines of each ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna, close to the input ports, have made it possible to study in detail the behavior of the ASDEX Upgrade two-strap antenna under changing loading conditions, and compare these measurements with the results of simulations using the TOPICA code. The present work extends previous studies by using the input impedance (more precisely, the complex voltage reflection coefficient Γ ) on each antenna port for comparison, instead of the more commonly used loading resistance or coupled power. The electron density profiles used for the simulation were reconstructed from the deuterium-carbon-nitrogen interferometer and lithium beam emission spectroscopy measurements, edge-localized mode-synchronized and averaged over time intervals from 10 to 200 ms depending on the case; 112 cases were compared from seven ASDEX Upgrade discharges with widely different plasma parameters and two operating frequencies (30 and 36.5 MHz). Very good agreement in \\vert Γ\\vert was found with the measurements on antenna 3 (<3% averaged over a shot), and good agreement was found with antennas 1 and 2 (<10%) the code reproduced the correct trend in loading resistance {{R}\\text{L}} in a significant majority of cases, although the discrepancies in the absolute values were rather high (up to  ˜50%) due to high reflection. Sources of discrepancy are discussed.

  6. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  7. Compact Miniaturized Antenna for 210 MHz RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Chun, Kue

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a miniaturized square-ring antenna. The miniaturized antenna, with overall dimensions of approximately one tenth of a wavelength (0.1 ), was designed to operate at around 210 MHz, and was intended for radio-frequency identification (RFID) application. One unique feature of the design is the use of a parasitic element to improve the performance and impedance matching of the antenna. The use of parasitic elements to enhance the gain and bandwidth of patch antennas has been demonstrated and reported in the literature, but such use has never been applied to miniaturized antennas. In this work, we will present simulation results and discuss design parameters and their impact on the antenna performance.

  8. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  9. Microstrip antennas for SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Current and future microstrip antenna technology development for Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) are summarized. Some of the electrical and mechanical characteristics of previously and presently developed microstrip SAR antennas are shown. The SEASAT, the SIR-A and presently the SIR-B antennas are all designed for operation at L-band with approximately 22 MHz of bandwidth. The antennas have linear polarization with minimum of 20 dB of polarization purity. Both the SEASAT and SIR-A antennas were designed for a fixed pointing angle of 20.5 deg and 47 deg, respectively. However, the SIR-B has the added feature of mechanical beam steering in elevation (range). With the exception of different mechanical characteristics, it is concluded that present spaceborne SAR antennas have only single frequency and single polarization performance. The lack of large spaceborne antennas operating at the higher degree of fabrication tolerance required for a given performance; and larger feed and radiating element losses.

  10. Multifrequency synthetic aperture radar antenna comparison study. [for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Three multifrequency, dual polarization SAR antenna designs are reviewed. The SAR antenna design specifications were for a "straw man' SAR which would approximate the requirements for projected shuttle-based SAR's. Therefore, the physical dimensions were constrained to be compatible with the space shuttle. The electrical specifications were similar to those of SIR-A and SIR-B with the addition of dual polarization and the addition of C and X band operation. Early in the antenna design considerations, three candidate technologies emerged as having promise. They were: (1) microstrip patch planar array antennas, (2) slotted waveguide planar array antennas, and (3) open-ended waveguide planar array antennas.

  11. Circularly polarized microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Engst, B.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1985-01-01

    A simple microstrip antenna can be made to radiate EM waves of any polarization, in particular, the circular polarization (CP) without any phasing network and power divider. A simple and accurate theory for this family of antennas was developed. However, the CP bandwidth, (CPBW) the bandwidth in which the axial ratio (AR) is less than a certain specified value, is very small. Most of the experimental designs were made for a feed placed along the diagonal of the patch. It is shown that there are practically infinitely many possible designs with different feed location. The speculation that other designs might give a wider bandwidth is clarified and an effective method for broadening the bandwidth is shown.

  12. Analysis of ICRH antenna loading data in TEXTOR obtained during gas injection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, I.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Dumortier, P.; Koch, R.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.

    2011-12-23

    The possibility of increasing the coupling of ICRH power to plasmas on TEXTOR by gas injection was investigated, for a given voltage applied at the input of an antenna pair. The antenna pair was operated in the conjugated T mode, D(H) heating was used. Modeling of the antenna by transmission line theory shows that load resilience is maintained in a broad range of independent resistance variation for each strap. It is found that the absolute value of the reflection coefficient can be maintained below 0.2 for typical values of resistance measured in plasma shots (2-10 {Omega}/m) in good matching conditions. During gas injection, the loading resistance showed a clear increase with increasing line average electron density measured close to the plasma edge. Evidence of fast wave eigenmodes was also found, as characteristic resonant behavior of loading resistance and antenna self-inductance, due to poor absorption in the plasma caused by high H minority concentration.

  13. Structural Analysis of the JET TAE Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, P.H.; Snipes, J.; Fasoli, A.F.; Testa, D.; Walton, B.

    2005-05-15

    In this paper the mechanical design of the new active MHD antennas for JET is described and the structural/mechanical analysis for the antennas is presented. These new antennas replace the existing n = 1 or 2 saddle coils with a set of eight smaller antennas designed to excite Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE's) with high toroidal mode number (n {approx} 10) in the frequency range of 30 kHz-500 kHz. TAE's with these higher mode numbers are expected in ITER and could enhance the loss of fast alpha particles in a burning plasma regime. By studying the properties of stable TAE's excited actively by these antennas, high performance regimes of operation avoiding unstable fast particle driven modes can be found. A more complete overview of the experiment may be found in Reference 1. Two antenna assemblies will be installed at toroidally opposite positions. Antenna wires are protected from the plasma heat flux by CFC tiles mounted on mini-limiters, located between the individual windings. The main structural element is a box section. The support scheme utilizes cantilevered brackets that connect to the saddle coils, and 'wing' brackets which add support to the top of the frame. Conservative estimates of the disruption currents in the MHD antennas and frame were used to calculate loading and resulting stress in the antenna structure. Fields, field transients, and halo current specifications were provided by JET. The frame originally was designed as a continuous loop, and was converted to an open structure to break eddy current loops. Antenna eddy currents were computed assuming the antenna is shorted. In the final design, frame forces primarily result from halo currents entering around the mini limiters that now protect the antenna windings. Accelerations due to the vessel disruption dynamic response were included in the loading. The antenna mechanical design has been shown to perform adequately for all identified disruption loading.

  14. Correlations between Muscle Activities and Strap Length and Types of School Bag during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine correlations between muscle activities and strap length and type of the school bag during walking. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy students. An 8-channel electromyograph (8-EMG) (Pocket EMG, BTS, Italy) was used to measure the muscle activities of the right upper trapezius, left upper trapezius, right erector spinae and left erector spinae during walking with the bag. The collected data were analyzed using Kendall’s coefficient of concordance. [Results] The muscle activities of the right upper trapezius, left upper trapezius, right erector spinae and left erector spinae were significantly higher when walking with a shoulder bag than when walking with a backpack. No significant correlations were found between muscle activities and strap lengths of the bag. [Conclusion] While carrying a bag, the activities of the trunk muscles were influenced more by the type of the bag than by the strap length. These results indicate that a backpack is a better method of carrying a load than a shoulder bag. PMID:25540502

  15. Releveling and behavior of strap-retrofitted damaged test foundations exposed to mine subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, G.G.

    1997-09-01

    Test foundation walls were constructed in an area of planned subsidence. These crawl space-sized block bearing walls were located in the tension zone of a longwall panel. The test walls were 1.2 m (40 ft) long and were vertically loaded on top with soil binds to simulate the weight of a house. As the longwall proceeded past these test foundations, subsidence movements damaged the test structures. These damaged foundations were then structurally and aesthetically repaired by using a steel strap retrofit and applying a cementitious surface coating. The repaired test foundations underwent significant subsequent subsidence as an adjacent longwall was mined beneath. The response of the repaired foundation is summarized in this paper. The steel straps were also used to relevel another set of the test foundations after they were tilted and damaged by subsidence. First, the straps were applied to the block bearing walls, and then wall jacks were used to lift the upper portion of the walls to a level position. This releveling procedure is outlined with the results.

  16. Correlations between Muscle Activities and Strap Length and Types of School Bag during Walking.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine correlations between muscle activities and strap length and type of the school bag during walking. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy students. An 8-channel electromyograph (8-EMG) (Pocket EMG, BTS, Italy) was used to measure the muscle activities of the right upper trapezius, left upper trapezius, right erector spinae and left erector spinae during walking with the bag. The collected data were analyzed using Kendall's coefficient of concordance. [Results] The muscle activities of the right upper trapezius, left upper trapezius, right erector spinae and left erector spinae were significantly higher when walking with a shoulder bag than when walking with a backpack. No significant correlations were found between muscle activities and strap lengths of the bag. [Conclusion] While carrying a bag, the activities of the trunk muscles were influenced more by the type of the bag than by the strap length. These results indicate that a backpack is a better method of carrying a load than a shoulder bag. PMID:25540502

  17. Process for producing elements from a fused bath using a metal strap and ceramic electrode body nonconsumable electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a ceramic electrode body and a metal subassembly of a metal conductor rod and at least one metal strap affixed to an end of the rod with opposing portions extending radially outwardly from the rod axis and having the ends of the strap attached to the electrode body.

  18. 24 CFR 3285.403 - Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line... Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.403 Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps. If sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, or shear wall straps are installed on the home, they must be connected to...

  19. 24 CFR 3285.403 - Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line... Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.403 Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps. If sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, or shear wall straps are installed on the home, they must be connected to...

  20. Process for producing elements from a fused bath using a metal strap and ceramic electrode body nonconsumable electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, S.C.

    1984-07-03

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly is described suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a ceramic electrode body and a metal subassembly of a metal conductor rod and at least one metal strap affixed to an end of the rod with opposing portions extending radially outwardly from the rod axis and having the ends of the strap attached to the electrode body. 7 figs.

  1. Design and realization of rat-race directional couplers for use in a constrained feed of a phased array X-band radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheijen, P. A. M.

    1987-07-01

    Directional hybrid ring couplers and power dividers were designed and realized for use in a planar constrained feed network of array antennas. Configurations in air stripline and in suspended stripline were considered, and theoretically analyzed using S-parameter techniques. Existing models for T-junction discontinuities were verified, and models for more realistic configurations were added. Hybrid ring couplers (so-called rat-race couplers) were realized in an air stripline configuration with coupling values in the X-band from 3 to 6 dB with a 1 dB increment.

  2. Dynamic interrogation of wireless antenna sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J.; Tjuatja, S.; Huang, H.; Sanders, J.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the dynamic interrogation of a wireless antenna sensor for mechanical vibration monitoring. In order to interrogate the antenna resonant frequency at sufficient high speeds, a wireless interrogator that consists of a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) synthesizer, a signal demodulation unit, and a real-time digital signal processing program was developed. The principle of operation of the dynamic wireless sensing system is first described, followed by the description of the design and implementation of the antenna sensor and the wireless interrogator. After calibrate the antenna sensor response using static tensile tests, dynamic interrogation of the wireless antenna sensor was carried out by subjecting the test specimen to a sinusoidal tensile load. The resonant frequency shifts of the antenna sensor were compared with the strains calculated from the applied loads. A good agreement between the antenna sensor readings and the strain values were achieved. A sampling rate of up to 50 Hz was demonstrated.

  3. The p53 cofactor Strap exhibits an unexpected TPR motif and oligonucleotide-binding (OB)-fold structure.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cassandra J; Pike, Ashley C W; Maniam, Sandra; Sharpe, Timothy D; Coutts, Amanda S; Knapp, Stefan; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Bullock, Alex N

    2012-03-01

    Activation of p53 target genes for tumor suppression depends on the stress-specific regulation of transcriptional coactivator complexes. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is activated upon DNA damage by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Chk2 kinases and is a key regulator of the p53 response. In addition to antagonizing Mdm2, Strap facilitates the recruitment of p53 coactivators, including JMY and p300. Strap is a predicted TPR-repeat protein, but shows only limited sequence identity with any protein of known structure. To address this and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Strap activity we determined the crystal structure of the full-length protein at 2.05 Å resolution. The structure of Strap reveals an atypical six tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein that also contains an unexpected oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain. This previously unseen domain organization provides an extended superhelical scaffold allowing for protein-protein as well as protein-DNA interaction. We show that both of the TPR and OB-fold domains localize to the chromatin of p53 target genes and exhibit intrinsic regulatory activity necessary for the Strap-dependent p53 response.

  4. Microstrip antenna on tunable substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Mohanan, P.

    1995-05-01

    The tunable patch antenna configurations are becoming popular and attractive in many aspects. This was mainly due to the advent of ferrite thin film technology and tunable substrate materials. The integration of monolithic microwave circuits and antennas are becoming easy today. In the development of magnetic tuning of microstrip patch on ferrite substrate is presented by Rainville and Harackewiez. Radiation characteristics of such antennas are presented by Pozer. Band width and radiation characteristics of such tunable antennas are measured and compared. Usually the substrate losses are considered in the analysis and metallization losses are assumed to be ideal. The analysis of magnetic tunable radiator including metallization and ferrite substrate losses are presented. However, all such tuning and integration of circuits and antennas are mainly on ferrite substrate due to magnetic tuning. Recently, Varadan et al. established that the BaxSr1-xTiO3 series ferroelectric materials such as Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) are well suited for microwave phase shifter applications. It could be possible to change the dielectric constant of these materials more than 50% depending on the BST composition, by changing the applied bias voltage. Also, the porosity of BST can be controlled during processing to produce dielectric constants in the range of 15 to 1500, with some trade off in tunability. In this paper, we are presenting the possibility of designing a microstrip patch antenna on such tunable substrate. Such antennas are having the major advantage of electronic tunability and compact size.

  5. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohammed Lotfy

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5) and WLAN (5.2) bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR) units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA) at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  6. Antennas For Receiving Signals Broadcast Via Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Four different antennas designed for use in receiving radio AM and FM signals broadcast via Earth-orbiting satellites at carrier frequency of 2.05 GHz in right-hand circular polarization. Antennas small, lightweight, inexpensive units with low-to-medium-gain, quasi-omnidirectional radiation patterns. Designed for outdoor and indoor uses.

  7. Interstitial microwave antennas for thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Wang, Y J

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a new microwave antenna design with improved heating at the tip for interstitial hyperthermia and thermocoagulation. Temperature distribution patterns surrounding a conventional insulated antenna and the new sleeved coaxial slot radiator are measured in a saline phantom under transient and steady-state conditions. The new design provides an improved steady-state temperature distribution over the active region of the radiator. In contrast to the cold zone at the tip of a conventional insulated antenna the new sleeved coaxial slot antenna provides maximal (sixfold greater) power deposition at its tip. PMID:3559297

  8. Cable-catenary large antenna concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, W.

    1985-04-01

    Deployable to very large diameters (over 1000 ft), while still remaining compatible with a complete satellite system launch by STS, the cable-catenary antenna comprises: 8 radial deployable boom masts; a deployable hub and feed support center mast; balanced front and back, radial and circumferential catenary cabling for highly accurate (mm) surface control; no interfering cabling in the antenna field; and an RF reflecting mesh supported on the front catenaries. Illustrations show the antenna-satellite system deployed and stowed configurations; the antenna deployment sequence; the design analysis logic; the sizing analysis output, and typical parametric design data.

  9. Genetic programming techniques for thin-wire antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Terry H.

    2007-04-01

    Simple genetic algorithm optimizations often utilize fixed-length chromosomes containing a predefined set of parameters to be optimized. While such algorithms have successfully created electrically small narrow-band and large wide-band military antennas, they require the antenna designer to have a fairly concrete antenna representation prior to exercising the genetic algorithm. In this research we investigate the use of genetic programming (GP) techniques to "program" the design of simple thin-wire antennas. Genetic programming techniques offer the potential to create random, multi-arm, multi-dimension antennas from variable length, tree-like chromosomes. We present a new genetic programming paradigm for creating multi-branched, thin-wire, genetic antennas and describe how GP commands are represented and decoded into physical antenna structures. We present preliminary results obtained from this algorithm showing evolutions along Pareto fronts representing antenna electrical size, VSWR, and antenna quality factor (Q).

  10. Distributed control of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. M.; Hamidi, M.; Lin, Y. H.; Wang, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic way to choose control design parameters and to evaluate performance for large space antennas is presented. The structural dynamics and control properties for a Hoop and Column Antenna and a Wrap-Rib Antenna are characterized. Some results of the effects of model parameter uncertainties to the stability, surface accuracy, and pointing errors are presented. Critical dynamics and control problems for these antenna configurations are identified and potential solutions are discussed. It was concluded that structural uncertainties and model error can cause serious performance deterioration and can even destabilize the controllers. For the hoop and column antenna, large hoop and long meat and the lack of stiffness between the two substructures result in low structural frequencies. Performance can be improved if this design can be strengthened. The two-site control system is more robust than either single-site control systems for the hoop and column antenna.

  11. Antenna arrays. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-04-01

    A bibliography containing 161 abstracts concerning the use of antenna arrays in the fields of radar, communications, radio astronomy, navigation, electronic countermeasures, and spacecraft is presented. Topics include design, antenna radiation patterns, mathematical models, and performance.

  12. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  13. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  14. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  15. An antenna system for the microwave limb sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an initial design study to determine a suitable antenna system for the Microwave Limb Sounder experiment are presented. The resulting antenna system consisting of a parabolic cylinder fed by a number of Gregorian subreflectors is described and estimates of achievable antenna beamwidths and beam efficiencies are made. A short analysis is presented which yields expressions for the subreflector coordinates which can be implemented into existing programs for future antenna design and evaluation.

  16. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  17. Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Antennas.

    PubMed

    Puchades, Ivan; Rossi, Jamie E; Cress, Cory D; Naglich, Eric; Landi, Brian J

    2016-08-17

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dipole antennas have been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. Antennas of varying lengths were fabricated using flexible bulk MWCNT sheet material and evaluated to confirm the validity of a full-wave antenna design equation. The ∼20× improvement in electrical conductivity provided by chemically doped SWCNT thin films over MWCNT sheets presents an opportunity for the fabrication of thin-film antennas, leading to potentially simplified system integration and optical transparency. The resonance characteristics of a fabricated chlorosulfonic acid-doped SWCNT thin-film antenna demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and indicate that when the sheet resistance of the thin film is >40 ohm/sq no power is absorbed by the antenna and that a sheet resistance of <10 ohm/sq is needed to achieve a 10 dB return loss in the unbalanced antenna. The dependence of the return loss performance on the SWCNT sheet resistance is consistent with unbalanced metal, metal oxide, and other CNT-based thin-film antennas, and it provides a framework for which other thin-film antennas can be designed. PMID:27454334

  18. Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Antennas.

    PubMed

    Puchades, Ivan; Rossi, Jamie E; Cress, Cory D; Naglich, Eric; Landi, Brian J

    2016-08-17

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dipole antennas have been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. Antennas of varying lengths were fabricated using flexible bulk MWCNT sheet material and evaluated to confirm the validity of a full-wave antenna design equation. The ∼20× improvement in electrical conductivity provided by chemically doped SWCNT thin films over MWCNT sheets presents an opportunity for the fabrication of thin-film antennas, leading to potentially simplified system integration and optical transparency. The resonance characteristics of a fabricated chlorosulfonic acid-doped SWCNT thin-film antenna demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and indicate that when the sheet resistance of the thin film is >40 ohm/sq no power is absorbed by the antenna and that a sheet resistance of <10 ohm/sq is needed to achieve a 10 dB return loss in the unbalanced antenna. The dependence of the return loss performance on the SWCNT sheet resistance is consistent with unbalanced metal, metal oxide, and other CNT-based thin-film antennas, and it provides a framework for which other thin-film antennas can be designed.

  19. New low-antimony alloy for straps and cycling service in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prengaman, R. David

    Lead-antimony alloys used for the positive grids in lead-acid batteries for cycling service have generally used antimony contents of 4.5 wt.% and above. Tubular batteries for cycling service that impart high compression of the active material to the grid surface via gauntlet use alloys with antimony contents as low as 1.5 wt.%. These batteries are generally employed in less-severe cycling service. Value-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries can give good cycling service without lead-antimony in the positive grid, but require a high tin content and high compression. The change in automotive battery positive grid alloys to lead-calcium-tin and the tin contents of VRLA positive grids and straps have dramatically increased the tin content of the recycled grid and strap lead in the USA, Europe, and Australia. The higher tin contents can contaminate the lead used for lead-antimony battery grids and generally must be removed to low levels to meet the specifications. This study describes a low-antimony alloy that contains a substantial amount of tin. The high tin content reduces the rate of corrosion of low-antimony positive grid alloys, improves conductivity, increases the bond between the grid and the active material, and cycles as well as the traditional 5-6 wt.% antimony alloys employed in conventional flat-plate batteries. The alloy is also used as a corrosion-resistant cast-on strap alloy for automotive batteries for high temperature service, as well as for posts, bushings, and connectors for all wet batteries.

  20. A pentanuclear lead(II) complex based on a strapped porphyrin with three different coordination modes.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, Stéphane; Furet, Eric; Roisnel, Thierry; Hijazi, Ismail; Halet, Jean-François; Boitrel, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    We have previously described Pb(II) and Bi(III) bimetallic complexes with overhanging carboxylic acid strapped porphyrins in which one metal ion is bound to the N-core ("out-of-plane", OOP), whereas the second one is bound to the strap ("hanging-atop", HAT). In such complexes, the hemidirected coordination sphere of a HAT Pb(II) cation provides sufficient space for an additional binding of a neutral ligand (e.g., DMSO). Interestingly, investigations of the HAT metal coordination mode in a single strap porphyrin show that a HAT Pb(II) can also interact via intermolecular coordination bonds, allowing the self-assembly of two bimetallic complexes. In the pentanuclear Pb(II) complex we are describing in this Article, three different coordination modes were found. The OOP Pb(II) remains inert toward the supramolecular assembling process, whereas the HAT Pb(II) cation, in addition to its intramolecular carboxylate and regular exogenous acetate groups, coordinates an additional exogenous acetate. These two acetates are shared with a third lead(II) cation featuring a holo-directed coordination sphere, from which a centro-symmetric complex is assembled. Density functional theory calculations show some electron-density pockets in the vicinity of the hemidirected HAT Pb(II) atoms, which are associated with the presence of a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. On the basis of the comparison with other HAT Pb(II) and Bi(III) systems, the "volume" of this lone pair correlates well with the bond distance distributions and the number of the proximal oxygen atoms tethered to the post-transition metal cation. It thus follows the order 6-coordinate Bi(III) > 6-coordinate Pb(II) > 5-coordinate Pb(II).