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Sample records for anterior shoulder dislocations

  1. Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Yuk Chuen; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common problems encountered in orthopedic practice. However, simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is quite rare. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presented with simultaneous bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a trauma, complicated with a traction injury to the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Conclusions: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. The excessive traction force during closed reduction may lead to nerve palsy. Clear documentation of neurovascular status and adequate imaging before and after a reduction should be performed. PMID:25685749

  2. Anterior Shoulder Dislocations in Busy Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Janitzky, Angelika A.; Akyol, Can; Kesapli, Mustafa; Gungor, Faruk; Imak, Arefe; Hakbilir, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Shoulder joint is the most common joint requiring reduction by emergency physicians. Successful reduction is based on the overcoming of resistance of the shoulder muscles. Pain is the most important factor in resistance increase and sedation; analgesia and, in certain cases, intra-articular anesthesia are preferred for reduction. The external rotation (ER) method can provide successful reduction without causing an increase in muscle resistance if applied slowly and gently. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the usefulness of the ERWOSA method in the reduction of acute anterior shoulder dislocations (AASDs). This was a retrospective descriptive study. The records of patients admitted to the emergency department with anterior shoulder dislocation between 2009 and 2011 were reviewed for demographic data, sedation, analgesia, and discharge times. Patients were then divided into ERWOSA (n = 80) and external rotation and sedation-analgesia (ERASA, n = 59) groups, with regard to the application of SA (sedation-analgesia). The study data were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0 software for Windows. Numerical data were presented as mean ± standard deviation and categorical data as rates. A total of 139 patients were included in the study. The patients’ average age was 35 ± 14 years, 108 (77.7%) were male. Successful reduction rates for 59 male and 21 female patients in the ERWOSA group were 83% and 66.7% (78.7% total success), respectively. Successful reduction rates for 49 male and 10 female patients in the ERASA group were 87.7% and 90% (88.1% total success), respectively. The length of stay of the ERWOSA and ERASA groups in emergency services were found to be significantly different, with 55 ± 17 and 118 ± 23 minutes for each group, respectively. There were no complications. The ER method can be used in reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations without sedation and analgesia, if applied slowly enough to overcome

  3. BBilateral Neglected Anterior Shoulder Dislocation with Greater Tuberosity Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Tejas; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; Mehta, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Shoulder dislocations are a very common entity in routine orthopaedic practice. Chronic unreduced anterior dislocations of the shoulder are not very common. Neurological and vascular complications may occur as a result of an acute anterior dislocation of the shoulder or after a while in chronic unreduced shoulder dislocation. Open reduction is indicated for most chronic shoulder dislocations. We report a case of neglected bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation with bilateral displaced greater tuberosity fracture. To the best of our knowledge, only a handful cases have been reported in literature with bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation with bilateral fractures. Delayed diagnosis/reporting is a scenario which makes the list even slimmer and management all the more challenging. Case Report: We report a case of a 35-year-old male who had bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation and bilateral greater tuberosity fracture post seizure and failed to report it for a period of 30 days. One side was managed conservatively with closed reduction and immobilization and the other side with open reduction. No neurovascular complications pre or post reduction of shoulder were seen. Conclusion: Shoulder dislocations should always be suspected post seizures and if found should be treated promptly. Treatment becomes difficult for any shoulder dislocation that goes untreated for considerable period of time PMID:27703939

  4. Bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders at the start of a backstroke competition.

    PubMed

    Dlimi, Fayçal; Rhanim, Abdelkarim; Lahlou, Abdou; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Ouadghiri, Mohammed; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is very rare. A 20-year-old man presented with bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation as a result of a diving incident. He complained of pain and restriction of movement in both shoulders with abducted and externally rotated arms. Radiographs revealed that the shoulders were dislocated. The patient was treated with closed reduction and was able to resume swimming 3 months later. To our knowledge, this is the first bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders during a backstroke swimming competition that was caused by this mechanism of injury. The rarity of this lesion and its uncommon mechanism prompted us to relate this observation. PMID:22318344

  5. First-time anterior shoulder dislocations: should they be arthroscopically stabilised?

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Ee, Gerard WW; Tan, Andrew HC

    2014-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is inherently unstable because the large humeral head articulates with the small shadow glenoid fossa. Traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a relatively common athletic injury, and the high frequency of recurrent instability in young athletes after shoulder dislocation is discouraging to both the patient and the treating physician. Management of primary traumatic shoulder dislocation remains controversial. Traditionally, treatment involves initial immobilisation for 4–6 weeks, followed by functional rehabilitation. However, in view of the high recurrence rates associated with this traditional approach, there has been an escalating interest in determining whether immediate surgical intervention can lower the rate of recurrent shoulder dislocation, improving the patient’s quality of life. This review article aims to provide an overview of the nature and pathogenesis of first-time primary anterior shoulder dislocations, the widely accepted management modalities, and the efficacy of primary surgical intervention in first-time primary anterior shoulder dislocations. PMID:25631890

  6. Increasing preoperative dislocations and total time of dislocation affect surgical management of anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Dai, Xuesong; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to determine the relationship between number of preoperative shoulder dislocations and total dislocation time and the need to perform bone deficiency procedures at the time of primary anterior instability surgery. Our hypothesis was that need for bone deficiency procedures would increase with the total number and hours of dislocation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of primary instability surgeries performed by a single surgeon. Patients with <25% glenoid bone loss were treated with an isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair. Those who also had an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage. Patients with >25% glenoid bone loss were treated with Latarjet reconstruction. Number of dislocations and total dislocation time were examined for their relationship with the treatment method. Results: Ten arthroscopic Bankart repairs, 13 arthroscopic Bankart plus remplissage procedures, and 9 Latarjet reconstructions were available for review. Total dislocations (P = 0.012) and total hours of dislocation (P = 0.019) increased from the Bankart, to the remplissage, to the Latarjet groups. Patients with a total dislocation time of 5 h or more were more likely to require a Latarjet reconstruction (P = 0.039). Patients with only 1 preoperative dislocation were treated with an isolated Bankart repair in 64% (7 of 11) of cases, whereas those with 2 or more dislocations required a bone loss procedure in 86% (18 of 21) of cases (P = 0.013). Conclusion: Increasing number of dislocations and total dislocation time are associated with the development of glenoid and humeral head bony lesions that alter surgical management of anterior shoulder instability. The necessity for the addition of a remplissage to an arthroscopic Bankart repair or the use of a Latarjet reconstruction increases with only 1 recurrent dislocation. Level of evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25709237

  7. A Case of Neglected Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation: A Rare Entity with Unusual Mechanism of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choulapalle, Raghuram; Chokkarapu, Ramu; Kolluri, Ravi Kanth; Anne, Sreedhar Reddy; Perumal, Shanmuga Raju; Avadhanam, Pavan Kumar; Bheemanathuni, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral shoulder dislocations are rare, and if they occurred, posterior type of dislocations is common. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocations are very rare and occur due to trauma with unique mechanism of injury. We report a case of unreduced simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocations of shoulder without associated fractures in a forty-year-old man following a unique mechanism of injury; both hands of the patient were pulled from either side. To the best of our knowledge, this unusual mechanism of injury has not been reported in the literature. PMID:25973279

  8. Endovascular Repair of a Traumatic Axillary Pseudoaneurysm Following Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    SciTech Connect

    Stahnke, Michaela; Duddy, Martin J.

    2006-04-15

    Pseudoaneurysms due to musculoskeletal trauma are rare and comprise less than 2% of all pseudoaneurysms. We report a case of axillary pseudoaneurysm following anterior dislocation of the shoulder. The patient was successfully treated by endovascular intervention.

  9. Treatment of recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder by Laterjet-Bristow operation: an experience.

    PubMed

    Bajracharya, A R; Anjum, M P

    2007-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is common problem in orthopaedics. Management of recurrent shoulder dislocation is painstaking with different surgical procedures having varying outcomes. Laterjet-Bristow procedure provides stability and good functional outcome in Rowe scale and long term patient satisfaction. This is an observational prospective study carried out at two different tertiary care centers at Nepal and Pakistan using the same protocol. Habitual and pathological recurrent dislocations were excluded and all the recurrent dislocation of shoulder following initial traumatic anterior dislocation was included in this study. Standard Laterjet-Bristow operation was done and followed up for average of 27 months. Functional evaluation was done using Rowe score and graded as excellent, good, fair and poor. There were 12 men and 9 women with the mean ages of 23.4 years. At 12 months, 11 patients had fair result and seven patients had good result. At two years only three had fair result, 15 had good result and three patients had excellent result. Only three patients had poor result at one year while none had poor result at two year. The mean loss of external rotation in operated shoulder at one year was 24.33 degrees which decreased to 21.2 degrees at the end of second year. There was no restriction of external rotation in three patients at both yearly follow-ups while 18 patients had restriction in the range 10-30 degrees. Laterjet-Bristow can be the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of recurrent traumatic anterior dislocation and also as a salvage surgery for failed cases from other types of procedures. The only shortcoming of this procedure was some limitation in external rotation and minor loss in muscle power of that shoulder.

  10. Innovative use of computer-assisted tomography in the management of an irreducible anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Rajpal S.; Uppal, Harpal; Matharu, Gulraj; Brooks, Stuart; Srinivasan, Kapakuntra

    2011-01-01

    Anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a common injury which is often reduced in the emergency department, without specialist orthopedic input. We report a case of an irreducible locked anterior glenohumeral dislocation with impaction of the humeral head onto the antero-inferior glenoid rim and subsequent generation of a Hill–Sachs lesion. To our knowledge, we describe the first reported case of using computer-assisted tomography to generate a sequence of movements to safely disimpact the locked dislocation without causing further iatrogenic injury or a fracture through the humeral articular surface. This novel image-assisted closed reduction technique spared the patient from the morbidity associated with performing open reduction surgery. At 6-month follow-up, the patient reported no re-dislocations, returned to work and had excellent range of motion. PMID:22058641

  11. Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder with large Hillsach's lesion & deficient glenoid: Treated by autogenous bone graft & modified Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Peshin, Chetan; Jangira, Vivek; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Rohit

    2015-12-01

    Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder is rare in spite of the fact that the anterior dislocation of the shoulder is seen in around 90% of the acute cases. Most of the series of neglected dislocation describe posterior dislocation to be far more common.(1) (,2) We hereby report a case of the neglected anterior shoulder dislocation in a 15 year old boy who had a history of epilepsy. There was a large Hill Sachs lesion in humeral head which was impacted in glenoid inferiorly and glenoid was eburnated at that margin. The humeral head was reconstructed with a tricortical iliac graft. Glenoid was reconstructed by transfer of coracoids process of scapula to antero-inferior glenoid (modified Latarjet procedure). This case is unique because management of humeral head defect with bone graft is not mentioned in anterior dislocation.

  12. Neurovascular complications due to the Hippocrates method for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Markus; Polzer, Hans; Mutschler, Wolf

    2014-01-18

    In spite of the fact that the Hippocrates method hardly has been evaluated in a scientific manner and numerous associated iatrogenic complications have been reported, this method remains to be one of the most common techniques for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations. We report the case of a 69-year-old farmer under coumarin anticoagulant therapy who sustained acute first time anterior dislocation of his dominant right shoulder. By using the Hippocrates method with the patient under general anaesthesia, the brachial vein was injured and an increasing hematoma subsequently caused brachial plexus paresis by pressure. After surgery for decompression and vascular suturing, symptoms declined rapidly, but brachial plexus paresis still was not fully reversible after 3 mo of follow-up. The hazardousness of using the Hippocrates method can be explained by traction on the outstretched arm with force of the operator's body weight, direct trauma to the axillary region by the physician's heel, and the topographic relations of neurovascular structures and the dislocated humeral head. As there is a variety of alternative reduction techniques which have been evaluated scientifically and proofed to be safe, we strongly caution against the use of the Hippocrates method as a first line technique for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, especially in elder patients with fragile vessels or under anticoagulant therapy, and recommend the scapular manipulation technique or the Milch technique, for example, as a first choice. PMID:24649415

  13. Long-Lever-Arm Manipulation Under Anesthesia With Resultant Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Paul J; Placzek, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who underwent long-lever manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for adhesive capsulitis. Two weeks following MUA, the constellation of clinical findings raised concern for possible adverse outcomes. Radiographs were obtained, as well as subsequent magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Images revealed anterior shoulder dislocation with Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, and an anterior rotator cuff tear. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):707. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0412.

  14. Long-Lever-Arm Manipulation Under Anesthesia With Resultant Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Paul J; Placzek, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who underwent long-lever manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for adhesive capsulitis. Two weeks following MUA, the constellation of clinical findings raised concern for possible adverse outcomes. Radiographs were obtained, as well as subsequent magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Images revealed anterior shoulder dislocation with Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, and an anterior rotator cuff tear. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):707. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0412. PMID:27477474

  15. The surgical treatment of the recurrent dislocation on the shoulder joint with minimum invasion anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Ninković, Srdan; Stanković, Milan; Savić, Dragan; Matijević, Radmila; Milankov, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Shoulder joint is one of the spherical joints and one of the most movable but also the most unstable joint of locomotive apparatus. The aims of this work are to review and analyse the results of medical treatment of frontal recurrent dislocations on the shoulder with open surgery technique on the Clinic for Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology in Novi Sad in the period from 2002 to 2005. Twenty one patients with anterior recurrent dislocations of the the shoulder were operated on, 19 men and 2 women. The average age of those patients was 24.8 (15-40 year-olds). Ten patients had an injury of the left and 11 patients the injury of the right shoulder. There were eight handball players, four fighting skills players; two of them played volleyball and one was a basketball player. Six of them were not sportsmen. The preoperational and post operational mean value of the modified Rowe scale showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). Observing the patients after the operation in the period of 2 years, according to Neer scale, 3 patients (14.28%) had great results (grade over 90), 16 patients (76.19%) had a good result, (75-89), and only two patients (9.52%) had results less than 75. The measuring of the volume of movements after physical treatment in 12 patients (57.14%) has shown the decrease of the outside rotation. Open surgery treatment of the front unstable shoulder joint is reliable and time tested and it gives good clinical results in young sportsmen with undirected unstable, bigger number of dislocations and associated osseous defects.

  16. Modified Boytchev procedure for treatment of recurrent anterior dislocation of shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Anant Kumar; Ayan, Saankritya; Keshari, Vikas; Kundu, Debi; Mukhopadhyay, Kiran Kumar; Acharyya, Biplab

    2011-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different operations have been described for the treatment of recurrent anterior dislocation of shoulder. The Modified Boytchev procedure employs rerouting of the detached tip of coracoid process with its attached conjoined tendon (short head of biceps and coracobrachialis) deep to subscapularis and reattaches to its anatomical location. We conducted a study on evaluation of long-term effect of modified Boytchev procedure and to compare our results with other studies published in literature. Materials and Methods: Since June 2002, modified Boytchev procedure was performed on 48 patients, who presented with recurrent anterior dislocation. 45 were men and 3 were women and were in the age group of 18-40 years (mean 27.83±4.95 years). Forty patients were affected on the dominant side and rest on the non-dominant side. The mean number of dislocations in these patients was 18.22±12.08. The mean followup period was 58.13±19.06 months (range 18-96 months). The patients were evaluated by visual analogue score, modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's Score (ASES), and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score at the last followup. Results: All the patients regained almost preoperative range of forward flexion at the last followup. In the preoperative period the mean external rotation deficit at 0° and at 90° of abduction was 13.22°±5.16° and 18.06°±6.50°, respectively. At the last followup, the mean external rotation deficit at 0° and at 90° of abduction was 8.06°±2.47° and 8.95°±2.07°, respectively. This improvement in external rotation deficit was statistically significant (P<.05). Preoperative scores were compared with the most recent followup scores for all variables with use of a paired t test. All patients had significant improvement in visual analogue score, modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's Score (ASES), and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score at the last followup. Four of the

  17. RESULTS FROM FILLING “REMPLISSAGE” ARTHROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Benegas, Eduardo; Prada, Flávia de Santis; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Sunada, Edwin Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical result from the filling (“remplissage”) technique in association with Bankart lesion repair for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Nine patients (10 shoulders), with a mean follow-up of 13.7 months, presented traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. All of them had a Bankart lesion, associated with a Hill-Sachs lesion showing the “engaging” sign. The Hill-Sachs lesion defect was measured and showed an average bone loss of 17.3% (7.7% to 26.7%) in relation to the diameter of the humeral head. All the cases underwent arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion, together with filling of the Hill-Sachs lesion by means of tenodesis of the infraspinatus. Results: The Rowe score ranged from 22.5 (10 to 45) before the operation to 80.5 (5 to 100) after the operation (p > 0.001). The UCLA score ranged from 18.0 (8 to 29) to 31.1 (21 to 31) (p > 0.001). The measurements of external and internal rotation at abduction of 90° after the operation were 63.5° (45° to 90°) and 73° (50° to 92°) respectively. Two patients presented recurrence (one with dislocation and the other with subluxation). None of the patients presented pain in the region of the infraspinatus tendon after the operation. Conclusion: Over the short term, the filling (“remplissage”) arthroscopic technique produced improvements in functional scores and a low complication rate when used for treating glenohumeral instability associated with Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27027073

  18. [Pre-hospital treatment of an anterior shoulder dislocation: medico-legal concerns].

    PubMed

    Möhler, A; Arikan, H; Gris, M

    2015-01-01

    A man of 23 years, diabetic of type 1, shows a functional handicap of the right upper limb following a convulsion in the context of hypoglycemia. On arrival of the "S.A.M.U.", the physician diagnoses an anterior shoulder dislocation that he decides to reduce on the spot after analgesic treatment. The X-ray examination at the emergency shows a reduction of the dislocation as well as a fracture of the greater tuberosity. Has the fracture followed the convulsion or the reduction movement ? The absence of an X-ray examination before the reduction movement presents a forensic medical problem. Certain criteria mentioned in several studies would allow the reduction without X-ray before. However, these studies remain controversial. PMID:26749634

  19. Ultrasound-guided intra-articular lidocaine block for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Kristen; Boniface, Keith; Cohen, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of successful reduction of an anterior shoulder dislocation after ultrasound-guided intra-articular lidocaine (IAL) block with subsequent sonographic confirmation of reduction. Current literature suggests that IAL can provide similar levels of analgesia as intravenous sedation, and IAL block is associated with lower complication rates and shorter emergency department stays. However, these studies may be limited by uncertainty about the accuracy of landmark-based glenohumeral injections. The use of beside ultrasound may improve the effectiveness of IAL block for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation and provide a mechanism for immediate postreduction evaluation of the placement of the humeral head.

  20. Chronic Irreducible Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder without Significant Functional Deficit.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hoejeong; Yoon, Yeo-Seung; Shin, Ji-Soo; Shin, John Junghun; Kim, Doosup

    2016-09-01

    Shoulder dislocation is frequently encountered by orthopedists, and closed manipulation is often sufficient to treat the injury in an acute setting. Although most dislocations are diagnosed and managed promptly, there are rare cases that are missed or neglected, leading to a chronically dislocated state of the joint. They are usually irreducible and cause considerable pain and functional disability in most affected patients, prompting the need to find a surgical method to reverse the worsening conditions caused by the dislocated joint. However, there are cases of even greater rarity in which chronic shoulder dislocations are asymptomatic with minimal functional or structural degeneration in the joint. These patients are usually left untreated, and most show good tolerance to their condition without developing disabling symptoms or significant functional loss over time. We report on one such patient who had a chronic shoulder dislocation for more than 2 years without receiving treatment. PMID:27583119

  1. Chronic Irreducible Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder without Significant Functional Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoejeong; Yoon, Yeo-Seung; Shin, Ji-Soo; Shin, John Junghun

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is frequently encountered by orthopedists, and closed manipulation is often sufficient to treat the injury in an acute setting. Although most dislocations are diagnosed and managed promptly, there are rare cases that are missed or neglected, leading to a chronically dislocated state of the joint. They are usually irreducible and cause considerable pain and functional disability in most affected patients, prompting the need to find a surgical method to reverse the worsening conditions caused by the dislocated joint. However, there are cases of even greater rarity in which chronic shoulder dislocations are asymptomatic with minimal functional or structural degeneration in the joint. These patients are usually left untreated, and most show good tolerance to their condition without developing disabling symptoms or significant functional loss over time. We report on one such patient who had a chronic shoulder dislocation for more than 2 years without receiving treatment. PMID:27583119

  2. The treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation by the modified Bristow-Helfet procedure.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, D B

    1984-03-01

    South African orthopaedic surgeons have been in the forefront of the development of reconstructive procedures performed for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. In addition to the Johannesburg stapling operation described by G. T. du Toit and D. Roux, Professor A. Helfet of Cape Town was the first to describe the coracoid transplantation operation in 1958. A modified form of this operation was performed on 31 patients between August 1975 and February 1981. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 38 months, and no recurrences were encountered in patients who had had true involuntary recurrent subluxation or dislocation. The operative technique is described in detail as it is considered that adequate exposure and accurate placement of the coracoid process are very important factors in obtaining a satisfactory result and in the prevention of complications. It has been postulated that this operation, which does not attempt to shorten the capsular structures or subscapularis tendon, affords a superior result in respect of patients who participate in throwing sports. It has been noted that patients who play cricket, baseball and basketball have encountered problems in regaining their ability to throw overhand after having had operations such as the Putti-Platt procedure, which entails intentional shortening of the capsular structures and subscapularis tendon.

  3. Acute spontaneous atraumatic bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulder joint with Hill-Sachs lesions: first reported case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Singh, Rohit; Ahmed, Bessam; Kathuria, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The anatomy of the shoulder joint comprises a relatively large humeral head with a shallow glenoid cavity allowing a remarkable range of motion at the expense of inherent instability. Despite anterior shoulder dislocations being the most common type encountered, bilateral dislocations are rare and almost always posterior. The aetiology is usually direct or indirect trauma related to sports, seizures, electric shock or electroconvulsive therapy. We present the first reported case of atraumatic bilateral acute anterior shoulder dislocations with associated Hill-Sachs lesions in a young, fit and well patient with no comorbidities. MRI illustrated the Hill-Sachs lesions with superior labral tear from anterior to posterior, and confirmed the acute nature of the injury by demonstrating the bone marrow oedema. The patient was treated surgically with arthroscopic anterior stabilisation. At 6 months following surgery, the patient has a pain free full range of movement of both shoulders with no further dislocations and has returned to work.

  4. Acute spontaneous atraumatic bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulder joint with Hill-Sachs lesions: first reported case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Singh, Rohit; Ahmed, Bessam; Kathuria, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The anatomy of the shoulder joint comprises a relatively large humeral head with a shallow glenoid cavity allowing a remarkable range of motion at the expense of inherent instability. Despite anterior shoulder dislocations being the most common type encountered, bilateral dislocations are rare and almost always posterior. The aetiology is usually direct or indirect trauma related to sports, seizures, electric shock or electroconvulsive therapy. We present the first reported case of atraumatic bilateral acute anterior shoulder dislocations with associated Hill-Sachs lesions in a young, fit and well patient with no comorbidities. MRI illustrated the Hill-Sachs lesions with superior labral tear from anterior to posterior, and confirmed the acute nature of the injury by demonstrating the bone marrow oedema. The patient was treated surgically with arthroscopic anterior stabilisation. At 6 months following surgery, the patient has a pain free full range of movement of both shoulders with no further dislocations and has returned to work. PMID:24895390

  5. Evaluation of the results and complications of the Latarjet procedure for recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Andrade; da Costa Lima, Álvaro Gonçalves; Kautsky, Raul Meyer; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the results and complications of Latarjet procedure in patients with anterior recurrent dislocation of the shoulder. Methods Fifty-one patients (52 shoulders) with anterior recurrent dislocation, surgically treated by Latarjet procedure, were analyzed retrospectively. The average follow-up time was 22 months, range 12–66 months; The age range was 15–59 years with a mean of 31; regarding sex, 42 (82.4%) patients were male and nine (17.6%) were female. The dominant side was affected in 29 (55.8%) shoulders. Regarding the etiology, 48 (92.3%) reported trauma and four (7.6%) had the first episode after a convulsion. Results The average elevation, lateral rotation and medial rotation of the operated shoulder were, respectively, 146° (60–80°), 59° (0–85°) and T8 (T5 gluteus), with statistical significance for decreased range of motion in all planes, compared with the other side. The scores of Rowe and UCLA were 90.6 and 31.4, respectively, in the postoperative period. Eleven shoulders (21.2%) had poor results: signs of instability (13.4%), non-union (11.5%) and early loosening of the synthesis material (1.9%). There was a correlation between poor results and convulsive patients (p = 0.026). Conclusion We conclude that the Latarjet procedure for correction of anterior recurrent dislocation leads to good and excellent results in 82.7% of cases. Complications are related to errors in technique. PMID:27218076

  6. Outcome of modified Bristow-Laterjet procedure in post-traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in young population.

    PubMed

    Sakeb, N; Islam, M A; Jannat, S N

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD) is a common injury of young population which may progress to recurrent episodes. The treatment is initially conservative but surgery is indicated when it fails. Out of more than 150 techniques, modified Bristow-Latarjet procedure has become most favorable even to arthroscopic techniques. We have intended to retrospectively assess the outcome of it in post-traumatic recurrent ASD of young non-athletes, performed at our different private settings between January 2007 and July 2012; which included 15 male patients of 20-39 years with minimum 2 years follow up. Clinical, functional, radiological and overall outcome status were evaluated. There was significant improvement of shoulder stability (p<0.05, chi-square test) despite significant deterioration (p<0.05, paired t-test) of external rotation (21.67°±00.61° loss). The patient self assessed pain and instability had highly significant (p<0.001, paired t-test) and all components of activities of daily living (except above shoulder weight carrying and overhead throwing) had significant improvement (p<0.05, paired t-test). Despite of intra-operative difficulties, radiological transplant errors (33.33%) and post-operative complications (06.67%), overall satisfactory outcome (86.67%) had been significant (p<0.05, chi-square test).

  7. Outcome of modified Bristow-Laterjet procedure in post-traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in young population.

    PubMed

    Sakeb, N; Islam, M A; Jannat, S N

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD) is a common injury of young population which may progress to recurrent episodes. The treatment is initially conservative but surgery is indicated when it fails. Out of more than 150 techniques, modified Bristow-Latarjet procedure has become most favorable even to arthroscopic techniques. We have intended to retrospectively assess the outcome of it in post-traumatic recurrent ASD of young non-athletes, performed at our different private settings between January 2007 and July 2012; which included 15 male patients of 20-39 years with minimum 2 years follow up. Clinical, functional, radiological and overall outcome status were evaluated. There was significant improvement of shoulder stability (p<0.05, chi-square test) despite significant deterioration (p<0.05, paired t-test) of external rotation (21.67°±00.61° loss). The patient self assessed pain and instability had highly significant (p<0.001, paired t-test) and all components of activities of daily living (except above shoulder weight carrying and overhead throwing) had significant improvement (p<0.05, paired t-test). Despite of intra-operative difficulties, radiological transplant errors (33.33%) and post-operative complications (06.67%), overall satisfactory outcome (86.67%) had been significant (p<0.05, chi-square test). PMID:25725671

  8. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  9. Using evidence-based algorithms to improve clinical decision making: the case of a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Federer, Andrew E; Taylor, Dean C; Mather, Richard C

    2013-09-01

    Decision making in health care has evolved substantially over the last century. Up until the late 1970s, medical decision making was predominantly intuitive and anecdotal. It was based on trial and error and involved high levels of problem solving. The 1980s gave way to empirical medicine, which was evidence based probabilistic, and involved pattern recognition and less problem solving. Although this represented a major advance in the quality of medical decision making, limitations existed. The advantages of the gold standard of the randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) are well-known and this technique is irreplaceable in its ability to answer critical clinical questions. However, the RCT does have drawbacks. RCTs are expensive and can only capture a snapshot in time. As treatments change and new technologies emerge, new expensive clinical trials must be undertaken to reevaluate them. Furthermore, in order to best evaluate a single intervention, other factors must be controlled. In addition, the study population may not match that of another organization or provider. Although evidence-based medicine has provided powerful data for clinicians, effectively and efficiently tailoring it to the individual has not yet evolved. We are now in a period of transition from this evidence-based era to one dominated by the personalization and customization of care. It will be fueled by policy decisions to shift financial responsibility to the patient, creating a powerful and sophisticated consumer, unlike any patient we have known before. The challenge will be to apply medical evidence and personal preferences to medical decisions and deliver it efficiently in the increasingly busy clinical setting. In this article, we provide a robust review of the concepts of customized care and some of techniques to deliver it. We will illustrate this through a personalized decision model for the treatment decision after a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

  10. Using evidence-based algorithms to improve clinical decision making: the case of a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Federer, Andrew E; Taylor, Dean C; Mather, Richard C

    2013-09-01

    Decision making in health care has evolved substantially over the last century. Up until the late 1970s, medical decision making was predominantly intuitive and anecdotal. It was based on trial and error and involved high levels of problem solving. The 1980s gave way to empirical medicine, which was evidence based probabilistic, and involved pattern recognition and less problem solving. Although this represented a major advance in the quality of medical decision making, limitations existed. The advantages of the gold standard of the randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) are well-known and this technique is irreplaceable in its ability to answer critical clinical questions. However, the RCT does have drawbacks. RCTs are expensive and can only capture a snapshot in time. As treatments change and new technologies emerge, new expensive clinical trials must be undertaken to reevaluate them. Furthermore, in order to best evaluate a single intervention, other factors must be controlled. In addition, the study population may not match that of another organization or provider. Although evidence-based medicine has provided powerful data for clinicians, effectively and efficiently tailoring it to the individual has not yet evolved. We are now in a period of transition from this evidence-based era to one dominated by the personalization and customization of care. It will be fueled by policy decisions to shift financial responsibility to the patient, creating a powerful and sophisticated consumer, unlike any patient we have known before. The challenge will be to apply medical evidence and personal preferences to medical decisions and deliver it efficiently in the increasingly busy clinical setting. In this article, we provide a robust review of the concepts of customized care and some of techniques to deliver it. We will illustrate this through a personalized decision model for the treatment decision after a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. PMID:23924748

  11. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical-pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  12. Sports-related shoulder dislocations: a state-hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hazmy, C H Wan; Parwathi, A

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the incidence of sports-related shoulder dislocations and their characteristics and the sports events involved. All patients with shoulder dislocation related to sporting activities admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included in the study. There were 18 sports-related shoulder dislocations out of 106 all shoulder dislocations admitted during this 4-year period. The average age of the patients was 25.4 years. All but two were male. All were anterior dislocations. Recurrent dislocation constitutes 78% of the cases with an average of 3 times re-dislocation. Rugby and badminton were the major contributors to the injuries followed by volleyball, soccer and swimming. Conservative treatment was successfully instituted for 88% of the patients and 12% opted for surgical intervention.

  13. Sports-related shoulder dislocations: a state-hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hazmy, C H Wan; Parwathi, A

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the incidence of sports-related shoulder dislocations and their characteristics and the sports events involved. All patients with shoulder dislocation related to sporting activities admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included in the study. There were 18 sports-related shoulder dislocations out of 106 all shoulder dislocations admitted during this 4-year period. The average age of the patients was 25.4 years. All but two were male. All were anterior dislocations. Recurrent dislocation constitutes 78% of the cases with an average of 3 times re-dislocation. Rugby and badminton were the major contributors to the injuries followed by volleyball, soccer and swimming. Conservative treatment was successfully instituted for 88% of the patients and 12% opted for surgical intervention. PMID:16381278

  14. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  15. Dislocated shoulder - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... NOT return to activities that place too much stress on your shoulder joint. Ask your provider first. These activities include most sports activities using your arms, gardening, heavy lifting, or ...

  16. Atraumatic Bilateral Neglected Anterior Shoulder Dislocation: Case Report of a Jehovah’s Witness 28-Year-Old Male Affected by Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Treated with Bilateral Latarjet Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Poggetti, Andrea; Castellini, Iacopo; Neri, Elisabetta; Marchettil, Stefano; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Neglected bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is a very rare condition, often related to seizures or major trauma. Open reduction is recommended whenever Hill-Sachs lesion is >25% of the joint and the dislocation is elder than 3 weeks. Case Report: We describe a case report of a 28-year-old man left handed Jehovah’s Witness laborer assessed 12 weeks after bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation. The patient was evaluated with clinical examination, and it was observed an asymptomatic intrarotation of both shoulders with a mild left circumflex nerve deficit. He was able to perform flexion and abduction of both arms up to 60° and 10° of extrarotation. Pre-operative constant scores were 49 in left and 55 in right shoulder, pre-operative disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores were 57 in left and 53 in right shoulder, and visual analogue scales (VAS) was 2. Radiological examination were bilateral anteroposterior shoulder X-rays and computer tomography scan. The surgeon treated both shoulder (not simultaneously) by open reduction and Bristow-Latarjet coracoids transfer procedure. A 1 year after operations, left flexion was 180° while right was 160, bilateral abduction was 180. He was able to return to his pre-injury activities, the constant score was 89 left and 83 right, DASH score was 17 left and 13 right and VAS was 0. Conclusion: Atraumatic bilateral neglected anterior shoulder dislocation can be treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure to provide a stable glenohumeral joint in laborer patient and permit a return to the pre-injury activities, to create a greater extension of the glenoid arc and to avoid future dislocation. PMID:27299079

  17. Clinical Outcomes Following Revision Anterior Shoulder Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Mellano, Chris; Shin, Jason J.; Feldheim, Terrence F.; Mascarenhas, Randhir; Yanke, Adam Blair; Cole, Brian J.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes following revision anterior shoulder stabilization performed either via all-arthroscopic soft tissue repair or via Latarjet coracoid transfer. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 91 shoulders undergoing revision anterior shoulder stabilization was performed. All patients underwent prior soft tissue stabilization; those with prior open bone grafting procedures were excluded. For patients with 25% glenoid bone loss, Latarjet was performed (n=28). Patients were queried regarding recurrent instability (subluxation or dislocation). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using validated patient reported outcome questionnaires including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). Results: A total of 63 shoulders in 62 patients (46 males, 16 females) with an average age of 23.2 ± 6.9 years were included in the revision arthroscopy group. At an average follow-up of 46.9 ± 16.8 months (range, 15 to 78), the mean WOSI score was 80.1 (range, 15.0 to 100), and there were significant improvements (p<0.001) in ASES (63.7 to 85.1), SST (6.2 to 9.1), and VAS pain scores (2.89 to 0.81). Recurrent instability occurred in 12 of 63 shoulders (19%); the number of prior surgeries and baseline hyperlaxity were significant risk factors for failure (p<0.001 and p=0.04, respectively). No patients developed clinical or radiographic evidence of arthritis. A total of 28 shoulders in 28 patients (21 male, 7 female) with an average age of 27.5 years (range 14 to 45) were included in the Latarjet group. Thirteen (46%) had more than one previous stabilization attempt. ), the average WOSI score was 71.9, and there were significant improvements (p<0.001) in ASES (65.7 to 87.0), SST (7.2 to 10.3), and VAS (3.1 to 1.1). Recurrent instability occurred in 2 of 28 shoulders

  18. Double Dislocation of Interphalangeal Joints Accompanied with Contralateral Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Raval, Pradyumna Ramchandra; Jariwala, Arpit

    2016-02-01

    Dislocation of any joint is an orthopaedic emergency and needs immediate attention by the attending physician. A delay in reducing a dislocated joint can lead to disastrous complications both immediately as well as in the long run. Although anterior dislocation of a shoulder joint is by far the commonest dislocation encountered by any emergency care physician, other joints may also get dislocated. In certain cases two joints may get dislocated simultaneously. Such dislocation is known as a double dislocation. Double dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint and the distal interphalangeal joint in the same finger is a rare injury. High impact loading at the fingertip is the primary cause in most cases and it is often associated with younger individuals playing contact sports. The right little finger is the digit commonly involved and this injury is evident in football players more often than not. Although closed reduction is a preferred treatment, it may not be always successful. Time of presentation, tendon interposition, associated swelling and co-existent phalangeal fractures are certain key impediments to a successful closed reduction manoeuvre. In patients with an open injury, a thorough wash out and appropriate antibiotic cover is mandatory. We report a rare case of double dislocation of the interphalangeal joints accompanied with contralateral shoulder dislocation in an elderly man sustained after a fall which was treated successfully with closed reduction and early mobilization. PMID:27028386

  19. The definition of recurrent shoulder dislocation in tramadol induced seizure patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei Amroodi, Morteza; Iri, Abdolrazzagh; Akhoondi, Salehe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of recurrent shoulder dislocation in patients taking tramadol has not been studied yet; so, this study aims to study the recurrent shoulder dislocation following tramadol induced seizure. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 205 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation complaints (2 or more) referred to Shafa Orthopedic and Iranmehr hospitals Tehran, Iran, from October 2012 to October 2014 were studied. Data on patient history and physical examination, patient demographic information such as age, sex, age at first dislocation, total number of dislocation, cause of the first dislocation, history of tramadol use, number of dislocation following tramadol induced seizure, history of other drugs use, the dominant hand, involved side, direction of dislocations and greater tuberosity fracture was recorded using a pre-designed questionnaire. Categorical variables were compared by chi-square test and the means were compared with student T-test. Results: In this study, 50 patients (24.4%) suffered from tramadol induced seizures and recurrent shoulder dislocation. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between the number of dislocation and tramadol use (P = 0.02). Recurrent shoulder dislocation following tramadol induced seizure was significantly associated with greater tuberosity fracture of humerus (P = 0.04); in 49 out of 50 patients (98%) dislocation was of anterior type. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that tramadol induced seizure may increase the risk of recurrent shoulder dislocation. Furthermore, the prevalence of greater tuberosity fracture in shoulder dislocation increases following tramadol induced seizure; and anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common type of dislocation following tramadol induced seizure. PMID:26913261

  20. Anterior capsulolabral reconstruction of the shoulder in athletes.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, D L; Jobe, F W; Glousman, R E; Kvitne, R S; Pink, M; Giangarra, C E

    1992-09-01

    We did an anterior capsulolabral reconstruction for recurrent subluxation or dislocation of the shoulder in 75 athletes after failure of conservative therapy. Average follow-up was 39 months (range 28 to 60 months). The results were 77% excellent, 75% good, 3% fair, and 5% poor. Seventy-five percent of the professional and 100% of the college baseball players returned to their previous level of competition. Seventy-seven percent of the professional pitchers were able to return to professional pitching. The range of motion at follow-up was full in 79% of the athletes. No infections or nerve injuries occurred. The anterior capsulolabral reconstruction procedure combined with an early rehabilitation program appears to provide an improved outcome compared with previously reported procedures for anterior instability of the shoulder in athletes.

  1. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  2. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Ulusoy, Ayhan; Yanik, Hakan Serhat; Mutlu, Serhat; Durakbasa, Mehmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare and commonly missed injury. Unilateral dislocations occur mostly due to trauma. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are even more rare and result mainly from epileptic seizures. Electrical injury is a rare cause of posterior shoulder dislocation. Injury mechanism in electrical injury is similar to epileptic seizures, where the shoulder is forced to internal rotation, flexion and adduction. Presentation of case This report presents a case of bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock. We were able to find a few individual case reports describing this condition. The case was acute and humeral head impression defects were minor. Our treatment in this case consisted of closed reduction under general anesthesia and applying of orthoses which kept the shoulders in abduction and external rotation. A rehabilitation program was begun after 3 weeks of immobilization. After 6 months of injury the patient has returned to work. 20 months postoperatively, at final follow-up, he was painless and capable of performing all of his daily activities. Discussion The amount of bilateral shoulder dislocations after electrical injury is not reported but is known to be very rare. The aim of this case presentation is to report an example for this rare entity, highlight the difficulties in diagnosis and review the treatment options. Conclusion Physical examination and radiographic evaluation are important for quick and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26904192

  3. Anterior instability in the throwing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; O'Brien, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The disabled throwing shoulder is a multifactorial problem. Laxity of the glenohumeral joint is necessary to achieve a satisfactory velocity. Normal wear and tear with throwing may convert this normal amount of excessive translation into instability. Instability in the throwing athlete manifests itself in 2 forms: traumatic anterior instability that happens to occur in a throwing athlete and excessive anterior subluxation because of overuse that occurs in conjunction with the disabled throwing shoulder. In most cases, it is difficult to determine by physical examination or imaging how much laxity is too much; therefore, the managing physician should always err on the side of caution. A trial of rest and rehabilitation should always be attempted before any consideration of surgery. The multifactorial issues in the disabled throwing athlete should be corrected during this phase of treatment, including assessment and treatment of hip abnormalities, restoration of satisfactory core strength, correction of scapular dyskinesis, and an evaluation and correction of any biomechanical abnormalities in the throwing mechanism. Surgical management of anterior instability in the throwing shoulder depends on the mechanism of injury. The traumatic anterior instability patient is managed by acute surgical repair without a shift, utilizing mattress sutures to prevent suture chondromalacia on the humeral head or glenoid. The anterior laxity management centers on the posterior superior labrum, although occasionally the anterior labrum or capsule may be involved as well. Overall, symptomatic anterior instability is less common in the throwing shoulder. Jobe and colleagues are credited with the first successful technique for the correction of anterior instability in the throwing athlete, the anterior capsulolabral reconstruction by a subscapularis split. The success of this technique paved the way for the adoption of the current arthroscopic techniques that are utilized to correct

  4. Acute shoulder and elbow dislocations in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Burra, Giridhar; Andrews, James R

    2002-07-01

    Dislocations of the elbow are less common than shoulder dislocations. The primary treatment is conservative, with a conscious effort toward early mobilization. Recurrence is rare, and improvement in function and motion can be expected for up to 1 year. Operative treatment should be reserved for baseball pitchers and cases of complex instability.

  5. Arthroscopic Release of Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder Complicated With Shoulder Dislocation and Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Fiesky A; Papadonikolakis, Anastasios; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injury after shoulder dislocation or arthroscopic shoulder surgery is low. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is an uncommon but painful condition that can develop after nerve injury. Historically, CRPS has been difficult to treat and therapeutic efforts are sometimes limited to ameliorating symptoms. However, if a dystrophic focus can be identified, the condition can be addressed with surgical exploration for potential neurolysis or nerve repair. The present article reports on a case of type II CRPS that developed in the postoperative setting of arthroscopic shoulder surgery complicated with simple shoulder dislocation. PMID:27518297

  6. Double figure-of-eight reconstruction technique for chronic anterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Tanaka, Sayo; Yoshitomi, Hiroki; Nagai, Ichiro; Sato, Wakyo; Karita, Tasturo; Kondo, Taiji

    2015-05-01

    Sternoclavicular joint dislocations account for <5 % of all dislocations of the shoulder girdle. Whereas most cases of anterior dislocation do not experience symptoms, some patients with anterior instability remain symptomatic and require reconstructive surgery to stabilize the sternoclavicular joint. We present the case of a 57-year-old male diagnosed with sternoclavicular joint anterior dislocation and unusual swallowing difficulty while bending the neck forward. The patient was treated using a new and effective surgical technique of sternoclavicular joint reconstruction named "double figure-of-eight" using the ipsilateral gracilis tendon. Surgical outcome was successful, based on the Rockwood SC joint rating scale, and the patient maintained excellent stability even after 2 years. This new surgical technique offers superior stability, without harvest site morbidity, to patients with rare, severe, and chronic sternoclavicular joint dislocation. Level of evidence IV. PMID:24722676

  7. Anterior Shoulder Instability with Concomitant Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Lesion Compared to Anterior Instability without SLAP Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Durban, Claire Marie C.; Kim, Je Kyun; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with combined anterior instability and superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, and to analyze the effect of concomitant SLAP repair on surgical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability between January 2004 and March 2013. A total of 120 patients were available for at least 1-year follow-up. Forty-four patients with reparable concomitant detached SLAP lesions (group I) underwent combined SLAP and anterior stabilization, and 76 patients without SLAP lesions (group II) underwent anterior stabilization alone. Patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative pain scores, Rowe scores, and shoulder ranges of motion were compared between the 2 groups. Results Patients in group I had higher incidences of high-energy trauma (p = 0.03), worse preoperative pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (p = 0.02), and Rowe scores (p = 0.04). The postoperative pain VAS and Rowe scores improved equally in both groups without significant differences. Limitation in postoperative range of motion was similar between the groups (all p-value > 0.05). Conclusions Anterior instability with SLAP lesion may not be related to frequent episodes of dislocation but rather to a high-energy trauma. SLAP fixation with anterior stabilization procedures did not lead to poor functional outcomes if appropriate surgical techniques were followed. PMID:27247742

  8. latrogenic fracture of humerus – complication of a diagnostic error in a shoulder dislocation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Riaz; Ahmed, Shahbaz; Bould, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is the commonest dislocation presenting to the emergency department, anterior being more common than posterior. The latter being less common has a tendency of being missed; this is supported by many cases in the literature. Kocher's method is one of the many methods of reducing anterior dislocation; there are many reported complications of employing this method. To the best of our knowledge we are reporting the first case of an iatrogenic fracture of the proximal humerus, due to the use of Kocher's method of shoulder reduction in a posterior dislocation following a diagnostic error which led to an avoidable difficult surgical intervention. We also discuss the mechanism of the iatrogenic fracture and the measures that can be undertaken to prevent it. PMID:17605806

  9. Dyspnea in a case of shoulder dislocation - to beware of this rare life-threatening symptom.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Satyen Praful; Challawar, Nikhil Subhash; Agrawal, Parth Vinod; Gajjar, Arpit S

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in orthopedic practice. In an acute presentation, closed reduction of the shoulder joint leads to an uneventful recovery. However, in the developing world neglected shoulder dislocation and treatments from quacks are not uncommon. Improper treatment and neglect can rarely become life threatening. We present one such case, emphasizing the need to investigate the symptom of dyspnea in a patient with history of shoulder dislocation. PMID:27658507

  10. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process.

  11. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process. PMID:26288539

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability.

  13. Long head of the biceps pathology as a cause of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, David V; Dines, David M

    2006-01-01

    The use of shoulder arthroplasty has been increasing over the last decade, with nearly 20,000 shoulder arthroplasties being performed each year. Although many patients have excellent results, there exists a subset of patients in whom anterior catching shoulder pain develops after arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to examine this group of patients and explore treatment options and outcomes for this condition. We undertook a review of 8 shoulders in 7 patients who were treated for anterior shoulder pain radiating into the biceps muscle after shoulder arthroplasty. Three patients had a hemiarthroplasty for fracture, and five had a total shoulder arthroplasty. All patients had anterior shoulder pain with physical examination findings consistent with biceps tendon pathology. Definitive diagnosis and treatment consisted of either arthroscopy, in 7 of 8 shoulders, or an open procedure, in 1 of 8 shoulders. The range of motion improved in all shoulders. The hemiarthroplasty group showed an increase in flexion of 36 degrees (range, 68 degrees -104 degrees ), external rotation of 23 degrees (range, 11 degrees -34 degrees ), and internal rotation to L4. The total shoulder group demonstrated an increase in flexion of 50 degrees (range, 66 degrees -166 degrees ), external rotation of 27 degrees (range, 22 degrees -39 degrees ), and internal rotation to L3. The Hospital for Special Surgery score improved in all shoulders, with all patients being satisfied with their final outcome. Pain scores improved from a mean of 6.9 (range, 4-9) preoperatively to 1.4 (range, 0.5-2) postoperatively on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 indicating the most pain. The role of the biceps tendon in the pathology of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty appears to be consistent with fibrosis and inflammation. Initial results, achieved with arthroscopic debridement or tenodesis, were encouraging.

  14. Active Stiffness and Strength in People With Unilateral Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Bilateral Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Olds, Margie; McNair, Peter; Nordez, Antoine; Cornu, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Context: Active muscle stiffness might protect the unstable shoulder from recurrent dislocation. Objective: To compare strength and active stiffness in participants with unilateral anterior shoulder instability and to examine the relationship between active stiffness and functional ability. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 16 males (age range, 16–40 years; height = 179.4 ± 6.1 cm; mass = 79.1 ± 6.8 kg) with 2 or more episodes of unilateral traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Main Outcome Measure(s): Active stiffness and maximal voluntary strength were measured bilaterally in participants. In addition, quality of life, function, and perceived instability were measured using the Western Ontario Stability Index, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form, and Single Alpha Numeric Evaluation, respectively. Results: We found less horizontal adduction strength (t15 = −4.092, P = .001) and less stiffness at 30% (t14 = −3.796, P = .002) and 50% (t12 = −2.341, P = .04) maximal voluntary strength in the unstable than stable shoulder. Active stiffness was not correlated with quality of life, function, or perceived instability (r range, 0.0–0.25; P > .05). Conclusions: The observed reduction in stiffness in the unstable shoulder warrants inclusion of exercises in the rehabilitation program to protect the joint from perturbations that might lead to dislocation. The lack of association between active stiffness and quality of life, function, or perceived instability might indicate that stiffness plays a less direct role in shoulder stability. PMID:22488190

  15. Posterior shoulder pain and anterior instability: a preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Conti, Marco; Borroni, Mario; Massazza, Giuseppe; Vinci, Enzo; Franceschi, Giorgio; Garofalo, Raffaele

    2008-02-01

    Different clinical tests have been suggested in the literature as significant indicators of anterior shoulder instability. Sometimes patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability may show some muscular guarding thus making the evaluation of specific clinical tests very difficult. These patients may also report a medical history with posterior shoulder pain that can be also elicited during some clinical manoeuvres. From September 2005 to September 2006 we prospectively studied patients who underwent an arthroscopic anterior capsuloplasty. Shoulder clinical examination was performed including anterior shoulder instability tests (drawer, apprehension and relocation tests). Furthermore the exam was focused on the presence of scapular dyskinesia and posterior shoulder pain. The patients were also evaluated with ASES, Rowe, SST (Simple Shoulder Test), Constant and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) scoring system preoperatively and at the latest follow-up time. In the period of this study we observed 16 patients treated for anterior gleno-humeral arthroscopic stabilisation, who preoperatively complained also of a posterior scapular pain. The pain was referred at the level of lower trapezium and upper rhomboids tendon insertion on the medial border of the scapula. It was also reproducible upon local palpation by the examiner. Four of these patients also referred pain in the region of the insertion of the infraspinatus and teres minor. After arthroscopic stabilisation the shoulder was immobilised in a sling with the arm in the neutral rotation for a period of 4 weeks. A single physician supervised shoulder rehabilitation. After a mean time of 6.8 months of follow-up, all the shoulder scores were significantly improved and, moreover, at the same time the patients referred the disappearance of the posterior pain. Posterior scapular shoulder pain seems to be another complaint and sign that can be found in patients affected by anterior shoulder instability

  16. A Case of Bilateral Anterior Gleno-Humeral Dislocation following First Time Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Wheelton, Andrew; Dowen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a seizure has recently been demonstrated as being more common than previously believed with 44 cases in the literature. This case is unique as it was caused by a first time seizure and there was no associated fracture of the humerus. Case Report: A previously fit and well 32 year old man presented to the Emergency Department following a convulsive episode. On initial assessment he was drowsy and the focus of investigation was the cause of the seizure, he was prepared for transfer to the medical ward. As he became more alert he complained of bilateral shoulder pain. Further clinical exam highlighted he had reduced range of movement in the shoulder joint bilaterally with a symmetrical clinical appearance of gleno-humeral dislocation. Radiographs confirmed bilateral anterior gleno-humeral dislocations which were reduced under sedation uneventfully. Conclusion: Post ictal patients can be difficult to assess when drowsy. Although not all seizures require musculoskeletal examination attending medical staff should remain vigilant to the possibility of injury following seizure to afford prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27299040

  17. Shoulder impingement syndrome in athletes treated by an anterior acromioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tibone, J E; Jobe, F W; Kerlan, R K; Carter, V S; Shields, C L; Lombardo, S J; Yocum, L A

    1985-09-01

    Shoulder pain caused by a impingement syndrome commonly affects an athlete's performance. Thirty-five shoulders in 33 athletes had an impingement syndrome treated by an anterior acromioplasty after failure of conservative treatment. Thirty-one of 35 shoulders (89%) were subjectively judged improved by the patients from their preoperative status. The moderate and severe pain was reduced from 97% of the shoulders preoperation to 20% postoperation. The pain at rest and with activities of daily living was reduced from 71% of the shoulders preoperation to 9% postoperation. However, only 15 of 35 operated shoulders (43%) allowed return to the same preinjury level of competitive athletics, and only four of 18 athletes involved in pitching and throwing returned to their former preinjury status. This operation is satisfactory for pain relief but does not allow an athlete to return to his former competitive status. A prolonged rehabilitation program may improve the results.

  18. Recurrent anterior shoulder instability: a review of the Latarjet procedure and its postoperative rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fedorka, Catherine J; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2015-02-01

    The shoulder is the most common joint to dislocate in the human body, with the dislocation often occurring in the anterior direction. This injury frequently results in soft tissue injury (eg, labral tear, capsular stretching) or bone injury (eg, glenoid or humeral head bone loss), which commonly leads to persistent deficits of shoulder function and a high risk of subsequent instability episodes in young, active patients. Patients with a significant degree of glenoid bone loss (> 25%) may require surgical intervention using the Latarjet procedure, which is an open bony augmentation of the glenoid. This procedure involves transferring the tip of the coracoid to the anteroinferior glenoid, creating a bony block and musculotendinous sling to prevent instability. Rehabilitation after the procedure is a slow progression over 4 to 6 months to regain range of motion and strength, while protecting the bony augmentation. Recent reports have shown success with the Latarjet procedure, as indicated by patient satisfaction scores and a low rate of recurrent instability.

  19. Changes to the mechanical properties of the glenohumeral capsule during anterior dislocation.

    PubMed

    Browe, Daniel P; Voycheck, Carrie A; McMahon, Patrick J; Debski, Richard E

    2014-01-22

    The glenohumeral joint is the most frequently dislocated major joint in the body, and instability due to permanent deformation of the glenohumeral capsule is a common pathology. The corresponding change in mechanical properties may have implications for the ideal location and extent of plication, which is a common clinical procedure used to repair the capsule. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the mechanical properties of four regions of the glenohumeral capsule after anterior dislocation and compare the properties to the normal glenohumeral capsule. Six fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dislocated in the anterior direction with the joint in the apprehension position using a robotic testing system. After dislocation, mechanical testing was performed on the injured glenohumeral capsule by loading the tissue samples in tension and shear. An inverse finite element optimization routine was used to simulate the experiments and obtain material coefficients for each tissue sample. Cauchy stress-stretch curves were then generated to represent the mechanical response of each tissue sample to theoretical loading conditions. Based on several comparisons (average of the material coefficients, average stress-stretch curve for each region, and coefficients representing the average curves) between the normal and injured tissue samples, the mechanical properties of the injured tissue samples from multiple regions were found to be lower than those of the normal tissue in tension but not in shear. This finding indicates that anterior dislocation primarily affects the tensile behavior of the glenohumeral capsule rather than the shear behavior, and this phenomenon could be caused by plastic deformation of the matrix, permanent collagen fiber rotation, and/or collagen fiber failure. These results suggest that plication and suturing may not be sufficient to return stability to the shoulder after dislocation in all individuals. Thus, surgeons may need to perform

  20. Minimally Invasive Modified Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi, Ali; Zarei, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in arthroscopic soft tissue repair and reconstruction for shoulder instability, Latarjet procedure is continuously a method of choice for many cases of unstable shoulders. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical results of minimally invasive modified Latarjet technique in recurrent, traumatic anterior shoulder instability associated with obvious Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions. Patients and Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, 36 consequent patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability who underwent modified Latarjet operation were enrolled in this prospective study. The MRI studies revealed labrum detachment and Hill-Sachs lesion in all shoulders. For all patients, demographic and injury data were obtained and Constant Shoulder score, Rowe score, and UCLA scores were completed by related surgeon. Stability of the shoulder was assessed with the Jobe’s relocation test preoperatively. The patients were followed up at two weeks, one month, three months, and six months from the date of the surgery and evaluated for probable complications. Above mentioned assessments were completed again at the time of the final follow-up. Results: The average age of the enrolled patients was 24.6 (ranging from 18 to 33 years) and 35 patients out of the total of 36 patients were males. Motor-vehicle accidents were the major cause of the injuries (52%) with the average interval between the injury and operation of 3.1 ± 1.2 years (Ranging from 1 to 5 years). The average number of incidents of dislocations between the injury date and the surgery was 7.2 ± 2.1 (Ranging from 4 to 20). The average follow-up period was 37 months (Ranging from 12 to 65 months). All patients had Jobe’s relocation test (Apprehension sign) pre-operatively and negative Jobe’s relocation test post-operation. Significant improvements in functional scores were demonstrated postoperatively compared to preoperational assessment in all cases. Final follow up radiographs showed

  1. Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Numa; Saragaglia, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common problem. The Latarjet procedure has been advocated as an option for the treatment of anteroinferior shoulder instability. The purpose of this paper is to explain our surgical procedure titled “Mini-open Latarjet Procedure.” We detailed patient positioning, skin incision, subscapularis approach, and coracoid fixation. Then, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the clinical outcomes of this procedure. PMID:22191039

  2. Traumatic shoulder dislocation with combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament in a professional basketball player: three-year follow-up of surgical stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aakash A; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been well documented to have associated lesions such as a Bankart tear, humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL), Hill-Sachs lesion, fracture, and nerve injury. To our knowledge, the combined Bankart and HAGL injury in a single acute anterior shoulder dislocation has not yet been reported. We describe a traumatic first-time anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation in a professional basketball player with a combined Bankart and HAGL lesion. The patient underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair followed by open repair of the HAGL lesion with an open capsular shift reconstruction. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient had returned to an elite level of play, with an excellent outcome.

  3. Recurrent anterior shoulder instability: Review of the literature and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sofu, Hakan; Gürsu, Sarper; Koçkara, Nizamettin; Öner, Ali; Issın, Ahmet; Çamurcu, Yalkın

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to discuss the clinical spectrum of recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability with the current concepts and controversies at the scientific level. Because of increasing participation of people from any age group of the population in sports activities, health care professionals dealing with the care of trauma patients must have a thorough understanding of the anatomy, patho-physiology, risk factors, and management of anterior shoulder instability. The risk factors for recurrent shoulder dislocation are young age, participation in high demand contact sports activities, presence of Hill-Sachs or osseous Bankart lesion, previous history of ipsilateral traumatic dislocation, ipsilateral rotator cuff or deltoid muscle insufficiency, and underlying ligamentous laxity. Achieving the best result for any particular patient depends on the procedure that allows observation of the joint surfaces, provides the anatomical repair, maintains range of motion, and also can be applied with low rates of complications and recurrence. Although various surgical techniques have been described, a consensus does not exist and thus, orthopedic surgeons should follow and try to improve the current evidence-based treatment modalities for the patients. PMID:25405191

  4. Dyspnea in a case of shoulder dislocation – to beware of this rare life-threatening symptom

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Satyen Praful; Challawar, Nikhil Subhash; Agrawal, Parth Vinod; Gajjar, Arpit S.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in orthopedic practice. In an acute presentation, closed reduction of the shoulder joint leads to an uneventful recovery. However, in the developing world neglected shoulder dislocation and treatments from quacks are not uncommon. Improper treatment and neglect can rarely become life threatening. We present one such case, emphasizing the need to investigate the symptom of dyspnea in a patient with history of shoulder dislocation. PMID:27658507

  5. A rare injury to a rear seat passenger: bilateral fracture dislocation of the shoulders.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Pandey, Vivek; Acharya, Kiran; Ramakrishna, Krishna Prasad Peruvaje

    2015-01-01

    Injury prevention measures in automobiles are mainly focused on the front seat passengers and driver. In the event of a head-on collision, rear seat passengers usually escape with minimal injuries. Most commonly observed injuries to rear passengers are to the head, chest wall or lower extremities. We report a case of bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders with asymmetrical fractures of the greater tuberosities in a 42-year-old man who was apparently injured in a head-on collision while travelling in a car as an unstrapped rear seat passenger. This kind of injury pattern in an unrestrained rear seat passenger is very unusual and has not been previously described. PMID:26065552

  6. Coracoid syndrome: a neglected cause of anterior shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; BARBADORO, PAMELA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the present prospective open-label study was designed to gain further insights into a condition thought to constitute a neglected but not uncommon syndrome characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process, not related to rotator cuff or pectoralis minor tendinopathy, long head of the biceps tendon disorders, or instability. The aim was to clarify its prevalence, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and response to corticosteroid injections. Methods patients with primary anterior shoulder pain precisely reproduced by deep pressure on the apex of the coracoid process were recruited. Patients with clinical or instrumental signs of other shoulder disorders were excluded. Patients were given an injection of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg/ml 1 ml at the coracoid trigger point. They were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days and at 2 years using Equal Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and the Italian version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Results between January 1 and December 31 2010, we treated 15 patients aged 26–66 years. The majority were women (86.67%). At 15 days, 6 (40%) patients reported complete resolution of their symptoms, while 9 (60%) complained of residual symptoms and received another injection. At 30 days, 14 (93.33%) patients were pain-free and very satisfied. At 2 years, the 14 patients who had been asymptomatic at 30 days reported that they had experienced no further pain or impaired shoulder function. The analysis of variance for repeated measures showed a significant effect of time on EQ-VAS and SST scores. Conclusions the present study documents the existence, and characteristics, of a “coracoid syndrome” characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process and showed that the pain is usually amenable to steroid treatment. This syndrome should be clearly distinguished from anterior shoulder pain due to other causes, in

  7. Effect of bone loss in anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Grant H; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, David M; Dines, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability with bone loss can be a difficult problem to treat. It usually involves a component of either glenoid deficiency or a Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent data shows that soft tissue procedures alone are typically not adequate to provide stability to the shoulder. As such, numerous surgical procedures have been described to directly address these bony deficits. For glenoid defects, coracoid transfer and iliac crest bone block procedures are popular and effective. For humeral head defects, both remplissage and osteochondral allografts have decreased the rates of recurrent instability. Our review provides an overview of current literature addressing these treatment options and others for addressing bone loss complicating anterior glenohumeral instability. PMID:26085984

  8. Superior Labral Anterior Posterior Lesions of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Malal, Joby Jacob George; Khan, Yousaf; Farrar, Graville; Waseem, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesion is of fairly recent description and its understanding is rapidly evolving. Its incidence and need for surgical treatment has increased exponentially in line with the increase in shoulder arthroscopies. It is of particular importance in the elite over head athlete and the young. A range of arthroscopic techniques and devices have been described with good functional results. The ability to return to pre injury level of sports remains a concern. PMID:24082975

  9. Gene expression analysis in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability suggests deregulation of collagen genes.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-10-01

    Shoulder dislocation occurs in 1-2% of the population. Capsular deformation is a key factor in shoulder dislocation; however, little is known about capsule biology. We evaluated, for the first time in literature, the expression of COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the antero-inferior, antero-superior and posterior regions of the glenohumeral capsule of 31 patients with anterior shoulder instability and eight controls. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1 and the ratio of COL1A1/COL1A2 were increased in all three portions of the capsule in patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). COL1A2 expression was upregulated in the antero-superior and posterior sites of the capsule of patients (p < 0.05). The ratio of COL1A2/COL3A1 expression was reduced in capsule antero-inferior and posterior sites of patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). In the capsule antero-inferior site of patients, the ratios of COL1A1/COL5A1, CO1A2/COL5A1 and COL3A1/COL5A1 expression were increased (p < 0.05). In patients, COL1A1/COL5A1 was also increased in the posterior site (p < 0.05). We found deregulated expression of collagen genes across the capsule of shoulder instability patients. These molecular alterations may lead to modifications of collagen fibril structure and impairment of the healing process, possibly with a role in capsular deformation. PMID:25042113

  10. Arthroscopic Conjoint Tendon Transfer: A Technique for Revision Anterior Shoulder Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tennent, Duncan; Colaço, Henry B; Arnander, Magnus; Pearse, Eyiyemi

    2016-02-01

    Revision anterior stabilization of the shoulder presents a challenge to the surgeon and carries a higher risk of recurrent dislocation than primary repair. The Latarjet procedure may be more reliable than revision soft-tissue repair but may not be indicated in patients without significant glenoid bone loss. We describe an arthroscopic technique of conjoint tendon transfer using a combination of suspensory and interference screw fixation for patients without significant glenoid bone loss (<15%). The arthroscopic approach to this procedure allows intra-articular visualization to assist in mobilization of the conjoint tendon, accurate bone tunnel placement, and subsequent labral repair. It avoids the additional steps of bone block preparation and the larger portals required for arthroscopic Latarjet techniques, in addition to eliminating potential complications due to coracoid bone block resorption. PMID:27274454

  11. Posterior shoulder dislocation and humeral head necrosis in a recreational scuba diver with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gorman, D F; Sandow, M J

    1992-11-01

    An insulin-dependent diabetic who was previously a recreational scuba diver suffered a posterior shoulder dislocation after a trivial injury and was subsequently found to have local necrosis of the humeral head. The only definite conclusion that can be reached is that this patient should not dive again.

  12. Bony Versus Soft Tissue Reconstruction for Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Richard James; Miniaci, Anthony; Jones, Morgan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: One complication of anteroinferior glenohumeral shoulder dislocation is a critical bone defect that requires surgical repair to prevent recurrent instability. However, controversy exists regarding the surgical management because both open and arthroscopic surgeries have respective advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, it is difficult to determine the patient’s preferred treatment, as factors that influence treatment choice include recurrence rates, morbidity of the procedures, and patient preferences. Hypothesis: Patients who have a higher probability of recurrent instability after arthroscopic surgery will select open surgery whereas patients with a lower probability of recurrent instability after arthroscopic surgery will favor arthroscopy. Study Design: Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A decision tree was constructed to model each hypothetical outcome after open or arthroscopic surgery for glenohumeral instability in patients with bone defects. A literature review was performed to determine the probability of occurrence for each node while utility values for each outcome were obtained via patient-administered surveys given to 50 patients without prior history of shoulder injury or dislocation. Fold-back analysis was then performed to show the optimal treatment strategy. Finally, sensitivity analysis established the thresholds at which open treatment becomes the optimal treatment. Results: The ultimate expected value—the objective evaluation of all potential outcomes after choosing either open or arthroscopic surgery—was found to be greater for arthroscopic surgery than for open surgery (87.17 vs 81.64), indicating it to be the preferred treatment. Results of sensitivity analysis indicated that open surgery becomes the preferred treatment when probability of recurrence after arthroscopic treatment is ≥23.8%, although varying the utility, defined as an aggregate patient preference for a particular outcome, has no

  13. Osseous Defects Seen in Patients with Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Itoi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder surgeons need to be aware of the critical size of the glenoid or humeral osseous defects seen in patients with anterior shoulder instability, since the considerable size of osseous defect is reported to cause postoperative instability. Biomechanical studies have identified the size of the osseous defect which affects stability. Since engagement always occurs between a Hill-Sachs lesion and the glenoid rim, when considering the critical size of the Hill-Sachs lesion, we have to simultaneously consider the size of the glenoid osseous defect. With the newly developed concept of the glenoid track, we are able to evaluate whether a large Hill-Sachs lesion is an "on-track" or "off-track" lesion, and to consider both osseous defects together. In case of an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion, if the glenoid defect is less than 25%, no treatment is required. In this case, the Latarjet procedure or arthroscopic remplissage procedure can be a treatment option. However, if the glenoid defect is more than 25%, treatment such as bone grafting is required. This will convert an off-track lesion to an on-track lesion. After the bone graft or Latarjet procedure, if the Hill-Sachs lesion persists as off-track, then further treatment is necessitated. In case with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and a less than 25% glenoid defect, arthroscopic Bankart repair alone is enough. PMID:26640623

  14. Management of mid-season traumatic anterior shoulder instability in athletes.

    PubMed

    Owens, Brett D; Dickens, Jonathan F; Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Rue, John-Paul H

    2012-08-01

    Shoulder dislocation and subluxation injuries are common in young athletes and most frequently occur during the competitive season. Controversy exists regarding optimal treatment of an athlete with an in-season shoulder dislocation, and limited data are available to guide treatment. Rehabilitation may facilitate return to sport within 3 weeks, but return is complicated by a moderate risk of recurrence. Bracing may reduce the risk of recurrence, but it restricts motion and may not be tolerated in patients who must complete certain sport-specific tasks such as throwing. Surgical management of shoulder dislocation or subluxation with arthroscopic or open Bankart repair reduces the rate of recurrence; however, the athlete is unable to participate in sport for the remainder of the competitive season. When selecting a management option, the clinician must consider the natural history of shoulder instability, pathologic changes noted on examination and imaging, sport- and position-specific demands, duration of treatment, and the athlete's motivation.

  15. Late Anterior Dislocation Due to Posterior Pelvic Tilt in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Takagishi, Kenji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excessive pelvic tilt may be one of the factors leading to instability in total hip arthroplasty (THA), even when the acetabular cup is placed properly. To our knowledge, only a few studies have described late anterior dislocation due to posterior pelvic tilt. We present 3 cases with late anterior dislocations possibly due to posterior pelvic tilt. Cases Presentations: Case-1: An 84-years-old woman fell and presented with an anterior dislocation 12-years after THA. Her pelvis had tilted to approximately 30° posteriorly in a supine position. After conservative treatment, she presented with 10 recurrent anterior dislocations. She had thoracolumbar kyphosis due to multiple compression fractures. Revision with anterior placement of an elevated liner and a 32-mm head corrected the dislocation, and no further dislocations occurred. Case-2: A 78-years-old woman fell and presented with an anterior dislocation 4-years after THA. Her posterior pelvic tilt had increased 23° due to a lumbar compression fracture. Revision by decreasing the cup anteversion was performed, but recurrent posterior dislocations occurred. Owing to her worsened general condition, further treatment was abandoned. Case-3: A 79-years-old woman twisted her body and presented an anterior dislocation 3-years after THA. After manual reduction and conservative treatment, the dislocation recurred. Her posterior pelvic tilt had increased 16°. Conclusion: Although minor trauma triggered the anterior instability in these patients, the underlying pathomechanism existed in the progressive pelvic posterior tilt due to thoracolumbar kyphosis. As longer life expectancy as well as implant survivorship is predicted, attention must be paid to the change of pelvic tilt in elderly patients. PMID:27398108

  16. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  17. Glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments as a cause of recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eugene M; Siparsky, Patrick N

    2010-09-01

    Although the Bankart lesion is accepted as the primary pathology responsible for recurrent shoulder instability, recognition of other soft-tissue lesions has improved the surgical treatment for this common problem. Whereas humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments has been acknowledged as a cause of anterior shoulder instability, we have not found any reported cases of glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. We describe 3 cases of recurrent anterior shoulder instability due to glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. The avulsed ligaments were repaired to the labrum and glenoid, restoring the glenohumeral ligament-labral complex.

  18. Evaluation of postoperative results from videoarthroscopic treatment for recurrent shoulder dislocation using metal anchors☆

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Éder Menegassi; Rodrigues, Airton; dos Santos Neto, Francisco José; Dahmer, Cleiton; Ranzzi, Abel; Dubiela, Rafaella Scuzziato

    2016-01-01

    Objective To clinically and radiologically evaluate the results from videoarthroscopic treatment using metal anchors in patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation and its complications. Methods This was a retrospective study on 47 patients (47 shoulders) operated by the shoulder group of the orthopedic hospital between February 2010 and February 2012. A questionnaire, interview and physical and radiographic examinations were used, with the classification of Samilson and Pietro. The mean postoperative follow-up was 33 months (range 12–47 months). The statistical analysis consisted of using Fisher's exact test through the IBM SPSS 22 statistical software. The significance level used was 5%. Results Recurrence was observed in nine cases. The patients were, on average, 26.5 years old at the first episode, and 19.1% were aged 20 years or under. Among these, 55.6% presented recurrence. In relation to age at the time of the surgical procedure, the average age was 27 years, and 12.8% were aged 20 years or under. Nineteen patients presented prominent anchors and, of these, 21% manifested arthrosis. Conclusion There was a statistically identified correlation between the recurrence rate and age less than or equal to 20 years at the times of first dislocation and the surgical procedure. Further studies should be conducted in order to compare the use of absorbable anchors, which despite higher cost, may provide lower risk of developing glenohumeral arthrosis in some cases. PMID:26962500

  19. Joystick reduction and percutaneous pinning for an acutely anteriorly dislocated coccyx: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Weon-Yoo; Han, Chang-Whan; Kim, Yong-Hwan

    2004-07-01

    A sacrococcygeal dislocation is a rare occurrence, and the treatment options vary. Initial treatment is nonoperative, consisting of a manual reduction with a gloved finger and local rest. Acute operative treatment of a failed closed reduction is unusual. We report a case of an acute irreducible anteriorly dislocated coccyx successfully treated with a minimally invasive technique: joystick reduction and Steinman pin fixation.

  20. Iliac crest allograft glenoid reconstruction for recurrent anterior shoulder instability in athletes: Surgical technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Raleigh, Eden; McRae, Sheila; Leiter, Jeff; Saltzman, Bryan; MacDonald, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Performing a labral repair alone in patients with recurrent anterior instability and a large glenoid defect has led to poor outcomes. We present a technique involving the use of the iliac crest allograft inserted into the glenoid defect in athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and large bony defects of the glenoid (>25% of glenoid diameter). All athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and a large glenoid defect that underwent open anterior shoulder stabilization and glenoid reconstruction with the iliac crest allograft were followed over a 4-year period. Preoperatively, a detailed history and physical exam were obtained along with standard radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the affected shoulder. All patients also completed the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) evaluation forms preoperatively. A computed tomography scan was obtained postoperatively to assess osseous union of the graft and the patient again went through a physical exam in addition to completing the SST, ASES, and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) forms. 10 patients (9 males, 1 female) were followed for an average of 16 months (4–36 months) and had a mean age of 24.4 years. All patients exhibited a negative apprehension/relocation test and full shoulder strength at final follow-up. Eight of 10 patients had achieved osseous union at 6 months (80.0%). ASES scores improved from 64.3 to 97.8, and SST scores improved from 66.7 to 100. Average postoperative WOSI scores were 93.8%. The use of the iliac crest allograft provides a safe and clinically useful alternative compared to previously described procedures for recurrent shoulder instability in the face of glenoid deficiency. PMID:25538432

  1. Irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation due to tibialis anterior subluxation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Summers, Hobie D

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible ankle fracture-dislocations are rare. Several cases of irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation have been reported in published studies secondary to the tibialis posterior tendon, deltoid ligament, or extensor digitorum longus tendon blocking the reduction. We report a case of irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation resulting from posteromedial subluxation of the tibialis anterior tendon around a medial malleolar fracture fragment. Ultimately, the ankle required open reduction of the incarcerated tendon to reduce the joint and proceed with internal fixation of the associated fracture. The patient's postoperative course was uncomplicated, and the tibialis anterior tendon was functioning at 10 months postoperatively, after which he did not return for follow-up examinations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the tibialis anterior tendon blocking closed reduction of an ankle fracture-dislocation. PMID:25618805

  2. Simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation in a 12-year-old girl with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ramin; Eraghi, Amir Sobhani; Mardookhpour, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  3. [Anterior dislocation of the fibula resulting from surgical malreduction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Wu, X B

    2016-04-18

    Ankle joint fracture is one of the most common types of fracture. There are many researches on the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. A type of injury which combines posterior dislocation of fibula, known as the Bosworth injury, is relatively rare. In 1947, Bosworth first described this type of injury as an unusual ankle fracture dislocation with fixed posterior fracture dislocation of the distal part of the fibula. In this type of fracture, the proximal fibular shaft fragment locks behind the tibialis posterior tubercle. This rare ankle fracture variant is often not recognized in initial radiographs and requires a computed tomographic (CT) scan for verification. But there are already many reports, discussing the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. However, there are few reports of anterior dislocation of the fibula, caused by either injury or surgery. The mechanism of the injury is still not clear. This article reports a case of anterior dislocation of the fibula. We report a patient with left ankle open fracture (Lauge-Hansen pronation-external rotation stage III, Gustilo IIIA). Open reduction and internal fixation was done in the initial surgery, but ended up with poor reduction, resulting in fibula anterior dislocation, anterior dislocation of talus and tibia fibular dislocation. The fibula was dislocated anteriorly of the tibia, which rarely happened. The patient suffered severe ankle joint dysfunction. The second operation took out the original internal fixation, reduced the fracture, and reset the internal fixation. The function of ankle joint was improved obviously after operation. But because of the initial injury and the two operations, the soft tissue around the fracture was greatly damaged. 6 months after the second operation, and the fracture still not healed, so the bone graft was carried out in the third surgery. Two months after the third surgery, the function of the ankle was significantly

  4. Evaluation of functional outcomes and complications following modified Latarjet reconstruction in athletes with anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    van der Watt, Christelle; de Beer, Joe F

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal management of anterior shoulder instability in athletes continues to be a challenge. The present study aimed to evaluate the functional outcomes of athletes with anterior shoulder instability following modified Latarjet reconstruction through assessing the timing of return to sport and complications. Methods Retrospective assessment was performed of athletes (n = 56) who presented with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and were treated with modified congruent arc Latarjet reconstruction over a 1-year period. Rugby union was the predominant sport performed. Pre-operative instability severity index scores were assessed. Postoperative complications were recorded as was the time taken for the athlete to return to sport. Results Arthroscopic evaluation revealed that 86% of patients had associated bony lesions affecting the glenohumeral joint. The overall complication rate relating to the Latarjet reconstruction was 7%. No episodes of recurrent shoulder instability were noted. Of the patients, 89% returned to competitive sport at the same level as that prior to surgery. The mean time post surgery to returning to full training was 3.2 months. Conclusions The modified congruent arc Latarjet procedure facilitates early rehabilitation and return to sport. These results support our systematic management protocol of performing modified Latarjet surgery in contact sport athletes with recurrent anterior instability. PMID:27582973

  5. Open anterior dislocation of the hip in an adult: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anderson Luiz; Machado, Eduardo Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Open anterior hip dislocation is a rare condition and results from high-energy trauma. Ten cases of open anterior dislocation have been described in the literature so far. Its rarity is due to the inherent stability of the joint, its deep position in the pelvis, with strong ligaments and bulky muscles around the articulation. Several factors influence the prognosis, such as the degree of compounding, the associated soft tissue injuries, the age of the patient and, mainly, the delay in reduction. The main complications are: arthrosis of the hip, with incidence of 50% of cases, when associated with fractures of the femoral head; and osteonecrosis of the femoral head, with incidence between 1.7 and 40% (in closed anterior dislocation). Because of the rarity and the potential disability of this lesion, we report a case in a 46-year-old man, involved in an automobile accident. The hip was reduced (anterior superior dislocation) in the first three hours of the trauma. The patient was kept non-weight bearing until sixth week, with complete weight bearing after 10th week. After one year follow-up, the functional result was poor (Harris Hip Score: 52), probably because of the associated labral tear, but without signs of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Bilateral spontaneous anterior dislocation of intraocular lens with the capsular bag in a patient with pseudoexfoliation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Saxena, Rushil Kumar; Medhi, Jnanankar

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of bilateral spontaneous anterior partial in-the-bag intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation in a 75-year-old man with pseudoexfoliation (PXF). He underwent uneventful phacoemulsification in both eyes with in-the-bag IOL implantation 9 years back. In the right eye, single piece poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) IOL (+19 D) and in the left eye, single piece acrylic foldable IOL (+19 D) were implanted. An attempt at pharmacological IOL repositioning was unsuccessful. The dislocated IOLs were explanted and exchanged with scleral suture fixated PMMA IOLs. Vision improved to 20/30 in both eyes following surgery, without any associated ocular morbidity. We believe that zonular weakness secondary to PXF, capsular contraction, and myopia together were the predisposing factors for partial anterior dislocation of IOLs and IOL exchange with scleral suture fixation of IOL is a safe and effective treatment option. PMID:26655008

  7. Arytenoid cartilage dislocation after reversed total shoulder replacement surgery in the beach chair position: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Yeo Hae; Choi, Jeong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Arytenoid cartilage dislocation is not a common complication, but its delayed diagnosis reduces the therapeutic effect of treatment. A male patient underwent reversed total shoulder replacement surgery in the beach chair position under general anesthesia. The patient experienced postoperative hoarseness, and it was revealed that he had right arytenoid dislocation. Voice restoration was accomplished with closed reduction. We discussed changes in patient position during the operation and how they may contribute to the arytenoid dislocation. Flexion and a slight rotation of the neck during the operation can lead to an increase in intracuff pressure of the endotracheal tube. It is necessary to check neck position and monitor intracuff pressure in patients undergoing operations in the beach chair position. Also, the anesthesiologist should suspect arytenoid dislocation in the case of persistent hoarseness after surgery in the beach chair position. PMID:27482316

  8. Technique for selecting capsular tightness in repair of anterior-inferior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Johnson, D; Miller, M; Caborn, D N

    1995-01-01

    Part I of our study consisted of sending a survey questionnaire to all members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons in which specific questions were asked about their technique of surgical repair in patients with anterior instability who had capsular laxity or injury in conjunction with marked inferior laxity. Part II is a description of the technique and preliminary results in 18 patients of a modified anterior-inferior capsular shift technique that tightens the inferior capsule with the shoulder positioned in abduction and external rotation and the superior capsule with the shoulder in adduction and external rotation. Of the members of the Society of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons who responded to the survey, 80% agreed that preservation of external rotation was important and that shoulder position at the time of capsular repair might influence the ultimate range of motion obtained. However, no more than 50% of the respondents agreed on any one position for the arm when repairing the capsule. The most common responses for each position were flexion 0 degrees (49%) (range, 0 degrees to 40 degrees), abduction 30 degrees (24%) (range, 0 degrees to 80 degrees), and external rotation 30 degrees (37%) (range, 0 degrees to 70 degrees). The average postoperative follow-up period for the 18 patients was 27 months (range, 24 to 39 months). Of the 18 patients, 11 (61%) maintained symmetric motion; the others had minimal loss of external rotation compared with that of the contralateral shoulder. Six of eight patients with repair on the dominant side were able to return to full premorbid recreational throwing or racquet sports, and seven with repair on the nondominant side returned to full participation in overhead sports such as basketball and swimming. We conclude that this method of "selective" capsular repair may be a useful guideline to gauge the degree of capsular tightening in patients who have capsular injury or laxity.

  9. Use of 3-Dimensional Printing for Preoperative Planning in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Theodoropoulos, John; Abouali, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability often results from large bony Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions. Preoperative imaging is essential in guiding our surgical management of patients with these conditions. However, we are often limited to making an attempt to interpret a 3-dimensional (3D) structure using conventional 2-dimensional imaging. In cases in which complex anatomy or bony defects are encountered, this type of imaging is often inadequate. We used 3D printing to produce a solid 3D model of a glenohumeral joint from a young patient with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and complex Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The 3D model from our patient was used in the preoperative planning stages of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and remplissage to determine the depth of the Hill-Sachs lesion and the degree of abduction and external rotation at which the Hill-Sachs lesion engaged. PMID:26759768

  10. Dislocation

    MedlinePlus

    Joint dislocation ... It may be hard to tell a dislocated joint from a broken bone . Both are emergencies that ... to repair a ligament that tears when the joint is dislocated is needed. Injuries to nerves and ...

  11. Anterior capsulolabral reconstruction of the shoulder in athletes in overhand sports.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W; Giangarra, C E; Kvitne, R S; Glousman, R E

    1991-01-01

    From April 1, 1985, through June 30, 1987, 25 skilled athletes with shoulder pain secondary to anterior glenohumeral instability that had failed to improve with conservative therapy had an anterior capsulolabral reconstruction. All but one athlete completed a formal rehabilitation program with an average followup of 39 months. The results at followup were rated excellent in 68%, good in 24%, fair in 4%, and poor in 4%. Seventeen patients returned to their prior competitive level for at least 1 year. This operation and rehabilitation program may allow many athletes who participate in overhand activities or throwing sports to return to their prior level of competition.

  12. Surgical interventions for anterior shoulder instability in rugby players: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Patel, Nirav K; Bull, Anthony MJ; Reilly, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To systematically evaluate the evidence-based literature on surgical treatment interventions for elite rugby players with anterior shoulder instability. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. A literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar using the following search terms: “rugby” and “shoulder” in combination with “instability” or “dislocation”. All articles published from inception of the included data sources to January 1st 2014 that evaluated surgical treatment of elite rugby players with anterior shoulder instability were examined. RESULTS: Only five studies were found that met the eligibility criteria. A total of 379 shoulders in 376 elite rugby union and league players were included. All the studies were retrospective cohort or case series studies. The mean Coleman Methodological Score for the 5 studies was 47.4 (poor). Owing to heterogeneity amongst the studies, quantitative synthesis was not possible, however a detailed qualitative synthesis is reported. The overall recurrence rate of instability after surgery was 8.7%, and the mean return to competitive play, where reported, was 13 mo. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic stabilization has been performed successfully in acute anterior instability and there is a preference for open Latarjet-type procedures when instability is associated with osseous defects. PMID:25992318

  13. A dual injury of the shoulder: acromioclavicular joint dislocation (type IV) coupled with ipsilateral mid-shaft clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Pandey, Vivek; Khanna, Vikrant; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-11-23

    A direct blow to the shoulder, as may be sustained in a road traffic accident (RTA), can result in various combinations of fracture dislocations in the shoulder joint complex. Among these, a rare variety is an acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation coupled with ipsilateral mid-shaft clavicle fracture. Diverse treatment options have been described in the literature, ranging from non-operative and operative, to hybrid management. Treatment for this complex injury is predominantly dictated by the type of dislocation and displacement of the clavicle fracture, as well as age and demand of the patient. Acute high grades of ACJ dislocation require restoration of the coracoclavicular relationship (in place of torn coracoclavicular (CC) ligament) by some form of internal fixation, thereby maintaining the ACJ reduction. An arthroscopic reinstatement of the coracoclavicular relationship using a dog bone button and fibre tape implant for this composite injury pattern has not been previously described. Furthermore, a comprehensive review of the literature associated with this injury pattern is briefly described.

  14. Posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (PHAGL) in anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Vedova, Franco Della; Ibáñez, Maximiliano; Alvarez, Victoria; Lépore, Salvador; Sulzle, Vanina Ojeda; Galan, Hernán; Slullitel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bankart lesion is the anterior glenohumeral instability most common associated injury. Tears at glenohumeral ligaments can be intra substance or at humeral insertion, this location may be the cause of instability. Posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (PHAGL) can be an isolated or associated cause of instability and it is usually related to the posterior glenohumeral instability. The aim of this article is to report the clinical assessment and postoperative outcomes of 6 patients with PHAGL with anterior shoulder instability. Materials and Methods: We evaluated six patients with PHAGL due to anterior glenohumeral instability arthroscopically repaired. All 6 patients developed the lesion after a sports-related trauma. Sixty six per cent of patients had associated intra-articular shoulder pathologies. The diagnosis with MRI arthrogram (with gadolinium) was performed preoperatively in 50% of patients. Postoperative evaluation was made with Rowe, ASES and WOSI scores. Results: All patients returned to their previous sports level. One patient had a recurrence. Postoperative scores results are WOSI: 13.13%, Rowe 83.33 and ASES 95.83. Discussion: Humeral avulsions of glenohumeral ligaments represent 25% of capsulolabral injuries. PHAGL injury was initially described as a cause of posterior instability, but according to two other series, our study shows that this lesion may also cause anterior instability. It is critical to have a high index of suspicion and make a correct arthroscopic examination to diagnose this injury, because arthroscopic repair of PHAGL has good postoperative outcomes.

  15. Biomechanical benefits of anterior offsetting of humeral head component in posteriorly unstable total shoulder arthroplasty: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Min Mike; Chacon, Alexander C; Andrews, Seth H; Roush, Evan P; Cho, Edward; Conaway, William K; Kunselman, Allen R; Lewis, Gregory S

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of joint stability during total shoulder arthroplasty can be challenging in the face of severe glenoid retroversion. A novel technique of humeral head component anterior-offsetting has been proposed to address posterior instability. We evaluated the biomechanical benefits of this technique in cadaveric specimens. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in 14 cadaveric shoulders from 7 donors. Complementary shoulders were assigned to either 10° or 20° glenoid retroversion, with retroversion created by eccentric reaming. Two humeral head component offset positions were tested in each specimen: The anatomic (posterior) and anterior (reverse). With loads applied to the rotator cuff and deltoid, joint contact pressures and the force and energy required for posterior humeral head translation were measured. The force and energy required to displace the humeral head posteriorly increased significantly with the anterior offset position compared to the anatomic offset position. The joint contact pressures were significantly shifted anteriorly, and the joint contact area significantly increased with the anterior offset position. Anterior offsetting of the humeral head component increased the resistance to posterior humeral head translation, shifted joint contact pressures anteriorly, and increased joint contact area, thus, potentially increasing the joint stability in total shoulder arthroplasty with simulated glenoid retroversion. PMID:26356804

  16. The collagen fibers of the anteroinferior capsulolabrum have multiaxial orientation to resist shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Debski, Richard E; Moore, Susan M; Mercer, Jennifer L; Sacks, Michael S; McMahon, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Instability of the glenohumeral joint can be associated with anteroinferior capsulolabral rupture. To understand its static stabilizing effect better, the collagen fiber orientation of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL), a component of the anteroinferior capsulolabrum, was studied with a small angle light scattering technique. Three rectangular samples (approximately 11 x 6 mm) were excised from the axillary pouch, one from the anterior band (AB) of the IGHL and one control sample from the long head of the biceps tendon of 7 cadaveric shoulders. The small angle light scattering technique scans the tissue with a helium-neon laser beam and quantifies the fiber alignment based on the resultant scattering pattern. The fiber orientation was quantified by an orientation index, defined as the angle within which 50% of the fibers lie. The axillary pouch had a random orientation, whereas the AB-IGHL was random with some regions of localized alignment. The percentage of tissue with an orientation index range of 25 degrees to 45 degrees was 23.2% +/- 8.5% and 29.0% +/- 13.1% for the axillary pouch and the AB-IGHL, respectively, whereas that for the long head of the biceps tendon was 61.6% +/- 15.2%. This suggests that the collagen fibers in the IGHL are not highly aligned and the anteroinferior capsulolabrum can be modeled as a continuous sheet. Moreover, a biomechanical evaluation of the anteroinferior capsulolabrum that investigates the possibility that the mechanical properties may be directionally independent should be conducted. PMID:12851577

  17. The Latarjet-Patte procedure for recurrent anterior shoulder instability in contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mithun A; Young, Allan A; Balestro, Jean-Christian; Walch, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability is common in contact athletes and the high-energy injuries seen in this group make them more prone to bone loss. Athletes with recurrent instability and associated bone loss have high failure rates when treated with a soft tissue reconstruction procedure. Therefore it is preferred to manage recurrent instability in contact athletes with the Latarjet-Patte procedure. In this article, the authors describe their technique. They have found this procedure to be safe and effective, with very low recurrence and early return to sport. A meticulous surgical technique is important to avoid intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  18. RESULTS FROM LATARJET SURGERY FOR TREATING TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BONE EROSION IN THE GLENOID CAVITY, AFTER MINIMUM FOLLOW-UP OF ONE YEAR

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovisky, Joel; Nascimento, Luis Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luiz Henrique Oliveira; Strose, Eric; Helmer, Fábio Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the results from the Latarjet procedure in patients with anterior recurrent dislocation of the shoulder who present bone loss of the glenoid cavity greater than 25%. Methods: Twenty six male patients underwent the Latarjet procedure, The bone loss was evaluated by means of radiography using the Bernageau view and by means of CAT scan. The patients were evaluated with regard to range of motion, using the Rowe and UCLA scales, before and after the operation, and by radiographs to assess the presence of arthrosis, position and consolidation of the graft and positioning of the screws. Statistical analysis was used to assess whether there was any relationship between the number of episodes of dislocation and the presence of arthrosis, , and any relationship between arthrosis and limitations on lateral rotation. Differences in range of motion between the operated and unaffected sides and in the UCLA and Rowe scale. Results: The means for elevation and lateral rotation were statistically poorer on the operated side. The UCLA and Rowe scale showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical-functional results (P < 0.001 for both). There was a relationship between the number of episodes of dislocation and the presence of arthrosis, We also did not observe any correlation between limitations on lateral rotation and arthrosis. Conclusion: The Latarjet procedure is an efficient method for cases of severe erosion of the glenoid margin. PMID:27027053

  19. The Impact of Superior Labral Anterior to Posterior Lesions on Functional Status in Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Gaudelli, Cinzia; Hébert-Davies, Jonah; Balg, Frédéric; Pelet, Stéphane; Djahangiri, Ali; Godbout, Véronique; Rouleau, Dominique M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type IV superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, which are superior labral detachments associated with Bankart tears, are reported to occur in up to 25% of recurrent shoulder instability patients. However, the clinical implications of this finding are debatable. Purpose: To determine whether there are any functional differences between anterior instability patients with and without type IV SLAP lesions at the time of presentation and at short-term follow-up after surgical intervention. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A prospective, multicenter database was established to follow the clinical evolution of patients with shoulder instability. Patients were diagnosed as having a type IV SLAP lesion at the time of arthroscopic Bankart surgery (SLAP+). These patients were compared with a group of patients who simply had a Bankart lesion (SLAP–). The 2 groups had their functional outcomes (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index [WOSI]; Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [QuickDASH]; and Walch-Duplay) compared prior to surgery and 1 year postoperatively. Results: A total of 103 subjects were included in the study; of these, 56 (43 men, 13 women) completed 1-year follow-up. Twenty-three subjects had a type IV SLAP tear, and most had this repaired along with their Bankart lesion. At baseline, SLAP+ subjects had inferior QuickDASH scores compared with SLAP– subjects (37.8 vs 29.0) as well as poorer pain subscores on both the WOSI and QuickDASH. At 1-year follow-up, however, there were no significant differences in any of the outcome measures. Conclusion: A type IV SLAP lesion can be expected in 22% of patients with recurrent shoulder instability. This finding implies that at baseline, the patient will have slightly worse functional scores related to pain. However, following surgical management of the labral pathology, these patients will have equivalent functional outcomes at short-term follow-up. Clinical

  20. Comparison of different approaches to the reduction of anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, M M; Tari, N; Bastaninejad, Sh; Amirizad, E

    2016-08-01

    This randomized clinical trial was designed to compare three different reduction methods for anterior temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation. The three methods evaluated were the conventional method, wrist pivot method, and extraoral method. The study sample comprised 90 consecutive patients suffering from anterior dislocation of the TMJ, who were allocated randomly to one of the three groups. This study found success rates of 86.7% for the conventional method, 96.7% for the wrist pivot method, and 66.7% for the extraoral method. The extraoral method was more difficult for the physician and the patient than the other two methods. For the patients, the wrist pivot method was easier than the other methods. For the doctors, the extraoral method was significantly more difficult than the other methods. In conclusion, due to the absence of a biting risk with the extraoral method and the lack of a significant difference in success between this method and the conventional method, the extraoral method could be considered the appropriate first-line treatment where there is a risk of the patient biting the surgeon's hand. Given the overall benefits of the wrist pivot method, this method could be considered the first-line and gold standard treatment modality in other cases. PMID:27160610

  1. Dislocations

    MedlinePlus

    Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a ... one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, ...

  2. Anterior Glenohumeral Laxity and Stiffness After a Shoulder-Strengthening Program in Collegiate Cheerleaders

    PubMed Central

    Laudner, Kevin G; Metz, Betsy; Thomas, David Q

    2013-01-01

    Context Approximately 62% of all cheerleaders sustain some type of orthopaedic injury during their cheerleading careers. Furthermore, the occurrence of such injuries has led to inquiry regarding optimal prevention techniques. One possible cause of these injuries may be related to inadequate conditioning in cheerleaders. Objective To determine whether a strength and conditioning program produces quantifiable improvements in anterior glenohumeral (GH) laxity and stiffness. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A sample of 41 collegiate cheerleaders (24 experimental and 17 control participants) volunteered. No participants had a recent history (in the past 6 months) of upper extremity injury or any history of upper extremity surgery. Intervention(s) The experimental group completed a 6-week strength and conditioning program between the pretest and posttest measurements; the control group did not perform any strength training between tests. Main Outcome Measure(s) We measured anterior GH laxity and stiffness with an instrumented arthrometer. We conducted a group × time analysis of variance with repeated measures on time (P < .05) to determine differences between groups. Results A significant interaction was demonstrated, with the control group having more anterior GH laxity at the posttest session than the strengthening group (P = .03, partial η2 = 0.11). However, no main effect for time (P = .92) or group (P = .97) was observed. In another significant interaction, the control group had less anterior GH stiffness at the posttest session than the strengthening group (P = .03, partial η2 = 0.12). Main effects for time (P = .02) and group (P = .004) were also significant. Conclusions Cheerleaders who participate in a shoulder-strengthening program developed less anterior GH laxity and more stiffness than cheerleaders in the control group. PMID:23672322

  3. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  4. Anterior-inferior shoulder instability: treatment based on the Thal method.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Giudice, G; Ciccarelli, M; Vernaglia Lombardi, L; Cautiero, F

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze the results of a consecutive series of 139 patients affected with anterior-inferior shoulder instability and treated by arthroscopic capsuloplasty using the Thal method with absorbable and non-absorbable Mitek knotless anchors. Much attention was paid to the preoperative and intraoperative selection of patients, excluding from the arthroscopic procedure those with bony Bankart lesions measuring more than 25%, with an inverted-pear glenoid, with engaged Hill-Sachs lesions and patients with HAGL lesions. Pre- and postoperative clinical evaluation was carried out using the Rowe scale. Scores rose from 45-55 to 96 postoperatively. Intra-articular mobilization of the anchors did not occur and peri-metallic lysis was not manifested. Areas of bone resorption were observed in 7 cases (7/38, 18.4%) with the presence of peri-insertional geodes with biological anchors, but this had no effect on the clinical results.

  5. Imaging of superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Simoni, P; Scarciolla, L; Kreutz, J; Meunier, B; Beomonte Zobel, B

    2012-12-01

    Superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears include a number of abnormal changes of the superior glenoid labrum. SLAP tears have been first reported in elite young atlete and are caused by repetitive overhead motion or by a fall on an outstretched arm. SLAP can lead to chronic pain and instability of shoulder. A diagnosis of SLAP may be difficult on the basis of clinical tests. Hence, modern imaging, including computed tomography arthrography (CTA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) play a key role in the diagnosis of SLAP. The large number of normal anatomic variants of the superior labrum and the surrounding structures make the interpretation of SLAP challenging on imaging and at arthroscopy. In this article the imaging of SLAP are discussed in detail along with relevant anatomy, anatomic variants and biomechanics.

  6. Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions in Patients With Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Dahm, Diane L.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is often accompanied by a Hill-Sachs defect on the humeral head that can contribute to recurrent instability if not addressed at the time of surgery. We describe a method of performing arthroscopic remplissage to treat engaging Hill-Sachs lesions in patients with glenohumeral instability. It has the benefits of being an efficient procedure that can be performed with minimal technical difficulty and can be used to augment other stabilization procedures such as labral repair. The indications for this technique include the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs defect in patients will little or no glenoid bone loss. In appropriately selected patients, arthroscopic remplissage has shown reduced rates of recurrent instability. PMID:26697311

  7. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  8. Massive rotator cuff tear associated with acute traumatic posterior shoulder dislocation: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Luenam, Suriya; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat

    2013-12-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear in association with acute traumatic posterior glenohumeral dislocation is rare. To our knowledge, only four documented cases have been reported in the literature. We present two additional cases of such injury secondary to the traffic accident. The first patient had an unsuccessful closed reduction due to the posterior instability while the second developed the profound shoulder weakness following the reduction. From the findings of our cases together with the previous reports, every patient had a unique injury mechanism of high-energy directed axial loading on an outstretched, adducted, and internally rotated arm. The glenohumeral capsule and rotator cuff were uniformly avulsed from the humeral attachment, and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus were always involved. However, the clinical presentations were variable based on the severity of the associated rotator cuff tear. The outcomes of operative treatment in this type of injury with the open repair were favorable. PMID:22782426

  9. Irreducible Atlanto-Axial Dislocation in Neglected Odontoid Fracture Treated with Single Stage Anterior Release and Posterior Instrumented Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Ashok Keshav; Chaudhary, Kshitij Subhash

    2016-01-01

    It is a well-know fact that type 2 odontoid fractures frequently go into nonunion. If left untreated, patients may develop irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD). We describe the surgical management of two patients with neglected odontoid fractures and irreducible AAD treated with single stage anterior release followed by posterior instrumented fusion. Both patients presented with history of neglected trauma and progressive myelopathy. Traction under anesthesia failed to achieve reduction of AAD. Anterior release was done by trans-oral approach in one patient and retrophayngeal approach in the other. Posterior fixation was performed with transarticular screws in both the patients. Both patients had full neurological recovery and demonstrated fusion at follow-up. Anterior release followed by posterior instrumented correction may be an effective alternative to the traditional means of treating irreducible dislocations associated with neglected odontoid fractures. PMID:27114778

  10. Arthroscopy of the shoulder joint--a cadaver and clinical study. Part 2: Clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rojvanit, V

    1984-10-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy was carried out 56 times on 50 patients. Different types of arthroscopes were employed. Anterior and posterior approaches were used. Diagnoses were 21 cases of glenohumeral instability including 17 of recurrent anterior dislocation and subluxation; 2 of voluntary anterior subluxation and 2 of habitual posterior dislocation, 13 of rotator cuff tear, 6 of chronic subacromial bursitis, 2 of fracture-dislocation, 2 of frozen shoulder, 2 of baseball shoulder, one of rheumatoid arthritis, and 3 miscellaneous. The arthroscopic findings in the instability group and rotator cuff tear group were verified. Bankart lesion and Hill-Sachs lesion were identified arthroscopically. The indications for shoulder arthroscopy are outlined. There was no significant morbidity with this procedure.

  11. Quantification of anterior translation of the humeral head in the throwing shoulder. Manual assessment versus stress radiography.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, T S; Mattalino, A J; Elam, E; Caplinger, R

    2000-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of humeral head translation relies mainly on manual tests to measure laxity in the human shoulder. The purposes of this study were to determine whether side-to-side differences exist in anterior humeral head translation in professional baseball pitchers, to compare manual laxity testing with stress radiography for quantifying humeral head translation, and to test intrarater reliability of the manual humeral head translation and stress radiography tests. Twenty professional baseball pitchers underwent bilateral manual anterior humeral head translation and stress radiographic tests. Stress radiography was performed by imparting a 15-daN anterior load to the shoulder in 90 degrees of abduction with both neutral and 60 degrees of external rotation and recording the glenohumeral joint translation at rest and under stress in each position. Eight subjects were retested to assess the reliability of these methods. Results showed no significant difference between the dominant and nondominant extremity in the amount of anterior humeral head translation measured manually and with stress radiography, nor significant correlation between anterior humeral head translation measured manually and by stress radiography. Test-retest reliability was moderate-to-poor for the manual humeral head translation test and moderate for stress radiography.

  12. Shoulder Pain and Common Shoulder Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... and muscles around the shoulder become loose or torn, dislocations can occur repeatedly. Recurring dislocations, which may ... involve arthroscopy to remove scar tissue or repair torn tissues, or traditional, open procedures for larger reconstructions ...

  13. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  14. Inferior capsular shift operation for multidirectional instability of the shoulder in players of contact sports

    PubMed Central

    Choi, C; Ogilvie-Harris, D

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the results of inferior capsular shift for multidirectional instability of the shoulder in athletes. Methods: Multidirectional instability was surgically corrected in 53 shoulders in 47 athletes who engaged in contact sports. A history of major trauma was found in eight patients, the others having had minor episodes. Before surgery, all patients had complex combinations of instabilities. The surgical approach was selected according to the predominant direction of instability. Results: Anterior inferior capsular shift was carried out in 37 shoulders, and anterior dislocation recurred in three. In one of these, it was anterior alone, one was anterior and inferior, and one was unstable in all three directions. After posterior inferior capsular shift in 16 shoulders, one dislocation occurred anteriorly and one posteriorly. With the anterior approach, four athletes could not return to sport. Two patients treated with the posterior approach could not return to sport. Of these six failures, five patients had had bilateral repairs. Successful repair based on the criteria of the American Shoulder and Elbow Association was achieved in 92% of anterior repairs and 81% of posterior repairs. Successful return to sport was noted in 82% of patients with anterior repairs, 75% with posterior repairs, and 17% with bilateral repairs. Overall, there were five subsequent dislocations, three in the anterior repair group (8%), and two in the posterior repair group (12%). Conclusions: Inferior capsular shift can successfully correct multidirectional instability in most players of contact sports, but the results in bilateral cases are poor. PMID:12145120

  15. The effects of shoulder joint abduction angles on the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle while vibrations are applied

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da-eun; Moon, Dong-chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the ratio between the upper trapezius and the serratus anterior muscles during diverse shoulder abduction exercises applied with vibrations in order to determine the appropriate exercise methods for recovery of scapular muscle balance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects performed shoulder abduction at various shoulder joint abduction angles (90°, 120°, 150°, 180°) with oscillation movements. [Results] At 120°, all the subjects showed significant increases in the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle in comparison with the upper trapezius muscle. However, no significant difference was found at angles other than 120°. [Conclusion] To selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, applying vibration stimuli at the 120° shoulder abduction position is considered to be appropriate. PMID:25642052

  16. INTEGRITY OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON AFTER OPEN SURGERY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY: A CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Osvandré; Piluski, Paulo; Tambani, Renato; Castro, Nero; Pimentel, Gilnei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the integrity of the subscapularis tendon by strength, function and magnetic resonance imaging after deltopectoralis access for anterior shoulder instability. Methods: 20 patients with anterior shoulder instability have been evaluated. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 40 months. Only male patients were included, with a mean of age of 29 years (20 − 42 years). The patients have been submitted to physical examinations of mobility, muscular strength, Belly Test and Gerber Test. The isokinetic strength in internal and external rotation, in angular speeds of 600/s and 1800/s, for both shoulders was measured using a dynamometer. In 15 patients magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out on both shoulders for evaluating the thickness, cross-sectional area and atrophy of the subscapularis muscle. Results: A significant difference was found between torque peaks at the speed of 600/s for internal (p=0.036) and external (p=0.008) rotation. However, at 1800/s the opposite happens (internal rotation: p=0.133; external rotation: p=0.393). Subscapularis muscle thickness and area are significantly smaller than the normal side, with a deficit of 19% and 23%, respectively. According to Rowe and UCLA scores, we find excellent and good results for the majority of patients, with a mean of 88 and 31.6 points, respectively. Conclusion: Despite of the good functional results, open surgery can limit strength and reduce the thickness and the cross-sectional area of subscapularis muscle. However, the best results were found in the patients who had the dominant side operated. PMID:27004190

  17. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O’Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical–pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles. PMID:26229839

  18. Arthroscopic Latarjet and Capsular Shift (ALCS) procedure: a new "freehand" technique for anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone defects.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone loss has been described as "bony-instability," and this condition is usually treated with an anterior glenoid bone grafting procedure (Latarjet procedure). The Latarjet procedure involves transfer of the horizontal limb of the coracoid process along with the conjoint tendon to the anterior glenoid rim, and is traditionally performed as an open surgical procedure. Recently, an arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure has been described; the technique necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation and involves excision of the entire anterior capsule to facilitate coracoid fixation. We describe a new "freehand" arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure, and, in addition, a simultaneous capsular shift to further optimize mid and end range stability. This technique eliminates the use of additional instrumentation and can be done using routine arthroscopic instruments. Preliminary experience with this technique suggests that the arthroscopic Latarjet and capsular shift is a technically demanding procedure. Glenohumeral capsule can be preserved, and this should be attempted wherever possible to optimize stability. Additional specialized instrumentation would probably reduce surgical time; however, the procedure can be performed with routine instruments.

  19. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  20. Traumatic anterior lumbosacral dislocation caused by hyperextension mechanism in preexisting L5 spondylolysis: a case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Kunio; Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Hiroya; Inokuchi, Kouichi

    2006-08-01

    Of many reports referring to injury mechanism in anterior lumbosacral dislocation, there were none concerning hyperextension mechanism. We report a case of a 46-year-old man with preexisting L5 spondylolysis sustaining traumatic complete anterior lumbosacral dislocation. The operative findings, together with the radiologic findings, strongly suggested that the dislocation occurred by hyperextension mechanism. Open reduction was done by applying force of distraction with flexion using a rod and screw system, followed by the internal fixation from the L3 to S1 vertebrae and the postero-superior iliac spine. The lumbosacral dislocation was reduced to 77%. At the follow-up at 5 years after surgery, bony union was obtained and the patient could move with a wheelchair although the neurologic deficit in lower extremities observed preoperatively did not recover. Preexisting L5 spondylolysis was considered to increase the potential for anterior lumbosacral dislocation by additional force of compression with hyperextension. Posterior instrumentation using a rod and screw system was considered a useful method for reduction, decompression, stabilization, and fusion.

  1. Emerging Indications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urch, Ekaterina; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, reverse shoulder arthroplasty was reserved for older, low-demand patients in whom rotator cuff arthropathy was diagnosed. Other common indications included sequelae of previously treated proximal humerus fractures, failed anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, tumor resection, and rheumatoid arthritis in the elderly population. Unpredictable implant durability and high complication rates have limited the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a narrow group of patients. Over the past decade, however, research has led to an improved understanding of the biomechanics behind reverse shoulder prostheses, which has improved implant design and surgical techniques. Consequently, orthopaedic surgeons have slowly begun to expand the indications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to include a wider spectrum of shoulder pathologies. Recent studies have shown promising results for patients who undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of acute proximal humerus fractures, massive rotator cuff tears without arthropathy, primary osteoarthritis, and chronic anterior dislocation, as well as for younger patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. These data suggest that, with judicious patient selection, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be an excellent treatment option for a growing patient cohort. PMID:27049188

  2. Treatment of recurrent anterior dislocation and subluxation of the glenohumeral joint in athletes.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, A B

    1975-01-01

    This series of 93 Putti-Platt arthroplasties performed on 88 athletes without a recurrence and with the return of each athlete to full participation demonstrates the excellence of this procedure. The 5 year average follow-up further confirms this. Only one valid objection was found. This procedure performed on the dominant shoulder definitely restricts the athlete in throwing a baseball or passing a football, and is not advocated where either of these two functions must be preserved. From this series it was found that operative limitation of external rotation to about

  3. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic. PMID:26535182

  4. Evaluating the Center of Gravity of Dislocations in Soccer Players With and Without Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using a Balance Platform

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Angelica Castilho; Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andréa; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to compare the dislocation of the center of gravity and postural balance in sedentary and recreational soccer players with and without anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the Biodex Balance System (BBS). METHOD Sixty-four subjects were divided into three groups: a) soccer players who were post- anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; b) soccer players with no anterior cruciate ligament injuries; and c) sedentary subjects. The subjects were submitted to functional stability tests using the Biodex Balance System. The instability protocols used were level eight (more stable) and level two (less stable). Three stability indexes were calculated: the anteroposterior stability index, the mediolateral stability index, and the general stability index. RESULTS Postural balance (dislocation) on the reconstructed side of the athletes was worse than on the side that had not undergone reconstruction. The postural balance of the sedentary group was dislocated less on both sides than the reconstructed knees of the athletes without anterior cruciate ligament injuries. There were no differences in postural balance with relation to left/right dominance for the uninjured athletes and the sedentary individuals. CONCLUSION The dislocation of the center of gravity and change in postural balance in sedentary individuals and on the operated limb of Surgery Group are less marked than in the soccer players from the Non Surgery Group and on the non-operated limbs. The dislocation of the center of gravity and the change in postural balance from the operated limb of the soccer players is less marked than in their non-operated limbs. PMID:19330239

  5. Superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder: Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Dominik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent which is the consequence of evolving progress in both, imaging and surgical technique as well as implants. The first classification of SLAP lesions was described in 1990, a subdivision in four types existed. The rising comprehension of pathology and pathophysiology in SLAP lesions contributed to increase the types in SLAP classification to ten. Concerning the causative mechanism of SLAP lesions, acute trauma has to be differed from chronic degeneration. Overhead athletes tend to develop a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit which forms the basis for two controversial discussed potential mechanisms of pathophysiology in SLAP lesions: Internal impingement and peel-back mechanism. Clinical examination often remains unspecific whereas soft tissue imaging such as direct or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography has technically improved and is regarded to be indispensable in detection of SLAP lesions. Concomitant pathologies as Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears or perilabral cysts should be taken into consideration when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy. In addition, normal variants such as sublabral recess, sublabral hole, Buford complex and other less common variants have to be distinguished. The most frequent SLAP type II needs a sophisticated approach when surgical teatment comes into consideration. While SLAP repair is considered to be the standard operative option, overhead athletes benefit from a biceps tenodesis because improved patient-reported satisfaction and higher rate of return to pre-injury level of sports has been reported. PMID:26495243

  6. Superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder: Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards.

    PubMed

    Popp, Dominik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-10-18

    Surgical treatment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent which is the consequence of evolving progress in both, imaging and surgical technique as well as implants. The first classification of SLAP lesions was described in 1990, a subdivision in four types existed. The rising comprehension of pathology and pathophysiology in SLAP lesions contributed to increase the types in SLAP classification to ten. Concerning the causative mechanism of SLAP lesions, acute trauma has to be differed from chronic degeneration. Overhead athletes tend to develop a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit which forms the basis for two controversial discussed potential mechanisms of pathophysiology in SLAP lesions: Internal impingement and peel-back mechanism. Clinical examination often remains unspecific whereas soft tissue imaging such as direct or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography has technically improved and is regarded to be indispensable in detection of SLAP lesions. Concomitant pathologies as Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears or perilabral cysts should be taken into consideration when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy. In addition, normal variants such as sublabral recess, sublabral hole, Buford complex and other less common variants have to be distinguished. The most frequent SLAP type II needs a sophisticated approach when surgical teatment comes into consideration. While SLAP repair is considered to be the standard operative option, overhead athletes benefit from a biceps tenodesis because improved patient-reported satisfaction and higher rate of return to pre-injury level of sports has been reported.

  7. Differential expression of extracellular matrix genes in glenohumeral capsule of shoulder instability patients.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2016-07-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common orthopedic problem. After a traumatic shoulder dislocation, patients present a plastic deformation of the capsule. The shoulder instability biology remains poorly understood. We evaluated the expression of genes that encode the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibronectin 1 (FN1), tenascin C (TNC) and tenascin XB (TNXB) in the glenohumeral capsule of anterior shoulder instability patients and controls. Moreover, we investigated the associations between gene expression and clinical parameters. The gene expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in the antero-inferior (macroscopically injured region), antero-superior and posterior regions of the capsule of 29 patients with shoulder instability and 8 controls. COMP expression was reduced and FN1 and TNC expression was increased in the antero-inferior capsule region of cases compared to controls (p < 0.05). TNC expression was increased in the posterior capsule portion of shoulder instability patients (p = 0.022). COMP expression was reduced in the antero-inferior region compared to the posterior region of shoulder instability patients (p = 0.007). In the antero-inferior region, FN1 expression was increased in the capsule of patients with more than one year of symptoms (p = 0.003) and with recurrent dislocations (p = 0.004) compared with controls. FN1 and TNXB expression was correlated with the duration of symptoms in the posterior region (p < 0.05). Thus, COMP, FN1, TNC and TNXB expression was altered across the capsule of shoulder instability patients. Dislocation episodes modify FN1, TNC and TNXB expression in the injured tissue. COMP altered expression may be associated with capsule integrity after shoulder dislocation, particularly in the macroscopically injured portion.

  8. Capsular tear in line with the inferior glenohumeral ligament: a cause of anterior glenohumeral instability in 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, David L; Burks, Robert T

    2009-08-01

    Anterior glenohumeral instability typically involves lesions associated with the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. Multiple lesions have been described in this setting, including Bankart, humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex, and mid-substance capsular tears. These lesions are indicative of the high-force traumatic nature of anterior shoulder dislocation. Two cases of recurrent anterior shoulder instability are presented with a capsular tear perpendicular to the usual orientation and not consistent to the amount of force involved in a dislocation. Arthroscopy revealed a capsular defect from the glenoid to the humeral head in the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligamentous complex in both. This lesion is an unusual circumstance, providing another pathology to include in the differential diagnosis of anterior glenohumeral instability.

  9. The Sheffield bone block procedure: a new operation for the treatment of glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior traumatic shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Phil; Macinnes, Scott J; Ali, Amjid; Potter, David

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the results of the Sheffield bone block procedure for anteroinferior bone loss in traumatic shoulder instability. In this modified open technique, the medial half of coracoid process without its soft tissue attachments is used to provide congruent augmentation of the anteroinferior glenoid and secured with two screws. Methods In this retrospective consecutive case series (2007–11), all patients having recurrent traumatic instability with glenoid bone loss > 20% and/or a large Hill–Sachs lesion were included. The shoulder function was evaluated clinically and by Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS; by post/telephone). Results There were 84 patients in this series with a large proportion engaged in contact sports. Mean (range) age was 33 years (16 years to 45 years); male : female, 59 : 8; mean (range) follow-up period was 48 months (36 months to 84 months) and the response rate 89% (75/84). Mean postoperative OSIS was 43 (33 to 46) and one patient had re-dislocation (1.3%). No neurovascular complications/hardware failure/non-union/infections were noted. By 6 months, 85% patients had returned to pre-injury sport and 93% had returned to pre-injury work. Conclusions The Sheffield bone block procedure provides reliable and satisfactory results in patients having recurrent instability with glenoid bone loss and/or a large Hill–Sachs lesion with minimal complications and an excellent chance of returning to original sport and occupation. PMID:27583007

  10. Does surgery for instability of the shoulder truly stabilize the glenohumeral joint?

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Tirefort, Jérôme; Kolo, Frank C.; Chagué, Sylvain; Cunningham, Grégory; Charbonnier, Caecilia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the fact that surgery is commonly used to treat glenohumeral instability, there is no evidence that such treatment effectively corrects glenohumeral translation. The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to analyze the effect of surgical stabilization on glenohumeral translation. Glenohumeral translation was assessed in 11 patients preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively following surgical stabilization for anterior shoulder instability. Translation was measured using optical motion capture and computed tomography. Preoperatively, anterior translation of the affected shoulder was bigger in comparison to the normal contralateral side. Differences were significant for flexion and abduction movements (P < 0.001). Postoperatively, no patients demonstrated apprehension and all functional scores were improved. Despite absence of apprehension, postoperative anterior translation for the surgically stabilized shoulders was not significantly different from the preoperative values. While surgical treatment for anterior instability limits the chance of dislocation, it does not seem to restore glenohumeral translation during functional range of motion. Such persistent microinstability may explain residual pain, apprehension, inability to return to activity and even emergence of dislocation arthropathy that is seen in some patients. Further research is necessary to better understand the causes, effects, and treatment of residual microinstability following surgical stabilization of the shoulder. PMID:27495043

  11. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery. PMID:27660658

  12. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery.

  13. Predictors for Surgery in Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lebus, George F.; Raynor, Martin B.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Wagstrom, Emily; Jani, Sunil S.; Carey, James L.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.; Cox, Charles L.; Kuhn, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shoulder instability is a common cause of pain and dysfunction in young, active patients. While studies have analyzed risk factors for recurrent instability and failure after instability surgery, few have examined which variables are associated with initial surgery in this patient population. Purpose: To identify variables that may be associated with surgical intervention in patients with shoulder instability in the context of the FEDS (frequency, etiology, direction, severity) classification, a system that may be useful in the surgical treatment of shoulder instability patients. Study Design: Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A database of patients treated for shoulder instability from 3 separate institutions from 2005 to 2010 was generated using International Classification of Diseases–9th Revision data. Data were collected via retrospective review. Injury data were categorized according to the FEDS system. Data were analyzed for significance, with the primary outcome of surgical intervention. Summary statistics were used to assess which variables were associated with eventual surgery. To test the unadjusted bivariate associations between shoulder surgery and each data point, Pearson chi-square tests were used for categorical variables and Wilcoxon tests were used for continuous variables. Results: Over the study time period, 377 patients were treated for shoulder instability. Patients who had surgery were more likely younger, had recurrent instability, and had their initial injury while playing a sport. Most patients had anterior instability; however, there was a greater proportion of posterior instability patients in the operative group. Severity of dislocation, measured by whether the patient required help to relocate the shoulder, was not significantly associated with eventual surgery. While imaging was not available for all patients, surgical patients were more likely to have magnetic resonance imaging findings of

  14. Management of sternoclavicular dislocation in young children: considerations about diagnosis and treatment of four cases.

    PubMed

    Gil-Albarova, J; Rebollo-González, S; Gómez-Palacio, V E; Herrera, A

    2013-08-01

    The records of 4 children of under 14 years of age treated at our institution for traumatic sternoclavicular dislocation (SCJ) were reviewed. Closed reduction in posterior SCJ after computed tomography (CT) was successful as immediate procedure. For anterior SCJ instability, open reduction and SCJ reconstruction obtained satisfactory results. Conservative treatment of SCJ subluxation for asymptomatic children was sufficient. Radiographs in "serendipity view" were useful for confirming reduction and stability in children. No postoperative CT was needed for this purpose. Closed reduction in posterior SCJ dislocation and surgical treatment in anterior SCJ dislocation in young children can provide stability and a satisfactory return to a normal function, but with some limitation when intense or competitive shoulder motion is required during sport. Young children and parents should be aware about this possibility. Conservative treatment of SCJ subluxation for asymptomatic children is useful. Reflection is required regarding the correct imaging examination after treatment to check stable reduction in a SCJ injury. PMID:23314981

  15. A biomechanical assessment of superior shoulder translation after reconstruction of anterior glenoid bone defects: The Latarjet procedure versus allograft reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Degen, Ryan M.; Giles, Joshua W.; Boons, Harm W.; Litchfield, Robert B.; Johnson, James A.; Athwal, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The coracoacromial ligament (CAL) is an important restraint to superior shoulder translation. The effect of CAL release on superior stability following the Latarjet is unknown; therefore, our purpose was to compare the effect of two Latarjet techniques and allograft reconstruction on superior instability. Materials and Methods: Eight cadaveric specimens were tested on a simulator. Superior translation was monitored following an axial force in various glenohumeral rotations (neutral, internal, and external) with and without muscle loading. Three intact CAL states were tested (intact specimen, 30% glenoid bone defect, and allograft reconstruction) and two CAL deficient states (classic Latarjet (classicLAT) and congruent-arc Latarjet (congruentLAT)). Results: In neutral without muscle loading, a significant increase in superior translation occurred with the classicLAT as compared to 30% defect (P = 0.046) and allograft conditions (P = 0.041). With muscle loading, the classicLAT (P = 0.005, 0.002) and the congruentLAT (P = 0.018, 0.021) had significantly greater superior translation compared to intact and allograft, respectively. In internal rotation, only loaded tests produced significant results; specifically, classicLAT increased translation compared to all intact CAL states (P < 0.05). In external rotation, only unloaded tests produced significant results with classicLAT and congruentLAT allowing greater translations than intact (P ≤ 0.028). For all simulations, the allograft was not significantly different than intact (P > 0.05) and no differences (P = 1.0) were found between classicLAT and congruentLAT. Discussion: In most simulations, CAL release with the Latarjet lead to increased superior humeral translation. Conclusion: The choice of technique for glenoid bone loss reconstruction has implications on the magnitude of superior humeral translation. This previously unknown effect requires further study to determine its clinical and kinematic

  16. The Neural Correlates of Shoulder Apprehension: A Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Shitara, Hitoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Hamano, Noritaka; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Osawa, Toshihisa; Iizuka, Haku; Hanakawa, Takashi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takagishi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder apprehension is an established clinical finding and is important for the prevention of shoulder dislocation, how this subjective perception is evoked remains unclear. We elucidated the functional neuroplasticity associated with apprehension in patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability (RSI) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twelve healthy volunteers and 14 patients with right-sided RSI performed a motor imagery task and a passive shoulder motion task. Brain activity was compared between healthy participants and those with RSI and was correlated with the apprehension intensity reported by participants after each task. Compared to healthy volunteers, participants with RSI exhibited decreased brain activity in the motor network, but increased activity in the hippocampus and amygdala. During the passive motion task, participants with RSI exhibited decreased activity in the left premotor and primary motor/somatosensory areas. Furthermore, brain activity was correlated with apprehension intensity in the left amygdala and left thalamus during the motor imagery task (memory-induced), while a correlation between apprehension intensity and brain activity was found in the left prefrontal cortex during the passive motion task (instability-induced). Our findings provide insight into the pathophysiology of RSI by identifying its associated neural alterations. We elucidated that shoulder apprehension was induced by two different factors, namely instability and memory. PMID:26351854

  17. [Post-traumatic bipolar dislocation of the clavicle: is operative treatment reasonable?].

    PubMed

    Dudda, M; Kruppa, C; Schildhauer, T A

    2013-02-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle ("floating clavicle") is extremely rare. It exists no standardised treatment for this trauma and the treatment is often conservative. This is mainly an anterior displacement of the sternoclavicular joint (type III according to Allman) and a posterior dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (type IV according to Rockwood).We report on a 60 year old male who fell onto the right shoulder. He sustained a 'floating clavicle' and had a massive dislocation, impairment of range of motion and pain. Venous congestion was observable. We stabilised the dislocated acromioclavicular joint with a Balser's plate, the sternoclavicular joint was fixed with PDS cord tension band technique around the first rip and the sternum. In addition we resected the anterior part of the distal clavicle to get a better cosmetic result. Post-operatively the patient had an excellent range of motion without any further symptoms after six weeks and one year. Venous congestion was not more observable.In most of the cases dislocations of both ends of the clavicle are treated conservatively. We recommend an operative treatment especially in young and active patients to avoid re-dislocation and to archive better cosmetic results. PMID:22367519

  18. Shoulder arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    SLAP repair; SLAP lesion; Acromioplasty; Bankart repair; Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... the lower part of the shoulder joint. A SLAP lesion involves the labrum and the ligament on ...

  19. Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle at acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joint is an uncommon traumatic injury. The conservative treatments adopted in the past is associated with redislocation dysfunction and deformity. A 41 years old lady with bipolar dislocation of right shoulder is treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation by oblique T-plate at sternoclavicular joint and Kirschner wire stabilization at acromioclavicular joint. The patient showed satisfactory recovery with full range of motion of the right shoulder and normal muscular strength. The case reported in view of rarity and at 2 years followup. PMID:23325981

  20. Shoulder Conditions: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline.

    PubMed

    Codsi, Michael; Howe, Chris R

    2015-08-01

    The following guideline covers a wide array of shoulder conditions seen in the workers' compensation, as well as the nonworkers' compensation, population. The guideline is intended to help establish work relatedness and aid in making the diagnosis of shoulder injuries and degenerative conditions. It also provides a nonoperative and operative guideline for the treatment of several shoulder conditions, not limited to rotator cuff tears, subacromial impingement syndrome, acromioclavicular arthritis and dislocations, as well as glenohumeral arthritis.

  1. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  2. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful.

  3. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful. PMID:27107998

  4. Bristow-Latarjet Technique: Still a Very Successful Surgery for Anterior Glenohumeral Instability - A Forty Year One Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ruci, Vilson; Duni, Artid; Cake, Alfred; Ruci, Dorina; Ruci, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the functional outcomes of the Bristow-Latarjet procedure in patients with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Personal clinical records of 42 patients with 45 operated shoulders were reviewed retrospectively. Patient age at time of first dislocation, injury mechanism, and number of recurring dislocations before surgery were recorded. The overall function and stability of the shoulder was evaluated. RESULTS: Thirty five (78%) of the scapulohumeral humeral instabilities were caused by trauma. The mean number of recurring dislocations was 9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0–18); one patient had had 17 recurrences. Mean follow-up 46 months (95% CI, 16-88). No dislocation happened postoperatively. Four patients have fibrous union (9%). Only two had clinical sign of pain and discomfort. One of them was reoperated for screw removal with very good post-operative result. The overall functional outcome was good, with a mean Rowe score of 88 points (95% CI, 78–100). Scores of 27 (64%) of the patients were excellent, 9 (22%) were good, 4 (9.5%) were fair, and 2 (4.5%) were poor. CONCLUSION: The Bristow-Latarjet procedure is a very good surgical treatment for recurrent anterior-inferior instability of the glenohumeral joint. It must not be used for multidirectional instability or psychogenic habitual dislocations. PMID:27275242

  5. Shoulder Arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... synovial fluid that lubricates the shoulder joint. Rotator cuff. Four tendons surround the shoulder capsule and help ... This thick tendon material is called the rotator cuff. The cuff covers the head of the humerus ...

  6. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  7. An Evaluation of the Clinical and Anatomic Predictors of Outcomes at a Minimum of 2 yrs Following the Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability with Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Horan, Marilee P.; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although the Latarjet procedure for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability is highly successful, reasons for failure are often unclear. The purpose of our study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic characteristics that were predictive of continued instability or poor outcomes following the Latarjet procedure. Methods: In this IRB approved study, patients who underwent open coracoid Latarjet procedures for anteroinferior instability with glenoid bone loss (>20%) prior to October of 2012 were included. Anatomic measurements of coracoid size (anteroposterior surface area, maximal coracoid width), conjoint and subscapularis tendon widths, estimated glenoid defect surface area, Hill-Sach's Interval, and projected postoperative glenoid track engagement were obtained from preoperative cross-sectional imaging. When the projected glenoid track was smaller than the Hill-Sach's interval, the lesion was determined to be outside-&-engaged compared to inside-&-non-engaged. Patient reported subjective data that was prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed included patient satisfaction, instability events, SANE score, ASES score, DASH score, and SF-12 PCS. Patients that progressed to another shoulder surgery not related to instability were considered complications and patients that continued to experience dislocations or who underwent revision instability surgeries were considered failures. Results: Thirty-nine shoulders in 39 patients (34 men, 5 women) with a mean age of 26 (range 16-43) were included at a mean follow-up was 3.3 years (2- 7.9 years). There were 25 out of 39 that had prior stabilization surgery and 6 workman's compensation claims. One patient was revised due to broken hardware at 2 months and one because of coracoid nonunion at 18 months. One patient experienced postsurgical adhesive capsulitis treated surgically at a year. All subjective outcome scores significantly improved (p<.05) and a 9 out of 10 median satisfaction score was

  8. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  9. The addition of cervical unilateral posterior-anterior mobilisation in the treatment of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Learman, Ken; Houghton, Steve; Showalter, Christopher; O'Halloran, Bryan

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is a complex, multi-factorial problem that is treated with a variety of different conservative options. One conservative option that has shown effectiveness is manual therapy to the thoracic spine. Another option, manual therapy to the cervical spine, has been studied only once with good results, evaluating short-term outcomes, in a small sample size. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefit of neck manual therapy for patients with SIS. The study was a randomised, single blinded, clinical trial where both groups received pragmatic, evidence-based treatment to the shoulder and one group received neck manual therapy. Subjects with neck pain were excluded from the study. Comparative pain, disability, rate of recovery and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) measures were analyzed on the 68 subjects seen over an average of 56.1 days (standard deviation (SD)=55.4). Eighty-six percent of the sample reported an acceptable change on the PASS at discharge. There were no between-groups differences in those who did or did not receive neck manual therapy; however, both groups demonstrated significant within-groups improvements. On average both groups improved 59.7% (SD=25.1) for pain and 53.5% (SD=40.2) for the Quick Disabilities of the Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (QuickDASH) from baseline. This study found no value when neck manual therapy was added to the treatment of SIS. Reasons may include the lack of therapeutic dosage provided for the manual therapy approach or the lack of benefit to treating the neck in subjects with SIS who do not have concomitant neck problems.

  10. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data were collected from the infraspinatus, upper trapezius, middle trapezius, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles. These measurements were compared across the various shoulder elevation angles. [Results] The strength measurements did not differ significantly by angulation. The infraspinatus activity was 92%, 75%, 68%, and 57% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly decreased as shoulder elevation increased. The serratus anterior activity was 24%, 48%, 53%, and 62% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly increased as shoulder elevation increased. [Conclusion] Shoulder external rotation torque was maintained regardless of shoulder elevation angle. The shoulder approximated to the zero position as the shoulder elevation increased so that infraspinatus activity decreased and the scapular posterior tilting by the serratus anterior might generate shoulder external rotation torque. PMID:26957748

  11. Shoulder replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  12. Delayed Axillary Artery Occlusion after Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heitmiller, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Axillary artery injury has been associated with shoulder dislocation and surgery. We describe a case of delayed axillary artery occlusion after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The injury was confirmed by Doppler and angiography and was treated with angioplasty and stenting. Early recognition and treatment of this injury are mandatory for patients' recovery. PMID:27555975

  13. Arthroscopic Treatment for Shoulder Instability with Glenoid Bone Loss Using Distal Tibia Allograft Augmentation - Short Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; Amar, Eyal; Coady, Catherine M.; Dilman, Daryl B.; Smith, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: The results of arthroscopic anterior labral (Bankart) repair have been shown to have high failure rate in patients with significant glenoid bone loss. Several reconstruction procedures using bone graft have been described to overcome the bone loss, including autogenous coracoid transfer to the anterior glenoid (Latarjet procedure) as well as iliac crest autograft and tibial allografts. In recent years, trends toward minimally invasive shoulder surgery along with improvements in technology and technique have led surgeons to expand the application of arthroscopic treatment. Purpose: This study aims to perform a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data to evaluate the clinical and radiological follow up of patient who underwent anatomic glenoid reconstruction using distal tibia allograft for the treatment of shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss at 1-year post operation time point. Methods: Between December 2011 and January 2015, 55 patients underwent arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder by means of capsule-labral reattachment to glenoid ream and bony augmentation of glenoid bone loss with distal tibial allograft for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation included general assessment by the western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) questionnaire, preoperative and postoperative radiographs and CT scans. Results: Fifty-five patients have been evaluated with mean age of 29.73 years at time of the index operation. There were 40 males (mean age of 29.66) and 15 female (mean age of 29.93). Minimum follow up time was 12 months. The following adverse effects were recorded: none suffered from recurrent dislocation, 2 patients suffered from bone resorption but without overt instability, 1 patient had malunion due to screw fracture, none of the patients had nonunion. The mean pre-operative WOSI score was 36.54 and the mean postoperative WOSI score was 61.0. Conclusion: Arthroscopic

  14. A biomechanical model correlating shoulder kinetics to pain in young baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P

    2012-10-01

    Previous work has postulated that shoulder pain may be associated with increases in both peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force. Unfortunately these relationships have yet to be quantified. Thus, the purpose of this study was to associate these kinetic values with reported shoulder pain in youth baseball pitchers. Nineteen healthy baseball pitchers participated in this study. Segment based reference systems and established calculations were utilized to identify peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force. A medical history questionnaire was utilized to identify shoulder pain. Following collection of these data, the strength of the relationships between both peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force and shoulder pain were analyzed. Although peak anterior force was not significantly correlated to shoulder pain, peak proximal force was. These results lead to the development of a single variable logistic regression model able to accurately predict 84.2% of all cases and 71.4% of shoulder pain cases. This model indicated that for every 1 N increase in peak proximal force, there was a corresponding 4.6% increase in the likelihood of shoulder pain. The magnitude of peak proximal force is both correlated to reported shoulder pain and capable of being used to accurately predict the likelihood of experiencing shoulder pain. It appears that those pitchers exhibiting high magnitudes of peak proximal force are significantly more likely to report experiencing shoulder pain than those who generate lower magnitudes of peak proximal force.

  15. A biomechanical model correlating shoulder kinetics to pain in young baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P

    2012-10-01

    Previous work has postulated that shoulder pain may be associated with increases in both peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force. Unfortunately these relationships have yet to be quantified. Thus, the purpose of this study was to associate these kinetic values with reported shoulder pain in youth baseball pitchers. Nineteen healthy baseball pitchers participated in this study. Segment based reference systems and established calculations were utilized to identify peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force. A medical history questionnaire was utilized to identify shoulder pain. Following collection of these data, the strength of the relationships between both peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force and shoulder pain were analyzed. Although peak anterior force was not significantly correlated to shoulder pain, peak proximal force was. These results lead to the development of a single variable logistic regression model able to accurately predict 84.2% of all cases and 71.4% of shoulder pain cases. This model indicated that for every 1 N increase in peak proximal force, there was a corresponding 4.6% increase in the likelihood of shoulder pain. The magnitude of peak proximal force is both correlated to reported shoulder pain and capable of being used to accurately predict the likelihood of experiencing shoulder pain. It appears that those pitchers exhibiting high magnitudes of peak proximal force are significantly more likely to report experiencing shoulder pain than those who generate lower magnitudes of peak proximal force. PMID:23486209

  16. Postoperative pectoral swelling after shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    ERCIN, ERSIN; BILGILI, MUSTAFA GOKHAN; ONES, HALIL NADIR; KURAL, CEMAL

    2015-01-01

    Fluid extravasation is possibly the most common complication of shoulder arthroscopy. Shoulder arthroscopy can lead to major increases in the compartment pressure of adjacent muscles and this phenomenon is significant when an infusion pump is used. This article describes a case of pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy. A 24-year-old male underwent an arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent shoulder dislocation. The surgery was performed in the beach chair position and lasted two hours. At the end of the procedure, the patient was found to have left pectoral swelling. A chest radiography showed no abnormality. Pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy has not previously been documented. PMID:26889473

  17. Muscle activation patterns in patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Jaggi, Anju; Noorani, Ali; Malone, Alex; Cowan, Joseph; Lambert, Simon; Bayley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to present muscle patterns observed with the direction of instability in a series of patients presenting with recurrent shoulder instability. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was carried out on shoulder instability cases referred for fine wire dynamic electromyography (DEMG) studies at a specialist upper limb centre between 1981 and 2003. An experienced consultant clinical neurophysiologist performed dual needle insertion into four muscles (pectoralis major (PM), latissimus dorsi (LD), anterior deltoid (AD) and infraspinatus (IS)) in shoulders that were suspected to have increased or suppressed activation of muscles that could be contributing to the instability. Raw EMG signals were obtained while subjects performed simple uniplanar movements of the shoulder. The presence or absence of muscle activation was noted and compared to clinical diagnosis and direction of instability. Results: A total of 140 (26.6%) shoulders were referred for fine wire EMG, and 131 studies were completed. Of the shoulders tested, 122 shoulders (93%) were identified as having abnormal patterns and nine had normal patterns. PM was found to be more active in 60% of shoulders presenting with anterior instability. LD was found to be more active in 81% of shoulders with anterior instability and 80% with posterior instability. AD was found to be more active in 22% of shoulders with anterior instability and 18% with posterior instability. IS was found to be inappropriately inactive in only 3% of shoulders with anterior instability but in 25% with posterior instability. Clinical assessment identified 93% of cases suspected to have muscle patterning, but the specificity of the clinical assessment was only correct in 11% of cases. Conclusion: The DEMG results suggest that increased activation of LD may play a role in both anterior and posterior shoulder instability; increased activation of PM may play a role in anterior instability. PMID:23493512

  18. The thrower's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Stuart D; Thomas, Stephen J; Huffman, G Russell; Kelly, John D

    2014-07-01

    Throwers, or athletes who engage in repetitive overhead motions, are a unique subset of athletes that experience distinct shoulder injuries. Athletes engaged in baseball comprise the majority of patients seeking orthopedic care for throwing related injuries. Injuries specific to throwers most commonly involve the labrum and the undersurface of the rotator cuff. In addition, tissue changes in both the anterior and posterior glenohumeral capsule are common with repetitive overhead motions. These capsular changes alter. This article will examine the pathomechanics of injuries to throwers, elaborate means of diagnoses of cuff and labral injury and discuss recent advances in both non-operative and operative interventions, including preventative principles.

  19. Iliac Bone Grafting of the Intact Glenoid Improves Shoulder Stability with Optimal Graft Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Willemot, Laurent B.; Eby, Sarah F.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Debeer, Phillipe; Victor, Jan; An, Kai-Nan; Verborgt, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone grafting procedures are increasingly popular for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. In cases with high risk of recurrence, open coracoid transplantation is preferred but can be technically demanding. Free bone graft glenoid augmentation may be an alternative strategy for high-risk patients without significant glenoid bone loss. This biomechanical cadaver study aims to assess the stabilizing effect of free iliac crest bone grafting of the intact glenoid and the importance of sagittal graft position. Methods Eight fresh frozen cadaver shoulders were tested. The bone graft was fixed on the glenoid neck at three sagittal positions (50%, 75% and 100% below the glenoid equator). Displacement and reaction force were monitored with a custom device while translating the humeral head over the glenoid surface in both anterior and antero-inferior direction. Results Peak force (PF) increased significantly from the standard labral repair to the grafted conditions in both anterior (14.7 (±5.5 N) vs. 27.3 (±6.9 N)) and antero-inferior translation (22.0 (±5.3 N) vs. 29.3 (±6.9 N)). PF was significantly higher for the grafts at the 50% and 75% positions, compared to the grafts 100% below the equator with anterior translation. Antero-inferior translation resulted in significantly higher values for the 100% and 75% positions compared to the 50% position. Conclusions This biomechanical study confirms improved anterior glenohumeral stability after iliac crest bone graft augmentation of the anterior glenoid. The results also demonstrate the importance of bone graft position in the sagittal plane, with the ideal position determined by the direction of dislocation. PMID:25457786

  20. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of the shoulder and humerus.

    PubMed

    Bonz, James; Tinloy, Bradford

    2015-05-01

    Shoulder injuries are among the most common musculoskeletal complaints seen in US emergency departments (EDs). ED evaluation of the shoulder must account for the broad range of potential fracture patterns seen in the clavicle, scapula, and humerus. Acromioclavicular dislocation is often encountered in the ED and treatment varies by severity. Dislocation of the shoulder is frequently seen, and the ED physician must be skilled in several reduction techniques to optimize a successful reduction. An understanding of when orthopedic consultation is appropriate and when patients can be dispositioned with timely follow-up are integral to complete patient recovery.

  1. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain is a common problem with an estimated prevalence of 4% to 26%. About 1% of adults aged over 45 years consult their GP with a new presentation of shoulder pain every year in the UK. The aetiology of shoulder pain is diverse and includes pathology originating from the neck, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, rotator cuff, and other soft tissues around the shoulder girdle. The most common source of shoulder pain is the rotator cuff, accounting for over two-thirds of cases. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment, topical drug treatment, local injections, non-drug treatment, and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, autologous whole blood injection, corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection, or intra-articular injection), electrical stimulation, excision of distal clavicle, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia, suprascapular nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), platelet-rich plasma injection

  2. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome - aftercare; Pericapsulitis - aftercare; Stiff shoulder - aftercare; Shoulder pain - frozen shoulder ... Call your doctor if: The pain in your shoulder is getting worse You re-injure your arm or shoulder Your frozen shoulder is making you feel sad or depressed

  3. Frozen Shoulder

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control pain and restore motion. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines. Drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen reduce pain ... Surgeons, 2010. Steroid injections. Cortisone is a powerful anti-inflammatory medicine that is injected directly into your shoulder ...

  4. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region) and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region) of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR). Results The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ± 0.052 vs. 0.155 ± 0.398; p = 0.028) of the glenohumeral capsule. Conclusion The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1. PMID:26229875

  5. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain covers a wide range of problems and affects up to 20% of the population. It is not a specific diagnosis. Shoulder pain can be caused by problems with the acromioclavicular joint, shoulder muscles, or referred pain from the neck. Rotator cuff problems account for 65-70% of cases of shoulder pain. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment; topical drug treatment; local injections; non-drug treatment; and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: arthroscopic laser subacromial decompression, corticosteroid injections (intra-articular), corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection), electrical stimulation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, guanethidine (intra-articular), ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia (plus intra-articular injection in people with frozen shoulder), multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation, nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, phonophoresis, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), surgical arthroscopic decompression, transdermal glyceryl trinitrate, ultrasound.

  6. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  7. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Acute Proximal Humeral Fractures in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Stanbury, Spencer Jay; Voloshin, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are frequently encountered in the elderly population. While the majority of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, 2-, 3-, and 4-part fractures, head splitting, and complex fracture dislocations typically require operative management. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is a popular treatment option for displaced fractures. Advent of locking plates potentially imparts a better option for patients with osteoporotic bone. Hemiarthroplasty has traditionally been used in proximal humeral fractures not amendable to ORIF. While typically providing good pain control, results of hemiarthroplasty have demonstrated inconsistent shoulder motion. Tuberosity malposition or poor healing is a major culprit in unsatisfactory postoperative range of motion. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has been used in the setting of rotator cuff arthropathy with successful results. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has recently been used in the setting of acute proximal humeral fractures of the elderly individuals. This technology has shown promising results with mean active anterior elevation from 97° to 122° reported with complication rates of 15% to 28% in short-term studies. Long-term studies and higher level evidence studies with comparison to hemiarthroplasty and ORIF are needed. PMID:23569688

  8. Dislocation of the knee: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Lomasney, Laurie; Pierce, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Dislocations of the knee are relatively uncommon injuries. However, the incidence of this injury appears to be increasing. Knee dislocations are most often high velocity blunt injuries, with motor vehicle accidents being a frequent etiology. Other causes include falls from height, athletic injuries, farming and industrial accidents, and even low velocity mechanisms such as a misstep into a hole. Likewise, minor trauma in the morbidly obese is increasingly recognized as a mechanism of knee dislocation. Multiple forms of dislocation exist, with the common factor being disruption of the tibiofemoral articulation. Dislocation can occur in a variety of directions depending on the mechanism of injury. The most common dislocation is anterior, which may be seen in hyperextension injuries such as martial arts kicking. The "dashboard injury" of motor vehicle accidents can result in a posterior dislocation of the knee. Lateral and rotary dislocations are less common. Knee dislocation is more commonly diagnosed in men, with a mean age of 23 to 31 years old. This is the very patient population encountered by Special Operations Forces (SOF) healthcare providers. Given the mechanisms of injury noted above, it is reasonable to conclude that knee dislocations may be seen in a young, active SOF patient population, particularly those engaged in parachuting, fast-roping/rappelling, driving at high speeds during military operations, and mixed martial arts. PMID:20306414

  9. [Bilateral elbow dislocation related to Essex-Lopresti injury].

    PubMed

    Romero Pérez, B; Marcos García, A; Medina Henríquez, J A; Muratore Moreno, G

    2012-01-01

    Elbow dislocation is second in frequency, after the shoulder, whereas bilateral dislocation is uncommon, even less than dislocations with concurrent associated fractures. One of the least frequent associations is the Essex-Lopresti injury which consists of a fracture of the radial head affecting the distal radioulnar joint with injury to the interosseous membrane. This is a case of bilateral elbow dislocation, one of the elbows associated with the Essex-Lopresti injury. During treatment, the premature closed reduction prevails, previously making sure the elbow is stable, the premise which will determine the orthopedic or surgical treatment of the injury.

  10. Can arthroscopic revision surgery for shoulder instability be a fair option?

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Silvana; Garofalo, Raffaele; Tafuri, Silvio; Cesari, Eugenio; Rose, Giacomo Delle; Castagna, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of arthroscopic capsuloplasty in the treatment of failed primary arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability. Methods: we retrospectively examined at a minimum of 3-years follow-up 22 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment between 1999 and 2007 who had recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a post-surgical failure. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate which variable could influence the definitive result and clinical outcomes at final follow-up. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: we observed after revision surgery an overall failure rate of 8/22 (36.4%) including frank dislocations, subluxations and also apprehension that seriously inhibit the patient's quality of life. No significant differences were observed in the examined parameters. Conclusions: according to our outcomes we generally do not recommend an arthroscopic revision procedure for failed instability surgery. PMID:25332940

  11. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27049189

  12. Biomechanics of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bechtol, C O

    1980-01-01

    Man's shoulder girdle is of the general pattern of his tree-swinging ancestors. With assumption of the upright posture, man's thorax has flattened from anterior-posterior. This results in a rotation of the scapula to a position of 45 degrees with the sagittal plane. In addition to this, man's forearm is habitually used in a position of approximately 45 degrees of internal rotation. This places the biceps tendon "off its trolley" and leads to biceps tinosynovitis. Motions of the glenohumeral joints result from the force couple of the deltoid muscle plus the rotator cuff muscles. The rotator cuff alone can abduct the arm with 50% force throughout the full range of its motion. In the absence of the supraspinatus muscle, however, the force couple is disrupted. Although initiation of abduction is with full force, the force rapidly falls off to 90 degrees. Above 90 degrees the arm can barely support its own weight. Although the shoulder undergoes progressive degenerative changes with age, the necessity for a joint implant, either partial or total--although successful--is rare.

  13. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  14. Monteggia fracture-dislocations: A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Maynard, Mallory A.; Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    The eponym Monteggia fracture-dislocation originally referred to a fracture of the shaft of the ulna accompanied by anterior dislocation of the radial head that was described by Giovanni Battista Monteggia of Italy in 1814. Subsequently, a further classification system based on the direction of the radial head dislocation and associated fractures of the radius and ulna was proposed by Jose Luis Bado of Uruguay in 1958. This article investigates the evolution of treatment, classification, and outcomes of the Monteggia injury and sheds light on the lives and contributions of Monteggia and Bado. PMID:24792923

  15. Prevention and Treatment of Swimmer's Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Tovin, Brian J

    2006-11-01

    Swimmer's shoulder is a musculoskeletal condition that results in symptoms in the area of the anterior lateral aspect of the shoulder, sometimes confined to the subacromial region. The onset of symptoms may be associated with impaired posture, glenohumeral joint mobility, neuromuscular control, or muscle performance. Additionally, training errors such as overuse, misuse, or abuse may also contribute to this condition. In extreme cases, patients with swimmer's shoulder may have soft tissue pathology of the rotator cuff, long head of the biceps, or glenoid labrum. Physical therapists involved in the treatment of competitive swimmers should focus on prevention and early treatment, addressing the impairments associated with this condition, and analyzing training methods and stroke mechanics. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the biomechanics of swimming, the etiology of the clinical entity referred to as swimmer's shoulder, and strategies for injury prevention and treatment. PMID:21522219

  16. Adolescent shoulder injuries: consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dean C; Krasinski, Kevin L

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent participation in sports is at an all-time high. Younger patients also are competing with a greater intensity level, frequently playing organized sports throughout the year. Players are putting greater demands on their shoulders, making them more prone to injuries. Because these players are in the process of skeletal development, certain considerations are needed for this patient population. There is controversy regarding the appropriate treatment of these adolescent athletes- including debate on injury prevention; nonsurgical treatment versus surgical treatment; overuse injuries; and return to play after shoulder fractures, dislocations, and instability. It is valuable to review evidence in the current literature regarding recommendations for the treatment of shoulder injuries in adolescent athletes.

  17. Chlorhexidine burns after shoulder arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas H; Hawken, Samuel M

    2012-04-01

    Chlorhexidine is an antiseptic and disinfectant commonly used for surgical site preparation and cleansing. It is active against a broad spectrum of bacteria, viruses, mycobacteria, and fungi. We report 3 cases of patients with superficial partial thickness burns immediately following shoulder arthroscopic surgery with the use of a Chloraprep 26 mL applicator (2% chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% isopropyl alcohol; CareFusion, Leawood, Kansas). All 3 patients reported pain as the anesthetic waned at a localized area on the anterior arm near the axilla. Erythema and blistering were noticeable. These areas were immediately treated with irrigation and local application of ice, and subsequently with topical triple-antibiotic ointment. All 3 cases were resolved within 3 months of surgery, but noticeable scars remained. We believe a combination of chlorhexidine skin preparation, local swelling inherent to shoulder arthroscopy, and traction contributed to these postoperative complications.

  18. Shoulder problems of adolescents. How they differ from those of adults.

    PubMed

    Tibone, J E

    1983-07-01

    The adolescent athlete with an open epiphyseal plate presents with different shoulder problems than does the adult. Most shoulder injuries in the adolescent athlete can be treated conservatively with a good prognosis for full return of function. The exception is a glenohumeral dislocation, which will probably recur and need a surgical reconstruction.

  19. Strength and muscle activity of shoulder external rotation of subjects with and without scapular dyskinesis

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the relationship between scapular dyskinesis and shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity. [Subjects and Methods] Both shoulders of 20 healthy males were evaluated. They were classified into 19 normal, 8 subtly abnormal, and 13 obviously abnormal shoulders using the scapular dyskinesis test. Subtly abnormal shoulders were subsequently excluded from the analysis. Shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity (infraspinatus, serratus anterior, upper, middle, and lower trapezius) were measured in 2 positions using a handheld dynamometer and surface electromyography while sitting in a chair with shoulder 0° abduction and flexion (1st position), and while lying prone on the elbows with the shoulders elevated in the zero position (zero position). The strength ratio was calculated to quantify the change in strength between the positions (zero position / 1st position). [Results] In the obviously abnormal shoulder group, the strength in the 1st position was significantly stronger, the strength ratio was significantly smaller, and the serratus anterior in the zero position showed significantly lower activity than the normal shoulder group. [Conclusion] In shoulder external rotation in the zero position, in obviously abnormal shoulders, the serratus anterior is poorly recruited, weakening the shoulder external rotation strength. PMID:27190434

  20. Open screw fixation of large anterior glenoid rim fractures: mid- and long-term results in 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Raiss, Patric; Baumann, Florian; Akbar, Michael; Rickert, Markus; Loew, Markus

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the clinical, functional and radiographic outcomes of patients sustaining traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder in combination with large anterior glenoid rim fractures, treated by open reduction and internal screw fixation (ORIF). Twenty-nine patients with a mean follow-up of 6.5 years (2.5-12 years) were evaluated clinically using the Constant and DASH scores, radiographs in two planes and isokinetic muscle strength measurement (Biodex 3 PRO). Mean age was 41.6 years (17-68 years). There was no case of postoperative re-dislocation. Eight out of 29 patients (27.5%) underwent revision surgery to remove the screws. The mean age- and gender-adjusted Constant score was 93.3% (range 64-102%), and the mean DASH score was 10.1 points (range 0-71 points). On radiological examination, 6 patients had signs of osteoarthritis: Samilson type I (n = 3) and II (n = 3). Significant differences for maximal strength in external rotation and muscular endurance compared to the unaffected side were found (P < 0.035). Twenty-seven patients (93%) were satisfied or very satisfied with the result after surgery. ORIF seems to be a good treatment option in cases of large glenoid rim fractures to avoid re-dislocation in the mid-term. Prospective randomised studies are necessary to compare these findings with those after non-operative or arthroscopic treatment of these injuries. PMID:19039575

  1. Concentric reduction of the dislocated hip: computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Concentric reduction of a dislocated hip can be evaluated by anteroposterior views or linear tomography. Anterior relationships, however, may be difficult to evaluate from a frontal radiograph despite good visibility. Computed tomography (CT), because of its cross-sectional imaging capabilities, is superior in demonstrating these relationships. The CT appearance of two types of dislocations (posterior and lateral ) is described. A posterior dislocation should be suspected if the femoral metaphysis approximates the acetabulum, a mass projects behind the ischium, or the fat plane anterior to the gluteus maximus is deformed or displaced posteriorly.

  2. Bilateral anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty versus reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Latif, Vaqar; Denard, Patrick J; Young, Allan A; Liotard, Jean-Pierre; Walch, Gllies

    2012-04-01

    The results of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty have previously been reported separately. Although the indications differ, scenarios exist in which a patient may have a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 shoulder and a reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral shoulder.Between 1992 and 2009, twelve patients underwent bilateral sequential primary shoulder arthroplasty with a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 side and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral side. Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, subjective shoulder value, and patient satisfaction were obtained a minimum 1 year postoperatively. Mean postoperative Constant score was 77 after total shoulder arthroplasty and 73 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P<.2488). Mean postoperative active forward flexion was similar after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.8910). Greater external rotation at the side (43° vs 12°; P<.0001) and internal rotation (T8 vs L1; P<.0001) were observed after total shoulder arthroplasty. Mean ASES score was 89.6 after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with 82.4 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.0125). Patient satisfaction was 92% for both prostheses, and mean subjective shoulder value was similar (85.4% vs 82.5%; P=.6333).Bilateral shoulder arthroplasty performed with a total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on opposite shoulders can provide good functional outcome and high patient satisfaction. Although range of motion is better following total shoulder arthroplasty, no difference was observed in final Constant score or subjective patient assessment. PMID:22495846

  3. Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Shoulder to Investigate the Mechanical Responses and Injuries in Side Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo; Yang, King H.

    Previous studies in both fields of automotive safety and orthopedic surgery have hypothesized that immobilization of the shoulder caused by the shoulder injury could be related to multiple rib fractures, which are frequently life threatening. Therefore, for more effective occupant protection, it is important to understand the relationship between shoulder injury and multiple rib fractures in side impact. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element model of the human shoulder in order to understand this relationship. The shoulder model included three bones (the humerus, scapula and clavicle) and major ligaments and muscles around the shoulder. The model also included approaches to represent bone fractures and joint dislocations. The relationships between shoulder injury and immobilization of the shoulder are discussed using model responses for lateral shoulder impact. It is also discussed how the injury can be related to multiple rib fractures.

  4. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... slower if you have: Arthritis in your shoulder joint Damaged cartilage (cushioning tissue) between your collarbone and ...

  5. 9. Painful shoulder complaints.

    PubMed

    Huygen, Frank; Patijn, Jacob; Rohof, Olav; Lataster, Arno; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Painful shoulder complaints have a high incidence and prevalence. The etiology is not always clear. Clinical history and the active and passive motion examination of the shoulder are the cornerstones of the diagnostic process. Three shoulder tests are important for the examination of shoulder complaints: shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, and horizontal shoulder adduction. These tests can guide the examiner to the correct diagnosis. Based on this diagnosis, in most cases, primarily a conservative treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs possibly in combination with manual and/or exercise therapy can be started. When conservative treatment fails, injection with local anesthetics and corticosteroids can be considered. In the case of frozen shoulder, a continuous cervical epidural infusion of local anesthetic and small doses of opioids or a pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the nervus suprascapularis can be considered.

  6. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... bursitis, torn rotator cuffs, frozen shoulder, fractures and arthritis. Usually shoulder problems are treated with RICE. This stands for Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Other treatments include exercise, medicines to reduce pain and swelling, and surgery ...

  7. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  8. Lateral subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Praveen; DuFosse, Julian

    2008-07-01

    Subtalar dislocations are rare in routine orthopedic practice. While many of these dislocations are a result of high-energy injuries such as fall from a height or traffic accidents, it is not uncommon for patients to present after slipping down a few stairs. Two types of dislocation have been described, medial and lateral. The type of dislocation is described according to the position of the foot. In lateral subtalar dislocation the head of talus is found medially and the calcaneus is dislocated laterally. The navicular may lie dorsolateral to the talus. The reverse is true of lateral dislocation. Medial dislocation has been referred to as "basketball foot" due to its preponderance in basketball players.4 The deciding factor is the inverted or everted position of the foot when the force is dissipated through the weak talonavicular and talocalcaneal ligaments. This article presents a case of an adult with lateral subtalar dislocation following a fall.

  9. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  10. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  11. Surgical hip dislocation: techniques for success.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Sink, Ernest L

    2014-01-01

    Surgical hip dislocation (SHD) is a versatile approach used to address both intra-articular and extra-articular pathology around the hip joint in both pediatric and adult patients. It allows anterior dislocation of the femoral head for direct visualization of the hip joint while preserving femoral head vascularity and minimizing trauma to the abductor musculature. Previously described indications for SHD include femoroacetabular impingement, deformity resulting from Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, periarticular trauma, benign lesions of the hip joint, and osteochondral lesions. In this review, we will describe current surgical techniques, indications, and clinical outcomes for SHD. PMID:25207733

  12. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  13. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  14. In-game Management of Common Joint Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Skelley, Nathan W.; McCormick, Jeremy J.; Smith, Matthew V.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sideline management of sports-related joint dislocations often places the treating medical professional in a challenging position. These injuries frequently require prompt evaluation, diagnosis, reduction, and postreduction management before they can be evaluated at a medical facility. Our objective is to review the mechanism, evaluation, reduction, and postreduction management of sports-related dislocations to the shoulder, elbow, finger, knee, patella, and ankle joints. Evidence Acquisition: A literature review was performed using the PubMed database to evaluate previous and current publications focused on joint dislocations. This review focused on articles published between 1980 and 2013. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinician should weigh the benefits and risks of on-field reduction based on their knowledge of the injury and the presence of associated injuries. Conclusion: When properly evaluated and diagnosed, most sports-related dislocations can be reduced and initially managed at the game. PMID:24790695

  15. Rehabilitation of the pitching shoulder.

    PubMed

    Pappas, A M; Zawacki, R M; McCarthy, C F

    1985-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a common complaint among baseball pitchers. Frequently, the nature of shoulder pathology can be traced to lack of flexibility and muscular imbalance. This paper describes: the normal biomechanics of a properly functioning shoulder during a baseball pitch, pathomechanics of shoulder problems, flexibility requirements of the throwing shoulder, and the muscular balance necessary for an effective throwing shoulder. Appropriate examination procedures are described along with remedial exercises which ensure normal glenohumeral motion and integrated muscle action.

  16. Sternoclavicular dislocation: case report and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Pádua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Martins, Marcelo Giovanini; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Sternoclavicular dislocations account for less than 5% of all dislocations of the scapular belt. Most cases of anterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint do not present symptoms. However, some patients may develop chronic anterior instability and remain symptomatic, and surgical treatment is indicated in these cases. There is a scarcity of reports in the literature relating to reconstruction using the long palmar tendon in cases of traumatic anterior instability. Although rare, these injuries deserve rapid diagnosis and efficient treatment in order to avoid future complications. The aim of this report was to report on a case of a motocross competitor who developed chronic traumatic anterior instability of the sternoclavicular joint and underwent surgical reconstruction using the autogenous long palmar tendon. The patient was a 33-year-old man with a history of anterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular subsequent to a fall during a maneuver in a motocross competition. Conservative treatment was instituted initially, consisting of use of a functional sling to treat the symptoms for 3 weeks, along with physiotherapeutic rehabilitation for 3 months. We chose to use a modification of the "figure of eight" technique based on the studies by Spencer and Kuhn. A longitudinal incision of approximately 10 cm was made at the level of the sternoclavicular joint. The graft from the ipsilateral long palmar tendon was passed through the orifices in the form of a modified "figure of eight" and its ends were sutured together. The patient was immobilized using an American sling for 4 weeks. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient no longer presented pain or instability when movement of the sternoclavicular joint was required. Minor discomfort and slight prominence of the sternoclavicular joint continued to be present but did not affect the patient's activities. Thus, the patient was able to return to racing 6 months after the operation. Our study presented a case of

  17. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty has been the subject of marked advances over the last few years. Modern implants provide a wide range of options, including resurfacing of the humeral head, anatomic hemiarthroplasty, total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse shoulder arthroplasty and trauma-specific implants for fractures and nonunions. Most humeral components achieve successful long-term fixation without bone cement. Cemented all-polyethylene glenoid components remain the standard for anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. The results of shoulder arthroplasty vary depending on the underlying diagnosis, the condition of the soft-tissues, and the type of reconstruction. Total shoulder arthroplasty seems to provide the best outcome for patients with osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthropathy. The outcome of hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures is somewhat unpredictable, though it seems to have improved with the use of fracture-specific designs, more attention to tuberosity repair, and the selective use of reverse arthroplasty, as well as a shift in indications towards internal fixation. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become extremely popular for patients with cuff-tear arthropathy, and its indications have been expanded to the field of revision surgery. Overall, shoulder arthroplasty is a very successful procedure with predictable pain relief and substantial improvements in motion and function. PMID:21584206

  18. Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J L; Hollingsworth, C L; Squire, D L; Bisset, G S

    2004-06-01

    A case of Little Leaguer's shoulder in a skeletally immature patient is described with a review of the English literature. This entity manifests as widening of the proximal humeral physis and is well known to our orthopedic colleagues. To our knowledge, however, there is little in the current radiologic literature describing Little Leaguer's shoulder. We describe such a case.

  19. Hemiplegic shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J W

    1986-12-01

    This article reviews the literature relevant to the possible causes, prevention, and treatment of hemiplegic shoulder pain. Shoulder pain and stiffness impede the rehabilitation of patients with hemiplegia. The cause of this complication is unknown, but it may be related to the severity of neurological deficits, preexisting or posthemiplegic soft tissue injury, subluxation, brachial plexus injury, or shoulder-hand syndrome. Shoulder pain may be preventable if risk factors can be identified and appropriate prophylaxis applied. Resolution of the condition depends on diagnosis and effective treatment at the onset of the symptoms. More clinical research is needed to clarify the cause of hemiplegic shoulder pain and to document the efficacy of prophylactic and treatment methods.

  20. Vascular and orthopedic complications of knee dislocation.

    PubMed

    Jones, R E; Smith, E C; Bone, G E

    1979-10-01

    Experience with complete dislocation of the knee in 22 consecutive patients during a six year period was analyzed. Major vascular complications occurred in nine of 13 extremities with anterior dislocation, one of seven extremities with posterior dislocation and none of two extremities with lateral dislocation. Liberal use of trans-femoral ateriography for diagnosis disclosed significant arterial injuries in four of 15 limbs, despite postreduction pedal pulses which were apparently normal. Limb salvage was accomplished in 20 of 21 survivors and in eight of nine with associated vascular complications. All patients demonstrated severe instability of the ligamentous structures of the knee consistent with the type of dislocation. Posterior instability was severe in all patients, an indication of disruption of the posterior cruciate ligament in every instance. Adequate follow-up information was available on 12 knees that had primary ligamentous repair, ten of which were stable to stress testing. Postoperative immobilization was accomplished by external skeletal fixation, skeletal traction or long leg posterior plaster splint. PMID:483133

  1. Myositis ossificans around shoulder following military training programme

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Mustafa C; Ozdemir, Mehmet T

    2011-01-01

    The myositis ossificans around shoulder in military recruits are not reported yet. Three young male soldiers presented with complaints of palpable mass at the anterior aspect of shoulder; tenderness around the superior part of deltopectoral groove close to acromioclavicular joint; and restriction of shoulder motion. They also noticed ecchymosis and pain around the coracoid process and anterior shoulder region during regular firing exercises. Plain X-rays and computerized tomography showed extra-capsular, dense, irregular structure in the space between pectoralis and deltoid muscles which correlated with heterotopic bone. One patient refused surgical intervention because of the completion of his military serving period. Surgical excision was performed for the other two patients. During surgical exploration, both ossified masses were found in deltopectoral region and mostly in fibers of clavicular and acromial parts of deltoid muscle. Pathological reports confirmed the structure of masses as mature trabecular bone. Postoperatively indomethacin treatment and active shoulder exercises were started until the full range of motion was regained. Mini soft bag was used on the rifle contact area of the shoulder. No complications or recurrences were observed during the 24 months of followup period. PMID:22144755

  2. An arthroscopic and electromyographic study of painful shoulders in elite gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Caraffa, A; Cerulli, G; Rizzo, A; Buompadre, V; Appoggetti, S; Fortuna, M

    1996-01-01

    Shoulder problems are common in overhead sports like baseball, basketball and volleyball. Although gymnastics also includes overhead activities, there are few reports about shoulder problems in this sports activity. During the time period 1992-1995 we treated five young competitive gymnasts for shoulder pain. Arthroscopy revealed that they were all suffering from SLAP lesions or other labral pathology, although they had never dislocated their shoulders. These injuries have not been described earlier in connection with gymnastics. In a survey of 13 gymnasts in an elite club, we found that six (46%) complained about shoulder pain. Since four of these athletes explained that their shoulder pain started acutely during ring exercises in suspension while one suffered a slower onset with pain also during parallel bar exercises, we undertook an electromyographic study of the shoulder musculature of three normal elite gymnasts during exercises on the parallel bars and rings. We found that during the ring exercises in suspension there was a "critical phase" during which the muscle activity around the shoulder was very low, leading to great articular stresses. This might explain the occurrence of labral lesions like the SLAP lesions in this type of athlete. If shoulder pain in elite gymnasts does not respond to rest and physical therapy over 2-3 months, a shoulder arthroscopy should be considered.

  3. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  4. Parallel Dislocation Simulator

    2006-10-30

    ParaDiS is software capable of simulating the motion, evolution, and interaction of dislocation networks in single crystals using massively parallel computer architectures. The software is capable of outputting the stress-strain response of a single crystal whose plastic deformation is controlled by the dislocation processes.

  5. Rehabilitation after surgical management of the thrower's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Leggin, Brian G; Sheridan, Scott; Eckenrode, Brian J

    2012-03-01

    The overhead throwing motion is a complex and coordinated movement pattern involving the lower extremities, the trunk, and the upper extremity. Because of these tremendous demands on the shoulder, various shoulder injuries may occur. Two of the more common injuries to throwers are shoulder instability and superior labrum anterior-posterior lesions. Although nonoperative treatment is frequently successful in treating these conditions, surgical management may be necessary for the athlete to return to their sport. The purpose of this article is to review the first 3 phases of rehabilitation after arthroscopic capsular stabilization and superior labrum anterior-posterior debridement or repair. The fourth phase, return to throwing, will be covered in the final section.

  6. Detailed shoulder MRI findings in manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Melissa M B; Van Straaten, Meegan G; Murthy, Naveen S; Braman, Jonathan P; Zanella, Elia; Zhao, Kristin D

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC) users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS) guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities. PMID:25180192

  7. Electromechanical simulations of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Oxana; Gracie, Robert; Potapenko, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    Improving the reliability of micro-electronic devices depends in part on developing a more in-depth understanding of dislocations because dislocations are barriers to charge carriers. To this end, the quasi-static simulation of discrete dislocations dynamics in materials under mechanical and electrical loads is presented. The simulations are based on the extended finite element method, where dislocations are modelled as internal discontinuities. The strong and weak forms of the boundary value problem for the coupled system are presented. The computation of the Peach-Koehler force using the J-integral is discussed. Examples to illustrate the accuracy of the simulations are presented. The motion of the network of the dislocations under different electrical and mechanical loads is simulated. It was shown that even in weak piezoelectric materials the effect of the electric field on plastic behaviour is significant.

  8. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  9. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  10. [The Throwing Shoulder].

    PubMed

    Wieser, Karl; Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C

    2016-02-01

    Repetitive top-performance of overhead athletes induces a tremendous stress for the throwing shoulder. Throwers reach rotational speed of their arm of more than 7000°/s with joint compression and distraction forces of more than 1000 N. This performance is tributary to adaption of the shoulder muscles and the joint itself. These adaptions may, however lead to two specific problems of the throwing shoulder: 1. The posterosuperior internal impingement of the rotator cuff and labrum between glenoid and humeral head during late cooking phase; 2. A decreased internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint (GIRD) with compensatory problems of the scapula-stabilizing muscles. Precise analysis of kinematics and pathomechanics aims to improve understanding and treatment of those specific problems of the throwing shoulder. PMID:26837325

  11. SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY RECORDS

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. Methodology: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. Results: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. Conclusion: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation. PMID:26998463

  12. What Are Shoulder Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the collarbone and the shoulder blade are torn. The injury is most often caused by a ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ...

  13. Exercise and Shoulder Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of four small muscles (known as the rotator cuff) and another five muscles that stabilize the scapula ( ... Adequate strength and endurance of both the rotator cuff and shoulder blade stabilizing muscles (trapezius, levator scapula, ...

  14. The shoulder in sports.

    PubMed

    Cofield, R H; Simonet, W T

    1984-03-01

    Many sports activities that involve the upper extremity entail similar patterns of movement. Analysis of these activities, a better understanding of the throwing motion, and an awareness of shoulder diseases or injuries have led to a rational plan for investigation and management of shoulder problems. Evaluation often extends beyond the usual medical boundaries and must be based on information obtained from an analysis of sports mechanics, a review of training methods, and a physical examination directed at determination of flexibility, strength, endurance, and the presence of inflammation. Three common sports injuries are damage to the acromioclavicular joint (shoulder separation), instability of the glenohumeral joint, and a spectrum of pathologic changes in the rotator cuff. Sports that are commonly associated with shoulder problems include swimming, baseball, tennis, football, and gymnastics. Treatment may comprise rest, changes in training methods, an alteration of technique, and a physical rehabilitation program. Surgical treatment has a well-defined role, but it is usually optional.

  15. Constrained fixed-fulcrum reverse shoulder arthroplasty improves functional outcome in epileptic patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J I L; Lambert, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Cases were identified using a computerized database and all clinic notes and operative reports were reviewed. All patients with epilepsy and recurrent shoulder instability were included for study. Between July 2003 and August 2011 five shoulders in five consecutive patients with epilepsy underwent fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The mean duration of epilepsy in the cohort was 21 years (range, 5-51) and all patients suffered from grand mal seizures. RESULTS: Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 32-64). The cohort consisted of four males and one female. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range, 4.3-5 years). There were no further episodes of instability, and no further stabilisation or revision procedures were performed. The mean Oxford shoulder instability score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 5-15) to 30 postoperatively (range, 16-37) (P = 0.015) and the mean subjective shoulder value improved from 20 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 60 (range, 50-70) postoperatively (P = 0.016). Mean active forward elevation improved from 71° preoperatively (range, 45°-130°) to 100° postoperatively (range, 80°-90°) and mean active external rotation improved from 15° preoperatively (range, 0°-30°) to 40° (20°-70°) postoperatively. No cases of scapular notching or loosening were noted. CONCLUSION: Fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty should be considered for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. PMID:27458554

  16. Electromyographic analysis and its role in the athletic shoulder.

    PubMed

    Glousman, R

    1993-03-01

    In 1944, Inman made some conclusions regarding shoulder function that have become the foundation of a classic model. Clinical observations of the athletic shoulder and its associated common injuries have demonstrated selective weakness of specific rotator cuff muscles rather than generalized muscle impairment. Shoulder mechanics during athletic activities have been evaluated dynamically with electromyography (EMG), which has helped to formulate a base for optimal rehabilitation. Dynamic EMG and high-speed film analysis have been used to evaluate the shoulder during throwing, swimming, tennis, and golf. Evaluation of shoulder function in these various sports revealed that although rotator cuff function is important in all, the emphasis and role of individual muscles varied. The importance of serratus anterior muscle activity to stabilization and protraction of the scapula has been consistently reported. The muscles about the shoulder act according to their mechanical qualities and are function- or sport-specific. A thorough understanding of the mechanics of the normal and pathologic shoulder constitutes the foundation for training and rehabilitation strategies.

  17. Common Shoulder Injuries in American Football Athletes.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel B; Lynch, T Sean; Nuber, Erika D; Nuber, Gordon W

    2015-01-01

    American football is a collision sport played by athletes at high speeds. Despite the padding and conditioning in these athletes, the shoulder is a vulnerable joint, and injuries to the shoulder girdle are common at all levels of competitive football. Some of the most common injuries in these athletes include anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, acromioclavicular pathology (including separation, osteolysis, and osteoarthritis), rotator cuff pathology (including contusions, partial thickness, and full thickness tears), and pectoralis major and minor tears. In this article, we will review the epidemiology and clinical and radiographic workup of these injuries. We also will evaluate the effectiveness of surgical and nonsurgical management specifically related to high school, collegiate, and professional football athletes.

  18. Dislocation of a total hip arthroplasty: acute management in the ED.

    PubMed

    Fillingham, Yale A; Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-12-01

    Dislocation is one of the most common complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Because of the growing number of patients undergoing THA annually and the immense number of patients who have previously undergone the procedure, familiarity with the diagnosis and treatment of this complication is critical. Although the most common direction of dislocation is posterior, anterior dislocations do occur, and correctly identifying the direction of dislocation is important before attempted closed reduction as both the reduction maneuvers used and the postoperative instructions afterward are distinct for an anterior as opposed to a posterior dislocation. We present the current case of an anterior hip dislocation that was unable to be closed reduced as the direction of dislocation was presumed to be posterior. Although a shoot through lateral is recommended in all cases to confirm the direction of dislocation, we highlight how the physician can differentiate the direction of dislocation based on the position of the foot and location of the lesser trochanter on the anteroposterior radiograph. PMID:24877720

  19. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided.

  20. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided. PMID:21735271

  1. Post-traumatic shoulder movement disorders: A challenging differential diagnosis between organic and functional

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay; Nahab, Fatta; Aldred, Jason; Nutt, John; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral trauma may be a trigger for the development of various movement disorders though the pathophysiology remains controversial and some of these patients have a functional (psychogenic) disorder. We report 3 cases of shoulder movement disorders following trauma to the shoulder region. Physiology was done in all the patients to extend the physical examination. Two patients had history of recurrent shoulder dislocation and were diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. One patient had shoulder injury following repeated falls while performing as a cheerleader. In two patients there were some clinical features suggesting a functional etiology, but physiological studies in all three failed to produce objective evidence of a functional nature. Shoulder movement following trauma is uncommon. Diagnosis in such cases is challenging considering the complex pathophysiology. The movements can be associated with prolonged pain and handicap, and once established they appear resistant to treatment. PMID:25197686

  2. Post-traumatic shoulder movement disorders: A challenging differential diagnosis between organic and functional.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay; Nahab, Fatta; Aldred, Jason; Nutt, John; Hallett, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral trauma may be a trigger for the development of various movement disorders though the pathophysiology remains controversial and some of these patients have a functional (psychogenic) disorder. We report 3 cases of shoulder movement disorders following trauma to the shoulder region. Physiology was done in all the patients to extend the physical examination. Two patients had history of recurrent shoulder dislocation and were diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. One patient had shoulder injury following repeated falls while performing as a cheerleader. In two patients there were some clinical features suggesting a functional etiology, but physiological studies in all three failed to produce objective evidence of a functional nature. Shoulder movement following trauma is uncommon. Diagnosis in such cases is challenging considering the complex pathophysiology. The movements can be associated with prolonged pain and handicap, and once established they appear resistant to treatment. PMID:25197686

  3. Medial subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kinik, H; Oktay, O; Arikan, M; Mergen, E

    1999-01-01

    We report a medial subtalar dislocation without fracture in an eighteen year old male injured during basketball game. He was successfully treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. At one year follow-up he was symptomless.

  4. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ps). Active MTrPs were most prevalent in the infraspinatus (77%) and the upper trapezius muscles (58%), whereas latent MTrPs were most prevalent in the teres major (49%) and anterior deltoid muscles (38%). The number of muscles with active MTrPs was only moderately correlated with the DASH score. Conclusion The prevalence of muscles containing active and latent MTrPs in a sample of patients with chronic non-traumatic shoulder pain was high. PMID:21711512

  5. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  6. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made of metal and a ...

  7. Tardy ulnar nerve palsy caused by chronic radial head dislocation after Monteggia fracture: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Itsubo, Toshiro; Horii, Emiko; Hayashi, Masanori; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Dislocation of the radial head is often encountered as a result of a pediatric Monteggia fracture. We report two rare cases of tardy ulnar nerve palsy associated with anterior radial head dislocation combined with anterior bowing of the ulna. They had cubitus valgus deformity, valgus instability, and osteoarthritis of the elbow, and had elbow injury more than 40 years back. They were diagnosed with chronic radial head dislocation long after a Bado type 1 Monteggia fracture. Anterior subcutaneous ulnar nerve transposition yielded favorable results. It is important to recognize the possibility of tardy ulnar nerve palsy caused by an improperly treated Monteggia fracture. PMID:26986030

  8. [Leading symptom shoulder pain].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2003-09-25

    Pain in the shoulder should prompt a systematic clinical examination that adheres closely to the functional anatomy. The basic examination of the shoulder joint comprises active and passive movements and isometric resistance tests with the aid of which external and internal rotation and abduction/adduction can be investigated. The results of these tests provide the physician with a "pattern of findings" which unequivocally identifies the pain-triggering structure. Accordingly, shoulder pain can be classified into four categories as proposed by Cyriax. As treatment, intra-articular injections of corticoids or local anesthetics as determined by findings, where necessary supported by physiotherapeutic measures. Rupture of a tendon, in particular in the case of an active patient, is an indication for surgery.

  9. Shoulder Problems Motivate Innovative Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Provencher, Matthew T

    2016-09-01

    Shoulder arthroscopic and related surgeons may require expertise in use of the 70° arthroscope, biologic patch augmentation, repair of massive rotator cuff tears, the Latarjet procedure and related glenoid bone augmentation, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27594323

  10. Using your shoulder after surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... you it is ok. If you had rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you ... Saunders; 2009:chap 20. Read More Osteoarthritis Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder pain ...

  11. Shoulder proprioception in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Safran, M R; Borsa, P A; Lephart, S M; Fu, F H; Warner, J J

    2001-01-01

    We examined proprioceptive differences between the dominant and nondominant shoulders of 21 collegiate baseball pitchers without a history of shoulder instability or surgery. A proprioceptive testing device was used to measure kinesthesia and joint position sense. Joint position sense was significantly (P =.05) more accurate in the nondominant shoulder than in the dominant shoulder when starting at 75% of maximal external rotation and moving into internal rotation. There were no significant differences for proprioception in the other measured positions or with kinesthesia testing. Six pitchers with recent shoulder pain had a significant (P =.04) kinesthetic deficit in the symptomatic dominant shoulder compared with the asymptomatic shoulder, as measured in neutral rotation moving into internal rotation. The net effect of training, exercise-induced laxity, and increased external rotation in baseball pitchers does not affect proprioception, although shoulder pain, possibly due to rotator cuff inflammation or tendinitis, is associated with reduced kinesthetic sensation.

  12. Epidemiologic perspective on shoulder injuries.

    PubMed

    Hill, J A

    1983-07-01

    The type and incidence of shoulder injuries in baseball, swimming, football, and wrestling are discussed in detail; also mentioned are shoulder injuries in tennis, basketball, skiing, and javelin throwing.

  13. SHOULDER DISORDERS AND OCCUPATION

    PubMed Central

    Linaker, CH; Walker-Bone, K

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain is very common and causes substantial morbidity. Standardised classification systems based upon presumed patho-anatomical origins have proved poorly reproducible and hampered epidemiological research. Despite this, there is evidence that exposure to combinations of physical workplace strains such as overhead working, heavy lifting and forceful work as well as working in an awkward posture increase the risk of shoulder disorders. Psychosocial risk factors are also associated. There is currently little evidence to suggest that either primary prevention or treatment strategies in the workplace are very effective and more research is required, particularly around the cost-effectiveness of different strategies. PMID:26612238

  14. Physical examination of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    King, Joseph J; Wright, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    This article summarizes the overall assessment of the shoulder joint and seeks to help direct clinicians to diagnose shoulder pathology using standard and specific physical examinations. The history and standard examination can prompt the examiner to focus on specific tests to further evaluate the shoulder and limit the differential diagnoses. An appropriate and directed shoulder physical examination allows the clinician to focus on further diagnostic strategies and treatment options for the patient.

  15. Sleep position and shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Zenian, John

    2010-04-01

    The overuse theory for musculoskeletal joint pain cannot explain adequately the occurrence of shoulder pain in those who do not engage in activities that involve repeated and stressful use of the shoulder since the percentage of the painful right shoulders usually does not match the percentage of dominant right arms in such individuals. An alternative hypothesis is presented to propose that shoulder pain is caused by postural immobility in the decubitus or side position during sleep. Prolonged pressure on the shoulder caused by the weight of the thorax can produce enough damage to cause subsequent shoulder pain. In order to test this hypothesis, a preliminary study was carried out to compare the laterality of shoulder pain with the laterality of sleep position. The calculated laterality ratios for sleep position and shoulder pain were found to be strikingly similar, suggesting a causal relationship between the two phenomena. However, the prevalence of shoulder pain in the general population was found to be smaller than the percentage of the time people would spend sleeping in the decubitus position. This discrepancy could be explained by the idea that in order for shoulder pain to develop subjects may have to spend longer times in the same decubitus position before changing to another position than the average person would. Additional evidence from published clinical studies also supports the postural theory of shoulder pain. More studies can be done to test this hypothesis by focusing on the sleep habits of patients with shoulder pain. According to the present hypothesis shoulder pain should for the most part occur on the side that the patient preferred to sleep on before the onset of shoulder pain. The postural theory of shoulder pain provides the possibility for a new and noninvasive method to treat shoulder pain by the modification of posture during sleep.

  16. Treatment of shoulder pain utilizing mechanical diagnosis and therapy principles.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Joshua

    2013-08-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT) in the management of a patient referred with a diagnosis of shoulder tendonitis. The patient was a 56-year-old male with a 3-month history of left anterior shoulder pain. Upon initial assessment, he presented with a positive open-can test, lift-off test, and Hawkins-Kennedy impingement test. A MDT assessment quickly ruled out cervical involvement and identified a loss of end-range shoulder mobility and pain during active shoulder movement. After the patient underwent a repeated movement examination and treatment based on responses to end-range movements over three visits, his shoulder pain was abolished and motion was fully restored. Despite having positive rotator cuff and impingement signs, this patient was effectively treated with repeated end-range movements over a short period of 2 weeks. This case demonstrates that treatment based on MDT sub-classification principles may be an effective way to manage shoulder pain as it is in the spine.

  17. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 2: Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; STAKER, JUSTIN L.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare differences in glenohumeral joint angular motion and linear translations between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Numerous clinical theories have linked abnormal glenohumeral kinematics, including decreased glenohumeral external rotation and increased superior translation, to individuals with shoulder pain and impingement diagnoses. However, relatively few studies have investigated glenohumeral joint angular motion and linear translations in this population. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the scapula and humerus of 12 a symptomatic and 10 symptomatic participants for direct bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Glenohumeral joint angular positions and linear translations were calculated during active shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups in angular positions were limited to glenohumeral elevation, coinciding with a reduction in scapulothoracic upward rotation. Symptomatic participants demonstrated 1.4 mm more anterior glenohumeral translation between 90° and 120° of shoulder flexion and an average of 1 mm more inferior glenohumeral translation throughout shoulder abduction. CONCLUSION Differences in glenohumeral kinematics exist between symptomatic and a symptomatic individuals. The clinical implications of these differences are not yet understood, and more research is needed to understand the relationship between abnormal kinematics, shoulder pain, and pathoanatomy. PMID:25103132

  18. [Biomechanics of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Gohlke, F

    2000-10-01

    The shoulder joint takes a special position among all the other joints of the human body because of its special requirements of stability and mobility. Knowledge of the biomechanics of the shoulder joint forms the basis for the development of modern concepts of reconstructive surgery and arthroplasty. Most of the biomechanical findings are the result of research performed on cadaver shoulders using increasingly sophisticated methods of measurement. These studies elucidate the interaction of the static and dynamic factors which contribute to the delicate balance of the glenohumeral joint. Recently performed research is increasingly being focussed on more detailed analyses of muscle forces and stress distribution in the subchondral bone and periarticular soft tissues. The efficiency of the computer systems now available has enabled the development of complex, virtual shoulder models and three-dimensional finite element analyses. In the future a pure mechanical understanding has to be modified to extend to a concept which includes more data obtained from living subjects, especially with regard to muscle activity under varying loads and neuromuscular feedback systems which currently are difficult to assess.

  19. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... include a stem made of metal and a metal ball that fits on the top of the stem. A plastic piece is used as the new surface of the shoulder blade. You received pain medicine. You also learned how to manage swelling around ...

  20. Dislocation of stapes with footplate fracture caused by indirect trauma.

    PubMed

    Kagoya, Ryoji; Ito, Ken; Kashio, Akinori; Karino, Shotaro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2010-09-01

    We report the first case of isolated stapedial dislocation caused by indirect head trauma, and present imaging and surgical findings in the case of a 25-year-old woman who suffered hearing loss and dizziness after head trauma caused by a traffic accident. The pure tone average was 60 dB, with an air-bone gap of 50 dB. The stapedial reflex was positive with the probe on the affected ear. Computed tomography scans revealed a longitudinal fracture of the temporal bone and a dislocated stapedial superstructure in the tympanic cavity, adhering to the tympanic membrane. During surgery, it was found that the stapes was broken at the base of the posterior crus and at the anterior one third of the footplate and that the stapedial superstructure was dislocated outward and downward, with the anterior one third of the footplate adhering to the tympanic membrane. The stapedial tendon was connected to the superstructure. Ossicular chain reconstruction was performed with success. In the present case, two mechanisms may have acted together: 1) an increase in perilymphatic pressure that caused the footplate to fracture, and 2) a distorting force that broke the posterior crus, disconnecting the incudostapedial joint, and finally dislocating the stapedial superstructure together with the anterior part of the footplate.

  1. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  2. Functional Analysis of the Primate Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Bianca; Scherf, Heike; Schmidt, Manuela; Krause, Cornelia; Witzel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the shoulder girdle are in most cases restricted to morphological comparisons and rarely aim at elucidating function in a strictly biomechanical sense. To fill this gap, we investigated the basic functional conditions that occur in the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle of primates by means of mechanics. Because most of nonhuman primate locomotion is essentially quadrupedal walking—although on very variable substrates—our analysis started with quadrupedal postures. We identified the mechanical situation at the beginning, middle, and end of the load-bearing stance phase by constructing force parallelograms in the shoulder joint and the scapulo-thoracal connection. The resulting postulates concerning muscle activities are in agreement with electromyographical data in the literature. We determined the magnitude and directions of the internal forces and explored mechanically optimal shapes of proximal humerus, scapula, and clavicula using the Finite Element Method. Next we considered mechanical functions other than quadrupedal walking, such as suspension and brachiation. Quadrupedal walking entails muscle activities and joint forces that require a long scapula, the cranial margin of which has about the same length as the axillary margin. Loading of the hand in positions above the head and suspensory behaviors lead to force flows along the axillary margin and so necessitate a scapula with an extended axillary and a shorter cranial margin. In all cases, the facies glenoidalis is nearly normal to the calculated joint forces. In anterior view, terrestrial monkeys chose a direction of the ground reaction force requiring (moderate) activity of the abductors of the shoulder joint, whereas more arboreal monkeys prefer postures that necessitate activity of the adductors of the forelimb even when walking along branches. The same adducting and retracting muscles are recruited in various forms of suspension. As a mechanical consequence, the scapula is in a more

  3. Comparison between ultrasound and plain X-ray in evaluating the cause of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Salek, K M; Mannan, M; Chowdhury, A Z; Haque, M A; Kaiser, M S; Nabi, S; Ferdousee, R A; Paul, B K; Ahmed, S M; Khan, M; Begum, M

    2011-01-01

    Painful shoulder is a common painful condition among patients. Apart from acute traumatic lesions such as fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains and ruptured tendons, 85 to 90% of painful shoulders are due to adhesive capsulitis, acute or chronic calcific tendinitis, bursitis, bicipital tendinitis and lesions of the musculotendinous cuff. Arthritis is the cause of less than 5% of painful shoulders. For evaluating conditions of shoulder joint, X-ray has been regarded as only method of choice for long time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an alternative procedure but the cost limits its utilization especially in Bangladesh. Ultrasonography is an effective imaging modality in the evaluation of both rotator and non-rotator cuff disorders. Because of low cost and availability, it can be an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of painful shoulder. The present study was conducted to assess ultrasonography as a useful modality in evaluating cases of shoulder pain and to compare the findings with X-ray findings. Thirty two patients with shoulder pain were evaluated by X-ray and Ultrasonography (USG). Clinical diagnosis was done for correlation. To identify the cause of shoulder pain, 100% patients were found normal in plain X-ray. On Ultrasonography (USG) 12.5% patients had displaced long head of biceps, 21.9% had biceps tendinitis, and 3.1% had bursitis. In the assessment of shoulder pathology, USG had a sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 88.2%, Positive predictive value (PPV) of 84.6%, Negative predictive value (NPV) of 78.9% and an accuracy of 81.3%. USG is a useful modality for evaluation the shoulder joint in case of painful shoulder even plain X-ray is non conclusive.

  4. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  5. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  6. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery – unusual complication of cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare. Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsulotomy, the patient presented with sudden decrease of vision. On anterior segment examination, the intraocular lens with bag was dislocated into the anterior chamber. Result: It was managed with intraocular lens explantation with bag, anterior vitrectomy and sclera fixated intraocular lens. Conclusion: Spontaneous intraocular lens dislocation with bag is possible after 1.5 years of uneventful surgery which may be managed using different techniques. PMID:27625955

  7. Anterior Glenoid Rim Fracture Following Use of Resorbable Devices for Glenohumeral Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Augusti, Carlo Alberto; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Merolla, Giovanni; Bigoni, Marco; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Resorbable anchors are widely used in arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder as a means of soft tissue fixation to bone. Their function is to ensure repair stability until they are replaced by host tissue. Complications include inflammatory soft tissue reactions, cyst formation, screw fragmentation in the joint, osteolytic reactions, and enhanced glenoid rim susceptibility to fracture. Purpose To evaluate resorption of biodegradable screws and determine whether they induce formation of areas with poor bone strength that may lead to glenoid rim fracture even with minor trauma. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods This study evaluated 12 patients with anterior shoulder instability who had undergone arthroscopic stabilization with the Bankart technique and various resorbable anchors and subsequently experienced redislocation. The maximum interval between arthroscopic stabilization and the new dislocation was 52 months (mean, 22.16 months; range, 12-52 months). The mean patient age was 31.6 years (range, 17-61 years). The persistence or resorption of anchor holes; the number, area, and volume of osteolytic lesions; and glenoid erosion/fracture were assessed using computed tomography scans taken after redislocation occurred. Results Complete screw resorption was never documented. Osteolytic lesions were found at all sites (mean diameter, 5.64 mm; mean depth, 8.09 mm; mean area, 0.342 cm2; mean volume, 0.345 cm3), and all exceeded anchor size. Anterior glenoid rim fracture was seen in 9 patients, even without high-energy traumas (75% of all recurrences). Conclusion Arthroscopic stabilization with resorbable devices is a highly reliable procedure that is, however, not devoid of complications. In all 12 patients, none of the different implanted anchors had degraded completely, even in patients with longer follow-up, and all induced formation of osteolytic areas. Such reaction may lead to anterior glenoid rim fracture according to the

  8. Behavior of dislocations in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Koji

    1995-08-01

    A review is given of dynamic behavior of dislocations in silicon on the basis of works of the author`s group. Topics taken up are generation, motion and multiplication of dislocations as affected by oxygen impurities and immobilization of dislocations due to impurity reaction.

  9. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  10. Dislocated Worker Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1988

    Due to the severe economic decline in the automobile manufacturing industry in southeastern Michigan, a Dislocated Workers Program has been developed through the partnership of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce, three community colleges, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, the Michigan State Department of Education, the…

  11. Dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, T L; Horne, J G

    1980-11-01

    A case of a rare radiocarpal fracture dislocation in a 17-year-old girl, with persisting loss of radiocarpal joint space following reduction under hematoma block, is described. The wrist joint was exposed, and two osteochondral fragments were rotated 90 degrees and secured with 2.7-mm AO screws. Satisfactory healing followed 3 months postinjury.

  12. Types of Traumatic Lens Dislocations at Larkana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Imtiaz Ali; Shah, Shujaat Ali; Rai, Partab; Siddiqui, Shahid Jamal; Abbasi, Safdar Ali; Katpar, Naeem Akhtar

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of traumatic lens dislocations presenting at our institute. This may help develop the preventive strategies. The number of cases of traumatic lens dislocations, presented at the Department of Ophthalmology, Chandka Medical College, Larkana, Pakistan, from January 2002 to June 2015, were 59 including 61.02% (n=36) males and 38.98% (n=23) females. Cause of trauma was wood or plant impalement in 35.6% (n=21) cases, cracker blast in 13.55% (n=8) cases, fall on ground in 11.86% (n=7) cases, penetrating injuries with needle, scissors or knife in 10.16% (n=6) cases, road traffic accidents in 10.16% (n=6) cases, sports injuries (cricket ball and gulle danda) in 8.47% (n=5) cases, firearm injuries in 5.1% (n=3) cases, and fist hitting in 5.1% (n=3) cases. Lens was dislocated posteriorly in 33.90% (n=20) cases, anteriorly in 25.42% (n=15) cases, inferiorly in 11.86% (n=7) cases, medially in 10.17% (n=6) cases, laterally in 10.17% (n=6) cases, superiorly in 6.78% (n=4) cases, and a single (1.69%) case of lenticele was seen. PMID:27539772

  13. Treatment of Humeral Fracture after Shoulder Arthroplasty using Functional Brace: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Terabayashi, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A periprosthetic humeral fracture is rare after shoulder arthroplasty, and such cases have considerable problems. Patients with this kind of fracture are often complicated by osteopenia, other types of severe disease, or are elderly. Surgical treatment of this fracture type carries some risk, and surgeons may be unsure about the most appropriate approach to adopt. Case report: The present case occurred in a 78-year-old woman with an osteoporotic humeral bone, and chronic dislocation of shoulder after shoulder arthroplasty. There were many risk factors for revision surgery or ostheosynthesis. Therefore, we decided to treat the patient by functional bracing. Fortunately, complete radiographic union was confirmed at 17 weeks. She returned to daily life with good functional activity. Conclusion: In our opinion, it is acceptable to select functional bracing for periprosthetic humeral fractures after shoulder arthroplasty without stem loosening in elderly patients with an osteoporotic humeral bone. PMID:27299112

  14. [Stability versus mobility of the shoulder. Biomechanical aspects in athletes].

    PubMed

    Pastor, M F; Smith, T; Struck, M; Wellmann, M

    2014-03-01

    The demand profile of athletes shoulders is high. On the one hand the shoulder has to provide a maximum active range of motion that allows rapid movements of the arm and on the other hand it has to be sufficiently stabilized to decelerate rapid movements and to neutralize the resulting translational forces. Two general types of instability can be differentiated in athletes shoulders: the macroinstability typically occurring in athletes involved in contact sports and the microinstability occurring in athletes involved in overhead sports.Repetitive abduction and external rotation movements of athletes involved in overhead sports lead to adaptation of the glenohumeral joint capsule and ligaments. The anterior capsule becomes stretched while the posterior capsule develops tightness. These adaptations can result in an anterior microinstability as well as posterosuperior impingement (PSI) which implicates a pathological contact of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with the posterior glenoid and which is also associated with SLAP lesions. In contrast the shoulders of swimmers are prone to anterosuperior impingement because the arm stroke involves a forceful combined anteflexion, adduction and internal rotation of the arm.The macroinstability of contact athletes is caused by sufficient trauma and characterized by a structural lesion of capsulolabral or bony lesion. While the empirical recurrence risk of young contact athletes is already high, it can be further impaired by bony defects of the glenoid. In suspected cases, critical glenoid defects should be quantified by computed tomography (CT) scans and treated by bony augmentation of the glenoid.

  15. Swimmer's Shoulder: Painful Shoulder in the Competitive Swimmer.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Suslavich, Kaytelin; Wes, David

    2016-08-01

    Swimmer's shoulder is a broad term often used to diagnose shoulder injury in swimmers. However, research has elucidated several specific shoulder injuries that often are incurred by the competitive swimmer. Hyperlaxity, scapular dyskinesis, subacromial impingement, labral damage, os acromiale, suprascapular nerve entrapment, and glenohumeral rotational imbalances all may be included within a differential diagnosis for shoulder pain in the competitive swimmer. An understanding of the mechanics of the swim stroke, in combination with the complex static and dynamic properties of the shoulder, is essential to the comprehension and identification of the painful swimmer's shoulder. It is important for the athlete, coach, and clinician to be aware of the discerning characteristics among these different injuries to ensure a proper diagnosis and treatment plan to aid the swimmer in his or her return to competition.

  16. Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Posada, Alejandro; Clifford, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    A case of Little Leaguer's shoulder (LLS) in a 12-year-old male is presented. Classically, LLS is an overuse injury affecting adolescent pitchers. The diagnosis is the result of a thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation. Clinicians unfamiliar with LLS may fail to detect this injury and order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study without radiographs. The objective of this case report is to help radiologists become more familiar with the MRI and radiographic findings of LLS.

  17. The shoulder in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A B; Jobe, F W; Collins, H R

    1980-01-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common orthopaedic problem in competitive swimming. In a group of 137 of this country's best swimmers, 58 had had symptoms of "swimmer's shoulder." Population characteristics of this group indicated that symptoms increased with the caliber of the athlete, were slightly more common in men, and were related to sprint rather than distance swimming. The use of hand-paddle training exacerbated symptoms, which were more common during the early and middle season. Consideration of shoulder mechanics in swimming reveals that freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke require similar motions; a swimmer using any of these strokes is susceptible to developing shoulder pain. Swimmer's shoulder represents chronic irritation of the humeral head and rotator cuff on the coracoacromial arch during abduction of the shoulder, the so-called impingement syndrome. Treatment included stretching, rest, ice therapy, oral antiinflammatory agents, judicious use of injectable steroids, and surgery as a last resort. PMID:7377446

  18. Arthroscopic Bone Graft Procedure for Anterior Inferior Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Ettore; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido

    2014-01-01

    There are many described surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Numerous authors have performed anterior bone block procedures with good results for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss. The benefits of using arthroscopic procedures for surgical stabilization of the shoulder include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, better repair accessibility, and the best possible outcome for external rotation. We describe an arthroscopic anteroinferior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac crest tricortical bone graft and capsulolabral reconstruction. It is an all-arthroscopic technique with the advantage of not using fixation devices, such as screws, but instead using special buttons to fix the bone graft. The steps of the operation are as follows: precise placement of a specific posterior glenoid guide that allows the accurate positioning of the bone graft on the anterior glenoid neck; fixation of the graft flush with the anterior glenoid rim using specific buttons under arthroscopic control; and finally, subsequent capsular, labral, and ligament reconstruction on the glenoid rim using suture anchors and leaving the graft as an extra-articular structure. PMID:25685669

  19. Validity and reliability of the SPORTS score for shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    BLONNA, DAVIDE; BELLATO, ENRICO; CARANZANO, FRANCESCO; BONASIA, DAVIDE E.; MARMOTTI, ANTONGIULIO; ROSSI, ROBERTO; CASTOLDI, FILIPPO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose athletes affected by shoulder instability cannot be judged solely according to the criteria used for non-athletes. In order to improve the assessment of shoulder instability surgery outcomes, the SPORTS score was tested in a cohort of athletes. Methods ninety-eight athletes at an average follow-up of 4.6 years (range 1–9.2) after open or arthroscopic surgery for recurrent anterior shoulder instability were included in this study. The patients were asked to complete the SPORTS score questionnaire twice, with an interval of 2–3 weeks between the two assessments. The Bland-Altman method and the intra-class correlation coefficient were used to measure reliability. Criterion validity was assessed by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficient between the SPORTS score and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score, the Rowe score, the Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), and the Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV). Results the SPORTS score showed excellent test-retest reliability. The systematic error between the first and the second assessment was 0.3 points (95% upper limit of agreement = 2.3 points). The criterion validity was found to be strong for the SPORTS score, which correlated best with the SSV and the “sport, recreation, and work” component of the WOSI score. The SPORTS score had an acceptable floor effect (8%). The ceiling effect was 46%, which was better than the ceiling effects seen with the Rowe, OSIS and WOSI scores. Conclusions this study suggests that the SPORTS score is a valid score in the assessment of athletes after surgery for shoulder instability and that it adds important information to the currently available scores. Level of evidence Level III, diagnostic study of nonconsecutive patients. PMID:25606544

  20. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... polyethylene and intended to be implanted to replace part of a shoulder joint. This generic type of device...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... polyethylene and intended to be implanted to replace part of a shoulder joint. This generic type of device...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... polyethylene and intended to be implanted to replace part of a shoulder joint. This generic type of device...

  3. Posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint leading to mediastinal compression.

    PubMed

    Jougon, J B; Lepront, D J; Dromer, C E

    1996-02-01

    Dislocations of the sternoclavicular joint are uncommon, and the posterior variety have a potential for considerable morbidity. We report a case with compression of the vital structures within the superior mediastinum. It was a rugby player getting run over by the scrum. The mechanism was an indirect force exerted forward and laterally against the shoulder. The patient complained of pain and dysphagia. A systolic right cervical murmur was heard. Angiography was normal and esophagography showed extrinsic esophageal compression. Surgical reduction was performed because there was a slight pneumomediastinum on the computed tomography. This case report demonstrates the mechanism, complications, and treatment of such a lesion. PMID:8572795

  4. Humeral rotational osteotomy for shoulder deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: which direction should I rotate?

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Amr A; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder internal rotation contracture is the most common deformity affecting the shoulder in patients with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy. With progression of the deformity, the glenohumeral joint starts to subluxate and then dislocates. This is accompanied with bony changes of both the humerus and the glenoid. Two opposite direction humeral osteotomies have been proposed for this condition (internal rotation osteotomy (IRO) and external rotation osteotomy (ERO)). This fact of different direction osteotomies has not adequately been explained in the literature. Most orthopedic surgeons may not be able to fully differentiate between these two osteotomies regarding the indications, outcomes and effects on the joint. This review explains these differences in details.

  5. The athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W; Pink, M

    1994-01-01

    Throughout the ages, instability has been noted to be the underlying problem in shoulder dysfunction of the young, overhand-throwing athlete. Impingement and rotator cuff tears are progressive symptoms of this instability. The classic theory of impingement describes a mechanism for "outside impingement," which is most often seen in the older, nonathletic population. The mechanism for "inside impingement" in the younger, athletic population is a pinching of the cuff undersurface on the posterosuperior glenoid labrum. In this younger group, the first treatment of choice is rehabilitation. If that fails, the surgical procedure with successful outcome is the ACLR coupled with a progressive rehabilitation program.

  6. Coracoid Process Avulsion Fracture at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Attachment Site in an Osteoporotic Patient with Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Takahisa; Fukuda, Kimitaka; Kajino, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP), and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and complained of pain in her shoulder. Radiographs revealed an ACJ dislocation with a distal clavicle fracture. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) reconstruction showed a small bone fragment at the medial apex of the CP. She was treated conservatively and achieved a satisfactory outcome. CP avulsion fractures at the CCL attachment can occur in osteoporotic patients with ACJ dislocations. Three-dimensional computed tomography is useful for identifying this fracture type. CP avulsion fractures should be suspected in patients with ACJ dislocations and risk factors for osteoporosis or osteopenia. PMID:27493819

  7. The Anterior Approach for Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hochfelder, Jason P; Davidovitch, Roy I

    2016-03-01

    The anterior approach for total hip replacements has recently gained popularity. Some authors report faster recoveries and decreased dislocation rated with no increased risk of complications. However others claim no difference in outcomes when compared to other approaches yet an increase in complication rates. This paper provides a brief history of the approach, discusses various indications and contraindications, preoperative considerations, surgical techniques, and postoperative protocols. PMID:26977549

  8. Three-Dimensional Scapular Kinematics in Patients with Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty during Arm Motion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Kim, Ha Yong; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few reports on altered kinematics of the shoulder after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). We investigated differences in 3-dimensional (3D) scapular motions assessed using an optical tracking system between RTSA treated shoulders and asymptomatic contralateral shoulders during arm motion. Methods Thirteen patients who underwent RTSA were assessed for active arm elevation in 2 distinct elevation planes (sagittal plane flexion and scapular plane abduction). Their mean age was 72 years (range, 69 to 79 years) and the mean follow-up was 24.4 months (range, 13 to 48 months). The dominant side was the right side in all the 13 patients, and it was also the side treated with RTSA. Scapular kinematics was recorded with an optical tracking system. The scapular kinematics and the scapulohumeral rhythm (SHR) of the RTSA shoulders and asymptomatic contralateral shoulders were recorded and analyzed during arm elevation. Results There were no significant differences in internal/external rotation and anterior/posterior tilting of the scapula between shoulders during arm motion (p > 0.05). However, upward rotation of the scapula differed significantly during arm motion (p = 0.035 for sagittal plane flexion; p = 0.046 for scapular plane abduction). There were significant differences in the SHR between the two shoulders (p = 0.016 for sagittal plane flexion; p = 0.021 for scapular plane abduction). Conclusions The shoulder kinematics after RTSA showed significant differences from the contralateral asymptomatic shoulders. Increased upward rotation and decreased SHR after RTSA indicate that RTSA shoulders use more scapulothoracic motion and less glenohumeral motion to elevate the arm. PMID:27583116

  9. A History of Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, S; Jacobs, U; Akhtar, A; Macfarlane, R.J; Waseem, M

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder surgery has emerged from being a marginalised sub-speciality to being an area of much research and advancement within the last seventy years. This has been despite the complexity of the joint, and success majorly rests on parallel development of biomedical technology. This article looks at the past and present of shoulder surgery and discusses future directions in the speciality. PMID:24082968

  10. Ankle dislocation without accompanying malleolar fracture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Masahito; Kotajima, Satoshi; Smith, Richard A; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without associated fracture is rare. We present here a 21-year-old man who sustained open posteromedial dislocation of the left ankle without malleolar facture when he jumped and sprained his right ankle while playing basketball. The most likely mechanism is forced flexion applied to the ankle joint leading to a rupture of the anterior capsule and lateral structures of the ankle followed by an accelerating inversion stress leading to a posteromedial dislocation of the talus from the tibial condyle. Transient paresthesia was noted in the area of the superficial peroneal nerve. At surgery, the anterior part of the tibiotalar joint capsule and anterior talofibular ligament were detached from their original sites. The calcaneofibular ligament was also detached with its associated periosteum and a tiny avulsed bony fragment. The articular facets of the tibia and talus were intact. The treatment consisted of wound irrigation, debridement, reduction and capsular suture followed by immobilization with a short leg cast. About 10 degrees of loss in the range of dorsiflexion was observed. The patient achieved good long-term functional results.

  11. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  12. Neglected dislocation in sub-axial cervical spine: Case series and a suggested treatment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Nemade, Pradip Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Approaches suggested for treatment of neglected dislocations in the subaxial cervical spine (SACS) include only anterior approach (a), only posterior approach (b), posterior-anterior approach, posterior-anterior-posterior approach, and anterior-posterior-anterior-posterior approach. No protocol is suggested in literature to guide surgeons treating neglected dislocations. Aim: To describe a protocol for the treatment of neglected dislocation in the SACS. Settings and Designs: Retrospective case series and review of literature. Materials and Methods: Six consecutive patients of neglected dislocation (presenting to us more than 3 weeks following trauma) of the SACS were operated as per the protocol suggested in this paper. A retrospective review of the occupational therapy reports, patient records, and radiographs was performed. Only cases with time lapse of more than 3 weeks between the time of injury and initial management have been included in the review. Results: Closed reduction (CR) was achieved in three patients following cervical traction and these were managed by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Open reduction via posterior approach and soft tissue release was required to achieve reduction in two patients. Following reduction posterior instrumented fusion was done in them. One patient with preoperative neurological deficit needed a facetectomy to achieve reduction. Following short-segment fixation, ACDF was also performed in this patient. None of the patients deteriorated neurologically following surgery. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Conclusions: Preoperative and intraoperative traction have a role in the management of neglected dislocations in the cervical spine. If CR is achieved the patient may be managed by ACDF. If CR is not achieved, posterior soft tissue release may be done to achieve reduction and partial facetectomy must be reserved for cases in which reduction is not achieved after soft tissue release. A treatment

  13. Arterial abnormalities of the shoulder in athletes.

    PubMed

    Nuber, G W; McCarthy, W J; Yao, J S; Schafer, M F; Suker, J R

    1990-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the shoulder may be misinterpreted as one of the more familiar shoulder abnormalities by a treating physician. We are reporting on 13 athletes who were found to have symptoms related to compression of the subclavian or axillary artery or their tributaries. Nine were amateur or professional baseball pitchers. Severe arm fatigue or finger ischemia, secondary to embolization, were presenting symptoms. Arm fatigue was noted in all pitchers. After complete history and physical examination, including auscultation for bruits in functional positions, all athletes were evaluated by noninvasive tests (Doppler and Duplex scanning). Arteriography was performed with positional testing, recreating overhead activity, and complete radiographic visualization of the dye to the digital arteries. Two patients were found to have subclavian artery aneurysm. The remaining athletes were found to have compression of the subclavian artery beneath the anterior scalene muscle (five patients), the axillary artery beneath the pectoralis minor (two patients), both arterial segments (two patients), and one was found to have arterial compromise at the level of the humeral head. Branch artery compression was also noted. One pitcher occluded the posterior circumflex humeral artery with embolization to the digit. The two patients with subclavian aneurysms underwent saphenous vein bypass with cervical rib resection. All of the other athletes except one underwent resection of a 2 to 3 cm segment of the anterior scalene muscle or pectoralis minor muscles. All returned to their previous level of activity except one patient who developed impingement type symptoms and required acromioplasty. He is currently undergoing rehabilitation. Proper recognition of vascular compromise in the upper extremity of athletes is essential to avoid the catastropic complications of arterial thrombosis.

  14. Dislocation and fracture-dislocation of the carpometacarpal joints.

    PubMed

    Jebson, P J; Engber, W D; Lange, R H

    1994-02-01

    Dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the carpometacarpal joints are rare. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, careful examination, and appropriate radiography. Treatment is controversial and is based upon the injury pattern and the surgeon's experience and preference. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, evaluation, and treatment of patients with carpometacarpal joint injuries.

  15. Reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder for treating rotator cuff arthropathy☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marcus Vinicius Galvão; de Faria, José Leonardo Rocha; Siqueira, Gláucio; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno; Moraes, Rickson; Monteiro, Martim; Motta, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective to present a retrospective analysis on the clinical-functional results and complications among patients with rotator cuff arthropathy (RCA) who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder. Methods patients with a diagnosis of RCA associated with pseudoparalysis of anterior elevation who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of one year were selected. Results preoperative information was gathered from our shoulder and elbow arthroplasty register, comprising age, sex, laterality, history of previous procedures, Constant's functional scores and the preoperative range of motion as described in the protocol of the American Academy of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (ASES). After a mean follow-up of 44 months, 17 patients (94%) were satisfied with the result from the procedure. Conclusion reverse arthroplasty for treating RCA in patients with pseudoparalysis of the shoulder was shown to be effective in achieving a statistically significant improvement in range of motion regarding anterior flexion and abduction. However, in this series, there was no improvement in range of motion regarding external and internal rotation. Reverse arthroplasty is a procedure that reestablishes shoulder joint function in patients who previously did not present any therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26229813

  16. Can scapular and humeral head position predict shoulder pain in adolescent swimmers and non-swimmers?

    PubMed

    McKenna, Leanda; Straker, Leon; Smith, Anne

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether scapular and humeral head position can predict the development of shoulder pain in swimmers, whether those predictors were applicable to non-swimmers and the annual rate of shoulder pain in adolescent swimmers and non-swimmers. Forty-six adolescent swimmers and 43 adolescent non-swimmers were examined prospectively with a questionnaire and anthropometric measures. The questionnaire examined demographic and training variables. Anthropometric measures examined the distances between the T7 spinous process and the inferior scapula (Inferior Kibler) and T3 spinous process and the medial spine of the scapula (Superior Kibler), humeral head position in relation to the acromion using palpation, BMI and chest width. Shoulder pain was re-assessed 12 months later by questionnaire. Shoulder pain in swimmers was best predicted by a larger BMI (OR = 1.48, P = 0.049), a smaller Inferior Kibler distance in abduction (e.g. OR = 0.90, P = 0.009) and a smaller horizontal distance between the anterior humeral head and the anterior acromion (OR = 0.76, P = 0.035). These variables were not significantly predictive of shoulder pain in non-swimmers. Annual prevalence of shoulder pain was 23.9% in swimmers and 30.8% in non-swimmers (χ(2) = 0.50, P = 0.478).

  17. Misfit dislocations in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Jan H.

    2002-08-01

    This article on epitaxy highlights the following: the definition and some historical milestones; the introduction by Frenkel and Kontorowa (FK) of a truncated Fourier series to model the periodic interaction at crystalline interfaces; the invention by Frank and van der Merwe (FvdM)—using the FK model—of (interfacial) misfit dislocations as an important mechanism in accommodating misfit at epilayer-substrate interfaces; the generalization of the FvdM theory to multilayers; the application of the parabolic model by Jesser and van der Merwe to describe, for growing multilayers and superlattices, the impact of Fourier coefficients in the realization of epitaxial orientations and the stability of modes of misfit accommodation; the involvement of intralayer interaction in the latter—all features that impact on the attainment of perfection in crystallinity of thin films, a property that is so vital in the fabrication of useful uniformly thick epilayers (uniformity being another technological requirement), which also depends on misfit accommodation through the interfacial energy that function strongly in the criterion for growth modes, proposed by Bauer; and the ingenious application of the Volterra model by Matthews and others to describe misfit accommodation by dislocations in growing epilayers.

  18. Shoulder injuries in soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Martinelli, Nicolò; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Even though soccer is the most popular sport of the world, no review is available at present to resume the available data on shoulder injuries in soccer. The aim of this review is to report the available epidemiological data on shoulder specific injuries in soccer players and to describe the common mechanisms of shoulder injuries in soccer. Studies published through September 15, 2011, were identified by using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, Pub-Med, Web of Science, and the full Cochrane Library. Reference lists of included studies were searched by hand. Studies were included if they reported on shoulder injuries in soccer players. Limits were not placed on year of publication, status of publication, or language. The journal, authors, and author affiliations of included studies were masked from 2 reviewers. We planned to perform a study on the epidemiology, mechanisms and management of shoulder injuries in elite soccer players. We also planned to use Review Manager (RevMan. Version 5 for Windows) to calculate the magnitude of treatment effect. No studies on clinical outcome of shoulder injuries in elite soccer athletes were found. No studies on the mechanism of shoulder injury in elite soccer players were found. The results of the available studies on epidemiology are reported. Despite soccer is the world’s game, few studies focused on shoulder injuries in soccer players, and therefore no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Further research is warranted to clarify the epidemiology, mechanisms and management of shoulder injuries in elite soccer players. PMID:23289025

  19. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... the proximal end of the humerus and to be fixed without bone cement (§ 888.3027). This device is...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... the proximal end of the humerus and to be fixed without bone cement (§ 888.3027). This device is...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... the proximal end of the humerus and to be fixed without bone cement (§ 888.3027). This device is...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... the proximal end of the humerus and to be fixed without bone cement (§ 888.3027). This device is...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint... the proximal end of the humerus and to be fixed without bone cement (§ 888.3027). This device is...

  4. Shoulder Injuries in Pediatric Athletes.

    PubMed

    Moyer, James E; Brey, Jennifer M

    2016-10-01

    Shoulder injuries in pediatric athletes are typically caused by acute or overuse injuries. The developing structures of the shoulder lead to injury patterns that are distinct from those of adult athletes. Overuse injuries often affect the physeal structures of the proximal humerus and can lead to pain and loss of sports participation. Shoulder instability is common in pediatric athletes, and recurrence is also a concern in this population. Fractures of the proximal humerus and clavicle are typically treated with conservative management, but there is a trend toward surgical intervention. PMID:27637662

  5. Does Prior Shoulder Surgery Negatively Impact Shoulder Arthroplasty Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Aiyash, Sal; Kupfer, Noam; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have shown a negative correlation between prior knee arthroscopy and ultimate knee arthroplasty outcomes compared to patients without prior arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prior shoulder surgery on patients undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) compared to patients without prior shoulder surgery. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed on 107 patients undergoing TSA or rTSA. All medical records were analyzed for demographic variables, type of prior shoulder surgery, and type of arthroplasty. All patients underwent a clinical follow-up evaluation, and were evaluated with the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) outcomes scores. Complications, failures, and reoperations were also recorded an analyzed. Results: A total of 107 patients (47 males, 60 females) were included with an average follow-up of 24 months (minimum 12 months). Seventy-one patients (underwent arthroplasty without prior surgery (30 rTSA, 41 TSA) while 50 patients underwent arthroplasty with a history of at least one prior shoulder surgery (27 rTSA, 9 TSA). Prior surgeries included a mix of both open and arthroscopic procedures, including open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, open and arthroscopic stabilization (with and without bone augmentation), arthroscopic capsular release, and arthroscopic debridement. Following arthroplasty, both groups experienced significant improvements in ASES, SST, and VAS scores compared to preoperative scores (P<0.05 for all). There was a statistically significant difference in postoperative ASES scores in the no-surgery group compared to the prior-surgery group (84.49 versus 71.67, P=0.0003) as well as in the SST scores (8.97 versus 5.47, P<0.0001); there were no differences in the VAS score (0.83 vs 1.40, P=0.104). Conclusion: Shoulder

  6. Treatment of fracture sequelae of the proximal humerus: anatomical vs reverse shoulder prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mansat, Pierre; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    The treatment of complex humeral fractures or fracture-dislocations presents several challenges. Late complications such as malunion, avascular necrosis, or nonunion are frequent and often lead to articular incongruence. Patients can be severely handicapped, presenting with considerable pain, stiffness, and important functional impairment. Stiff shoulders with distorted proximal humerus, soft tissue damage, a scarred deltoid, and rotator cuff tears make shoulder arthroplasty a challenging procedure, often with unpredictable results and a high risk of complications. The overall results of patients with old trauma are inferior to the results currently obtained in patients with primary osteoarthritis or with recent 4-part fractures who are treated initially with humeral head replacement. In certain circumstances, with important distortion of the proximal humerus, poor bone quality, rotator cuff lesions, or muscle atrophy a reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be proposed in elderly patients instead of a non-constrained arthroplasty. PMID:25616730

  7. Asymmetric Bilateral Hip Dislocations: A Case Report and Historical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Joseph; Westerlind, Brian; Karam, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymmetric bilateral hip dislocations are a rare injury pattern in which one hip dislocates posteriorly, and the contralateral hip dislocates anteriorly. We report a case of bilateral asymmetric hip dislocations and provide a comprehensive review of all available reports, identifying 104 total cases, which is 70 more than previously reported. Purpose To review and evaluate the total body of literature regarding bilateral asymmetric hip dislocations. Methods Comprehensive literature review and analysis of all reports of bilateral asymmetric hip dislocations with concurrent case report. Results and Conclusions Bilateral, asymmetric represent approximately 0.01%–0.02% of all joint dislocations. There has been a substantial increase in the number of case reports in the literature in the last 10 years. Males are more likely than females to incur this injury pattern and the most common mode of injury is motor vehicle accident Urgent closed reduction should be attempted in an efficient and safe manner to avoid potential complications, and open reduction should be considered in irreducible dislocations. Post reduction management should include stability assessment and CT to assess for associated injuries and intraarticular fragments; although no clear guidelines for post-reduction treatment emerged. Common complications include: nerve palsies, AVN and heterotopic ossification. PMID:26361448

  8. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  9. New concepts in restoring shoulder elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder patient.

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Robert; Ruivo, R M; Thurner, Michael; Ibrahim, Mahmoud Ibrahim

    2014-02-01

    The treatment and evaluation of a stiff and painful shoulder, characteristic of adhesive capsulitis and "frozen" shoulders, is a dilemma for orthopedic rehabilitation specialists. A stiff and painful shoulder is all-inclusive of Adhesive capsulitis and Frozen Shoulder diagnoses. Adhesive capsulitis and frozen shoulder will be referred to as a stiff and painful shoulder, throughout this paper. Shoulder motion occurs in multiple planes of movement. Loss of shoulder mobility can result in significant functional impairment. The traditional treatment approach to restore shoulder mobility emphasizes mobilization of the shoulder overhead. Forced elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder can be painful and potentially destructive to the glenohumeral joint. This manuscript will introduce a new biomechanical approach to evaluate and treat patients with stiff and painful shoulders.

  10. Frozen shoulder: a sympathetic dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Müller, L A; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    2000-01-01

    Diagnostic and clinical features of the frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are similar in many aspects. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in affected areas in both diseases, while native radiographs show a progressive demineralisation. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative digital radiography objectified these local decalcification processes in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome; 10 of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder had BMD decreases greater 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the non-affected side. In the immobilised control group with degenerative changes of the rotator cuff, calcifying tendinitis and shoulder instability (n = 12) and in the group of healthy probands (n = 20), the difference between the affected and non-affected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was only more than 21% in one case each. There are several references in the literature that assume frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process; our observations support this hypothesis, possibly leading to earlier diagnoses and extended therapeutic management. PMID:10653111

  11. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Torkaman, Ali; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Mokhatri, Tahmineh; Haghighi, Mohammad Hossein Shabanpour; Monshizadeh, Siamak; Taraz, Hamid; Hasanvand, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH), constant and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71%) were male and four (14.28%) were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments. PMID:26894217

  12. POSTEROSUPERIOR SURGICAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATIONS: RESULTS FROM 84 SURGICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Stipp, Willian Nandi; Petros, Rodrigo Souto Borges

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of 84 cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, using a posterosuperior access route. Methods: Eighty-four cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III in the Allman-Tossy classification) operated between November 2002 and May 2010 were evaluated. The patients’ mean age was 34 years. The diagnoses were made using clinical and radiographic evaluations. The patients were operated by the same surgical team, within three weeks of the date of the trauma, using a posterosuperior approach to the shoulder to access the top of the base of the coracoid process for placement of two anchors, which were used in reducing the dislocation. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. The postoperative clinical-radiographic evaluation was done using the modified Karlsson criteria and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Results: 92.8% of the 84 patients treated presented good or excellent results, and 7.2% presented fair or poor results, using the UCLA assessment score. According to the modified Karlsson criteria, 76.2% were assessed as grade A, 17.9% as grade B and 5.9% as grade C. Conclusion: The posterosuperior access route to the shoulder is a new option for accessing the coracoid process and treating acromioclavicular dislocation, with clinical and radiographic results equivalent to those in the literature. PMID:27047866

  13. Moving Dislocations in Disordered Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Caro, A

    2006-11-18

    Using atomistic simulations of dislocation motion in Ni and Ni-Au alloys we report a detailed study of the mobility function as a function of stress, temperature and alloy composition. We analyze the results in terms of analytic models of phonon radiation and their selection rules for phonon excitation. We find a remarkable agreement between the location of the cusps in the {sigma}-v relation and the velocity of waves propagating in the direction of dislocation motion. We identify and characterize three regimes of dissipation whose boundaries are essentially determined by the direction of motion of the dislocation, rather than by its screw or edge character.

  14. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  15. Buckling of dislocation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Wang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    The buckling of dislocation in graphene is discussed through the lattice theory of dislocation and elastic theory. The approximate solution of the buckling is obtained based on the inner stress distribution caused by different structure of dislocations and is proved to be suitable by the simulation. The position of the highest buckling is predicted to be at the vertex of the pentagon far away from the heptagon. The buckling is strongly influenced by the internal stress and the distance between the extrusive area and stretching area, as well as the critical stress σc. The SW defect is proved to be unbuckled due to its strong interaction between extrusion and stretching.

  16. Dynamic electromyographic analysis of the throwing shoulder with glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Glousman, R; Jobe, F; Tibone, J; Moynes, D; Antonelli, D; Perry, J

    1988-02-01

    Fifteen male athletes who were skilled in throwing and who had chronic anterior instability of the shoulder (Group 1) were evaluated by dynamic intramuscular electromyography while pitching a baseball. Indwelling wire electrodes recorded the levels of activity in the biceps, middle deltoid, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis major, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, and serratus anterior throughout the entire pitching sequence. These signals were synchronized electronically with records of the pitch that were made using high-speed photography. The pitch was divided into five phases: wind-up, early cocking, late cocking, acceleration, and follow-through. The results were compared with previous identical studies of twelve healthy, uninjured male athletes who were skilled in throwing (Group 2). Activity increased mildly in the biceps and supraspinatus in Group 1 as compared with Group 2. Similar patterns of activity were demonstrated in the deltoid. In Group 1 the infraspinatus had increased activity during early cocking and follow-through but had decreased activity during late cocking. The pectoralis major, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, and serratus anterior in Group 1 all were shown to have markedly decreased activity. The study revealed a difference between Groups 1 and 2 in all of the muscles of the shoulder that were tested with the exception of the deltoid. The mildly increased activity levels of the biceps and supraspinatus that were found in Group 1 may compensate for anterior laxity. The marked reduction in activity in the pectoralis major, subscapularis, and latissimus dorsi added to the anterior instability by decreasing the normal internal-rotation force that is needed during the phases of late cocking and acceleration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  18. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean

  19. A new method to evaluate glenoid erosion in instable shoulder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to establish values and parameters using multislice reconstruction in axial computerized tomography (CT) in order to quantify the erosion of the glenoid cavity in cases of shoulder instability. Methods We studied two groups using CT. Group I had normal subjects and Group II had patients with shoulder instability. We measured values of the vertical segment, the superior horizontal, medial and inferior segments, and also calculated the ratio of the horizontal superior and inferior segments of the glenoid cavity in both normal subjects and those with shoulder instability. These variables were recorded during arthroscopy for cases with shoulder instability. Results The mean values were 40.87 mm, 17.86 mm, 26.50 mm, 22.86 mm and 0.79 for vertical segment, the superior horizontal, medial and inferior segments, and the ratio between horizontal superior and inferior segments of the glenoid cavity respectively, in normal subjects. For subjects with unstable shoulders the mean values were 37.33 mm, 20.83 mm, 23.07 mm and 0.91 respectively. Arthroscopic measurements yielded an inferior segment value of 24.48 mm with a loss of 2.39 mm (17.57%). The ratio between the superior and inferior segments of the glenoid cavity was 0.79. This value can be used as a normative value for evaluating degree of erosion of the anterior border of the glenoid cavity. However, values found using CT should not be used on a comparative basis with values found during arthroscopy. Conclusions Computerized tomographic measurements of the glenoid cavity yielded reliable values consistent with those in the literature. PMID:24134872

  20. Management of Neglected Traumatic Bilateral Cervical Facet Dislocations Without Neurological Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sub axial cervical spine dislocations are common and managing these cases by closed reduction is successful in the majority of cases. However, treatment of old and neglected cases is difficult and the results may vary in terms of neurological and functional outcomes. Case Presentation: We present two cases of traumatic bilateral cervical facet dislocation with no neurological deficit (ND) who referred four months after the injury. They were managed via single stage anterior discectomy, posterior facet reduction, instrumentation, and then anterior reconstruction with bone graft and cervical plate. The patients had no ND in the postoperative period and returned to work. Discussion: Patients presenting with neck pain after a history of trauma should be evaluated thoroughly with radiographs and computed tomography. The management of old neglected facet dislocations is difficult, lengthy, and fraught with potential neurological complications; operative intervention can substantially improve the quality of life in these patients. PMID:26543838

  1. Dislocation Detection Through Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, B. T.; Kropf, M.; Boudraeu, K.; Guers, M. J.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2010-02-01

    A fundamental goal of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is to characterize material defects before failure. During material fatigue, dislocations tend to nucleate, becoming sources of stress concentration. Eventually, cracks start to form and lead to material failure. Recent research has indicated that nonlinear harmonic generation can be used to distinguish between materials of high and low dislocation densities. This research reports nonlinear harmonic generation measurements to distinguish between those areas of high and low dislocation densities in copper bars. The copper bars were subjected to flexural fatigue. Periodic scans were taken in order to track dislocation development during the fatigue life of the material. We show that this technique provides improved early detection for critical components of failure.

  2. Soft tissue balancing in total shoulder replacement.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is now capable of recreating near anatomic reproduction of native bony shoulder anatomy, but the function and longevity of anatomic shoulder replacement is dependent on a competent soft tissue envelope and adequate motoring of all musculo-tendinous units about the shoulder. Balancing the soft tissues requires understanding of the anatomy and pathology, as well as technical skills. The advent of reverse shoulder biomechanics has brought with it special requirements of understanding of the soft tissue elements still left in the shoulder despite major rotator cuff deficiency.

  3. Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the shoulder: a rare presentation of an uncommon pathology.

    PubMed

    Madruga Dias, João; Costa, Maria Manuela; Duarte, Artur; Pereira da Silva, José A

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis is a rare clinical entity characterized as a synovial membrane benign tumour, despite possible aggressive presentation with articular destruction. The localized variant is four times less frequent and the shoulder involvement is uncommon. We present the case of a Caucasian 59 year-old patient, who presented with left shoulder pain, of uncharacteristic quality, with local swelling and marked functional limitation of 1 month duration. Shoulder ultrasonography showed subacromial bursitis. An ultrasound-guided aspiration was performed: synovial fluid was citrine-colored and translucid. One month later, the patient maintained swelling, pain and functional impairment of the left shoulder. New shoulder ultrasound revealed exuberant subacromial bursitis, which was again aspirated using ultrasound guidance. The synovial fluid was haematic, without changes in the cell count or biochemical analysis and cultural exams. We performed an injection with 60 mg of hexacetonide triamcinolone. Two months later there was a relapse, with shoulder ultrasonography once more showing subacromial bursitis with extensive synovial membrane proliferation. Shoulder MRI revealed subacromial bursitis involving the anterior, posterior and medial recesses, with deltoid distension, but without tendinous or intra-articular involvement. In the interior of the bursa hypointense images in T2 were observed, suggesting the diagnosis of Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis. The patient had surgical bursectomy with success and without complications. The histological exam of the operatory piece confirmed the imaging diagnosis. Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis is uncommon, rarely affecting the shoulder in a localized variant. It is a diagnosis to be considered in shoulder pain, especially if associated with recurrent subacromial bursitis. PMID:24016657

  4. In vivo pediatric shoulder muscle volumes and their relationship to 3D strength.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyun Soo; Alter, Katharine E; Brochard, Sylvain; Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T

    2014-08-22

    In the pediatric shoulder, injury and pathology can disrupt the muscle force balance, resulting in severe functional losses. As little data exists pertaining to in vivo pediatric shoulder muscle function, musculoskeletal data are crucially needed to advance the treatment of pediatric shoulder pathology/injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a pediatric database of in vivo volumes for the major shoulder muscles and correlate these volumes with maximum isometric flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and abduction/adduction joint moments. A methodology was developed to derive 3D shoulder muscle volumes and to divide the deltoid into sub-units with unique torque producing capabilities, based on segmentation of three-dimensional magnetic resonance images. Eleven typically developing children/adolescents (4F/7M, 12.0 ± 3.2 years, 150.8 ± 16.7 cm, 49.2 ± 16.4 kg) participated. Correlation and regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between volume and maximum, voluntary, isometric joint torques. The deltoid demonstrated the largest (30.4 ± 1.2%) and the supraspinatus the smallest (4.8 ± 0.5%) percent of the total summed volume of all six muscles evaluated. The anterior and posterior deltoid sections were 43.4 ± 3.9% and 56.6 ± 3.9% of the total deltoid volume. The percent volumes were highly consistent across subjects. Individual muscle volumes demonstrated moderate-high correlations with torque values (0.70-0.94, p<0.001). This study presents a comprehensive database documenting normative pediatric shoulder muscle volume. Using these data a clear relationship between shoulder volume and the torques they produce was established in all three rotational degrees-of-freedom. This study furthers the understanding of shoulder muscle function and serves as a foundation for evaluating shoulder injury/pathology in the pediatric/adolescent population. PMID:24925254

  5. Ipsilateral obturator type of hip dislocation with fracture shaft femur in a child: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arjun, R H H; Kumar, Vishal; Saibaba, Balaji; John, Rakesh; Guled, Uday; Aggarwal, Sameer

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of traumatic hip dislocations in children is rising in this fast developing world along with increasing numbers of high-velocity road traffic accidents. Anterior dislocation of the hip has a lower incidence compared with posterior dislocation of the hip. We encountered a rare case of the obturator type of anteriorly dislocated hip associated with ipsilateral fracture of the shaft femur in an 11-year-old child. This is a highly unusual injury combination and the mechanism of injury is obscure. Only two similar cases have been reported in the English literature to date. Closed reduction of the hip using a hitherto undescribed technique and an intramedullary interlocking nail was performed in this case. At 6 months of follow-up, the fracture shaft femur has united and the child is bearing full weight on the limb. PMID:27128394

  6. Perilunar carpal dislocations treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Tarczyńska, Marta; Kosior, Piotr

    2006-06-30

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze late outcomes of perilunar carpal dislocations, depending on the type of the injury, time of the diagnosis and the treatment methods. Material and methods. The material is constituted by 37 patients treated in our department between 1981-2004 because of perilunar dislocation. In group were 2 women and 35 men, aged 19-56 (mean 31 years). All patients were asked for control visit. DASH and Mayo score were used to evaluate the outcome. Range of wrist motion, its stability, grip strength and X-ray pictures were analyzed. Results. Better follow-up results were observed in persons with early diagnosed dislocations of the wrist. The best outcomes were observed in group with perilunar early diagnosed dislocations, which were treated by open reduction. Posttraumatic wrist instability often was diagnosed in patients with dislocation of lunar bone and late-diagnosed transscaphoid perilunar carpal dislocations. Conclusions. The data we obtained show, that the consequences of late-diagnosed and late-treated injuries of the wrist are instability, pain, decrease in range of motion and hand skills. PMID:17592406

  7. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  8. Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Rick; McCulloch, Pat; Van Baalen, Mary; Watson, Richard; Bowen, Steve; Blatt, Terri

    2012-01-01

    There are multiple factors associated with the mechanism of injury that leads to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Despite the injury prevention measures taken from the 2003 Shoulder Tiger Team recommendations, shoulder injuries and subsequent shoulder surgeries remain relatively unchanged.

  9. Clinical features and surgical outcomes following closed reduction of arytenoid dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Park, Ki Nam; Welham, Nathan V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Arytenoid dislocation is a rare condition characterized by vocal fold immobility and is easily mistaken as recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objective To describe presenting features, multimodal diagnostic evaluation, and surgical outcomes following closed reduction (CR) of arytenoid dislocation. Design, Setting and Participants Prospective case series at a single academic medical center. Evaluation and treatment data were obtained from 22 consecutive patients with arytenoid dislocation over a 7-year period. Interventions Patients underwent direct laryngoscopy and CR of the dislocated arytenoid, with adjunct injection laryngoplasty or botulinum toxin administration in select cases. Main outcomes and measures Initial diagnosis was confirmed using flexible laryngeal endoscopy with stroboscopy, computed tomography, electromyography, and interoperative palpation. Arytenoid motion (primary outcome measure) and vocal function data (secondary outcome measures) were collected before treatment and up to 6 months after treatment. Results Key history features included emergent intubation, elective intubation and external laryngeal trauma. Sixteen patients (73%) had anterior and 6 patients (27%) had posterior dislocation. One patient experienced spontaneous recovery. Following CR, with or without adjunct therapy, 18 of the remaining patients (86%) exhibited arytenoid motion recovery with concomitant voice improvement. Recovery was sustained at 6 months after CR. Closed Reduction performed within 21 days of the presumed dislocation event was associated with a superior arytenoid motion recovery rate. Conclusions and Relevance These data represent the largest clinical series on arytenoid dislocation with complete vocal function data and follow-up at 6 months after CR. These findings also corroborate existing evidence for early surgical intervention. PMID:25257336

  10. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  11. Strength Training and Shoulder Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Velasques, Bruna; Cossich, Victor; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Pedro; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Motta, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proprioception is essential to motor control and joint stability during daily and sport activities. Recent studies demonstrated that athletes have better joint position sense (JPS) when compared with controls matched for age, suggesting that physical training could have an effect on proprioception. Objective: To evaluate the result of an 8-week strength-training program on shoulder JPS and to verify whether using training intensities that are the same or divergent for the shoulder's dynamic-stabilizer muscles promote different effects on JPS. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: We evaluated JPS in a research laboratory and conducted training in a gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 90 men, right handed and asymptomatic, with no history of any type of injury or shoulder instability. Intervention(s): For 8 weeks, the participants performed the strength-training program 3 sessions per week. We used 4 exercises (bench press, lat pull down, shoulder press, and seated row), with 2 sets each. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured shoulder JPS acuity by calculating the absolute error. Results: We found an interaction between group and time. To examine the interaction, we conducted two 1-way analyses of variance comparing groups at each time. The groups did not differ at pretraining; however, a difference among groups was noted posttraining. Conclusions: Strength training using exercises at the same intensity produced an improvement in JPS compared with exercises of varying intensity, suggesting that the former resulted in improvements in the sensitivity of muscle spindles and, hence, better neuromuscular control in the shoulder. PMID:25594912

  12. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  13. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    PubMed

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads.

  14. Anterior approach in THA improves outcomes: affirms.

    PubMed

    Moskal, Joseph T

    2011-09-01

    In general, the literature makes numerous positive claims regarding the direct anterior approach with a fracture table for total hip arthroplasty (THA), including quicker recovery and return to unassisted ambulation, along with reduced soft tissue damage, surgery time, pain, and risk of dislocation with early elimination of hip precautions. The benefits of the direct anterior approach are mostly due from muscle preservation rather than muscle splitting, which occurs with the more traditional approaches. With the use of the muscle-preserving direct anterior approach for THA, there is less muscle damage and earlier return to function, and postoperative precautions are not needed. The most significant improvements in THA have been allowing patients to be immediately weight bearing as tolerated after THA, incorporating a multimodal pain management protocol, and now using the direct anterior approach. There is a learning curve, and I strongly recommend that people attend cadaver-based learning centers as well as surgeon visitations. We must always remember the oath we took to "do no harm," especially when embarking on a new procedure such as the direct anterior approach in THA or any other new procedure or technology. My position in the debate is not whether we should embrace this technique or other new techniques, but rather how they should be introduced.

  15. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  16. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis Page ( 1 ) One of the most common physical complaints is shoulder pain. Your shoulder is made up of several ... is vulnerable to many different problems. The rotator cuff is a frequent source of pain in the ...

  17. Homo floresiensis and the evolution of the hominin shoulder.

    PubMed

    Larson, Susan G; Jungers, William L; Morwood, Michael J; Sutikna, Thomas; Jatmiko; Saptomo, E Wahyu; Due, Rokus Awe; Djubiantono, Tony

    2007-12-01

    The holotype of Homo floresiensis, diminutive hominins with tiny brains living until 12,000 years ago on the island of Flores, is a partial skeleton (LB1) that includes a partial clavicle (LB1/5) and a nearly complete right humerus (LB1/50). Although the humerus appears fairly modern in most regards, it is remarkable in displaying only 110 degrees of humeral torsion, well below modern human average values. Assuming a modern human shoulder configuration, such a low degree of humeral torsion would result in a lateral set to the elbow. Such an elbow joint would function more nearly in a frontal than in a sagittal plane, and this is certainly not what anyone would have predicted for a tool-making Pleistocene hominin. We argue that Homo floresiensis probably did not have a modern human shoulder configuration: the clavicle was relatively short, and we suggest that the scapula was more protracted, resulting in a glenoid fossa that faced anteriorly rather than laterally. A posteriorly directed humeral head was therefore appropriate for maintaining a normally functioning elbow joint. Similar morphology in the Homo erectus Nariokotome boy (KNM-WT 15000) suggests that this shoulder configuration may represent a transitional stage in pectoral girdle evolution in the human lineage.

  18. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  19. Modeling hydrogen transport by dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Martin, May L.; Nagao, Akihide; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental studies of the microstructure beneath fracture surfaces of specimens fractured in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen suggest that the dislocation structure and hydrogen transported by mobile dislocations play important roles in establishing the local conditions that promote failure. The experiments demonstrate that hydrogen is responsible for the copious plasticity in large volumes of material before the onset of fracture and further afield from a crack tip. A revised model for hydrogen transport that accounts for hydrogen carried by dislocations along with stress driven diffusion and trapping at other microstructural defects is proposed. With the use of this new model, numerical simulation results for transient hydrogen profiles in the neighborhood of a crack tip are presented. Based on hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and density, the results indicate that dislocation transport can contribute to the elevation of the local hydrogen concentrations ahead of the crack to levels above those predicted by the classical diffusion model and to distributions that extend farther afield.

  20. Dislocations and other topological oddities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieranski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    We will show that the book Dislocations by Jacques Friedel, published half a century ago, can still be recommended, in agreement with the author's intention, as a textbook "for research students at University and for students at engineering schools as well as for research engineers". Indeed, today dislocations are known to occur not only in solid crystals but also in many other systems discovered more recently such as colloidal crystals or liquid crystals having periodic structures. Moreover, the concept of dislocations is an excellent starting point for lectures on topological defects occurring in systems equipped with order parameters resulting from broken symmetries: disclinations in nematic or hexatic liquid crystals, dispirations in chiral smectics or disorientations in lyotropic liquid crystals. The discussion of dislocations in Blue Phases will give us an opportunity to call on mind Sir Charles Frank, friend of Jacques Friedel since his Bristol years, who called these ephemeral mesophases "topological oddities". Being made of networks of disclinations, Blue Phases are similar to Twist Grain Boundary (TGB) smectic phases, which are made of networks of screw dislocations and whose existence was predicted by de Gennes in 1972 on the basis of the analogy between smectics and superconductors. We will stress that the book by Jacques Friedel contains seeds of this analogy.

  1. Dislocation-density function dynamics - An all-dislocation, full-dynamics approach for modeling intensive dislocation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, H. S.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2016-06-01

    It has long been recognized that a successful strategy for computational plasticity will have to bridge across the meso scale in which the interactions of high quantities of dislocations dominate. In this work, a new meso-scale scheme based on the full dynamics of dislocation-density functions is proposed. In this scheme, the evolution of the dislocation-density functions is derived from a coarse-graining procedure which clearly defines the relationship between the discrete-line and density representations of the dislocation microstructure. Full dynamics of the dislocation-density functions are considered based on an "all-dislocation" concept in which statistically stored dislocations are preserved and treated in the same way as geometrically necessary dislocations. Elastic interactions between dislocations in a 3D space are treated in accordance with Mura's formula for eigen stress. Dislocation generation is considered as a consequence of dislocations to maintain their connectivity, and a special scheme is devised for this purpose. The model is applied to simulate a number of intensive microstructures involving discrete dislocation events, including loop expansion and shrinkage under applied and self stress, dipole annihilation, and Orowan looping. The scheme can also handle high densities of dislocations present in extensive microstructures.

  2. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training.

  3. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  4. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Stephen F; Recht, Michael P; Profitt, Brad

    2006-02-01

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature.

  5. Anterior Longitudinal Osteotomy of the Greater Trochanter in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Regazzola, Gianmarco M V; Vulcano, Ettore; Monestier, Luca; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The extra-articular impingement of the greater trochanter against the ileum is an underrated cause of early dislocation in total hip arthroplasty. In this preliminary study, the authors assess the effectiveness of an anterior longitudinal osteotomy of the greater trochanter for preventing dislocation. A total of 115 patients underwent a total hip arthroplasty through a posterolateral approach. All patients underwent clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months. No dislocation was reported. All patients demonstrated fast recovery of range of motion and walking. No trochanter fractures were observed. The osteotomy of the greater trochanter is an effective surgical technique that decreases anterior impingement and consequently lowers the dislocation rate in primary total hip arthroplasty. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(8):490-493.]. PMID:26313167

  6. Shoulder muscle firing patterns during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Maffet, M W; Jobe, F W; Pink, M M; Brault, J; Mathiyakom, W

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the activity of eight shoulder muscles during the windmill fast-pitch softball throw. Ten collegiate female pitchers were analyzed with intramuscular electromyography, high-speed cinematography, and motion analysis. The supraspinatus muscle fired maximally during arm elevation from the 6 to 3 o'clock position phase, centralizing the humeral head within the glenoid. The posterior deltoid and teres minor muscles acted maximally from the 3 to 12 o'clock position phase to continue arm elevation and externally rotate the humerus. The pectoralis major muscle accelerated the arm from the 12 o'clock position to ball release phase. The serratus anterior muscle characteristically acted to position the scapula for optimal glenohumeral congruency, and the subscapularis muscle functioned as an internal rotator and to protect the anterior capsule. Although the windmill softball pitch is overtly different from the baseball pitch, several surprising similarities were revealed. The serratus anterior and pectoralis major muscles work in synchrony and seem to have similar functions in both pitches. Although the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles are both posterior cuff muscles, they are characteristically uncoupled during the 6 to 3 o'clock position phase, with the infraspinatus muscle acting more independently below 90 degrees. Subscapularis muscle activity seems important in dynamic anterior glenohumeral stabilization and as an internal rotator in both the baseball and softball throws.

  7. Shoulder muscle firing patterns during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Maffet, M W; Jobe, F W; Pink, M M; Brault, J; Mathiyakom, W

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the activity of eight shoulder muscles during the windmill fast-pitch softball throw. Ten collegiate female pitchers were analyzed with intramuscular electromyography, high-speed cinematography, and motion analysis. The supraspinatus muscle fired maximally during arm elevation from the 6 to 3 o'clock position phase, centralizing the humeral head within the glenoid. The posterior deltoid and teres minor muscles acted maximally from the 3 to 12 o'clock position phase to continue arm elevation and externally rotate the humerus. The pectoralis major muscle accelerated the arm from the 12 o'clock position to ball release phase. The serratus anterior muscle characteristically acted to position the scapula for optimal glenohumeral congruency, and the subscapularis muscle functioned as an internal rotator and to protect the anterior capsule. Although the windmill softball pitch is overtly different from the baseball pitch, several surprising similarities were revealed. The serratus anterior and pectoralis major muscles work in synchrony and seem to have similar functions in both pitches. Although the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles are both posterior cuff muscles, they are characteristically uncoupled during the 6 to 3 o'clock position phase, with the infraspinatus muscle acting more independently below 90 degrees. Subscapularis muscle activity seems important in dynamic anterior glenohumeral stabilization and as an internal rotator in both the baseball and softball throws. PMID:9167819

  8. [Bilateral Dislocation Fracture of the Humeral Head (Right AO 11C3.3; Left AO 11A1.3) without Direct Trauma Due to First Clinical Manifestation of Seizure - a Case Report and Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Ploeger, M M; Pennekamp, P H; Müller, M C; Kabir, K; Burger, C; Wirtz, D C; Schmolders, J

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of fractures among epileptics is frequent and mostly occurs by direct trauma due to falls caused by seizures. The risk of fractures is estimated to be 50 % higher in epileptics than in the general population. Most of the fractures affect the proximal femora and the hip joint. Dorsal shoulder dislocations occur frequently in epileptics. If they occur bilaterally, this is pathognomonic for seizuring. Besides this, shoulder dislocation and bilateral dislocation fractures of the humeral head, however, are far more rare even among epileptics but pathognomonic for seizure. In this case report we present a female patient with bilateral dislocation fracture of the humeral head due to first clinical manifestation of a tonic-clonic seizure without direct trauma.

  9. Sternoclavicular joint dislocation and its management: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Daniel J; Thyagarajan, David S

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) occur with relative infrequency and can be classified into anterior and posterior dislocation, with the former being more common. The SCJ is inherently unstable due to its lack of articular contact and therefore relies on stability from surrounding ligamentous structures, such as the costoclavicular, interclavicular and capsular ligaments. The posterior capsule has been shown in several studies to be the most important structure in determining stability irrespective of the direction of injury. Posterior dislocation of the SCJ can be associated with life threatening complications such as neurovascular, tracheal and oesophageal injuries. Due to the high mortality associated with such complications, these injuries need to be recognised acutely and managed promptly. Investigations such as X-ray imaging are poor at delineating anatomy at the level of the mediastinum and therefore CT imaging has become the investigation of choice. Due to its rarity, the current guidance on how to manage acute and chronic dislocations is debatable. This analysis of historical and recent literature aims to determine guidance on current thinking regarding SCJ instability, including the use of the Stanmore triangle. The described methods of reduction for both anterior and posterior dislocations and the various surgical reconstructive techniques are also discussed. PMID:27114931

  10. Irreducible dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R A; Bellafiore, V A; Corzatt, R D

    1999-11-01

    Irreducible knee dislocation is a rare injury. This case report describes a knee dislocation in a 39-year-old male U.S. Army noncommissioned officer who was injured while playing in a softball game. Arthroscopy showed the medial collateral ligament and capsule to be locked in the intercondylar notch, covering the medial femoral condyle. Arthrotomy and open reduction were required. Staged posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft was later performed. Review of the magnetic resonance imaging scan showed the irreducible lesion. The diagnostic clinical and radiographic features of this unusual injury are described.

  11. Dislocation nonlinearity and nonlinear wave processes in polycrystals with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the modification of the linear part of the Granato-Lücke dislocation theory of absorption, the equation of state of polycrystalline solids with dissipative and reactive nonlinearity has been derived. The nonlinear effects of the interaction and self-action of longitudinal elastic waves in such media have been theoretically studied.

  12. Posthemiplegic shoulder-hand syndrome, with special reference to related cerebral localization.

    PubMed

    Eto, F; Yoshikawa, M; Ueda, S; Hirai, S

    1980-01-01

    Seven autopsy cases of shoulder-hand syndrome following hemiplegia were studied with regard to cerebral localization. One of them showed an isolated brain lesion in the premotor area due to a metastasis from malignant melanoma. Four other cases with cerebral infarction and one with glioblastoma multiforme showed massive brain lesions involving the frontal and parietal lobe cortex in the area supplied by the middle cerebral artery. The seventh case showed a hemorrhagic cerebral lesion in the lentiform nucleus. The most common overlap area in 6 of the 7 cases was located in the premotor region including the anterior part of the motor region. The shoulder-hand syndrome following hemiplegia always develops on the side contralateral to the brain lesion which might cause a unilateral longstanding autonomic dysfunction. As corroborated in a review of the relevant literature, a lesion in the premotor area appears chiefly responsible for the primary mechanism of the shoulder-hand syndrome in post-stroke hemiplegia.

  13. Pathological fracture dislocation of the acetabulum in a patient with neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Saibaba, Balaji; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Sharma, Manish; Nahar, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal neurofibromatosis (NF) commonly manifests as scoliosis and tibial dysplasias. NF affecting the pelvic girdle is extremely rare. Pathological fracture of the acetabulum leading to anterior hip dislocation in a patient with NF-1 has never been reported in the literature. The paper presents the clinical symptomatology, the course of management and the successful outcome of such a rare case of NF-1. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry studies showing abundant spindle cells, which are S-100 positive and of neural origin are the classical hallmarks of neurofibromatous lesions. Tumor resection and iliofemoral arthrodesis can be considered as a valid option in young patients with pathological fracture dislocation of the acetabulum.

  14. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  15. Relationship Between Hand Contact Angle and Shoulder Loading During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion by Individuals with Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Mulroy, Sara J.; Ruparel, Puja; Hatchett, Patricia E.; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Eberly, Valerie J.; Gronley, JoAnne K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shoulder loading during manual wheelchair propulsion (WCP) contributes to the development of shoulder pain in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: To use regression analysis to investigate the relationships between the hand contact angle (location of the hand on the pushrim at initial contact and release during the push phase of the WCP cycle) with propulsion characteristics, pushrim forces, and shoulder kinetics during WCP in individuals with paraplegia. Methods: Biomechanical data were collected from 222 individuals (198 men and 24 women) with paraplegia from SCI during WCP on a stationary ergometer at a self-selected speed. The average age of participants was 34.7 years (±9.3), mean time since SCI was 9.3 years (±6.1), and average body weight was 74.4 kg (±15.9). The majority (n = 127; 56%) of participants had lower level paraplegia (T8 to L5) and 95 (42%) had high paraplegia (T2 to T7). Results: Increased push arc (mean = 75.3°) was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.384, P < .001) and cycle distance (R = 0.658, P < .001) and reduced cadence (R = -0.419, P < .001). Initial contact angle and hand release angles were equally associated with cycle distance and cadence, whereas a more anterior release angle was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.372, P < .001). When controlling for body weight, a more posterior initial contact angle was associated with greater posterior shoulder net joint force (R = 0.229, P = .001) and greater flexor net joint moment (R = 0.204, P = .002), whereas a more anterior hand release angle was significantly associated with increased vertical (R = 0.270, P < .001) and greater lateral (R = .293, P < .001) pushrim forces; greater shoulder net joint forces in all 3 planes — posterior (R = 0.164, P = .015), superior (R = 0.176, P = .009), and medial (R = 0.284, P < .001); and greater external rotator (R = 0.176, P = .009) and adductor (R = 0.259, P = .001) net joint moments. Conclusions: Current

  16. The effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on cervical multifidus muscle dimensions in healthy office workers.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Khalkhali Zavieh, Minoo; Noori Kochi, Farhang; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    It is argued that cervical multifidus muscles (CMM) are responsible for providing neck stability. However, whether they are actually activated during the tasks performed by the upper extremities to the neck is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on the dimensions of CMM. Twenty three healthy males voluntarily participated in this study. Ultrasonography imaging of CMM was conducted at rest and at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 directions of shoulder movements. Anterior-posterior dimension (APD), lateral dimension (LD), shape ratio and multiplied linear dimension (MLD) of cervical multifidus were measured. The APD of CMM was increased while LD and shape ratio were decreased by shoulder muscles contraction (P < 0.01).

  17. Effects of diagonal shoulder training in a closed kinematic chain for secondary impingement syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of diagonal shoulder training on an individual with secondary impingement due to scapular dyskinesis. [Subject] A 54 year-old female with secondary impingement participated in this study. [Methods] The patient performed diagonal shoulder training in 4-point kneeling, 3 times per day for 20 minutes over a period of 6 weeks. Evaluations of shoulder pain, range of motion, upper trapezius/lower serratus anterior ratio, and impingement were performed before training and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. [Results] The patient’s parameters improved gradually. All parameters returned to normal ranges at 4 weeks. [Conclusion] Diagonal shoulder training is effective for improving dysfunction in individuals with secondary impingement. In addition, this training should be applied for more than 4 weeks. PMID:26180371

  18. Simultaneous double interphalangeal dislocation in one finger.

    PubMed

    Takami, H; Takahashi, S; Ando, M

    2000-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the proximal or distal interphalangeal joint of a finger is common, but simultaneous dislocation of both joints is rare. Three cases of simultaneous dislocations of both interphalangeal joints in the same finger are reported. Closed reduction was easily achieved in all cases.

  19. Dislocated Workers: Neighbors, Friends, Relatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blessington, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Worker dislocation is a major problem in Wisconsin. Services needed include provision of coping mechanisms, job search methods, and retraining. A partnership between the state and the Wisconsin American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations was created to provide these services and referrals, as well as preventive training…

  20. Financial Dislocations among Divorcing Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Marilyn J.

    Extensive economic changes may be brought about by divorce. In an attempt to demonstrate that the degree of financial dislocation following divorce depends on three factors--custody arrangements, wife's employment, and social class--data on men's and women's employment, income, and support payments were gathered for 222 divorcing families. Total…

  1. [Case report and literature review: elbow fracture dislocation in children].

    PubMed

    Guzmdn, R; Rincón, D; Camacho, J

    2015-01-01

    Elbow dislocation in children is a very infrequent traumatic event which was first described by Stimson in 1900 and then by Tachdjian in 1990. Its estimated incidence ranges from 3% to 6% of all elbow injuries, peaking at 13-14 years. Elbow trauma is classified considering the direction in which the proximal radioulnar joint shifts with respect to the humerus, into posterior and anterior dislocation. The former is the most frequent and accounts for 95% of cases. Elbow fracture dislocation is an even rarer event. The incidence rate of avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle is 25-36%, of the lateral condyle 4%, of the olecranon 1.7%, of the radial head 8%, of the coronoid process 3.5%, and others, 3.5%. At present there is no consensus in the literature on how to treat this type of lesions, particularly because some authors advocate nonsurgical management, while others propose surgical management as the definitive treatment. What is clear, however, is that a late diagnosis or untimely treatment may affect the child's growth and lead to serious complications. The purpose of this study is to share our experience and good results with the surgical management of these infrequent cases.

  2. Observing implantable collamer lens dislocation by panoramic ultrasound biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, M; Kong, J; Li, X; Yan, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observe the image characteristics and dislocation of implantable collamer lenses (ICL) following their use to correct high myopia. Methods A total of 127 patients (242 eyes); 64 females (50.3%) and 63 males (49.7%) were included in this retrospective study with ICL V4 implantation and mean spherical equivalent −9.08±2.04 diopters (D). Panoramic ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was utilized to observe anterior segment morphology and ICL location at various follow-up periods (1 week preoperative, followed by 1, 3, 6, and yearly postoperative). Results Twenty-eight ICL eyes (11.2%) were noted to have abnormal postoperative positioning. The central vault of 12 eyes was too high with ICL decentration, mean central vault 1.14±0.39 mm; 10 eyes were too low but without ICL decentration, mean central vault 0.13±0.11 mm. The remaining subjects were only ICL decentration without abnormal central vault, mean central vault was 0.54±0.28 mm. Conclusions This study shows the abnormal characteristics regarding ICL locations. The ICL dislocation closely correlates with the central vault. The ICL dislocation is the primary cause of several postoperative complications. Panoramic UBM is one of the most effective imaging means to observe the ICL positioning and its stability after implantable surgery. PMID:25613840

  3. [Application of ganglion impar block in patient with coccyx dislocation].

    PubMed

    Sağır, Ozlem; Ozaslan, Sabri; Köroğlu, Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Sacrococcygeal dislocation is a rare injury. The ganglion impar (also called the ganglion of Walther) is a single, small solitary, sympathetic ganglion located in the retrorectal space, anterior to the sacrococcygeal joint or coccyx. It provides the nociceptive and sympathetic supply to the perineal structure. Ganglion impar blockade is not a routinely used anesthetic and analgesic procedure in clinical practice. An elective intrarectal manuel treatment was planned for a woman patient with coccyx dislocation due to falling down from a chair 5 days ago. Ganglion impar block was performed with saccrococcygeal approach using 22 gauge spinal needle along with fluoroscopy following routine monitorization. Blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation and visual analog scale (VAS) were recorded before and, after block with three minute intervals. VAS value of the patient, 8 before the procedure, decreased 50% 6 minutes after block. Intrarectal manuel treatment was applied to the patient with VAS of 0 at 9th minute. Hemodynamic values were within normal limits during and after the procedure and no motor block was observed. The patient with VAS of 0 at 2nd and 6th hour after block was discharged. VAS of 0 was determined at 24th and 48th hour by phone call. In conclusion, ganglion impar block provided adequate analgesia without causing any complications during and after the intrarectal manuel treatment for the patient with coccyx dislocation. However, we believe that further clinical studies are required to establish the safety and efficiency of this technique for other procedures at perianal region.

  4. From the unstable painful shoulder to multidirectional instability in the young athlete.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haifeng; Bicknell, Ryan T

    2013-10-01

    In conclusion, instability as a cause of shoulder pain in the young athlete is a difficult and often missed diagnosis. These young patients often seek treatment of shoulder pain but do not recall any episodes of shoulder instability. As a result, these uncommon, poorly described forms of instability are often misdiagnosed. A heightened clinical suspicion and an accurate, prompt diagnosis of instability is of paramount importance in this athletic group. It dictates appropriate treatment of the condition, avoids treatment delays and failure, provides better outcomes, and ensures timely return to play. UPS and MDI are two forms of this diagnosis. In UPS, patients at risk are young hyperlax athletes with a history of direct trauma or forceful overextension of the shoulder. They have shoulder pain that is described as deep anterior, reproduced with an anterior apprehension test and relieved with a relocation test. Soft tissue and/or bony lesions consistent with instability (observed on imaging or at arthroscopy) are necessary to confirm the diagnosis of UPS. Once the diagnosis is made, standard arthroscopic techniques with labrum reinsertion and/or anteroinferior capsule plication can lead to predictable good results and return to sport. In MDI, patients at risk are also young hyperlax athletes. However, these patients often do not have a history of trauma. They have shoulder pain that is often somewhat vague in location and is reproduced with a sulcus and/or hyper abduction test. Soft tissue and/or bony lesions consistent with instability are uncommon, with the exception of capsular laxity. The mainstay of treatment is physiotherapy rehabilitation. When surgery is necessary, open capsular shift and arthroscopic capsular plication are effective.

  5. Closed Reduction of “Irreducible” Posterolateral Knee Dislocation - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Umehara, Jutaro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Posterolateral rotary knee dislocation is a rare orthopedic injury that is considered to be irreducible by closed reduction because of soft tissue incarceration. Here, we present a case of posterolateral rotary knee dislocation, which was reduced by closed manipulation. Case report: The patientwas a 33-year-old man who sustained a twisting injury to his right knee that was diagnosed as posterolateral rotary knee dislocation by plain radiographs and the characteristic physical finding known as a dimple sign. Under general anesthesia, the knee dislocation was reduced by closed manipulation with internal rotation of the lower leg at knee flexion and reproduced by valgus and external rotation stress. There were was complete tear of posterior cruciate ligament, and partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament which were not reconstructed. The medial collateral ligament that was detached from the femoral footprint was repaired. One year postoperatively, the range of motion was 0–145°. There was no knee symptom and no ligament instability. Conclusion: This is the first report of a successful closed reduction for posterolateral knee dislocation. The mechanism of dislocation was considered valgus and external rotation stress during knee flexion. PMID:27299118

  6. An electromyographic analysis of shoulder function in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ryu, R K; McCormick, J; Jobe, F W; Moynes, D R; Antonelli, D J

    1988-01-01

    Shoulder injuries in tennis players are common because of the repetitive, high-magnitude forces generated around the shoulder during the various tennis strokes. An understanding of the complex sequences of muscle activity in this area may help reduce injury, enhance performance, and assist the rapid rehabilitation of the injured athlete. The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, middle deltoid, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, biceps brachii, and serratus anterior muscles were studied in six uninjured male Division II collegiate tennis players using dynamic electromyography (EMG) and synchronized high-speed photography. Each subject performed the tennis serve and the forehand and backhand groundstrokes, and each stroke was divided into stages. The tennis serve contains four stages. Three stages characterize the forehand and backhand groundstrokes. Our results indicate that the subscapularis, pectoralis major, and serratus anterior display the greatest activity during the serve and forehand. The middle deltoid, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus are most active in the acceleration and follow-through stages of the backhand. The biceps brachii increases its activity during cocking and follow-through in the serve with a similar pattern noted in the acceleration and follow-through stages of the forehand and backhand. The serratus anterior demonstrates intense activity in the serve and forehand, thus providing a stable platform for the humeral head and assisting in gleno-humeral-scapulothoracic synchrony. The tennis serve and forehand and backhand groundstrokes are accomplished by complex sequences of muscle activity that incorporate contributions from the lower extremities and trunk into smooth, coordinated patterns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3189681

  7. Pathomechanics of the throwing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kibler, W Ben; Thomas, Stephen J

    2012-03-01

    Many anatomic, physiological, and biomechanical alterations have been observed in overhead athletes who present with painful shoulders. This is probably due to the complex kinetic chain mechanics required in the overhead throwing or serving motion. Any alteration along the kinetic chain can result in deficits in force production or increase in joint loads in other parts of the chain. The "disabled throwing shoulder" (DTS) is a general term that describes the limitations in function that exist in symptomatic overhead athletes. DTS typically results from a "cascade to injury" with alterations in the kinetic chain. Evaluation of athletes with the DTS should include examination of the local and distant anatomic injuries and screening for physiological (muscle inflexibilities, weakness, or imbalances) or biomechanical (motions, positions) alterations.

  8. Infected shoulder joint with loose Suture Anchor in the joint after Bankart’s Repair- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The glenoid labrum is frequently torn in traumatic glenohumeral dislocation; arthroscopic repair is the standard method of treatment. The complications associated with this repair are pulling out of metal suture anchors, chondrolysis and joint infection. The infection of joint after arthroscopy is less than 1%. Staphylococcus is most common organism and rarely followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report a case of infected shoulder with chondrolysis of the joint and pulled out metal suture anchor lying inside the joint after Bankart’s repair. Case Report: A 22-year-old gentleman came to us with complaints of shoulder joint pain & gross restriction of movements for one year, with history of intermittent fever and treatment in nearby hospital. He also gives past history of recurrent dislocation of shoulder with last episode 18 months back, which was diagnosed as Bankart’s lesion and arthroscopic Bankart’s repair was done 15 months back. He was evaluated at our institute and suspected to have infection of shoulder joint with pulled out metal suture anchor inside the joint. Arthroscopic removal of suture anchor and debridement of shoulder joint was done, Culture was obtained and culture specific antibiotics were given for six weeks, and significant improvement was observed with this line of treatment. At lyear follow up, the patient was able to perform his daily activities with terminal restriction of range of motion. Conclusions: Shoulder joint infection is rare after Bankart’s repair and required a high degree of suspicion. Any foreign materials inside the joint should be taken out & followed with aggressive treatment by debridement, irrigation and culture specific antibiotics. Suppression of joint infection with antibiotics should be avoided specially when there is foreign body inside the joint.

  9. Shoulder injuries from attacking motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tetsu; Itoh, Masaru; Wada, Yuhei; Watanabe, Naoki

    1997-03-01

    Sports injuries have bothered professional players. Although many medical doctors try to treat injured players, to prevent sports injuries is more important. Hence, it is required to clear a kinematic mechanism of the sport injuries. A shoulder of volleyball attacker or baseball pitcher is often inured by playing motion. The injuries are mainly caused at the end of long head tendon, which is located in the upper side of scapula. Generally, a muscle and tendon have enough strength against tensile force, however, it seems that they are sometimes defeated by the lateral force. It is imagined that the effect of the lateral force has a possibility of injuring the tendon. If we find the influence of the lateral force on the injured portion, the mechanism of injuries must be cleared. In our research, volleyball attacking motion is taken by high speed video cameras. We analyze the motion as links system and obtain an acceleration of an arm and a shoulder from video image data. The generated force at a shoulder joint is calculated and resolved into the lateral and longitudinal forces. Our final goal is to discuss a possibility that the lateral force causes the injuries.

  10. Linguatula serrata in the anterior chamber of the eye

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Muna; Abhishek; Biswas, Jyotirmoy; Raman, M; Bhende, Pramod S

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular Linguatula in healthy young female who presented with a history of trivial trauma, dislocated lens, inflammation and secondary glaucoma. A mobile worm was seen in the anterior chamber. Pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy was planned to remove both the cataractous lens and the parasite during which the worm disappeared from view but was later recovered from the cassette fluid. It was identified as the nymphal form of Linguatula serrata (tongue worm). PMID:25579362

  11. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  12. Theory of interacting dislocations on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Paulose, Jayson; Nelson, David R.

    2013-04-01

    We study the mechanics and statistical physics of dislocations interacting on cylinders, motivated by the elongation of rod-shaped bacterial cell walls and cylindrical assemblies of colloidal particles subject to external stresses. The interaction energy and forces between dislocations are solved analytically, and analyzed asymptotically. The results of continuum elastic theory agree well with numerical simulations on finite lattices even for relatively small systems. Isolated dislocations on a cylinder act like grain boundaries. With colloidal crystals in mind, we show that saddle points are created by a Peach-Koehler force on the dislocations in the circumferential direction, causing dislocation pairs to unbind. The thermal nucleation rate of dislocation unbinding is calculated, for an arbitrary mobility tensor and external stress, including the case of a twist-induced Peach-Koehler force along the cylinder axis. Surprisingly rich phenomena arise for dislocations on cylinders, despite their vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  13. Difference in the Electromyographic Onset of the Deep and Superficial Multifidus during Shoulder Movement while Standing

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Teppei; Shimamura, Ryota; Ogawa, Daisuke; Abiko, Yoko; Hirosawa, Masaki; Momose, Natsumi; Tsuchihashi, Wataru; Suzuki, Takaharu; Takei, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Based on the current literature, it remains unclear whether electromyographic onset of the deep fibers of the multifidus (DM) is dependent on the direction of shoulder movement and the position of the center of foot pressure (CFP). In the present study, we re-examined the electromyographic onset of the DM during shoulder flexion and extension and investigated the influence of the CFP position before arm movement. Intramuscular and surface electrodes recorded the electromyographic onset of the DM, superficial fibers of the multifidus (SM), rectus abdominis, and anterior and posterior deltoid. Eleven healthy participants performed rapid, unilateral shoulder flexion and extension in response to audio stimuli at three CFP positions: quiet standing, extreme forward leaning, and extreme backward leaning. It was found that the electromyographic onset of the DM and SM relative to the deltoid was dependent on the direction of arm movement. Additionally, of all electromyographic onsets recorded, only that of the DM occurred earlier in the extreme forward leaning position than in the extreme backward leaning position during shoulder flexion. These results suggest that the electromyographic onset of DM was influenced by the biomechanical disturbance such as shoulder movement and CFP position. PMID:25850066

  14. Assessment of Correlation Between MRI and Arthroscopic Pathologic Findings in the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Momenzadeh, Omid R; Gerami, Mohamad H; Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Dehghani, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging for shoulder joint pathologies and then compare the results with arthroscopy, the standard for joint diagnosis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 80 patients with shoulder joint disorders, who underwent final arthroscopy, were studied. Based on patients’ medical history and physical examinations, shoulder MRI was requested if paraclinical investigations were. If non-surgical therapies failed, arthroscopy of the affected shoulder was done and the same structures were inspected. Subsequently, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV) and (NPV) of MRI were determined by arthroscopy comparisons. Results: The highest sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were found in MRI pathology reports that included: Hill-Sach lesion (0.910), infraspinatus tendon (0.985), supraspinatus tendon (0.930), and biceps tendon (0.954), respectively. Rotator interval (0.250), biceps labrum complex (0.805), subscapularis tendon (0.538) and anterior labrum lesions (0.604) had the lowest sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that MRI can be a useful tool in ruling out possible abnormalities in the shoulder and to give clues to the most probable diagnosis. Although knowing some practical skills in order to successfully perform the procedure and experience of the radiologist with suitable feedback by surgeon is necessary. PMID:26550595

  15. Kinematics of chiropteran shoulder girdle in flight.

    PubMed

    Panyutina, A A; Kuznetsov, A N; Korzun, L P

    2013-03-01

    New data on the mechanisms of movements of the shoulder girdle and humerus of bats are described; potential mobility is compared to the movements actually used in flight. The study was performed on the basis of morphological and functional analysis of anatomical specimens of 15 species, high speed and high definition filming of two species and X-ray survey of Rousettus aegyptiacus flight. Our observations indicate that any excursions of the shoulder girdle in bats have relatively small input in the wing amplitude. Shoulder girdle movements resemble kinematics of a crank mechanism: clavicle plays the role of crank, and scapula-the role of connecting rod. Previously described osseous "locking mechanisms" in shoulder joint of advanced bats do not affect the movements, actually used in flight. The wing beats in bats are performed predominantly by movements of humerus relative to shoulder girdle, although these movements occupy the caudal-most sector of available shoulder mobility. PMID:23381941

  16. Effect of power-assisted hand-rim wheelchair propulsion on shoulder load in experienced wheelchair users: A pilot study with an instrumented wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; de Vries, Wiebe; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to compare hand-rim and power-assisted hand-rim propulsion on potential risk factors for shoulder overuse injuries: intensity and repetition of shoulder loading and force generation in the extremes of shoulder motion. Eleven experienced hand-rim wheelchair users propelled an instrumented wheelchair on a treadmill while upper-extremity kinematic, kinetic and surface electromyographical data was collected during propulsion with and without power-assist. As a result during power-assisted propulsion the peak resultant force exerted at the hand-rim decreased and was performed with significantly less abduction and internal rotation at the shoulder. At shoulder level the anterior directed force and internal rotation and flexion moments decreased significantly. In addition, posterior and the minimal inferior directed forces and the external rotation moment significantly increased. The stroke angle decreased significantly, as did maximum shoulder flexion, extension, abduction and internal rotation. Stroke-frequency significantly increased. Muscle activation in the anterior deltoid and pectoralis major also decreased significantly. In conclusion, compared to hand-rim propulsion power-assisted propulsion seems effective in reducing potential risk factors of overuse injuries with the highest gain on decreased range of motion of the shoulder joint, lower peak propulsion force on the rim and reduced muscle activity. PMID:26307457

  17. Effect of power-assisted hand-rim wheelchair propulsion on shoulder load in experienced wheelchair users: A pilot study with an instrumented wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; de Vries, Wiebe; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to compare hand-rim and power-assisted hand-rim propulsion on potential risk factors for shoulder overuse injuries: intensity and repetition of shoulder loading and force generation in the extremes of shoulder motion. Eleven experienced hand-rim wheelchair users propelled an instrumented wheelchair on a treadmill while upper-extremity kinematic, kinetic and surface electromyographical data was collected during propulsion with and without power-assist. As a result during power-assisted propulsion the peak resultant force exerted at the hand-rim decreased and was performed with significantly less abduction and internal rotation at the shoulder. At shoulder level the anterior directed force and internal rotation and flexion moments decreased significantly. In addition, posterior and the minimal inferior directed forces and the external rotation moment significantly increased. The stroke angle decreased significantly, as did maximum shoulder flexion, extension, abduction and internal rotation. Stroke-frequency significantly increased. Muscle activation in the anterior deltoid and pectoralis major also decreased significantly. In conclusion, compared to hand-rim propulsion power-assisted propulsion seems effective in reducing potential risk factors of overuse injuries with the highest gain on decreased range of motion of the shoulder joint, lower peak propulsion force on the rim and reduced muscle activity.

  18. Shoulder injuries in overhead athletes. The "dead arm" revisited.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S S; Morgan, C D; Kibler, W B

    2000-01-01

    The following statements summarize this article: Three distinct categories of Type 2 SLAP lesions exist: (1) anterior, (2) posterior, and (3) combined anteroposterior. Posterior Type 2 SLAP lesions have distinct clinical and anatomic features that distinguish them from anterior Type 2 SLAP lesions. Posterior and combined Type 2 SLAP lesions can be disabling to overhead-throwing athletes because of posterosuperior instability and anteroinferior pseudolaxity. The Jobe relocation test is positive with posterosuperior pain in patients with posterior or combined anterior-posterior Type 2 SLAP lesions and is negative in patients with anterior Type 2 SLAP lesions. Rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with posterior or combined anterior-posterior SLAP lesions, are lesion-location specific, and typically begin from inside the joint as undersurface tears. Repair of posterior SLAP lesions can return overhead-throwing athletes to full overhead athletic functioning. The peel-back mechanism is a likely cause of posterior Type 2 SLAP lesions. To securely repair the posterosuperior labrum to resist torsional peel-back, sulure anchors must be placed posterior to the biceps at the corner of the glenoid. The repair must be protected against external rotation past 0 degree for 3 weeks to avoid undue premature torsional stresses on the repair from the peel-back mechanism. A tight posteroinferior capsule predisposes to Type 2 SLAP lesions in overhead athletes. Shoulders at risk for the dead arm syndrome have a marked loss of internal rotation caused by contracture of the posteroinferior capsule such that less than a 180 degrees arc of rotation is achieved with the arm abducted 90 degrees (the 180 degrees rule). Type 2 SLAP lesions that cause the dead arm syndrome in overhead-throwing athletes are most likely acceleration injuries that occur in late cocking rather than deceleration injuries in follow-through. Rehabilitation of athletes with the dead arm syndrome must include the

  19. Editorial Commentary: Glenoid Bone Reconstruction for Recurrent Shoulder Instability-Risk or Benefit?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    Bone reconstruction for management of glenohumeral instability to reduce postoperative recurrence rates is increasingly emphasized in our literature. Unfortunately, significant complication rates are associated with these procedures, particularly in the United States where training in bony glenoid reconstruction may be limited. The alternative of early intervention, specifically surgical treatment of first-time shoulder dislocation, could result in glenoid bone preservation and overall improvement in the results of soft-tissue stabilization procedures. Avoidance of future glenohumeral bone loss may diminish the need for more complicated surgery. PMID:27594329

  20. Shoulder Injury Incidence Rates in NASA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Foy, Millennia; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the astronaut shoulder injury rates began with an operational concern at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training. An astronaut suffered a shoulder injury during an NBL training run and commented that it was possibly due to a hardware issue. During the subsequent investigation, questions arose regarding the rate of shoulder injuries in recent years and over the entire history of the astronaut corps.

  1. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  2. Triple endobuttton technique for the treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocations: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Feng; Chen, Yun-Feng; Zeng, Bing-Fang; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Chai, Yi-Min; Wang, Hai-Ming; Lu, Ye

    2011-04-01

    Numerous procedures have been described for the operative management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries. Some of these techniques, including hardware fixation and non-anatomical reconstructions, are associated with serious complications and high failure rates. Recently, AC joint reconstruction techniques have focused on anatomical restoration of the coracoclavicular ligaments to achieve optimal clinical outcomes. We used a triple endobutton technique to separately reconstruct the trapezoid and the coronoid portions of the coracoclavicular ligament. We evaluated the preliminary clinical and radiological results of this technique in patients with acute complete dislocation of the AC joint. All patients achieved a significant improvement in the pain and function of shoulder at a mean follow-up interval of 12 months (range, 8-14 months). Excellent reduction of the AC joint was maintained. The triple endobutton technique may be safe and effective for the treatment of acute complete AC joint dislocations.

  3. Electromyographic response of shoulder muscles to acute experimental subacromial pain.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated effects of experimentally-induced subacromial pain, induced via hypertonic saline injection, on shoulder muscles activity. Electromyographic activity of 20 healthy participants was assessed for humeral elevation and descent for the control and experimental pain conditions, using fine wire electrodes for subscapularis and supraspinatus and surface electrodes for middle deltoid, upper trapezius, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and serratus anterior. Normalized mean amplitudes were analyzed for each muscle for four phases for elevation and descent, respectively. Repeated measures analysis of variances (ANOVAs) were used to determine differences between muscle activity in the control and experimental condition for the four phases of elevation and descent. Differences for mean normalized amplitudes were not significant during humeral elevation. Increased activity was found for the pain condition for serratus anterior and middle deltoid during the first (120-90°) and third (60-30°) parts and decreased activity for infraspinatus in the second half of descent (60-0°). No significant differences were found during descent for upper and lower trapezius, subscapularis and supraspinatus. While increased serratus anterior activity during 60-30° of descent may be protective, increased middle deltoid and decreased infraspinatus activity during the same range may threaten subacromial tissues in that range. Overall the changes in muscle activation were individual specific, particularly during the concentric elevation phase. PMID:24685367

  4. Judo-related traumatic posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Nikiforos; Anastasiadis, Prodromos; Grigoropoulou, Foteini; Kirkos, John; Kapetanos, George

    2014-05-01

    Judo is a combat sport with high risk of injury. We present a rare case of traumatic left posterior sternoclavicular (SC) joint dislocation, inflicted to a 12-year-old boy during a judo contest. An extensive literature review did not reveal any case of posterior SC joint dislocation in judo. The patient was treated with closed reduction under general anesthesia. At 2-year follow-up, his left upper extremity had full range of motion, and he did not complain of any residual symptoms. He decided to discontinue judo training; however, he participates in other physically demanding sports. Although not often encountered, posterior SC joint dislocation is a challenging and critical medical problem that can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated on time and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of trauma-related anterior chest pain. PMID:24172655

  5. [Asymmetric bilateral traumatic dislocation of the hip joint: a case report].

    PubMed

    Azar, Nikola; Yalçinkaya, Merter; Akman, Yunus Emre; Uzümcügil, Onat; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz S

    2010-08-01

    Bilateral traumatic dislocation of the hip is a rare condition. Simultaneous asymmetric traumatic dislocation of the hip, one hip anterior and the other posterior, is even more unusual. This article reports a 21-year-old male patient with asymmetric bilateral dislocation of the hip joint, injured due to a landslide during a canal excavation. The patient was treated conservatively and evaluated according to Thompson and Epstein clinical and radiographic criteria after a follow-up period of 10 years and six months. The clinical result was perfect and radiographical result was good. We determined that our case had occurred as a result of a mechanism that has not been previously published in the literature and evaluated it from this point of view.

  6. Cervical facet dislocation adjacent to the fused motion segment.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a case that forces re-examination of merits and demerits of anterior cervical fusion. A 79-year-old male was brought to the emergency room (ER) of our hospital after he fell and struck the occipital region of his head following excessive alcohol consumption. Four years prior, he had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/6 and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 3 years after this surgery indicated that he was suffering from degeneration of C6/7 intervertebral discs. After arriving at the ER, he presented motor impairment at level C7 and lower of manual muscle testing grade 1 as well as moderate loss of physical sensation from the trunk and peripheries of both upper limbs to the peripheries of both lower limbs (Frankel B). Cervical computed tomography (CT) indicated anterior dislocation of C6/7, and MRI indicated severe spinal cord edema. We performed manipulative reduction of C6/7 with the patient under general anesthesia. Next, we performed laminectomy on C5-T1 and posterior fusion on C6/7. Postoperative CT indicated that cervical alignment had improved, and MRI indicated that the spinal cord edema observed prior to surgery had been mitigated. Three months after surgery, motor function and sensory impairment of the lower limbs had improved, and the patient was ambulatory upon discharge from the hospital (Frankel D). In the present case, although C5 and 6 were rigidly fused, degeneration of the C6/7 intervertebral disc occurred and stability was compromised. As a result, even slight trauma placed a severe dynamic burden on the facet joint of C6/7, which led to dislocation.

  7. Three-dimensional formulation of dislocation climb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yejun; Xiang, Yang; Quek, Siu Sin; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a Green's function formulation for the climb of curved dislocations and multiple dislocations in three-dimensions. In this new dislocation climb formulation, the dislocation climb velocity is determined from the Peach-Koehler force on dislocations through vacancy diffusion in a non-local manner. The long-range contribution to the dislocation climb velocity is associated with vacancy diffusion rather than from the climb component of the well-known, long-range elastic effects captured in the Peach-Koehler force. Both long-range effects are important in determining the climb velocity of dislocations. Analytical and numerical examples show that the widely used local climb formula, based on straight infinite dislocations, is not generally applicable, except for a small set of special cases. We also present a numerical discretization method of this Green's function formulation appropriate for implementation in discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulations. In DDD implementations, the long-range Peach-Koehler force is calculated as is commonly done, then a linear system is solved for the climb velocity using these forces. This is also done within the same order of computational cost as existing discrete dislocation dynamics methods.

  8. Superior Dislocation of the Patella in a Young Woman without Osteophytes: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Tatsunori; Iizawa, Norishige; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    Superior dislocation of the patella without patellar ligament injury is an extremely rare condition. A review of the English-language literature found only 23 reported cases. In addition, the primary factor for dislocation in most of these cases was considered to be osteophytes in the inferior pole of the patella and the anterior surface of the femoral condyle; only 1 case had no osteophytes. We treated a 19-year-old woman who sustained a painful locking of the left knee after colliding with a friend. Plain radiography and computed tomography showed superior-lateral dislocation of the patella and an interlocking between notches in the inferior pole of the patella and the anterior surface of the femoral condyle. Closed reduction without sedation was performed without difficulty, and the patient was able to walk home without pain. After 1 week, the knee was without problems. The patient had no osteophytes in the knee and had no other common risk factors, such as patella alta, ligamentous laxity, genu recurvatum, and paralytic disorders. After a comparison with previously reported cases of superior patella dislocation, we concluded that the primary factor in the present case might have been a different condition. PMID:26960585

  9. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location.

  10. Mobility Laws in Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V

    2003-10-21

    Prediction of the plastic deformation behavior of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, to establish a statistically representative model of crystal plasticity. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss an important ingredient of this code--the mobility laws dictating the behavior of individual dislocations. They are materials input for DD simulations and are constructed based on the understanding of dislocation motion at the atomistic level.

  11. Why is the humeral retroversion of throwing athletes greater in dominant shoulders than in nondominant shoulders?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; Minagawa, Hiroshi; Urayama, Masakazu; Saito, Hidetomo; Seki, Nobutoshi; Iwase, Takenobu; Kashiwaguchi, Shinji; Matsuura, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    A rotation angle of the proximal humerus relative to the elbow (bicipital-forearm angle) was measured by use of ultrasonography to determine the relationship between humeral retroversion and growth in dominant and nondominant shoulders of 66 elementary and junior high school baseball players. The subjects were aged 12 years on average. The bicipital-forearm angle was significantly smaller in dominant shoulders than in nondominant shoulders. This indicated that the retroversion angle was greater in dominant shoulders than in nondominant shoulders. Furthermore, there was a moderately positive correlation between age and the bicipital-forearm angle in both dominant and nondominant shoulders. From these data, we conclude that the humeral retroversion angle decreases with age, and the decrease is much smaller in dominant shoulders. We assume that the repetitive throwing motion does not increase the retroversion of the humeral head but rather restricts the physiologic derotation process of the humeral head during growth.

  12. Current Concepts in Anaesthesia for Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Lutfi; MacFarlane, Robert J; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the volume of shoulder surgery in the last 2 decades and a very wide variety of anaesthetic techniques have emerged to provide anaesthesia and post-operative analgesia. In this article we examine current opinion, risks, benefits and practicalities of anaesthetic practice and the provision of post-operative analgesia for shoulder surgery. PMID:24082970

  13. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication.

  14. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-09-18

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  15. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  16. Shoulder rotational properties of throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Eaton, K

    2012-06-01

    Throwing arm injuries are common and often related to the shoulder external and internal rotation. Quantitative assessment may provide new insights to physical assessment and options for treatment. After having signed IRB approved consents and filled out injury questionnaires, 96 baseball pitchers were examined on both shoulders using a custom-made wireless device. The resistance onset angle (ROA), end-point angle (EPA), shoulder rotational flexibility (SRF) in both external and internal rotation, and rotational ranges of motion (ROM) of both shoulders were determined. About 34% of subjects had surgeries on their throwing arm. Another 15% of subjects had throwing arm injuries that did not require surgical treatments. The throwing arm had significantly lower internal ROA, EPA and SRF, but significantly higher external ROA, EPA and SRF than the non-throwing arm. There were significant differences in shoulder rotational properties among groups with different surgery locations. Subjects with shoulder surgeries had greater internal rotation flexibility of their throwing arm than those with surgeries on the elbow. Throwers with injury and surgery history had significantly different shoulder rotational properties. Abnormal shoulder rotational properties may be related to throwing arm injuries. A better understanding of their relationship may lead us to effective preventive measures of throwing arm injuries.

  17. Shoulder rotational properties of throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Eaton, K

    2012-06-01

    Throwing arm injuries are common and often related to the shoulder external and internal rotation. Quantitative assessment may provide new insights to physical assessment and options for treatment. After having signed IRB approved consents and filled out injury questionnaires, 96 baseball pitchers were examined on both shoulders using a custom-made wireless device. The resistance onset angle (ROA), end-point angle (EPA), shoulder rotational flexibility (SRF) in both external and internal rotation, and rotational ranges of motion (ROM) of both shoulders were determined. About 34% of subjects had surgeries on their throwing arm. Another 15% of subjects had throwing arm injuries that did not require surgical treatments. The throwing arm had significantly lower internal ROA, EPA and SRF, but significantly higher external ROA, EPA and SRF than the non-throwing arm. There were significant differences in shoulder rotational properties among groups with different surgery locations. Subjects with shoulder surgeries had greater internal rotation flexibility of their throwing arm than those with surgeries on the elbow. Throwers with injury and surgery history had significantly different shoulder rotational properties. Abnormal shoulder rotational properties may be related to throwing arm injuries. A better understanding of their relationship may lead us to effective preventive measures of throwing arm injuries. PMID:22422310

  18. Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    DE CARLI, ANGELO; PULCINELLI, FERDINANDO; ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; PITINO, DARIO; FERRETTI, ANDREA

    2014-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common disease that predominantly affects individuals aged between 40 and 60 years. Women seem to be more affected than men. Various factors have been suggested to play a role in this condition, such as abnormal activity of the thyroid gland, metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes), and genetic predisposition. Various etiological hypotheses have been advanced: the degenerative and multiphasic theories are the two most accredited ones. Clinically, calcific tendinitis is characterized by severe, disabling pain which occurs spontaneously, usually in the morning. There can be concomitant stiffness, giving rise to a frozen shoulder-like clinical picture. Conventional radiography of the shoulder is the most appropriate imaging approach. Most cases resolve spontaneously. Many conservative treatments have been reported in the literature, showing varying levels of evidence of efficacy. Arthroscopic surgery is the orthopedic specialist’s last option. It is to be noted that post-surgical pain can persist for many weeks after the operation. Finally, it is important not to forget the variant characterized by osteolytic involvement of the greater tuberosity, which has been associated with a worse clinical outcome, both after conservative treatment and after surgery. PMID:25606556

  19. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders. PMID:26180310

  20. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

  1. Frozen shoulder--an algoneurodystrophic process?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Rittmeister, M; John, J; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    1998-12-01

    The frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are clinically in many aspects similar. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in the affected areas in both diseases, while standard radiographs show a progressive demineralization. With measurement of bone-mineral density by quantitative digital radiography these local decalcification processes were diagnosed in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome: of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder 10 had a bone-mineral density decrease of more than 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the unaffected side. In the control groups (n = 32) the difference between affected and unaffected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was in only one case each above 21%. There are several indications in the literature assuming the frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process. Our observation supports this hypothesis, and may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic management. PMID:9922549

  2. Effects of mop handle height on shoulder muscle activity and perceived exertion during floor mopping using a figure eight method

    PubMed Central

    WALLIUS, Mari-Anne; RISSANEN, Saara M.; BRAGGE, Timo; VARTIAINEN, Paavo; KARJALAINEN, Pasi A.; RÄSÄNEN, Kimmo; JÄRVELIN-PASANEN, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of mop handle height on electromyographic (EMG) activities of the shoulder muscles and perceived exertion for the shoulder area during floor mopping using a figure eight method. An experimental study with 13 cleaners was conducted using surface EMG and category ratio (CR-10) scale. EMG activity was recorded unilaterally from the upper trapezius, infraspinatus, anterior and middle deltoid muscles. Each subject performed four trials of mopping and each trial consisted of using a different mop handle height (mop adjustment at the level of shoulder, chin, nose and eye) in randomized order. EMG data were normalized to a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). The muscle activities were assessed by estimating the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) of the EMG signals and analysed by linear mixed model analysis. Results showed that shoulder muscle activity was significantly lower when the mop handle height was adjusted to shoulder level or chin level as compared to eye level. These findings were supported by subjective ratings of exertion. It seems that mop handle height adjustment between shoulder and chin level may be recommended as a basis for figure eight mopping. PMID:26423328

  3. Worker Dislocation. Case Studies of Causes and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert F., Ed.

    Case studies were made of the following dislocated worker programs: Cummins Engine Company Dislocated Worker Project; GM-UAW Metropolitan Pontiac Retraining and Employment Program; Minnesota Iron Range Dislocated Worker Project; Missouri Dislocated Worker Program Job Search Assistance, Inc.; Hillsborough, North Carolina, Dislocated Worker Project;…

  4. The Results of Adductor Magnus Tenodesis in Adolescents with Recurrent Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Krzysztof; Fabis, Jaroslaw; Flont, Pawel; Niedzielski, Kryspin Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the patella is a common orthopaedic problem which occurs in about 44% of cases after first-time dislocation. In most cases of first-time patellar dislocation, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) becomes damaged. Between 2010 and 2012, 33 children and adolescents (39 knees) with recurrent patellar dislocation were treated with MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon. The aim of our study is to assess the effectiveness of this surgical procedure. The outcomes were evaluated functionally (Lysholm knee scale, the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, and isokinetic examination) and radiographically (Caton index, sulcus angle, congruence angle, and patellofemoral angle). Four patients demonstrated redislocation with MPFL graft failure, despite the fact that patellar tracking was found to be normal before the injury, and the patients had not reported any symptoms. Statistically significant improvements in Lysholm and Kujala scales, in patellofemoral and congruence angle, were seen (P < 0.001). A statistically significant improvement in the peak torque of the quadriceps muscle and flexor was observed for 60°/sec and 180°/sec angular velocities (P = 0.01). Our results confirm the efficacy of MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon in children and adolescents with recurrent patellar dislocation. PMID:25785271

  5. Incidence, Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission After Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; Anthony, Chris A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service has identified several quality metrics, including unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, to assess and compare surgeons and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes and risk factors for unplanned 30-day readmission after total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods We identified patients undergoing primary elective shoulder arthroplasty performed at American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) participating hospitals in 2013. Cases were stratified by readmission status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess patient demographics, comorbidities and operative variables predicting unplanned readmission. Results 2779 patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty were identified, with 74 (2.66%) requiring unplanned readmissions within 30 days of surgery. The most common surgical causes for unplanned readmission were surgical site infections (18.6%), dislocations (16.3%) and venous thromboembolism (14.0%). Medical causes for readmission were responsible for 51% of unplanned readmissions. Multivariate analysis identified patient age >75 (OR 2.62, 95% CI: 1.27 - 5.41), and ASA class of 3 (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.01 - 3.18) or 4 (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.31 - 10.08) as independent risk factors for unplanned readmission. Predictive modeling estimated that patients with ASA class of 4 and age >75 are 17.4 times more likely (95% CI 1.77-171.09) to be readmitted within 30 days of shoulder arthroplasty. Conclusion Unplanned readmission after shoulder arthroplasty is infrequent and medical complications account for more than 50% of occurrences. The risk of readmission exponentially increases when age and preoperative comorbidity burden are increased. PMID:27528839

  6. Robust atomistic calculation of dislocation line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Pavia, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The line tension Γ of a dislocation is an important and fundamental property ubiquitous to continuum scale models of metal plasticity. However, the precise value of Γ in a given material has proven difficult to assess, with literature values encompassing a wide range. Here results from a multiscale simulation and robust analysis of the dislocation line tension, for dislocation bow-out between pinning points, are presented for two widely-used interatomic potentials for Al. A central part of the analysis involves an effective Peierls stress applicable to curved dislocation structures that markedly differs from that of perfectly straight dislocations but is required to describe the bow-out both in loading and unloading. The line tensions for the two interatomic potentials are similar and provide robust numerical values for Al. Most importantly, the atomic results show notable differences with singular anisotropic elastic dislocation theory in that (i) the coefficient of the \\text{ln}(L) scaling with dislocation length L differs and (ii) the ratio of screw to edge line tension is smaller than predicted by anisotropic elasticity. These differences are attributed to local dislocation core interactions that remain beyond the scope of elasticity theory. The many differing literature values for Γ are attributed to various approximations and inaccuracies in previous approaches. The results here indicate that continuum line dislocation models, based on elasticity theory and various core-cut-off assumptions, may be fundamentally unable to reproduce full atomistic results, thus hampering the detailed predictive ability of such continuum models.

  7. Microdiffraction Analysis of Hierarchical Dislocation Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R.I.; Ice, G.E.

    2007-12-19

    This article describes how x-ray microdiffraction is influenced by the number, kind, and organization of dislocations. Particular attention is placed on micro-Laue diffraction, where polychromatic x-rays are diffracted into characteristic Laue patterns that are sensitive to the dislocation content and arrangement. Diffraction is considered for various stages of plastic deformation. For early stages of plastic deformation with random dislocation spacing, the intensity in reciprocal space is redistributed about Laue spots with a length scale proportional to the number of dislocations within the sample volume and with a characteristic shape that depends on the kinds of dislocations and the momentum transfer vector. Unpaired dislocations that contribute to lattice rotations cause the largest redistribution of scattered intensity. In later stages of plastic deformation, strong interactions between individual dislocations cause them to organize into correlated arrangements. Here again, xray diffraction Laue spots are broadened in proportion to the number of excess (unpaired) dislocations inside the wall and to the total number of unpaired walls, but the broadening can be discontinuous. With microdiffraction it is possible to quantitatively test models of dislocation organization.

  8. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  9. Congenital dislocation of the patella - clinical case.

    PubMed

    Miguel Sá, Pedro; Raposo, Filipa; Santos Carvalho, Manuel; Alegrete, Nuno; Coutinho, Jorge; Costa, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Congenital patellar dislocation is a rare condition in which the patella is permanently dislocated and cannot be reduced manually. The patella develops normally as a sesamoid bone of the femur. This congenital dislocation results from failure of the internal rotation of the myotome that forms the femur, quadriceps muscle and extensor apparatus. It usually manifests immediately after birth, although in some rare cases, the diagnosis may be delayed until adolescence or adulthood. Early diagnosis is important, thereby allowing surgical correction and avoiding late sequelae, including early degenerative changes in the knee. A case of permanent dislocation of the patella is presented here, in a female child aged seven years.

  10. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms. PMID:26871192

  11. Clavicle length, throwing performance and the reconstruction of the Homo erectus shoulder.

    PubMed

    Roach, Neil T; Richmond, Brian G

    2015-03-01

    Powerful, accurate throwing may have been an important mode of early hunting and defense. Previous work has shown that throwing performance is functionally linked to several anatomical shifts in the upper body that occurred during human evolution. The final shift to occur is the inferior reorientation of the shoulder. Fossil scapulae show the earliest evidence of a more inferior glenoid in Homo erectus. However, where the scapula rests on the thorax is uncertain. The relative length of the clavicle, the only skeletal attachment of the scapula to the torso, is quite variable. Depending on which fossils or skeletal measures are used to reconstruct the H. erectus shoulder, either a novel, anteriorly facing shoulder configuration or a modern human-like lateral orientation is possible. These competing hypotheses have led to very different conclusions regarding the throwing ability and hunting behavior of early Homo. Here, we evaluate competing models of H. erectus shoulder morphology and examine how these models relate to throwing performance. To address these questions, we collected skeletal measures from fossil and extant taxa, as well as anthropometric (N = 36) and kinematic (N = 27) data from Daasanach throwers from northwestern Kenya. Our data show that all H. erectus fossil clavicles fall within the normal range of modern human variation. We find that a commonly used metric for normalizing clavicle length, the claviculohumeral ratio, poorly predicts shoulder position on the torso. Furthermore, no significant relationship between clavicle length and any measure of throwing performance was found. These data support reconstructing the H. erectus shoulder as modern human-like, with a laterally facing glenoid, and suggest that the capacity for high speed throwing dates back nearly two million years. PMID:25439706

  12. Rheumatoid shoulder assessed by ultrasonography: prevalence of abnormalities and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Elbinoune, Imane; Amine, Bouchra; Wabi, Moudjibou; Rkain, Hanan; Aktaou, Souad; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The shoulder involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common. It can be subclinical and compromise the function of the upper limb. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography can detect subclinical abnormalities in rheumatoid shoulder. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of ultrasound abnormalities in rheumatoid shoulder, and investigate their association with different parameters. Methods Cross-sectional study including 37 patients with RA, meeting the ACR/EULAR 2010 classification criteria, who were enrolled during a month. A questionnaire with sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data was filled in for all patients. Ultrasound evaluation was performed by a single experienced operator. For each patient, both of shoulders were evaluated. Results Mean age was 50 years with female predominance. Median disease duration of RA was 7.5 years. All patients had a seropositive form of RA. Mean clinical DAS28 was 5.1. Mean HAQ was 1.2. Thirty-one (83.8%) patients had involvement of the shoulder: unilateral in 9(24.3%) cases and bilateral in 22(59.5%) cases. Synovitis was found in 16(43.2%) patients with Doppler in 4 (10.8%) cases. Sub-acromial bursitis was noted in 14 (37.8%) cases and the effusion in 20 (54.1%). Synovitis was noted especially in elderly individuals (p: 0.01). The Doppler was visualized in elderly patients (p: 0.01), with a shorter disease duration (p: 0.02) and with a high SDAI (p: 0.006). US inflammatory findings in anterior recess of glenohumeral joint were linked to a higher synovial index (p: 0.03) and a higher level of rheumatoid factor (p: 0.01). Conclusion 59.5% of our RA patients had bilateral involvement of the shoulder which was related to the disease activity. Ultrasound should be a systematic tool to look for the involvement of this joint in RA patients. PMID:27800090

  13. Quantum dislocations in solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinikava, Darya

    In this thesis the following problems on properties of solid 4He are considered: (i) the role of long-range interactions in suppression of dislocation roughening at T = 0; (ii) the combined effect of 3He impurities and Peierls potential on shear modulus softening; (iii) the dislocation superclimb and its connection to the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility"; (iv) non-linear dislocation response to the applied stress and stress-induces dislocation roughening as a I-order phase transition in 1D at finite temperature. First we investigate the effect of long-range interactions on the state of edge dislocation at T = 0. Such interactions are induced by elastic forces of the solid. We found that quantum roughening transition of a dislocation at T = 0 is completely suppressed by arbitrarily small long-range interactions between kinks. A heuristic argument is presented and the result has been verified by numerical Monte-Carlo simulations using Worm Algorithm in J-current model. It was shown that the Peierls potential plays a crucial role in explaining the elastic properties of dislocations, namely shear modulus softening phenomenon. The crossover from T = 0 to finite temperatures leads to intrinsic softening of the shear modulus and is solely controlled by kink typical energy. It was demonstrated that the mechanism, involving only the binding of 3He impurities to the dislocations, requires an unrealistically high concentrations of defects (or impurities) in order to explain the shear modulus phenomenon and therefore an inclusion of Peierls potential in consideration is required. Superclimbing dislocations, that is the edge dislocations with the superfluidity along the core, were investigated. The theoretical prediction that superclimb is responsible for the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility" was confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. It was demonstrated that the isochoric compressibility is suppressed at low temperatures. The dependence of

  14. Assessment of shoulder position variation and its impact on IMRT and VMAT doses for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For radiotherapy of the head and neck, 5-point mask immobilization is used to stabilize the shoulders. Still, the daily position of the shoulders during treatment may be different from the position in the treatment plan despite correct isocenter setup. The purpose of this study was to determine the interfractional displacement of the shoulders relative to isocenter over the course of treatment and the associated dosimetric effect of this displacement. Methods The extent of shoulder displacements relative to isocenter was assessed for 10 patients in 5-point thermoplastic masks using image registration and daily CT-on-rails scans. Dosimetric effects on IMRT and VMAT plans were evaluated in Pinnacle based on simulation CTs modified to represent shoulder shifts between 3 and 15 mm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left directions. The impact of clinically observed shoulder shifts on the low-neck dose distributions was examined. Results Shoulder motion was 2-5 mm in each direction on average but reached 20 mm. Superior shifts resulted in coverage loss, whereas inferior shifts increased the dose to the brachial plexus. These findings were generally consistent for both IMRT and VMAT plans. Over a course of observed shifts, the dose to 99% of the CTV decreased by up to 101 cGy, and the brachial plexus dose increased by up to 72 cGy. Conclusions he position of the shoulder affects target coverage and critical structure dose, and may therefore be a concern during the setup of head and neck patients, particularly those with low neck primary disease. PMID:22316381

  15. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615-24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  16. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615–24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  17. [Differential therapy for the rheumatoid shoulder].

    PubMed

    Schill, S; Thabe, H; Grifka, J

    2002-12-01

    Despite frequent involvement, the rheumatoid shoulder is neglected in operative treatment of the upper extremities. The slow course of omarthritis, the compensation mechanism of scapulothoracic motion and neighbouring joints as well as dominating disabilities of the lower extremities and the rheumatoid hand are possible explanations. The pattern of destruction of the rheumatoid shoulder is characterized by progressive joint and soft tissue deterioration. Soft tissue involvement determines the course of the shoulder joint. The subacromial space is a common and early site for rheumatoid involvement, often leading to bursitis, tenosynovitis of the biceps tendon and rotator cuff rupture. Sonography and MRI enable the early detection of subacromial and glenohumeral pathology before deterioration is visible radiologically. Surgical intervention in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder is based on the degree of radiological destruction according to Larsen, the natural course of the shoulder joint and the soft-tissue condition. The goals of surgery are to relieve pain, increase motion and restore shoulder function. Surgery should be carried out early in the course of the disease, thus determining the long-term prognosis and the remaining surgical options. Depending on the pattern of destruction of the rheumatoid shoulder, the options for treatment can be divided into early and late procedures.Joint-preserving surgery is indicated in the early stages of radiological destruction according to Larsen classification O-III, whereas the late stages of destruction (Larsen IV-V) require reconstructive surgery. The introduction of arthroscopic and semiarthroscopic techniques has improved the acceptance of early synovectomy for the rheumatoid shoulder, but there is still a place for open synovectomy in patients with extensive soft-tissue repair and bone-remodelling procedures. Arthroscopic and open synovectomy are supplementary and noncompetitive surgical procedures for

  18. Design and evaluation of prosthetic shoulder controller

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Joseph E.; Sorkin, John D.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) shoulder position transducer (sensing shoulder protraction-retraction and elevation-depression) that can be used to control two of a powered prosthetic humerus' DOFs. We also developed an evaluation protocol based on Fitts' law to assess the performance of our device. The primary motivation for this work was to support development of powered prosthetic shoulder joints of a new generation of prosthetic arms for people with shoulder disarticulation and very high-level transhumeral amputation. We found that transducers that provided resistance to shoulder movement performed better than those providing no resistance. We also found that a position control scheme, where effector position is proportional to shoulder position, performed better than a velocity control scheme, where effector velocity is proportional to shoulder position. More generally, our transducer can be used to control motion along any two DOFs. It can also be used in a more general 4-DOF control scheme by sequentially controlling two DOFs at a time. The evaluation protocol has general applicability for researchers and practitioners. Researchers can employ it to compare different prosthesis designs and control schemes, while practitioners may find the evaluation protocol useful in evaluating and training people with amputation in the use of prostheses. PMID:25357185

  19. Shouldering the load, maximising value.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    In mid-November last year Ryhurst signed what it dubbed 'a ground-breaking strategic estates partnership' agreement with the Isle of Wight NHS Trust (HEJ - January 2015). Under the Wight Life Partnership, the two organisations will work in partnership 'to comprehensively review the estate across all the Trust's sites to ensure that buildings and grounds are being fully utilised, and suitable for modern healthcare'. This is Ryhurst's third such 'whole estate' joint-venture agreement with the NHS, and the first with a non-Foundation Trust, harnessing an approach that sees the company shoulder a considerable part of the burden of making optimum use of, and deriving 'maximum value' from, large healthcare estates. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports. PMID:26268015

  20. Shouldering the load, maximising value.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    In mid-November last year Ryhurst signed what it dubbed 'a ground-breaking strategic estates partnership' agreement with the Isle of Wight NHS Trust (HEJ - January 2015). Under the Wight Life Partnership, the two organisations will work in partnership 'to comprehensively review the estate across all the Trust's sites to ensure that buildings and grounds are being fully utilised, and suitable for modern healthcare'. This is Ryhurst's third such 'whole estate' joint-venture agreement with the NHS, and the first with a non-Foundation Trust, harnessing an approach that sees the company shoulder a considerable part of the burden of making optimum use of, and deriving 'maximum value' from, large healthcare estates. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.

  1. Electromyographic Analysis of the Shoulder Girdle Musculature During External Rotation Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Hawkes, David H.; Kemp, Graham J.; Frostick, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Implementation of overhead activity, a key component of many professional sports, requires an effective and balanced activation of the shoulder girdle muscles, particularly during forceful external rotation (ER) motions. Purpose: To identify activation strategies of 16 shoulder girdle muscles/muscle segments during common shoulder ER exercises. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Method: Thirty healthy subjects were included in this study, and 16 shoulder girdle muscles/muscle segments were investigated (surface electrode: anterior, middle, and posterior deltoid; upper, middle, and lower trapezius; serratus anterior; teres major; upper and lower latissimus dorsi; and upper and lower pectoralis major; fine wire electrodes: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and rhomboid major) using a telemetric electromyography (EMG) system. Five ER exercises (standing ER at 0° and 90° of abduction, with underarm towel roll, prone ER at 90° of abduction, side-lying ER with underarm towel) were studied. Exercise EMG amplitudes were normalized to EMG at maximum ER force in a standard position. Univariate analysis of variance and post hoc analysis applied on EMG activity of each muscle were used to assess the main effect of the exercise condition. Results: Muscular activity differed significantly among the ER exercises (P < .05 to P < .001). The greatest activation for anterior and middle deltoid, supraspinatus, upper trapezius, and serratus anterior occurred during standing ER at 90° of abduction; for posterior deltoid, middle trapezius, and rhomboid during side-lying ER with underarm towel; for lower trapezius, upper and lower latissimus dorsi, subscapularis, and teres major during prone ER at 90° of abduction; and for the clavicular and sternal part of the pectoralis major during standing ER with underarm towel. Conclusion: Key glenohumeral and scapular muscles can be optimally activated during specific ER exercises, particularly in positions that

  2. Dislocation generation during early stage sintering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, J. E.; Lenel, F. V.; Ansell, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of capillarity-induced stresses on dislocations during early stage sintering. A special version of Hirth's (1963) theoretical calculation procedures modified to describe dislocation nucleation on planes meeting the sintering body's neck surface obliquely is shown to predict plastic flow at stress levels know to exist between micron size metal particles in the early stages of sintering.

  3. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M.; Barat, P.

    2014-10-01

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  4. A rare variant of knee dislocation

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; AB HALIM, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Knee dislocation is a rare injury. It represents less than 0.2% of orthopaedic injuries. This case reports a rare form of knee dislocation caused by the impact of a high-energy trauma. In these cases the appropriate assessment and management is needed to ensure that patient receives the proper treatment. PMID:27381692

  5. Obesity. A risk factor for knee dislocation.

    PubMed

    Marin, E L; Bifulco, S S; Fast, A

    1990-06-01

    Complete dislocation of the knee joint is a severe injury that is commonly the result of high-velocity injuries and often associated with disruption of the popliteal artery. We report two cases in which obesity appeared to be the principal cause of knee dislocation with vascular compromise. Preventive measures in extremely obese patients are recommended.

  6. Community College Adjustment among Dislocated Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Duggan, Molly H.; Laughlin, Janet T.; Walker, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Community colleges often are catalysts for economic and workforce development in localities with high unemployment or large numbers of dislocated workers. Increasingly, dislocated workers--individuals who have experienced job loss due to occupational closings, reduced workforces, or severe local economic downturns--are enrolling in educational and…

  7. Dislocation of the cuboid bone without fracture.

    PubMed

    Gough, D T; Broderick, D F; Januzik, S J; Cusack, T J

    1988-10-01

    A 37-year-old man presented following an inversion plantar flexion injury to the left foot and ankle. Dislocation of the cuboid without associated fracture was identified and successfully treated by closed reduction. The patient was immobilized in a walking cast for seven weeks after surgery and no further dislocation occurred.

  8. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M. Barat, P.

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  9. Geometric approach to dislocation and disclination theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, A.I.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1988-05-01

    Cartan structure equations are used to create a four-dimensional geometric description of dislocations in continuum theory. It is shown that the dislocation distribution is determined by the torsion tensor, while the disclination distribution is determined by the curvature tensor. An analogy to electrodynamics is offered.

  10. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic. PMID:19292189

  11. [Bipolar forearm dislocation or floating forearm (a case report)].

    PubMed

    Daoudi, A; Elibrahimi, A; Loudiyi, W D; Elmrini, A; Chakour, K; Boutayeb, F

    2009-02-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the forearm or floating forearm is a rare injury. It combines concomitant elbow and wrist dislocation. Only six cases have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of wrist dislocation may initially be missed and therefore the prognosis will be worse. The authors report a case of a bipolar dislocation with a posterior dislocation of the elbow and a perilunate dislocation of the wrist.

  12. Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Labroligamentous Pathology of the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Darren; Grubin, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Because of the widespread use of eponyms and acronyms to describe labroligamentous findings in the shoulder, interpreting shoulder magnetic resonance imaging reports can be challenging. A summary of the appearance of these lesions on shoulder magnetic resonance images can help the orthopedic surgeon to understand these entities as imaging findings and to determine the appropriate treatment for patients with shoulder injuries. PMID:26866313

  13. Initial dislocation structure and dynamic dislocation multiplication in Mo single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Lassila, D H

    2000-03-22

    Initial dislocation structure in annealed high-purity Mo single crystals and deformation substructure in a crystal subjected to 1% compression have been examined and studied in order to investigate dislocation multiplication mechanisms in the early stages of plastic deformation. The initial dislocation density is in a range of 10{sup 6} {approx} 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, and the dislocation structure is found to contain many grown-in superjogs along dislocation lines. The dislocation density increases to a range of 10{sup 8} {approx} 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, and the average jog height is also found to increase after compressing for a total strain of 1%. It is proposed that the preexisting jogged screw dislocations can act as (multiple) dislocation multiplication sources when deformed under quasi-static conditions. Both the jog height and length of link segment (between jogs) can increase by stress-induced jog coalescence, which takes place via the lateral migration (drift) of superjogs driven by unbalanced line-tension partials acting on link segments of unequal lengths. Applied shear stress begins to push each link segment to precede dislocation multiplication when link length and jog height are greater than critical lengths. This dynamic dislocation multiplication source is subsequently verified by direct simulations of dislocation dynamics under stress to be crucial in the early stages of plastic deformation in Mo single crystals.

  14. MRI findings in Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Song, James C; Lazarus, Martin L; Song, Alexandra Pae

    2006-02-01

    Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress injury of the proximal humeral physis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent baseball player with shoulder pain, especially if the player is pitching regularly in a competitive environment. While roentgenographs may or may not be helpful, depending on the duration and severity of the injury, we report the MRI appearance of a case of little leaguer's shoulder. We found MRI helpful in diagnosing injury to the growth plate that was radiographically occult; furthermore, we were able to document the patient's progress with a follow-up MRI examination, which showed improvement with treatment.

  15. Shoulder adaptive changes in youth baseball players.

    PubMed

    Levine, William N; Brandon, Mark L; Stein, Beth Shubin; Gardner, Thomas R; Bigliani, Louis U; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2006-01-01

    Shoulder adaptive changes in response to overhand throwing have been observed in adults, but the age of onset and progression of these adaptive changes have not been established. Two-hundred ninety-eight youth baseball players (8- to 28-year-olds) were studied to determine whether shoulder range of motion and laxity differences between the dominant and non-dominant shoulders exist between different age groups. The subjects were separated into 3 different age groups of 100 8- to 12-year-olds (Group 1), 100 13- to-14 year-olds (Group 2), and 98 15- to 28-year-olds (Group 3). For dominant shoulder external rotation with the humerus in abduction, all groups were significantly different from each other, with Group 2 having the greatest range and Group 1 having the smallest range (P < .05). When comparing dominant shoulder internal rotation in abduction among different groups, Group 3 and Group 2 motion was significantly less than that for Group 1 (P < .05.) When comparing dominant to non-dominant shoulder motion within each group, a significant increase in dominant shoulder external rotation in abduction was found in all 3 age groups (P < .05). Comparison of the differences in external rotation in abduction between the dominant and non-dominant shoulders demonstrated an increase with increasing age, Group 1 (1.5 +/- 6.8 degrees), Group 2 (9.6 +/- 15.3 degrees), and Group 3 (15.0 +/- 11.2 degrees; P < .05). Comparison of differences in internal rotation in abduction between dominant and non-dominant shoulders demonstrated a decrease with increasing age, Group 1 (4.6 +/- 8.2 degrees), Group 2 (8.4 +/- 14.5 degrees), and Group 3 (15.5 +/- 11.7 degrees; P < .05). For shoulder laxity, Groups 2 and 3 had significantly more inferior shoulder laxity when compared to Group 1. In summary, our results indicate that shoulder range of motion and laxity of youth baseball players are caused by adaptive changes that manifest during adolescence.

  16. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function. PMID:27094888

  17. Dislocation patterning in a two-dimensional continuum theory of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groma, István; Zaiser, Michael; Ispánovity, Péter Dusán

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the spontaneous emergence of dislocation patterns during plastic deformation is a long standing challenge in dislocation theory. During the past decades several phenomenological continuum models of dislocation patterning were proposed, but few of them (if any) are derived from microscopic considerations through systematic and controlled averaging procedures. In this paper we present a two-dimensional continuum theory that is obtained by systematic averaging of the equations of motion of discrete dislocations. It is shown that in the evolution equations of the dislocation densities diffusionlike terms neglected in earlier considerations play a crucial role in the length scale selection of the dislocation density fluctuations. It is also shown that the formulated continuum theory can be derived from an averaged energy functional using the framework of phase field theories. However, in order to account for the flow stress one has in that case to introduce a nontrivial dislocation mobility function, which proves to be crucial for the instability leading to patterning.

  18. Glide dislocation nucleation from dislocation nodes at semi-coherent {111} Cu–Ni interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Misra, Amit

    2015-07-23

    Using atomistic simulations and dislocation theory on a model system of semi-coherent {1 1 1} interfaces, we show that misfit dislocation nodes adopt multiple atomic arrangements corresponding to the creation and redistribution of excess volume at the nodes. We identified four distinctive node structures: volume-smeared nodes with (i) spiral or (ii) straight dislocation patterns, and volume-condensed nodes with (iii) triangular or (iv) hexagonal dislocation patterns. Volume-smeared nodes contain interfacial dislocations lying in the Cu–Ni interface but volume-condensed nodes contain two sets of interfacial dislocations in the two adjacent interfaces and jogs across the atomic layer between the two adjacent interfaces. Finally, under biaxial tension/compression applied parallel to the interface, we show that the nucleation of lattice dislocations is preferred at the nodes and is correlated with the reduction of excess volume at the nodes.

  19. Glide dislocation nucleation from dislocation nodes at semi-coherent {111} Cu–Ni interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Misra, Amit

    2015-07-23

    Using atomistic simulations and dislocation theory on a model system of semi-coherent {1 1 1} interfaces, we show that misfit dislocation nodes adopt multiple atomic arrangements corresponding to the creation and redistribution of excess volume at the nodes. We identified four distinctive node structures: volume-smeared nodes with (i) spiral or (ii) straight dislocation patterns, and volume-condensed nodes with (iii) triangular or (iv) hexagonal dislocation patterns. Volume-smeared nodes contain interfacial dislocations lying in the Cu–Ni interface but volume-condensed nodes contain two sets of interfacial dislocations in the two adjacent interfaces and jogs across the atomic layer between the two adjacent interfaces.more » Finally, under biaxial tension/compression applied parallel to the interface, we show that the nucleation of lattice dislocations is preferred at the nodes and is correlated with the reduction of excess volume at the nodes.« less

  20. The shoulder in baseball pitching: biomechanics and related injuries-part 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Samuel S; Loebenberg, Mark L; Rokito, Andrew S; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    The extreme range of motion at the shoulder, the high angular velocities and torques, and the repetitious nature of the pitching motion combine to make the shoulder vulnerable to injury during the baseball pitch. An understanding of the biomechanics that contribute to shoulder injuries during each phase of the pitching motion can facilitate the athlete's diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. Common injuries that occur during the late cocking and acceleration phases of the pitch include anterior instability and impingement, bicipital tendinitis, and subacromial impingement. Nonoperative treatment consisting of an initial period of rest and NSAIDS, followed by physical therapy and a gradual return to activity, is usually successful. When this approach fails, surgical intervention, either arthroscopic or open, may be necessary. Physical therapy and rehabilitation are directed toward restoring the integrity and strength of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the shoulder joint, yet preserving the range of motion necessary for performance. Through rehabilitation, the dedicated athlete can often return to the pitching mound at his previous level of performance.

  1. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program.

    PubMed

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  2. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program.

    PubMed

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity.

  3. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  4. Internal stresses, dislocation mobility and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, G.

    1991-06-01

    The description of plastic deformation must take into account individual mechanisms and heterogeneity of plastic strain. Influence of dislocation interaction with forest dislocations and of cross slip are connected with the organization of dipole walls. The latter are described and their development is explained as a consequence of edge effects. Applications are discussed. La description de la déformation plastique doit prendre en compte les interactions individuelles des dislocations et l'hétérogénéité à grande échelle de la déformation plastique. Les interactions des dislocations mobiles avec la forêt de dislocations, le glissement dévié, ont pour effet la création de parois dipolaires. Celles-ci sont décrites et leur développement est appliqué à partir des effets de bord.

  5. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  6. Changes of the mineralization pattern in the subchondral bone plate of the glenoid cavity in the shoulder joints of the throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Natsu, Koji; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of mineralization in the subchondral bone plate (DMSB) is used as a parameter for individual stress distribution of shoulder joints. We have analyzed 28 shoulder joints of throwing athletes by DMSB of the glenoid with computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry and described their mineralization patterns. The throwing motion imposes a heavy rotational load on the shoulder joint, and this, in turn, may lead to excessive translation of the humeral head on the glenoid. This could explain why the two most frequent density maxima were localized to the anterior and posterior portions of the glenoid. Our finding of a frequent bicentric density distribution of the shoulder joints of throwing athletes should be useful in any future analysis of the relationship between the DMSB and the bone morphology of the glenoid.

  7. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  8. The reverse shoulder prosthesis (Delta III) in acute shoulder fractures: technical considerations with respect to stability.

    PubMed

    Van Seymortier, Peter; Stoffelen, Daniel; Fortems, Yves; Reynders, Piet

    2006-08-01

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis reverses the relationship between the scapular and humeral component, resulting in a mechanical advantage as the deltoid muscle is able to compensate for the rotator cuff deficiency. Based on this mechanical advantage, the reverse shoulder prosthesis has become an accepted alternative for the treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures. The purpose of this article is to discuss technical considerations related to stability in the use of the reverse shoulder prosthesis in acute shoulder fractures, based on clinical experience. PMID:17009830

  9. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  10. Atlantoaxial dislocation and Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, W J; Gray, W D

    1980-01-01

    The phenotypic features of Down's syndrome are easily recognized and include characteristic facial features, hypotonia, ligament laxity, transverse palmar creases and mental subnormality. Associated manifestations and complications are also familiar and involve almost every organ system. Congenital heart defects, bowel malformations and a tendency to leukemia are common attendant problems. Less common, however, are defects of the skeletal system; in fact, the most recent edition of a standard pediatric textbook makes no mention of anomalies of the vertebral column. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the association between Down's syndrome and atlantoaxial dislocation, which in our patient resulted in quadriplegia and eventually death. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6448087

  11. Recurrent Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate results of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction associated with lateral release and advancement of vastus medialis in recurrent dislocation of the patella. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 11 patients with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Mean age was 23, mainly women. We did MPFL reconstruction with semitendinosus or gracilis tendon depending on BMI, associated with advancement of vastus medialis and lateral release. Results: Mean Kujala score improved from 46,54 pts. preoperative to 88,36 postoperative. Our main complication was 1 patient with rigid knee, who required movilization under anesthesia and arthroscopic arthrolisis to improve her outcome. Conclusion: The combination of this techniques are a good alternative to treat patients with recurrent patella disclocation, with good short and mid-term results. Biomechanic intra and postop complications of MPFL reconstruction are related to patellar fixation, anatomic positioning of femoral tunnel and knee position of the graft fixation.

  12. Rehabilitation of the shoulder in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Litchfield, R; Hawkins, R J

    1995-01-01

    The tennis player places unique demands on the shoulder by creating a high risk for overuse and overloading of the soft tissues. Tennis requires concentric work to position and move the arm, eccentric work to stabilize the shoulder, effective depression of the humeral head to avoid impingement in the overhead position, and normal stability to prevent secondary impingement. The tennis serve produces enormous angular velocities about the shoulder joint. A comprehensive rehabilitation program has been described in which the therapist, trainer, player, and physician alike need to have an understanding of the basic biomechanics of this sport. This program can be used to treat the painful shoulder, prevent injury, and enhance performance. PMID:7712546

  13. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  14. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  15. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  16. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  17. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  18. Instability and impingement in the athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ticker, J B; Fealy, S; Fu, F H

    1995-06-01

    The competitive athlete who participates in a sport requiring overhead motion depends on a shoulder with optimal function. An acute episode of injury or a gradual onset of symptoms in the shoulder can affect the athlete's ability to perform. An understanding of shoulder anatomy and function is essential, and an accurate diagnosis of the underlying pathology is critical for planning treatment options. The correct diagnosis may be less clear when the athlete presents with an insidious onset of shoulder pain. A detailed history and physical examination, as well as an evaluation of the overhead motion and onset of pain, is important when the diagnosis of instability or impingement is considered. Rehabilitation of the rotator cuff often succeeds in alleviating symptoms and restoring function. Surgery is considered when symptoms and diminished function persist despite appropriate nonoperative treatment. Operative repair or reconstruction must be anatomical in nature. Postoperative rehabilitation is equally important in this setting, and a motivated athlete helps to ensure success.

  19. Dislocation-obstacle interactions in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Blythe Gore

    Dislocation-obstacle interactions play a significant role in determining the mechanical response of a material. Because higher stresses are needed for dislocations to bypass obstacles, these interactions reduce dislocation mobility and increase the yield strength of a material, as well as improve the work-hardening rate and the resistance to coarsening. The phenomenon of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be advantageous, as in the case of particle-strengthening to increase the creep strength of a material, or disadvantageous, as in embrittlement of a metal due to radiation-induced defects. In order to accelerate the time from development to implementation of a new material, optimize production parameters, and accurately predict the behavior of a material while in service, it is necessary to develop robust material models based on fundamental physical inputs. Through careful experimentation, the nature of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be assessed, allowing key physical parameters to be identified and clarified. These can serve as the basis for developing new and accurate material models. This thesis examines two types of dislocation-obstacle interactions: dislocation-particle interactions during creep deformation, and dislocation-loop interactions during deformation at room temperature. Dislocation-particle interaction studies in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr, Al-4Mg-0.3Sc, and Al-0.3Sc showed that temperature, coherency, and particle size play a role in determining the dominant bypass mechanism, and that interactions are more complex than what is considered in current models. A new mechanism for elevated temperature bypass of particles during creep deformation was revealed, in which dislocations interact directly with the particle-matrix interface, altering the interfacial structure, and affecting subsequent dislocation interactions. These results are discussed in relation to macroscopic behavior in steady-state creep experiments. In addition, dislocation

  20. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  1. Trunk and Shoulder Kinematic and Kinetic and Electromyographic Adaptations to Slope Increase during Motorized Treadmill Propulsion among Manual Wheelchair Users with a Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to quantify the effects of five different slopes on trunk and shoulder kinematics as well as shoulder kinetic and muscular demands during manual wheelchair (MWC) propulsion on a motorized treadmill. Eighteen participants with spinal cord injury propelled their MWC at a self-selected constant speed on a motorized treadmill set at different slopes (0°, 2.7°, 3.6°, 4.8°, and 7.1°). Trunk and upper limb movements were recorded with a motion analysis system. Net shoulder joint moments were computed with the forces applied to the handrims measured with an instrumented wheel. To quantify muscular demand, the electromyographic activity (EMG) of the pectoralis major (clavicular and sternal portions) and deltoid (anterior and posterior fibers) was recorded during the experimental tasks and normalized against maximum EMG values obtained during static contractions. Overall, forward trunk flexion and shoulder flexion increased as the slope became steeper, whereas shoulder flexion, adduction, and internal rotation moments along with the muscular demand also increased as the slope became steeper. The results confirm that forward trunk flexion and shoulder flexion movement amplitudes, along with shoulder mechanical and muscular demands, generally increase when the slope of the treadmill increases despite some similarities between the 2.7° to 3.6° and 3.6° to 4.8° slope increments. PMID:25793200

  2. Trunk and shoulder kinematic and kinetic and electromyographic adaptations to slope increase during motorized treadmill propulsion among manual wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dany; Babineau, Annie-Claude; Champagne, Audrey; Desroches, Guillaume; Aissaoui, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to quantify the effects of five different slopes on trunk and shoulder kinematics as well as shoulder kinetic and muscular demands during manual wheelchair (MWC) propulsion on a motorized treadmill. Eighteen participants with spinal cord injury propelled their MWC at a self-selected constant speed on a motorized treadmill set at different slopes (0°, 2.7°, 3.6°, 4.8°, and 7.1°). Trunk and upper limb movements were recorded with a motion analysis system. Net shoulder joint moments were computed with the forces applied to the handrims measured with an instrumented wheel. To quantify muscular demand, the electromyographic activity (EMG) of the pectoralis major (clavicular and sternal portions) and deltoid (anterior and posterior fibers) was recorded during the experimental tasks and normalized against maximum EMG values obtained during static contractions. Overall, forward trunk flexion and shoulder flexion increased as the slope became steeper, whereas shoulder flexion, adduction, and internal rotation moments along with the muscular demand also increased as the slope became steeper. The results confirm that forward trunk flexion and shoulder flexion movement amplitudes, along with shoulder mechanical and muscular demands, generally increase when the slope of the treadmill increases despite some similarities between the 2.7° to 3.6° and 3.6° to 4.8° slope increments. PMID:25793200

  3. Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ranju; Chawla, Reeta

    2014-01-01

    We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson's disease (PD) with deep brain stimulator (DBS) using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG) normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS. PMID:25024475

  4. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  5. Glenoumeral dislocation: a prospective randomized study comparing spazo and kocher maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Bruno da Rocha Moreira; de Almeida, José Inácio; de Sousa, Uriel Jaime; Bomfim, Leônidas de Souza; Ferreira, Mário Soares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and to compare the Spaso and Kocher reduction maneuvers in terms of efficiency, time of reduction, facileness, pain, discomfort to the patient, complications and risks, besides promoting the comparison between the two maneuvers, aiming to ground the emergency conduct. METHODS: A prospective study with 105 patients with acute shoulder dislocations were enrolled in the study between February 2011 and September 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups and they were submitted to the reduction of dislocation using the Spaso maneuver (group A) or the Kocher technique (group B) by first, second or third-year orthopedic surgery residents from our service. The results were evaluated and compared. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, timing of reduction, number of precedent episodes and complications after reduction. However, reduction was achieved in more cases using the Spaso method than it was among the Kocher group, as well as the mean duration of the reduction maneuver and discomfort were shorter in the group A patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both methods presented good results in terms of dislocation reduction and low complications rates. Nevertheless, the Spaso maneuver was more efficient, fast and easily applicable in comparison with Kocher's method. Level of Evidence I, Therapeutic. PMID:26327800

  6. Chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated by the GraftRope device

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Jonas S; Aagaard, Knut E; Lunsjö, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations is challenging, and no single procedure can be considered to be the gold standard. In 2010, the GraftRope method (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was introduced in a case series of 10 patients, showing good clinical results and no complications. We wanted to evaluate the GraftRope method in a prospective consecutive series. Patients and methods 8 patients with chronic Rockwood type III–V acromioclavicular joint dislocations were treated surgically using the GraftRope method. The patients were clinically evaluated and a CT scan was performed to assess the integrity of the repair. Results and interpretation In 4 of the 8 patients, loss of reduction was seen within the first 6 weeks postoperatively. A coracoid fracture was the reason in 3 cases and graft failure was the reason in 1 case. In 3 of the 4 patients with intact repairs, the results were excellent with no subjective shoulder disability 12 months postoperatively. It was our intention to include 30 patients in this prospective treatment series, but due to the high rate of complications the study was discontinued prematurely. Based on our results and other recent reports, we cannot recommend the GraftRope method as a treatment option for chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations. PMID:25323800

  7. Thermodynamic forces in single crystals with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Goethem, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    A simple model for the evolution of macroscopic dislocation regions in a single crystal is presented. This model relies on maximal dissipation principle within Kröner's geometric description of the dislocated crystal. Mathematical methods and tools from shape optimization theory provide equilibrium relations at the dislocation front, similarly to previous work achieved on damage modelling (J Comput Phys 33(16):5010-5044, 2011). The deformation state variable is the incompatible strain as related to the dislocation density tensor by a relation involving the Ricci curvature of the crystal underlying elastic metric. The time evolution of the model variables follows from a novel interpretation of the Einstein-Hilbert flow in terms of dislocation microstructure energy. This flow is interpreted as the dissipation of non-conservative dislocations, due to the climb mechanism, modelled by an average effect of mesoscopic dislocations moving normal to their glide planes by adding or removing points defects. The model equations are a fourth-order tensor parabolic equation involving the operator "incompatibility," here appearing as a tensorial counterpart of the scalar Laplacian. This work encompasses and generalizes results previously announced (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:923-927, 2011), with in addition a series of physical interpretations to give a meaning to the newly introduced concepts.

  8. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings. PMID:23395053

  9. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings.

  10. Long-term results of the surgical treatment of type III acromioclavicular dislocations: an update of a previous report.

    PubMed

    Lizaur, A; Sanz-Reig, J; Gonzalez-Parreño, S

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the long-term outcomes of a previously reported prospective series of 46 type III acromioclavicular dislocations. These were treated surgically with temporary fixation of the acromioclavicular joint with wires, repair of the acromioclavicular ligaments, and overlapped suture of the deltoid and trapezius muscles. Of the 46 patients, one had died, four could not be traced, and three declined to return for follow-up, leaving 38 patients in the study. There were 36 men and two women, with a mean age at follow-up of 57.3 years (41 to 71). The mean follow-up was 24.2 years (21 to 26). Patients were evaluated using the Imatani and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scoring systems. Their subjective status was assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand and Simple Shoulder Test questionnaires, and a visual analogue scale for patient satisfaction. The examination included radiographs of the shoulder. At a follow-up of 21 years, the results were satisfactory in 35 (92.1%) patients and unsatisfactory in three (7.9%). In total, 35 patients (92.1%) reported no pain, one slight pain, and two moderate pain. All except two patients had a full range of shoulder movement compared with the opposite side. Unsatisfactory results were the result of early redisplacement in two patients, and osteoarthritis without redisplacement in one. According to the Imatani and UCLA scores, there was no difference between the operated shoulder and the opposite shoulder (p > 0.05). Given the same situation, 35 (92.1%) patients would opt for the same surgical treatment again. Operative treatment of type III acromioclavicular joint injuries produces satisfactory long-term results.

  11. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trishkina, L.; Cherkasova, T.; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N.; Kozlov, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  12. Management of frontal sinus fractures--treatment decision based on metric dislocation extent.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, Daniel; Burtscher, Doris; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Rasse, Michael; Kloss, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of frontal sinus fractures is still a matter of research in neurosurgical and craniofacial surgery. The present study aimed to determine new criteria regarding surgical or observational treatment, especially concerning the fracture dislocation. Clinical information on 164 consecutive patients with fractures of the frontal sinus, treated at the Department of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery of the Medical University of Innsbruck from 2006 to 2010, have been evaluated. 23 female (14%) and 141 male (86%) patients suffered mainly from traffic (31.7%) and sports accidents (28.0%), followed by work accidents (20.1%), violence (3.7%) and accidents at home (3.1%). 51.8% presented an isolated fracture of the anterior wall, 47.6% both anterior and posterior wall fracture, 0.6% an isolated posterior wall fracture. Injury of the nasofrontal duct was found in 29.2%, CSF liquorrhoea in 15.9%. In total, 44.5% of the patients underwent surgical therapy, 55.5% were treated conservatively by observation. Treatment decision depended significantly on concomitant injuries of the nasofrontal duct and the presence of rhinoliquorrhoea as well as on the fracture dislocation. A new classification of frontal sinus fractures depending on their maximum dislocation is proposed. In addition, a treatment algorithm considering displacement, liquorrhoea and injury of the nasofrontal duct is presented. PMID:24942098

  13. Shoulder muscle recruitment patterns and related biomechanics during upper extremity sports.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    Understanding when and how much shoulder muscles are active during upper extremity sports is helpful to physicians, therapists, trainers and coaches in providing appropriate treatment, training and rehabilitation protocols to these athletes. This review focuses on shoulder muscle activity (rotator cuff, deltoids, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, triceps and biceps brachii, and scapular muscles) during the baseball pitch, the American football throw, the windmill softball pitch, the volleyball serve and spike, the tennis serve and volley, baseball hitting, and the golf swing. Because shoulder electromyography (EMG) data are far more extensive for overhead throwing activities compared with non-throwing upper extremity sports, much of this review focuses on shoulder EMG during the overhead throwing motion. Throughout this review shoulder kinematic and kinetic data (when available) are integrated with shoulder EMG data to help better understand why certain muscles are active during different phases of an activity, what type of muscle action (eccentric or concentric) occurs, and to provide insight into the shoulder injury mechanism. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG data have been reported extensively during overhead throwing, such as baseball pitching and football passing. Because shoulder forces, torques and muscle activity are generally greatest during the arm cocking and arm deceleration phases of overhead throwing, it is believed that most shoulder injuries occur during these phases. During overhead throwing, high rotator cuff muscle activity is generated to help resist the high shoulder distractive forces approximately 80-120% bodyweight during the arm cocking and deceleration phases. During arm cocking, peak rotator cuff activity is 49-99% of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in baseball pitching and 41-67% MVIC in football throwing. During arm deceleration, peak rotator cuff activity is 37-84% MVIC in baseball pitching and 86-95% MVIC in football

  14. Shoulder muscle recruitment patterns and related biomechanics during upper extremity sports.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    Understanding when and how much shoulder muscles are active during upper extremity sports is helpful to physicians, therapists, trainers and coaches in providing appropriate treatment, training and rehabilitation protocols to these athletes. This review focuses on shoulder muscle activity (rotator cuff, deltoids, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, triceps and biceps brachii, and scapular muscles) during the baseball pitch, the American football throw, the windmill softball pitch, the volleyball serve and spike, the tennis serve and volley, baseball hitting, and the golf swing. Because shoulder electromyography (EMG) data are far more extensive for overhead throwing activities compared with non-throwing upper extremity sports, much of this review focuses on shoulder EMG during the overhead throwing motion. Throughout this review shoulder kinematic and kinetic data (when available) are integrated with shoulder EMG data to help better understand why certain muscles are active during different phases of an activity, what type of muscle action (eccentric or concentric) occurs, and to provide insight into the shoulder injury mechanism. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG data have been reported extensively during overhead throwing, such as baseball pitching and football passing. Because shoulder forces, torques and muscle activity are generally greatest during the arm cocking and arm deceleration phases of overhead throwing, it is believed that most shoulder injuries occur during these phases. During overhead throwing, high rotator cuff muscle activity is generated to help resist the high shoulder distractive forces approximately 80-120% bodyweight during the arm cocking and deceleration phases. During arm cocking, peak rotator cuff activity is 49-99% of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in baseball pitching and 41-67% MVIC in football throwing. During arm deceleration, peak rotator cuff activity is 37-84% MVIC in baseball pitching and 86-95% MVIC in football

  15. Clinical Effect of Acute Complete Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Treated with Micro-Movable and Anatomical Acromioclavicular Plate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingjun; Miao, Jianyun; Lin, Bin; Guo, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate. Methods: Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range16 to 63 years) with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months). Results: The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100). The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%), good in 3 patients (18.8%) and satisfactory in 1patient (6.2%). Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients. Conclusion: We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique. PMID:23091410

  16. “Conjugate Channeling” Effect in Dislocation Core Diffusion: Carbon Transport in Dislocated BCC Iron

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction , but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not , thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility. PMID:23593255

  17. Shoulder-to-Shoulder Research "with" Children: Methodological and Ethical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Krista M.; Lahman, Maria K. E.; Opitz, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodological study with children where two different interview methods were utilized: the "walk-around" (a form of mobile interview) and the "shoulder-to-shoulder." The paper reviews the methodological aspects of the study then provides a brief review of the history of methods employed in research with…

  18. Why does my shoulder hurt? A review of the neuroanatomical and biochemical basis of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Gwilym, Stephen Edward; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    If a patient asks 'why does my shoulder hurt?' the conversation will quickly turn to scientific theory and sometimes unsubstantiated conjecture. Frequently, the clinician becomes aware of the limits of the scientific basis of their explanation, demonstrating the incompleteness of our understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. This review takes a systematic approach to help answer fundamental questions relating to shoulder pain, with a view to providing insights into future research and novel methods for treating shoulder pain. We shall explore the roles of (1) the peripheral receptors, (2) peripheral pain processing or 'nociception', (3) the spinal cord, (4) the brain, (5) the location of receptors in the shoulder and (6) the neural anatomy of the shoulder. We also consider how these factors might contribute to the variability in the clinical presentation, the diagnosis and the treatment of shoulder pain. In this way we aim to provide an overview of the component parts of the peripheral pain detection system and central pain processing mechanisms in shoulder pain that interact to produce clinical pain.

  19. Fundamentals in generalized elasticity and dislocation theory of quasicrystals: Green tensor, dislocation key-formulas and dislocation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus; Agiasofitou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    The present work provides fundamental quantities in generalized elasticity and dislocation theory of quasicrystals. In a clear and straightforward manner, the three-dimensional Green tensor of generalized elasticity theory and the extended displacement vector for an arbitrary extended force are derived. Next, in the framework of dislocation theory of quasicrystals, the solutions of the field equations for the extended displacement vector and the extended elastic distortion tensor are given; that is, the generalized Burgers equation for arbitrary sources and the generalized Mura-Willis formula, respectively. Moreover, important quantities of the theory of dislocations as the Eshelby stress tensor, Peach-Koehler force, stress function tensor and the interaction energy are derived for general dislocations. The application to dislocation loops gives rise to the generalized Burgers equation, where the displacement vector can be written as a sum of a line integral plus a purely geometric part. Finally, using the Green tensor, all other dislocation key-formulas for loops, known from the theory of anisotropic elasticity, like the Peach-Koehler stress formula, Mura-Willis equation, Volterra equation, stress function tensor and the interaction energy are derived for quasicrystals.

  20. A Case of Septic Arthritis of Shoulder Presenting as Stiffness of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Atturu, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septic arthritis of the shoulder is uncommon in adults. It is a surgical emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying liver disease. MRI is a useful adjunct in early detection of atypical causes of shoulder pain. Case report: A 43 years old male came to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and stiffness of his left shoulder. On examination, his shoulder movements were severely restricted. Further evaluation with MRI revealed septic arthritis of left gleno-humeral joint for which emergency arthroscopic debridement was done. Conclusion: Septic arthritis of shoulder may not present with classical clinical features. Hence, a through clinical and radiological evaluation will help us prognosticate and treat accordingly thereby preventing complications like septic shock, osteomyelitis.

  1. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Methods: Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. Results: 14 of the 55 players evaluated were pitchers, and 20 reported pain during the pitching motion. The mean values for lateral and medial rotation and range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder were, respectively, 110 °, 61 ° and 171 °, with a statistically significant difference in relation to the non-dominant limb. Pitchers had greater gains in lateral rotation and deficits in medial rotation than did non-pitchers. Pain presented a statistically significant correlation with diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of “shoulder at risk”. Conclusions: Statistically significant differences in dominant shoulder mobility were found, with increased lateral rotation, diminished medial rotation and smaller ROM, in relation to the contralateral limb. There was a statistically significant relationship between the pitcher's position and greater gain in lateral rotation and diminished medial rotation. There were statistically significant correlations between pain and diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of “shoulder at risk”. There was a statistical tendency suggesting that players with diminished medial rotation of the dominant shoulder presented a relationship with pain. PMID:27028320

  2. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal andmore » also identifies dislocation junctions.« less

  3. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal and also identifies dislocation junctions.

  4. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  5. Analysis of dislocation pile-ups using a dislocation-based continuum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, K.; Dickel, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sandfeld, S.; Weygand, D.; Gumbsch, P.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing demand for materials with well-defined microstructure, accompanied by the advancing miniaturization of devices, is the reason for the growing interest in physically motivated, dislocation-based continuum theories of plasticity. In recent years, various advanced continuum theories have been introduced, which are able to described the motion of straight and curved dislocation lines. The focus of this paper is the question of how to include fundamental properties of discrete dislocations during their motion and interaction in a continuum dislocation dynamics (CDD) theory. In our CDD model, we obtain elastic interaction stresses for the bundles of dislocations by a mean-field stress, which represents long-range stress components, and a short range corrective stress component, which represents the gradients of the local dislocation density. The attracting and repelling behavior of bundles of straight dislocations of the same and opposite sign are analyzed. Furthermore, considering different dislocation pile-up systems, we show that the CDD formulation can solve various fundamental problems of micro-plasticity. To obtain a mesh size independent formulation (which is a prerequisite for further application of the theory to more complex situations), we propose a discretization dependent scaling of the short range interaction stress. CDD results are compared to analytical solutions and benchmark data obtained from discrete dislocation simulations.

  6. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant. PMID:24555406

  8. Electromyographic analysis of shoulder muscles during press-up variations and progressions.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Lee; Waterman, Rosemary; Smith, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Due to the versatility of the press-up it is a popular upper extremity strengthening and rehabilitation exercise. Press-up programmes are often progressed by increasing weight-bearing load and using unstable bases of support. Despite the popularity of the press-up research examining press-up variations is limited. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of common press-up exercises on serratus anterior, infraspinatus, anterior deltoid, pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi muscles overall EMG activity. Twenty-one healthy individuals participated in this study. Surface electrodes were placed on pectoralis major, anterior deltoid, infraspinatus, serratus anterior and latissimus dorsi muscles. Participants were tested under 7 static press-up conditions that theoretically progressively increase weight-bearing load and proprioceptive challenge while surface electromyographic activity was recorded. There was a high correlation between increased weight-bearing load and increased EMG activity for all muscles in stable base conditions. The introduction of the unstable base conditions resulted in an activation decline in all muscles. Within the two-armed press-up the Swiss ball resulted in decreased activation in all muscles except pectoralis major. Serratus anterior demonstrated the greatest activation as a percentage of maximum isometric contraction across all exercises. The findings of this study indicate that by varying the weight-bearing load and base of support whilst in the press-up position results in significantly different demands on shoulder and scapula muscles.

  9. Unloading behavior of dislocations emitted from a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Huan; Li, J. C. M.

    1985-12-01

    Upon unloading, dislocations emitted from a crack can be retracted partially (stationary crack with lattice friction for dislocation motion) or completely (moving crack or zero friction for dislocation motion). The behavior of the plastic zone, the dislocation distribution, and the dislocation-free zone during the retraction process are studied by computer simulation. A propagating crack always moves forward upon unloading until all the dislocations are retracted. Its speed could be much faster during retraction than during the emission of dislocations. The rate of dislocation retraction or crack motion is slow in the beginning but then suddenly the crack jumps forward to retract all the rest of dislocations. This incubation period before the sudden crack surge seems to depend on the size of the dislocation-free zone.

  10. Anterior skull base oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Vivanco, Blanca; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José L

    2013-03-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed of oncocytes (ie, epithelial cells with a large cytoplasm that is rich in mitochondria). Most cases are benign and originate from the salivary glands. Although there have been a few reported cases of oncocytomas being found in the sinonasal tract, most if not all cases seem not to involve the anterior skull base. We report a rare case of oncocytoma involving the anterior skull base occurring in a 44-year-old male patient. Preoperative carotid angiography and selective embolization was performed. The patient underwent an expanded endoscopic endonasal anterior craniofacial resection, which allowed complete resection of the tumor, with a low morbidity. The pathological diagnosis was oncocytoma. At 36 months after the initial treatment, the patient is free of disease. Based on our literature search, this may be the first such reported case. A brief review of the available literature examining the known body of knowledge regarding these neoplasms is presented.

  11. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Valone, Steven M; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Germann, T. C.

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  12. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  13. Medial dislocation of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Chan, S K L; Robb, C A; Singh, T; Chugh, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the first reported case of symptomatic medial dislocation of the medial meniscus in a patient who had no previous history of trauma and who had an otherwise normal knee. The treatment of instability of the medial meniscus is controversial and studies have indicated that certain individuals without a firm meniscal bony insertion may be predisposed to meniscal dislocation. In our patient, the meniscal instability interfered with daily activities. Operative stabilisation by reconstruction of the meniscotibial ligaments cured the symptoms.

  14. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elmer E.

    1976-01-01

    Congenital dislocation or subluxation of the hip (congenital acetabular dysplasia) is a complete or partial displacement of the femoral head out of the acetabulum. The physical signs essential for diagnosis are age related. In newborns the tests for instability are the most sensitive. After the neonatal period, and until the age of walking, tightness of the adductor muscles is the most reliable sign. Early diagnosis is vital for successful treatment of this partially genetically determined condition. Various therapeutic measures, ranging from abduction splinting to open reduction and osteotomy, may be required. Following diagnosis in the first month of life, the average treatment time in one recent series was only 2.3 months from initiation of therapy to attainment of a normal hip. When the diagnosis was not made until 3 to 6 months of age, ten months of treatment was required to achieve the same outcome. When the diagnosis is not made, or the treatment is not begun until after the age of 6, a normal hip will probably not develop in any patient. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:1251603

  15. Handheld vibration effects shoulder motion.

    PubMed

    Tripp, B L; Eberman, L E; Dwelly, P M

    2009-12-01

    We explored effects of handheld vibration on glenohumeral motion in competitive overhead-throwing athletes. We used a randomized, blinded pre-test post-test cross-over design. Each arm of each subject experienced 2 conditions (1-control, 1-experimental), each with pre-test and post-test measures; the order of which was randomized. Participants included Division-I baseball and softball players (n=35: age=20+/-2 yr, height=178+/-9 cm, mass=84+/-12 kg, years of sport participation=13+/-4 yrs). During the experimental condition, participants held a vibrating (2.2 mm, 15 Hz, 20 s), 2.55 kg (5.62 lbs) Mini-VibraFlex dumbbell (Orthometric, New York, NY) in neutral glenohumeral rotation. During the control condition, participants held the still dumbbell (0 mm, 0 Hz, 20 s). Participants rested one min after each trial (3). We used a digital protractor to assess range of motion bilaterally, employing a standard technique for measuring maximal internal (IR) and external rotation (ER). Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that range of dominant IR increased 6.8% ( P=0.001, ES=0.16) after handheld vibration. Handheld vibration did not affect range of dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.20), non-dominant IR ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.41), or non-dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.05). Short bouts of handheld vibration increased dominant IR in collegiate baseball and softball athletes. These results suggest that handheld vibration may help maintain glenohumeral IR that is vital to the healthy and competitive throwing shoulder.

  16. EXTRA-ARTICULAR FRACTURE OF THE MEDIAL END OF THE CLAVICLE ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE IV ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION: CAAE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Mário Chaves; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, Jose Carlos Souza; Leonel, Igor Lima; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the clavicle and acromioclavicular dislocations are very common injuries when they occur separately. The combination of an acromioclavicular dislocation and a fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle is not rare. However, there are very few reported cases of acromioclavicular dislocations associated with fractures of the middle third of the clavicle; those associated with fractures of the medial third are even rarer. We report the case of an adult male who suffered an acromioclavicular dislocation (type IV) associated with a displaced extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle (Almann group 3) in a cycling accident. The patient was treated during the acute phase with open reduction and internal fixation of the two lesions. At the clinical evaluation 12 months after the surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, with full active and passive mobility, and normal strength and endurance of the shoulder girdle. Radiographs and a three-dimensional CT scan showed persistent posterosuperior subluxation of the acromioclavicular joint and anatomical consolidation of the clavicular fracture. PMID:27027060

  17. Sudden death from pelvic hemorrhage after bilateral central fracture dislocations of the hip due to an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C A; O'Briain, D S

    2000-12-01

    Fracture and dislocation of major joints may be caused by the forceful tonic muscular contractions of seizure activity. A 77-year-old man who was found dead in bed with no sign of external trauma had bilateral central fracture dislocations of the femoral head through the acetabular floor with fatal pelvic hemorrhage and extensive pulmonary fat and bone marrow embolism. He had epilepsy, but the last seizure was 6 years earlier, and he had long discontinued medication. The fractures were attributed to a new unwitnessed seizure. This is the twentieth case of central fracture dislocation of the hip since 1970, when better anesthesia eliminated convulsive therapy-induced fractures. The authors review these 20 cases. Seizures followed inflammation, infarction or neoplasia of the brain, eclampsia, metabolic or iatrogenic causes, or epilepsy (6 cases, 2 of which had no prior seizures for 5 years). There were 11 men (mean age, 64 years) and 9 women (mean age, 47 years). Fractures were unilateral in 13 and bilateral in 7. Additional fractures (in vertebrae, shoulders, or femur) were present in eight. Only eight had prior bone disease. Local symptoms led to diagnosis in most, but two were identified incidentally on imaging. The current patient was the only one to die suddenly, but six other patients presented with shock and three died (one of whom had injuries that led to a suspicion of manslaughter). Central fracture-dislocation of the hip is a rare and little known consequence of seizures, with strong potential for misdiagnosis and lethal complications.

  18. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, Bjorn; Woo, Wanchuck; Zhili, Feng; Edward, Kenik; Ungar, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  19. Dislocation electrical conductivity of synthetic diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, S. N. Samsonenko, N. D.

    2009-05-15

    A relationship between the electric resistance of single-crystal homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films and their internal structure has been investigated. It is established that the electrical conductivity of undoped homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films is directly related to the dislocation density in them. A relation linking the resistivity {rho} ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} {omega} cm) with the dislocation density {gamma} ({approx}10{sup 14}-4 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -2}) is obtained. The character of this correlation is similar for both groups of homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films. Thin ({approx}1-8 {mu}m) homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films with small-angle dislocation boundaries between mosaic blocks exhibit dislocation conductivity. The activation energy of dislocation acceptor centers was calculated from the temperature dependence of the conductivity and was found to be {approx}0.3 eV. The conduction of thick diamond films (h > 10 {mu}m) with the resistivity {rho} {approx} 10{sup 8} {omega} cm is determined by the conduction of intercrystallite boundaries, which have a nondiamond hydrogenated structure. The electronic properties of the diamond films are compared with those of natural semiconductor diamonds of types IIb and Ic, in which dislocation acceptor centers have activation energies in the range 0.2-0.35 eV and are responsible for hole conduction.

  20. Chronic Knee Dislocation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ross, John P; Brown, Nicholas M; Levine, Brett R

    2015-12-01

    Knee dislocation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although rare, is a dangerous injury that can lead to neurovascular compromise and permanent disability. Chronic dislocation after TKA is even less common and is defined as dislocation that is present for 4 weeks or more. There are few reports of its management. Chronic dislocation may be complicated further by concomitant extensor mechanism disruption, ligamentous instability, and/or capsular contracture. This article describes 3 cases of chronically dislocated TKAs and the challenges encountered in treating this difficult problem. A higher level of constraint was required to maintain knee stability, and an extensor mechanism allograft was needed in 2 of the 3 reported patients. The preferred technique at the authors' institution is a complete allograft composite, tensioned in full extension. In the setting of a chronically dislocated TKA, the authors now recommend revision surgery with an enhanced measure of constraint (constrained condylar device or hinged knee prosthesis), reconstruction of the extensor mechanism when necessary, and restoration of the joint while compensating for concomitant bony defects. Even when surgeons follow these principles, it is important to inform the patient that long-term outcomes will likely be inferior to those of revision surgery for other causes.

  1. Investigation of the Dynamics of a Screw Dislocation in Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupaeva, S. N.; Petelina, Yu. P.; Polosukhin, K. A.; Petelin, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    A modification of the mathematical model of forming the crystallographic shear band is proposed in which the strength of elastic interaction between all dislocations of the forming dislocation pileups is taken into account in addition to the Peach-Keller force; lattice, impurity, and dislocation friction; linear tension; viscous braking; and intensity of generation of point defects behind kinks. The model is used to investigate the influence of the dislocation density on the time characteristics of the formation of dislocation loops in copper.

  2. Anterior tibial striations.

    PubMed

    Daffner, R H

    1984-09-01

    Radiolucent horizontal striations of the anterior cortex of the tibia were seen in 10 athletes who were evaluated for "shin-splints." There were seven basketball players, two professional dancers, and one hurdler. Each patient's history included vigorous leaping in performance of athletic feats. All the lesions were similar in location and appearance and were accompanied by thickening of the anterior tibial cortex. These striations are considered stress fractures and were not observed in a group of runners who were evaluated for shin-splints.

  3. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  4. Fracture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in a 12-year-old boy. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hamoud, K; Abbas, J

    2015-11-01

    A case report and literature review. To present a rare case of facture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in a 12-year-old boy who was treated conservatively. Fracture dislocations of the sacrum or the sacro-coccygeal joint are infrequent injuries and are rarely reported. The treatment for these disorders is usually conservative. Detailed description of the anterior dislocation (Salter-Harris type I) of the sacro-coccygeal joint in this child and its management are presented, with review of the relevant literature. A conservative treatment was performed, with excellent clinical and radiological result at three years after the injury. MR imaging obtained at two years showed very good healing and alignment. Fracture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in the pediatric population should be treated conservatively, as the potential of healing and remodeling is great. Closed reduction should not be attempted.

  5. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  6. US anatomy of the shoulder: Pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Precerutti, M; Garioni, E; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2010-12-01

    A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the shoulder is essential for the assessment of its condition. The purpose of this article is to provide a useful tool for the ultrasound (US) study of this joint. The shoulder girdle and upper arm are made up of a number of muscles and tendons: rotator cuff (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis), humeral biceps, deltoid and pectoral muscles, which can all be evaluated at US examination. Various and complex capsular ligamentous structures contribute to the stability of the shoulder, but only a few can be adequately evaluated by US and will therefore receive particular attention. Numerous serous bursae are situated among muscles, skin, subcutaneous tissues, joint capsule structures and bones to prevent friction and they can be evaluated by US only in the presence of pathologies. Subacromial-subdeltoid and subcoracoid bursa are most frequently involved and will therefore be described in detail. There are furthermore nerves and vessels providing the various components of the shoulder with innervation and vascularization, and they can also be studied by US. The shoulder girdle (humerus, scapula, clavicle and sternal manubrium) is situated in the deep layers; only the cortex of the bone can be seen at US as a continuous hyperechoic line. For a better understanding of the location and relationship between the structures which can be studied by US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be carried out as this method provides a wider and more complete view of the structures.

  7. The evaluation of the failed shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Wiater, J Michael

    2014-05-01

    As the incidence of shoulder arthroplasty continues to rise, the orthopedic shoulder surgeon will be increasingly faced with the difficult problem of evaluating a failed shoulder arthroplasty. The patient is usually dissatisfied with the outcome of the previous arthroplasty as a result of pain, but may complain of poor function due to limited range of motion or instability. A thorough and systematic approach is necessary so that the most appropriate treatment pathway can be initiated. A comprehensive history and physical examination are the first steps in the evaluation. Diagnostic studies are numerous and include laboratory values, plain radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound imaging, joint aspiration, nuclear scans, and electromyography. Common causes of early pain after shoulder arthroplasty include technical issues related to the surgery, such as malposition or improper sizing of the prosthesis, periprosthetic infection, neurologic injury, and complex regional pain syndrome. Pain presenting after a symptom-free interval may be related to chronic periprosthetic infection, component wear and loosening, glenoid erosion, rotator cuff degeneration, and fracture. Poor range of motion may result from inadequate postoperative rehabilitation, implant-related factors, and heterotopic ossification. Instability is generally caused by rotator cuff deficiency and implant-related factors. Unfortunately, determining the cause of a failed shoulder arthroplasty can be difficult, and in many situations, the source of pain and disability is multifactorial.

  8. The Kaiser Permanente Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ake, Christopher F; Burke, Mary F; Singh, Anshuman; Yian, Edward H; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Navarro, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed in the United States with increasing frequency. We describe the medium-term findings from a large integrated healthcare system shoulder arthroplasty registry. Patients and methods Shoulder arthroplasty cases registered between January 2005 and June 2013 were included for analysis. The registry included patient characteristics, surgical information, implant data, attrition, and patient outcomes such as surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and revision procedures. Results During the study period, 6,336 primary cases were registered. Median follow-up time for all primaries was 3.3 years; 461 cases were lost to follow-up by ending of health plan membership. Primary cases were predominantly female (56%) and white (81%), with an average age of 70 years. The most common reason for surgery was osteoarthritis in 60% of cases, followed by acute fracture (17%) and rotator cuff tear arthropathy (15%). In elective shoulder arthroplasty procedures, 200 all-cause revisions (4%) were reported, with glenoid wear being the most common reason. Interpretation Most arthroplasties were elective procedures: over half performed for osteoarthritis. Glenoid wear was the most common reason for revision of primary shoulder arthroplasty in elective cases. PMID:25727949

  9. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play.

  10. Shoulder injuries in adolescent rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Hodhody, Ghazal; Mackenzie, Tanya A

    2016-01-01

    Background Rugby is a high-intensity contact sport, frequently causing shoulder injuries. Between the ages of 12 years to 18 years, academy and county level players are being selected for professional contracts, making this is a critical stage of their career. The present study aimed to describe the patterns of injury in adolescent rugby players with shoulder injuries. Methods Academy and county level rugby players in the target age group, over a 7-year period, were included in the present study. Data collected included the mechanism of injury, position and level of play, radiology and surgical findings, and recurrence rate at a minimum of 2 years post-surgery. Results One hundred and sixty-nine cases adhered to the inclusion criteria, with most cases involving two or more pathologies in the shoulder (54%). Forwards sustained more shoulder injuries than backs, incurring more labral injuries. By contrast, backs had a higher incidence of bony pathology. The mechanism of injury frequently correlated with player positions. There was a 21% injury recurrence rate, with forwards (7%) and higher level academy players (11%) most likely to suffer a recurrence. Conclusions Shoulder injury patterns in this important group of adolescent contact athletes are complex, with recurrence rates being higher than those in older rugby players. PMID:27583014

  11. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  12. Functional outcomes assessment in shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, James D; Beckmann, James T; Granger, Erin; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2014-01-01

    The effective evaluation and management of orthopaedic conditions including shoulder disorders relies upon understanding the level of disability created by the disease process. Validated outcome measures are critical to the evaluation process. Traditionally, outcome measures have been physician derived objective evaluations including range of motion and radiologic evaluations. However, these measures can marginalize a patient’s perception of their disability or outcome. As a result of these limitations, patient self-reported outcomes measures have become popular over the last quarter century and are currently primary tools to evaluate outcomes of treatment. Patient reported outcomes measures can be general health related quality of life measures, health utility measures, region specific health related quality of life measures or condition specific measures. Several patients self-reported outcomes measures have been developed and validated for evaluating patients with shoulder disorders. Computer adaptive testing will likely play an important role in the arsenal of measures used to evaluate shoulder patients in the future. The purpose of this article is to review the general health related quality-of-life measures as well as the joint-specific and condition specific measures utilized in evaluating patients with shoulder conditions. Advances in computer adaptive testing as it relates to assessing dysfunction in shoulder conditions will also be reviewed. PMID:25405091

  13. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. PMID:26206550

  14. The Impact of Arthroscopic Capsular Release in Patients with Primary Frozen Shoulder on Shoulder Muscular Strength

    PubMed Central

    Waszczykowski, Michał; Fabiś, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of arthroscopic capsular release in patients with primary frozen shoulder on muscular strength of nonaffected and treated shoulder after at least two-year follow-up after the surgery. The assessment included twenty-seven patients, who underwent arthroscopic capsular release due to persistent limitation of range of passive and active motion, shoulder pain, and limited function of upper limb despite 6-month conservative treatment. All the patients underwent arthroscopic superior, anteroinferior, and posterior capsular release. After at least two-year follow-up, measurement of muscular strength of abductors, flexors, and external and internal rotators of the operated and nonaffected shoulder, as well as determination of range of motion (ROM) and function (ASES) in the operated and nonaffected shoulder, was performed. Measurement of muscular strength in the patient group did not reveal statistically significant differences between operated and nonaffected shoulder. The arthroscopic capsular release does not have significant impact on the decrease in the muscular strength of the operated shoulder. PMID:25050374

  15. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  16. [Triple fracture of the shoulder suspensory complex].

    PubMed

    Tamimi Mariño, I; Martin Rodríguez, I; Mora Villadeamigo, J

    2013-01-01

    The superior suspensory complex of the shoulder (SSCS) is a ring shaped structure composed of bones and soft tissues that play a fundamental role in the stability of the shoulder joint. Isolated injuries of the SSCS are relatively common, but injuries that affect 3 components are extremely unusual. We present a triple injury of the SSCS in a 26 year old patient with a Neer type ii clavicular fracture, a Kuhn type iii acromion fracture and an Ogawa type i coracoid fracture. An open reduction and stabilization of the clavicle was performed with 2 Kirschner nails. The acromial fracture was synthesized with 2 cannulated screws, and the coracoid fracture was treated conservatively. After 24 months of follow up the patient had an excellent functional outcome according to the Constat-Murley shoulder score and QuickDASH scoring system, and all the fractures healed correctly.

  17. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes. PMID:27583013

  18. Evaluation and treatment of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Deborah L

    2014-05-01

    Shoulder pain is a common symptom in the adult population. The most common cause of shoulder pain is SIS, reflecting a problem with the rotator cuff or subacromial bursa. Determining the cause of a patient’s pain is usually a clinical diagnosis based on careful history taking and physical examination. Limited use of imaging studies will be needed in the setting of trauma, possible glenohumeral arthritis, or when a complete tendon tear is suspected. Therapy is based on pain control and therapeutic exercises in almost all cases. Despite the prevalence of shoulder pain, there is no consensus on the best way to achieve pain control or on the type of exercise most likely to achieve speedy recovery.

  19. Physical examination of the overhead athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Sewick, Amy; Kelly, John D; Rubin, Ben

    2012-03-01

    Overhead athletes seek the services of an orthopedic surgeon because of pain and/or dysfunction. It is important to address the cause of the symptoms more so than the source of the patient's pain, so that treatment will eliminate the problem rather than merely ameliorate symptoms temporarily. In order to accomplish a thorough assessment of shoulder function, the examiner must expand his/her view from isolated assessment of the glenohumeral joint range of motion, stability, assessment of rotator cuff strength, palpation and provocative maneuvers, and add assessment of the shoulder in the context of the kinetic chain. The examination of the thrower's shoulder, coupled with a thorough history, will usually provide a solid functional diagnosis and provide a good idea as to the presence of structural damage. As a result, the value of rehabilitation and the benefit of surgical intervention are made more predictable.

  20. A navigation system for shoulder arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tyryshkin, K; Mousavi, P; Beek, M; Ellis, R E; Pichora, D R; Abolmaesumi, P

    2007-10-01

    The general framework and experimental validation of a novel navigation system designed for shoulder arthroscopy are presented. The system was designed to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the human shoulder. Prior to surgery, a surface model of the shoulder was created from computed tomography images. Intraoperatively, optically tracked arthroscopic instruments were calibrated. The surface model was then registered to the patient using tracked freehand ultrasound images taken from predefined landmark regions on the scapula. Three-dimensional models of the surgical instruments were displayed, in real time, relative to the surface model in a user interface. Laboratory experiments revealed only small registration and calibration errors, with minimal time needed to complete the intraoperative tasks. PMID:18019466