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Sample records for anterior tibial post

  1. [Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery secondary to tibial shaft fracture. Case report].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Salazar, J; Tovar-López, J; Hernández-Rodríguez, G; De la Concha-Ureta, H

    2016-01-01

    Arterial pseudoaneurysm of the lower limb is an infrequent entity, particularly in the infrapopliteal segment. It is commonly associated to vascular repairs or follows a localized arterial lesion, a fracture or a surgical procedure. There is little information in Mexico about this entity in cases involving the anterior tibial artery, and secondary to trauma and osteosynthesis. Given that sudden bleeding due to rupture of the pseudoaneurysm is a possible catastrophic outcome for the viability of the segment, it is important to timely detect and diagnose the pseudoaneurysm. Treatment indications contained in the international literature are controversial. Solution-oriented approaches may be either surgical or endovascular. Current reports show that the best treatment option is an autologous saphenous vein graft, which maintains blood flow and minimizes the risk of peripheral ischemia. The purpose of this paper is to report the case of a patient who sustained the above mentioned complication and provide a literature review. This topic should be further investigated, as this condition may go unnoticed in a large number of cases, given that its symptoms are silent. PMID:27627775

  2. [Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery secondary to tibial shaft fracture. Case report].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Salazar, J; Tovar-López, J; Hernández-Rodríguez, G; De la Concha-Ureta, H

    2016-01-01

    Arterial pseudoaneurysm of the lower limb is an infrequent entity, particularly in the infrapopliteal segment. It is commonly associated to vascular repairs or follows a localized arterial lesion, a fracture or a surgical procedure. There is little information in Mexico about this entity in cases involving the anterior tibial artery, and secondary to trauma and osteosynthesis. Given that sudden bleeding due to rupture of the pseudoaneurysm is a possible catastrophic outcome for the viability of the segment, it is important to timely detect and diagnose the pseudoaneurysm. Treatment indications contained in the international literature are controversial. Solution-oriented approaches may be either surgical or endovascular. Current reports show that the best treatment option is an autologous saphenous vein graft, which maintains blood flow and minimizes the risk of peripheral ischemia. The purpose of this paper is to report the case of a patient who sustained the above mentioned complication and provide a literature review. This topic should be further investigated, as this condition may go unnoticed in a large number of cases, given that its symptoms are silent.

  3. Anterior tibial striations.

    PubMed

    Daffner, R H

    1984-09-01

    Radiolucent horizontal striations of the anterior cortex of the tibia were seen in 10 athletes who were evaluated for "shin-splints." There were seven basketball players, two professional dancers, and one hurdler. Each patient's history included vigorous leaping in performance of athletic feats. All the lesions were similar in location and appearance and were accompanied by thickening of the anterior tibial cortex. These striations are considered stress fractures and were not observed in a group of runners who were evaluated for shin-splints.

  4. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2016-03-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  5. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  6. Tibial cyst formation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Ibon López; Solsona, Sergi Sastre

    2014-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the right knee 2 years prior using a hamstring autograft, with tibial fixation achieved using a bioabsorbable interference screw. Evaluation of the region by radiography revealed widening of the tibial tunnel, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic formation in the tibial tunnel and the fragmentation of the bioabsorbable interference screw. PMID:25098192

  7. Injury to the anterior tibial system during percutaneous plating of a proximal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Gary, Joshua L; Sciadini, Marcus F

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures has grown in popularity in recent years. This article describes a patient with a Schatzker type VI proximal tibial fracture (AO/OTA type 41.C3) and previous compartment syndrome treated with definitive fixation 8 weeks after initial injury with a precontoured proximal tibial plate and a distal targeting device. Brisk bleeding occurred during percutaneous insertion of a cortical screw at the midshaft of the tibia. Surgical exploration revealed sidewall tearing of the anterior tibial artery and vein, which were clipped at the screw insertion site. After the bleeding was controlled, the patient had a strong palpable posterior tibial pulse with no palpable dorsalis pedis pulse, and the foot remained well perfused. Function of the deep peroneal nerve was normal postoperatively. Previous concerns regarding the percutaneous treatment of proximal tibial fractures have focused on the risks of damage to the superficial peroneal nerve from distal screws. Based on cadaveric studies, percutaneously and laterally based screw placement in the distal tibial metaphysis threatens injury to the anterior tibial system. However, with alterations to the normal anatomy caused by severe trauma, previously described safe zones may be changed and neurovascular structures may be exposed to risk in locations that were previously thought safe. PMID:22784915

  8. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  9. Evaluation of 3 Fixation Devices for Tibial-Sided Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Backup Fixation.

    PubMed

    Verioti, Christopher A; Sardelli, Matthew C; Nguyen, Tony

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a study to biomechanically evaluate 3 methods of tibial-sided fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: fully threaded interference screw only, interference screw backed with 4.75-mm SwiveLock anchor, and fully threaded bio-interference screw backed with 4.5-mm bicortical screw (all Arthrex). Thirty skeletally mature porcine tibiae were used. The first group was prepared by graft fixation within the tibial tunnel using only an interference screw. The second and third groups included an interference screw with 2 types of secondary fixation: 4.5-mm bicortical post and SwiveLock anchor. Mechanical testing consisted of 500 cycles between 50 and 250 N at 1 Hz, followed by a pull to failure conducted at 20 mm per minute. Ultimate load-to-failure testing demonstrated the largest mean (SD) load tolerated in the post/washer group, 1148 (186) N, versus the SwiveLock group, 1007 (176) N, and the screw-only group, 778 (139) N. There was no statistical difference between the 2 backup fixation groups. Use of a SwiveLock anchor as backup fixation at the tibial side in soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a safe, effective alternative to a bicortical post and provides statistically equivalent pullout strength with unlikely requirement for future hardware removal.

  10. Direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-01-19

    Anterior tibial loading is a major factor involved in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanism during ski impact landing. We sought to investigate the direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact of intact knee joints without quadriceps activation. Twelve porcine knee specimens were procured. Four specimens were used as non-impact control while the remaining eight were mounted onto a material-testing system at 70 degrees flexion and subjected to simulated landing impact, which was successively repeated with incremental actuator displacement. Four specimens from the impacted group underwent pre-impact MRI for tibial plateau angle measurements while the other four were subjected to histology and microCT for cartilage morphology and volume assessment. The tibial plateau angles ranged from 29.4 to 38.8 degrees . There was a moderate linear relationship (Y=0.16X; R(2)=0.64; p<0.001) between peak axial impact compressive load (Y) and peak anterior tibial load (X). The anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group sustained surface cartilage fraying, superficial clefts and tidemark disruption, compared to the control group. MicroCT scans displayed visible cartilage deformation for both anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group. Due to the tibial plateau angle, increased axial impact compressive load can directly elevate anterior tibial load and hence contribute to ACL failure during simulated landing impact. Axial impact compressive load resulted in shear cartilage damage along anterior-posterior tibial plateau regions, due to its contribution to anterior tibial loading. This mechanism plays an important role in elevating ACL stress and cartilage deformation during impact landing.

  11. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  12. Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, S; Oberg, B; Kvist, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different rehabilitation exercises with respect to dynamic anterior tibial translation and muscle activation 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Another aim was to compare the ACL-reconstructed knee with the ACL-injured and the uninjured knees for differences in anterior tibial translation and muscle activation during the exercises. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during seven rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients. Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared with those obtained before the ACL reconstruction (ACL-deficient and uninjured knee). After ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. The ACL reconstruction reduced the static and the dynamic tibial translation and the tibial translations measured in ACL-reconstructed knees were similar to those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a joint stiffening strategy that used more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibial translation. Although all exercises tested are suitable for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, to protect the graft from excessive strain, the straight leg raise and squat on one leg are preferable for quadriceps training in the early phase of rehabilitation.

  13. Anterior Tibial Translation in Collegiate Athletes with Normal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in anterior tibial translation (ATT) among sports, sex, and leg dominance in collegiate athletes with normal anterior cruciate ligament integrity. Design and Setting: Subjects from various athletic teams were measured for ATT in right and left knees. Subjects: Sixty subjects were measured for ATT with a KT-1000 knee arthrometer. Measurements: Statistical analyses were computed for each sex and included a 2 × 3 × 4 mixed-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) for anterior cruciate ligament displacement, right and left sides, and force and sport. A 2 × 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare means for sex and force. A 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare sex differences across 3 forces. Results: For males and females, no significant interactions were found among leg, force, and sport for mean ATT, for leg and sport or leg and force, or for translation values between dominant and nondominant legs. Males had a significant interaction for force and sport, and a significant difference was found for side of body, since the right side had less translation than the left side. Females had greater ATT than males at all forces. Conclusions: Sex differences exist for ATT, and differences in ATT exist among sports for both sexes. Differences between the right and left sides of the body should be expected when making comparisons of ligamentous laxity. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 5. PMID:16558565

  14. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the tibial-remnant preserving technique using a hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Min, Kyung-Dae; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2006-03-01

    We propose that the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is able to enhance the revascularization and cellular proliferation of the graft, to preserve proprioceptive function, and to be able to acquire anatomic placement of the graft without roof impingement. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that preserving the tibial remnant as much as possible as a source of reinnervation, if technically possible without causing impingement, would be of potential benefit to the patient. Our surgical technique was developed to maximize the preservation of the tibial remnant. The distally attached semitendinosus and gracilis tendons are harvested using the tendon stripper. After satisfactory placement of 2 guide pins convergently, a closed-end socket in the lateral femoral condyle is created using an adequately sized curved curette. For anatomic placement of the graft, the tibial tunnel should be positioned within the boundaries of the normal ACL tibial remnant. The reamer must be advanced very carefully to minimize injury to the residual remnant at the intra-articular margin of the tibial tunnel. Penetration should stop at the base of the stump. The folded grafts are then pulled intra-articularly through the tibial tunnel, the tibial remnant, and the femoral socket by pulling sutures under arthroscopic visualization. The ACL tibial remnant is compacted by the tendon passage. The graft is secured proximally by tying sutures in the lateral femoral condyle and distally at the tibia with double staples by a belt-buckle method. The advantages of our technique include maximal preservation of the tibial remnant, no roof impingement caused by intrasynovial anatomic placement of the graft, the simplicity of the procedure, the minimal need for hardware or special instruments, the economic benefit, and the potential prevention of tibial tunnel enlargement by preventing synovial fluid leakage. PMID:16517320

  15. Anatomical study of the human anterior cruciate ligament stump's tibial insertion footprint.

    PubMed

    Tállay, András; Lim, Mui-Hong; Bartlett, John

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define the topographical relationship of the anatomical bundles of the human anterior cruciate ligament's (ACL) stump over the tibial insertion site. Between January and April 2007, a total of 36 resected tibial plateaus were retrieved from patients who underwent total knee replacements. These samples had intact cruciate ligaments with no major osteophyte around the ACL tibial insertion footprint. The anatomical bundles of the ACL were identified and mapped, based on the topographical relationship over the tibial insertion footprint. Measurements of the dimensions of the ACL tibial footprint and tibial plateau were performed. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the tibia plateau was 78.7 +/- 6.5 and 46.4 +/- 5.0 mm, respectively. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the ACL tibial footprint was 10.3 +/- 1.9 and 19.5 +/- 2.6 mm, respectively. Out of the 36 freshly dissected ACL stumps, it was not possible to distinguish separate bundles in 14 (38.9%) cases. The average distance between the centers of the two bundles was 9.3 +/- 1.8 mm. The mean AP alignment of the tibial footprint was 89.6 degrees +/- 26.4 degrees , with a very wide range of 23 degrees -158 degrees . Of the 22 specimens with separate anatomical bundles, the alignment of the tibial footprint was AM-PL in six (27.3%), sagittal (85 degrees -95 degrees ) in five (22.7), AL-PM in nine (40.9%), and lateral-medial (L-M) in two (9.1%) cases. This study provides new information about the topographical anatomy of the ACL tibial insertion footprint. Based on gross anatomy, separate anatomical bundles of the ACL can be distinguished in 61.1% [22] of the specimens. The topographical alignment of the separate bundles is varied on a very wide range.

  16. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  17. Arthroscopic 4-Point Suture Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial Avulsion Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Agathangelidis, Filon; Ditsios, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2014-01-01

    Tibial eminence avulsion fractures are rare injuries occurring mainly in adolescents and young adults. When necessary, regardless of patient age, anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are mandatory for fracture healing and accurate restoration of normal knee biomechanics. Various arthroscopically assisted fixation methods with sutures, anchors, wires, or screws have been described but can be technically demanding, thus elongating operative times. The purpose of this article is to present a technical variation of arthroscopic suture fixation of anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures. Using thoracic drain needles over 2.4-mm anterior cruciate ligament tibial guidewires, we recommend the safe and easy creation of four 2.9-mm tibial tunnels at different angles and at specific points. This technique uses thoracic drain needles as suture passage cannulas and offers 4-point fixation stability, avoiding potential complications of bony bridge fracture and tunnel connection. PMID:25685674

  18. The Changed Route of Anterior Tibial Artery due to Healed Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Sagtas, Ergin; Comert, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Baloglu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    We would like to highlight unusual sequelae of healed distal third diaphyseal tibia fracture that was treated conservatively 36 years ago, in which we incidentally detected peripheral CT angiography. The anterior tibial artery was enveloped three-quarterly by the healing callus of the bone (distal tibia). PMID:27019760

  19. How to overcome severed sutures of the tibial bone peg in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yip, Daniel K H; Wong, Jimmy W K; Chien, Eric P

    2002-03-01

    We report a case of severed sutures of the tibial bone peg during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The graft retracted proximally in the bone tunnel. We describe a simple and aesthetically acceptable method to salvage this rare complication by use of a small arthrotomy through the defect in the remaining patellar tendon.

  20. [Compartment pressure of the anterior tibial area in jogging].

    PubMed

    Jerosch, J; Geske, B; Castro, W H; Hille, E

    1989-01-01

    31 healthy persons had to run on a treadmill under defined conditions at a constant speed of 8 km/h. Pressure in the anterior flexor-muscles compartment was measured regulary in time before, during and after running; the size of the compartment was documented by sonography. The measured pressure was attached to the respective compartment size. The runners were divided into three groups based on characteristic pressure-courses: the normal-type with average values below 50 mmHg, the indifference-type with a distinctly higher pressure than 50 mmHg and the risk-type with values more than 70 mmHg. A correlation between exercise-pressure and time of post-exercising decrease of pressure was found. While the normal type reached the starting pressure within 6 minutes the indifference and risk type didn't succeed in decreasing after this period of time. No change of compartmental size was measured while the pressure increased on exertion. PMID:2655333

  1. Type III tibial avulsion fracture with associated anterior cruciate ligament injury: Report of two cases in adults.

    PubMed

    Levy, H J; Fowble, V A

    2001-05-01

    Tibial spine avulsion fractures are more common in children than adults. Many reports have provided classification and treatment options, including fixation for displaced type III fractures. However, long-term follow-up on injury to the anterior cruciate ligament and knee joint stability in adults is not well documented. We present 2 cases of type III tibial avulsion fractures in adults with associated interstitial injury to the anterior cruciate ligament. Primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed in both patients.

  2. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  3. A Case of Nonunion Avulsion Fracture of the Anterior Tibial Eminence

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Avulsion fracture of the anterior tibial eminence is an uncommon injury. If bone union does not occur, knee extension will be limited by impingement of the avulsed fragment and knee instability will be induced by dysfunction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This report describes a 55-year-old woman who experienced an avulsion fracture of the right anterior tibial eminence during recreational skiing. Sixteen months later, she presented at our hospital with limitation of right knee extension. Plain radiography showed nonunion of the avulsion fracture region, and arthroscopy showed that the avulsed fragment impinged the femoral intercondylar notch during knee extension. The anterior region of the bony fragment was debrided arthroscopically until the knee could be extended completely. There was no subsequent instability, and the patient was able to climb a mountain 6 months after surgery. These findings indicate that arthroscopic debridement of an avulsed fragment for nonunion of an avulsion fracture of the anterior tibial eminence is a minimally invasive and effective treatment for middle-aged and elderly patients with a low level of sports activity. PMID:27119035

  4. Non-union of a midshaft anterior tibial stress fracture: a frequent complication.

    PubMed

    Mabit, C; Pécout, C

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of non-union of a midshaft anterior cortex tibial stress fracture and review the literature concerning this pathological entity. This is a relatively rare clinical form of tibial stress fracture which often results in delayed union, non-union or complete fracture. Initial management is as for a conventional stress fracture, associated in some cases, according to certain authors, with pulsing electromagnetic field physiotherapy. If after 4-6 months no sign of union is present, surgical management is indicated, in the form of excision of the fracture site with or without bone graft.

  5. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  6. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  7. Retrograde Proximal Anterior Tibial Artery Access for Treating Femoropopliteal Segment Occlusion: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Affonso, Breno Boueri; Golghetto Domingos, Fernanda Uchiyama; da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Bortolini, Edgar; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Some challenges have been detected when there are long and complex lesions of femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease, even with descriptions of the retrograde pedal approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the retrograde proximal anterior tibial artery access for treatment of femoropopliteal segment occlusion when antegrade recanalization failed (retrograde recanalization and rearranging the system into an antegrade position). Technical and clinical success was achieved in 100% of 4 cases, with an improvement of at least 2 Rutherford classes. Minor complication, small hematoma in an anterior compartment of the limb, occurred in 1 patient. No sign of compartmental syndrome was observed. PMID:26902943

  8. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  9. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  10. Endovascular treatment of anterior tibial artery pseudoaneurysm following locking compression plating of the tibia.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, P Boele; Ponsen, K J; Reekers, J A; Goslings, J C

    2007-04-01

    Less invasive surgery and interventional radiology are relatively new techniques. This case report describes a patient with a distal tibial fracture that was stabilized using minimally invasive osteosynthesis consisting of a precontoured metaphyseal Locking Compression Plate (LCP). Postoperative radiographs showed good alignment of the bone, and the initial postoperative course was uneventful. At the sixth-week follow-up visit after surgery, the patient presented with a pulsating and tender mass on the lower leg that was palpable subcutaneously. Arteriography showed a pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery. At the same procedure an endovascular stent was placed, thereby excluding the pseudoaneurysm from the main circulation while keeping the vessel lumen patent. At the time of the last visit, 6 months after the operation, the patient was fully weightbearing with normal function of the ankle but with a nonhealing fracture on the x-ray. The dorsalis pedis pulse was equally strong as on the right side. Endovascular treatment with a covered stent proved to be an effective treatment for the described posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery. This case illustrates a risk of less invasive fracture surgery and at the same time underlines the value of a multidisciplinary approach to complications in trauma surgery. PMID:17414557

  11. Results of bypasses to the anterior tibial artery through the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Calio, F G; Bertagni, A; Martinelli, V

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of anatomically tunneled grafts to the anterior tibial artery for distal revascularization in terms of patency and limb salvage rates as well as local morbidity, which can lengthen the postoperative hospital stay. Twenty-three patients received 24 bypasses to the anterior tibial artery, with grafts tunneled through the interosseous membrane. The mean age was 67 years; 10 patients were diabetic, 12 were smokers, 9 presented with significant coronary artery disease, and 2 with chronic renal insufficiency. The donor vessel was the common femoral artery in 17 cases, the superficial femoral artery in 4, and the infra-articular popliteal artery in 3. The graft material consisted in the reversed saphenous vein in 4 cases, the non-reversed devalvulated ex situ saphenous vein in 11, composite polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) + inversed saphenous vein in 6, and PTFE alone in 3 cases. No postoperative mortality was observed, nor was there postoperative graft occlusion or need for major amputation. The average postoperative length of stay in the hospital was 9.7 days. Two local surgical wound complications were observed, which did not necessitate a postoperative hospital stay exceeding 15 days. Cumulative primary patency and limb salvage rates at 3 years were 50% and 70%, respectively. Anatomic tunneling of grafts to the anterior tibial artery yields patency and limb salvage rates comparable to those reported in the literature for distal bypasses and, considered overall, an acceptably low local morbidity and short hospital stay. Definitive superiority over externally tunneled grafts, however, is not definitely demonstrated by this study and should be prospectively tested.

  12. Relationship between tibial acceleration and proximal anterior tibia shear force across increasing jump distance.

    PubMed

    Sell, Timothy C; Akins, Jonathan S; Opp, Alexis R; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-02-01

    Proximal anterior tibia shear force is a direct loading mechanism of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and is a contributor to ACL strain during injury. Measurement of this force during competition may provide insight into risk factors for ACL injury. Accelerometers may be capable of measuring tibial acceleration during competition. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acceleration measured by a tibia-mounted accelerometer and proximal anterior tibia shear force as measured through inverse dynamics and peak posterior ground reaction forces during two leg stop-jump tasks. Nineteen healthy male subjects performed stop-jump tasks across increasing jump distances. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine if a relationship exists between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force and peak posterior ground reaction force. An analysis of variance was performed to compare these variables across jump distance. Significant correlations were observed between accelerometer data and peak posterior ground reaction force, but none between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force. All variables except peak proximal anterior tibia shear force increased significantly as jump distance increased. Overall, results of this study provide initial, positive support for the use of accelerometers as a useful tool for future injury prevention research.

  13. Relationship between tibial acceleration and proximal anterior tibia shear force across increasing jump distance.

    PubMed

    Sell, Timothy C; Akins, Jonathan S; Opp, Alexis R; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-02-01

    Proximal anterior tibia shear force is a direct loading mechanism of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and is a contributor to ACL strain during injury. Measurement of this force during competition may provide insight into risk factors for ACL injury. Accelerometers may be capable of measuring tibial acceleration during competition. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acceleration measured by a tibia-mounted accelerometer and proximal anterior tibia shear force as measured through inverse dynamics and peak posterior ground reaction forces during two leg stop-jump tasks. Nineteen healthy male subjects performed stop-jump tasks across increasing jump distances. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine if a relationship exists between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force and peak posterior ground reaction force. An analysis of variance was performed to compare these variables across jump distance. Significant correlations were observed between accelerometer data and peak posterior ground reaction force, but none between accelerometer data and proximal anterior tibia shear force. All variables except peak proximal anterior tibia shear force increased significantly as jump distance increased. Overall, results of this study provide initial, positive support for the use of accelerometers as a useful tool for future injury prevention research. PMID:23878269

  14. Tibialis anterior muscle fatigue leads to changes in tibial axial acceleration after impact when ankle dorsiflexion angles are visually controlled.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2010-08-01

    Heel impact forces may lead to injury as they travel through the human musculoskeletal system. Previous work on the effect that localized muscle fatigue has on the tibial response (shank axial acceleration) to impact was limited because ankle angle was not controlled. The purpose of this study was to compare the tibial response when the tibialis anterior was fatigued and when not fatigued, while participants controlled dorsiflexion angles at impact using visual feedback. Twenty participants (10 male, 10 female; M+/-SD=21.8+/-2.9 years) were strapped supine to a human pendulum apparatus, and instrumented with a low mass accelerometer (affixed medial to the tibial tuberosity). Participant dorsiflexion angle range was recorded by an electro-goniometer, and divided into four angle ranges so tibial response variables (peak tibial acceleration, time to peak acceleration, acceleration slope) could be compared when fatigued and not fatigued. Peak tibial acceleration and acceleration slopes decreased, and time to peak acceleration increased following fatigue, when comparing values across the same dorsiflexion ranges. Dorsiflexion angle alone did not account for differences in tibial response during localized leg muscle fatigue; supporting prior work and suggesting that the muscle and ankle joint become less stiff when fatigued, thereby increasing the lower extremity attenuation capability to heel impacts.

  15. [Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms of the anterior tibial artery: a review of the literature and a clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Stio, F; Ortensi, A; Battisti, G; Felici, A; Marigliani, M; Gallinacci, E; De Vita, M; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Porcelli, C

    1993-02-01

    The authors after a review of the literature report a case of anterior tibial artery false aneurysm in a seventeen year old male, due to traumatic sprained ankle during a basketball match. Surgical techniques used in repairing the lesion as well as microsurgical technique for the direct suture of the artery, which allowed to resolve the problem, are discussed.

  16. Arthroscopic treatment for tibial "Peel off" tears in anterior cruciate ligament-case report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Han, Kye Young; Yu, In Sang; Koh, Kyoung Hwan

    2013-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was very common, and its reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic surgeries. A standard treatment option for ACL complete rupture in active young patients is debridement of remnant tissue and reconstruction with various types of tendon graft. However, "A tibial peel off tear" of ACL without bony avulsion can be treated using preservation of original ACL and trans-osseous pullout suture repair. The IKDC subjective score was 90, the objective score was A, and the Lysholm score was 95 at 24 months after surgery. KT-2000 arthrometer showed 2 mm side-to-side difference. Pivot shift test and Lachman test were negative, and there was no limitation in range of motion. Patient returned to full activities including sports and satisfied with the surgical results. In the postoperative MRI at 6 months after the surgery, the continuity of ACL was well maintained without any Cyclops lesion. We believe that trans-osseous pullout suture repair could be included as an alternative method in this "tibial peel off" type ACL injury instead of the usual removal of remnant tissue and reconstruction with a graft. PMID:23412240

  17. Operative treatment in case of a closed rupture of the anterior tibial tendon.

    PubMed

    Otte, Stephanie; Klinger, Hans-Michael; Lorenz, Frank; Haerer, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Closed rupture of the tibial anterior tendon is a rare clinical entity. Case reports in the literature reveal a total of only 49 cases up to the year 2000. According to these reports, the age group affected is 50 to 70 years old, and there are more men than women affected. Although the functional limitation is quite considerable, late diagnosis is common. An appropriate clinical examination, including an exact history taking, should lead to the right diagnosis. Ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful. 'Restitutio ad integrum' can only be achieved by operative treatment. If technically possible, reinsertion of the tendon directly into bone or direct tendon repair is preferred. After delayed diagnosis, a secondary reconstruction through tendon transfer or transplantation is often necessary. A 64-year-old woman presented with pain and swelling in the area of the ankle joint 5 months after falling. She showed insecurity in walking, and the heel-walk could not be demonstrated. The distal neurovascular function was intact. The area of the retinaculum showed a swelling, and the tendon was not palpable in comparison with the other forefoot. An intact tendon could not be seen by ultrasound, and MRI confirmed these findings. A complete rupture was noted during the operative revision. The proximal and the distal tendon stumps were found to be thickened and knotted, the proximal stump was also atrophic. An augmented tenoplasty was performed. Afterwards, the tendon was tense in the neutral position. The lower leg was put in a plaster cast for 6 weeks, followed by physiotherapy. Ten months after the operation, the tendon was palpable in the correct position, the dorsal extension was powerful, and the patient did not experience any difficulty. Rupture of the anterior tibial tendon is a rare clinical entity and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain in the area of the ankle joint. An early operative treatment is advantageous.

  18. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  19. Fluoroscopic Analysis of Tibial Translation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Knees With and Without Bracing During Forward Lunge

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Maryam; Farahmand, Farzam; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Golestanha, Seyed Ali; Rezaeian, Tahmineh; Shirvani Broujeni, Shahram; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Esfandiarpour, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite several studies with different methods, the effect of functional knee braces on knee joint kinematics is not clear. Direct visualization of joint components through medical imaging modalities may provide the clinicians with more useful information. Objectives: In this study, for the first time in the literature, video fluoroscopy was used to investigate the effect of knee bracing on the sagittal plane kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured patients. Patients and Methods: For twelve male unilateral ACL deficient subjects, the anterior tibial translation was measured during lunge exercise in non-braced and braced conditions. Fluoroscopic images were acquired from the subjects using a digital fluoroscopy system with a rate of 10 fps. The image of each frame was scaled using a calibration coin and analyzed in AutoCAD environment. The angle between the two lines, tangent to the posterior cortexes of the femoral and tibial shafts was measured as the flexion angle. For the fluoroscopic images associated with 0°, 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion angles, the relative anterior-posterior configuration of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by measuring the position of landmarks on the tibia and femur. Results: Results indicated that the overall anterior translations of the tibia during the eccentric (down) and concentric (up) phases of lunge exercise were 10.4 ± 1.7 mm and 9.0 ± 2.2 mm for non-braced, and 10.1 ± 3.4 mm and 7.4 ± 2.5 mm, for braced conditions, respectively. The difference of the tibial anterior-posterior translation behaviors of the braced and non-braced knees was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic imaging provides an effective tool to measure the dynamic behavior of the knee joint in the sagittal plane and within the limitations of this study, the pure mechanical stabilizing effect of functional knee bracing is not sufficient to control the anterior tibial translation of the ACL deficient

  20. Ultrasound measurement of the size of the anterior tibial muscle group: the effect of exercise and leg dominance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge of normal muscle characteristics is crucial in planning rehabilitation programmes for injured athletes. There is a high incidence of ankle and anterior tibial symptoms in football players, however little is known about the effect of limb dominance on the anterior tibial muscle group (ATMG). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of limb dominance and sports-specific activity on ATMG thickness in Gaelic footballers and non-football playing controls using ultrasound measurements, and to compare results from transverse and longitudinal scans. Methods Bilateral ultrasound scans were taken to assess the ATMG size in 10 Gaelic footballers and 10 sedentary controls (age range 18-25 yrs), using a previously published protocol. Both transverse and longitudinal images were taken. Muscle thickness measurements were carried out blind to group and side of dominance, using the Image-J programme. Results Muscle thickness on the dominant leg was significantly greater than the non-dominant leg in the footballers with a mean difference of 7.3%, while there was no significant dominance effect in the controls (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the measurements from transverse or longitudinal scans. Conclusions A significant dominance effect exists in ATMG size in this group of Gaelic footballers, likely attributable to the kicking action involved in the sport. This should be taken into account when rehabilitating footballers with anterior tibial pathology. Ultrasound is a reliable tool to measure ATMG thickness, and measurement may be taken in transverse or longitudinal section. PMID:21914209

  1. Modified Anchor Shaped Post Core Design for Primary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, R.; Baroudi, Kusai; Reddy, K. Bala Kasi; Praveen, B. H.; Kumar, V. Sumanth; Amit, S.

    2014-01-01

    Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention. PMID:25379294

  2. Immunohistochemical study of mechanoreceptors in the tibial remnant of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament in human knees.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ill; Min, Kyung Dae; Choi, Hyung Suk; Kwon, Sai Won; Chun, Dong Il; Yun, Eun Soo; Lee, Dong Wha; Jin, So Young; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2009-09-01

    This study was performed to identify the mechanoreceptors in the tibial remnants of ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) by immunohistochemical staining. Thirty-six specimens of tibial ACL remnants were obtained from patients with ACL ruptures during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. As control, two normal ACL specimens were taken from healthy knee amputated at thigh level due to trauma. The specimen was serially sectioned at 40 mum. In control group, the average number of sections per specimen was 132, and a total of 264 slices were available. In remnant group, the average number of sections per specimen was 90, and a total of 3,251 slices were available. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the neural element of mechanoreceptors. Histologic examinations were performed under a light microscope and interpreted by a pathologist. Nineteen (8 Ruffini, 11 Golgi) mechanoreceptors were identified in the two normal ACLs, which were evenly distributed at both tibial and femoral attachments. In the remnant group, mechanoreceptors were observed in 12 out of 36 cases (33%), and a total of 17 (6 Ruffini and 11 Golgi) mechanoreceptors observed. No significant differences in the harvest volume, number of sections, age, or time between injury to surgery was observed between the 12 mechanoreceptor-present and the 24 mechanoreceptor-absent ones. The presence of mechanoreceptor at the tibial remnants of torn ACLs was verified. The immunohistochemical staining methodology proved useful, but requires further refinement. Although the mechanoreceptors were detected relatively less frequently than expected, the authors consider that it does not negate the necessity of remnant-preserving ACL reconstruction.

  3. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  4. Effect of physiotherapy on the strength of tibial internal rotator muscles in males after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR)

    PubMed Central

    Czamara, Andrzej; Szuba, Łukasz; Krzemińska, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of physiotherapy on the strength of muscles responsible for tibial internal rotation (IR) in male patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) using autografts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles (STGR). Material/Methods Fifty-nine males were examined. The first group consisted of 19 patients subjected to 4-stage physiotherapy following ACLR. The second group consisted of 20 males without knee injuries. The third group consisted of 20 males who had not undergone systematic physiotherapy within the last 12 months following lower limb injuries. Moments of maximal strength (MMS), isometric torque (IT), and peak torque (PT) were measured under static and isokinetic conditions using the Humac Norm System. In the first group, IT measurements were performed during the 13th and 21st week of physiotherapy, while PT measurements were performed during the 16th and 21st weeks of physiotherapy following ACLR. In the control groups (II and III) the measurements were performed once. Results In the first group, the IT (13 weeks) and PT (16 weeks) values of internal tibial rotator muscles, obtained from the operated extremities were significantly lower than the values obtained from the uninvolved knees and the control group results. During the 21st week of physiotherapy, the results obtained for IT and PT in patients after ACLR were similar to the values obtained from the uninvolved knees and the results of the second group subjects. Conclusions The 21-week physiotherapy in ACLR patients favorably affected the PT values of tibial rotator muscles of the operated knees. In the third group, the IT values did not indicate a complete improvement after 12 months without systematic physiotherapy. PMID:21873950

  5. Strain-Blood Pressure Index for Evaluation of Early Changes in Elasticity of Anterior Tibial Artery in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chunpeng; Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Chao; Zhao, Yaping; Li, Xingwang

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and value of strain-blood pressure index (SBPI) to assess early changes in elasticity of anterior tibial artery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods Eighty-one randomly selected in-patients with T2DM were divided into 2 groups – a vascular complication negative group (n=42) and a vascular complication positive group (n=39). Forty healthy volunteers were enrolled in a control group. Ultrasonographic scans using Xstrain™ technique were conducted for every patient to obtain the maximum circumferential strain (CSmax) of anterior tibial artery; patient blood pressure was also measured for calculating strain-blood pressure index (SBPI=CSmax/[(local pulse pressure)/local diastolic blood pressure] ×100%. Afterwards, SBPIs of various groups were comparatively analyzed. Results Differences in SBPIs among the 3 groups were statistically significant (control group > negative group > positive group, P<0.05). Conclusions SBPI could be used as a new indicator for the evaluation on the anterior tibial arterial elasticity of T2DM patients and it was able to reflect the early elasticity changes in anterior tibial arteries in T2DM patients with atherosclerosis. PMID:25418129

  6. Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Sturnick, Daniel R; Van Gorder, Robert; Vacek, Pamela M; DeSarno, Michael J; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Johnson, Robert J; Shultz, Sandra J; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Tibial plateau subchondral bone geometry has been associated with the risk of sustaining a non-contact ACL injury; however, little is known regarding the influence of the meniscus and articular cartilage interface geometry on risk. We hypothesized that geometries of the tibial plateau articular cartilage surface and meniscus were individually associated with the risk of non-contact ACL injury. In addition, we hypothesized that the associations were independent of the underlying subchondral bone geometry. MRI scans were acquired on 88 subjects that suffered non-contact ACL injuries (27 males, 61 females) and 88 matched control subjects that were selected from the injured subject's teammates and were thus matched on sex, sport, level of play, and exposure to risk of injury. Multivariate analysis of the female data revealed that increased posterior-inferior directed slope of the middle articular cartilage region and decreased height of the posterior horn of the meniscus in the lateral compartment were associated with increased risk of sustaining a first time, non-contact ACL injury, independent of each other and of the slope of the tibial plateau subchondral bone. No measures were independently related to risk of non-contact ACL injury among males.

  7. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  8. Postoperative evaluation of tibial footprint and tunnels characteristics after anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomic aimers.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Amit; Christel, Pascal; Anne, Francois; Appleby, David; Basdekis, Georges

    2010-11-01

    Following anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring tendon autografts, 38 consecutive patients were evaluated with high-speed three-dimensional computed tomography. Scans were performed within 3 days following surgery. The length and width of the reconstructed ACL footprint were measured on axial images. Then, 3D images were converted into 2D with radiologic density for measurement purposes. Tunnel orientation was measured on AP and lateral views. In the sagittal plane, the center of the anteromedial (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) tibial attachment positions was calculated as the ratio between the geometric insertion sites with respect to the sagittal diameter of the tibia. In addition, the length from the anterior tibial plateau to the retro-eminence ridge was measured; the relationship of this line with the centers of the AM and PL tunnels was then measured. The AP length of the reconstructed footprint was 17.1 mm ± 1.9 mm and the width 7.3 mm ± 1.2 m. The distance from retro-eminence ridge to center of AM tunnel was 18.8 mm ± 2.8 mm, and the distance from RER to center of PL tunnel was 8.7 mm ± 2.6 mm. The distance between tunnels center was 10.1 mm ± 1.7 mm. There were no significant differences between the intra- and inter-observer measurements. The bone bridge thickness was 2.1 mm ± 0.8 mm. In the sagittal plane, the centers of the tunnel apertures were located at 35.7% ± 6.7% and 53.7% ± 6.8% of the tibia diameter for the AMB and PLB, respectively. The surface areas of the tunnel apertures were 46.3 mm(2) ± 4.4 mm(2) and 36.3 mm(2) ± 4.0 mm(2) for the AM and PL tunnels, respectively. The total surface area occupied by both tunnels was 82.6 mm(2) ± 7.0 mm(2). In the coronal plane, tunnel orientation showed the AM tunnel was more vertical than the PL tunnel with a 10° divergence (14.8° vs. 24.1°). In the sagittal plane, both tunnels were almost parallel (29.9° and 25.4° for the AM and PL

  9. A security evaluation of the Rigid-fix crosses pin system used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in tibial fixation site

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huaqiang; Wang, Jian; Fu, Yangpan; Dong, Huixiang; Wang, Jianxiong; Tang, Cong; Huang, Changming; Shi, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the safeness and feasibility that Rigid-fix cross pin system was used for hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the tibial fixation site. In this study, eleven adult conservative cadaver knees were performed using the Rigid-fix Cross Pin device in the tibial fixation site for modeling the ACL reconstruction. The guide rod top was put through the tibial tunnel at the three horizontal positions: equal pace to articular facet (group A), the plane 5 mm below articular facet (group B), and the plane 10 mm below articular facet (group C). We gave four rotation positions to the cross-pin guide: 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° slope, referring to the parallel line of the posterior border of tibial plateau. We recorded the iatrogenic damages incidence, in the four different slope angle in the three groups, and then compare the incidence using Chi-Square test. Our results suggested that the incidence of chondral injury of tibial plateau in group B and group C was significantly lower compared to group A (χ 2 A-B = 27.077, χ 2 A-C 45.517, P = 0.000); However, there was no significant difference for the incidence penetrating the medial condyle of tibial plateau among the three groups (χ 2 = 5.733, P = 0.057); The highest incidence of injuring ligamentum transversum is in group A with 72.7%, especially at the 60° slope angle. In summary, our study suggested that in order to achieve the satisfactory clinical effect for the Rigid-fix system used in the tibia end fixation of ACL reconstruction surgery, the guide rod top should be put at the 5 mm below articular facet with a slope that parallel to the tibial medial plane at 30°-60° slope angle. PMID:25550991

  10. Estimation of Ligament Loading and Anterior Tibial Translation in Healthy and ACL-Deficient Knees During Gait and the Influence of Increasing Tibial Slope Using EMG-Driven Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; MacLeod, Toran D.; Manal, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a biomechanical model to estimate anterior tibial translation (ATT), anterior shear forces, and ligament loading in the healthy and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee joint during gait. This model used electromyography (EMG), joint position, and force plate data as inputs to calculate ligament loading during stance phase. First, an EMG-driven model was used to calculate forces for the major muscles crossing the knee joint. The calculated muscle forces were used as inputs to a knee model that incorporated a knee–ligament model in order to solve for ATT and ligament forces. The model took advantage of using EMGs as inputs, and could account for the abnormal muscle activation patterns of ACL-deficient gait. We validated our model by comparing the calculated results with previous in vitro, in vivo, and numerical studies of healthy and ACL-deficient knees, and this gave us confidence on the accuracy of our model calculations. Our model predicted that ATT increased throughout stance phase for the ACL-deficient knee compared with the healthy knee. The medial collateral ligament functioned as the main passive restraint to anterior shear force in the ACL-deficient knee. Although strong co-contraction of knee flexors was found to help restrain ATT in the ACL-deficient knee, it did not counteract the effect of ACL rupture. Posterior inclination angle of the tibial plateau was found to be a crucial parameter in determining knee mechanics, and increasing the tibial slope inclination in our model would increase the resulting ATT and ligament forces in both healthy and ACL-deficient knees. PMID:20683675

  11. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Post-Traumatic Proximal Tibial Bone Defect: Three Cases Report

    PubMed Central

    Tigani, D; Dallari, D; Coppola, C; Ben Ayad, R; Sabbioni, G; Fosco, M

    2011-01-01

    Bone stock deficiency in primary as well as in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) represents a difficult problem to surgeon with regard to maintaining proper alignment of the implant components and in establishing a stable bone-implant interface. Different surgical procedures are available in these situations, for instances the use of bone cement, prosthetic augments, custom implant, and wire mesh with morsellized bone grafting and structural bone allograft. Structural allograft offers a numerous advantages as easy remodeling and felling cavitary or segmental defects, excellent biocompatibility, bone stock restoration and potential for ligamentous reattachment. In this article we report a short term result of three cases affected by severe segmental medial post/traumatic tibial plateau defect in arthritic knee, for which massive structural allograft reconstruction and primary total knee replacement were carried. The heights of the bone defect were between 27-33 mm and with moderate medio-lateral knee instability. Pre-operative AKS score in three cases was 30, 34 and 51 points consecutively and improved at the last follow-up to 83, 78 and 85 consecutively. No acute or chronic complication was observed. Last radiological exam referred no signs of prosthetic loosening, no secondary resorption of bone graft and well integrated graft to host bone. These results achieved in our similar three cases have confirmed that the structural bone allograft is a successful biological material to restore hemi-condylar segmental tibial bone defect when total knee replacement is indicated. PMID:21584202

  12. Editorial Commentary: Tibial Tubercle-Trochlear Groove Distance as an Independent Risk Factor for Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Is Possible but Remains Uncertain.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The MRI tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance is statistically significantly higher in adolescent and young adults with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears compared with those without tears. The authors use lateral thinking to assess this marker for extensor mechanism alignment as a potential risk factor for ACL tear. Yet the approximate 2 mm increase seen in those with ACL tears portends unproven clinical significance.

  13. Prevalence and influence of tibial tunnel widening after isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patella-bone-tendon-bone-graft: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Struewer, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Schwarting, Tim; Buecking, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate incidence, degree and impact of tibial tunnel widening (TW) on patient-reported long-term clinical outcome, knee joint stability and prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) after isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. On average, 13.5 years after ACL reconstruction via patella-bone-tendon-bone autograft, 73 patients have been re-evaluated. Inclusion criteria consisted of an isolated anterior cruciate ligament rupture and reconstruction, a minimum of 10-year follow-up and no previous anterior cruciate ligament repair or associated intra-articular lesions. Clinical evaluation was performed via the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and the Tegner and Lysholm scores. Instrumental anterior laxity testing was carried out with the KT-1000™ arthrometer. The degree of degenerative changes and the prevalence of osteoarthritis were assessed with the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Tibial tunnel enlargement was radiographically evaluated on both antero-posterior and lateral views under establishment of 4 degrees of tibial tunnel widening by measuring the actual tunnel diameters in mm on the sclerotic margins of the inserted tunnels on 3 different points (T1–T3). Afterwards, a conversion of the absolute values in mm into a 4 staged ratio, based on the comparison to the results of the initial drill-width, should provide a better quantification and statistical analysis. Evaluation was performed postoperatively as well as on 2 year follow-up and 13 years after ACL reconstruction. Minimum follow-up was 10 years. 75% of patients were graded A or B according to IKDC score. The mean Lysholm score was 90.2±4.8 (25–100). Radiological assessment on long-term follow-up showed in 45% a grade I, in 24% a grade II, in 17% a grade III and in additional 12% a grade IV enlargement of the tibial tunnel. No evident progression of TW was found in comparison to the 2 year results. Radiological evaluation revealed

  14. Habituation behavior of the medium-latency reflex over the anterior tibial muscle after electrical stimulation of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Alaid, S; Hanke, D; Kornhuber, M

    2014-11-01

    Over human leg muscles, three motor responses (MR) can commonly be elicited, namely short-latency reflex (SLR), medium-latency reflex (MLR), and long-latency reflex (LLR). The MLR is less well understood than SLR and LLR. As the response to subsequent stimuli may be used to characterize central influences of an MR, we were interested, whether the MLR differs from SLR and LLR with respect to its habituation and facilitation behavior. MR were examined over the anterior tibial (TA) muscle at different contraction levels after electrical single or train stimuli (time intervals of 3 ms) over the ipsilateral sural nerve. Furthermore, MR were selectively averaged after each of four subsequent stimuli (1Hz, 0.4 Hz, trains-of-3). After single stimuli, the peak latency values were 46.2±2.3 ms, 88.0±5.8 ms (MLR), and 131.7±22.2 ms (LLR). All three MR gained similarly strong and significantly in amplitude when up to 10 kg of weight was loaded compared with no weight load. After train stimuli, the LLR but not SLR and MLR gained significantly in amplitude as compared with single stimuli. Different to SLR and LLR, the MLR showed significant habituation behavior at a stimulus repetition rate of 1Hz but not of 0.4 Hz. Thus, inhibitory interneurons seem to be involved in the MLR pathway.

  15. Relationship between Mucoid Degeneration of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Tibial Slope in Patients with Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Hye-Yong; Jung, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to analyze the relationship between posterior tibial slope (PTS) and mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in patients with total knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods Four hundred and twenty-four patients (24 males and 400 females; 636 knees) who received total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis were included. Their mean age was 68.9 years (range, 48 to 88 years). The patients were classified into three groups according to the status of ACL; normal ACL group (group I), mucoid degeneration of ACL group (group II) and ruptured or absent ACL group (group III). Plain lateral radiographs were used to measure the PTS and the values were compared among groups. Results There were no significant differences with regard to gender, age and left-to-right side ratio among groups (p>0.05). The mean PTS was 9.9° (range, 0.6° to 20.1°) in group I (161 knees), 10.8° (range, 0.2° to 21.8°) in group II (342 knees) and 12.3° (range, 2° to 22.2°) in group III (133 knees), which showed significant differences (p<0.001). Conclusions The patients with mucoid degeneration of the ACL and those with ruptured or absent ACL had greater PTS than those with normal ACL. These findings suggest that an increased PTS may be one of the causative factors for mucoid degeneration of the ACL. PMID:26955611

  16. Estradiol effect on anterior crural muscles-tibial bone relationship and susceptibility to injury.

    PubMed

    Warren, G L; Lowe, D A; Inman, C L; Orr, O M; Hogan, H A; Bloomfield, S A; Armstrong, R B

    1996-05-01

    The study's objective was to determine whether estradiol (E2) deficiency alters the functional relationship of muscle to bone and causes a differential increase in injury susceptibility. Ovariectomized 6-wk-old mice were administered E2 (40 micrograms. day-1. kg-1; n = 8) or the oil vehicle (n = 8) for 21 days. The anterior crural muscles of the left hindlimb were then stimulated to produce 150 maximal in vivo eccentric contractions. In vitro functional measurements were then made on the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and tibia from both the exercised and unexercised legs. The maximal isometric torque produced by the anterior crural muscles before the eccentric contraction protocol and the unexercised EDL maximal isometric tetanic force (P(0)) were higher in E2-treated mice by 18 and 14%, respectively (P < or = 0.03). Both ultimate load and stiffness for the unexercised tibia were higher by 16% in E2-treated mice (P < or = 0.03). The muscle-to-bone relationship of these measurements was unaffected by E2 status (P > or = 0.59). No evidence for increased injury susceptibility was found in either tissue from E2-deficient mice. In fact, the decrement in P(0) was only 36.9 +/- 3.8% in exercised EDL muscles from E2-deficient mice compared with 50.6 +/- 4.2% in exercised muscles from E2-treated mice (P = 0.03). Tibia stiffness was 3.9% higher in bones from exercised legs than in bones from unexercised legs (72.64 +/- 2.77 vs. 69.95 +/- 2.66 N/mm; P = 0.05) with ultimate load showing a similar trend (P = 0.07); no effect of E2 status was observed on these differences (P > or = 0.53). In conclusion, the functional relationship of bone to muscle and the susceptibility to injury in bone are not altered by the presence of E2 in ovariectomized mice; however, E2 does increase injury susceptibility in the EDL muscle. PMID:8727552

  17. Post-doffing residual limb fluid volume change in people with trans-tibial amputation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan E; Harrison, Daniel S; Cagle, John C; Myers, Timothy R; Ciol, Marcia A; Allyn, Katheryn J

    2014-01-01

    Background Residual limb volume may change after doffing, affecting the limb shape measured and used as a starting point for socket design. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare residual limb fluid volume changes after doffing for different test configurations. Study Design The study was a repeated measures experimental design with three conditions (Sit, Liner, and Walk). Methods Residual limb fluid volume on 30 people with trans-tibial amputation was measured using bioimpedance analysis. Three tests were conducted – Sit: sit for 10 minutes, remove the prosthesis, socks and liner, sit for 10 minutes; Liner: sit for 10 minutes, remove the prosthesis and socks but not the liner, sit for 10 minutes; Walk: conduct sit, stand and walk activities for 30 minutes, remove the prosthesis, socks and liner, sit for 10 minutes. Results The percentage fluid volume increase after doffing was significantly higher for Walk (2.8%) than for Sit (1.8%) (p = 0.03). The time to achieve a maximum or stable fluid volume was shorter for Liner (4.3 min) than for Sit (6.6 min) (p = 0.03). Conclusions Activity before doffing intensified the post-doffing limb fluid volume increase. Maintaining a liner after doffing caused limb fluid volume to stabilize faster than removing the liner. PMID:22588848

  18. Effects of Anterior-Posterior Constraint on Injury Patterns in the Human Knee During Tibial-Femoral Joint Loading from Axial Forces through the Tibia.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, V M; Sevensma, E T; Kitagawa, M; Haut, R C

    2001-11-01

    According to the National Accident Sampling System (NASS), 10% of all automobile accident injuries involve the knee. These injuries involve bone fracture and/or "soft tissue" injury. Previous investigators have determined the tibial-femoral (TF) joint failure load for an experimentally constrained human knee at 90 degrees flexion. In these experiments bone fractures have been documented. During TF joint compression, however, anterior motion of the tibia has been noted by others. It was therefore the objectives of this study to document effects of flexion angle and anterior-posterior joint constraint on the nature and severity of knee injury during TF compression loading via axial loads in the tibia. The effect of flexion angle was examined using 10 unconstrained human knees from 5 cadavers aged 73.2+/-9.4 years. The tibial-femoral joint was loaded in compression as a result of axial loading along the tibia using a servo-hydraulic testing machine until gross failure with the knee flexed 60 degrees or 120 degrees . Pressure sensitive film measured the distribution of internal TF joint loads. Both 60 degrees and 120 degrees flexed preparations failed by rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) at 4.6+/-1.2 kN, and the internal joint loads were significantly higher (2.6+/-1.5 kN) on the medial versus the lateral (0.4+/-0.5 kN) aspect of the tibial plateau. The effect of anterior-posterior (AP) constraint of the femur along the longitudinal axis of the femur was investigated in a second series of tests using the same TF joint loading protocol on 6 pairs of human joints (74.3+/-10.5 years) flexed at 90 degrees . The primary mode of failure for the AP constrained joints was fracture of bone via the femoral condyle at a maximum load of 9.2+/-2.6 kN. The mode of failure for unconstrained joints was primarily due to rupture of the ACL at a maximum load of 5.8+/-2.9 kN. Again, the pressure film indicated an unequal internal TF load distribution for the unconstrained

  19. Geometric profile of the tibial plateau cartilage surface is associated with the risk of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Beynnon, Bruce D; Vacek, Pamela M; Sturnick, Daniel R; Holterman, Leigh Ann; Gardner-Morse, Mack; Tourville, Timothy W; Smith, Helen C; Slauterbeck, James R; Johnson, Robert J; Shultz, Sandra J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if geometry of the articular surfaces of the tibial plateau is associated with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This was a longitudinal cohort study with a nested case-control analysis. Seventy-eight subjects who suffered a non-contact ACL tear and a corresponding number of controls matched by age, sex, and sport underwent 3 T MRI of both knees. Surface geometry of the tibial articular cartilage was characterized with polynomial equations and comparisons were made between knees on the same person and between ACL-injured and control subjects. There was no difference in surface geometry between the knees of the control subjects. In contrast, there were significant differences in the surface geometry between the injured and normal knees of the ACL-injured subjects, suggesting that the ACL injury changed the cartilage surface profile. Therefore, comparisons were made between the uninjured knees of the ACL-injured subjects and the corresponding knees of their matched controls and this revealed significant differences in the surface geometry for the medial (p < 0.006) and lateral (p < 0.001) compartments. ACL-injured subjects tended to demonstrate a posterior-inferior directed orientation of the articular surface relative to the long axis of the tibia, while the control subjects were more likely to show a posterior-superior directed orientation.

  20. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Compartment syndrome complicating tibial tubercle avulsion.

    PubMed

    Pape, J M; Goulet, J A; Hensinger, R N

    1993-10-01

    Avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon physeal injury. Complications from this fracture are infrequent. Adolescent boys developed compartment syndrome after tibial tubercle avulsion. Injury to the soft tissue surrounding the tibial tubercle avulsion may be more extensive than is usually appreciated. The anatomy of the proximal tibia and the tibial tubercle with nearby branches of the anterior tibial recurrent artery suggest a predisposing factor for the development of compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome should be added to the list of possible complications of tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

  2. Extracellular matrix-blood composite injection reduces post-traumatic osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Proffen, Benedikt L; Sieker, Jakob T; Murray, Martha M; Akelman, Matthew R; Chin, Kaitlyn E; Perrone, Gabriel S; Patel, Tarpit K; Fleming, Braden C

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if an injection of a novel extracellular matrix scaffold and blood composite (EMBC) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury would have a mitigating effect on post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) development in rat knees. Lewis rats underwent unilateral ACL transection and were divided into three groups as follows: (1) no further treatment (ACLT; n = 10); (2) an intra-articular injection of EMBC on day 0 (INJ0; n = 11); and (3) an intra-articular injection of EMBC on day 14 (INJ14; n = 11). Ten additional animals received capsulotomy only (n = 10, SHAM group). The OARSI histology scoring of the tibial cartilage and micro-CT of the tibial epiphysis were performed after 35 days. The ratio of intact/treated hind limb forces during gait was determined using a variable resistor walkway. The OARSI cartilage degradation sum score and total degeneration width were significantly greater in the ACLT group when compared to the INJ0 (p = 0.031, and p = 0.005) and INJ14 (p = 0.022 and p = 0.04) group. Weight bearing on the operated limb only decreased significantly in the ACLT group (p = 0.048). In the rat ACL transection model, early or delayed injection of EMBC ameliorated the significant decrease in weight bearing and cartilage degradation seen in knees subjected to ACL transection without injection. The results indicate that the injection of EMBC may slow the process of PTOA following ACL injury and may provide a promising treatment for PTOA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:995-1003, 2016. PMID:26629963

  3. Modified intracanal post for severely mutilated primary anterior teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rallan, Mandeep; Rallan, Neelakshi Singh; Navit, Pragati; Malhotra, Garima

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood caries leads to early damage, discolouration and gross destruction of the maxillary anterior teeth. This leads to difficulty in speech, decreased masticatory efficiency, development of abnormal tongue thrust and subsequent malocclusion, psychological problems and problem with self-esteem, if aesthetics are compromised. Thus, restoration of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth is often considered as a special challenge, especially in an emotionally immature child. This case documents the restoration of severely mutilated incisors in a patient with early childhood caries. PMID:23605834

  4. Short-term effects of thermotherapy for spasticity on tibial nerve F-waves in post-stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Kawahira, Kazumi; Etoh, Seiji; Ikeda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2006-03-01

    Thermotherapy is generally considered appropriate for post-stroke patients with spasticity, yet its acute antispastic effects have not been comprehensively investigated. F-wave parameters have been used to demonstrate changes in motor neuron excitability in spasticity and pharmacological antispastic therapy. The present study aimed to confirm the efficacy of thermotherapy for spasticity by evaluating alterations in F-wave parameters in ten male post-stroke patients with spastic hemiparesis (mean age: 49.0±15.0 years) and ten healthy male controls (mean age: 48.7±4.4 years). The subjects were immersed in water at 41°C for 10 min. Recordings were made over the abductor hallucis muscle, and antidromic stimulation was performed on the tibial nerve at the ankle. Twenty F-waves were recorded before, immediately after, and 30 min following thermotherapy for each subject. F-wave amplitude and F-wave/M-response ratio were determined. Changes in body temperature and surface-skin temperature were monitored simultaneously. The mean and maximum values of both F-wave parameters were higher on the affected side before thermotherapy. In the post-stroke patients, the mean and maximum values of both parameters were significantly reduced after thermotherapy ( P<0.01). Hence, the antispastic effects of thermotherapy were indicated by decreased F-wave parameters. Body temperature was significantly increased both immediately after and 30 min after thermotherapy in all subjects. This appeared to play an important role in decreased spasticity. Surface-skin temperature increased immediately after thermotherapy in both groups and returned to baseline 30 min later. These findings demonstrate that thermotherapy is an effective nonpharmacological antispastic treatment that might facilitate stroke rehabilitation.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of tibial spine malunion with resorbable screws.

    PubMed

    Estes, A Reed; Oladeji, Lasun O

    2015-05-01

    Anterior tibial spine fractures are rare and were thought to occur mainly in children; however, recent literature indicates that the incidence in adults is much greater than previously thought. Because the tibial spine is an attachment point for the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), an avulsion may produce ACL laxity, predisposing to further issues. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a tibial spine fracture that failed conservative management. He developed a malunion with impingement anteriorly of the tibial spine on the notch and residual instability of the ACL. In this report, we present a novel approach for arthroscopic reduction of a tibial spine fracture using 8 resorbable poly-L-lactic/polyglycolic acid nails. PMID:25950547

  6. Relative movements between Kinemax Plus tibial inserts and the tibial base-plates.

    PubMed

    Ash, H E; Scholes, S C; Parkin, R; Unsworth, A

    2003-01-01

    Tests were performed on six large Kinemax Plus knee bearings (snap-fit design) to evaluate the amount of movement between 10- and 15-mm-thick tibial inserts and the tibial base plates. The knee bearings were tested up to 1 x 10(6) cycles on the Durham six-station knee wear simulator which subjected the bearings to similar motion and loading profiles that would be experienced by the natural knee during walking. Although passive internal/external (I/E) rotation was allowed, no active I/E rotation was applied. The movement of the tibial inserts was measured with dial gauges (accuracy +/-0.01 mm) before and after the bearings were tested on the simulator, when unloaded, and throughout the tests while the bearings were being dynamically loaded in the simulator. Movement occurred between the tibial insert and the tibial base plate after initial assembly due to the snap-fit mechanism used to locate the tibial insert within the tibial base plate. However this decreased appreciably when the bearings were loaded in the simulator. The amount of movement did not change with time when the bearings were continuously loaded in the simulator. However, after each test the amount of movement of the tibial inserts, when unloaded, was only 65 per cent (anterior-posterior) and 46 per cent (medial-lateral) of the values before the test. This was thought to be due to creep of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts. The movement between the tibial insert and tibial base plate in situ is likely to be much less than that observed by a surgeon at the time of assembly due to loading of the knee bearing in the body. However, the amount of movement when the tibial inserts are loaded may still be great enough to produce a second interface where wear of the tibial insert may take place. PMID:12666776

  7. Polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin used as a short post in severely decayed primary anterior teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen; Tuloglu, Nuray

    2009-05-01

    The case report presented here is of a 4-year-old girl with severely decayed maxillary anterior teeth. After root canal treatment, the primary maxillary central and lateral incisors were reinforced using polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin short posts and restored using celluloid strip crowns. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring severely decayed primary anterior teeth that reestablishes function, shape, and esthetics. PMID:19272811

  8. Rupture traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une fracture fermée de la cheville: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Karabila, Mohamed Amine; Azouz, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Younes; Hmouri, Ismail; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Bardouni, Ahmed; Lahlou, Abdou; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une rupture post-traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une fracture bimalléolaire de la cheville. Le diagnostic a été posé lors de l'intervention chirurgicale. La réparation du tendon, non dégénératif, a été réalisée en même temps que l'ostéosynthèse. Bien que rare, cette possibilité de lésion tendineuse lors des fractures de la cheville ne doit pas êtreoubliée. Des douleurs résiduelles, un déficit de l'inversion active du pied, une modification de l'arche médiane du pied et à terme une évolution vers un pied plat valgus doivent faire évoquer rétrospectivement le diagnostic. PMID:27022431

  9. Superficial Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty (SALK) for Trauma-induced Post Refractive Surgery Corneal Opacity

    PubMed Central

    Ganger, Anita; Tandon, Radhika; Vanathi, M.; Sagar, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of post laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), nebulomacular corneal opacity following a trauma induced flap dehiscence and was managed with superficial anterior lamellar keratoplasty (SALK). Case Report: A 32-year-old female underwent LASIK 2.5 years back, with a postoperative unaided visual acuity (VA) of 6/6 in both eyes. She was involved in a road traffic accident and sustained blunt trauma to the right eye 5 months before. At the time of presentation, the VA was 1/60 in the right eye. Slit lamp examination revealed flap dehiscence, stromal scar and descemet folds in that eye. There was a small macular scar in the parafoveal area due to a resolved Berlin's edema. SALK was performed in the affected eye. Unaided VA of 6/36 was noted on post- operative day 1. After 4 weeks of SALK surgery, best corrected VA was 6/24. Conclusion: This case highlights that flap adhesions are not very strong even years after LASIK and SALK may be an effective treatment option for post refractive surgery corneal opacities. PMID:27621794

  10. Superficial Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty (SALK) for Trauma-induced Post Refractive Surgery Corneal Opacity

    PubMed Central

    Ganger, Anita; Tandon, Radhika; Vanathi, M.; Sagar, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of post laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), nebulomacular corneal opacity following a trauma induced flap dehiscence and was managed with superficial anterior lamellar keratoplasty (SALK). Case Report: A 32-year-old female underwent LASIK 2.5 years back, with a postoperative unaided visual acuity (VA) of 6/6 in both eyes. She was involved in a road traffic accident and sustained blunt trauma to the right eye 5 months before. At the time of presentation, the VA was 1/60 in the right eye. Slit lamp examination revealed flap dehiscence, stromal scar and descemet folds in that eye. There was a small macular scar in the parafoveal area due to a resolved Berlin's edema. SALK was performed in the affected eye. Unaided VA of 6/36 was noted on post- operative day 1. After 4 weeks of SALK surgery, best corrected VA was 6/24. Conclusion: This case highlights that flap adhesions are not very strong even years after LASIK and SALK may be an effective treatment option for post refractive surgery corneal opacities.

  11. A post-discharge functional outcome measure for lower limb amputees: test-retest reliability with trans-tibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, B G; Sockalingam, S; Treweek, S P; Condie, M E

    2002-08-01

    There are approximately 700 lower limb amputations performed throughout Scotland each year. A national system of survey and analysis conducted by the Scottish Physiotherapy Amputee Research Group (SPARG) provides information on these patients up until discharge from hospital. However, there has been no method of collecting long-term functional and prosthetic use information following discharge. The Functional Measure for Amputees (FMA) has, therefore, been developed from the Prosthetic Profile of the Amputee (PPA) questionnaire, designed by Gauthier-Gagnon and colleagues in Canada (Grisé et al, 1993). Modifications to the PPA were carried out to make it more appropriate for the Scottish amputee population; these changes were approved by the original authors. The test-retest reliability of the 14-question FMA was assessed using a repeat postal questionnaire study. One hundred and thirty-three (133) from a possible 390 trans-tibial amputees were returned. Comparing sociodemographic and clinical variables between consenters and non-consenters showed no evidence to support sample bias. Continuous data items on the FMA analysed using an intraclass correlation coefficient showed ICC values of 0.74, 0.85, 0.96 and 0.64. Categorical data items analysed using percentage agreements showed reliability of over 70% for seven items, between 40% and 70% for three items and between 20% and 40% for the remaining three items. The FMA questionnaire was found to be reliable on the majority of its questions and moderately reliable on the remaining questions during successive follow-up postal administrations. PMID:12227445

  12. Post-operative imaging of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques across the spectrum of skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M; Meyers, Arthur B; Wall, Eric J

    2016-04-01

    Due to an increased frequency of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in young patients and improved outcomes in athletic performance following ACL reconstruction, surgery is increasingly being performed across the spectrum of skeletal maturity. We present a review of the range of reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally immature patients (physeal sparing techniques, which may involve epiphyseal tunnels or the utilization of an iliotibial band autograft), those performed in patients nearing skeletal maturity (transphyseal techniques), and the more conventional ACL reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally mature adolescents. It is important that radiologists be aware of the range of techniques being performed throughout the spectrum of skeletal maturity in order to accurately characterize the expected post-operative appearance as well as to identify complications, including those unique to this younger population. PMID:26646675

  13. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts

    PubMed Central

    Ranjkesh, Bahram; Lovschall, Henrik; Erfanparast, Leila; Jafarabadi, Mohammad A; Oskouei, Sina Ghertasi; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the survival of composite resin restorations retained by glass fiber posts or reversed-orientated (upside-down) metal posts in severely decayed primary anterior teeth after 6, 12, and 18 months. Materials and methods: A total of forty-four 3- to 5-year-old children with bilateral severely decayed primary maxillary canines were included. Patients were treated under general anesthesia. After pulpectomy, an intracanal post was seated in the primary maxillary canine on each side: either a glass fiber post or a metallic post in reversed orientation and teeth restored with light-cured composite. Survival rate of each technique was evaluated at predetermined follow-ups and data were analyzed with McNemar’s test (α = 0.05). Results: The difference in survival of restorations retained by two types of posts was not statistically significant in clinical and radiographical evaluations after 6, 12, and 18 months. The survival rate of reversed-orientated metal and glass fiber posts after 18 months was 81.1 and 67.6% respectively (p = 0.14). Conclusion: Reversed-orientated metal post did not show lower clinical survival compared with glass fiber posts in 18-month follow-up. Hence, reversed-orientated metal post can be considered as a potential method to obtain retention for composite restorations in severely decayed primary anterior teeth. How to cite this article: Vafaei A, Ranjkesh B, L0vschall H, Erfanparast L, Jafarabadi MA, Oskouei SG, Isidor F. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):109-113. PMID:27365929

  14. Safety and functional outcomes associated with short-term rehabilitation therapy in the post-operative management of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Laura S.; Cook, James L.

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study using electronic questionnaires compared the perioperative complication rates of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) surgery and the 8-week, 6-month, and 1-year functional outcomes, between rehabilitation and traditional post-operative management. Dogs were placed into 1 of 2 cohort groups based on attending veterinarian’s selected management: i) “traditional” involving restriction to cage rest and leash walking, and ii) “rehabilitation” performed by a certified practitioner. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates in the perioperative period between the 2 treatment cohorts (P > 0.1). The rehabilitation group was 1.9 times more likely to reach full function at 8 wk (P = 0.045). Conversely, the traditional group was 2.9 times more likely be categorized as having unacceptable function at 8 wk after surgery (P = 0.05). This study suggests that rehabilitation performed by a certified practitioner is safe and may improve short-term outcomes when used in the initial postoperative management for dogs treated with TPLO. PMID:26347395

  15. Safety and functional outcomes associated with short-term rehabilitation therapy in the post-operative management of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Romano, Laura S; Cook, James L

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study using electronic questionnaires compared the perioperative complication rates of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) surgery and the 8-week, 6-month, and 1-year functional outcomes, between rehabilitation and traditional post-operative management. Dogs were placed into 1 of 2 cohort groups based on attending veterinarian's selected management: i) "traditional" involving restriction to cage rest and leash walking, and ii) "rehabilitation" performed by a certified practitioner. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates in the perioperative period between the 2 treatment cohorts (P > 0.1). The rehabilitation group was 1.9 times more likely to reach full function at 8 wk (P = 0.045). Conversely, the traditional group was 2.9 times more likely be categorized as having unacceptable function at 8 wk after surgery (P = 0.05). This study suggests that rehabilitation performed by a certified practitioner is safe and may improve short-term outcomes when used in the initial postoperative management for dogs treated with TPLO.

  16. Post-Learning Infusion of Anisomycin into the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Impairs Instrumental Acquisition through an Effect on Reinforcer Valuation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonkman, Sietse; Everitt, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    The integrity of the rodent anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is essential for various aspects of instrumental behavior, but it is not clear if the ACC is important for the acquisition of a simple instrumental response. Here, it was demonstrated that post-session infusions of anisomycin into the rat ACC completely prevented the acquisition of…

  17. Medially posted insoles consistently influence foot pronation in runners with and without anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Chang, Ryan; TenBroek, Trampas; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a common injury among runners and effectively treated with posted insoles and foot orthotics. While clinically effective, the underlying biomechanical mechanisms that bring about these improvements remain debatable. Several methodological factors contribute to the inconsistent biomechanical findings, including errors associated with removing and reattaching markers, inferring foot motion from markers placed externally on a shoe, and redefining segmental coordinate systems between conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of medially posted insoles on lower extremity kinematics in runners with and without AKP while trying to limit the influence of these methodological factors. Kinematics of 16 asymptomatic and 17 runners with AKP were collected while running with and without insoles. Reflective markers were attached to the surface of the calcaneus and kept in place (as opposed to detached) between conditions, eliminating the error associated with reattaching markers and redefining segmental coordinate systems. Using these methods, no significant interactions between insole and injury and the main effect of injury were detected (p>0.05); therefore, means were pooled across injury. Insoles, on average, reduced peak eversion by 3.6° (95% confidence interval -2.9° to -4.3°), peak eversion velocity by 53.2°/s (95% confidence interval -32.9 to -73.4) and eversion range of motion by 1.33 (95% confidence interval -0.8 to -1.9). However, while insoles systematically reduced eversion variables, they had small influences on the transverse plane kinematics of the tibia or knee, indicating that they may bring about their clinical effect by influencing other variables.

  18. Assessing post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ambulation using wireless wearable integrated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arosha Senanayake, S M N; Ahmed Malik, Owais; Mohammad Iskandar, Pg; Zaheer, Dansih

    2013-11-01

    Abstract A hardware/software co-design for assessing post-Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction ambulation is presented. The knee kinematics and neuromuscular data during walking (2-6 km h(-1)) have been acquired using wireless wearable motion and electromyography (EMG) sensors, respectively. These signals were integrated by superimposition and mixed signals processing techniques in order to provide visual analyses of bio-signals and identification of the recovery progress of subjects. Monitoring overlapped signals simultaneously helps in detecting variability and correlation of knee joint dynamics and muscles activities for an individual subject as well as for a group. The recovery stages of subjects have been identified based on combined features (knee flexion/extension and EMG signals) using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The proposed system has been validated for 28 test subjects (healthy and ACL-reconstructed). Results of ANFIS showed that the ambulation data can be used to distinguish subjects at different levels of recuperation after ACL reconstruction. PMID:24117351

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Francisco; Barclay, Fernando; Nacul, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The most recent advances in ACL reconstruction try to reproduce the anatomic femoral and tibial footprints as close as possible. Creating independent tunnels would allow an optimal of the entry point and the femoral tunnel obliquity, and together with an adequate reamer diameter they wouldreproduce with greater certainty the anatomy. Objective: To compare the radiographic parameters of the femoral and tibial tunnel positions in two groups of patients, one operated with a transtibial and other with transportal anatomic techniques. Materials and Methods: From December 2012 to December 2013, 59 patients with a primary ACL reconstruction divided in two groups, a trans tibial technique (TT), 19 patients, and an transportal one (TP) with 40 patients were prospectively evaluated with AP and lateral X-rays. The femoral tunnel angle, the insertion site with respect of the Blumensaat line, the trans osseous distance, the tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the tibial plateau in the AP and lateral views. And finally the tibial tunnel angle in the AP and Lateral views. Results: The femoral tunnel angle was in the TP group of 45,92º and in the TT one 24,53º, p 0,002. The insertion site percentage of the Blumensaat line was of 20,96 in TP and 20,74 in the TT, p 0,681.Trans osseous distance was in the TP of 3,43 cm and in the TT of 4,79 cm, p <0,000. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage in the AP tibial plateau was of 44,35 in TP and of 40,80 TT with a p of 0,076. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the lateral tibial plateau was of 28,70 in TP and 34,53 in TT with a p 0,367. Tibial tunnel angle in the AP was of 73,48º in TP and 62,81 in TT with a p of 0,002, and in the lateral plateau of 114,69º in TP and 112,79º in TT with a p of 0,427. Conclusion: It is possible to create tibial and femoral tunnel in optimal positions but not equal between both groups. Creating independent tunnels allow a more anterior and vertical tibial tunnel

  20. Glass fibre-reinforced composite post and core used in decayed primary anterior teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Verma, Leena; Passi, Sidhi

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic requirement of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth in the case of early childhood caries has been a challenge to pediatric dentist. Among restorative treatment options, prefabricated crown and biological and resin composite restoration either by means of direct or indirect technique are mentioned in the literature. This paper presents the clinical sequence of rehabilitation of maxillary anterior primary teeth. Endodontic treatment was followed by the placement of a glass fibre-reinforced composite resin post. The crown reconstruction was done with composite restoration. Resin glass fibre post has best properties in elasticity, translucency, adaptability, tenaciousness, and resistance to traction and to impact. Along with ease of application, fiber can be used as an alternative to traditionally used materials in the management of early childhood caries.

  1. Glass Fibre-Reinforced Composite Post and Core Used in Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Leena; Passi, Sidhi

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic requirement of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth in the case of early childhood caries has been a challenge to pediatric dentist. Among restorative treatment options, prefabricated crown and biological and resin composite restoration either by means of direct or indirect technique are mentioned in the literature. This paper presents the clinical sequence of rehabilitation of maxillary anterior primary teeth. Endodontic treatment was followed by the placement of a glass fibre-reinforced composite resin post. The crown reconstruction was done with composite restoration. Resin glass fibre post has best properties in elasticity, translucency, adaptability, tenaciousness, and resistance to traction and to impact. Along with ease of application, fiber can be used as an alternative to traditionally used materials in the management of early childhood caries. PMID:22567447

  2. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  3. Fracture resistance of three different posts in restoration of severely damaged primary anterior teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Seraj, Bahman; Ghadimi, Sara; Estaki, Zohreh; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Restoration of anterior primary teeth with severe caries lesion is a big challenge. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of three types of post, including composite resin, customized quartz fiber and prefabricated glass fiber in restoration of severely damaged primary anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human primary maxillary incisors were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1: Customized quartz fiber post, Group 2: Composite post and Group 3: Prefabricated glass fiber post. Due to the effect of bonded area on the fracture resistance, the bonded surface of each sample was measured 1 mm above cementoenamel junction. An increasing force was subjected with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min by a universal testing machine until fracture occurred, and the failure mode was assessed afterwards. Data were analyzed using One-way analysis of variance and Kruskal–Wallis tests. The level of significance was considered at P < 0.05. Results: The mean fracture resistance values of three groups were 343.28 N, 278.70 N and 284.76 N, respectively. Although customized quartz fiber post showed the greatest fracture resistance, statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between groups (P = 0.21). The mean fracture strength values of three groups were 12.82 N/mm–2, 11.93 N/mm–2 and 11.31 N/mm–2, respectively; however, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.72). Favorable failure mode was more frequent in all groups (P = 0.12). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that all three types of studied posts can be successfully used to restore badly destructed primary anterior teeth. PMID:26286271

  4. Air entry into the anterior chamber post intravitreal injection of Eylea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Sing; Sikandar, Munir; Jackson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old man had air entry into the anterior chamber following intravitreal injection. The air bubble was reabsorbed over time without any complications. No further problems occurred with subsequent intravitreal injections. PMID:27440854

  5. Air entry into the anterior chamber post intravitreal injection of Eylea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Sing; Sikandar, Munir; Jackson, Heather

    2016-07-20

    An 84-year-old man had air entry into the anterior chamber following intravitreal injection. The air bubble was reabsorbed over time without any complications. No further problems occurred with subsequent intravitreal injections.

  6. Bilateral atraumatic tibial tubercle avulsion fractures: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khoriati, Al-Achraf; Guo, Shigong; Thakrar, Raj; Deol, Rupinderbir S; Shah, Khalil Y

    2015-04-01

    An avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon injury, comprising less than 1% of all physeal injuries. The occurrence of such injuries bilaterally is even rarer. We report a case of bilateral atraumatic tibial tubercle avulsion fractures and its presentation, mechanism of injury, surgical management, post-operative rehabilitation and implications for clinical practice. A 17-year-old healthy male presented to the emergency department with severe pain on the anterior aspect of both knees and was unable to walk, having been brought in by ambulance after hearing a crack whilst jogging. On examination, there was significant swelling of both knees which were held in extension. On both sides there was a prominent deformity on the region of the tibial tubercle with a palpable gap, although no open skin wound. He was unable to actively move either knee joint. No neurovascular deficit was present. Plain radiographs revealed bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fractures. Gentle manipulation was performed in the emergency department to the fragments in order to remove the tension from the skin. The fragments were reduced and fixed surgically with 4mm cannulated screws in an anterior to posterior direction. Both limbs were placed in temporary casts in 20 degrees of flexion. Postoperatively, the patient was kept non-weight bearing for four weeks then placed into a range of motion brace and movement commenced. Full weight bearing was permitted at the one month stage and he was advised to avoid any sporting activity until the 8 week stage and contact sports until the 10 week stage. Full movement of both joints was regained and the patient returned to full sporting activity in the absence of symptoms. This case emphasises the need for a high degree of vigilance when faced with such a presentation and a low threshold for further investigation and surgical intervention. PMID:25638599

  7. Retentive strength of different intracanal posts in restorations of anterior primary teeth: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Abbaszadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the retentive strength and failure mode of undercut composite post, glass fiber post and polyethylene fiber post luted with flowable composite resin and resin-cement. Materials and Methods Coronal parts of 120 primary canine teeth were sectioned and specimens were treated endodontically. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 20). Prepared root canals received intracanal retainers with a short composite post, undercut composite post, glass fiber post luted with flowable resin or resin-cement, and polyethylene fiber post luted with flowable resin or resin-cement. After crown reconstruction, samples were tested for retentive strength and failure mode. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.001). Mean bond strength in the undercut group was significantly greater than in the short composite post (p = 0.030), and the glass fiber post (p = 0.001) and the polyethylene fiber post group luted with resin-cement (p = 0.008). However, the differences between the undercut group and the groups with flowable composite as the luting agent were not significant (p = 0.068, p = 0.557). Adhesive failure was more frequent in the fiber post groups. Conclusions Although the composite post with undercutting showed the greatest resistance to dislodgement, fiber posts cemented with flowable composite resin provided acceptable results in terms of retentive strength and fracture mode. PMID:24303356

  8. Do pre-operative knee laxity values influence post-operative ones after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Bonanzinga, T; Lopomo, N; Marcheggiani Muccioli, G M; Bignozzi, S; Filardo, G; Zaffagnini, S; Marcacci, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to verify whether pre-reconstruction laxity condition effects post-reconstruction outcome. A total of 100 patients who underwent navigated Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction were included in the study and knee laxity analysed retrospectively. The knee was assessed in six different laxity tests before and after ACL reconstruction, namely antero-posterior (AP) and internal-external (IE) at 30° and 90°, and varus-valgus (VV) rotations at 0° and 30° of flexion. For each test, the least square (LS) fitting line based on pre-operative-to-post-operative laxity value was calculated. To what degree the post-operative laxity value is explainable by the corresponding pre-operative condition was evaluated by the LS line slope. Post-operatively, for each single patient, the grade of laxity decreased at any evaluated test. The strongest influence of pre-operative-to-post-operative laxity values was found during IE30 and IE90 tests. While AP30 and VV0 tests seem to be those in which the post-reconstruction laxity was barely affected by the pre-surgery condition. The analysis of the global laxity reduction confirms the previous results. Following this hypothesis, our study remarks on the importance of combined lesions to secondary restraints and the importance of fully understanding the residual laxity to optimize the surgical technique.

  9. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  10. Insula and anterior cingulate GABA levels in post-traumatic stress disorder: Preliminary findings using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Isabelle M.; Weiner, Melissa R.; Crowley, Davidan J; Silveri, Marisa M.; Rauch, Scott L.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased reactivity of the insular cortex and decreased activity of the dorsal anterior cingulate (ACC) are seen in functional imaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and may partly explain the persistent fear- and anxiety-proneness that characterize the disorder. A possible neurochemical correlate is altered function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We report results from what we believe is the first study applying proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to measure brain GABA in PTSD. Methods Thirteen adults with DSM-IV PTSD and 13 matched healthy control subjects underwent single voxel 1H-MRS at 4 Tesla. GABA was measured in the right anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate, using MEGAPRESS spectral editing. Subjects were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, and also completed the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results Insula GABA was significantly lower in PTSD subjects than in controls, and dorsal ACC GABA did not differ significantly between the groups. Insula GABA was not significantly associated with severity of PTSD symptoms. However, lower insula GABA was associated with significantly higher state and trait anxiety in the subject sample as a whole. Conclusions PTSD is associated with reduced GABA in the right anterior insula. This preliminary evidence of the 1H-MRS GABA metabolite as a possible biomarker of PTSD encourages replication in larger samples and examination of relations with symptom dimensions. Future studies also should examine whether insula GABA is a marker of anxiety proneness, cutting across clinical diagnostic categories. PMID:23861191

  11. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  12. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  13. Comparison of volumetric bone mineral density in the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Scott A; Nyland, John; Caborn, David N M; Kocabey, Yavuz; Nawab, Akbar

    2005-12-01

    Adequate tibial bone mineral density (BMD) is essential to soft tissue graft fixation during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare volumetric bone plug density measurements at the tibial region of interest for ACL reconstruction using a standardized immersion technique and Archimedes' principle. Cancellous bone cores were harvested from the proximal, middle, and distal metaphyseal regions of the lateral tibia and from the standard tibial tunnel location used for ACL reconstruction of 18 cadaveric specimens. Proximal tibial cores displayed 32.6% greater BMD than middle tibial cores and 31.8% greater BMD than distal tibial cores, but did not differ from the BMD of the tibial tunnel cores. Correlational analysis confirmed that the cancellous BMD in the tibial tunnel related to the cancellous BMD of the proximal and distal lateral tibial metaphysis. In conjunction with its adjacent cortical bone, the cancellous BMD of the region used for standard tibial tunnel placement provides an effective foundation for ACL graft fixation. In tibia with poor BMD, bicortical fixation that incorporates cortical bone from the distal tibial tunnel region is recommended. PMID:16237489

  14. Modified Technique of Tibial Tuberosity Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Gopalakrishna; Raad, Abbas; Kotecha, Amit; Chugh, Sanjiv; Mughal, Ejaz

    2015-08-01

    Tibial tuberosity transfer is a well-established procedure in the treatment of patellar instability and in selected cases of anterior knee pain. Several techniques have been advocated in the literature. Some of the common complications associated with this procedure have been pain and discomfort due to prominent screw heads, necessitating their removal; nonunion and delayed union of the osteotomy; and failure of fixation. Tibial fractures have also been reported in some case reports. We present our technique of tibial tuberosity transfer using two 4-mm cannulated screws for stabilization of the tuberosity fragment. We have used this technique either for isolated tibial tuberosity transfer or as part of a combined procedure along with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in treating patellar instability. Using this technique, we have encountered no patients with wound problems, nonunion, delayed union, or loss of fixation and only 1 patient with a metal work problem needing a second procedure for its removal. We attribute our good outcomes to the preservation of the soft-tissue attachments to the tuberosity fragment; minimal soft-tissue dissection, which allows rapid bony consolidation of the osteotomy, which in turn allows accelerated rehabilitation; and the use of 4-mm cannulated screws for fixation of the osteotomy, minimizing the potential for metal work problems. PMID:26759775

  15. Tibial Tubercle Avulsion.

    PubMed

    Floyd, T; Picetti, G D; Schneider, F R

    1989-08-01

    In brief: Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon injury that has a peak incidence in early adolescence near the time of physeal closure. Because growth arrest and deformation can follow this injury, immediate diagnosis and treatment are essential. In this case a 14-year-old boy sustained a type 2 tibial tubercle avulsion while playing basketball and could not walk without assistance. Closed reduction was not possible because of soft-tissue interposition.

  16. Posterior tibial nerve as a tendon transfer for drop foot reconstruction: a devastating complication.

    PubMed

    Armangil, Mehmet; Basat, H Çağdaş; Bilgin, S Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries can result from numerous medical procedures, particularly transection, stretching, compression, injections, heat, radiation, and the use of anticoagulant agents. Late diagnosis may lead to atrophy of the motor endplate and result in poor outcomes. We report a case in which the posterior tibial nerve was accidentally sectioned as the posterior tibial tendon for transfer to the anterior tibial tendon in the reconstruction of drop foot. This iatrogenic complication ultimately required foot amputation. Physicians must be aware of the anatomy of the posterior tibial nerve in order to avoid such complications. PMID:25803264

  17. Lessons learnt from an atypical mycobacterium infection post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Stacy W L; Yee Han, Dave Lee

    2015-03-01

    Infections following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are rare, with no previous reports citing Mycobacterium abscessus as the culprit pathogen. A 22-year-old man presented twice over three years with a painful discharging sinus over his right tibia tunnel site necessitating repeated arthroscopy and washout, months of antibiotic therapy, and ultimately culminating in the removal of the implants. In both instances, M. abscessus was present in the wound cultures, along with a coinfection of Staphyloccocus aureus during the second presentation. Though rare, M. abscessus is an important pathogen to consider in postoperative wounds presenting with chronic discharging sinuses, even in healthy non-immunocompromised patients. This case illustrates how the organism can cause an indolent infection, and how the removal of implants can be necessary to prevent the persistence of infection. Coinfection with a second organism is not uncommon and necessitates a timely change in treatment regime as well.

  18. High tibial osteotomy in the ACL-deficient knee with medial compartment osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Benjamin V; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has traditionally been used to treat varus gonarthrosis in younger, active patients. Varus malalignment increases the risk of progression of medial compartment osteoarthritis and an HTO can be performed to realign the mechanical axis of the lower limb towards the lateral compartment, thereby decreasing contact pressures in the medial compartment. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency may lead to post-traumatic arthritis due to altered joint loading and associated injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage. Understanding the importance of posterior tibial slope and its role in sagittal knee stability has led to the development of biplane osteotomies designed to flatten the posterior tibial slope in the ACL deficient knee. Altering the alignment in both the sagittal and coronal planes helps improve stability as well as alter the load in the medial compartment. Detailed history, physical exam and radiographic analysis guide treatment decisions in this high demand patient population. Lateral closing wedge (LCW) and medial opening wedge (MOW) HTOs have been performed and their potential advantages and disadvantages have been well described. Given the triangular shape of the proximal tibia, it is imperative that the surgeon pay close attention to the geometry of the osteotomy "gap" when performing MOW HTO to avoid inadvertently increasing the posterior tibial slope. Simultaneous ACL reconstruction may require technique modifications depending on the type of HTO and ACL graft chosen. With appropriate patient selection and good surgical technique, it is reasonable to expect patients to return to activities of daily living and recreational sports without debilitating pain or instability. PMID:27358200

  19. Biological Dentin Post for Intra Radicular Rehabilitation of A Fractured Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Swarupa, C.H; Sajjan, Girija S; Bhupahupathiraju, Vijaya Lakshmi; Anwarullahwarullah, Anupreeta; Y.V, Sashikanth

    2014-01-01

    Ideal coronal reconstruction of endodontically treated tooth is still a challenge for restorative dentistry. Despite having varied types of commercially available posts, none of them meet all the ideal biological and mechanical properties. In this context a “Biological Post” serves as a homologous recipe for intraradicular rehabilitation of a fractured endodontically treated tooth by virtue of its biomimetic property.This case report addresses the esthetic and functional restoration of a fractured, endodontically treated maxillary lateral incisor in a young patient, through the preparation and adhesive cementation of a “Biological Post” made from a freshly extracted, intact human canine. The use of biological post can be considered as a novel alternative technique for the rehabilitation of an extensively damaged tooth. PMID:24701545

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  1. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of a displaced tibial eminence fracture.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Murphy, Kevin P; Machen, M Shaun; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2003-02-01

    This study describes a new arthroscopic method using a whip-stitch technique for treating a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture. A 12-year-old girl who sustained a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture was treated with arthroscopic fixation using the Arthrosew disposable suture device (Surgical Dynamics, Norwalk, CT) to place a whip stitch into the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The Arthrex ACL guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to reduce the avulsed tibial spine fragment. Sutures were then passed through the tibial tunnel and secured over a bony bridge with the knee in 20 degrees of flexion. At 9 months, the patient has a full range of motion with normal Lachman and anterior drawer testing, and she has returned to competitive basketball. Radiographs show complete fracture healing. KT-1000 and isokinetic testing at 9-month follow-up show only minimal side-to-side differences. The Arthrosew device provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the ACL, thus obviating arthrotomy and hardware placement. This technique also restores the proper length and tension to the ACL, and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treatment for this injury.

  2. Outcome of modified Bristow-Laterjet procedure in post-traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in young population.

    PubMed

    Sakeb, N; Islam, M A; Jannat, S N

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD) is a common injury of young population which may progress to recurrent episodes. The treatment is initially conservative but surgery is indicated when it fails. Out of more than 150 techniques, modified Bristow-Latarjet procedure has become most favorable even to arthroscopic techniques. We have intended to retrospectively assess the outcome of it in post-traumatic recurrent ASD of young non-athletes, performed at our different private settings between January 2007 and July 2012; which included 15 male patients of 20-39 years with minimum 2 years follow up. Clinical, functional, radiological and overall outcome status were evaluated. There was significant improvement of shoulder stability (p<0.05, chi-square test) despite significant deterioration (p<0.05, paired t-test) of external rotation (21.67°±00.61° loss). The patient self assessed pain and instability had highly significant (p<0.001, paired t-test) and all components of activities of daily living (except above shoulder weight carrying and overhead throwing) had significant improvement (p<0.05, paired t-test). Despite of intra-operative difficulties, radiological transplant errors (33.33%) and post-operative complications (06.67%), overall satisfactory outcome (86.67%) had been significant (p<0.05, chi-square test).

  3. Outcome of modified Bristow-Laterjet procedure in post-traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in young population.

    PubMed

    Sakeb, N; Islam, M A; Jannat, S N

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD) is a common injury of young population which may progress to recurrent episodes. The treatment is initially conservative but surgery is indicated when it fails. Out of more than 150 techniques, modified Bristow-Latarjet procedure has become most favorable even to arthroscopic techniques. We have intended to retrospectively assess the outcome of it in post-traumatic recurrent ASD of young non-athletes, performed at our different private settings between January 2007 and July 2012; which included 15 male patients of 20-39 years with minimum 2 years follow up. Clinical, functional, radiological and overall outcome status were evaluated. There was significant improvement of shoulder stability (p<0.05, chi-square test) despite significant deterioration (p<0.05, paired t-test) of external rotation (21.67°±00.61° loss). The patient self assessed pain and instability had highly significant (p<0.001, paired t-test) and all components of activities of daily living (except above shoulder weight carrying and overhead throwing) had significant improvement (p<0.05, paired t-test). Despite of intra-operative difficulties, radiological transplant errors (33.33%) and post-operative complications (06.67%), overall satisfactory outcome (86.67%) had been significant (p<0.05, chi-square test). PMID:25725671

  4. The high variability of tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Goodman, Stuart B; Patel, Jay J; Delp, Scott L; Giori, Nicholas J

    2006-11-01

    Although various techniques are advocated to establish tibial rotational alignment during total knee arthroplasty, it is unknown which is most repeatable. We evaluated the precision and accuracy of five tibial rotational alignment techniques to determine whether computer-assisted navigation systems can reduce variability of tibial component rotational alignment when compared to traditional instrumentation. Eleven orthopaedic surgeons used four computer-assisted techniques that required identification of anatomical landmarks and one that used traditional extramedullary instrumentation to establish tibial rotational alignment axes on 10 cadaver legs. Two computer-assisted techniques (axes between the most medial and lateral border of the tibial plateau, and between the posterior cruciate ligament [PCL] and the anterior tibial crest) and the traditional technique were least variable, with standard deviations of 9.9 degrees, 10.8 degrees, and 12.1 degrees, respectively. Computer-assisted techniques referencing the tibial tubercle (axes between the PCL and the medial border or medial 1/3 of the tubercle) were most variable, with standard deviations of 27.4 degrees and 28.1 degrees. The axis between the medial border of the tibial tubercle and the PCL was internally rotated compared to the other techniques. None of the techniques consistently established tibial rotational alignment, and navigation systems that establish rotational alignment by identifying anatomic landmarks were not more reliable than traditional instrumentation.

  5. PHILOS humerus plate for a distal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Twaij, Haider; Damany, Dev

    2013-01-04

    This report discusses the use of an alternative implant in the emergency fixation of a distal tibial fracture. We planned to fix the shear-type medial malleolar fracture in a closed, tri-malleolar fracture with a locking distal tibial plate. Intra-operatively, it was noted that the required plate was unavailable. A PHILOS humeral plate seemed to fit the contours of the distal tibia. The broad end of the PHILOS, when placed distally, gave options to place locking screws in the medial malleolar fragment. The fracture was stable after fixation. The patient made a full post-operative recovery and follow-up at 4 months was satisfactory. Despite adequate planning, there will be instances where one has to improvise. An understanding of the principles of fracture management can aid in finding solutions. PHILOS humeral plate may be used to stabilize a distal tibial fracture if an appropriate distal tibial locking plate is not available.

  6. Resting state functional connectivity of the anterior cingulate cortex in veterans with and without post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Kennis, Mitzy; Rademaker, Arthur R; van Rooij, Sanne J H; Kahn, René S; Geuze, Elbert

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that is associated with structural and functional alterations in several brain areas, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Here, we examine resting state functional connectivity of ACC subdivisions in PTSD, using a seed-based approach. Resting state magnetic resonance images were obtained from male veterans with (n = 31) and without (n = 25) PTSD, and healthy male civilian controls (n = 25). Veterans with and without PTSD (combat controls) had reduced functional connectivity compared to healthy controls between the caudal ACC and the precentral gyrus, and between the perigenual ACC and the superior medial gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Combat controls had increased connectivity between the rostral ACC and precentral/middle frontal gyrus compared to PTSD patients and healthy civilian controls. The resting state functional connectivity differences in the perigenual ACC network reported here indicate that veterans differ from healthy controls, potentially due to military training, deployment, and/or trauma exposure. In addition, specific alterations in the combat controls may potentially be related to resilience. These results underline the importance of distinguishing trauma-exposed (combat) controls from healthy civilian controls when studying PTSD.

  7. High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Seong Joon

    2012-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a widely performed procedure to treat medial knee arthrosis. In general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. The ideal candidate for an HTO is a middle aged patient (60 to 65 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Some issues that need resolution remain; these include the choice between opening and closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. Precise indication, preoperative planning, and operative technique selection are essential to achieve good results. PMID:22708105

  8. Non-invasive measurement of tibialis anterior muscle temperature during rest, cycling exercise and post-exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Flouris, Andreas D; Dinas, Petros C; Tsitoglou, Kiriakos; Patramani, Ioanna; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a non-invasive and accurate method to assess tibialis anterior muscle temperature (Tm) during rest, cycling exercise, and post-exercise recovery using the insulation disk (INDISK) technique. Twenty-six healthy males (23.6  ±  6.2 years; 24.1  ±  3.1 body mass index) were randomly allocated into the 'model' (n = 16) and the 'validation' (n = 10) groups. Participants underwent 20 min supine rest, 20 min cycling exercise at 60% of age-predicted maximum heart rate, and 20 min supine post-exercise recovery. In the model group, Tm (34.55  ±  1.02 °C) was greater than INDISK temperature (Tid; 32.44  ±  1.23 °C; p < 0.001) and skin surface temperature (Tsk; 29.84  ±  1.47 °C; p < 0.001) throughout the experimental protocol. The strongest prediction model (R(2) = 0.646) incorporated Tid and the difference between the current Tid temperature and that recorded four minutes before. No mean difference (p > 0.05) and a strong correlation (r = 0.804; p < 0.001) were observed between Tm and predicted Tm (predTm) in the model group. Cross-validation analyses in the validation group demonstrated no mean difference (p > 0.05), a strong correlation (r = 0.644; p < 0.001), narrow 95% limits of agreement (-0.06  ±  1.51), and low percent coefficient of variation (2.24%) between Tm (34.39  ±  1.00 °C) and predTm (34.45  ±  0.73 °C). We conclude that the novel technique accurately predicts Tm during rest, cycling exercise, and post-exercise recovery, providing a valid and cost-efficient alternative when direct Tm measurement is not feasible.

  9. Relief of Cervicogenic Headaches after Single-Level and Multilevel Anterior Cervical Diskectomy: A 5-Year Post Hoc Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R.; Schrot, Rudolph J.; Kim, Kee D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Prospective study. Objective  Because single-level disk arthroplasty or arthrodesis in the lower subaxial spine improves headaches after surgery, we studied whether this effect may be better appreciated after two-level arthroplasty. Methods  We performed an independent post hoc analysis of two concurrent prospective randomized investigational device exemption trials for cervical spondylosis, one for single-level treatment and the other for two adjacent-level treatments. Results  For the one-level study, baseline mean headache scores significantly improved at 60 months for both the cervical disk arthroplasty (CDA) and anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) groups (p < 0.0001). However, mean improvement in headache scores was not statistically different between the investigational and control groups from 6 months through 60 months. For the two-level study, baseline mean headache scores significantly improved at 60 months for both the CDA and ACDF groups (p < 0.0001). The CDA group demonstrated greater improvement from baseline at all points; this difference was statistically significant at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months but not at 18 and 60 months. Conclusion  Both CDA and ACDF at either one or two levels are associated with sustained headache relief from baseline. Patients undergoing two-level arthroplasty had significantly greater improvement in headache at all points except for at 18 and 60 months. This difference in improvement was not observed in patients undergoing single-level arthroplasty. The mechanism of greater headache relief after two-level arthroplasty remains unclear. PMID:27555998

  10. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Tawonsawatruk, T.; Simpson, C. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The radiographic union score for tibial (RUST) fractures was developed by Whelan et al to assess the healing of tibial fractures following intramedullary nailing. In the current study, the repeatability and reliability of the RUST score was evaluated in an independent centre (a) using the original description, (b) after further interpretation of the description of the score, and (c) with the immediate post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Methods A total of 15 radiographs of tibial shaft fractures treated by intramedullary nailing (IM) were scored by three observers using the RUST system. Following discussion on how the criteria of the RUST system should be implemented, 45 sets (i.e. AP and lateral) of radiographs of IM nailed tibial fractures were scored by five observers. Finally, these 45 sets of radiographs were rescored with the baseline post-operative radiograph available for comparison. Results The initial intraclass correlation (ICC) on the first 15 sets of radiographs was 0.67 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). However, the original description was being interpreted in different ways. After agreeing on the interpretation, the ICC on the second cohort improved to 0.75. The ICC improved even further to 0.79, when the baseline post-operative radiographs were available for comparison. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the RUST scoring system is a reliable and repeatable outcome measure for assessing tibial fracture healing. Further improvement in the reliability of the scoring system can be obtained if the radiographs are compared with the baseline post-operative radiographs. Cite this article: Mr J.M. Leow. The radiographic union scale in tibial (RUST) fractures: Reliability of the outcome measure at an independent centre. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:116–121. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000628. PMID:27073210

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Reinforcing Effect of Different Post Systems in the Restoration of Endodontically Treated Human Anterior Teeth at Two Different Lengths of Post Space Preparation- An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Sahil; Jindal, Ritu; Gupta, Kanika; Mahajan, Sandeep; Garg, Sunidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Comparative evaluation of the reinforcing effect of different post systems in the restoration of endodontically treated human anterior teeth at two different lengths of post space preparation- an in vitro study Materials and Methods: 135 extracted human incisors were endodontically treated, out of which 120 teeth were decoronated 2mm above the cementoenamel junction and divided into four experimental groups based on the post system to be used: Glass fiber post (GFP) and stainless steel post (SSP), titanium post (TTP), cast metal post (CMP). Each group was divided into two sub-groups according to the length of post space preparation: 5mm and 10mm. All the samples were restored with metal crowns. The fracture resistance was measured by applying loads at an angle of 135º to the long axis of teeth in an instron universal testing machine. Fracture mode was analyzed for all the samples. Results from the four test groups were compared and analysed using one-way ANOVA test and the Post-hoc Bonferroni test to demonstrate differences between pairs of groups. Results: The results revealed that SSP group at 10mm post space length showed the significantly (“P-value< 0.05”) highest fracture resistance (793.7787 N). Decrease in post length resulted in the decrease in fracture resistance in all the groups reduced to values even lesser than the control (437.8733N). Conclusion: The different post systems used in the study were able to reinforce endodontically treated teeth only at 10mm post space length. PMID:23724211

  12. Biomechanical Characterization of a Model of Noninvasive, Traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael D; Davidson, Abigail A; Baker, Kevin C; Anderson, Kyle; Matthew, Howard W T

    2015-10-01

    The onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) remains prevalent following traumatic joint injury such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, and animal models are important for studying the pathomechanisms of PTOA. Noninvasive ACL injury using the tibial compression model in the rat has not been characterized, and it may represent a more clinically relevant model than the common surgical ACL transection model. This study employed four loading profiles to induce ACL injury, in which motion capture analysis was performed, followed by quantitative joint laxity testing. High-speed, high-displacement loading repeatedly induces complete ACL injury, which causes significant increases in anterior-posterior and varus laxity. No loading protocol induced valgus laxity. Tibial internal rotation and anterior subluxation occurs up to the point of ACL failure, after which the tibia rotates externally as it subluxes over the femoral condyles. High displacement was more determinative of ACL injury compared to high speed. Low-speed protocols induced ACL avulsion from the femoral footprint whereas high-speed protocols caused either midsubstance rupture, avulsion, or a combination injury of avulsion and midsubstance rupture. This repeatable, noninvasive ACL injury protocol can be utilized in studies assessing PTOA or ACL reconstruction in the rat.

  13. Successful stabilisation of a type III paediatric tibial eminence fracture using a tensioned wire technique.

    PubMed

    Archer, Matthew; Parkin, Tom; Latimer, Mark David

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with a type III tibial eminence fracture. The fracture fragment was reduced arthroscopically. Two 1.6 mm retrograde K-wires were inserted from the tibial metaphysis across the physis and into the fracture fragment using a standard anterior cruciate ligament tibial tunnel guide. Once the wires were clearly visible within the joint the tips were bent over by ∼120°. The wires were then tensioned around a single small fragment screw inserted into the tibial metaphysis. An exceptionally strong fixation was achieved. The boy was mobilised without a brace. The wires were removed at 12 weeks and he returned to full activity at 14 weeks. PMID:27646317

  14. Permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in mice: a model of post-myocardial infarction remodelling and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Lox, Marleen; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2014-12-02

    Heart failure is a syndrome in which the heart fails to pump blood at a rate commensurate with cellular oxygen requirements at rest or during stress. It is characterized by fluid retention, shortness of breath, and fatigue, in particular on exertion. Heart failure is a growing public health problem, the leading cause of hospitalization, and a major cause of mortality. Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of heart failure. Ventricular remodelling refers to changes in structure, size, and shape of the left ventricle. This architectural remodelling of the left ventricle is induced by injury (e.g., myocardial infarction), by pressure overload (e.g., systemic arterial hypertension or aortic stenosis), or by volume overload. Since ventricular remodelling affects wall stress, it has a profound impact on cardiac function and on the development of heart failure. A model of permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in mice is used to investigate ventricular remodelling and cardiac function post-myocardial infarction. This model is fundamentally different in terms of objectives and pathophysiological relevance compared to the model of transient ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In this latter model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, the initial extent of the infarct may be modulated by factors that affect myocardial salvage following reperfusion. In contrast, the infarct area at 24 hr after permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery is fixed. Cardiac function in this model will be affected by 1) the process of infarct expansion, infarct healing, and scar formation; and 2) the concomitant development of left ventricular dilatation, cardiac hypertrophy, and ventricular remodelling. Besides the model of permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the technique of invasive hemodynamic measurements in mice is presented in detail.

  15. Medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Noam; Guelich, David R

    2012-04-01

    MTSS is a benign, though painful, condition, and a common problem in the running athlete. It is prevalent among military personnel, runners, and dancers, showing an incidence of 4% to 35%. Common names for this problem include shin splints, soleus syndrome, tibial stress syndrome, and periostitis. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Previous theories included an inflammatory response of the periosteum or periosteal traction reaction. More recent evidence suggests a painful stress reaction of bone. The most proven risk factors are hyperpronation of the foot, female sex, and history of previous MTSS. Patient evaluation is based on meticulous history taking and physical examination. Even though the diagnosis remains clinical, imaging studies, such as plain radiographs and bone scans are usually sufficient, although MRI is useful in borderline cases to rule out more significant pathology. Conservative treatment is almost always successful and includes several options; though none has proven more superior to rest. Prevention programs do not seem to influence the rate of MTSS, though shock-absorbing insoles have reduced MTSS rates in military personnel, and ESWT has shortened the duration of symptoms. Surgery is rarely indicated but has shown some promising results in patients who have not responded to all conservative options.

  16. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  17. Inside-Out Antegrade Tibial Tunnel Drilling Through the Posterolateral Portal Using a Flexible Reamer in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Stuart, Joseph J.; Choi, J.H. James; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the transtibial drilling or arthroscopic tibial-inlay technique has a risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle because a pin is drilled anterior to posterior. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to decrease the risk of neurovascular injury. In addition, graft passage in the transtibial technique may be problematic because of a sharp turn when placing the graft into the tibial tunnel, which may damage graft fibers. In the surgical technique described in this report, the posteromedial portal is used for visualization and the posterolateral portal is used for debridement of the PCL tibial footprint and the synovial fold closest to the PCL. A curved guide is placed from the posterolateral portal to the tibial footprint, and a flexible pin is drilled across the tibia. The tibial tunnel is then created using a flexible reamer under direct visualization up to the desired length, and a graft can be positioned in the tibial tunnel through the posterolateral portal. This technique has the potential advantages of decreasing the risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle (use of anteriorly directed, inside-out drilling), avoiding a sharp turn during graft passage, and allowing accurate and anatomic tibial tunnel placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy. PMID:26900551

  18. Posterior Wall Blowout During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Suspensory Cortical Fixation With a Screw and Washer Post.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Menge, Travis J; Vap, Alexander R; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterior wall blowout can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This loss of osseous containment can cause difficulty with graft fixation and can potentially lead to early graft failure if unrecognized and left untreated. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the local anatomy and surgical salvage options is paramount to ensure positive patient outcomes. This article highlights our preferred salvage technique using suspensory cortical fixation with a screw and washer construct. PMID:27656377

  19. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  20. Management of aseptic tibial nonunion.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J

    2011-09-01

    Tibial nonunion remains a significant clinical challenge despite advances in surgical management. New techniques to help manage tibial nonunion include extracorporeal shock wave therapy and percutaneous application of bone marrow aspirate. Management strategies vary based on the type of nonunion: aseptic or infected, and atrophic or hypertrophic. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgical management in patients with stable hypertrophic nonunion. New fixation options include locked plates and intramedullary compression nails. Novel methods of external fixation have been developed for bone graft harvest from the intramedullary canal. Several biologic adjuncts also are available, including bone marrow aspirates, stem cells, and bone morphogenetic protein. PMID:21885702

  1. Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Brodie E; Stanitski, Carl L

    2003-07-01

    Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are uncommon, and these injuries typically occur in mature-appearing adolescent boys involved in jumping sports, particularly basketball. The developmental anatomy of the tibial tuberosity and the changes surrounding normal physiologic epiphysiodesis render this structure susceptible to acute avulsion fractures. Possible associated injuries include patellar and quadriceps avulsions, collateral and cruciate ligament tears, and meniscal damage. The treatment of this injury is based on the amount of displacement and associated injuries. Nondisplaced fractures are treated nonoperatively with cast immobilization. Displaced fractures require open reduction and internal fixation. Even in Type III injuries, the outcome is usually excellent.

  2. Combined technique with glass-fibre-reinforced composite post and original fragment in restoration of traumatized anterior teeth--a case report.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ceyhan; Guven, Gunseli

    2008-12-01

    Dentoalveolar trauma is frequently encountered by dental practitioners. In some instances, saving a child's traumatized permanent teeth can create difficulties for the child, the parents and the dentist. Reattachment of a crown fragment is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This case describes the clinical reattachment of an original tooth fragment. A 10-year-old male presented at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry with a complex crown fracture of the left maxillary central incisor 1 day after the trauma occurred. Following endodontic treatment, a glass-fibre-reinforced composite root canal post (FRC Postec; Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) was inserted to increase retention and distribute stress along the root. The dental restoration was completed using the original fragment and a dual-cured resin composite (Variolink II; Ivoclar Vivadent AG). Clinical and radiographic examinations at 1-year recall showed the glass-fibre-reinforced composite root canal post and restoration to be in place, indicating the success of the treatment in maintaining the fractured tooth. Thus, we conclude that reattachment of a tooth fragment using a dual-cured resin composite and a glass-fibre-reinforced composite root canal post is an alternative method for the rehabilitation of fractured teeth that offers satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcomes.

  3. Resin composite restoration in primary anterior teeth using short-post technique and strip crowns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; De Benedetto, Monique Saveriano; del Conte Zardetto, Cristina Giovannetti; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla; Correa, Maria Salete Nahás Pires

    2004-10-01

    A case report describing a technique for the restoration of endodontically treated primary maxillary incisors with resin composite short posts and celluloid strip crowns in a 3-year-old boy is presented. The technique offers the advantages of using one restorative material, improving esthetics, and reducing chairtime and costs. PMID:15470991

  4. The effect of leg muscle activation state and localized muscle fatigue on tibial response during impact.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of voluntarily manipulating muscle activation and localized muscle fatigue on tibial response parameters, including peak tibial acceleration, time to peak tibial acceleration, and the acceleration slope, measured at the knee during unshod heel impacts. A human pendulum delivered consistent impacts to 15 female and 15 male subjects. The tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius were examined using electromyography, thus allowing voluntary contraction to various activation states (baseline, 15%, 30%, 45%, and 60% of the maximum activation state) and assessing localized muscle fatigue. A skin-mounted uniaxial accelerometer, preloaded medial to the tibial tuberosity, allowed tibial response parameter determination. There were significant decreases in peak acceleration during tibialis anterior fatigue, compared to baseline and all other activation states. In females, increased time to peak acceleration and decreased acceleration slope occurred during fatigue compared to 30% and 45%, and compared to 15% through 60% of the maximum activation state, respectively. Slight peak acceleration and acceleration slope increases, and decreased time to peak acceleration as activation state increased during tibialis anterior testing, were noted. When examining the lateral gastrocnemius, the time to peak acceleration was significantly higher across gender in the middle activation states than at the baseline and fatigue states. The acceleration slope decreased at all activation states above baseline in females, and decreased at 60% of the maximum activation state in males compared to the baseline and fatigue states. Findings agree with localized muscle fatigue literature, suggesting that with fatigue there is decreased impact transmission, which may protect the leg. The relative effects of leg stiffness and ankle angle on tibial response need to be verified.

  5. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injury about 20 years post-treatment: A kinematic analysis of one-leg hop.

    PubMed

    Tengman, E; Grip, H; Stensdotter, Ak; Häger, C K

    2015-12-01

    Reduced dynamic knee stability, often evaluated with one-leg hops (OLHs), is reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This may lead to long-standing altered movement patterns, which are less investigated. 3D kinematics during OLH were explored in 70 persons 23 ± 2 years after ACL injury; 33 were treated with physiotherapy in combination with ACL reconstruction (ACL(R)) and 37 with physiotherapy alone (ACL(PT)). Comparisons were made to 33 matched controls. We analyzed (a) maximal knee joint angles and range of motion (flexion, abduction, rotation); (b) medio-lateral position of the center of mass (COM) in relation to knee and ankle joint centers, during take-off and landing phases. Unlike controls, ACL-injured displayed leg asymmetries: less knee flexion and less internal rotation at take-off and landing and more lateral COM related to knee and ankle joint of the injured leg at landing. Compared to controls, ACL(R) had larger external rotation of the injured leg at landing. ACL(PT) showed less knee flexion and larger external rotation at take-off and landing, and larger knee abduction at Landing. COM was more medial in relation to the knee at take-off and less laterally placed relative to the ankle at landing. ACL injury results in long-term kinematic alterations during OLH, which are less evident for ACL(R). PMID:25728035

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament injury about 20 years post-treatment: A kinematic analysis of one-leg hop.

    PubMed

    Tengman, E; Grip, H; Stensdotter, Ak; Häger, C K

    2015-12-01

    Reduced dynamic knee stability, often evaluated with one-leg hops (OLHs), is reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This may lead to long-standing altered movement patterns, which are less investigated. 3D kinematics during OLH were explored in 70 persons 23 ± 2 years after ACL injury; 33 were treated with physiotherapy in combination with ACL reconstruction (ACL(R)) and 37 with physiotherapy alone (ACL(PT)). Comparisons were made to 33 matched controls. We analyzed (a) maximal knee joint angles and range of motion (flexion, abduction, rotation); (b) medio-lateral position of the center of mass (COM) in relation to knee and ankle joint centers, during take-off and landing phases. Unlike controls, ACL-injured displayed leg asymmetries: less knee flexion and less internal rotation at take-off and landing and more lateral COM related to knee and ankle joint of the injured leg at landing. Compared to controls, ACL(R) had larger external rotation of the injured leg at landing. ACL(PT) showed less knee flexion and larger external rotation at take-off and landing, and larger knee abduction at Landing. COM was more medial in relation to the knee at take-off and less laterally placed relative to the ankle at landing. ACL injury results in long-term kinematic alterations during OLH, which are less evident for ACL(R).

  8. Can a post-operative brace in slight hyperextension prevent extension deficit after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, C; Cerulli, G; Lorenzini, M; Bergstrand, G; Werner, S

    2003-09-01

    It has been our observation that post-operative anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) braces together with the post-operative bandages do not always allow the knee to reach full extension. In ten uninjured knees with known hyperextension, the knees were bandaged in the same way as after an ACL-reconstruction. The knees were then studied radiologically in a Hypex brace set at 0 degrees, -5 degrees and -10 degrees of knee extension. Not a single knee was found to be straight in the brace set at 0 degrees. At -5 degrees most of the knees were straight or in slight hyperextension. It took -10 degrees to get all knees straight or in hyperextension. In a prospective randomised study 44 patients who underwent an arthroscopic ACL-reconstruction with a bone patellar tendon bone graft were randomised to use either a brace set at -5 degrees or a straight brace (0 degrees ) for at least the first three postoperative weeks. Before and three months after surgery range of motion was determined, using a goniometer with long arms, and sagittal knee laxity was measured with a KT-2000 arthrometer at manual max. Pre- and post-operative pain was evaluated with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The same examiner (blindfolded to what type of brace was used) performed all the measurements. At three months, two of the 22 patients with the brace set at -5 degrees and twelve of the 22 patients with the straight brace had a loss of full extension of 2 degrees or more ( p<0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of knee flexion, sagittal knee laxity or post-operative pain. Although extension deficit after ACL-reconstruction can be prevented also in other ways, a Hypex brace set at -5 degrees seems to be an easy way of ensuring full knee extension.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  10. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of displaced tibial eminence fractures using a suture loop transporter.

    PubMed

    Yip, D K; Wong, J W; Chien, E P; Chan, C F

    2001-01-01

    Current arthroscopic suture fixation techniques of tibial eminence fractures are time consuming and the number of anchor sutures that can be placed is limited by the cumbersome and repetitive numerous needle threading steps. This occurs at 2 stages: first, when placing anchoring sutures through the avulsed anterior cruciate ligament stump with a suture punch, and second, when there is a need to traverse the tibial bone canal with the suture ends. We describe a modification that reduces the reliance on conventional rigid instruments and instead uses a loop transporter made from readily available suture material. The suture loop transporter being malleable reduces the necessary width of the tibial bone canal to be made and has a further advantage of minimizing the bone loss during the reaming of the bone tunnel. The subsequent potential for a stress fracture at these tunnel sites is also substantially reduced. Our technique is more user friendly, more accurate, and quicker to perform.

  11. Safety and efficacy of Intraurethral Mitomycin C Hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Derakhshandeh, Katayoun; Karimian, Babak; Fasihi, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of intraurethral Mitomycin C (MMC) hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. Methods: A thermoresponsive hydrogel base consisting of 0.8 mg MMC with 1cc water and propylene glycol to PF-127 poloxamer was used in theater. 40 male patients with short, non-obliterated, urethral stricture were randomized into 2 groups: control and MMC. After internal urethrotomy, the MMC group patients received the MMC-Hydrogel while the others were just catheterized. Both groups had their catheters for at least 1 week. After surgery, they were followed up by means of medical history and physical examination, monitoring voiding patterns and retrograde urethrogram at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: 40 male patients between 14 to 89 years old (Mean = 54.15) underwent internal urethrotomy. The average age for the control and MMC group was 54.55±21.25 and 53.75±24.75 respectively. In a comparison of age between the two groups, they were matched (P=0.574). Stricture length was 10.7±5.9 and 9.55±4.15 mm for the control and MMC group respectively. There were no statistically meaningful differences between the two groups (P=0.485). Fifteen patients had a history of one previous internal urethrotomy which in a comparison between the two groups meant there was no meaningful difference (P = 0.327). During postoperative follow up, total urethral stricture recurrence happened in 12 patients: 10 patients (50%) in control group and 2 patients (10%) in MMC group. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). There were no significant complications associated with the MMC injection in our patients. Conclusions: Based on our results, MMC Hydrogel may have an anti-fibrotic action preventing post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence with no side effects on pre-urethral tissue. Due to our study limitations, our follow up time and the

  12. Anatomic femorotibial changes associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Jennifer A; Allen, David A; Bergman, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    This prospective study evaluated anatomic femorotibial changes utilizing the relationship between the intercondylar notch and the intercondylar eminence following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). We hypothesized that TPLO results in anatomic alteration of the femorotibial joint. Pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) scans of cranial cruciate deficient stifle joints treated with TPLO were performed on 25 client-owned dogs. Computed tomography scans were performed at 3 different stifle angles: extension, 135° walking angle, and 90° of flexion. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy did not result in a significant medial or lateral shift of the intercondylar eminence relative to the intercondylar notch. There was a significant cranial shift of the intercondylar eminence with the stifle in extension following TPLO. In addition, TPLO resulted in a significantly narrowed femorotibial joint space. The biomechanical effects of TPLO and medial meniscal release need to be further defined. PMID:26345618

  13. A review of tibial spine fractures in bicycle injury.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J N; Tehranzadeh, J

    1987-01-01

    Nine tibial spine fractures were studied. Three of these nine cases included younger patients who fell from a bicycle and sustained an isolated avulsion fracture of the tibial spine. In all three cases, the medial tibial spines of the right knees were fractured. The other remaining five medial tibial fractures included two motorcycle and two automobile accidents, together with one basketball injury. One of the nine tibial spine fractures involved the lateral tibial spine.

  14. Tibial Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, John J; Bowman, Eric N; Phillips, Barry B; Weinlein, John C

    2016-10-01

    Tibial stress fractures are common in the athlete. There are various causes of these fractures, the most common being a sudden increase in training intensity. Most of these injuries are treated conservatively; however, some may require operative intervention. Intervention is mostly dictated by location of the fracture and failure of conservative treatment. There are several surgical options available to the treating surgeon, each with advantages and disadvantages. The physician must understand the nature of the fracture and the likelihood for it to heal in a timely manner in order to best treat these fractures in this patient subset. PMID:27637660

  15. Genu Recurvatum Deformity in a Child due to Salter Harris Type V Fracture of the Proximal Tibial Physis Treated with High Tibial Dome Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Beslikas, Theodoros; Christodoulou, Andreas; Chytas, Anastasios; Gigis, Ioannis; Christoforidis, John

    2012-01-01

    Salter-Harris type V fracture is a very rare injury in the immature skeleton. In most cases, it remains undiagnosed and untreated. We report a case of genu recurvatum deformity in a 15-year-old boy caused by a Salter-Harris type V fracture of the proximal tibial physis. The initial X-ray did not reveal fracture. One year after injury, genu recurvatum deformity was detected associated with significant restriction of knee flexion and limp length discrepancy (2 cm) as well as medial and posterior instability of the joint. Further imaging studies revealed anterior bone bridge of the proximal tibial physis. The deformity was treated with a high tibial dome osteotomy combined with a tibial tubercle osteotomy stabilized with malleolar screws and a cast. Two years after surgery, the patient gained functional knee mobility without clinical instability. Firstly, this case highlights the importance of early identification of this rare lesion (Salter-Harris type V fracture) and, secondly, provides an alternative method of treatment for genu recurvatum deformity.

  16. Dual locked plating of unstable bicondylar tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ufuk; Parmaksizoglu, Atilla Sancar

    2015-07-01

    The operative treatment of displaced bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is challenging. The displaced condyles must be reduced, depressed plateaus must be elevated and adequately supported and early rehabilitation must be encouraged in order to obtain good clinical results. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with dual locked plates using raft screws with MIPO technique and autologous bone grafting. We hypothesized that in this group of patients dual locked plating reduces the complication rates by avoiding loss of reduction due to the accomplished rigid fixation. Twenty-two consecutive patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures (AO Type C) were included in this study. The mean follow up was 26 months. Bone healing was achieved in all patients with 3 cases of superficial and 1 case of deep infection. Secondary loss of reduction, secondary loss of alignment, early post-traumatic arthritis were not observed in this study. The Lysholm knee score showed an average of 80.5 points (range: 61.5-90) at the final follow up assessment. Optimal fixation of the fracture with dual locked plating which allows immediate motion and partial weight bearing may be an alternative concept to prevent secondary loss of reduction to obtain a good clinical outcome. PMID:26021666

  17. Spatial localization and distribution of the TMS-related 'hotspot' of the tibialis anterior muscle representation in the healthy and post-stroke motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anjali; Tahara-Eckl, Lenore; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a type of noninvasive brain stimulation used to study corticomotor excitability of the intact and injured brain. Identification of muscle representations in the motor cortex is typically done using a procedure called 'hotspotting', which involves establishing the optimal location on the scalp that evokes a maximum TMS response with minimum stimulator intensity. The purpose of this study was to report the hotspot locations for the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle representation in the motor cortex of healthy and post stroke individuals. A retrospective data analyses from 42 stroke participants and 32 healthy participants was conducted for reporting TMS hotspot locations and their spatial patterns. Single pulse TMS, using a 110mm double cone coil, was used to identify the motor representation of the TA. The hotspot locations were represented as x and y-distances from the vertex for each participant. The mediolateral extent of the loci from the vertex (x-coordinate) and anteroposterior extent of the loci from the vertex (y-coordinate) was reported for each hemisphere: non-lesioned (XNLes, YNLes), lesioned (XLes, YLes) and healthy (XH, YH). We found that the mean hotspot loci for TA muscle from the vertex were approximately: 1.29cm lateral and 0.55cm posterior in the non-lesioned hemisphere, 1.25cm lateral and 0.5cm posterior in the lesioned hemisphere and 1.6cm lateral and 0.8cm posterior in the healthy brain. There was no significant difference in the x- and y-coordinates between the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres. However, the locations of the XNLes (p=0.01) and XLes (p=0.004) were significantly different from XH. The YNLes and YLes showed no significant differences from YH loci. Analyses of spatial clustering patterns using the Moran's I index showed a negative autocorrelation in stroke participants (NLes: Moran's I=-0.09, p<0.001; Les: Moran's I=-0.14, p=0.002), and a positive autocorrelation in healthy participants

  18. Spatial localization and distribution of the TMS-related 'hotspot' of the tibialis anterior muscle representation in the healthy and post-stroke motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anjali; Tahara-Eckl, Lenore; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a type of noninvasive brain stimulation used to study corticomotor excitability of the intact and injured brain. Identification of muscle representations in the motor cortex is typically done using a procedure called 'hotspotting', which involves establishing the optimal location on the scalp that evokes a maximum TMS response with minimum stimulator intensity. The purpose of this study was to report the hotspot locations for the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle representation in the motor cortex of healthy and post stroke individuals. A retrospective data analyses from 42 stroke participants and 32 healthy participants was conducted for reporting TMS hotspot locations and their spatial patterns. Single pulse TMS, using a 110mm double cone coil, was used to identify the motor representation of the TA. The hotspot locations were represented as x and y-distances from the vertex for each participant. The mediolateral extent of the loci from the vertex (x-coordinate) and anteroposterior extent of the loci from the vertex (y-coordinate) was reported for each hemisphere: non-lesioned (XNLes, YNLes), lesioned (XLes, YLes) and healthy (XH, YH). We found that the mean hotspot loci for TA muscle from the vertex were approximately: 1.29cm lateral and 0.55cm posterior in the non-lesioned hemisphere, 1.25cm lateral and 0.5cm posterior in the lesioned hemisphere and 1.6cm lateral and 0.8cm posterior in the healthy brain. There was no significant difference in the x- and y-coordinates between the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres. However, the locations of the XNLes (p=0.01) and XLes (p=0.004) were significantly different from XH. The YNLes and YLes showed no significant differences from YH loci. Analyses of spatial clustering patterns using the Moran's I index showed a negative autocorrelation in stroke participants (NLes: Moran's I=-0.09, p<0.001; Les: Moran's I=-0.14, p=0.002), and a positive autocorrelation in healthy participants

  19. Post-operative use of knee brace in bone-tendon-bone patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 5-year follow-up results of a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Harilainen, A; Sandelin, J

    2006-02-01

    Sixty patients were prospectively randomized to brace and no-brace groups after bone-tendon-bone patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The brace group wore a rehabilitation knee brace for 12 weeks post-operatively, while the no-brace group was mobilized immediately, and crutches were discarded 2 weeks post-operatively. The groups were comparable with respect to age, gender, time from injury to surgery and concomitant injuries. There were no differences either pre-operatively or 5 years post-operatively (80% of patients reviewed) between the groups in terms of the knee score (Lysholm), activity level (Tegner), degree of laxity or isokinetic peak muscle torque. Thus it appears that knee braces are not needed in the post-operative rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction with the patellar tendon graft.

  20. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  1. The effect of muscle fatigue on in vivo tibial strains.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa R; Finestone, Aharon; Nyska, Meir; Mendelson, Stephen; Benjuya, Nisim; Simkin, Ariel; Burr, David

    2007-01-01

    Stress fracture is a common musculoskeletal problem affecting athletes and soldiers. Repetitive high bone strains and strain rates are considered to be its etiology. The strain level necessary to cause fatigue failure of bone ex vivo is higher than the strains recorded in humans during vigorous physical activity. We hypothesized that during fatiguing exercises, bone strains may increase and reach levels exceeding those measured in the non-fatigued state. To test this hypothesis, we measured in vivo tibial strains, the maximum gastrocnemius isokinetic torque and ground reaction forces in four subjects before and after two fatiguing levels of exercise: a 2km run and a 30km desert march. Strains were measured using strain-gauged staples inserted percutaneously in the medial aspect of their mid-tibial diaphysis. There was a decrease in the peak gastrocnemius isokinetic torque of all four subjects' post-march as compared to pre-run (p=0.0001), indicating the presence of gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. Tension strains increased 26% post-run (p=0.002, 95 % confidence interval (CI) and 29% post-march (p=0.0002, 95% CI) as compared to the pre-run phase. Tension strain rates increased 13% post-run (p=0.001, 95% CI) and 11% post-march (p=0.009, 95% CI) and the compression strain rates increased 9% post-run (p=0.0004, 95% CI) and 17% post-march (p=0.0001, 95% CI). The fatigue state increases bone strains well above those recorded in rested individuals and may be a major factor in the stress fracture etiology.

  2. Distal tibial physeal bridge: a complication from a tension band plate and screw construct. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Oda, Jon E; Thacker, Mihir M

    2013-05-01

    We report on a case of a tension band plate and screw construct (Eight Plate) used over the anterior distal tibia in an 9-year-old girl in an attempt to induce recurvatum of the ankle joint to correct a recalcitrant equinus deformity. With growth of the distal tibial physis, the epiphyseal screw was drawn through the physis into the distal tibial metaphysis, resulting in the creation of a transphyseal bony bar. Caution should be exercised when attempting temporary hemiepiphyseodesis using a plate and screw construct in small epiphyses or in an osteopenic bone.

  3. Compartment syndrome with mononeuropathies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kindle, Brett J; Murthy, Naveen; Stolp, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Compartment syndrome rarely follows anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, when it does, it may result in mononeuropathies that are amenable to neurolysis. The authors of this study present an 18-yr-old woman who sustained a right anterior cruciate ligament tear and underwent uneventful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using femoral and popliteal nerve blocks. Postoperatively, she developed compartment syndrome requiring emergent fasciotomies. At 11 wks after fasciotomy, results of electrophysiologic tests showed evidence of severe fibular and tibial neuropathies. Magnetic resonance images showed extensive tricompartmental myonecrosis. Fibular and tibial neurolysis as well as decompression were performed, followed by intensive outpatient rehabilitation. At the 6-mo follow-up, she reported resolution of pain as well as significant improvement in sensation, strength, and function. Early recognition and intervention are crucial to prevent serious neurologic damage. Excessive tourniquet pressure and anesthetic nerve blocks may have been responsible.

  4. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  5. Tibial inlay posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, David R; Hussain, Suleman M

    2010-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries occur much less frequently than other ligament injuries of the knee such as anterior cruciate ligament injuries. There is general agreement for nonoperative treatment for lower grade injuries such as type I PCL injuries. However, for more severe injuries which may require surgery, there is no consensus on an optimal reconstruction method. Multiple arthroscopic and open techniques exist to reconstruct the PCL. Limited clinical outcomes data reveals good short-term clinical results with different reconstruction options. Biomechanical data has helped further the understanding regarding the performance of different reconstructions. This article will present a surgical technique for single bundle tibial inlay reconstruction of the PCL along with the objective biomechanical data that supports this reconstruction.

  6. Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Susan M; Stanitski, Carl L

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 18 patients with 19 acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures was performed. Mean age at injury was 13 years 8 months. Mean follow-up time was 2 years 8 months. A group of four preadolescent patients ages 9 to 12 years at injury was identified. Participation in athletics, particularly basketball, resulted in 77% of fractures. There were one type IA, three type IB, two type IIA, six type IIB, two type IIIA, four type IIIB, and one type IV fractures. Fifteen fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation and four by closed reduction and cylinder cast immobilization. Three cases (15.7%) of extensor mechanism disruption were noted, two patellar tendon avulsions and one quadriceps avulsion. Final outcome was good in all patients regardless of fracture type or treatment. There were no complications.

  7. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the groups for knee extension power. The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance

  8. Tibial shaft fractures in amateur footballers

    PubMed Central

    Lenehan, B; Fleming, P; Walsh, S; Kaar, K

    2003-01-01

    Background: Footballers constitute a unique group of patients with tibial shaft fractures. They tend to have excellent general health and well developed musculature in the leg, and their fractures are generally closed injuries caused by low velocity trauma. However, little has been reported on the outcome after tibial shaft fractures in this group. Objective: To identify patterns of injury, response to treatment, and functional outcome in such a group. Method: Fifty consecutive tibial shaft fractures in adult footballers treated at Merlin Park Regional Hospital over a five year period were analysed. Results: Most of the fractures were type A injuries (AO/ASIF classification). The incidence of complications was low. All patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. However, only 54% of patients returned to playing competitive football. Conclusion: Tibial shaft fractures in amateur footballers are associated with good results when traditional outcome criteria are used, but many patients do not regain their previous level of function. PMID:12663363

  9. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated.

  10. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on femorotibial contact mechanics and stifle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D

    2009-01-01

    Objective- To evaluate the effects of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) on femorotibial contact mechanics and 3-dimensional kinematics in cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifles of dogs. Study Design- In vitro biomechanical study. Animals- Unpaired pelvic limbs from 8 dogs, weighing 28-35 kg. Methods- Digital pressure sensors placed subjacent to the menisci were used to measure femorotibial contact force, contact area, peak and mean contact pressure, and peak pressure location with the limb under an axial load of 30% body weight and a stifle angle of 135 degrees . Three-dimensional static poses of the stifle were obtained using a Microscribe digitizing arm. Each specimen was tested under normal, CrCL-deficient, and TTA-treated conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance with a Tukey post hoc test (P<.05) was used for statistical comparison. Results- Significant disturbances to all measured contact mechanic parameters were evident after CrCL transection, which corresponded to marked cranial tibial subluxation and internal tibial rotation in the CrCL-deficient stifle. No significant differences in any contact mechanic and kinematic parameters were detected between normal and TTA-treated stifles. Conclusion- TTA eliminates craniocaudal stifle instability during simulated weight-bearing and concurrently restores femorotibial contact mechanics to normal. Clinical Relevance- TTA may mitigate the progression of stifle osteoarthritis in dogs afflicted with CrCL insufficiency by eliminating cranial tibial thrust while preserving the normal orientation of the proximal tibial articulating surface.

  11. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure.

  12. Femoral interference screw placement through the tibial tunnel: a novel method without graft damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2006-11-01

    A frequently encountered problem in endoscopic 1-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the difficulty involved in accurately inserting the femoral interference screw without significant and undesirable divergence between the screw and the graft when a femoral interference screw is fixed through the anteromedial portal. To minimize divergence, the authors demonstrated a modified, easy, and reproducible procedure that can be performed without causing graft injury or requiring special instrumentation. A ligament reconstruction route is created with the use of an ACL guide system. Lead graft sutures are pulled through the anteromedial portal by way of the femoral tunnel and out the anterolateral thigh first. The tendon graft is then inserted through the anteromedial portal and up into the femoral tunnel. A guidewire is introduced through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. An appropriately sized BioScrew (Linvatec, Largo, FL) is inserted, with the use of a guidewire inside the screw, through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. The graft is then retrieved through the anteromedial portal and is inserted through the tibial tunnel. Finally, the tendon graft in the tibial tunnel is similarly fixed with a BioScrew of the same size. Moreover, this novel approach is feasible for all tendon grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts, quadriceps tendon-patellar bone grafts, and hamstring tendon grafts). PMID:17084309

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of tibial eminence fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Monto, Raymond Rocco; Cameron-Donaldson, Michelle L; Close, Matthew A; Ho, Charles P; Hawkins, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    Proton density and T2-weighted sagittal, axial, coronal, and inversion recovery fat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were reviewed in 21 adults (10 men and 11 women) with 22 tibial eminence fractures. Average patient age was 43 years (range: 19-62 years). There were 3 type I, 3 type II, 12 type III, and 4 type IV fractures. The average fracture fragment size was 21 x 23 mm, and the average displacement was 5.5 mm (range: 0-12 mm). The MRI disclosed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertional avulsions in 20 (91%), distal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsions in 4 (18%), intrasubstance ACL damage in 9 (41%), intrasubstance PCL injury in 3 (14%), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears in 9 (41%) knees, retinacular injury in 8 (36%), posterolateral corner damage in 8 (36%), medial meniscal tears in 5 (23%), and 4 (18%) had lateral meniscal tears. Occult subchondral osseous injuries were seen in the posterolateral tibial plateau in 13 (59%) knees, anterolateral femoral condyle in 4 (18%), and posteromedial tibial plateau in 5 (23%) knees. Discrete osteochondral fractures were present in 7 (32%) knees. Significant osseous, cartilaginous, meniscal, and ligamentous damage was discovered in all patients. Based on these findings, we recommend MRI evaluation of all tibial eminence fractures to accurately detect all knee damage.

  14. Simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture.

    PubMed

    Maar, D C; Kernek, C B; Pierce, R O

    1988-11-01

    Bilateral simultaneous tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are extremely rare. The present case was a 16-year-old boy who sustained bilateral simultaneous tibial tubercle avulsion fractures (Watson-Jones Type III) from jumping while playing basketball. Both fractures were treated successfully by open reduction and internal fixation with screws. Three years later, the patient had the screws removed because of knee pain and tenderness over the screws.

  15. Atypical tibial tuberosity fracture in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Jalgaonkar, Azal A; Dachepalli, Sunil; Al-Wattar, Zaid; Rao, Sudhir; Kochhar, Tony

    2011-06-01

    Avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity are typically sustained by adolescent males during sporting activities. Tibial tuberosity avulsions with simultaneous proximal tibial epiphyseal fractures are rare injuries. We present an unusual case of Ogden type IIIA avulsion fracture of tibial tuberosity with a Salter Harris type IV posterior fracture of proximal tibial epiphysis in a 13-year-old boy. We believe that the patient sustained the tibial tuberosity avulsion during the take-off phase of a jump while playing basketball due to sudden violent contraction of the quadriceps as the knee was extending. This was then followed by the posterior Salter Harris type IV fracture of proximal tibial physis as he landed on his leg with enormous forces passing through the knee. Although standard radiographs were helpful in diagnosing the complex fracture pattern, precise configuration was only established by computed tomography (CT) scan. The scan also excluded well-recognized concomitant injuries including ligament and meniscal injuries. Unlike other reported cases, our patient did not have compartment syndrome. Anatomic reduction and stabilization with a partially threaded transepiphyseal cannulated screw and a metaphyseal screw followed by early mobilization ensured an excellent recovery by the patient.Our case highlights the importance of vigilance and a high index of suspicion for coexisting fractures or soft tissue injuries when treating avulsion fractures of tibial tuberosity. A CT scan is justified in such patients to recognize complex fracture configurations, and surgical treatment should be directed appropriately to both the fractures followed by early rehabilitation. Patients with such injuries warrant close monitoring for compartment syndrome during the perioperative period.

  16. Use of Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 among Tibial Fracture Patients was Redundant

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores among patients undergoing operative management of tibial fractures. Study Design and Setting Between July 2000 and September 2005, we enrolled 1319 skeletally mature patients with open or closed fractures of the tibial shaft that were managed with intramedullary nailing. Patients were asked to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and Short Form-36 at discharge and 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. Results Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were highly correlated at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. The difference in mean standardized change scores for the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, from 3 to 12 months post-surgical fixation, was not statistically significant. Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were able to discriminate between healed and non-healed tibial fractures at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgery. Conclusion In patients with tibial shaft fractures, the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index offered no important advantages over the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary score. These results, along with the usefulness of the Short Form-36 for comparing populations, recommends the Short Form-36 for assessing physical function in studies of patients with tibial fractures. PMID:19364637

  17. Treatment of tibial eminence fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Tarabichi, Majd; Harris, David; Wright, Rick

    2015-06-01

    Fractures of the tibial eminence are rare, accounting for less than 1% of the injuries involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Most agree that nondisplaced fractures can be managed nonoperatively, but debate exists over the ideal treatment of displaced fractures. This systematic review evaluates the outcome of nonoperatively and operatively managed displaced tibial eminence fractures. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were queried. Inclusion criteria included reported outcomes of displaced tibial eminence fractures, minimum 2-year follow-up, and English language. Outcomes reported were pooled and included the following: clinical instability (Lachman/anterior drawer, pivot shift, and KT 1000), patient-reported pain and/or instability, return to sport, Lysholm, Tegner, and the need for ACL reconstruction. Comparison was made in the outcomes of nonoperatively and operatively treated fractures and between suture and screw fixation techniques. Overall 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. The pooled mean age was 23 years and mean follow-up was 35 months. Clinical instability was seen in 70% of nonoperatively treated patients and 14% of operatively treated patients (p < 0.0001). Patient-reported instability was higher in nonoperatively treated patients (54 vs. 1.2%, p < 0.0001), as was the rate of ACL reconstruction (10 vs. 1.0%, p = 0.036). In comparing suture fixation to screw fixation, patient-reported instability and the rate of ACL reconstruction were equivalent. Patients treated with screw fixation had a higher incidence of clinically measured instability (Lachman and KT arthrometer) and an increased rate of hardware removal (3.9 vs. 64.9%, p < 0.05). Surgically managed patients report less instability, are higher functioning, and require fewer ACL reconstructions when compared with nonoperatively treated patients. Suture fixation was associated with improvements in clinical measures of stability and decreased need for hardware

  18. Porous tantalum tibial component prevents periprosthetic loss of bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty for five years-a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Ikebuchi, Mitsuhiko; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Inori, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    In 21 knees receiving porous tantalum tibial component and 21 knees receiving a cemented cobalt-chromium tibial component, dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed for five years post-operatively. The postoperative decrease in the bone mineral density in the lateral aspect of the tibia was significantly less in knees with porous tantalum tibial components (11.6%) than in knees with cemented cobalt-chromium tibial components (29.6%) at five years (p < 0.05). No prosthetic migration or periprosthetic fracture was detected in either group. The present study is one of the studies with the longest follow-up period on bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty. Porous tantalum tibial component has a favorable effect on the bone mineral density of the proximal tibia after total knee arthroplasty up to five years.

  19. A Fluoroscopy-Free Technique for Percutaneous Screw Positioning During Arthroscopic Treatment of Depression Tibial Plateau Fractures.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Camelo Barbosa, Nuno; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jan, Nicolas; Fayard, Jean Marie; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    This article aims to describe a simple and reliable technique that helps in positioning the cannulated percutaneous screws during fixation of depression-type tibial plateau fractures. After fracture reduction under arthroscopic control, an outside-in anterior cruciate ligament femoral guide is introduced through the tibial cortical metaphyseal window and positioned under endoscopic control just underneath the elevated fragment. When proper height is achieved, a guide pin is drilled from lateral to medial through the sleeve, 1 to 2 cm distal to the articular surface of the depressed fragment. The cannulated screw can then be introduced under endoscopic control, without fluoroscopic assistance, just under the previously elevated joint surface. This technique ensures optimal placement of the cannulated screw in the middle of the bony tunnel to obtain optimal subchondral bone support during fixation of the depressed tibial plateau fracture. PMID:27656370

  20. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  1. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  2. Tibial Bone Density in Athletes With Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Özgürbüz, Cengizhan; Yüksel, Oğuz; Ergün, Metin; İşlegen, Çetin; Taskiran, Emin; Denerel, Nevzad; Karamizrak, Oğuz

    2011-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common overuse injury of the lower extremity predominantly observed in weight bearing activities. Knowledge about the pathological lesions and their pathophysiology is still limited. Only a single study was found to have investigated tibial bone density in the pain region, revealing lower density in athletes with long standing (range, 5-120 month) MTSS. In a follow-up study, bone density was determined to return to normal levels after recovery. The purpose of the present study was to investigate tibial bone density in athletes with shorter MTSS history (range, 3-10 weeks). A total of 11 athletes (7 males, 4 females) diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome were included in the study. The control group consisted of 11 regularly exercising individuals (7 males, 4 females). Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Total calcium intake was calculated by evaluating detailed nutrition history. No statistically significant differences were found in the tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities between the groups. No statistically significant difference was found among groups, considering for calcium intake. Tibial bone densities were not lower in athletes with MTSS of 5.0 weeks mean duration (range, 3-10 weeks) compared to the healthy control group. Longitudinal studies with regular tibial bone density measurements in heavily trained athletes are necessary to investigate tibial density alterations in MTSS developing athletes during the course of the symptoms. Key points Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. No differences were found between the MTSS group (MTSS history 3-10 weeks) and the healthy athletes group. PMID:24149568

  3. Tibial bone density in athletes with medial tibial stress syndrome: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ozgürbüz, Cengizhan; Yüksel, Oğuz; Ergün, Metin; Işlegen, Cetin; Taskiran, Emin; Denerel, Nevzad; Karamizrak, Oğuz

    2011-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common overuse injury of the lower extremity predominantly observed in weight bearing activities. Knowledge about the pathological lesions and their pathophysiology is still limited. Only a single study was found to have investigated tibial bone density in the pain region, revealing lower density in athletes with long standing (range, 5-120 month) MTSS. In a follow-up study, bone density was determined to return to normal levels after recovery. The purpose of the present study was to investigate tibial bone density in athletes with shorter MTSS history (range, 3-10 weeks). A total of 11 athletes (7 males, 4 females) diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome were included in the study. The control group consisted of 11 regularly exercising individuals (7 males, 4 females). Tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Total calcium intake was calculated by evaluating detailed nutrition history. No statistically significant differences were found in the tibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities between the groups. No statistically significant difference was found among groups, considering for calcium intake. Tibial bone densities were not lower in athletes with MTSS of 5.0 weeks mean duration (range, 3-10 weeks) compared to the healthy control group. Longitudinal studies with regular tibial bone density measurements in heavily trained athletes are necessary to investigate tibial density alterations in MTSS developing athletes during the course of the symptoms. Key pointsTibial, femoral and vertebral bone densities were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.No differences were found between the MTSS group (MTSS history 3-10 weeks) and the healthy athletes group.

  4. Do microfractures improve high tibial osteotomy outcome?

    PubMed

    Pascale, Walter; Luraghi, Simone; Perico, Laura; Pascale, Valerio

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if microfractures improve the outcome of high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritis in genu varum. Forty patients presenting with Outerbridge grade III and IV chondropathies on the femoral and/or the tibial joint surface underwent high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plates (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) for primary medial compartment osteoarthritis in genu varum at our institution. Patients were randomly assigned to either the high tibial osteotomy plus microfractures group (A; n=20) or the high tibial osteotomy alone group (B; n=20). Final assessment was conducted 5 years postoperatively, including clinical response measured by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm score, and patient satisfaction score. All patients were blinded to the treatment received and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. A statistically significant improvement between pre- and postoperative values was observed for Lysholm and IKDC scores in both groups, without any statistically significant difference between them. Regarding the satisfaction score, there were no differences between the 2 groups in terms of preoperative self-assessment (P>.05), whereas postoperative subjective satisfaction at 5-year follow-up was significantly higher in group A than in group B (P=.0036).Our study results provide further evidence that medial tibial osteotomy is an effective surgical option for treating a varus knee associated with medial degenerative arthritis in patients wishing to continue accustomed levels of physical activity. In particular, patient satisfaction was higher among those who underwent the combined treatment involving high tibial osteotomy to correct femorotibial angle and microfractures. PMID:21717984

  5. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  6. Comparing methods of quantifying tibial acceleration slope.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2010-05-01

    Considerable variability in tibial acceleration slope (AS) values, and different interpretations of injury risk based on these values, have been reported. Acceleration slope variability may be due in part to variations in the quantification methods used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify differences in tibial AS values determined using end points at various percentage ranges between impact and peak tibial acceleration, as a function of either amplitude or time. Tibial accelerations were recorded from 20 participants (21.8 +/- 2.9 years, 1.7 m +/- 0.1 m, 75.1 kg +/- 17.0 kg) during 24 unshod heel impacts using a human pendulum apparatus. Nine ranges were tested from 5-95% (widest range) to 45-55% (narrowest range) at 5% increments. AS(Amplitude) values increased consistently from the widest to narrowest ranges, whereas the AS(Time) values remained essentially the same. The magnitudes of AS(Amplitude) values were significantly higher and more sensitive to changes in percentage range than AS(Time) values derived from the same impact data. This study shows that tibial AS magnitudes are highly dependent on the method used to calculate them. Researchers are encouraged to carefully consider the method they use to calculate AS so that equivalent comparisons and assessments of injury risk across studies can be made.

  7. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  8. The anterior cruciate ligament-lateral meniscus complex: A histological study.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Maehara, Ami; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus (LM) dives underneath the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although the distinct role of meniscal attachments has been investigated, the relationship between the LM anterior insertion (LMAI) and ACL tibial insertion (ACLTI) remains unclear. This study histologically analyzed the LMAI and ACLTI. Samples were divided into four regions in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Histological measurements of these insertion sites were performed using safranin O-stained coronal sections. Distribution and signal densities of type I and II collagen were quantified. The ACLTI and LMAI formed the ACL-LM complex via fiber connections. The anterior part of the ACLTI had a widespread attachment composed of dense fibers. Attachment fibers of the LMAI became dense and wide gradually at the middle-to-posterior region. The ACL-LM transition zone (ALTZ) was observed between the LMAI and the lateral border of the ACLTI at the middle part of the ACL tibial footprint. Type II collagen density of the LMAI was higher than that of the ACLTI and ALTZ. Our results can help create an accurate tibial bone tunnel within the dense ACL attachment during ACL reconstruction surgery.

  9. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  10. Tibial stress injuries: decisive diagnosis and treatment of 'shin splints'.

    PubMed

    Couture, Christopher J; Karlson, Kristine A

    2002-06-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called 'shin splints,' often result when bone remodeling processes adapt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who care for athletic patients need a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are implications for appropriate diagnosis, management, and prevention.

  11. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  12. Arthroscopic repair for a flap tear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus adjacent to its tibial insertion.

    PubMed

    Shino, K; Hamada, M; Mitsuoka, T; Kinoshita, H; Toritsuka, Y

    1995-08-01

    A flap tear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus adjacent to its tibial insertion combined with acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament was successfully repaired arthroscopically by a combination of advancement of the tip of the flap into a drill hole created in the tibia and an inside-out stacked suture technique using Henning instrumentation in two cases. However, the long-term function of the repaired menisci, which was reduced several millimeters in circumferential length, is still unknown.

  13. Posttraumatic saphenous neuroma after open tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Heare, Austin; Mitchell, Justin J; Bravman, Jonathan T

    2015-11-01

    Neuralgia and neuroma secondary to iatrogenic saphenous nerve injury have been described in the setting of orthopedic surgical interventions. However, postoperative neuropathic pain caused by saphenous neuroma in the setting of orthopedic trauma has not been reported. We present a case of a 43-year-old woman with a symptomatic saphenous neuroma after an open, laterally angulated tibial fracture. The diagnosis was confirmed in the clinical setting, and treatment consisted of neurolysis and partial neurectomy, resulting in complete pain relief and functional recovery. This case demonstrates the diagnosis and treatment strategy for a symptomatic posttraumatic saphenous neuroma in the setting of a healed, open distal one-third tibial fracture.

  14. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  15. Fracture of tibial tuberosity in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Campos, André Siqueira; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Gameiro, Vinícius Schott

    2013-01-01

    The fracture of tibial tuberosity is a rare lesion and still more unusual in adults. We describe a case in an adult who suffered a left knee injury due to a fall from height. No risk factors were identified. The lesion was treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation. The rehabilitation method was successful, resulting in excellent function and rage of motion of the knee. The aim of this study was to present an unusual case of direct trauma of the tibial tuberosity in an adult and the therapy performed. PMID:24293543

  16. Clinical Outcomes of High Tibial Osteotomy for Knee Instability

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Chase S.; Liechti, Daniel J.; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years there has been an increasing interest in high tibial osteotomy (HTO) to treat patients with chronic knee instability due to posterolateral corner (PLC), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiencies with concurrent malalignment in the coronal and/or sagittal plane. Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the use of HTO for the treatment of knee ligament instability with concurrent malalignment. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted for the treatment of combined knee ligament instability and malalignment with HTO using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE (1980 to present); the queries were performed in July 2015. Terms searched included the following: high or proximal tibial osteotomy, unstable, instability, laxity, subluxation, tibial slope, and malalignment, in the knee joint. Inclusion criteria were as follows: HTO to treat instability of the knee joint in the sagittal and/or coronal plane, minimum 2-year follow-up with reported outcomes measures, English language, and human studies. Animal, basic science, and cadaveric studies were excluded as well as editorials, reviews, expert opinions, surveys, special topics, letters to the editor, and correspondence. Results: The search resulted in 460 studies. After applying exclusion criteria and removing duplicates, 13 studies were considered. Of the studies reviewed, knee ligament pathologies, previous surgeries, and measurement of knee stability were heterogeneous. However, all studies reported an improvement in knee stability after HTO. Most studies reported improvement in outcome scores. However, other studies did not provide preoperative scores for comparison. Reported complication rates ranged from 0% to 47%. Conclusion: Although HTO has been highly advocated and used in treating patients with ligamentous knee instability, there

  17. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  18. Editorial Commentary: Anatomy of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament - Are We Up to Date?

    PubMed

    Provencher, Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review demonstrates that knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomic landmarks continue to be better defined, but debate as to the precise location of the ACL femoral and tibial footprints persists. The ACL anatomy of an individual patient may ultimately be impossible to determine using generalized research data, but current research probably gets us pretty close.

  19. Tibial Fixation Properties of a Continuous-Loop ACL Hamstring Graft Construct with Suspensory Fixation in Porcine Bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick A; DeBerardino, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to compare tibial fixation strength of suspensory fixation for a quadrupled semitendinosus continuous loop all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) construct versus a doubled semitendinosus and gracilis graft fixated with an interference screw. Biomechanical testing was conducted using human hamstring allografts and porcine tibias. Constructs were cycled from 50 to 250 N for 500 cycles followed by a pull to failure. The average load to failure of tibial suspensory fixation of the all-inside continuous loop construct (1,012 N) was statistically different compared with the tibial interference screw group (612 N) (p < 0.001). The cyclic displacement of the continuous loop construct (2.5 mm) was not statistically different from the interference screw construct (1.9 mm). For both the groups, approximately half the overall cyclic displacement occurred with the first cycle. Tibial side suspensory fixation of a novel all-inside continuous loop hamstring graft provided suitable strength for tibial fixation for ACL reconstruction. The continuous loop construct had a significantly higher load to failure compared with the use of an interference screw, and cyclic loading was comparable. Use of hamstring soft tissue grafts is very common for ACL reconstruction. An all-inside ACL reconstruction is based on a continuous loop construct utilizing a single semitendinosus graft that is quadrupled employing suspensory fixation on both the femoral and tibial side. Suspensory fixation on the femoral side been previously reported, but this is the first report of strength of this method of suspensory fixation on the tibia. PMID:25347056

  20. Non-invasive mouse models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, B A; Guilak, F; Lockwood, K A; Olson, S A; Pitsillides, A A; Sandell, L J; Silva, M J; van der Meulen, M C H; Haudenschild, D R

    2015-10-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) are essential tools for investigating the development of the disease on a more rapid timeline than human OA. Mice are particularly useful due to the plethora of genetically modified or inbred mouse strains available. The majority of available mouse models of OA use a joint injury or other acute insult to initiate joint degeneration, representing post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). However, no consensus exists on which injury methods are most translatable to human OA. Currently, surgical injury methods are most commonly used for studies of OA in mice; however, these methods may have confounding effects due to the surgical/invasive injury procedure itself, rather than the targeted joint injury. Non-invasive injury methods avoid this complication by mechanically inducing a joint injury externally, without breaking the skin or disrupting the joint. In this regard, non-invasive injury models may be crucial for investigating early adaptive processes initiated at the time of injury, and may be more representative of human OA in which injury is induced mechanically. A small number of non-invasive mouse models of PTOA have been described within the last few years, including intra-articular fracture of tibial subchondral bone, cyclic tibial compression loading of articular cartilage, and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture via tibial compression overload. This review describes the methods used to induce joint injury in each of these non-invasive models, and presents the findings of studies utilizing these models. Altogether, these non-invasive mouse models represent a unique and important spectrum of animal models for studying different aspects of PTOA. PMID:26003950

  1. Five cases of failure of the tibial polyethylene insert locking mechanism in one design of constrained knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rapuri, Venkata R; Clarke, Henry D; Spangehl, Mark J; Beauchamp, Christopher P

    2011-09-01

    We describe 5 cases of failure of the locking mechanism of the polyethylene insert and tibial base-plate in one design of constrained condylar knee prosthesis due to disengagement of the locking screw. Loosening of the screw is believed to occur because of a counterclockwise torque created by the axial rotation of the femur on the tibia that occurs as the knee extends during gait. This torque is transmitted via the highly rotationally constrained femoral housing and tibial post to the locking screw. These failures suggest that an alternative locking mechanism should be considered for this prosthesis.

  2. Comparison of unreamed nailing and external fixation of tibial diastases--mechanical conditions during healing and biological outcome.

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Opitz, M; Schell, H; Taylor, W R; Heller, M O; Kassi, J-P; Kandziora, F; Duda, G N

    2004-09-01

    Locked intramedullary nailing and external fixation are alternatives for the stabilization of tibial shaft fractures. The goal of this study was to determine to what extent the mechanical conditions at the fracture site influence the healing process after unreamed tibial nailing compared to external fixation. A standardized tibial diastasis was stabilized with either a locked unreamed tibial nail or a monolateral fixator in a sheep model. Interfragmentary movements and ground reaction parameters were monitored in vivo throughout the healing period. After sacrifice, the tibiae were examined mechanically and histologically. Bending angles and axial torsion at the fracture site were larger in the nail group within the first five weeks post-operatively. Unlike the fixator group, the operated limb in the nail group did not return to full weight bearing during the treatment period. Mechanical and histomorphometrical observations showed significantly inferior bone healing in the nail group compared to the fixator group. In this study, unreamed nailing of a tibial diastasis did not provide rotational stability of the osteosynthesis and resulted in a significant delay in bone healing.

  3. Effects of coronal plane conformity on tibial loading in TKA: a comparison of AGC© flat versus conforming articulations.

    PubMed

    Berend, Michael E; Small, Scott R; Ritter, Merrill A; Buckley, Christine A; Merk, James C; Dierking, W Kurt

    2009-04-01

    Conforming articulations potentially decrease polyethylene contact stresses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA); however, less is known about the effect of coronal geometry on tibial loading and clinical failure. This study examined the relationship between coronal plane geometry and loading patterns in the proximal tibia. Composite tibiae were implanted with modular, metal-backed tibial trays and were compressively loaded with conforming and nonconforming ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) tibial bearings and comparable femoral components. Changes in strain on the proximal tibia were quantified using a photoelastic strain analysis method. In balanced loading, coronally dished components created a strain increase in the anterior medial tibia while creating a significant strain decrease in the posterior tibia. Proximal tibial strains were decreased and centralized in conforming versus flat articulations. This centralization of loading may lead to a reduction in edge loading during gait. Lower strains were observed with coronally dished implants in key regions corresponding to the clinical overload of the tibia leading to aseptic loosening.

  4. Combined lateral femoral epicondylar osteotomy and a submeniscal approach for the treatment of a tibial plateau fracture involving the posterolateral quadrant.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Ang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Beom-Koo

    2015-02-01

    Exposure of a tibial plateau fracture involving the posterolateral quadrant is challenging, and several approaches for treating these fractures have been introduced. However, these approaches may have limited applicability, and they can potentially cause neurovascular, musculotendinous, or ligamentous injury of the posterolateral corner. Lateral femoral epicondylar osteotomy has been used for meniscal transplantation, total knee arthroplasty, and the treatment of posterolateral articular disorders of the femur and tibia. We encountered a case of a tibial plateau fracture involving the posterolateral quadrant without an anterior-extending fracture line. We successfully exposed, reduced, and fixed the fracture using combined lateral femoral epicondylar osteotomy and a submeniscal approach. This combined modality can be used as an alternative surgical technique for the treatment of tibial plateau fractures involving the posterolateral quadrant. PMID:25548115

  5. Post-natal molecular adaptations in anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ovine anterior cruciate ligament: one structure with two parts or two distinct ligaments?

    PubMed

    Huebner, Kyla D; O'Brien, Etienne J O; Heard, Bryan J; Chung, May; Achari, Yamini; Shrive, Nigel G; Frank, Cyril B

    2012-01-01

    The human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a composite structure of two anatomically distinct bundles: an anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles. Tendons are often used as autografts for surgical reconstruction of ACL following severe injury. However, despite successful surgical reconstruction, some people experience re-rupture and later development of osteoarthritis. Understanding the structure and molecular makeup of normal ACL is essential for its optimal replacement. Reportedly the two bundles display different tensions throughout joint motion and may be fundamentally different. This study assessed the similarities and differences in ultrastructure and molecular composition of the AM and PL bundles to test the hypothesis that the two bundles of the ACL develop unique characteristics with maturation. ACLs from nine mature and six immature sheep were compared. The bundles were examined for mRNA and protein levels of collagen types I, III, V, and VI, and two proteoglycans. The fibril diameter composition of the two bundles was examined with transmission electron microscopy. Maturation does alter the molecular and structural composition of the two bundles of ACL. Although the PL band appears to mature slower than the AM band, no significant differences were detected between the bundles in the mature animals. We thus reject our hypothesis that the two ACL bundles are distinct. The two anatomically distinct bundles of the sheep ACL can be considered as two parts of one structure at maturity and material that would result in a structure of similar functionality can be used to replace each ACL bundle in the sheep.

  6. Biomechanical Solutions in Tibial Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, C.; Budescu, E.; Cotoros, V.

    This paper presents a biomechanical analysis of three solutions with implants in fracture fixation of tibial malleolus, on the mechanical strength testing. Samples were tested in mechanical traction, the forces revealed the minimum threshold from which start the phenomenon of bone destruction and maximum forces that destroyed the fractured fragments achieved by fixation elements. Experimental tests showed the best technical solution of the three, namely that consists of two Kirschner pins, cortical screws and wire tightening.

  7. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery after manipulation under anesthesia of a total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Bleazey, Scott T; Oskin, Timothy C; Protzman, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Although pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery has been reported, no investigators have discussed the development of a pseudoaneurysm after manipulation under anesthesia of a total ankle replacement. We present the case of a 59-year-old female with end-stage post-traumatic tibiotalar joint disease who underwent an uneventful INBONE® Total Ankle Replacement. She experienced continued postoperative pain and impingement after physical therapy. Consequently, she underwent manipulation under anesthesia. The manipulation provided complete and immediate pain relief. However, she developed a pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery that required vascular repair. She recovered uneventfully and was ambulating free of pain with improved functionality. Although manipulation under anesthesia of a total ankle replacement is a valuable, noninvasive tool that can provide near-immediate pain relief, it is important to realize that this distal arterial injury, although uncommon, is a possibility.

  9. How to avoid the risk of intraoperative cartilage damage in anatomic four tunnel double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Benetos, Ioannis S; Sartory, Nico; He, Zhenming; Hariri, Nawid; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-01-01

    Double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is technically demanding. In order to create four anatomical anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bone tunnels many surgeons adopt new ways of tibial and femoral bone tunnel drilling. From surgical experience, these technical changes might increase the risk for intraoperative pitfalls. An intraoperative articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle or the medial tibial plateau could be disastrous for the patient. It may be caused by an insufficient anteromedial portal technique for femoral AM and PL bone tunnel drilling or flat tibial AM or PL bone tunnel reaming. Potential pitfalls may be avoided by small modifications to the surgical technique. In this present technical note, a sequence of surgical steps are described, which may help to avoid articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau in anatomical four tunnel DB ACL reconstruction.

  10. Contribution of angular motion and gravity to tibial acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Hennig, E M

    1991-03-01

    A bone-mounted accelerometer and high-speed cinematography were used to compare the axial tibial acceleration caused by ground impact with the total tibial axial acceleration as measured by a transducer. Due to the effects of gravity and tibial angular motion, the magnitude of the peak acceleration at foot strike was 43% below and 18% above the peak axial acceleration due to impact for running and walking, respectively. Depending on the distance of the accelerometer from the tibial center of rotation which is located at the ankle joint, different axial acceleration signals should be expected during comparable locomotor activities.

  11. Interstitial pressure measurements in the anterior and posterior compartments in athletes with shin splints.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosia, R D; Zelis, R F; Chuinard, R G; Wilmore, J

    1977-01-01

    We found no basis for increased intercompartmental pressure in either the anterior or posterior compartments as the cause of shin splints. The pain in all 14 of the patients studied was localized to the posterior medial border of the tibia at the origin of the posterior tibial muscle, and evidence of periostitis in this area was seen in two of our patients, suggesting the possible tearing away of the posterior tibial muscle from its origin. Shin splints is a lay term which has assumed medical diagnostic significance and should be removed from common usage by more accurately localizing the focus of pain.

  12. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  13. Prognostic Value of the 24-Hour Neurological Examination in Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke: A post hoc Analysis of Two Randomized Controlled Stroke Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Frankel, Michael; Jovin, Tudor G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early prognostication of long-term outcomes following ischemic stroke can facilitate medical decision-making. We hypothesized that the 24-hour National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) predicts 3-month clinical outcomes in anterior circulation stroke. Methods Secondary analyses of the Interventional Management of Stroke 3 (IMS3) and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) for acute ischemic stroke [National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) IV tPA] trials were performed. In participants with documented 24-hour NIHSS and 3-month Modified Rankin Scale (mRS), the predictive power of the 24-hour NIHSS and 24-hour NIHSS improvement for 3-month outcomes [mRS 0-2 and Barthel Index (BI) ≥95] was assessed. Percentages of good outcome (mRS 0-2 or BI ≥95) at 3, 6, and 12 months and mean quality of life (EQ5D™) index at 3 months across 24-hour NIHSS quartiles were compared. Results The majority of the study participants were included (IMS3 n = 587/656, NINDS IV tPA n = 619/624). The 24-hour NIHSS was correlated with 3-month mRS (R = 0.73) with excellent predictive power for mRS 0-2 [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.91] and BI ≥95 (AUC = 0.9) in both cohorts. A model with the 24-hour NIHSS alone correctly classified 82-84% of patients in both cohorts. The percentages of good outcomes at 3-12 months across 24-hour NIHSS quartiles were similar in both cohorts. mRS 0-2 was achieved by 75.6-77.7% of patients with 24-hour NIHSS ≤11 but by only 1.4-3.6% with 24-hour NIHSS ≥20. The EQ5D index at 3 months varied among NIHSS 0-4 (mean 0.86 ± 0.16), 5-11 (0.77 ± 0.18), and 12-19 (0.59 ± 0.26) quartiles. Conclusions The 24-hour NIHSS strongly predicts long-term stroke outcomes and is associated with quality of life. Its easy availability, reliability, and validity support its use as an early prognostic marker and surrogate of clinical outcome in ischemic stroke. PMID:27051408

  14. Tibiofemoral alignment in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: Static alignment does not predict dynamic tibial plateau loading.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Pagnano, Mark W; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-08-01

    For total knee arthroplasty (TKA), neutral mechanical alignment produces balanced static knee loading. Dynamically, knee loading is affected by more than limb static alignment. We compared static and dynamic knee loading following TKA. Fifteen TKA patients were evaluated pre-operatively and 2 months and 2 years post-operatively. Tibiofemoral angles and medial tibial plateau loading were calculated. Pre-operatively, static medial load was greater for varus than valgus knees. Post-operatively, no relationship existed between tibiofemoral angle and static medial plateau load. Pre-operatively and post-operatively, dynamic medial load was not dependent on tibiofemoral angle. While all patients achieved equal static plateau load distributions at 2 years, only 47% had dynamic medial load distributions of 50 ± 10%. Static tibiofemoral alignment alone does not predict dynamic tibial loading.

  15. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Results: Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P < 0.05). Mean operation time was 235.27 ± 58.88 min in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P < 0.05). Posterior drawer test were negative in 15 cases, slight positive in 2 with improved tibial inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion: Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good. PMID:25419349

  16. Can Tibial Cementation Be Enhanced in Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component continues to be a significant mode of failure in total knee arthroplasty surgery. Surface cemented components preserve tibial bone stock, but are reliant on a strong bone-cement interface. This study compares standard surface cemented tibial component design to a tibial component with the addition of an undersurface cement containment skirt. The hypothesis was that the addition of a 2-mm underside skirt would allow cement containment and pressurization during implantation, which might improve the overall survival. Two identical tibial components were used, out of which one had the 2-mm underside skirt removed for the purposes of this study. Overall, 12 tibial Sawbones were prepared identically and transducers placed in the medial and lateral plateau. Each component was implanted six times, according to the manufacturer's operative technique. The series of implantation experiments showed no difference in cement pressurization (p = 0.86) regardless of the tibial component design used, with a wide variation in pressure measurements occurring in both groups. The tibial component skirt has not demonstrated any enhancement in cement pressurization. The cement containment skirt might still be advantageous by increasing the cement mantle thickness without causing excessive bone penetration; however, the biological effects cannot be predicted without further clinical evaluation.

  17. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF TIBIAL SLOPE ANGLE AND PATELLAR HEIGHT AFTER MEDIAL-OPENING TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vieira Costa, Marcos Areias; de Araujo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure the variation in posterior tibial slope angle and patellar height in patients who underwent proximal tibial valgus-producing osteotomy using the medial-opening wedge technique. Methods: Anteroposterior panoramic radiographs of the lower limbs and lateral radiographs of the knee obtained before and after tibial valgus-producing osteotomy on 46 patients with unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee were analyzed. Results: In 23 patients, an external fixator was used to gradually apply a medial-opening wedge; and in the other 23, a blocked plate with a stop bar was applied as a fixation method. Patients with tricompartmental knee disease and those who underwent osteotomy to treat fracture sequelae were excluded from this study. After surgery, the mean increase in the tibial slope was 1.7 degrees (p < 0.01) in the group in which the blocked plate with a stop bar was used; and 2.7 degrees (p < 0.05) in the group in which the external fixator was used. There was no statistical difference between the groups regarding the increase in the posterior tibial slope. Conclusion: The patellar height did not present any change in the cases in which the plate was used, when measured using the Insall-Salvati method, but it presented a decrease in 11 cases (47.8%) when the Caton-Deschamps method was applied. The same tendency was observed regarding change in the patellar height in the cases in which the external fixator was used, such that a decrease was observed in eight cases (34.7%) only when measured using the Caton-Deschamps method. PMID:27047847

  19. Knee joint arthroplasty after tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Matteo; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A total of 29 consecutive knee joint arthroplasties in 24 patients who underwent previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial unicompartment osteoarthritis of the knee and followed up for a mean of 97 months were compared with a control group of 28 patients with 29 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without previous HTO. Results for the osteotomy group were satisfactory in 96.5% of cases. In one patient loosening of the implant occurred after 37 months, which required prosthesis revision. Three patients underwent a further operation of secondary patella resurfacing for patella pain. The group without osteotomy reported a similar percentage of satisfactory results. PMID:19882155

  20. Tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeanine L; Losito, James M

    2007-01-01

    A single case of a tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player is reported here. A review of the literature confirms that this is an unusual and difficult problem to treat in the athletic population given the significant loads placed on the sesamoids during athletic activity. In the case presented, conservative care was not effective, and the athlete underwent surgical excision of the fractured sesamoid. With use of a postoperative orthosis and cleat modification, surgical management was successful and allowed the athlete to return to her athletic endeavors without restrictions in 8 weeks.

  1. Tibial Plateau Fractures in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Rozell, Joshua C; Vemulapalli, Krishna C; Gary, Joshua L; Donegan, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common in the elderly population following a low-energy mechanism. Initial evaluation includes an assessment of the soft tissues and surrounding ligaments. Most fractures involve articular depression leading to joint incongruity. Treatment of these fractures may be complicated by osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and medical comorbidities. Optimal reconstruction should restore the mechanical axis, provide a stable construct for mobilization, and reestablish articular congruity. This is accomplished through a variety of internal or external fixation techniques or with acute arthroplasty. Regardless of the treatment modality, particular focus on preservation and maintenance of the soft tissue envelope is paramount. PMID:27551570

  2. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  3. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-08-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  4. Tibial lengthening over humeral and tibial intramedullary nails in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daoyun; Chen, Jianmin; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Fanggang

    2011-06-01

    Leg discrepancy is common after poliomyelitis. Tibial lengthening is an effective way to solve this problem. It is believed lengthening over a tibial intramedullary nail can provide a more comfortable lengthening process than by the conventional technique. However, patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis typically have narrow intramedullary canals allowing limited space for inserting a tibial intramedullary nail and Kirschner wires. To overcome this problem, we tried using humeral nails instead of tibial nails in the lengthening procedure. In this study, we used humeral nails in 20 tibial lengthening procedures and compared the results with another group of patients who were treated with tibial lengthening over tibial intramedullary nails. The mean consolidation index, percentage of increase and external fixation index did not show significant differences between the two groups. However, less blood loss and shorter operating time were noted in the humeral nail group. More patients encountered difficulty with the inserted intramedullary nail in the tibial nail group procedure. The complications did not show a statistically significant difference between the two techniques on follow-up. In conclusion, we found the humeral nail lengthening technique was more suitable in leg discrepancy patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis.

  5. Anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament with regard to its two bundles.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2007-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of two major fiber bundles, namely the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle. When the knee is extended, the posterolateral bundle (PL) is tight and the anteromedial (AM) bundle is moderately lax. As the knee is flexed, the femoral attachment of the ACL becomes a more horizontal orientation; causing the AM bundle to tighten and the PL bundle to relax. There is some degree of variability for the femoral origin of the anterome-dial and posterolateral bundle. The anteromedial bundle is located proximal and anterior in the femoral ACL origin (high and deep in the notch when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ); the posterolateral bundle starts in the distal and posterior aspect of the femoral ACL origin (shallow and low when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ). In the frontal plane the anteromedial bundle origin is in the 10:30 clock position and the postero-lateral bundle origin in the 9:30 clock position. At the tibial insertion the ACL fans out to form the foot region. The anteromedial bundle insertion is in the anterior part of the tibial ACL footprint, the posterolateral bundle in the posterior part. While the anteromedial bundle is the primary restraint against anterior tibial translation, the posterolateral bundle tends to stabilize the knee near full extension, particularly against rotatory loads.

  6. Biological post

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B. Suresh; Kumar, Senthil; Mohan Kumar, N. S.; Karunakaran, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior tooth fracture as a result of traumatic injuries, is frequently encountered in endodontic practice. Proper reconstruction of extensively damaged teeth can be achieved through the fragment reattachment procedure known as “biological restoration.” This case report refers to the esthetics and functional recovery of extensively damaged maxillary central incisor through the preparation and adhesive cementation of “biological post” in a young patient. Biological post obtained through extracted teeth from another individual–represent a low-cost option and alternative technique for the morphofunctional recovery of extensively damaged anterior teeth. PMID:26538952

  7. Tibial somatosensory evoked potential can prognosticate for ambulatory function in subacute hemiplegic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Pyoungsik; Sohn, Min Kyun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Jee, Sungju

    2016-04-01

    Early prediction of expected recovery in stroke can help in planning appropriate medical and rehabilitation interventions. Recovery of ambulation is one of the essential endpoints in stroke rehabilitation. However, the correlation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) with clinical parameters and their predictive significance are not clearly defined. We aimed to examine the association between tibial nerve SSEP and ambulatory outcomes in subacute hemiplegic stroke patients. We reviewed medical records for hemiplegic patients with first-ever stroke who received inpatient rehabilitation from January 2009 to May 2013. We excluded patients with diabetes mellitus, quadriplegia, bilateral lesions, brainstem lesions, those aged over 80 years, and those with severe musculoskeletal problems. Tibial nerve SSEP were performed when they were transferred to the rehabilitation department. SSEP findings were divided into three groups; normal, abnormal and absent response. Berg balance scale and functional ambulation category (FAC) at discharge were compared with initial tibial SSEP findings using one-way analysis of variance. Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. Berg balance scale and FAC were significantly different according to the SSEP (P<0.001). Post hoc analysis showed a significant difference between normal and absent response in Berg balance scale (P<0.001) and FAC (P<0.001), and between abnormal and absent response in Berg balance scale (P=0.012) and FAC (P=0.019). Functional outcomes of the normal response group were better than the abnormal response group, but there was no statistical significance. These findings suggest that initial tibial nerve SSEP may be a useful biomarker for prognosticating functional outcomes in hemiplegic patients.

  8. Evaluation of the posterior tibial slope on MR images in different population groups using the tibial proximal anatomical axis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Behrooz; Konan, Sujith; Mannan, Ken; Scott, Gareth

    2012-12-01

    We measured the posterior tibial slope for the medial and lateral tibial plateau separately in MR images of 143 knees (71 women, 72 men) and compared the measurements between genders and different ethnic groups. For the whole population the mean medial slope was 5.7 degrees and the mean lateral slope 5.6 degrees. There was a significant difference between the medial and lateral posterior tibial slope in the Asian patients compared with other ethnic groups (p < 0.001). We have shown that measurement of the posterior tibial slope (PTS) could be reliably performed on MR images, revealing a gender difference. These findings might have clinical relevance when performing reconstructive surgery at the knee in determining ideal placement of the tibial component.

  9. How I do it: Anterior pull-through tympanoplasty for anterior eardrum perforations.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey P; Wong, Yu-Tung; Yang, Tzong-Hann; Miller, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions This technique is offered as a convenient and reliable method for cases with anterior TM perforation and inadequate anterior remnant. Objectives Chronic otitis media surgery is one of the most common procedures in otology. Anterior tympanic membrane (TM) perforation with inadequate anterior remnant is associated with higher rates of graft failure. It was the goal of this series to evaluate the anatomical and functional outcomes of a modified underlay myringoplasty technique-the anterior pull-through method. Materials and methods In a retrospective clinical study, 13 patients with anterior TM perforations with inadequate anterior remnants underwent tympanoplasty with anterior pull-through technique. The anterior tip of the temporalis fascia was pulled through and secured in a short incision lateral to the anterior part of the annulus. Data on graft take rate, pre-operative, and post-operative hearing status were analyzed. Results A graft success rate of 84.6% (11 out of 13) was achieved, without lateralization, blunting, atelectasia, or epithelial pearls. The air-bone gap was 21.5 ± 6.8 dB before intervention and 11.75 ± 5.7 dB after surgery (p = 0.003). PMID:26988908

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  11. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  12. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation PMID:27357222

  13. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods - 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results - 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation - The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation. PMID:27357222

  14. The anatomical tibial axis: reliable rotational orientation in knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Cobb, J P; Dixon, H; Dandachli, W; Iranpour, F

    2008-08-01

    The rotational alignment of the tibia is an unresolved issue in knee replacement. A poor functional outcome may be due to malrotation of the tibial component. Our aim was to find a reliable method for positioning the tibial component in knee replacement. CT scans of 19 knees were reconstructed in three dimensions and orientated vertically. An axial plane was identified 20 mm below the tibial spines. The centre of each tibial condyle was calculated from ten points taken round the condylar cortex. The tibial tubercle centre was also generated as the centre of the circle which best fitted eight points on the outside of the tubercle in an axial plane at the level of its most prominent point. The derived points were identified by three observers with errors of 0.6 mm to 1 mm. The medial and lateral tibial centres were constant features (radius 24 mm (SD 3), and 22 mm (SD 3), respectively). An anatomical axis was created perpendicular to the line joining these two points. The tubercle centre was found to be 20 mm (SD 7) lateral to the centre of the medial tibial condyle. Compared with this axis, an axis perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was internally rotated by 6 degrees (SD 3). An axis based on the tibial tubercle and the tibial spines was also internally rotated by 5 degrees (sd 10). Alignment of the knee when based on this anatomical axis was more reliable than either the posterior surfaces or any axis involving the tubercle which was the least reliable landmark in the region.

  15. Flexible multibody simulation approach in the analysis of tibial strain during walking.

    PubMed

    Al Nazer, R; Rantalainen, T; Heinonen, A; Sievänen, H; Mikkola, A

    2008-01-01

    Strains within the bone tissue play a major role in bone (re)modeling. These small strains can be assessed using experimental strain gage measurements, which are challenging and invasive. Further, the strain measurements are, in practise, limited to certain regions of superficial bones only, such as the anterior surface of the tibia. In this study, tibial strains occurring during walking were estimated using a numerical approach based on flexible multibody dynamics. In the introduced approach, a lower body musculoskeletal model was developed by employing motion capture data obtained from walking at a constant velocity. The motion capture data were used in inverse dynamics simulation to teach the muscles in the model to replicate the motion in forward dynamics simulation. The maximum and minimum tibial principal strains predicted by the model were 490 and -588 microstrain, respectively, which are in line with literature values from in vivo measurements. In conclusion, the non-invasive flexible multibody simulation approach may be used as a surrogate for experimental bone strain measurements and thus be of use in detailed strain estimations of bones in different applications.

  16. Arthroscopic Fixation of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fracture in Open Physis

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis without damaging the growth plate is very important. We have described a very simple and effective technique for the first time in this article. Case report: A 16-year-old boy sustained avulsion fractures of tibial spine while playing. He was treated arthroscopically with excellent results. Conclusion: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis with two cannulated screws perpendicular to each other is a very simple technique providing strong construct, and allowing early mobilization without risk of damage to the growth plate. PMID:27703945

  17. Anatomical sector analysis of load-bearing tibial bone structure during 90-day bed rest and 1-year recovery.

    PubMed

    Cervinka, Tomas; Rittweger, Jörn; Hyttinen, Jari; Felsenberg, Dieter; Sievänen, Harri

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the bone response to long bed rest-related immobility and during subsequent recovery differed at anatomically different sectors of tibial epiphysis and diaphysis. For this study, peripheral quantitative tomographic (pQCT) scans obtained from a previous 90-day 'Long Term Bed Rest' intervention were preprocessed with a new method based on statistical approach and re-analysed sector-wise. The pQCT was performed on 25 young healthy males twice before the bed rest, after the bed rest and after 1-year follow-up. All men underwent a strict bed rest intervention, and in addition, seven of them received pamidronate treatment and nine did flywheel exercises as countermeasures against disuse-related bone loss. Clearly, 3-9% sector-specific losses in trabecular density were observed at the tibial epiphysis on average. Similarly, cortical density decreased in a sector-specific way being the largest at the anterior sector of tibial diaphysis. During recovery, the bed rest-induced bone losses were practically restored and no consistent sector-specific modulation was observed in any subgroup. It is concluded that the sector-specific analysis of bone cross-sections has potential to reveal skeletal responses to various interventions that cannot be inferred from the average analysis of the whole bone cross-section. This approach is considered also useful for evaluating the bone responses from the biomechanical point of view. PMID:21672131

  18. A Japanese male patient with 'fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligodactyly': an additional case report.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Kim, Ji Yoo; Kubota, Takuo; Miura, Kohji; Miyoshi, Yoko; Hirai, Haruhiko; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-07-01

    We report a male infant with FATCO syndrome, an acronym for fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly. Courtens et al. reported an infant with oligosyndactyly of the left hand, complete absence of the right fibula, bowing of the right tibia, and absence of the right fifth metatarsal and phalanges. They noted 5 patients with similar clinical features, and proposed the FATCO syndrome. Our patient had a left-sided cleft lip, cleft palate, oligosyndactyly of the right hand and bilateral feet, and bilateral anterior bowing of the limbs associated with overlying skin dimpling. Radiographs showed a short angulated tibia with left fibular aplasia and right fibular hypoplasia. We consider our case the 6th patient with FATCO syndrome, and the cleft lip and palate, not reported in the previous 5 patients, may allow us to further understand the development of the extremities and facies. PMID:23926365

  19. [Tibial abscess caused by histoplasma capsulatum].

    PubMed

    de Fernández, M I; Negroni, R; Arechavala, A

    2001-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is the most serious form of the disease produced by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis was first described by Darling in 1906, and it is endemic in certain areas of Central and Southeastern regions of USA, and most Latin America countries, including the Pampa húmeda and Mesopotamia regions in Argentina, but in other continents it has a limited regional distribution. Lung involvement predominates in 90% of cases, but H. capsulatum may involve bone and soft tissues. Bone lesions without other signs of infection are very rare, and are often misdiagnosed as cancer. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a man with a myelodysplasia who presented a left tibial abscess, without any clinical evidence of pulmonary involvement. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole.

  20. Medial tibial stress syndrome: conservative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R Michael; Lavallee, Mark E

    2009-10-07

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as "shin splints," is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes (Willems T, Med Sci Sports Exerc 39(2):330-339, 2007; Korkola M, Amendola A, Phys Sportsmed 29(6):35-50, 2001; Hreljac A, Med Sci Sports Exerc 36(5):845-849, 2004). Although often not serious, it can be quite disabling and progress to more serious complications if not treated properly. Often, the cause of MTSS is multi-factorial and involves training errors and various biomechanical abnormalities. Few advances have been made in the treatment of MTSS over the last few decades. Current treatment options are mostly based on expert opinion and clinical experience. The purpose of this article is to review published literature regarding conservative treatment options for MTSS and provide recommendations for sports medicine clinicians for improved treatment and patient outcomes.

  1. Minimally invasive reconstruction of lateral tibial plateau fractures using the jail technique: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study described a novel, minimally invasive reconstruction technique of lateral tibial plateau fractures using a three-screw jail technique and compared it to a conventional two-screw osteosynthesis technique. The benefit of an additional screw implanted in the proximal tibia from the anterior at an angle of 90° below the conventional two-screw reconstruction after lateral tibial plateau fracture was evaluated. This new method was called the jail technique. Methods The two reconstruction techniques were tested using a porcine model (n = 40). Fracture was simulated using a defined osteotomy of the lateral tibial plateau. Load-to-failure and multiple cyclic loading tests were conducted using a material testing machine. Twenty tibias were used for each reconstruction technique, ten of which were loaded in a load-to-failure protocol and ten cyclically loaded (5000 times) between 200 and 1000 N using a ramp protocol. Displacement, stiffness and yield load were determined from the resulting load displacement curve. Failure was macroscopically documented. Results In the load-to-failure testing, the jail technique showed a significantly higher mean maximum load (2275.9 N) in comparison to the conventional reconstruction (1796.5 N, p < 0.001). The trend for better outcomes for the novel technique in terms of stiffness and yield load did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). In cyclic testing, the jail technique also showed better trends in displacement that were not statistically significant. Failure modes showed a tendency of screws cutting through the bone (cut-out) in the conventional reconstruction. No cut-out but a bending of the lag screws at the site of the additional third screw was observed in the jail technique. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the jail and the conventional technique have seemingly similar biomechanical properties. This suggests that the jail technique may be a feasible alternative to

  2. Anterolateral Biplanar Proximal Tibial Opening-Wedge Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moulton, Samuel G; Nitri, Marco; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Proximal tibial anterolateral opening-wedge osteotomies have been reported to achieve successful biplanar lower-extremity realignment. Indications for a proximal tibial anterolateral osteotomy include symptomatic genu recurvatum with genu valgus alignment, usually in patients with a flat sagittal-plane tibial slope. The biplanar approach is able to simultaneously address both components of a patient's malalignment with a single procedure. The correction amount is verified with spacers and intraoperative imaging, while correction of the patient's heel height is simultaneously measured. A plate is secured into the osteotomy site, and the site is filled with bone allograft. The anterolateral tibial osteotomy has been reported to be an effective surgical procedure for correcting concomitant genu recurvatum and genu valgus malalignment. PMID:27656374

  3. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  4. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  5. TIBIAL TUBERCLE AVULSION FRACTURE IN A MALE ADOLESCENT.

    PubMed

    Matoković, Damir; Šimić-Klarić, Andrea; Rajić, Marijana Tomić; Crnković, Helena Tesari; Jurinić, Mislav; Jovanović, Savo

    2015-06-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures are rare in childhood, most frequently due to excessive quadriceps muscle contraction. On performing long jump, a 15-year-old boy sustained tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture type II according to Watson-Jones. The patient was treated operatively with fragment repositioning and screw fixation. Ten months after the injury and rehabilitation, he resumed his sports activities with full range knee motion. PMID:26415319

  6. Understanding the etiology of the posteromedial tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Burr, David B; Finestone, Aharon S; Voloshin, Arkady

    2015-09-01

    Previous human in vivo tibial strain measurements from surface strain gauges during vigorous activities were found to be below the threshold value of repetitive cyclical loading at 2500 microstrain in tension necessary to reduce the fatigue life of bone, based on ex vivo studies. Therefore it has been hypothesized that an intermediate bone remodeling response might play a role in the development of tibial stress fractures. In young adults tibial stress fractures are usually oblique, suggesting that they are the result of failure under shear strain. Strains were measured using surface mounted unstacked 45° rosette strain gauges on the posterior aspect of the flat medial cortex just below the tibial midshaft, in a 48year old male subject while performing vertical jumps, staircase jumps and running up and down stadium stairs. Shear strains approaching 5000 microstrain were recorded during stair jumping and vertical standing jumps. Shear strains above 1250 microstrain were recorded during runs up and down stadium steps. Based on predictions from ex vivo studies, stair and vertical jumping tibial shear strain in the test subject was high enough to potentially produce tibial stress fracture subsequent to repetitive cyclic loading without necessarily requiring an intermediate remodeling response to microdamage. PMID:25933941

  7. Distal Locking Screws for Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Agathangelidis, Filon; Petsatodis, Georgios; Kirkos, John; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced tibial intramedullary nails allow a number of distal screws to be used to reduce the incidence of malalignment and loss of fixation of distal metaphyseal fractures. However, the number of screws and the type of screw configuration to be used remains obscure. This biomechanical study was performed to address this question. Thirty-six Expert tibial nails (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland) were introduced in composite bone models. The models were divided into 4 groups with different distal locking configurations ranging from 2 to 4 screws. A 7-mm gap osteotomy was performed 72 mm from the tibial plafond to simulate a 42-C3 unstable distal tibial fracture. Each group was divided in 3 subgroups and underwent nondestructive biomechanical testing in axial compression, coronal bending, and axial torsion. The passive construct stiffness was measured and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance. Although some differences were noted between the stiffness of each group, these were not statistically significant in compression (P=.105), bending (P=.801), external rotation (P=.246), and internal rotation (P=.370). This in vitro study showed that, when using the Expert tibial nail for unstable distal tibial fractures, the classic configuration of 2 parallel distal screws could provide the necessary stability under partial weight-bearing conditions. PMID:26840700

  8. Pharyngocutaneous fistula after anterior cervical spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sansur, Charles A.; Early, Stephen; Reibel, James

    2009-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of anterior spine surgery occurring in less than 0.1% of all anterior surgery cases. We report a case of a 19 year old female who sustained a C6 burst fracture with complete quadriplegia. She was treated urgently with a C6 corpectomy with anterior cage and plating followed by posterior cervical stabilization at another institution. Post operatively she developed a pharyngocutaneous fistula that failed to heal despite several attempts of closure and esophageal exclusion with a Jpeg tube. The patient was eventually successfully treated with a three-stage procedure consisting of firstly a posterior approach to reinforce the posterior stabilization of the cervical spine that was felt to be inadequate, secondly an anterior approach with removal of all the anterior instrumentation followed by iliac crest bone graft and thirdly a superior based sternocleidomastoid flap that was interposed between the esophagus and the anterior cervical spine. The patient's fistula healed successfully. However, yet asymptomatic, the anterior iliac crest bone graft resorbed almost completely at 16 months follow up. In light of this complication, we discuss the surgical options for the treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistulae and the closure of this fistula using a superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle flap. PMID:19330360

  9. Quantification of the role of tibial posterior slope in knee joint mechanics and ACL force in simulated gait.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hashemi, J

    2015-07-16

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee joint injury with higher prevalence in female athletes. In search of contributing mechanisms, clinical imaging studies of ACL-injured individuals versus controls have found greater medial-lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) in injured population irrespective of the sex and in females compared to males, with stronger evidence on the lateral plateau slope. To quantify these effects, we use a lower extremity musculoskeletal model including a detailed finite element (FE) model of the knee joint to compute the role of changes in medial and/or lateral PTS by ±5° and ±10° on knee joint biomechanics, in general, and ACL force, in particular, throughout the stance phase of gait. The model is driven by reported kinematics/kinetics of gait in asymptomatic subjects. Our predictions showed, at all stance periods, a substantial increase in the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and ACL force as PTS increased with reverse trends as PTS decreased. At mid-stance, for example, ACL force increased from 181 N to 317 N and 460 N as PTS increased by 5° and 10°, respectively, while dropped to 102 N and 0 N as PTS changed by -5° and -10°, respectively. These effects are caused primarily by change in PTS at the tibial plateau that carries a larger portion of joint contact force. Steeper PTS is a major risk factor, especially under activities with large compression, in markedly increasing ACL force and its vulnerability to injury. Rehabilitation and ACL injury prevention programs could benefit from these findings.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  11. Evaluation of the bone healing process in an experimental tibial bone defect model in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Tim, Carla Roberta; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio; da Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Malavazi, Iran; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of postmenopausal bone loss (induced by ovariectomy) in the process of bone healing in a tibial bone defect model in rats by means of histological evaluation of bone defects and the analysis of the expression of genes and proteins involved in bone consolidation. Twenty female Wistar rats (12 weeks old, weighing ±250 g) were randomly divided into two groups: control group (CG) and ovariectomized group (OG). Rats of OG were submitted to ovariectomy and after 8 weeks post-surgery, all animals were submitted to the tibial bone defect model. The main histological finding analysis revealed that ovariectomized animals showed a higher amount of granulation tissue and immature newly formed bone compared to CG. Furthermore, quantitative histological analysis showed that OG presented a significant decrease in the amount of newly formed bone (p = 0.0351). RT-PCR analysis showed no difference in Runx2, ALP, RANK, RANKL and Osterix gene expression 14-day post-surgery. Interestingly, immunohistochemical evaluation showed that Runx2 was down expressed (p = 0.0001) and RANKL was up expressed (p = 0.0022) in the OG. In conclusion, these data highlight that bone loss induced by ovariectomy causes an impairment in the capacity of bone to heal mainly probably because of alterations in the imbalance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts activities. PMID:24532218

  12. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period. PMID:26834316

  13. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period.

  14. Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Yuk Chuen; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common problems encountered in orthopedic practice. However, simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is quite rare. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presented with simultaneous bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a trauma, complicated with a traction injury to the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Conclusions: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. The excessive traction force during closed reduction may lead to nerve palsy. Clear documentation of neurovascular status and adequate imaging before and after a reduction should be performed. PMID:25685749

  15. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  16. Double tibial osteotomy for bow leg patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilollah; Fouladi, Arash; Chinigarzadeh, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: High tibia osteotomy (HTO) is a common surgical operation for correction of genu varum deformity. In some patients, there are concurrent tibia vara and genu varum (bow leg). This study aimed to consider the possibility of better correction of bow leg deformity after double level tibial osteotomy (DLTO). Materials and Methods: A case series of 10 patients of genu varum in addition to tibia vara (bow leg) deformity who were referred to orthopedic ward of an academic hospital of Isfahan- Iran during 2009–2011 were included in the study. The mean age was 17.3 ± 3.1 years and all of them underwent DLTO. The results of treatment have been assessed based on clinical and radiological parameters before and after surgery. Results: The mean pre- and post operative values for Tibia-Femoral Angle, Medial Proximal of Tibia Angle (MPTA), and Lateral Distal of Tibia Angle (LDTA) were 18.13 ± 3.05° vs. 3.93 ± 0.66°, 79.13 ± 3.4° vs. 89.7 ± 1.8° and 96.40 ± 1.8° vs. 88.73 ± 3.0° respectively (P < 0.05). Improvement of all radiological parameters was meaningful. Seventy three percent of patients had normal mechanical axis of limb after surgery. The remaining cases had varus deformity in distal femur that was corrected by valgus supracondylar osteotomy in an additional operation. Limited range of motion (ROM) near knee and ankle was not observed. Conclusion: DLTO correct bow leg deformity in the point of alignment of limb and paralleling of knee and ankle joint more effectively. This method can be used in metabolic and congenital bow leg which deformities are present in throughout of the lower limb. We described this technique for the first time. PMID:24523802

  17. TIBIAL PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURE COMBINED WITH TIBIAL STEM STRESS FRACTURE FROM TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Rebelo, Edgar; Completo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty complications related to the prosthetic material are very rare, except for polyethylene wear. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman who came to the emergency service of our hospital with a periprosthetic tibial fracture (Mayo Clinic type I). Careful examination showed that this fracture was concomitantly associated with a tibial stem fatigue fracture. The prosthesis and the stem were sent to an independent biomechanics laboratory for evaluation. A finite-element CAD system was used to make a reconstruction, so as to ascertain whether there had been any manufacturing defect and what the causes of the event might have been. After evaluation of several hypotheses, it was concluded that the fracture in the prosthetic material had been caused by overloading at the plate/stem transition zone secondary to previous bone failure (fracture). From the evaluation of this case, the need to make appropriate assessment of bone mineralization can again be emphasized. In cases of doubt, a longer stem should be used. PMID:27047838

  18. Validation of a standardised gait score to predict the healing of tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Macri, F; Marques, L F; Backer, R C; Santos, M J; Belangero, W D

    2012-04-01

    There is no absolute method of evaluating healing of a fracture of the tibial shaft. In this study we sought to validate a new clinical method based on the systematic observation of gait, first by assessing the degree of agreement between three independent observers regarding the gait score for a given patient, and secondly by determining how such a score might predict healing of a fracture. We used a method of evaluating gait to assess 33 patients (29 men and four women, with a mean age of 29 years (15 to 62)) who had sustained an isolated fracture of the tibial shaft and had been treated with a locked intramedullary nail. There were 15 closed and 18 open fractures (three Gustilo and Anderson grade I, seven grade II, seven grade IIIA and one grade IIIB). Assessment was carried out three and six months post-operatively using videos taken with a digital camera. Gait was graded on a scale ranging from 1 (extreme difficulty) to 4 (normal gait). Bivariate analysis included analysis of variance to determine whether the gait score statistically correlated with previously validated and standardised scores of clinical status and radiological evidence of union. An association was found between the pattern of gait and all the other variables. Improvement in gait was associated with the absence of pain on weight-bearing, reduced tenderness over the fracture, a higher Radiographic Union Scale in Tibial Fractures score, and improved functional status, measured using the Brazilian version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire (all p < 0.001). Although further study is needed, the analysis of gait in this way may prove to be a useful clinical tool. PMID:22434473

  19. Outcome at 12 to 22 years of 1502 tibial shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Connelly, C L; Bucknall, V; Jenkins, P J; Court-Brown, C M; McQueen, M M; Biant, L C

    2014-10-01

    Fractures of the tibial shaft are common injuries, but there are no long-term outcome data in the era of increased surgical management. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the clinical and functional outcome of this injury at 12 to 22 years. Secondary aims were to determine the short- and long-term mortality, and if there were any predictors of clinical or functional outcome or mortality. From a prospective trauma database of 1502 tibial shaft fractures in 1474 consecutive adult patients, we identified a cohort of 1431 tibial diaphyseal fractures in 1403 patients, who fitted our inclusion criteria. There were 1024 men, and mean age at injury was 40.6 years. Fractures were classified according to the AO system, and open fractures graded after Gustilo and Anderson. Requirement of fasciotomy, time to fracture union, complications, incidence of knee and ankle pain at long-term follow-up, changes in employment and the patients' social deprivation status were recorded. Function was assessed at 12 to 22 years post-injury using the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and short form-12 questionnaires. Long-term functional outcome data was available for 568 of the surviving patients, 389 were deceased and 346 were lost to follow-up. Most fractures (90.7%, n = 1363) united without further intervention. Fasciotomies were performed in 11.5% of patients; this did not correlate with poorer functional outcome in the long term. Social deprivation was associated with a higher incidence of injury but had no impact on long-term function. The one-year mortality in those over 75 years of age was 29 (42%). At long-term follow-up, pain and function scores were good. However, 147 (26%) reported ongoing knee pain, 62 (10%) reported ankle pain and 97 (17%) reported both. Such joint pain correlated with poorer functional outcome. PMID:25274924

  20. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Single-Bundle Achilles Allograft with Open Tibial Inlay Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zehir, Sinan; Elmalı, Nurzat; Çalbıyık, Murat; Taşdemir, Zeki; Sağlam, Fevzi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: PCL reconstruction research has shown that the tibial inlay and transtibial tunnel procedures offer similar biomechanical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early results of PCL reconstruction using a single-bundle Achilles allograft and tibial inlay fixation. Methods: We retrospectively studied 14 patients who had undergone PCL reconstruction using the direct tibial inlay fixation technique from 2009 to 2013, with a mean follow-up of 13.4 months. (6-28 months). The patients were 11males and 3 females with an average age of 29.2 years (17-41 years). Ipsilateral femoral shaft fractures were determined in 2 cases, ipsilateral trochanteric fracture in 1 case and popliteal artery injury in 1 case. Surgery was performed within 2-4 weeks. Spanning-joint external fixation was applied to 2 patients because of gross instability with failure to maintain reduction in a brace. Combined reconstructions involving the posterolateral corner (9/14), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL (11/14)), or medial collateral ligament (MCL (1/14)) were performed. All PCL reconstructions were performed with Achilles allograft. In 1 case with arterial injury, the repair was made by a cardiovascular surgeon. In 2 case, deep infection developed, which was controlled with debridement and antibiotic treatment. Superficial peroneal nerve injury in 1 case was treated with tenolysis in the 6th month, then partial healing was seen at 18 months. In all patients, the preoperative posterior drawer (PD) examination was positive. All patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative examination and x-rays. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation was applied to all patients at the final follow-up. Results: Postoperative PD examination demonstrated the following: 0 (normal) in 4 patients, 1+ in 7 patients, and 2+ in 3 patients, compared to the preoperative PD of 3+ or greater in all patients. Preoperative IKDC objective evaluation rated all knees

  1. Tibial high-density polyethylene wear in conforming tibiofemoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Plante-Bordeneuve, P; Freeman, M A

    1993-07-01

    We have studied 27 tibial prostheses retrieved from knee replacements after 1 to 9 years. In 22 the femoral components were of cobalt-chrome, in five polyacetal. The design of the components gave a nominal contact area of 320 mm2 on each condyle. The tibial component was of high-density polyethylene (HDP) at least 6 mm thick, and not heat-treated. In the metal/HDP prostheses the average wear rate was 0.025 mm/year. The relative wear on the medial and lateral sides was related to the leg axis. None of the retrieved prostheses showed any severe disruption of their surface. The polyacetal/HDP prostheses showed similar wear with a statistically insignificant trend towards slower penetration. We conclude that the rate of wear of HDP in a conforming tibiofemoral bearing with a fixed tibial component at least 6 mm thick and not heat-treated is slow enough to be safe in clinical practice.

  2. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  7. Long-term quadriceps femoris functional deficits following intramedullary nailing of isolated tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J; Bealle, D P; Kaufer, H; Johnson, D L

    2001-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed 5 male and 5 female patients, age 35.1+/-16 years, height 171.8+/-12 cm, and weight 75.5+/-18 kg (mean+/-SD) who were more than 1 year post isolated tibial fracture (18+/-6 months) and had been treated with an intramedullary tibial nail. Subjects completed a 12-question visual analog scale, a physical symptom and activity of daily living survey, and were also tested for bilateral isokinetic (60 degrees/s) quadriceps femoris and hamstring strength. Knee pain during activity, stiffness, swelling, and buckling were the primary symptomatic complaints. Perceived functional task deficits were greatest for climbing or descending stairs, pivoting, squatting, and walking on uneven surfaces. Involved lower extremity knee extensor and flexor torque production deficits were 25% and 17%, respectively. Early rehabilitation focuses on maintaining adequate operative site bony fixation while providing controlled, progressive, and regular biomechanical loading to restore functionally competent tissue. Following adequate fracture healing, greater emphasis should be placed on lower extremity functional recovery including commonly performed activities of daily living and other functional tasks that are relevant to the patient's disability level. A cyclic rehabilitation program that progresses the weight-bearing environment to facilitate bone and soft tissue healing and neuromuscular re-education is proposed.

  8. The risk of revision in total knee arthroplasty is not affected by previous high tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Mona; Fenstad, Anne M; Indrekvam, Kari; Havelin, Leif I; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Previous studies have found different outcomes after revision of knee arthroplasties performed after high tibial osteotomy (HTO). We evaluated the risk of revision of total knee arthroplasty with or without previous HTO in a large registry material. Patients and methods — 31,077 primary TKAs were compared with 1,399 TKAs after HTO, using Kaplan-Meier 10-year survival percentages and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results — The adjusted survival analyses showed similar survival in the 2 groups. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year survival was 93.8% in the primary TKA group and 92.6% in the TKA-post-HTO group. Adjusted RR was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.77–1.21; p = 0.8). Interpretation — In this registry-based study, previous high tibial osteotomy did not appear to compromise the results regarding risk of revision after total knee arthroplasty compared to primary knee arthroplasty. PMID:26058747

  9. Temporary Stabilization with External Fixator in ‘Tripolar’ Configuration in Two Steps Treatment of Tibial Pilon Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Daghino, Walter; Messina, Marco; Filipponi, Marco; Alessandro, Massè

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tibial pilon fractures represent a complex therapeutic problem for the orthopedic surgeon, given the frequent complications and outcomes disabling. The recent medical literature indicates that the best strategy to reduce amount of complications in tibial pilon fractures is two-stages procedure. We describe our experience in the primary stabilization of these fractures. Methods: We treated 36 cases with temporary external fixation in a simple configuration, called "tripolar": this is an essential structure (only three screws and three rods), that is possible to perform even without the availability of X-rays and with simple anesthesia or sedation. Results: We found a sufficient mechanical stability for the nursing post-operative, in absence of intraoperative and postoperative problems. The time between trauma and temporary stabilization ranged between 3 and 144 hours; surgical average time was 8.4 minutes. Definitive treatment was carried out with a delay of a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 15 days from the temporary stabilization, always without problems, both in case of ORIF (open reduction, internal fixation) or circular external fixation Conclusion: Temporary stabilization with external fixator in ‘tripolar’ configuration seems to be the most effective strategy in two steps treatment of tibial pilon fractures. These preliminary encouraging results must be confirmed by further studies with more cases. PMID:27123151

  10. In vitro modeling of human tibial strains during exercise in micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterman, M. M.; Hamel, A. J.; Cavanagh, P. R.; Piazza, S. J.; Sharkey, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to micro-gravity causes substantial bone loss (Leblanc et al., Journal of Bone Mineral Research 11 (1996) S323) and treadmill exercise under gravity replacement loads (GRLs) has been advocated as a countermeasure. To date, the magnitudes of GRLs employed for locomotion in space have been substantially less than the loads imposed in the earthbound 1G environment, which may account for the poor performance of locomotion as an intervention. The success of future treadmill interventions will likely require GRLs of greater magnitude. It is widely held that mechanical tissue strain is an important intermediary signal in the transduction pathway linking the external loading environment to bone maintenance and functional adaptation; yet, to our knowledge, no data exist linking alterations in external skeletal loading to alterations in bone strain. In this preliminary study, we used unique cadaver simulations of micro-gravity locomotion to determine relationships between localized tibial bone strains and external loading as a means to better predict the efficacy of future exercise interventions proposed for bone maintenance on orbit. Bone strain magnitudes in the distal tibia were found to be linearly related to ground reaction force magnitude (R(2)>0.7). Strain distributions indicated that the primary mode of tibial loading was in bending, with little variation in the neutral axis over the stance phase of gait. The greatest strains, as well as the greatest strain sensitivity to altered external loading, occurred within the anterior crest and posterior aspect of the tibia, the sites furthest removed from the neutral axis of bending. We established a technique for estimating local strain magnitudes from external loads, and equations for predicting strain during simulated micro-gravity walking are presented.

  11. In vitro modeling of human tibial strains during exercise in micro-gravity.

    PubMed

    Peterman, M M; Hamel, A J; Cavanagh, P R; Piazza, S J; Sharkey, N A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to micro-gravity causes substantial bone loss (Leblanc et al., Journal of Bone Mineral Research 11 (1996) S323) and treadmill exercise under gravity replacement loads (GRLs) has been advocated as a countermeasure. To date, the magnitudes of GRLs employed for locomotion in space have been substantially less than the loads imposed in the earthbound 1G environment, which may account for the poor performance of locomotion as an intervention. The success of future treadmill interventions will likely require GRLs of greater magnitude. It is widely held that mechanical tissue strain is an important intermediary signal in the transduction pathway linking the external loading environment to bone maintenance and functional adaptation; yet, to our knowledge, no data exist linking alterations in external skeletal loading to alterations in bone strain. In this preliminary study, we used unique cadaver simulations of micro-gravity locomotion to determine relationships between localized tibial bone strains and external loading as a means to better predict the efficacy of future exercise interventions proposed for bone maintenance on orbit. Bone strain magnitudes in the distal tibia were found to be linearly related to ground reaction force magnitude (R(2)>0.7). Strain distributions indicated that the primary mode of tibial loading was in bending, with little variation in the neutral axis over the stance phase of gait. The greatest strains, as well as the greatest strain sensitivity to altered external loading, occurred within the anterior crest and posterior aspect of the tibia, the sites furthest removed from the neutral axis of bending. We established a technique for estimating local strain magnitudes from external loads, and equations for predicting strain during simulated micro-gravity walking are presented.

  12. In vitro modeling of human tibial strains during exercise in micro-gravity.

    PubMed

    Peterman, M M; Hamel, A J; Cavanagh, P R; Piazza, S J; Sharkey, N A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to micro-gravity causes substantial bone loss (Leblanc et al., Journal of Bone Mineral Research 11 (1996) S323) and treadmill exercise under gravity replacement loads (GRLs) has been advocated as a countermeasure. To date, the magnitudes of GRLs employed for locomotion in space have been substantially less than the loads imposed in the earthbound 1G environment, which may account for the poor performance of locomotion as an intervention. The success of future treadmill interventions will likely require GRLs of greater magnitude. It is widely held that mechanical tissue strain is an important intermediary signal in the transduction pathway linking the external loading environment to bone maintenance and functional adaptation; yet, to our knowledge, no data exist linking alterations in external skeletal loading to alterations in bone strain. In this preliminary study, we used unique cadaver simulations of micro-gravity locomotion to determine relationships between localized tibial bone strains and external loading as a means to better predict the efficacy of future exercise interventions proposed for bone maintenance on orbit. Bone strain magnitudes in the distal tibia were found to be linearly related to ground reaction force magnitude (R(2)>0.7). Strain distributions indicated that the primary mode of tibial loading was in bending, with little variation in the neutral axis over the stance phase of gait. The greatest strains, as well as the greatest strain sensitivity to altered external loading, occurred within the anterior crest and posterior aspect of the tibia, the sites furthest removed from the neutral axis of bending. We established a technique for estimating local strain magnitudes from external loads, and equations for predicting strain during simulated micro-gravity walking are presented. PMID:11311711

  13. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, Y; Aoki, K; Hasegawa, T

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. PMID:9880644

  14. Modified biplanar open-wedge high tibial osteotomy with rigid locking plate to treat varus knee*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-ning; Zhang, Jie; Lv, Cheng-yu; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-zhen; Wang, Xiang-da; Wang, Chang-yao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and characterize the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy with rigid fixation to treat varus knee in young and active patients. Methods: Between June 2001 to July 2008, 18 patients with monocompartmental degeneration of the knee combined with a varus malalignment of the leg had the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy and the osteotomy was fixed with the locking plates (Locking Compression Plate System). The mean varus deformity before operation was 11.5° (5°~19°) and no degenerative changes were found in other departments. Stability of the knee was normal in 15 patients, but ruptures in anterior cruciate ligaments or lateral collateral ligament were presented in the remaining 3 patients. Preoperative symptom was mainly limited in the pain of medial compartment. The preoperative and follow-up data for the range of motion and Lysholm score were determined. Subjective satisfactory examination was also applied to the patients for the operation they selected. Results: All of the patients were followed up with an average of 32.5 months (12~82 months). There was no ununion or delayed union in this group during the follow-up period. No complications like broken plate, nerve injury, or blood vessel injury occurred. The postoperative average corrected degree was 9.5° (5.5°~18°). No degenerations developed in the three departments of the knee. The Lysholm scores before and after surgery were 42.5 and 77.5, respectively (P<0.01). The overall fineness rate was 83.3%. The subjective satisfactory survey demonstrated that about 83.3% patients showed satisfactory on the operation. There was no obvious difference in the range of motion before and after operation, but significant changes were found in the Lysholm score and varus degree from preoperative to follow-up. Conclusion: Proximal opening high tibial osteotomy performed in conjunction with the special rigid locking plate yielded good results for symptomatic genu varum. This

  15. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  16. Porous bioactive scaffolds: characterization and biological performance in a model of tibial bone defect in rats.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Tim, Carla Roberta; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Crovace, Murilo Camuri; Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Peitl Filho, Oscar; de Freitas Anibal, Fernanda; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of highly porous Biosilicate(®) scaffolds on bone healing in a tibial bone defect model in rats by means of histological evaluation (histopathological and immunohistochemistry analysis) of the bone callus and the systemic inflammatory response (immunoenzymatic assay). Eighty Wistar rats (12 weeks-old, weighing±300 g) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=10 per experimental group, per time point): control group and Biosilicate® group (BG). Each group was euthanized 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post-surgery. Histological findings revealed a similar inflammatory response in both experimental groups, 3 and 7 days post-surgery. During the experimental periods (3-21 days post-surgery), it was observed that the biomaterial degradation, mainly in the periphery region, provided the development of the newly formed bone into the scaffolds. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the Biosilicate® scaffolds stimulated cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor and runt-related transcription factor 2 expression. Furthermore, in the immunoenzymatic assay, BG presented no difference in the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha in all experimental periods. Still, BG showed a higher level of interleukin 4 after 14 days post-implantation and a lower level of interleukin 10 in 21 days post-surgery. Our results demonstrated that Biosilicate® scaffolds can contribute for bone formation through a suitable architecture and by stimulating the synthesis of markers related to the bone repair. PMID:25631271

  17. Fixation techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: early follow-up. A systematic review of level I and II therapeutic studies.

    PubMed

    Speziali, Andrea; Delcogliano, Marco; Tei, Matteo; Placella, Giacomo; Bartoli, Matteo; Menghi, Amerigo; Cerulli, Giuliano

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was that to systematically review the fixation techniques for the ACL reconstruction and associated clinical outcomes at the early follow-up. Systematic search on three electronic databases (Cochrane register, Medline and Embase) of fixation devices used for primary ACL reconstruction with doubled semitendinosus and gracilis and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts in randomized clinical trials of level I and II of evidence published from January 2001 to December 2011. Therapeutic studies collected were with a minimum 12-month follow-up, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated by at least one of International Knee Documentation Committee, Lysholm and Tegner functional scales and at least one of the following knee stability tests: arthrometric AP tibial translation, Lachman test and pivot-shift test. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. At the femoral side cross-pin, metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, and suspensory device were used in 32.3, 27.3, 24.8, 15.5% of patients, respectively. At the tibial side fixation was achieved with metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, screw and plastic sheath, screw post and cross-pin in 38.7, 31, 15.7, 12.8, and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Side-to-side anterior-posterior tibial translation was 1.9 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 0.4 mm for metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. At least two-third of all the patients achieved good-to-excellent clinical outcomes. Rate of failure was 6.1, 3.3, 1.7 and 1.2% for bioabsorbable interference screw, metallic interference screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. Clinical outcomes are good to excellent in almost two-third of the patients but several pitfalls that affect the current fixation techniques as graft tensioning such as graft-tunnel motion are still unaddressed. PMID:25269758

  18. Induction of Tibial Dyschondroplasia by Carbamate and Thiocarbamate Pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a major poultry leg problem the natural etiology of which is unknown. Certain dithiocarbamate pesticides such as tetramethyl thiuram disulfide (thiram) have been shown to induce the disease in chickens. Since many different carbamate and thiocarbamate chemicals are ...

  19. Morphological characteristics of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Gao; Zhi-Jun, Pan; Qiang, Zheng; Hang, Li

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures is controversial, and information regarding this specific fracture pattern is lacking. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the frequency and morphological features of posterolateral articular fragments in tibial plateau fractures. A retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed on a consecutive series of patients who sustained tibial plateau fractures between May 2008 and August 2012. The articular surface area, maximum posterior cortical height, sagittal fracture angle, and amount of displacement were measured on computed tomography scans using the Picture and Archiving Communication System. Thirty-six (15%) of 242 injuries demonstrated a posterolateral fracture fragment comprising a mean 14.3% of the articular surface of the total tibial plateau (range, 8% to 32%). Mean major articular fragment angle was 23° (range, 62° to -43°), mean maximum posterior cortical height was 29 mm (range, 18 to 42 mm), and mean sagittal fracture angle was 77° (range, 58° to 97°). The posterolateral plateau articular fracture fragment has morphological characteristics of a conically shaped fragment with a relatively small articular surface area and sagittal fracture angle. Recognizing these morphological features will help the clinician formulate an effective surgical plan.

  20. Unusual Tibial Stress Fracture in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, H

    1990-09-01

    In brief Stress fractures of the proximal middle third of the tibia are common; those of the distal tibia are less common; and longitudinal stress fractures are rare. The basketball player in this case report had a rare longitudinal tibial pilon stress fracture, for which few diagnostic or treatment guidelines existed.

  1. Synchronisation of tibial rotational alignment with femoral component in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan

    2008-04-01

    The rotational axis of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty described by Insall is generally accepted, but rotational mismatch between the femoral and the tibial components can occur because the alignment of each component is determined separately. We developed a connecting instrument to synchronise the axis of the tibia to the axis of the femur. We compared the rotational axis of the tibial component using our method and medial one third of tibial tuberosity (Insall's reference) in 70 consecutive TKAs. The rotational axis of the tibial component from the femoro-tibial synchronisation was rotated internally 13.8 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees (range, 2 degrees - 24 degrees ) more than the axis of Insall's reference. Eighty three percent of patellae tracked centrally and the patellae tilt measured 2.2 degrees on average. More attention should be given to the rotational congruency between the femoro-tibial components, because the recent prosthetic design has more conforming articular surfaces.

  2. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  3. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, A. D.; Pandit, H. G.; Jenkins, C.; Lobenhoffer, P.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Murray, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:345–9. PMID:24589789

  4. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Liddle, A D; Pandit, H G; Jenkins, C; Lobenhoffer, P; Jackson, W F M; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W

    2014-03-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients.

  5. The modified bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huijun; Wang, Fei

    2011-06-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has been an attractive option for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in clinical practice. However, the graft-tunnel mismatch in the proximal part of the tibial tunnel and the ultimate strength after postoperative ligamentization process have been potential problems for the traditional 10-mm wide graft. We modified the traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft to make it double-layer, as an ideal substitute graft for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with better graft-tunnel match and higher initial graft strength.

  6. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and flatfoot: analysis with simulated walking.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kota; Kitaoka, Harold B; Fujii, Tadashi; Crevoisier, Xavier; Berglund, Lawrence J; Zhao, Kristin D; Kaufman, Kenton R; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-02-01

    Many biomechanical studies investigated pathology of flatfoot and effects of operations on flatfoot. The majority of cadaveric studies are limited to the quasistatic response to static joint loads. This study examined the unconstrained joint motion of the foot and ankle during stance phase utilizing a dynamic foot-ankle simulator in simulated stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Muscle forces were applied on the extrinsic tendons of the foot using six servo-pneumatic cylinders to simulate their action. Vertical and fore-aft shear forces were applied and tibial advancement was performed with the servomotors. Three-dimensional movements of multiple bones of the foot were monitored with a magnetic tracking system. Twenty-two fresh-frozen lower extremities were studied in the intact condition, then following sectioning peritalar constraints to create a flatfoot and unloading the posterior tibial muscle force. Kinematics in the intact condition were consistent with gait analysis data for normals. There were altered kinematics in the flatfoot condition, particularly in coronal and transverse planes. Calcaneal eversion relative to the tibia averaged 11.1±2.8° compared to 5.8±2.3° in the normal condition. Calcaneal-tibial external rotation was significantly increased in flatfeet from mean of 2.3±1.7° to 8.1±4.0°. There were also significant changes in metatarsal-tibial eversion and external rotation in the flatfoot condition. The simulated PTTD with flatfoot was consistent with previous data obtained in patients with PTTD. The use of a flatfoot model will enable more detailed study on the flatfoot condition and/or effect of surgical treatment.

  7. Arthroscopic anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Devgan, Ashish; Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh; Singla, Rohit; Magu, Narender Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Reetadyuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been the current standard of treatment for ACL deficiency. However, a significant subset of patients continue to report residual symptoms of instability with a poor pivot control. Cadaveric biomechanical studies have shown double bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions to restore the knee kinematics better. This study evaluates the outcome of DB ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: 30 consecutive patients who underwent anatomic DB ACL reconstruction were included in this prospective longitudinal study. There were all males with a mean age of 25 ± 7.45 years. All patients were prospectively evaluated using GeNouRoB (GNRB) arthrometer, functional knee scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] and Lysholm) and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for comparing the graft orientation and footprint of the reconstructed ACL with that of the normal knee. Results: The average followup was 36.2 months. At the time of final followup the mean Lysholm score was 93.13 ± 3.31. As per the objective IKDC score, 26 patients (86.6%) were in Group A while 4 patients (13.3%) were in Group B. The mean differential anterior tibial translation by GNRB, arthrometer was 1.07 ± 0.8 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm). All cases had a negative pivot shift test. MRI scans of operated and the contralateral normal knee showed the mean sagittal ACL tibial angle coronal ACL tibial angle and tibial ACL footprint to be in accordance with the values of the contralateral, normal knee. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that DB ACL reconstruction restores the ACL anatomically in terms of size and angle of orientation. However, long term studies are needed to further substantiate its role in decreasing the incidence of early osteoarthritic changes compared to the conventional single bundle reconstructions. PMID:26015600

  8. Retrograde Approach Using Surgical Cutdown Technique for Limb Salvage in a Case of Critical Limb Ischemia With Severely Calcified Tibial Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Tatsuya; Iida, Osamu; Suemitsu, Kotaro; Tsuji, Yoriko; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    We here report a successful angioplasty for tibial artery occlusion using direct tibial puncture and subsequent retrograde approach under surgical cutdown technique. An 82-year-old man with ulcer/gangrene in first and second digits was referred to our hospital for endovascular therapy (EVT) of lower extremity ischemia. Diagnostic angiogram revealed anterior tibial artery (ATA) occlusion with severe calcification. Subintimal angioplasty was attempted using a 0.014-inch hydrophilic guidewire but was unsuccessful. A retrograde approach was subsequently attempted for ATA recanalization. However, because of severe calcification of dorsal pedis artery (DPA), percutaneous distal puncture was also unsuccessful. Direct puncture under surgical cutdown technique for DPA was subsequently performed and was successful. A 0.014-inch hydrophilic wire was advanced in retrograde fashion across the ATA occlusion and was used to access the microcatheter positioned at the proximal ATA via antegrade approach. Angioplasty of the ATA occlusion was performed using a 2.5-/3.0-mm tapered balloon. Completion angiogram revealed restoration of flow without dissection. Skin perfusion pressure was dramatically improved. Complete wound healing was achieved 5 months after EVT. PMID:27207678

  9. Hamstrings Stiffness and Landing Biomechanics Linked to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Loading

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, J. Troy; Norcross, Marc F.; Cannon, Lindsey N.; Zinder, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Greater hamstrings stiffness is associated with less anterior tibial translation during controlled perturbations. However, it is unclear how hamstrings stiffness influences anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading mechanisms during dynamic tasks. Objective: To evaluate the influence of hamstrings stiffness on landing biomechanics related to ACL injury. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 36 healthy, physically active volunteers (18 men, 18 women; age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 73.1 ± 16.6 kg). Intervention(s): Hamstrings stiffness was quantified via the damped oscillatory technique. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were captured during a double-legged jump-landing task via a 3-dimensional motion-capture system interfaced with a force plate. Landing biomechanics were compared between groups displaying high and low hamstrings stiffness via independent-samples t tests. Main Outcome Measure(s): Hamstrings stiffness was normalized to body mass (N/m·kg−1). Peak knee-flexion and -valgus angles, vertical and posterior ground reaction forces, anterior tibial shear force, internal knee-extension and -varus moments, and knee-flexion angles at the instants of each peak kinetic variable were identified during the landing task. Forces were normalized to body weight, whereas moments were normalized to the product of weight and height. Results: Internal knee-varus moment was 3.6 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 2.221, P = .02). A trend in the data also indicated that peak anterior tibial shear force was 1.1 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 1.537, P = .07). The high-stiffness group also demonstrated greater knee flexion at the instants of peak anterior tibial shear force and internal knee-extension and -varus moments (t22 range = 1.729–2.224, P < .05). Conclusions: Greater hamstrings stiffness was associated with landing

  10. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Fei; Qin, Liang; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Hui; Guo, Fengjing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT), or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I) were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CK), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage degeneration in

  11. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Fei; Qin, Liang; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Hui; Guo, Fengjing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT), or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I) were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CK), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage degeneration in

  12. Anterior skull base oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Vivanco, Blanca; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José L

    2013-03-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed of oncocytes (ie, epithelial cells with a large cytoplasm that is rich in mitochondria). Most cases are benign and originate from the salivary glands. Although there have been a few reported cases of oncocytomas being found in the sinonasal tract, most if not all cases seem not to involve the anterior skull base. We report a rare case of oncocytoma involving the anterior skull base occurring in a 44-year-old male patient. Preoperative carotid angiography and selective embolization was performed. The patient underwent an expanded endoscopic endonasal anterior craniofacial resection, which allowed complete resection of the tumor, with a low morbidity. The pathological diagnosis was oncocytoma. At 36 months after the initial treatment, the patient is free of disease. Based on our literature search, this may be the first such reported case. A brief review of the available literature examining the known body of knowledge regarding these neoplasms is presented.

  13. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  14. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  15. Analysis of the Tibial Epiphysis in the Skeletally Immature Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L.; Almardawi, Ranyah; Mitchell, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physeal-sparing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is being performed increasingly in skeletally immature knees. Purpose: To determine normal values for the maximum oblique length and “safe” physeal-sparing length and their corresponding angular trajectories across the tibial epiphysis on reconstructed magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in children and adolescents. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: An electronic search for pediatric knee MR examinations from April 2003 to April 2013 was performed at our institution. A 3-dimensional system viewer was used to measure the maximum oblique length, physeal-sparing length, and their corresponding angular trajectories on reconstructed MRIs. Knees were stratified by age into 2 groups: group 1 consisted of boys <13 years and girls <12 years and group 2 consisted of older boys (13-14 years) and girls (12-14 years). Each cohort was further stratified by sex. Group 1 consisted of 36 knees (mean age, 10.9 years) and group 2 consisted of 59 knees (mean age, 13.6 years). Results: Significant differences existed for the maximum oblique length and its angular trajectory for the younger versus older cohort (22.2 ± 2.7 vs 23.8 ± 2.7 mm, P = .007; 42.0° ± 4.0° vs 39.4° ± 4.2°, P = .003) and for the physeal-sparing length and its angular trajectory (19.4 ± 2.8 vs 21.3 ± 2.9 mm, P = .001; 30.1° ± 4.1° vs 28.2° ± 4.5°, P = .042). In group 2, females had shorter maximal oblique length and physeal-sparing length than boys (22.7 ± 2.3 vs 25.0 ± 2.7 mm, P < .001; 20.3 ± 2.6 vs 22.4 ± 2.9 mm, P = .004). Conclusion: The maximum oblique length across the tibial epiphysis is shorter than previously believed, measuring approximately 22 mm and approximately 24 mm for high- and intermediate-risk knees, respectively. However, “safe” physeal-sparing lengths were only approximately 19 mm and 21 mm for the younger and older cohorts, respectively. The angles

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  17. Tibial torsion in non-arthritic Indian adults: A computer tomography study of 100 limbs

    PubMed Central

    Mullaji, Arun B; Sharma, Amit K; Marawar, Satyajit V; Kohli, AF

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of normal tibial torsion is mandatory during total knee replacement (TKR), deformity correction and fracture management of tibia. Different values of tibial torsion have been found in different races due to biological and mechanical factors. Value of normal tibial torsion in Indian limbs is not known, hence this study to determine the norm of tibial torsional value in normal Indian population. Materials and Methods: Computer tomography (CT) scans were performed in 100 non-arthritic limbs of 50 Indian adults (42 males, eight females; age 26-40 years). Value of tibial torsion was measured using dorsal tangent to tibial condyles proximally and bimalleolar axis distally. Results: Normal tibial torsion was found to be 21.6 ± 7.6 (range 4.8 to 39.5) with none of the values in internal rotation. Right tibia was externally rotated by 2 degrees as compared to the left side (P 0.029). No significant difference was found in male and female subjects. Value of tibial torsion was less than in Caucasian limbs, but was comparable to Japanese limbs when studies using similar measurement technique were compared. Conclusions: Indian limbs have less tibial torsion than Caucasian limbs but the value of tibial torsion is comparable to Japanese limbs. PMID:19753157

  18. Does human immunodeficiency virus status affect early wound healing in open surgically stabilised tibial fractures?: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Howard, N E; Phaff, M; Aird, J; Wicks, L; Rollinson, P

    2013-12-01

    We compared early post-operative rates of wound infection in HIV-positive and -negative patients presenting with open tibial fractures managed with surgical fixation. The wounds of 84 patients (85 fractures), 28 of whom were HIV positive and 56 were HIV negative, were assessed for signs of infection using the ASEPIS wound score. There were 19 women and 65 men with a mean age of 34.8 years. A total of 57 fractures (17 HIV-positive, 40 HIV-negative) treated with external fixation were also assessed using the Checkett score for pin-site infection. The remaining 28 fractures were treated with internal fixation. No significant difference in early post-operative wound infection between the two groups of patients was found (10.7% (n = 3) vs 19.6% (n = 11); relative risk (RR) 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 1.8); p = 0.32). There was also no significant difference in pin-site infection rates (17.6% (n = 3) vs 12.5% (n = 5); RR 1.62 (95% CI 0.44 to 6.07); p = 0.47). The study does not support the hypothesis that HIV significantly increases the rate of early wound or pin-site infection in open tibial fractures. We would therefore suggest that a patient's HIV status should not alter the management of open tibial fractures in patients who have a CD4 count > 350 cells/μl. PMID:24293603

  19. Assessment of cortical and trabecular bone changes in two models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Hannah M; Larson, Blair E; Coatney, Garrett A; Button, Keith D; DeCamp, Charlie E; Fajardo, Ryan S; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone is thought to play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The goal of this study was to document changes in tibial and femoral subchondral bone that occur as a result of two lapine models of anterior cruciate ligament injury, a modified ACL transection model and a closed-joint traumatic compressive impact model. Twelve weeks post-injury bones were scanned via micro-computed tomography. The subchondral bone of injured limbs from both models showed decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density. Surgical transection animals showed significant bone changes primarily in the medial hemijoint of femurs and tibias, while significant changes were noted in both the medial and lateral hemijoints of both bones for traumatic impact animals. It is believed that subchondral bone changes in the medial hemijoint were likely caused by compromised soft tissue structures seen in both models. Subchondral bone changes in the lateral hemijoint of traumatic impact animals are thought to be due to transmission of the compressive impact force through the joint. The joint-wide bone changes shown in the traumatic impact model were similar to clinical findings from studies investigating the progression of osteoarthritis in humans.

  20. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  1. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  2. Biomechanical effects of plate area and locking screw on medial open tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chu-An; Lin, Shang-Chih; Hwa, Su-Yang; Chen, Chun-Ming; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2015-01-01

    Medial open high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been used to treat osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee. However, weaker plate strength, unstable plate/screw junction and improper surgery technique are highly related to the HTO outcomes. Two π-shape plates were designed and eight variations (two supporting area × four locking stiffness) were compared by finite-element method. The computed tomography-based tibia was reconstructed and both wedge micromotion and implant stresses were chosen as the comparison indices. The construct was subjected to surgical and physiological loads. The medial-posterior region is the most loaded region and the load through the posterior leg is about four times that through the anterior leg. This indicates that the two-leg design can form a force-couple mechanism to effectively reduce the implant stresses. The use of locking screws significantly decrease the screw and hole stresses. However, the extending plate reduces the stresses of screws and holes above the wedge but makes the distal screws and holes much stressed. Wedge micromotion is affected by extending plate rather than locking screw. Three factors contribute to effective stabilisation of unstable HTO wedge: (1) intimate tibia-plate contact at medial-posterior regions, (2) sufficient rigidity at plate-screw junctions and (3) effective moment-balancing design at distal tibia-plate interfaces.

  3. Transfer function between tibial acceleration and ground reaction force.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Lake, M J; Hennig, E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to capture the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) and tibial axial acceleration. Tibia acceleration and GRF were simultaneously recorded from five subjects during running. The acceleration of the bone was measured with a transducer mounted onto an intracortical pin. The signals were analyzed in the frequency domain to characterize the relationship between GRF and tibial acceleration. The results confirmed that for each subject this relationship could be represented by a frequency transfer function. The existence of a more general relationship for all five subjects was also confirmed by the results. The transfer functions provided information about transient shock transmissibility for the entire impact phase of running.

  4. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction: An Overlooked Cause of Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Bubra, Preet Singh; Keighley, Geffrey; Rateesh, Shruti; Carmody, David

    2015-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. Degenerative changes in this tendon, lead to pain and weakness and if not identified and treated will progress to deformity of the foot and degenerative changes in the surrounding joints. Patients will complain of medial foot pain, weakness, and a slowly progressive foot deformity. A “too many toes” sign may be present and patients will be unable to perform a single heal raise test. Investigations such X-ray, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging will help stage the disease and decide on management. The optimal manage may change based on the progression of deformity and stage of disease. Early identification and prompt initiation of treatment can halt progression of the disease. The purpose of this article is to examine the causes, signs, symptoms, examinations, investigations and treatment options for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:25810985

  5. Rates of tibial osteotomies in Canada and the United States.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Heck, D; Hawker, G; Dittus, R; Freund, D; Joyce, D; Paul, J; Young, W; Coyte, P

    1995-10-01

    This study determined the temporal trends and factors associated with the rates of performance of tibial osteotomies from 1985 to 1990 in Ontario, Canada and the United States. The Health Care Financing Administration, Ontario Health Insurance Plan, and National Hospital Discharge Survey databases were used to determine the number of osteotomies from 1985 to 1990. Osteotomy rates decreased in both countries approximately by 11% to 14% per year in patients 65 years and older and by 3% to 4% per year in patients younger than 65 years. Men received twice as many osteotomies as women in both countries. In the United States, the average rate of tibial osteotomies was 2 to 3 times lower than in Ontario. PMID:7554639

  6. [Minimally invasive treatment of tibial plateau fracture under arthroscopy monitoring].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixin; Ma, Shaoyun; Li, Xianpeng

    2014-05-01

    Twenty six patients with fracture of tibial plateau was under arthroscopy assisted reduction, the joint surface of bone graft, and USES the steel plate fixation treatment. Average surgery time was 65 min (70-120 min), average fracture healing time was 15 weeks (12-17 weeks), joint surface anatomical reattachment rate was 92.9%. Using break knee function criteria evaluation of curative effect: 18 cases great 6 cases wed, 2 cases ok, fine rate was 92.3%. No infection, deep venous thrombosis and small leg fascia chamber syndrome and other complications. Conclusion is that treatment of tibial plateau fractures under arthroscope has advantages of small trauma, check intuitively and reset accurately, functional recovery of patients are satisfied, the treatment has certain clinical application value.

  7. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  8. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty).

  9. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits.

    PubMed

    Loia, Marco Corgiat; Vanni, Stefania; Rosso, Federica; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Dettoni, Federico; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  10. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  11. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  12. Simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Metin; Taşkiran, Emin; Ozgürbüz, Cengizhan

    2003-05-01

    A 16-year-old male basketball player had sustained an injury upon landing after a forceful jump. Plain radiography demonstrated bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture involving partially proximal physis. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed at once. Continuous passive motion was started immediately after operation, and the patient was ambulated with hinged knee extension braces. After 27 months follow-up his knees completely regained normal range of motion except a 3 degrees extension loss in the left knee. He resumed all daily functional activities (Lysholm functional score of 99), but he slightly lost his level of activity (Tegner activity level from 7 to 6). No angular deformity at all on the frontal plane was determined upon radiological examination. Tibial slope angles were symmetrical and within the normal range. There were visible small bone fragments inside the left patellar tendon.

  13. Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Jakoi, Andre; Freidl, Michael; Old, Andrew; Javandel, Mitra; Tom, James; Realyvasquez, Juan

    2012-08-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures most commonly occur in adolescent boys and usually result from pushing off or landing while jumping. These fractures are relatively uncommon but can have a significant functional effect. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome with return to play in 8 adolescent basketball players with at least 4 years of postoperative reconditioning. Results with return to play at the preinjury level are favorable after treatment of acute tibial avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players. Long-term outcome was excellent in all patients regardless of fracture type. Open reduction and internal fixation using 1 or 2 cancellous bone screws achieved union in all cases.

  14. Total knee arthroplasty with concurrent femoral and tibial osteotomies in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Russell; Luedke, Colten

    2014-01-01

    Three total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with concurrent femoral and/or tibial osteotomies in 2 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were performed from 2004 to 2009. The 2 patients were followed for a mean of 6 years. One patient with concurrent TKA, and femoral and tibial osteotomies developed a nonunion of the tibial site that responded to open reduction and internal fixation with iliac crest bone graft. The second patient underwent right TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies, which healed uneventfully, allowing pain free, unassisted ambulation. The same patient then elected to undergo left TKA with bi-level tibial osteotomies. Intraoperatively he sustained a minor tibial plateau fracture requiring the use of a stemmed component and postoperatively, he developed a nonunion at the proximal site and valgus malunion of the distal site. Revision of fixation was performed at both osteotomy sites, and both healed within 3 months. Both patients are now pain free and ambulate without assistance.

  15. The medial tibial syndrome. The role of surgery.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, A J; Schepsis, A; McArthur, C

    1994-11-01

    Among authors over the past 35 years, medial tibial syndrome, or "shin splints," has been interpreted to mean many different things. We present a review of the literature to attempt to ascribe one definition to this clinical entity, and to clearly define its symptoms, signs, pathophysiology, biomechanics, and treatment. In addition, we describe our results with five patients whose seven affected limbs eventually required surgery for this condition, and we compare them to the results in the literature.

  16. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  17. Case report: comprehensive management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krenner, Bernard John

    2002-01-01

    Activity or exercise-induced leg pain is a common complication among competitive and "weekend warrior" athletes. Shin splints is a term that has been used to describe all lower leg pain as a result of activity. There are many different causes of "shin splints," one of which is medial tibial stress syndrome, and the treating clinician must be aware of potentially serious causes of activity related leg pain. Restoring proper biomechanics to the entire kinetic chain and rehabilitation of the injured area should be the primary aim of treatment to optimize shock absorption. The role inflammation plays in medial tibial stress syndrome is controversial, but in this case, seemed to be a causative factor as symptomatology was dramatically decreased with the addition of proteolytic enzymes. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be quite difficult to treat and keeping athletes away from activities that will slow healing or aggravate the condition can be challenging. "Active" rest is the best way in which to allow proper healing while allowing the athlete to maintain their fitness.

  18. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient.

  19. Morphogenesis of Fusarium sp-induced tibial dyschondroplasia in chickens.

    PubMed

    Haynes, J S; Walser, M M; Lawler, E M

    1985-11-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia was induced in female broiler chicks by the incorporation of 2% Fusarium roseum "Alaska" culture into their starter ration. Chicks were placed on this diet at one day of age and maintained until they were killed at four days or one week. Proximal tibial physes were grossly thickened into cone-shaped masses of cartilage by one week of age. Microscopically, lesions were in both ages of treated chickens and were characterized by thickening of the transitional zone which was especially prominent in the center of the growth plate. This zone was unmineralized, avascular, and contained chondrocytes which were crenated and densely eosinophilic. The cartilage matrix was pale and contained some patchy eosinophilic foci. Four growth plates with tibial dyschondroplasia and four normal growth plates from each of the four-day and one-week-old age groups were evaluated based on the following parameters: number of metaphyseal vascular sprouts, distance between the proliferative/transitional junction and the tip of the metaphyseal vascular sprouts, width of the tips of the metaphyseal sprouts, distance between tips of adjacent metaphyseal vascular sprouts, and number of perforating vessels in the proliferative zone. The distance between the proliferative/transitional junction and the metaphyseal sprout tips was greatly increased (p less than 0.01) in the affected four-day and one-week-old chickens compared to age-matched controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Leg tissue mass composition affects tibial acceleration response following impact.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M

    2012-02-01

    To date, there has not been a direct examination of the effect that tissue composition (lean mass/muscle, fat mass, bone mineral content) differences between males and females has on how the tibia responds to impacts similar to those seen during running. To evaluate this, controlled heel impacts were imparted to 36 participants (6 M and 6 F in each of low, medium and high percent body fat [BF] groups) using a human pendulum. A skin-mounted accelerometer medial to the tibial tuberosity was used to determine the tibial response parameters (peak acceleration, acceleration slope and time to peak acceleration). There were no consistent effects of BF or specific tissue masses on the un-normalized tibial response parameters. However, females experienced 25% greater peak acceleration than males. When normalized to lean mass, wobbling mass, and bone mineral content, females experienced 50%, 62% and 70% greater peak acceleration, respectively, per gram of tissue than males. Higher magnitudes of lean mass and bone mass significantly contributed to decreased acceleration responses in general.

  1. The impact of tibial torsion measurements on gait analysis kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Santos, Nadia Maria; Godoy, Wagner De; Bernal, Milena Moreira Barreto; Paes, Ângela Tavares; Ramalho, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure and compare tibial torsion values as assessed by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics. In addition, the impact of each one of these measurements on kinematic and kinetic results for normal gait was determined. Methods: Twenty-three healthy and fully ambulatory patients were assessed, 11 women and 12 men, from 20 to 40 years old. Data were collected at a laboratory for the three-dimensional analysis of movement with 10 cameras and two force plates. Tibial torsion measurements were obtained using goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics based on the Plug-in Gait model. Afterwards, both procedures were compared, and the impact of each result was assessed on the kinematic and kinetic modeling of the knee and ankle. Results: Pearson's linear correlation coefficient (r=0,504) showed a moderate correlation between the three-dimensional kinematics and goniometry, and between the changes in the measurements. Regarding the processed kinematic and kinetic results for every torsion position, no significant differences were noticed among any of the studied variables (p>0.05). Conclusion: Although statistical correlation among tibial torsion angles by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematic were moderate, kinematic and kinetic analysis of the joints did not reveal any significant changes. Level of Evidence I, Diagnostic Studies - Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:25328438

  2. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; McCoy, Brett W; Hussain, Waqas M; Saluan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The authors present a report of a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture in an adolescent athlete after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The procedure was performed via arthroscopic transtibial PCL reconstruction with quadrupled semi-tendinosus and gracilis autograft. The patient recovered uneventfully postoperatively and was able to participate in high-level sports activity, such as baseball and track, with no limitations, no subjective complaints, and no episodes of instability. He continued to be asymptomatic up to 3.5 years postoperatively. Almost 4 years postoperatively, the patient reinjured the left knee during recreational noncontact football and was seen emergently. Plain radiographs, magnetic resonance image scan, and computed tomography scan at the time of injury showed a bicondylar tibial plateau fracture with intra-articular involvement. Operative intervention was undertaken for open reduction and internal fixation of the bicondylar tibial plateau fracture. A plate was placed along the medial aspect of the tibia with locking and nonlocking screws, and the joint line was restored appropriately. The patient recovered uneventfully and at the most recent follow-up had full active and passive range of motion, had no subjective or objective evidence of instability, and had returned to full activity with no restrictions. The patient had no history of multiple fractures or any medical or pharmacologic history that predisposed him to decreased bone density. This case shows a unique possible complication after transtibial PCL reconstruction in an adolescent patient. PMID:25760514

  3. Temporary intra-operative reduction techniques for tibial fracture fixation: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Beazley, J C; Hull, P

    2010-12-01

    Accurate intra-operative reduction and maintenance of reduction is essential for successful fixation of tibial fractures. Although many tibial fractures can be reduced with minimal manipulation, numerous techniques have been described to facilitate fixation of more difficult fractures. These include use of a traction table, manual traction techniques, temporary distracters, reduction clamps and temporary unicortical plating. This article reviews the literature and assesses the options available for the temporary reduction and maintenance of reduction of tibial fractures prior to definitive fixation.

  4. Dynamic Contact Mechanics on the Tibial Plateau of the Human Knee During Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susannah; Chen, Tony; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Choi, Dan; Voigt, Clifford; Warren, Russell F.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in scaffold design, manufacture, and development, it remains unclear what forces these scaffolds must withstand when implanted into the heavily loaded environment of the knee joint. The objective of this study was to fully quantify the dynamic contact mechanics across the tibial plateau of the human knee joint during gait and stair climbing. Our model consisted of a modified Stanmore knee simulator (to apply multi-directional dynamic forces), a two-camera motion capture system (to record joint kinematics), an electronic sensor (to record contact stresses on the tibial plateau), and a suite of post-processing algorithms. During gait, peak contact stresses on the medial plateau occurred in areas of cartilage-cartilage contact; while during stair climb, peak contact stresses were located in the posterior aspect of the plateau, under the meniscus. On the lateral plateau, during gait and in early stair-climb, peak contact stresses occurred under the meniscus, while in late stair-climb, peak contact stresses were experienced in the zone of cartilage-cartilage contact. At 45% of the gait cycle, and 20% and 48% of the stair-climb cycle, peak stresses were simultaneously experienced on both the medial and lateral compartment, suggesting that these phases of loading warrant particular consideration in any simulation intended to evaluate scaffold performance. Our study suggests that in order to design a scaffold capable of restoring ‘normal’ contact mechanics to the injured knees, the mechanics of the intended site of implantation should be taken into account in any pre-clinical testing regime. PMID:24296275

  5. Effects of femoral tunnel placement on knee laxity and forces in an anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Hame, Sharon; Hunter, D Monte; Oakes, Daniel A; Zoric, Bojan; Gause, Paul; Finerman, Gerald A M

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of variation in placement of the femoral tunnel upon knee laxity, graft pretension required to restore normal anterior-posterior (AP) laxity and graft forces following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Two variants in tunnel position were studied: (1) AP position along the medial border of the lateral femoral condyle (at a standard 11 o'clock notch orientation) and (2) orientation along the arc of the femoral notch (o'clock position) at a fixed distance of 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall. AP laxity and forces in the native ACL were measured in fresh frozen cadaveric knee specimens during passive knee flexion-extension under the following modes of tibial loading: no external tibial force, anterior tibial force, varus-valgus moment, and internal-external tibial torque. One group (15 specimens) was used to determine effects of AP tunnel placement, while a second group (14 specimens) was used to study variations in o'clock position of the femoral tunnel within the femoral notch. A bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was placed into a femoral tunnel centered at a point 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall at the 11 o'clock position in the femoral notch. A graft pretension was determined such that AP laxity of the knee at 30 deg of flexion was restored to within 1 mm of normal; this was termed the laxity match pretension. All tests were repeated with a graft in the standard 11 o'clock tunnel, and then with a graft in tunnels placed at other selected positions. Varying placement of the femoral tunnel 1 h clockwise or counterclockwise from the 11 o'clock position did not significantly affect any biomechanical parameter measured in this study, nor did placing the graft 2.5 mm posteriorly within the standard 11 o'clock femoral tunnel. Placing the graft in a tunnel 5.0 mm anterior to the standard 11 o'clock tunnel increased the mean laxity match pretension by 16.8 N (62%) and produced a knee which was on

  6. Tibial rotational osteotomy for idiopathic torsion. A comparison of the proximal and distal osteotomy levels.

    PubMed

    Krengel, W F; Staheli, L T

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 52 rotational tibial osteotomies (RTOs) performed on 35 patients with severe idiopathic tibial torsion. Thirty-nine osteotomies were performed at the proximal or midtibial level. Thirteen were performed at the distal tibial level with a technique previously described by one of the authors. Serious complications occurred in five (13%) of the proximal and in none of the distal RTOs. For severe and persisting idiopathic tibial torsion, the authors recommend correction by RTO at the distal level. Proximal level osteotomy is indicated only when a varus or valgus deformity required concurrent correction.

  7. Posterior tibial tendon tears in young competitive athletes: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Porter, D A; Baxter, D E; Clanton, T O; Klootwyk, T E

    1998-09-01

    Unlike the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibial tendon does not typically undergo acute rupture. We report two cases of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in young, athletic individuals (<30 years old) that required operative intervention before the patients could return to competitive sports. We believe that these are the first two reports of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in this population without the patient having a prior history of steroid injections in the tendon. The tears we observed and described at surgical exploration were chronic and degenerative in nature. We also comment on our approach to treatment of posterior tibial tendon injuries in the athletic population.

  8. Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Semitendinosus Tendon Using the PINN-ACL CrossPin System: Minimum 4-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung-Gil; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Lee, Chang-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated mid-term results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the PINN-ACL CrossPin system that allowed for short graft fixation. Materials and Methods Forty-three patients underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with a 4-strand semitendinosus tendon graft using the PINN-ACL CrossPin system. Femoral fixation was done using the PINN-ACL CrossPin system, and the tibial side was fixed with post-tie and a bioabsorbable interference screw. The mean follow-up period was 50 months. Evaluation was done using the Lachman test, pivot-shift test, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and grade. Anterior displacement was assessed. Results There was improvement in the Lachman test and pivot-shift test at final follow-up, form grade II (n=40) or III (n=3) to grade I (n=3) or 0 (n=40) and from grade I (n=20) or II (n=10) to grade I (n=8) or 0 (n=22), respectively. The mean IKDC score was 88.7, and grade A and B were 93.0% at final follow-up. Side-to-side difference was improved from 6.7 mm to 2.1 mm at final follow-up. Complications occurred in 3 patients, a re-ruptured due to trauma at 2 years after surgery and a deep infection and a superficial infection. Conclusions The mid-term follow-up results of ACL reconstruction with the PINN-ACL CrossPin system were satisfactory. The PINN-ACL CrossPin can be considered as a useful instrument for short graft fixation. PMID:25750893

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant–Preserving Reconstruction Using a “Lasso-Loop” Knot Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant–sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a “lasso-loop” technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring autograft: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Yong Seuk; Ha, Hae Chan

    2009-08-01

    During an arthroscopic examination for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is a relatively thick remnant ACL tibial stump attached to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) or rarely remained between the femur origin and the tibia insertion. We thought that preservation of the remnant ACL original bundle might promote graft healing or be helpful in preserving the proprioception and function to stabilize the knee. Therefore, we established a remnant preservation procedure without additional instruments during an ACL reconstruction using a bio-cross pin (RIGIDfix system: Mitek, Johnson & Johnson, USA) for the femoral tunnel fixation. The remnant ACL was sutured (usually three stitches) using a suture hook (Linvatec, Largo, FL), and both ends of the sutures were pulled to the far anteromedial (AM) portal. These sutures protected the remnant tissue during the ACL reconstruction because medial traction of these sutures can provide a wide view during the reconstruction. After the femoral and tibial tunnel formation, these sutures were pulled out to the inferior sleeve of the cross pin using a previously inserted wire loop via an inferior sleeve. After graft passage, a superior cross pin was first fixed and tibial fixation was then performed. Finally, inferior cross pin fixation was performed and ties were made at the entrance of the inferior cross pin. PMID:18299859

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant-Preserving Reconstruction Using a "Lasso-Loop" Knot Configuration.

    PubMed

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant-sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a "lasso-loop" technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  12. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cadaveric model.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Chen, Tony; Santner, Thomas J; El-Amin, Saadiq; Kelly, Natalie H; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2013-09-01

    The effects of tears of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee kinematics and contact mechanics during dynamic everyday activities, such as gait, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee contact mechanics and kinematics during simulated gait. Nine human cadaveric knees were each augmented with a sensor capable of measuring dynamic normal contact stresses on the tibial plateau, mounted on a load-controlled simulator, and subjected to physiological, multidirectional, dynamic loads to mimic gait. Using a mixed model with random knee identifiers, confidence intervals were constructed for contact stress before and after anterior cruciate ligament transection at two points in the gait cycle at which axial force peaked (14% and 45% of the gait cycle). Kinematic and contact mechanics changes after anterior cruciate ligament transection were highly variable across knees. Nonetheless, a statistically significant increase in contact stress in the posterior-central aspect of the medial tibial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was identified, the location of which corresponds to the location of degenerative changes that are frequently found in patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament injury. The variability in the contact stress in other regions of the medial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was partly explained by the variations in osseous geometry across the nine knees tested. At 14% of gait, there was no significant change in peak contact stress after anterior cruciate ligament transection in any of the four quadrants, and none of the possible explanatory variables showed statistical significance. Understanding the variable effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on contact mechanics based on geometric differences in osseous anatomy is of paramount clinical importance and may be invaluable to select the best reconstruction techniques and counsel patients on their individual risk of subsequent

  13. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: A cadaveric model

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Chen, Tony; Santner, Thomas J; El-Amin, Saadiq; Kelly, Natalie H; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of tears of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee kinematics and contact mechanics during dynamic everyday activities, such as gait, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knee contact mechanics and kinematics during simulated gait. Nine human cadaveric knees were each augmented with a sensor capable of measuring dynamic normal contact stresses on the tibial plateau, mounted on a load-controlled simulator, and subjected to physiological, multidirectional, dynamic loads to mimic gait. Using a mixed model with random knee identifiers, confidence intervals were constructed for contact stress before and after anterior cruciate ligament transection at two points in the gait cycle at which axial force peaked (14% and 45% of the gait cycle). Kinematic and contact mechanics changes after anterior cruciate ligament transection were highly variable across knees. Nonetheless, a statistically significant increase in contact stress in the posterior–central aspect of the medial tibial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was identified, the location of which corresponds to the location of degenerative changes that are frequently found in patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament injury. The variability in the contact stress in other regions of the medial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was partly explained by the variations in osseous geometry across the nine knees tested. At 14% of gait, there was no significant change in peak contact stress after anterior cruciate ligament transection in any of the four quadrants, and none of the possible explanatory variables showed statistical significance. Understanding the variable effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on contact mechanics based on geometric differences in osseous anatomy is of paramount clinical importance and may be invaluable to select the best reconstruction techniques and counsel patients on their individual risk of subsequent

  14. Clinical assessment following tibial tuberosity advancement in 28 stifles at 6 months and 1 year after surgery.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Tamara L; Allen, David A; Monteith, Gabrielle J

    2013-03-01

    This prospective study evaluated the effect of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) on lameness, thigh circumference, range of motion (ROM), and radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) scores at 6 wk, 6 mo, and 1 y after surgery in 24 client-owned dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency. Complications associated with TTA were also assessed. A significant improvement in lameness score and thigh circumference was observed in CrCL deficient limbs that received TTA, but no significant overall change in range of motion occurred in the affected limbs over the course of the study. Post-operative complications were identified in 33.3% of the dogs. This study demonstrates that TTA results in significant clinical improvement in patients up to 1 y after surgery. However, 21% of the dogs had post-operative recurrent lameness.

  15. Minimizing Alteration of Posterior Tibial Slope During Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: a Protocol with Experimental Validation in Paired Cadaveric Knees

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Methods Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Results Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Discussion & Conclusions Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the

  16. Intraoperative fluorescence vascular angiography: during tibial bypass.

    PubMed

    Perry, Diana; Bharara, Manish; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Preventing amputations in persons with lower extremity complications of diabetes is a complex endeavor, particularly in those with concomitant ischemia and tissue loss. Fluorescence angiography (Novadaq SPY system) may provide a tool for objective evaluations of tissue viability in the diabetic foot, which is an important indicator of the ability of the diabetic ulcer to heal adequately. The SPY system uses a low-power laser coupled with a charge-coupled device camera and indocyanine green (ICG) to sequence perfusion at the surface of the skin. We present an illustrated example of the potential utility of ICG fluorescence angiography (ICGFA) before and after vascular intervention in a high-risk limb. ICGFA appeared to reveal demarcation between viable and nonviable tissue and real-time perfusion, specifically capillary fill. ICGFA clarified the extent of necessary debridement and provided an immediate indication of improvement in regional perfusion status following revascularization. Future studies involving ICGFA may include pre- and postdebridement and closure perfusion, comparison of tissue perfusion pre- and post-endovascular therapy, and lower extremity flap viability. Future works will also address the consistency of results with ICGFA by analyzing a larger cohort of patients being treated by our unit. PMID:22401340

  17. Effect of the Fatigue Induced by a 110-km Ultramarathon on Tibial Impact Acceleration and Lower Leg Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Gimenez, Philippe; Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J; Martin, Vincent; Rupp, Thomas; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-01-01

    Ultramarathon runners are exposed to a high number of impact shocks and to severe neuromuscular fatigue. Runners may manage mechanical stress and muscle fatigue by changing their running kinematics. Our purposes were to study (i) the effects of a 110-km mountain ultramarathon (MUM) on tibial shock acceleration and lower limb kinematics, and (ii) whether kinematic changes are modulated according to the severity of neuromuscular fatigue. Twenty-three runners participated in the study. Pre- and post-MUM, neuromuscular tests were performed to assess knee extensor (KE) and plantar flexor (PF) central and peripheral fatigue, and a treadmill running bouts was completed during which step frequency, peak acceleration, median frequency and impact frequency content were measured from tibial acceleration, as well as foot-to-treadmill, tibia-to-treadmill, and ankle flexion angles at initial contact, and ankle range of motion using video analysis. Large neuromuscular fatigue, including peripheral changes and deficits in voluntary activation, was observed in KE and PF. MVC decrements of ~35% for KE and of ~28% for PF were noted. Among biomechanical variables, step frequency increased by ~2.7% and the ankle range of motion decreased by ~4.1% post-MUM. Runners adopting a non rearfoot strike pre-MUM adopted a less plantarflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM while those adopting a rearfoot strike pre-MUM tended to adopt a less dorsiflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM. Positive correlations were observed between percent changes in peripheral PF fatigue and the ankle range of motion. Peripheral PF fatigue was also significantly correlated to both percent changes in step frequency and the ankle angle at contact. This study suggests that in a fatigued state, ultratrail runners use compensatory/protective adjustments leading to a flatter foot landing and this is done in a fatigue dose-dependent manner. This strategy may aim at minimizing the overall load applied to the musculoskeletal

  18. Effect of the Fatigue Induced by a 110-km Ultramarathon on Tibial Impact Acceleration and Lower Leg Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Gimenez, Philippe; Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J; Martin, Vincent; Rupp, Thomas; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-01-01

    Ultramarathon runners are exposed to a high number of impact shocks and to severe neuromuscular fatigue. Runners may manage mechanical stress and muscle fatigue by changing their running kinematics. Our purposes were to study (i) the effects of a 110-km mountain ultramarathon (MUM) on tibial shock acceleration and lower limb kinematics, and (ii) whether kinematic changes are modulated according to the severity of neuromuscular fatigue. Twenty-three runners participated in the study. Pre- and post-MUM, neuromuscular tests were performed to assess knee extensor (KE) and plantar flexor (PF) central and peripheral fatigue, and a treadmill running bouts was completed during which step frequency, peak acceleration, median frequency and impact frequency content were measured from tibial acceleration, as well as foot-to-treadmill, tibia-to-treadmill, and ankle flexion angles at initial contact, and ankle range of motion using video analysis. Large neuromuscular fatigue, including peripheral changes and deficits in voluntary activation, was observed in KE and PF. MVC decrements of ~35% for KE and of ~28% for PF were noted. Among biomechanical variables, step frequency increased by ~2.7% and the ankle range of motion decreased by ~4.1% post-MUM. Runners adopting a non rearfoot strike pre-MUM adopted a less plantarflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM while those adopting a rearfoot strike pre-MUM tended to adopt a less dorsiflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM. Positive correlations were observed between percent changes in peripheral PF fatigue and the ankle range of motion. Peripheral PF fatigue was also significantly correlated to both percent changes in step frequency and the ankle angle at contact. This study suggests that in a fatigued state, ultratrail runners use compensatory/protective adjustments leading to a flatter foot landing and this is done in a fatigue dose-dependent manner. This strategy may aim at minimizing the overall load applied to the musculoskeletal

  19. Effect of the Fatigue Induced by a 110-km Ultramarathon on Tibial Impact Acceleration and Lower Leg Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Giandolini, Marlene; Gimenez, Philippe; Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J.; Martin, Vincent; Rupp, Thomas; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y.

    2016-01-01

    Ultramarathon runners are exposed to a high number of impact shocks and to severe neuromuscular fatigue. Runners may manage mechanical stress and muscle fatigue by changing their running kinematics. Our purposes were to study (i) the effects of a 110-km mountain ultramarathon (MUM) on tibial shock acceleration and lower limb kinematics, and (ii) whether kinematic changes are modulated according to the severity of neuromuscular fatigue. Twenty-three runners participated in the study. Pre- and post-MUM, neuromuscular tests were performed to assess knee extensor (KE) and plantar flexor (PF) central and peripheral fatigue, and a treadmill running bouts was completed during which step frequency, peak acceleration, median frequency and impact frequency content were measured from tibial acceleration, as well as foot-to-treadmill, tibia-to-treadmill, and ankle flexion angles at initial contact, and ankle range of motion using video analysis. Large neuromuscular fatigue, including peripheral changes and deficits in voluntary activation, was observed in KE and PF. MVC decrements of ~35% for KE and of ~28% for PF were noted. Among biomechanical variables, step frequency increased by ~2.7% and the ankle range of motion decreased by ~4.1% post-MUM. Runners adopting a non rearfoot strike pre-MUM adopted a less plantarflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM while those adopting a rearfoot strike pre-MUM tended to adopt a less dorsiflexed foot strike pattern post-MUM. Positive correlations were observed between percent changes in peripheral PF fatigue and the ankle range of motion. Peripheral PF fatigue was also significantly correlated to both percent changes in step frequency and the ankle angle at contact. This study suggests that in a fatigued state, ultratrail runners use compensatory/protective adjustments leading to a flatter foot landing and this is done in a fatigue dose-dependent manner. This strategy may aim at minimizing the overall load applied to the musculoskeletal

  20. Repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion alters hamstring reflex responses and tibial translation in males and females.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Wassermann, Franziska; Plewka, Antje; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries is considerably higher in females than in males and the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Research indicates that the neuromuscular system of females and males might respond differently to the same fatigue protocol due to differences in muscle activation during movement tasks. This study analyzed sex differences in hamstring reflex responses and posterior-anterior tibial translation (TT) before and after fatiguing exercise. We measured the isolated movement of the tibia relative to the femur as a consequence of mechanically induced TT in standing subjects as well as muscle activity of the hamstrings before and after repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion. Muscle fatigue delayed reflex onset latencies in females and males. A reduction in reflex responses associated with an increased TT was observed after fatiguing exercise for both sexes. Data indicate that the used fatigue protocol altered the latency and magnitude of reflex responses as well as TT in females and males. Based on the results of previous research and the outcome of this study, it might be that sex-specific effects of fatigue on reflex activity and mechanical stability of the knee depend on the kind of fatiguing exercise.

  1. Relevance of anterior mandibular body ostectomy in mandibular prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pankaj; Singh, Virender; Anand, S. C.; Bansal, Sumidha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We tried to find out the relevance of anterior mandibular body ostectomy in deformities of the mandible specially prognathism, which is primarily limited to anterior part only. Patients and Methods: Ten patients with skeletal deformity along with malocclusion, which was limited to anterior body of mandible were selected. Selected patients had proper molar interdigitation (even if class 3) and in general had anterior crossbite (except one). All patients had crossed their growth spurts and had no hormonal influence on facial deformity. Specific protocol, including cephelometric analysis cephalometry for orthognathic surgery, prediction tracing and model surgeries were devised. Pre and post-surgical orthodontics and body ostectomy were performed in all patients along with 18-month post-op follow-up. Results: There was significant reduction in prognathism and horizontal dysplasia in all ten patients. Anterior crossbite as well as axis of incisiors over mandibular plane was corrected in all patients due to decrease in length of mandibular body. All patients showed decreased facial height and better lip competence with intact posterior occlusion and no (negligible or transient) sensory loss. Conclusions: Our study could confirm that people whose deformity is limited to the anterior part of mandible with reasonable occlusion posteriorly can get satisfactory cosmetic and functional results through body ostectomy alone rather than going for surgical procedure in the ramal area, which is liable to cause sensory and occlusal disturbances. PMID:24163554

  2. [Anterior cruciate ligament-plasty using the "U-dos" technique].

    PubMed

    Morales-Trevizo, C; Paz-García, M; Leal-Berumen, I; Leal-Contreras, C; Berumen-Nafarrate, E

    2013-01-01

    The knee is a compound diarthrodial joint, vulnerable to serious injuries such as ligament injuries of: medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament, as cruciate ligaments limit rotation movement in the joint. The purpose of our study was to create a new technique to treat injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, which is composed of two bundles--anteromedial and posterolateral--trying to achieve an anatomical reconstruction that allows for a normal biomechanical recovery. This technique reduces the use of fixation material and costs. The diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injuries was made with the pivot shift test. There are currently two repair methods for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: single bundle or double bundle repair; none of these techniques is considered as the gold standard, as their results are very similar. This paper describes a technique used for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, known as "U-dos", and its clinical results. Cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 20 patients with total anterior cruciate ligament injuries who underwent anterior cruciate ligament plasty using the "U-dos" technique between June 2009 and June 2010. The technique requires the use of bone bank allograft, in this case of the anterior tibial ligament. Patients were assessed using the Lysholm scale and the pivot shift test. Our results show that all the pivot shift tests were negative and assessments according to the Lysholm scale were from normal to excellent in 95% of cases (19/20). Only one failure was reported, with avulsion of the graft attachment which required a surgical intervention.

  3. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  4. The influence of graft placement on clinical outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    PADUA, ROBERTO; ALVITI, FEDERICA; VENOSA, MICHELE; MAZZOLA, CARLO; PADUA, LUCA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of graft tunnel position on both clinical outcome and instrumental knee stability in patients submitted to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft. Methods thirty patients (24 men and 6 women) who underwent ACL reconstruction performed using an autologous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft were studied at a mean follow-up of 18 months. Clinical outcome was assessed on the basis of the Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective form and the Short Form-36. Clinical outcomes were correlated with both femoral and tibial tunnel placement measured on standard anteroposterior and lateral knee radiographs, in accordance with established guidelines. Results tibial tunnel position on the lateral view correlated significantly with both the IKDC subjective form (r = −0.72; p<0.05) and the Lysholm score (r=−0.73; p<0.05). Tibial tunnel position on the lateral view also correlated with stability measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer at 30N of force (r=0.57; p<0.05). No correlation was found between α angle and anteroposterior (AP) laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer. No significant correlation was found between femoral tunnel position (on either view) and Lysholm score, IKDC score and Tegner activity level. Similarly, no correlation was found between AP laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer and femoral tunnel position. Conclusions these results suggest that the more anterior the placement of the tibial tunnel, the better the clinical outcome will be. On the basis of literature data and our findings, we discuss the hypothesis that there exists a “correct area” for tunnel placement, making it possible to obtain the best results. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:27386442

  5. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.): Study rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures – the most common of long bone fractures – with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high – between 23% and 60% in prior trials – and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. Methods/Design The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T) was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB) or closed (Tscherne Types 0–3) fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group). The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group). Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. Discussion The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after nailing). The primary

  6. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection.

  7. BBilateral Neglected Anterior Shoulder Dislocation with Greater Tuberosity Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Tejas; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; Mehta, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Shoulder dislocations are a very common entity in routine orthopaedic practice. Chronic unreduced anterior dislocations of the shoulder are not very common. Neurological and vascular complications may occur as a result of an acute anterior dislocation of the shoulder or after a while in chronic unreduced shoulder dislocation. Open reduction is indicated for most chronic shoulder dislocations. We report a case of neglected bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation with bilateral displaced greater tuberosity fracture. To the best of our knowledge, only a handful cases have been reported in literature with bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation with bilateral fractures. Delayed diagnosis/reporting is a scenario which makes the list even slimmer and management all the more challenging. Case Report: We report a case of a 35-year-old male who had bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation and bilateral greater tuberosity fracture post seizure and failed to report it for a period of 30 days. One side was managed conservatively with closed reduction and immobilization and the other side with open reduction. No neurovascular complications pre or post reduction of shoulder were seen. Conclusion: Shoulder dislocations should always be suspected post seizures and if found should be treated promptly. Treatment becomes difficult for any shoulder dislocation that goes untreated for considerable period of time PMID:27703939

  8. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-04-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  9. Strong Association Between Tibial Plateau Bone Mineral Density and Cartilage Damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA), but no study has looked at its relationship with a direct measure of cartilage damage. We hypothesize that a relative increase in medial and lateral tibial BMD will be associated with cartilage damage...

  10. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  11. Multiple Looping Technique for Tibial Fixation in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may be negatively affected by insufficient tibial tunnel fixation due to relatively lower bone density of the proximal tibia. We introduce a new technique of tibial fixation for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using free tendon Achilles allograft that is less affected by the bone density of the tibial metaphysis. PMID:25973367

  12. Mid-term results of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Yong, C K; Choon, David S K

    2005-07-01

    We studied the factors influencing the mid-term outcomes of tibial plateau fractures treated conservatively (n=21) and surgically (n=27) from December 1994 to December 1997. Joint stability was an important prognostic determinant. In the surgical group, the most important factor was good anatomical reduction. Functional outcomes were comparable between the conservative and surgical groups. We concluded that conservative treatment is a valid option for fractures with minimal displacement and surgical treatment is justified for severely displaced or depressed fractures. Attention must be paid to the recognition and restoration of joint stability and articular surface congruency for a satisfactory outcome.

  13. Fracture of the os tibiale externum in a decathlete.

    PubMed

    Lepore, L; Francobandiera, C; Maffulli, N

    1990-01-01

    The upsurge in popularity in sports activities has produced a large number of lower extremity injuries. This article describes acute fracture of the os tibiale externum in a 28-year-old decathlete. The injury was treated conservatively, and excellent functional recovery was obtained. This is the second case of traumatic fracture of this accessory bone of the foot described in the English literature. When dealing with the feet of an athlete, supernumerary bones must be taken into consideration as a possible cause of serious discomfort. PMID:1977791

  14. Tibial-talar dislocation without fracture: treatment principles and outcome.

    PubMed

    Finkemeier, C; Engebretsen, L; Gannon, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of tibial-talar dislocations without fracture is unknown and has been sparsely reported in the literature. The diagnosis of the injury is straightforward with the appropriate examination and roentgenograms. Good to excellent results can be achieved with open or closed dislocations treated by closed reduction and immobilization for 4-6 weeks. Although open dislocations require irrigation, debridement, and possibly delayed closure, controversy exists with regard to acute ligament repair. Because good to excellent results are possible without acute ligament repair, and delayed repair on reconstruction can be accomplished with good outcomes, we recommend treating these injuries without ligament repair.

  15. Grade 3 open tibial shaft fractures treated with a circular frame, functional outcome and systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dickson, D R; Moulder, E; Hadland, Y; Giannoudis, P V; Sharma, H K

    2015-04-01

    We report on the surgical and functional outcome of 22 patients with Grade 3 open tibial fractures treated with circular frame. All cases united and there were no re-fractures or amputations. All patients were assessed at a minimum of 1-year post frame removal. Assessment included clinical examination, IOWA ankle and knee scores, Olerud and Molander ankle score and EuroQol EQ-5D. Clinical scores were either good or excellent in over half of the patients in all knee and ankle scores. There was a significant positive correlation between functional outcomes and the EQ-5D score. The EQ-5D mean health state visual analogue score was comparable to the general UK population despite patients scoring less than the average UK population in three of the five domains. 36% reported some difficulties in walking and 41% had problems with pain. 14% had difficulties with self-care and 46% had difficulties with their usual activities. 14% had problems with anxiety or depression. Systematic review of the literature suggests, in the management of open tibial fractures, circular frames provide equivalent or superior surgical outcomes in comparison with other techniques. Our study finds the application of a circular frame also results in a good functional outcome in the majority of cases. PMID:25648287

  16. Combined Tibial Tubercle Avulsion Fracture and Patellar Avulsion Fracture: An Unusual Variant in an Adolescent Patient.

    PubMed

    Stepanovich, Matthew T; Slakey, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic extensor dysfunction of the knee in children is a rare injury, with the majority resulting from tibial tubercle avulsion fracture or patellar sleeve fracture. We report a rare case of combined patellar avulsion fracture and tibial tubercle fracture. With open anatomic reduction, both injuries were successfully treated. While many variations of tibial tubercle fracture have been reported, the authors believe this to be the first report in the English-language literature of this particular combined injury to the knee extensor mechanism in an adolescent. Advanced imaging with computed tomography provided vital information to aid with operative planning, especially since the majority of the unossified tubercle was not seen on plain radiographs, and all fracture fragments were originally believed to be from the tibial tubercle. Computed tomography distinguished the patellar fracture from the tibial tubercle fragments, verifying preoperatively the complexity of the injury. PMID:26761925

  17. Unintended Rotational Changes of the Distal Tibia After Biplane Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jeong Lae; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study involved 35 knees undergoing biplane medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) to assess the axial rotation of the distal tibia. The distal tibiae were internally rotated by 3.0° ± 7.1° after OWHTO. The opening width showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.743 (P < .001), and the tuberosity osteotomy angle showed that of -0.678 (P < .001) with distal tibial rotation. However, changes in hip-knee-ankle angle, medial proximal tibial angle, and posterior tibial slope were not significantly correlated with the change in distal tibial rotation. In conclusion, there was an unintended tendency of increasing internal rotation of the distal tibia after biplane medial OWHTO, and this tendency was positively related to the opening width and tuberosity osteotomy angle.

  18. Tibial stress fractures in an active duty population: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury among military recruits. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, long-term effects that tibial stress fractures have on military personnel with respect to physical activity level, completion of military training, recurrence of symptoms, and active duty service. Twenty-six military recruits included in a previous tibial stress fracture study were contacted 10 years after initial injury and asked a series of questions related to any long-term consequences of their tibial stress fracture. Of the 13 patients available for contact, no patients reported any necessary limited duty while on active duty, and no patient reported being separated or discharged from the military as a result of stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures in military recruits are most often an isolated injury and do not affect ability to complete military training or reflect a long-term need for decreased physical activity.

  19. Comparison of cementing techniques of the tibial component in total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming Guo; Wood, David; Nivbrant, Bo

    2008-01-01

    A few studies have shown that cementing the stem enhances fixation of the tibial baseplate in total knee replacement (TKR). Even the horizontal technique has been shown to provide good fixation. We used radiostereometry to study migration of the tibial component in 30 knees operated with Profix TKR. The knees were randomised for either complete (both under the baseplate and around the stem) or horizontal (only under the baseplate) cementing of the tibial component. At two years the tibial baseplate rotated externally a median of 0.18° in the uncemented stem group and internally a median of 0.23° in the cemented stem group. The tibial baseplate subsided 0.14 mm in the cemented stem group, and no translation was seen in the uncemented stem group. The differences in migration were small and probably without clinical significance. The findings do not favour either of the cementing techniques in TKR. PMID:18704414

  20. Comparison of cementing techniques of the tibial component in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Saari, Tuuli; Li, Ming Guo; Wood, David; Nivbrant, Bo

    2009-10-01

    A few studies have shown that cementing the stem enhances fixation of the tibial baseplate in total knee replacement (TKR). Even the horizontal technique has been shown to provide good fixation. We used radiostereometry to study migration of the tibial component in 30 knees operated with Profix TKR. The knees were randomised for either complete (both under the baseplate and around the stem) or horizontal (only under the baseplate) cementing of the tibial component. At two years the tibial baseplate rotated externally a median of 0.18 degrees in the uncemented stem group and internally a median of 0.23 degrees in the cemented stem group. The tibial baseplate subsided 0.14 mm in the cemented stem group, and no translation was seen in the uncemented stem group. The differences in migration were small and probably without clinical significance. The findings do not favour either of the cementing techniques in TKR. PMID:18704414

  1. Radiographic Findings in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions from the MARS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) group was developed to investigate revision ACL reconstruction outcomes. An important part of this is obtaining and reviewing radiographic studies. The goal for this radiographic analysis is to establish radiographic findings for a large revision ACL cohort to allow comparison with future studies. The study was designed as a cohort study. Various established radiographic parameters were measured by three readers. These included sagittal and coronal femoral and tibial tunnel position, joint space narrowing, and leg alignment. Inter- and intraobserver comparisons were performed. Femoral sagittal position demonstrated 42% were more than 40% anterior to the posterior cortex. On the sagittal tibia tunnel position, 49% demonstrated some impingement on full-extension lateral radiographs. Limb alignment averaged 43% medial to the medial edge of the tibial plateau. On the Rosenberg view (45-degree flexion view), the minimum joint space in the medial compartment averaged 106% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 4.6%. Lateral compartment narrowing at its minimum on the Rosenberg view averaged 91.2% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 0.0%. On the coronal view, verticality as measured by the angle from the center of the tibial tunnel aperture to the center of the femoral tunnel aperture measured 15.8 degree ± 6.9% from vertical. This study represents the radiographic findings in the largest revision ACL reconstruction series ever assembled. Findings were generally consistent with those previously demonstrated in the literature. PMID:23404491

  2. A predictive factor for acquiring an ideal lower limb realignment after opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bito, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kumagai, Ken; Aratake, Masato; Saito, Izumi; Hayashi, Riku; Sasaki, Yohei; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2009-04-01

    Obtaining a correct postoperative limb alignment is an important factor in achieving a successful clinical outcome after an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). To better predict some of the aspects that impact upon the clinical outcomes following this procedure, including postoperative correction loss and over correction, we examined the changes in the frontal plane of the lower limb in a cohort of patients who had undergone OWHTO using radiography. Forty-two knees from 33 patients (23 cases of osteoarthritis and 10 of osteonecrosis) underwent a valgus realignment OWHTO procedure and were radiographically assessed for changes that occurred pre- and post-surgery. The mean femorotibial angle (FTA) was found to be 182.1 +/- 2.0 degrees (12 +/- 2.0 anatomical varus angulation) preoperatively and 169.6 +/- 2.4 degrees (10.4 +/- 2.4 anatomical valgus angulation) postoperatively. These measurements thus revealed significant changes in the weight bearing line ratio (WBL), femoral axis angle (FA), tibial axis angle (TA), tibia plateau angle (TP), tibia vara angle (TV) and talar tilt angle (TT) following OWHTO. In contrast, no significant change was found in the weight bearing line angle (WBLA) after these treatments. To assess the relationship between the correction angle and these indexes, 42 knees were divided into the following three groups according to the postoperative FTA; a normal correction group (168 degrees < or = FTA < or = 172 degrees ), an over-correction group (FTA < 168 degrees ), and an under-correction group (FTA > 172 degrees ). There were significant differences in the delta angle [DA; calculated as (pre FTA - post FTA) - (pre TV - post TV)] among each group of patients. Our results thus indicate a negative correlation between the DA and preoperative TA (R(2) = 0.148, p < 0.05). Hence, given that the correction errors in our patients appear to negatively correlate with the preoperative TA, postoperative malalignments are likely to be predictable

  3. Anterior endoscopic correction of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Picetti, George D; Ertl, Janos P; Bueff, H Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Our technique of anterior endoscopic scoliosis correction demonstrates the ability to perform an anterior approach through a minimally invasive technique with minimal disruption of the local biology. The initial results appear to equal curve correction and fusion rates to those of a formal open anterior approach. Additional benefits are: 1) shortened operative time, 2) lower blood loss, 3) shortened rehabilitation time, 4) less pain, and 5) shortened hospital stays. Endoscopic technique shows great promise in the management of scoliosis curves; however, this is a technically demanding procedure that requires cross-training in endoscopic discectomy and scoliosis management as well as familiarity with the anterior approach anatomy. PMID:12389288

  4. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Flexible Reamer System

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Saluan, Paul; Richter, Dustin L.; Huff, Nathan; Schenck, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been shown to improve stability of the knee, particularly rotational stability, potentially leading to superior clinical outcomes and a shorter return to sport. Nonanatomic ACL reconstruction has been linked to graft failure and abnormal cartilage loading thought to contribute to progression of degenerative joint disease. Use of the far anteromedial portal (FAMP) to uncouple the tibial and femoral tunnels has led to improved reproduction of the femoral footprint and facilitates drilling of the femoral tunnel in an anatomic position. The use of the FAMP and straight reamer systems introduces its own set of potential complications, including short femoral tunnels and peroneal nerve injury. These potential complications have been addressed by drilling the femoral tunnel in a hyperflexed position, which can lead to difficulty with positioning the operative extremity, visualization, and identification of anatomic landmarks. The purpose of this case report was to review the advantages and technical aspects of using a flexible reamer system and the FAMP to achieve an anatomic ACL reconstruction while avoiding potential complications and pitfalls. Flexible reamer systems allow an additional way of uncoupling the tibial and femoral tunnels to clearly visualize and establish an anatomic starting point within the femoral footprint of the native ACL while avoiding the complications associated with knee hyperflexion and straight reamers with the far anteromedial portal. In the authors’ experience, an anatomic reconstruction of the ACL can be achieved safely using flexible reamers while avoiding some of the difficulties seen with straight reamers used in conjunction with an uncoupled, far anteromedial approach. PMID:26673860

  6. [Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using double anteromedial and posterolateral bundles].

    PubMed

    Franceschi, J P; Sbihi, A; Champsaur, P

    2002-11-01

    We propose a method for repairing the anterior cruciate ligament which takes advantage of the multifascular nature of the ligament to achieve better physiological anteroposterior and rotational stability compared with conventional methods. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ligament closely reproduces normal anatomy. We have used this technique in 92 patients with anterior cruciate ligament laxity and present here the mid-term results. The hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) are harvested carefully to obtain good quality grafts. Arthroscopic preparation of the notch allows careful cleaning of the axial aspect of the lateral condyle; it is crucial to well visualize the region over the top and delimit the 9 h-12 h zone for the right knee or the 12-15 h zone for the left knee. The femoral end of the anteromedial tunnel lies close to the floor of the intercondylar notch, 5 to 10 mm in front of the posterior border of the lateral condyle, at 13 h for the left knee and 11 h for the right knee. The femoral end of the posterolateral tunnel lies more anteriorly, at 14 h for the left knee and 10 h for the right knee. The tibial end of the posterolateral tunnel faces the anterolateral spike of the tibia. The tibial end of the anteromedial tunnel lies in front of the apex of the two tibial spikes half way between the anteromedial spike and the anterolateral spike, 8 mm in front of the protrusion of the posteriolateral pin. The posterolateral graft is run through the femoral and tibial tunnels first. A cortical fixation is used for the femoral end. The femoral end of the anteromedial graft is then fixed in the same way. The tibial fixation begins with the posterolateral graft with the knee close to full extension. The anteromedial graft is fixed with the knee in 90 degrees flexion. Thirty patients were reviewed at least six months after the procedure. Mean age was 28.2 years. Mean overall IKDC score was 86% (36% A and

  7. Bending strength and holding power of tibial locking screws.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Lin, S J; Chiang, H; Hou, S M

    2001-04-01

    The bending strength and holding power of two types of specially designed tibial locking devices, a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt, were studied and compared with four types of commercially available tibial interlocking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, and Osteo AG. To test bending strength, the devices were inserted into a high molecular weight polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three point bending test. Single loading yielding strength and cyclic loading fatigue life were measured. To test holding power, the devices were inserted into tubes made of polyurethane foam, and their tips were loaded axially to measure pushout strength. The devices were tested with two different densities of foam materials and two different sizes of pilot holes. Insertion torque and stripping torque of the screws were measured first. Pushout tests were performed with each screw inserted with a tightness equal to 60% of its stripping torque. Test results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the screws. The stripping torque predicted the pushout strength more reliably than did the insertion torque. All tested devices showed greater holding power in the foam with the higher density and with the smaller pilot holes. The both-ends-threaded screw had the highest pushout strength and a satisfactory fatigue strength. The unthreaded bolt had the highest fatigue strength but only fair holding power. Clinical studies of the use of these two types of locking devices are worthwhile.

  8. Surgical Technique of Anterolateral Approach for Tibial Plateau Fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-cheng; Ren, Dong; Zhou, Bing

    2015-11-01

    A 66-year-old woman had sustained crush injury 3 hours prior to her presentation to our hospital. The diagnosis was defined as lateral tibial plateau fracture of the right knee (Schatzker III). Supine position was set up and a pad was put under the affected hip. After sterilization of the surgical field the sterilized sheets were placed beneath the leg in order to be higher than the other side. A rolled sheet was put under the knee joint so that the knee joint was flexed around 30° to 40°. After the surgical field was draped the skin was incised. Iliotibial band was incised by blade (not by electrotomy) and sharp dissection was performed in the Gerdy's tubercle. Capsulotomy was made by cutting the tibial meniscal ligament. Then the meniscus was tagged superiorly and the articular surface was clearly visualized. A window was made in the lateral cortex beneath the plateau, so the impacted fragment was elevated through the window. The metaphyseal void was filled by bone allograft. The placement of the raft-screw plate must be ensured that the raft screws passing the plate could purchase the subchondral bone. After perfect placement of the plate was defined, the femoral distractor was removed and the knee joint was relaxed. It was ensured that the alignment of the lower leg was normal, and then the other screws were inserted. Following placing drainage in the wound the iliotibial band was closed and the subcutaneous soft tissue and skin were closed in layer. PMID:26791810

  9. Induction of tibial dyschondroplasia in turkeys by tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram).

    PubMed

    Simsa, S; Hasdai, A; Dan, H; Ornan, E M

    2007-08-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a prevalent skeletal abnormality associated with rapid growth rate in many avian species; it causes enormous economic losses and is an animal welfare problem. Tibial dyschondroplasia is characterized by the presence of a nonvascularized, nonmineralized lesion that extends from the epiphyseal growth plate into the metaphysis of the proximal tibiotarsal bones. The mechanisms underlying TD development are not known, although they have been extensively studied in broilers using different induction models. However, an effective model for TD induction in turkeys has never been described. The objective of this study was to establish such a model by using tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram), an agent that is frequently used in broilers to induce TD. We found that dramatically longer exposures to much higher concentrations of thiram were required to induce TD in turkeys vs. broilers. In contrast to broilers, in which 50 mg/kg of thiram induces a high incidence of severe TD within 10 d, in turkeys, an exposure to 400 mg/kg of thiram for 11 wk was necessary for the development of severe TD lesions. These results show different mechanisms for TD induction in these 2 closely related species, suggesting differences in TD etiology between them.

  10. Effect of interstitial low level laser therapy on tibial defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Hwang, Donghyun; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Tibial defect is very common musculoskeletal disorder which makes patient painful and uncomfortable. Many studies about bone regeneration tried to figure out fast bone healing on early phase. It is already known that low level laser therapy (LLLT) is very convenient and good for beginning of bone disorder. However, light scattering and absorption obstruct musculoskeletal therapy which need optimal photon energy delivery. This study has used an interstitial laser probe (ILP) to overcome the limitations of light penetration depth and scattering. Animals (mouse, C57BL/6) were divided into three groups: laser treated test group 1 (660 nm; power 10 mW; total energy 5 J) and test group 2 (660 nm; power 20 mW; total energy 10 J); and untreated control group. All animals were taken surgical operation to make tibial defect on right crest of tibia. The test groups were treated every 48 hours with ILP. Bone volume and X-ray attenuation coefficient were measured on 0, 14th and 28th day with u-CT after treatment and were used to evaluate effect of LLLT. Results show that bone volume of test groups has been improved more than control group. X-ray attenuation coefficients of each groups have slightly different. The results suggest that LLLT combined with ILP may affect on early phase of bone regeneration and may be used in various musculoskeletal disease in deep tissue layer.

  11. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  12. Results of high tibial osteotomy: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Annunziato

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate long-term follow-up and survival analysis studies regarding high tibial osteotomies (HTO) for the treatment of medial knee arthritis. Despite the good number of studies available, comparison and pooling of the results are challenging because of the different evaluation systems and techniques used. However, in general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. Based on our findings, the ideal candidate for an HTO is a young patient (<60 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Furthermore, the literature review shows that the outcomes gradually deteriorate with time. Nevertheless, some issues remain that need resolution; these include the choice between opening or closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. PMID:19838706

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE REPRODUCIBILITY OF TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES’ CLASSIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Pallottino, Alexandre; Sassine, Tannous; Canedo, Rodrigo; Pina, Juliana; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the inter-observer agreement of three tibial plateau fracture classifications: Schatzker, AO Group, and Hohl. Methods: Nine physicians of different levels of expertise (six Orthopaedic Residents – OR – and three Orthopaedic Attendings – OA) classified 50 tibial plateau fractures. Results: There was a low to moderate agreement between OR and OA on the three classification systems. A straight correlation was found between the year of Residence and an increase on the level of agreement on the AO group and Hohl classifications. This was partially seen on the Schatzker classification. Kappa ranged from 0.344 to 0.577, 0.36 to 0.499, and 0.278 to 0.465 for the Hohl, AO group, and Schatzker systems, respectively. Conclusion: With a level of 0.1, there was a significant agreement on the three classifications among the physicians. When comparing ORs to OAs, the three studied classifications show low to moderate consistency, with the Hohl classification showing the highest level of agreement between OR. PMID:27004176

  14. Bone Transport for Limb Reconstruction Following Severe Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fürmetz, Julian; Soo, Chris; Behrendt, Wolf; Thaller, Peter H; Siekmann, Holger; Böhme, Jörg; Josten, Christoph

    2016-03-21

    A common treatment of tibial defects especially after infections is bone transport via external fixation. We compare complications and outcomes of 25 patients treated with a typical Ilizarov frame or a hybrid system for bone reconstruction of the tibia. Average follow up was 5.1 years. Particular interest was paid to the following criteria: injury type, comorbidities, development of osteitis and outcome of the different therapies. The reason for segmental resection was a second or third grade open tibia fractures in 24 cases and in one case an infection after plate osteosynthesis. Average age of the patients was 41 years (range 19 to 65 years) and average defect size 6.6 cm (range 3.0 to 13.4 cm). After a mean time of 113 days 23 tibial defects were reconstructed, so we calculated an average healing index of 44.2 days/cm. Two patients with major comorbidities needed a below knee amputation. The presence of osteitis led to a more complicated course of therapy. In the follow up patients with an Ilizarov frame had better results than patients with hybrid systems. Bone transport using external fixation is suitable for larger defect reconstruction. With significant comorbidities, however, a primary amputation or other methods must be considered. PMID:27114814

  15. Recombinant Human Elastase Alters the Compliance of Atherosclerotic Tibial Arteries After Ex Vivo Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Karen; Moss, Emma; Gottlieb, Daniel P.; Wong, Marco D.; Bland, Kimberly S.; Franano, F. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether vonapanitase (formerly PRT-201), a recombinant human elastase, treatment can fragment the protein elastin in elastic fibers and cause dilation of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries subjected to ex vivo balloon angioplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven patients undergoing lower limb amputation for peripheral artery disease or who died and donated their bodies to science donated 11 tibial arteries (5 anterior, 6 posterior) for this study. All arteries were atherosclerotic by visual inspection. The arteries underwent ex vivo balloon angioplasty and thereafter were cut into rings and studied on wire myographs where the rings were stretched and tension was recorded. After treatment with vonapanitase 2 mg/mL or vehicle control, myography was repeated and the rings were then subject to elastin content measurement using a desmosine radioimmunoassay and elastic fiber visualization by histology. The wire myography data were used to derive compliance, stress-strain, and incremental elastic modulus curves. Results: Vonapanitase treatment reduced elastin (desmosine) content by 60% and decreased elastic fiber histologic staining. Vonapanitase-treated rings experienced less tension at any level of stretch and as a result had shifts in the compliance and stress-strain curves relative to vehicle-treated rings. Vonapanitase treatment did not alter the incremental elastic modulus curve. Conclusions: Vonapanitase treatment of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries after ex vivo balloon angioplasty fragmented elastin in elastic fibers, decreased tension in the rings at any level of stretch, and altered the compliance and stress-strain curves in a manner predicting arterial dilation in vivo. Based on this result, local treatment of balloon angioplasty sites may increase blood vessel diameter and thereby improve the success of balloon angioplasty in peripheral artery disease. PMID:26745001

  16. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  17. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years. PMID:27606653

  18. HOW CAN BONE TUNNEL ENLARGEMENT IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY BE MEASURED? DESCRIPTION OF A TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar Leonardi, Adriano Barros de; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Junior, Aires Duarte

    2015-01-01

    To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple flexor tendon grafts, and to propose a new technique for its measurement. Methods: The study involved 25 patients aged 18-43 years over a six-month period. The assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and in the third and sixth months of evolution after operations to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using grafts from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, fixed in the femur with a transverse metal screw and in the tibia with an interference screw. The radiographs were evaluated in terms of the relative value between the diameter of the tunnel and the bone, both at 2 cm below the medial tibial condyle. Results: There were significant increases in tunnel diameters: 20.56% for radiographs in anteroposterior view and 26.48% in lateral view. Enlargement was present in 48% of anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, but was present in both views in only 16% of the cases. Conclusions: Bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. The measurement technique proposed in this study was sufficient to detect it. PMID:27027030

  19. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  20. [Suprapatellar approach to tibial medullary nailing with electromagnetic field-guided distal locking].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Rücker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2015-04-01

    Closed tibial shaft fractures are the domain of intramedullary nailing. With the introduction of new nail designs and technologies, even small, dislocated distal fragments can be anatomically aligned and safely fixed. Unsolved or to a lesser degree controlled are the problems of distal locking in the freehand technique, which can still be difficult and can lead to a significant radiation exposure, and how to control very short proximal tibial fragments in metaphyseal tibial fractures or tibial segmental fractures, where the proximal fracture line also runs through the metaphysis.By using a suprapatellar approach, i.e. a skin incision proximal to the patella with an entry point into the tibial bone from within the knee at the same site as for a standard infrapatellar approach, and then nailing the tibia in a semi-extended position, i.e. the knee is only flexed 10-20°, the intraoperative dislocation of a short proximal fragment can be avoided. The main indications for semi-extended tibial nailing are a short diaphyseal fragment in an isolated tibial shaft fracture, a segmental fracture where the proximal fracture line is metaphyseal and in patients where infrapatellar soft tissues are compromised.The use of the electromagnetic guidance system SureShot® generates reliable and reproducible results, reduces the operating time and is independent from radiation for distal locking.

  1. Ultrasound Guidance in Performing a Tendoscopic Surgery to Treat Posterior Tibial Tendinitis: A Useful Tool?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Fukuda, Aki; Kato, Ko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old man with a pronation-external rotation type of fracture was surgically treated using a fibular plate. Five years later, he underwent resection of bone hyperplasia because of the ankle pain and limitation of range of motion. Thereafter, the left ankle became intermittently painful, which persisted for about one year. He presented at the age of 43 with persistent ankle pain. Physical and image analysis findings indicated a diagnosis of posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis, which we surgically treated using tendoscopy. Endoscopic findings showed tenosynovitis and fibrillation on the tendon surface. We cleaned and removed the synovium surrounding the tendon and deepened the posterior tibial tendon groove to allow sufficient space for the posterior tibial tendon. Full weight-bearing ambulation was permitted one day after surgery and he returned to his occupation in the construction industry six weeks after surgery. The medial aspect of the ankle was free of pain and symptoms at a review two years after surgery. Although tendoscopic surgery for stage 1 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been reported, tendoscopic surgery to treat posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis has not. Our experience with this patient showed that tendoscopic surgery is useful not only for stage 1 posterior tibial dysfunction, but also for posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis. PMID:27478666

  2. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene tibial components in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The choice of either all-polyethylene (AP) tibial components or metal-backed (MB) tibial components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials that have evaluated MB and AP tibial components in primary TKA. Methods The search strategy included a computerized literature search (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and a manual search of major orthopedic journals. A meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized or quasi-randomized trials that compared the performance of tibial components in primary TKA was performed using a fixed or random effects model. We assessed the methodological quality of studies using Detsky quality scale. Results 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 2000 and 2009 met the inclusion quality standards for the systematic review. The mean standardized Detsky score was 14 (SD 3). We found that the frequency of radiolucent lines in the MB group was significantly higher than that in the AP group. There were no statistically significant differences between the MB and AP tibial components regarding component positioning, knee score, knee range of motion, quality of life, and postoperative complications. Interpretation Based on evidence obtained from this study, the AP tibial component was comparable with or better than the MB tibial component in TKA. However, high-quality RCTs are required to validate the results. PMID:21895503

  3. [Peripheral anterior synechiae overlying the haptics of posterior chamber lenses].

    PubMed

    Li, M; Yin, Y; Chen, J

    1995-09-01

    To study the changes of the anterior chamber angle after intraocular lens implantation, 111 patients (130 eyes) with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation at different post-operative periods were examined by gonioscopy. Peripheral anterior synechia overlying the position of the lens haptic (lens haptic PAS) was observed in up to 50.8% of eyes implanted with haptics vaulted anteriorly by 10%. The lens haptic PAS is easy to be identified, it is a broad based forward displacement of the peripheral iris adhesive to the anterior wall of the anterior chamber angle. The size of the PAS was of half to one o'clock position and occasionally it was of one and a half to two o'clock position. The differences between the rates of occurrence of lens haptic PAS were not significant at different post-operative periods (P > 0.05). 55.9% of the sulcus fixated and 42.3% of the capsular fixated eyes had lens haptic PAS (P > 0.05). There were more lens haptic PAS in eyes with horizontally oriented lens haptics (62.7%) than with lens haptics at vertical position (41.4%, P < 0.05). Regular gonioscopy for posterior chamber lens implantation was recommended.

  4. Effects of closed versus open kinetic chain knee extensor resistance training on knee laxity and leg function in patients during the 8- to 14-week post-operative period after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Perry, Mark C; Morrissey, Matthew C; King, John B; Morrissey, Dylan; Earnshaw, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Open kinetic chain (OKC) knee extensor resistance training has lost favour in ACLR rehabilitation due to concerns that this exercise is harmful to the graft and will be less effective in improving function. In this randomized, single-blind clinical trial OKC and closed kinetic chain (CKC) knee extensor training were compared for their effects on knee laxity and function in the middle period of ACLR rehabilitation. The study subjects were 49 patients recovering from ACLR surgery (37 M, 12 F; mean age=33 years). Tests were carried out at 8 and 14 weeks after ACLR with knee laxity measured using a ligament arthrometer and function with the Hughston Clinic knee self-assessment questionnaire and single leg, maximal effort jump testing (post-test only). Between tests, subjects trained using either OKC or CKC resistance of their knee and hip extensors as part of formal physical therapy sessions three times per week. No statistically significant (one-way ANOVA, p>0.05) differences were found between the treatment groups in knee laxity or leg function. OKC and CKC knee extensor training in the middle period of rehabilitation after ACLR surgery do not differ in their effects on knee laxity or leg function. Exercise dosages are described in this study and further research is required to assess whether the findings in this study are dosage specific.

  5. Parathyroid receptor gene expression by epiphyseal growth plates in rickets and tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, S; Genina, O; Lavelin, I; Leach, R M; Pines, M

    1999-03-25

    PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was evaluated in situ in avian epiphyseal growth plates taken from normal, rachitic and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) afflicted chicks induced by thiram or by genetic selection. In the normal growth plates, PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was localized to the maturation zone as demonstrated by the expression of collagen type II (col II), osteopontin (OPN) genes and alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). In TD, either induced by thiram or by genetic selection, normal levels of PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression were observed up to 21 days post-hatch. In rickets, on the other hand, no PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was observed in the growth plate from day 8 of a vitamin D-deficient diet. In cultured chondrocytes, PTH caused time-dependent down-regulation of its own receptor. These results suggest that alterations in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression are associated with rickets but not with TD. The reduction in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression in rickets may be due to the high plasma levels of PTH.

  6. Comparison of volumetric bone mineral density in the operated and contralateral knee after anterior cruciate ligament and reconstruction: A 1-year follow-up study using peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mündermann, Annegret; Payer, Nina; Felmet, Gernot; Riehle, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in the tibial plateau of the operated and contralateral leg measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) before and 3, 6, and 12 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL was reconstructed with a hamstring tendon autograft using press-fit fixation. pQCT measurements of the proximal tibia were obtained in 61 patients after ACL reconstruction, and total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD were calculated. vBMD in the operated leg decreased from baseline to 3 months (-12% [total], -11% [cortical], and -12.6% [trabecular]; p<0.001) and remained below baseline for 12 months after surgery (6 months: -9.5%, -9.4%, and -9.6%, p<0.001; 12 months: -8%, -5%, and -11%, p<0.001). vBMD in the contralateral leg was slightly reduced only 6 months after surgery. Including age and sex as covariates into the analysis did not affect the results. ACL reconstruction contributed to loss in bone mineral density within the first year after surgery. The role of factors such as time of weight-bearing, joint mechanics, post-traumatic inflammatory reactions, or genetic predisposition in modulating the development of posttraumatic knee osteoarthritis after ACL injury should be further elucidated. PMID:26123943

  7. Comparison of volumetric bone mineral density in the operated and contralateral knee after anterior cruciate ligament and reconstruction: A 1-year follow-up study using peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mündermann, Annegret; Payer, Nina; Felmet, Gernot; Riehle, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in the tibial plateau of the operated and contralateral leg measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) before and 3, 6, and 12 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL was reconstructed with a hamstring tendon autograft using press-fit fixation. pQCT measurements of the proximal tibia were obtained in 61 patients after ACL reconstruction, and total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD were calculated. vBMD in the operated leg decreased from baseline to 3 months (-12% [total], -11% [cortical], and -12.6% [trabecular]; p<0.001) and remained below baseline for 12 months after surgery (6 months: -9.5%, -9.4%, and -9.6%, p<0.001; 12 months: -8%, -5%, and -11%, p<0.001). vBMD in the contralateral leg was slightly reduced only 6 months after surgery. Including age and sex as covariates into the analysis did not affect the results. ACL reconstruction contributed to loss in bone mineral density within the first year after surgery. The role of factors such as time of weight-bearing, joint mechanics, post-traumatic inflammatory reactions, or genetic predisposition in modulating the development of posttraumatic knee osteoarthritis after ACL injury should be further elucidated.

  8. Retrograde Pedal/Tibial Artery Access for Treatment of Infragenicular Arterial Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular intervention has emerged as an accepted modality for treating patients with critical limb ischemia. However, this therapy poses multiple challenges to the interventionalist due to the presence of widespread multilevel disease, long and complex occlusive lesions, and the common involvement of the tibial vessels. Retrograde pedal/tibial access is a relatively new technique that allows the treatment of tibial occlusive lesions when conventional endovascular techniques fail. This article reviews the technical details and published data regarding this technique and evaluates its use in this difficult-to-treat patient population. PMID:23805338

  9. Medial tibial pain. A prospective study of its cause among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Giladi, M; Stein, M; Kashtan, H; Margulies, J; Chisin, R; Steinberg, R; Swissa, A; Aharonson, Z

    1986-12-01

    In a prospective study of 295 infantry recruits during 14 weeks of basic training, 41% had medial tibial pain. Routine scintigraphic evaluation in cases of medial tibial bone pain showed that 63% had abnormalities. A stress fracture was found in 46%. Only two patients had periostitis. None had ischemic medial compartment syndrome. Physical examination could not differentiate between cases with medial tibial bone pain secondary to stress fractures and those with scintigraphically normal tibias. When both pain and swelling were localized in the middle one-third of the tibia, the lesion most likely proved to be a stress fracture.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle in adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tulic, Goran; Sopta, Jelena; Bumbasirevic, Marko; Todorovic, Aleksandar; Vucetic, Cedomir

    2010-01-01

    Acute avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon injury, accounting for less than 1% of all physeal injuries. Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fractures of the tibial tubercle are extremely rare. Only 10 cases have been reported in the literature to date. We report a case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from the bilateral avulsion fractures of the tibial tubercle during basketball in take-off phase of the high jump. He went through surgery and 4 years after index procedures he has no deformities, the knee is painless and he participates in sport activities on daily basis.

  11. Risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury in high school and college athletes.

    PubMed

    Woodford-Rogers, B; Cyphert, L; Denegar, C R

    1994-12-01

    The anterior cruciate (ACL) is the most frequently ruptured ligament of the knee. Some authors have suggested that excessive internal tibial rotation concomitant with hyperpronation of the subtalar joint during stance and inherent knee joint laxity may predispose an athlete to knee injury. Over a period of 2 years, we identified 14 ACL-injured football players and eight ACL-injured female basketball players and gymnasts. We matched them by sport, team, position, and level of competition with 22 athletes without history of ACL injury. Measures of navicular drop, calcaneal alignment, and anterior knee joint laxity with a KT-1000 were obtained from the uninjured knee of the ACL-injured athletes and compared with measures obtained from the ACL-noninjured athletes. ACL-injured athletes had greater amounts of navicular drop, suggesting greater subtalar pronation and greater anterior knee joint laxity. Discriminant analysis and multiple regression indicated that these variables correctly predicted injury status for 87.5% of the females and for 70.5% of all cases. These results suggest that the more an athlete pronates and the greater the anterior knee joint laxity, the greater the association with ACL injury.

  12. Changes in the tibial growth plates of chickens with thiram-induced dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Rath, N C; Richards, M P; Huff, W E; Huff, G R; Balog, J M

    2005-07-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a metabolic cartilage disease of young poultry in which endochondral bone formation is disrupted leading to the retention of a non-calcified, avascular plug of cartilage in the tibial growth plate. Chicks aged 7 days were fed either a control diet or one containing thiram 100 ppm for 48 h to induce TD. Cell multiplication in the growth plate was determined thereafter with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling, and metabolic changes by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and glutathione (GSH) activities. The effect on chondrocyte maturation was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and DNA fragmentation were used to determine the effects of thiram on cell survival. The results showed that thiram-induced TD was not due to the multiplication of cells in the post-proliferative zones. Thiram did not affect ALP activity, which would have indicated a loss of calcification potential, but it reduced both TRAP and the glutathione concentrations, suggesting that the growth plate metabolism and remodelling functions were adversely affected. Thiram appeared to have no effect on the expression of type X collagen, transglutaminase, RUNX2, or matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP) genes suggesting that it did not alter the maturation potential of chondrocytes. On the contrary, the expressions of MMP-13 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes were "up-regulated," suggesting that thiram has pro-angiogenic activity. However, TUNEL assay showed that thiram induced endothelial cell apoptosis in the capillary vessels of the growth plates, as early as 10 days of age, when TD was not visually evident. The vascular death increased on subsequent days accompanied by massive death of chondrocytes in the transition zone of the growth plate. The induction of apoptosis in the

  13. [Arthroscopic fracture fixation of intercondylar eminence in children using instrumentarium for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Sleczka, Paweł; Krzywoń, Jerzy; Ambrozy, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    In our article we introduce a proposal of intercondylar tibial eminence fracture in children management. When dealing with II and III type fracture according to Mes and McKeever classification, we would like to suggest artroscopic fracture fixation with the help of a tension band wiring technique using single bundle reconstruction set of anterior cruciate ligament.The method mentioned above was presented on two cases managed in our ward. Stable fixation of this type fracture allows for quick mobilization and physiotherapy of a patient. It appears to be the key element to full recovery in articular surface fracture. PMID:21648155

  14. [Anterior pituitary hypersecretion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Steinhäuslin, F; Crottaz, B; Temler, E

    1987-01-17

    Anterior pituitary hypersecretion can be due to abnormal hypothalamic regulation, decreased peripheral hormone feedback or pituitary tumor. In some cases hypersecretion gives rise to a typical clinical syndrome involving acromegaly, hyperprolactinemia, and excess corticotropin (ACTH). The etiology of acromegaly is a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumor in the vast majority of cases. Hyperprolactinemia and excess cortisol, however, may be due to many causes among which prolactin (PRL)- and ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors are not frequent. Glycoprotein-secreting pituitary tumors, especially gonadotropin (LH and FSH) and free subunits usually do not cause a typical excess hormone syndrome. Perhaps for this reason they are seldom recognized clinically, although histopathological studies are increasingly disclosing the gonadotrope nature of many pituitary tumors. Mixed hormonal secretions are common. When pituitary hormone secretion can be selectively suppressed by medical therapy, a significant reduction of tumor size is by no means rare. In other cases, pituitary irradiation or surgery, or even treatment aimed at a peripheral target gland, may be necessary. PMID:3029861

  15. [Rehabilitation after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Smékal, D; Kalina, R; Urban, J

    2006-12-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of therapy in patients who have had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A well-designed rehabilitation program avoids potential graft damage and speeds up patients' return to their full function level. The course of rehabilitation depends on the type of surgery, mode of fixation and possible co-existing injury to the knee's soft tissues. The rehabilitation program presented here is based on the present-day knowledge of neurophysiological and biomechanical principles and is divided into five phases. In the pre-operative phase (I), the main objective is to prepare patients for surgery in terms of maximum muscle strength and range of motion. It also includes providing full information on the procedure. In the early post-operative phase (II) we are concerned with pain alleviation and reduction of knee edema. After suture removal we begin with soft techniques for the patella and post-operative physical therapy to reduce scarring. In the next post-operative phase (III) patients are able to walk with their full weight on the extremity operated on, and we continue doing exercises that improve flexor/extensor co-contraction. In this phase we also begin with exercises improving the patient's proprioceptive and sensorimotor functions. In the late post-operative phase (IV) we go on with exercises promoting proprioception of both lower extremities with the aim of increasing muscle control of the knee joints. In the convalescent phase (V) patients gradually return to their sports activities.

  16. The modified Kidner-Cobb procedure for symptomatic flexible pes planovalgus and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction stage II: review of 50 feet in 39 patients.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Renato; Giorgini, Tara; Calderaro, Michele; Japour, Christopher; Cortes, Jane; Kim, David

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic flatfoot is a prevalent disorder. We undertook a review of 50 feet in 39 patients with flexible flatfoot treated between August 2000 and January 2008 in order to evaluate the modified Kidner-Cobb procedure. Overall clinical results were rated as good in 48 (96%) feet and fair in 2 (4%) feet, and there were no poor results. Average follow-up was 4.6 years, and total recovery time was 5.7 months in older patients and 3.7 months in children. Manual muscle-strength testing revealed no difference in tibialis anterior strength between the operated and contralateral extremity. All patients visually demonstrated postoperative elevation of the medial longitudinal arch height. Complications included 2 feet with wound dehiscence and 1 foot with fractured hardware. The results of this review indicate that the modified Kidner-Cobb procedure is a useful treatment option for patients with symptomatic flexible flatfoot with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction stage 2. PMID:20797583

  17. Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa complicated with chronic tibial osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Egemen; Ege, Ahmet; Keser, Selcuk; Bayar, Ahmet

    2008-10-01

    Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa represents an infrequent clinical entity with cutaneous changes characterized by dermal fibrosis, hyperkeratotic verrucous and papillamotous lesions resulting from chronic non-filarial lymphedema secondary to infections, surgeries, tumor obstruction, radiation, congestive heart failure, and obesity. Although recurrent streptococcal lymphangitis is believed to play a critical role in the origin of elephantiasis nostras verrucosa, the exact pathogenesis of the disorder is not yet clear. Therapeutic efforts should aim to reduce lymph stasis, which will also lead to improvement of the cutaneous changes but unfortunately there is no specific treatment for advanced cases. In this report, we present a patient who was treated by below knee amputation as a result of elephantiasis nostras verrucosa complicated with chronic tibial osteomyelitis.

  18. [Treatment of tibial shaft fractures by intramedullary locking nailing].

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Robert; Blacha, Jan; Blicharski, Tomasz; Gagala, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Authors analyzed consecutive series of 56 tibial shaft fractures (43 men and 13 women) treated by intramedullary locking nails in years 1993-2004. Age of patients ranged from 17 to 83 years (mean 38 years). The final result was analyzed in 51 patients (91%). The bone union was observed in 50 patients. Fractures united within 6 months in 45 patients (88%), between 8 and 15 months in 5 patients. Operative treatment of non-union was necessary in one patient. The fractures united in anatomical axis in 45 cases, small (less than 10 degrees) valgus deviation was noticed in four patients, whereas five patients with fractures localized in distal part of the tibia had 11-30 degrees valgus deviation. The limb length inequality more than 1 cm was noticed in one case. There was neither infection nor compartment syndrome. One patient died because of fatal pulmonary embolism.

  19. Videofluoroscopy Instrument to Identify the Tibiofemoral Contact Point Migration for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Follow-up: CINARTRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simini, F.; Santos, D.; Francescoli, L.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the Tibiofemoral contact point migration to offer clinicians a tool to evaluate Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction. The design of the tool includes a C arm with fluoroscopy, image acquisition and processing system, interactive software and report generation for the clinical record. The procedure samples 30 images from the videofluoroscopy describing 2 seconds movements of hanging-to-full-extension of the knee articulation. A geometrical routine implemented in the original equipment (CINARTRO) helps capture tibial plateau and femoral condile profile by interaction with the user. The tightness or looseness of the knee is expressed by the migration given in terms of movement of the femur along the tibial plateau, as a percentage. We automatically create clinical reports in standard Clinical Document Architecture or CDA format. A special phantom was developed to correct the “pin cushion effect” in Rx images. Five cases of broken ACL patients were measured giving meaningful results for clinical follow up. Tibiofemoral contact point migration was measured as 60% of the tibial plateau, with standard deviation of 6% for healthy knees, 4% when injured and 1% after reconstruction.

  20. Effect of Modularity on the Fatigue Performance of Tibial Tray Designs in TKA Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ahilan Anantha; Ghyar, Rupesh; Ravi, Bhallamudi

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue performance of tibial tray in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of critical importance in terms of longevity of the prosthesis. Standards have been proposed by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to ensure its long-term structural integrity. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of modularity in the tibial tray following the testing standards, using finite element analysis. Goodman and Sines criteria were used to compare the fatigue safety factor (FSF) of four modular designs versus the two conventional designs. Cruciate-retaining (CR) type modular tibial tray designs were better than posterior-stabilized (PS) type tibial tray designs. More cutouts in the tray and absence of keel were reasons for poor fatigue performance.

  1. Mechanical bond strength of the cement-tibial component interface in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Gavin T; Peters, Christopher L; Hines, Jerod L; Bachus, Kent N

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically test the cement-tibial component interface using titanium and cobalt-chrome sample prostheses with several commercially available surface textures. The results of this study indicate that the type of metal substrate and surface preparation of contemporary tibial baseplates may influence the strength of the metal-cement interface and as such influence tibial component survival. The results indicate that, in general, metal-cement interface strength increases with increasing surface roughness and common surface treatments such as AlO2 grit-blasting (Ra = 6.76 microm) produce interface strengths similar to plasma-spray, porous-coated specimens. Macrosurfaced tibial components, although comparable in tension, may be vulnerable to metal-cement interface failure with rotational loading.

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Tibial Components with Modular Stems Used in Primary TKA

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Broome, Brandon; Osuji, Obi; Harman, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the known potential for fretting and corrosion at modular junctions in orthopaedic implants, this retrospective study evaluated radiographic and clinical outcomes of 85 primary TKA patients implanted with modular stemmed tibial components and followed up for an average of 82 months. There was low incidence of tibial radiolucent lines, excellent functional outcomes, and no complications associated with stem modularity. The findings were comparable to the historical control study involving 107 TKA with a nonmodular tibial stem design. When using surface cemented tibial components combined with a constrained polyethylene bearing, modular stems appear to be a viable option for primary TKA when adequate fixation and rotational stability are maintained. PMID:24669319

  3. A geometric morphometric analysis of the medial tibial condyle of African hominids.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Although the hominid knee has been heavily scrutinized, shape variation of the medial tibial condyle has yet to be described. Humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas differ in the shape of their medial femoral condyles and in their capacity for external and internal rotation of the tibia relative to the femur. I hypothesize that these differences should be reflected in the shape of the medial tibial condyle of these hominids. Here I use geometric morphometric techniques to uncover shape differences between the medial tibial condyles of humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Humans are distinguished from the other two species by having a much more oval-shaped medial tibial condyle, while those of chimpanzees and gorillas are more triangular in outline. Gorillas (especially males) are distinguished by having more concavely-curved condyles (mediolateral direction), which is interpreted as an effect of heavy loading through the medial compartment of the knee in conjunction with differences in the degree of arboreality.

  4. Effect of Modularity on the Fatigue Performance of Tibial Tray Designs in TKA Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ahilan Anantha; Ghyar, Rupesh; Ravi, Bhallamudi

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue performance of tibial tray in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of critical importance in terms of longevity of the prosthesis. Standards have been proposed by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to ensure its long-term structural integrity. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of modularity in the tibial tray following the testing standards, using finite element analysis. Goodman and Sines criteria were used to compare the fatigue safety factor (FSF) of four modular designs versus the two conventional designs. Cruciate-retaining (CR) type modular tibial tray designs were better than posterior-stabilized (PS) type tibial tray designs. More cutouts in the tray and absence of keel were reasons for poor fatigue performance. PMID:27649765

  5. The effect of tibial curvature and fibular loading on the tibia index.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Rudd, Rodney W; Kerrigan, Jason R; Crandall, Jeff R

    2004-06-01

    The tibia index (TI) is commonly used to predict leg injury based on measurements taken by an anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The TI consists of an interaction formula that combines axial loading and bending plus a supplemental compressive force criterion. Current ATD lower limbs lack geometric biofidelity with regard to tibial curvature and fibular load-sharing. Due to differences in tibial curvature, the midshaft moments induced by axial loading are different in humans and ATDs. Midshaft tibial loading in the human is also reduced by load-sharing through the fibula, which is not replicated in current ATDs. In this study, tibial curvature and fibular load-sharing are quantified through CT imaging and biomechanical testing, and equations are presented to correct ATD measurements to reflect the loading that would be experienced by a human tibia.

  6. Retrospective evaluation of the Duracon periapatite-coated tibial tray: midterm results and factors affecting success.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brad J

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the retrospective radiographic outcome of a series of 63 consecutive total knee arthroplasties using an uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Duracon cruciate-retaining tibial baseplate (Stryker Howmedica Osteonics Corp, Mahwah, NJ). Sixty-three knees were assessed at a mean follow-up of 65 months. The knees were primarily diagnosed with osteoarthritis with a mean age of 61 years. Radiographic analysis showed 6 knees with tibial baseplate radiolucencies, with all of these resolving or improving over the course of the study. All tibial baseplates were implanted with the concomitant use of autologous bone slurry. There were no reoperations for aseptic loosening, fracture, or patellofemoral problems. This intermediate study demonstrates excellent radiographic outcomes for uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Duracon cruciate-retaining tibial baseplates and evaluates other factors felt to be important in the success of a cementless implant.

  7. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for exposure of the difficult total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Ohl, M D

    1990-11-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy provides a safe and reliable means of extensile exposure of the knee. A technique was developed using a long osteoperiosteal segment including the tibial tubercle and upper tibial crest leaving lateral muscular attachments intact to this bone fragment. The bone fragment was reattached to its bed with two cobalt-chromium wires passed through the fragment and through the medial tibial cortex. The procedure was used in 71 knees to expose the joint for total knee arthroplasty, and the follow-up period was one to five years. All healed uneventfully, and no significant complications occurred. Mean postoperative flexion was 97 degrees. No extension lag occurred, and mean flexion contracture was 2.5 degrees. Excellent exposure can be achieved by means of a viable bone flap below the knee. Early rehabilitation and weight bearing can be done with low potential for complications. PMID:2225644

  8. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  9. Clinical Applications of Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) was recently developed and has become a crucial tool in clinical practice. AS-OCT is a noncontact imaging device that provides the detailed structure of the anterior part of the eyes. In this review, the author will discuss the various clinical applications of AS-OCT, such as the normal findings, tear meniscus measurement, ocular surface disease (e.g., pterygium, pinguecula, and scleromalacia), architectural analysis after cataract surgery, post-LASIK keratectasia, Descemet's membrane detachment, evaluation of corneal graft after keratoplasty, corneal deposits (corneal dystrophies and corneal verticillata), keratitis, anterior segment tumors, and glaucoma evaluation (angle assessment, morphological analysis of the filtering bleb after trabeculectomy, or glaucoma drainage device implantation surgery). The author also presents some interesting cases demonstrated via AS-OCT. PMID:25821589

  10. Reconstruction of Female Urethra with Tubularized Anterior Vaginal Flap

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin; Bansal, Sumit; Kapadnis, Lomesh; Savalia, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Female urethral injury is a rare disease. Causes of urethral injuries are prolonged obstructed labour, gynaecological surgeries like vaginoplasty and post traumatic urethral injuries. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcome of female urethral reconstruction using tubularized anterior vaginal wall flap covered with fibroadipose martius flap and autologous fascia sling in patients with urethral loss. Aim Aim of study was to evaluate outcome of reconstruction of female urethra with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all the patients with complete urethral loss was done from August 2008 to July 2015. Total seven patients were included in study. All patients presenting with total urethral loss were included. These patients were treated with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Neourethra was covered with Martius labial flap and autologous fascia lata or rectus abdominis fascia sling. Most common cause of urethral loss was obstructed labour (57.1%). Postoperatively patients were assessed for continence, urine flow rate, ultrasound for upper urinary tract and post void residue. Results Mean operative time was 180 minutes (160-200 minutes) and Intraoperative blood loss was 220ml (170-260 ml). Mean postoperative hospital stay was eight days (seven to nine days) Mean post surgery maximum urine flow rate was more than 15ml/sec (6.7-18.2ml/sec) and mean post void residual urine was 22.5ml (10-50ml). Median follow-up time was 35 months. All patients were catheter free and continent post three weeks of surgery except one patient who developed mild stress urinary incontinence. One patient developed urethral stenosis which was managed by intermittent serial urethral dilatation. Conclusion Female neourethral reconstruction with tabularized anterior vaginal flap and autologous pubovaginal sling is feasible in patients of total urethral loss with success rate of approximately 86%. It should be considered in

  11. Reconstruction of Female Urethra with Tubularized Anterior Vaginal Flap

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin; Bansal, Sumit; Kapadnis, Lomesh; Savalia, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Female urethral injury is a rare disease. Causes of urethral injuries are prolonged obstructed labour, gynaecological surgeries like vaginoplasty and post traumatic urethral injuries. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcome of female urethral reconstruction using tubularized anterior vaginal wall flap covered with fibroadipose martius flap and autologous fascia sling in patients with urethral loss. Aim Aim of study was to evaluate outcome of reconstruction of female urethra with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all the patients with complete urethral loss was done from August 2008 to July 2015. Total seven patients were included in study. All patients presenting with total urethral loss were included. These patients were treated with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Neourethra was covered with Martius labial flap and autologous fascia lata or rectus abdominis fascia sling. Most common cause of urethral loss was obstructed labour (57.1%). Postoperatively patients were assessed for continence, urine flow rate, ultrasound for upper urinary tract and post void residue. Results Mean operative time was 180 minutes (160-200 minutes) and Intraoperative blood loss was 220ml (170-260 ml). Mean postoperative hospital stay was eight days (seven to nine days) Mean post surgery maximum urine flow rate was more than 15ml/sec (6.7-18.2ml/sec) and mean post void residual urine was 22.5ml (10-50ml). Median follow-up time was 35 months. All patients were catheter free and continent post three weeks of surgery except one patient who developed mild stress urinary incontinence. One patient developed urethral stenosis which was managed by intermittent serial urethral dilatation. Conclusion Female neourethral reconstruction with tabularized anterior vaginal flap and autologous pubovaginal sling is feasible in patients of total urethral loss with success rate of approximately 86%. It should be considered in

  12. Arterial blood pressure wave forms in radial and posterior tibial arteries in critically ill newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, W W; Ree, E F; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document arterial blood pressure wave forms at two sites along the arterial tree of the neonate: in the radial and posterior tibial arteries. Using a high-fidelity catheter tip-transducer system, peripheral arterial blood pressure wave forms in 26 critically newborn infants were studied. In 14 infants the radial artery and in 12 infants the posterior tibial artery was cannulated. Radial artery blood pressure waves resembled those of proximal aortic rather than those of the radial artery in adults. Quantitative analysis of the waves was performed to reassure this finding. Blood pressure waves obtained from posterior tibial artery resembled those of femoral artery rather than those of posterior tibial artery waves in adults. We conclude that radial and posterior tibial artery wave forms in neonates appear to have a central appearance. This phenomenon might be explained by the close proximity of the radial and posterior tibial artery to the central aorta and femoral artery respectively, due to the small and short limbs of the neonate. The finding allows an "easy central pressure look" at both ends of the neonatal aorta.

  13. Arthroscopic management of proximal tibial fractures: technical note and case series presentation

    PubMed Central

    BENEA, HOREA; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; MARTIN, ARTUR; BARDAS, CIPRIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this article is to describe a new surgical method of arthroscopy assisted treatment of intraarticular proximal tibial fractures (ARIF – arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation), analyzing its efficiency and safety on a series of patients. Tibial plateau fractures affect the proximal tibial metaphyseal and articular surface, representing 1.2% of all fractures and up to 8% of all fractures in elderly. Patients and method Our case series consists of 6 patients with Schatzker types I-III tibial plateau fractures, treated in the Orthopedic and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca from July 2012 to August 2014. Patients included in the study presented Schatzker type I-III tibial plateau fracture. Results The results obtained with the arthroscopic method were excellent in 5 cases (mean Rasmussen score 27.60 points) and good in 1 case (mean score 23.75). The radiological consolidation appeared after a mean of 12 weeks. No major complication was noted. Conclusions Diagnosis and treatment of associated lesions, shortening of hospitalization length and postoperative rehabilitation, but also the lower rate of complications, can make arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation the method of choice for the operative treatment of selected Schatzker I-III types of proximal tibial fractures. PMID:26528076

  14. Manufacturing lot affects polyethylene tibial insert volume, thickness, and surface geometry.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Milner, Jaques S; MacDonald, Steven J; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2013-08-01

    To perform wear measurements on retrieved joint replacement implants, a reference geometry of the implant's original state is required. Since implants are rarely individually scanned before implantation, a different, new implant of the same kind and size is frequently used. However, due to manufacturing variability, errors may be introduced into these measurements, as the dimensions between the retrieved and reference components may not be exactly the same. The hypothesis of this study was that new polyethylene tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots would demonstrate greater variability than those from the same lot. In total, 12 new tibial inserts of the same model and size were obtained, 5 from the same lot and the remainder from different lots. The geometry of each tibial insert was obtained using microcomputed tomography. Measurements of tibial insert volume, thickness, and three-dimensional surface deviations were obtained and compared between tibial inserts from the same and different manufacturing lots. Greater variability was found for the tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots for all types of measurements, including a fourfold difference in volume variability (p < 0.001) and a maximum of 0.21 mm difference in thickness (p < 0.001). Investigators should be aware of this potential confounding error and take steps to minimize it, such as by averaging together the geometries of multiple new components from different manufacturing lots for use as the reference geometry.

  15. Magnitude of cement-device interfacial stresses with and without tibial stemming: impact of BMI.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ananthkrishnan; Hedley, Anthony Keith; Kester, Mark A

    2011-03-01

    Patients expect their total knee arthroplasty to relieve pain and to be long lasting. With patients becoming more active, weighing more, and living longer, this expectation becomes increasingly more difficult to fulfill. Patients who are obese and active put greater loads on their implants and may have a greater risk of failure. Although much attention has been paid to decreasing polyethylene wear, a major cause of implant failure, very little research focus has been directed to elucidate other measures to reduce failure, such as the efficacy of prophylactic stemming of the tibial tray. This study explored whether additional mechanical support for tibial base plates would help reduce bone cement stresses in heavy patients, who, like patients with a high activity level, put added stress on their implants. A tibial base plate with a 12-mm-diameter x 50-mm-long stem was compared with the same tibial base plate with a 15-mm-diameter x 20-mm-long end cap using finite element analysis. The results indicate that the tibial base plate with a prophylactic stem significantly reduced compressive and shear stresses on the cement-device interface and therefore may help to reduce the possibility of tibial loosening in these at-risk patients. Further, such studies will aid the surgeon in educating patients and in selecting the appropriate implant strategy. PMID:21618932

  16. Tibial developmental field defect is the most common lower limb malformation pattern in VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola

    2008-05-15

    VACTERL association is one of the most common recognizable patterns of human malformation and has been recently defined as a multiple polytopic developmental field defect. Limb anomalies are a key component of this condition and characteristically reflect perturbation of radial ray development. However, the pattern of appendicular malformations in VACTERL association is wider and includes a broad spectrum of additional and apparently nonspecific anomalies. We report on the sporadic case of a 4-10/12-year-old boy presenting with multiple costovertebral defects, dextrocardia, bilateral radial ray hypo/aplasia, unilateral kidney agenesis and anal atresia. Homolaterally to the more severe radial ray defect and kidney aplasia, he also has a complex lower limb malformation, consisting of distal tibial aplasia, clubfoot, hallucal deficiency and preaxial polydactyly. Literature review identifies 24 additional patients with VACTERL manifestations and lower limb malformations (excluding cases with isolated secondary deformations). Tibial hypo/aplasia with or without additional tibial field defects, reported in about 2/3 (68%) of the patients, represents the most common finding, while involvement of the fibular ray is rare (20%) and very often accompanies tibial anomalies. The relatively high frequency of tibial ray anomalies in VACTERL patients could easily be explained by the principle of homology of the developmental field theory. Careful search of lower limb anomalies of the "tibial type" is, therefore, indicated in all patients with multiple polytopic developmental field defects. PMID:18386801

  17. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  18. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Waliullah, Khalid; Khair, Michael; Smith, Patrick; Bach, Bernard; Sherman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The number of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is rapidly increasing. In patients who wish to return to their preoperative level of function, specifically as it pertains to participation in sports, the gold standard of treatment following an ACL tear remains an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite a majority of good/excellent results following primary ACL reconstruction, there is a growing subset of patients with persistent or recurrent functional instability who require revision ACL reconstruction. Preoperative planning for revision ACL reconstruction requires a careful understanding of the root cause of ACL failure, including possible technical causes of primary ACL failure and the presence of combined knee pathology that was not addressed at the index ACL reconstruction. The decision to perform 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction is multifactorial and is reached by technical considerations that may make a 1-stage revision less optimal, including tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, active infection, and others. Concomitant knee pathology such as meniscal deficiency, malalignment (including an increase in posterior tibial slope), chondral lesions, and other ligamentous laxity may also require a staged approach to treatment. This evidence-based review covers the indications for 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction, surgical techniques, evidence for and technique of bone grafting prior ACL tunnels, and outcomes of 2-stage revision stratified by initial cause of ACL reconstruction failure. With proper preoperative planning and an understanding of the cause of failure following the primary ACL reconstruction, revision ACL reconstruction can offer excellent outcomes in the motivated patient. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e456-e464.]. PMID:27045480

  19. Gait patterns before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Zsolt; Kocsis, László; Kiss, Rita M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how selected gait parameters may change as a result of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and following ACL reconstruction. The study was performed on 25 ACL-deficient subjects prior to and 6 weeks, 4 months, 8 months and 12 months after ACL reconstructive surgery by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the zebris three-dimensional ultrasound-based system with surface electromyograph (zebris Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany). Kinematic data were recorded for the lower limb. The muscles examined include vastus lateralis and medialis, biceps femoris and adductor longus. The results obtained from the injured subjects were compared with those of 51 individuals without ACL damage. The acute ACL-deficient patients exhibited a quadriceps avoidance pattern prior to and 6 weeks after surgery. The quadriceps avoidance phenomenon does not develop in chronic ACL-deficient patients. In the individuals operated on, the spatial-temporal parameters and the knee angle had already regained a normal pattern for the ACL-deficient limb during gait 4 months after surgery. However, the relative ACL movement parameter-which describes the tibial translation into the direction of ACL-and the EMG traces show no significant statistical difference compared with the values of healthy control group just 8 months after surgery. The results suggest that: (1) development of a quadriceps avoidance pattern is less common than previously reported, (2) anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction significantly alter the lower extremity gait pattern, (3) the gait parameters shift towards the normal value pattern, and (4) the re-establishment of pre-injury gait patterns--including the normal biphase of muscles--takes at least 8 months to occur.

  20. [The geometry of the keel determines the behaviour of the tibial tray against torsional forces in total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    García David, S; Cortijo Martínez, J A; Navarro Bermúdez, I; Maculé, F; Hinarejos, P; Puig-Verdié, L; Monllau, J C; Hernández Hermoso, J A

    2014-01-01

    The keel design of the tibial tray is essential for the transmission of the majority of the forces to the peripheral bone structures, which have better mechanical proprieties, thus reducing the risk of loosening. The aim of the present study was to compare the behaviour of different tibial tray designs submitted to torsional forces. Four different tibial components were modelled. The 3-D reconstruction was made using the Mimics software. The solid elements were generated by SolidWorks. The finite elements study was done by Unigraphics. A torsional force of 6 Nm. applied to the lateral aspects of each tibial tray was simulated. The GENUTECH® tibial tray, with peripheral trabecular bone support, showed a lower displacement and less transmitted tensions under torsional forces. The results suggest that a tibial tray with more peripheral support behaves mechanically better than the other studied designs. PMID:25037111

  1. [The geometry of the keel determines the behaviour of the tibial tray against torsional forces in total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    García David, S; Cortijo Martínez, J A; Navarro Bermúdez, I; Maculé, F; Hinarejos, P; Puig-Verdié, L; Monllau, J C; Hernández Hermoso, J A

    2014-01-01

    The keel design of the tibial tray is essential for the transmission of the majority of the forces to the peripheral bone structures, which have better mechanical proprieties, thus reducing the risk of loosening. The aim of the present study was to compare the behaviour of different tibial tray designs submitted to torsional forces. Four different tibial components were modelled. The 3-D reconstruction was made using the Mimics software. The solid elements were generated by SolidWorks. The finite elements study was done by Unigraphics. A torsional force of 6 Nm. applied to the lateral aspects of each tibial tray was simulated. The GENUTECH® tibial tray, with peripheral trabecular bone support, showed a lower displacement and less transmitted tensions under torsional forces. The results suggest that a tibial tray with more peripheral support behaves mechanically better than the other studied designs.

  2. Surgical reconstruction of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: prospective comparison of flexor digitorum longus substitution combined with lateral column lengthening or medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Marks, Richard M; Long, Jason T; Ness, Mary Ellen; Khazzam, Michael; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) may require surgical intervention when nonoperative measures fail. Different methods of bony reconstruction may supplement tendon substitution. This study compares two types of bony procedures used to reinforce reconstruction of the posterior tibial tendon-the lateral column lengthening (LCL), and the medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy (MDCO). Twenty patients with PTTD were evaluated before and after scheduled reconstruction comprised of either flexor digitorum longus (FDL) substitution combined with MDCO (MDCO group, 14 patients) or FDL substitution with LCL fusion or osteotomy (LCL group, 6 patients). Foot/ankle kinematics and temporal-spatial parameters were analyzed using the Milwaukee Foot Model, and results were compared to a previously evaluated normal population of 25 patients. Post-operatively, both patient groups demonstrated significantly improved stride length, cadence and walking speed, as well as improved hindfoot and forefoot position in the sagittal plane. The LCL group also demonstrated greater heel inversion. All post-operative subjects revealed significant improvement in the talo-MT1 angle in the A/P and lateral planes, calcaneal pitch and medial cuneiform-MT5 height. Surgical reconstruction of PTTD with either the LCL or MDCO shows comparable improvements in gait parameters, with better heel inversion seen with the LCL, but improved 1st ray plantarflexion and varus with the MDCO. Both procedures demonstrated comparable improvements in radiographic measurements. PMID:18603429

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture: differences between males and females.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Karen M; Bullock, James Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    The rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is three times higher in female athletes than in male athletes. Intrinsic factors such as increased quadriceps angle and increased posterior tibial slope may predispose girls and women to ACL injury. Compared with males, females have smaller notch widths and smaller ACL cross-sectional area; however, no conclusive correlation between ACL size and notch dimension exists, especially in relation to risk of ACL injury. Female athletes who land with the knees in inadequate flexion and in greater-than-normal valgus and external rotation are at increased risk of ACL injury. No conclusive link has been made between ACL injury and the menstrual cycle. Neuromuscular intervention protocols have been shown to reduce the rate of injury in girls and women. Females are more likely than males to have a narrow A-shaped intercondylar notch, and special surgical considerations are required in such cases. Following ACL reconstruction, female athletes are more likely than male athletes to rupture the contralateral ACL; however, males and females are equally likely to rupture the reconstructed knee. Although self-reported outcomes in the first 2 years following reconstruction are worse for females than for males, longer-term studies demonstrate no difference between males and females.

  4. Adolescent Segond fracture with an intact anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Deepak; Alexander, Reginald; Hussain, Waqas M; Leland, J Martin

    2012-07-01

    Segond fractures, or avulsion fractures of the proximal lateral tibial plateau, have been well documented and studied since their original description in 1878. Segond fractures have a widely recognized pathognomonic association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and often prompt orthopedic surgeons to consider reconstruction following radiographic and clinical evaluation. Adolescent patients are particularly vulnerable to these fractures due to the relative weakness of their physeal growth plates compared with the strength of their accompanying ligamentous structures. This article describes a case of a 13-year-old boy who sustained a Segond fracture that was not coupled with an ACL avulsion or tear. The patient sustained a twisting injury to his knee. He presented to the emergency room with an effusion and radiographic findings consistent with a Segond fracture. On follow-up examination 1 week after injury, the ACL was intact. The patient was followed for 5 months of conservative treatment. At final follow-up, the patient had reestablished his previous level of activity. This article describes the history, physical examination, and radiographic findings necessary to care for patients who present with a Segond fracture. Although considered pathognomonic for an associated ACL injury, this article describes a Segond fracture that occurred in isolation. PMID:22784911

  5. Outcome of limb reconstruction system in open tibial diaphyseal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Anand; Verma, Ankit; Agrawal, Mukul; Jain, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Arunangshu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial diaphyseal fractures with bone loss is a matter of debate. The treatment options range from external fixators, nailing, ring fixators or grafting with or without plastic reconstruction. All the procedures have their own set of complications, like acute docking problems, shortening, difficulty in soft tissue management, chronic infection, increased morbidity, multiple surgeries, longer hospital stay, mal union, nonunion and higher patient dissatisfaction. We evaluated the outcome of the limb reconstruction system (LRS) in the treatment of open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss as a definative mode of treatment to achieve union, as well as limb lengthening, simultaneously. Materials and Methods: Thirty open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss of at least 4 cm or more with a mean age 32.5 years were treated by using the LRS after debridement. Distraction osteogenesis at rate of 1 mm/day was done away from the fracture site to maintain the limb length. On the approximation of fracture ends, the dynamized LRS was left for further 15-20 weeks and patient was mobilized with weight bearing to achieve union. Functional assessment was done by Association for the Study and Application of the Methods of Illizarov (ASAMI) criteria. Results: Mean followup period was 15 months. The mean bone loss was 5.5 cm (range 4-9 cm). The mean duration of bone transport was 13 weeks (range 8-30 weeks) with a mean time for LRS in place was 44 weeks (range 24-51 weeks). The mean implant index was 56.4 days/cm. Mean union time was 52 weeks (range 31-60 weeks) with mean union index of 74.5 days/cm. Bony results as per the ASAMI scoring were excellent in 76% (19/25), good in 12% (3/25) and fair in 4% (1/25) with union in all except 2 patients, which showed poor results (8%) with only 2 patients having leg length discrepancy more than 2.5 cm. Functional results were excellent in 84% (21/25), good in 8% (2/25), fair in 8% (2/25). Pin tract

  6. Myringoplasty for anterior and subtotal perforations using KTP-532 laser.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Imre; Ráth, Gábor; Szanyi, István; Pytel, József

    2006-09-01

    A retrospective study was performed on patients who underwent myringoplasty for either anterior or subtotal perforations over an 8-year period (from 1994 till 2004). We used the KTP-laser assisted anterior anchoring technique combining with anterior "pull-back" method. Patients' ages ranged from 6-62 years (median 36.5). The mean follow-up period was 2.8 years (minimum 6 months). The audiological results were analysed with the "Pytel software", which was developed in our department. As for the procedure, the drum remnant was freed from the malleus handle with the use of the laser and elevated out of it's sulcus anterior-superiorly. Large fascia graft was fashioned with a split of 4-5 mm in the middle of one edge. The graft was placed using the underlay technique medial to the handle of the malleus. A pull-back tunnel was created at the border of the anterior quadrants to further facilitate the survival of the graft. In this series the graft taking rate was 100%. Reperforation due to an undersized fascia was observed in one case. Post-operative audiological results indicated no bone conduction threshold elevation in any frequencies. Using the laser, cochlear trauma can be prevented, double fixation of the drum prevents lateralisation and blunting. Wide canalplasty makes both the approach and the follow-up very easy. Thorough soft tissue and bone work is advantageous from the fascia taking rate point of view.

  7. Outcome of double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using crosspin and aperture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Modi, Prashant; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (DBACL) reconstruction is said to reproduce the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomy better than single bundle anterior cruciate ligament, whether it leads to better functional results is debatable. Different fixation methods have been used for DBACL reconstruction, the most common being aperture fixation on tibial side and cortical suspensory fixation on the femoral side. We present the results of DBACL reconstruction technique, wherein on the femoral side anteromedial (AM) bundle is fixed with a crosspin and aperture fixation was done for the posterolateral (PL) bundle. Materials and Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Results: The KT-1000 results were evaluated using paired t test with the P value set at 0.001. At the end of 1

  8. Anterior Orbit and Adnexal Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Hussain, Hailah; Edward, Deepak P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe six cases of anterior orbital and adnexal amyloidosis and to report on proteomic analysis to characterize the nature of amyloid in archived biopsies in two cases. Materials and Methods: The clinical features, radiological findings, pathology, and outcome of six patients with anterior orbit and adnexal amyloidosis were retrieved from the medical records. The biochemical nature of the amyloid was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy archived paraffin-embedded tissue in two cases. Results: Of the six cases, three had unilateral localized anterior orbit and lacrimal gland involvement. Four of the six patients were female with an average duration of 12.8 years from the time of onset to presentation eyelid infiltration by amyloid caused ptosis in five cases. CT scan in patients with lacrimal gland involvement (n = 3) demonstrated calcified deformable anterior orbital masses and on pathological exmaintionamyloid and calcific deposits replaced the lacrimal gland acini. Ptosis repair was performed in three patients with good outcomes. One patient required repeated debulking of the mass and one patient had recurrenct disease. Proteomic analysis revealed polyclonal IgG-associated amyloid deposition in one patient and AL kappa amyloid in the second patient. Conclusion: Amyloidosis of the anterior orbit and lacrimal gland can present with a wide spectrum of findings with good outcomes after surgical excision. The nature of amyloid material can be precisely determined in archival pathology blocks using diagnostic proteomic analysis. PMID:24014979

  9. A Finite-Element Study of Metal Backing and Tibial Resection Depth in a Composite Tibia Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Susumu; Rogge, Renee D; Small, Scott R; Berend, Michael E; Ritter, Merrill A

    2016-04-01

    Prosthetic alignment, patient characteristics, and implant design are all factors in long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the level at which each of these factors contribute to implant loosening has not been fully described. Prior clinical and biomechanical studies have indicated tibial overload as a cause of early TKA revision. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between tibial component design and bone resection on tibial loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) was performed after simulated implantation of metal backed (MB) and all-polyethylene (AP) TKA components in 5 and 15 mm of tibial resection into a validated intact tibia model. Proximal tibial strains significantly increased between 13% and 199% when implanted with AP components (p < 0.05). Strain significantly increased between 12% and 209% in the posterior tibial compartment with increased bone resection (p < 0.05). This study indicates elevated strains in AP implanted tibias across the entirety of the proximal tibial cortex, as well as a posterior shift in tibial loading in instances of increased resection depth. These results are consistent with trends observed in prior biomechanical studies and may associate the documented device history of tibial collapse in AP components with increased bone strain and overload beneath the prosthesis. PMID:26810930

  10. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  11. Kinematic motion of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee during functionally high and low demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical adaptations were present in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees during high-demand activities. Twenty-two subjects with unilateral ACL deficiency (11 males and 11 females, 19.6 months after injury) performed five different activities at a comfortable speed (level walking, ascending and descending steps, jogging, jogging to a 90-degree side cutting toward the opposite direction of the tested side). Three-dimensional knee kinematics for the ACL-deficient knees and uninjured contralateral knees were evaluated using the Point Cluster Technique. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle, but an offset toward the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation was observed in the ACL-deficient knee. The tendency was more obvious in high demand motions, and a significant difference was clearly observed in the side cutting motions. These motion patterns, with the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation, are proposed to be an adaptive movement to avoid pivot shift dynamically, and reveal evidence in support of a dynamic adaptive motion occurring in ACL-deficient knees.

  12. Tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons for ACL-reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Scheunemann, K; Knobloch, K; Albrecht, K; Krettek, C; Hurschler, C; Zeichen, J

    2006-12-01

    Press-fit fixation of patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament autografts is an interesting technique because no hardware is necessary to achieve fixation. Up till the present point, there is no biomechanical data available for the tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons. Hamstring tendons of 21 human cadavers (age: 41.9 +/- 13.1 years) were used. A press-fit fixation with looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons secured by a tape (T) over a bone bridge, or by a baseball-stitched suture (S), was compared with degradable interference screw fixation (I) in 21 porcine tibiae. The constructs were cyclically strained and subsequently loaded to failure. The maximum load to failure, stiffness, and elongation during cyclical loading were measured. The maximum load to failure was highest for the T-fixation at 970 +/- 83 N, followed by the I-fixation with 544 +/- 109 N, and the S-fixation with 402 +/- 78 N (P < 0.03). Stiffness of the constructs averaged 78 +/- 13 N/mm for T, 108 +/- 18 N/mm for S, and 162 +/- 27 N/mm for I (P < 0.03). Elongation during initial cyclical loading was 2.0 +/- 0.6 mm for T, 3.3 +/- 1.1 mm for S, and 1.4 +/- 0.5 mm for I (S inferior to I and T, P<0.05). Elongation between the 20th and 1,500th loading cycle was lower for T (2.2 +/- 0.7 mm) compared with I (4.1 +/- 2.7 mm) and S (4.8 +/- 0.7 mm; P < 0.001). The T-fixation technique exhibited a significantly higher failure load than the S-, and I- techniques. All techniques exhibited larger elongation during initial cyclical loading than is reported in the literature for grafts with bone blocks. Only one technique (T) showed satisfactory elongation behavior during long-term cyclic loading. Interference screw fixation demonstrated significantly higher stiffness. Only one of the investigated techniques (T) seemed to exhibit adequate mechanical properties necessary for early aggressive rehabilitation programs.

  13. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial muscle cross-sectional area as predictors of tibial bone strength in middle-aged and older men.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Nikander, R; Kukuljan, S; Daly, R M

    2013-09-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that bones adapt to the site-specific prevalent loading environment, reasonable ways to estimate skeletal loads are not necessarily available. For long bone shafts, muscles acting to bend the bone may provide a more appropriate surrogate of the loading than muscles expected to cause compressive loads. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was a better predictor of tibial mid-shaft bone strength than mid-tibia muscle CSA in middle aged and older men. 181 Caucasian men aged 50-79 years (mean±SD; 61±7 years) participated in this study. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial bone traits cortical area, density weighted polar moment of area and muscle CSA [cm(2)] were assessed with computed tomography. Tibial bone traits were positively associated with both the mid-femur (r=0.44 to 0.46, P<0.001) and the mid-tibia muscle CSA (r=0.35 to 0.37, P<0.001). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age, weight, physical activity and femoral length, indicated that mid-femur muscle CSA predicted tibial mid-shaft bone strength indices better than mid-tibia muscle CSA. In conclusion, the association between a given skeletal site and functionally adjacent muscles may provide a meaningful probe of the site-specific effect of loading on bone. PMID:23989248

  14. Surgical Management of Tibial Plateau Fractures With 3.5 mm Simple Plates

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jabalameli, Mahmoud; Hadi, Hosseinali; Rahbar, Mohammad; Minator Sajjadi, Mohammadreza; Jahansouz, Ali; Karimi Heris, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Tibial plateau fractures can be successfully fixed utilizing 3.5 mm locking plates. However, there are some disadvantages to using these plates. Objectives In the current prospective study, we investigated the outcome of treating different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates which, to our knowledge, has not been evaluated in previous studies. Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 32 patients aged 40 ± 0.2 years underwent open reduction and internal fixation for tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple plates. The patients were followed for 16.14 ± 2.1 months. At each patient’s final visit, the articular surface depression, medial proximal tibial angle, and slope angle were measured and compared with measurements taken early after the operation. The functional outcomes were measured with the WOMAC and Lysholm knee scores. Results The mean union time was 13 ± 1.2 weeks. The mean knee range of motion was 116.8° ± 3.3°. The mean WOMAC and Lysholm scores were 83.5 ± 1.8 and 76.8 ± 1.6, respectively. On the early postoperative and final X-rays, 87.5% and 84% of patients, respectively, had acceptable reduction. Medial proximal tibial and slope angles did not change significantly by the last visit. No patient was found to have complications related to the type of plate. Conclusions In this case series study, the fixation of different types of tibial plateau fractures with 3.5 mm simple non-locking and non-precontoured plates was associated with acceptable clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes. Based on the advantages and costs of these plates, the authors recommend using 3.5 mm simple plates for different types of tibial plateau fractures. PMID:27626010

  15. Fact or fiction? Iatrogenic hallux abducto valgus secondary to tibial sesamoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Canales, Michael B; DeMore, Matthew; Bowen, Michael F; Ehredt, Duane J; Razzante, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    First ray function and hallux misalignment after isolated tibial sesamoidectomy have been topics of debate. Although sesamoidectomy has been proved to be effective in the relief of sesamoid pain, many foot and ankle surgeons remain hesitant to perform the procedure fearing a possible joint perturbation. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate both laboratory and clinical evidence of the association between isolated tibial sesamoidectomy and hallux abducto valgus deformity. The bench study consisted of 10 cadaveric limbs that were dissected and prepared for testing. Controlled valgus loads were applied before and after tibial sesamoidectomy. No significant difference was found in the joint position after sesamoidectomy in both the rectus (p = .36) and the dorsiflexed (p = .062) positions. The clinical evaluation consisted of a retrospective cohort of 5 females; all of whom underwent isolated tibial sesamoidectomy. The pre- and postoperative radiographs and self-reported pain scores (visual analog scale) were compared. None of the patients developed a postoperative hallux abducto valgus deformity. Neither the hallux abductus angle (p = .180) nor the intermetatarsal angle 1-2 (p = .180) changed significantly in the postoperative setting. The visual analog scale pain scores changed from a mean of 6.8 to 1, a significant difference (p = .042). Based on our observations and clinical experience, we believe that isolated tibial sesamoidectomy does not have a significant effect on the position of the first metatarsophalangeal joint when meticulous surgical technique is used to excise the sesamoid. Isolated tibial sesamoidectomy can provide substantial pain relief and appears to be a safe treatment for a variety of conditions affecting the tibial sesamoid.

  16. Thermal Analysis of the Tibial Cement Interface with Modern Cementing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher J.; Zbrojkiewicz, David; Vizesi, Frank; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The major cause of cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) failure is aseptic loosening of the tibial component necessitating revision surgery. Recently, multiple techniques have been described to maximize cement penetration depth and density in the proximal tibia during TKA to potentially avoid early loosening. While cement polymerisation is an exothermic reaction, minimal investigation into the proximal tibial thermal safety margin during cement polymerisation has been undertaken. In animal models osseous injury occurs at temperatures greater than 47 °C when applied for one minute. The aim of this study was to investigate the cement bone interface temperatures in TKA using modern tibial cementing techniques with a cadaveric tibial tray model. Methods: Eight adult cadavers were obtained with the proximal tibial surface prepared by a fellowship trained arthroplasty surgeon. Third generation cementation techniques were used and temperatures during cement polymerization on cadaveric knee arthroplasty models were recorded using thermocouples. Results: The results showed that no tibial cement temperature exceeded 44 °C for more than 1 minute. Two of the eight cadaveric tibias recorded maximum temperatures greater than 44 °C for 55 seconds and 33 seconds, just less than the 60 seconds reported to cause thermal injury. Average maximum polymerization temperatures did not correlate with deeper cement penetration or tray material. Maximum mantle temperatures were not statistically different between metal and all polyethylene tibial trays. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that modern cementing techniques result in maximum mantle temperatures that are less than previously recorded temperatures required to cause thermal osseous injury, although this thermal injury safety margin is quite narrow at an average of 4.95 °C (95% confidence interval ± 4.31). PMID:27073585

  17. Evaluation of Tibial Condyle Fractures Treated with Ilizarov Fixation, A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy R, Sandeep; Shah, Harshad M; Golla, Dinesh Kumar; Ganesh D J, Niranthara; Kumar P, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tibial plateau fractures are associated with significant soft tissue injuries which increases the risks of complications and must be considered when managing tibial plateau fractures. Various modalities of treatment are available for treatment of these fractures but Ilizarov fixation has a special advantage over others. Review of literature shows many studies of Ilizarov fixation in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures with variable results. Aim of our study was to evaluate tibial condyle fractures treated by Ilizarov fixation. Materials and Methods: Study included 43 patients with Schatzker type II and above tibial plateau fractures treated by ilizarov fixation. Standard trauma evaluation, a meticulous musculoskeletal and neurologic examination was carried out. All patients underwent Ilizarov fixation by same team of surgeons. Clinicoradilogical assessment of the patients carried out at regular intervals. Results: Our study included 43 cases of tibial plateau of various types except type I. Mean time for radiological union was 24.51 wk (range 15 to 32 wk). Mean fixator period was 26.6 wk( 16-34 wk). The functional results were measured by Lyshom’s and Hohl and Luck score. The mean Lyshom’s score was at the end of one year was 82.16. At end of one year by Hohl and Luck grading 11 patients had fair, 23 had good and 9 had excellent results. Conclusion: High energy tibial plateau fractures can be definitively treated with Ilizarov external fixation. Treatment with this method gives good union rates and less risk of infection. Closed reduction, minimal soft tissue damage and early mobilization are the key to low complications. PMID:25584250

  18. Cementless fixation of the tibial component for the ICLH knee.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, M A; Bradley, G W; Blaha, J D; Insler, H P

    1982-01-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate bone cement in joint replacement surgery is not without drawbacks. Certain hazards have been appreciated and the bone cement interface may not be as stable in the long run as was once felt. This paper reports the results in 52 knees which were replaced using the uncemented ICLH (Imperial College/London Hospital) tibial component; the average follow up was two years (range six months to four years). The results were compiled with regard to pain as well as clinical examination and X-ray evaluation. The results were comparable to those achieved in knees replaced using bone cement. Roentgenographic evaluation revealed no evidence of loosening nor sinkage of any of these prostheses. Considerations in the development of a knee prosthesis to be utilized without bone cement and the operative technique employed to implant such a prosthesis are presented. The merits of such a system are discussed. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7086790

  19. Ovine Model for Critical-Size Tibial Segmental Defects

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Chris; Oliver, Rema A; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2014-01-01

    A segmental tibial defect model in a large animal can provide a basis for testing materials and techniques for use in nonunions and severe trauma. This study reports the rationale behind establishing such a model and its design and conclusions. After ethics approval of the study, aged ewes (older than 5 y; n = 12) were enrolled. A 5-cm mid diaphyseal osteoperiosteal defect was made in the left tibia and was stabilized by using an 8-mm stainless-steel cross-locked intramedullary nail. Sheep were euthanized at 12 wk after surgery and evaluated by using radiography, microCT, and soft-tissue histology techniques. Radiology confirmed a lack of hard tissue callus bridging across the defect. Volumetric analysis based on microCT showed bone growth across the 16.5-cm3 defect of 1.82 ± 0.94 cm3. Histologic sections of the bridging tissues revealed callus originating from both the periosteal and endosteal surfaces, with fibrous tissue completing the bridging in all instances. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the quality of the healing response. Clinical, radiographic, and histologic union was not achieved by 12 wk. This model may be effective for the investigation of surgical techniques and healing adjuncts for nonunion cases, where severe traumatic injury has led to significant bone loss. PMID:25402178

  20. Early migration of tibial components is associated with late revision

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We performed two parallel systematic reviews and meta-analyses to determine the association between early migration of tibial components and late aseptic revision. Methods One review comprised early migration data from radiostereometric analysis (RSA) studies, while the other focused on revision rates for aseptic loosening from long-term survival studies. Thresholds for acceptable and unacceptable migration were determined according to that of several national joint registries: < 5% revision at 10 years. Results Following an elaborate literature search, 50 studies (involving 847 total knee prostheses (TKPs)) were included in the RSA review and 56 studies (20,599 TKPs) were included in the survival review. The results showed that for every mm increase in migration there was an 8% increase in revision rate, which remained after correction for age, sex, diagnosis, hospital type, continent, and study quality. Consequently, migration up to 0.5 mm was considered acceptable during the first postoperative year, while migration of 1.6 mm or more was unacceptable. TKPs with migration of between 0.5 and 1.6 mm were considered to be at risk of having revision rates higher than 5% at 10 years. Interpretation There was a clinically relevant association between early migration of TKPs and late revision for loosening. The proposed migration thresholds can be implemented in a phased, evidence-based introduction of new types of knee prostheses, since they allow early detection of high-risk TKPs while exposing only a small number of patients. PMID:23140091

  1. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Matthew C; Slater, Rick C; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 30-60% above control; however, TNS did not produce this effect during AA irritation. TNS applied during CMGs at 5 Hz but not 30 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 127.3 ± 6.1% of saline control or 187.6 ± 5.0% of AA control. During AA irritation, naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) administered intravenously (1 mg/kg) or directly to the surface of the rostral brain stem (300-900 μg) eliminated acute TNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bladder capacity to 62.8 ± 22.6% (intravenously) or 47.6 ± 25.5% (brain stem application). Results of this and previous studies indicate 1) forebrain circuitry rostral to the pons is not essential for TNS inhibition; and 2) opioid receptors in the brain stem have a critical role in TNS inhibition of overactive bladder reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. PMID:26017973

  2. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Matthew C.; Slater, Rick C.; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 30–60% above control; however, TNS did not produce this effect during AA irritation. TNS applied during CMGs at 5 Hz but not 30 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 127.3 ± 6.1% of saline control or 187.6 ± 5.0% of AA control. During AA irritation, naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) administered intravenously (1 mg/kg) or directly to the surface of the rostral brain stem (300–900 μg) eliminated acute TNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bladder capacity to 62.8 ± 22.6% (intravenously) or 47.6 ± 25.5% (brain stem application). Results of this and previous studies indicate 1) forebrain circuitry rostral to the pons is not essential for TNS inhibition; and 2) opioid receptors in the brain stem have a critical role in TNS inhibition of overactive bladder reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. PMID:26017973

  3. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on cranial tibial subluxation in the feline cranial cruciate deficient stifle joint: An ex vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Retournard, M; Bilmont, A; Asimus, E; Palierne, S; Autefage, A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) on Cranial Tibial Subluxation (CTS) and Tibial Rotation Angle (TRA) were evaluated in a model of feline Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle joint. Ten hindlimbs of adult cats were used. Quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles were simulated using cables, turnbuckles and a spring. An axial load of 30% body weight was applied. The stifle and talocrural joint angles were adjusted to 120°. Patellar tendon angle (PTA), CTS and TRA were measured radiographically before and after CrCL section, after TTA and after additional advancement by 1 and 2mm. CrCL section resulted in a CTS of 8.1±1.5mm and a TRA of 18.4±5.7 °. After TTA, PTA was significantly decreased from 99.1±1.7° to 89.1±0.7°; CTS and TRA did not change significantly (7.8±1.0mm and 15.9±5.7° respectively). Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 1mm did not significantly affect CTS and TRA. Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 2mm significantly reduced the PTA to 82.9±0.9°. A significant decrease of CTS (6.9±1.3mm) and TRA (14.7±3.6°) was also observed. A lack of stabilization of the CrCL deficient stifle was observed after TTA in this model of the feline stifle. Even though the validity of the model can be questioned, simple transposition of the technique of TTA from the cat to the dog appeared hazardous. PMID:27474002

  4. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  5. Surgical treatment of a rare isolated bilateral agenesis of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Cerulli, G; Amanti, A; Placella, G

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in snowboarders: a quadriceps-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hywel; Tietjens, Barry; Van Sterkenburg, Maayke; Mehgan, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in snowboarders are rare. However, in expert boarders landing big jumps, ACL injuries are occurring more frequently. We identified 35 snowboarders with an identical injury mechanism. All these patients were landing from a jump. All described a flat landing on a flexed knee with significant knee compression. In 31 of 35 boarders, it was the front knee that was injured. Only two riders felt there was any twisting component to their injury. We postulate that the ACL rupture is due to maximal eccentric quadriceps contraction, as the boarder resists a compressive landing. Internal tibial rotation of the front knee in the snowboarding stance results in preloading of the ACL predisposing to injury.

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament anatomy: a review of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jeffrey R; Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Rue, John-Paul H

    2009-04-01

    Critical evaluations of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure modes have shown that the most common cause for failure is aberrant femoral tunnel placement. Regardless of the surgical reconstruction technique, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the anatomy and function of the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles of the native ACL to successfully restore the stability and motion of the injured knee. Similar to the observation that anatomic reduction is critical to successful fracture management, ACL reconstruction techniques must focus on restoring the normal anatomy of the ACL. This article reviews the anatomy of the AM and PL bundles of the ACL, including landmarks for identifying their femoral and tibial footprints.

  8. Apophysitis of the Tibial Tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter Disease): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Azizi, Ahmad Tariq; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is a condition in which the patellar tendon insertion on the tibial tuberosity becomes inflamed. It is a well-known condition in late childhood characterized by pain and a bony prominence over the tibial tuberosity. The pain is usually exacerbated by physical activities like running, jumping, and climbing stairs. In the acute stage, the margins of the patellar tendon become blurred in radiographs due to the soft tissue swelling. After three to four months, bone fragmentation at the tibial tuberosity is viewed. In the sub-acute stage, soft tissue swelling resolves, but the bony ossicle remains. In the chronic stage, the bone fragment may fuse with the tibial tuberosity which can appear normal. The primary goal in the treatment of OSD is the reduction of pain and swelling over the tibial tuberosity. The patient should limit physical activities until the symptoms are resolved. In some cases, the patient should restrict physical activities for several months. The presence of pain with kneeling because of an ossicle that does not respond to conservative measures is the indication for surgery. In these cases, the removal of the ossicle, surrounding bursa, and the bony prominence is the treatment of choice. PMID:27752406

  9. Effects of physical exertion on trans-tibial prosthesis users' ability to accommodate alignment perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Goeran; Slavens, Brooke A; O'Connor, Kristian M; Smith, Roger O; Hafner, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Background It has long been reported that a range of prosthesis alignments is acceptable in trans-tibial prosthetics. This range was shown to be smaller when walking on uneven surfaces. It has also been argued that findings on gait with prostheses that were obtained under laboratory conditions are limited in their applicability to real-life environments. Objectives This study investigated the hypothesis that efforts to compensate for suboptimal alignments by active users of trans-tibial prostheses become less effective when levels of physical exertion increase. Study design A 2 × 2 repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to compare the effects of physical exertion and subtle alignment perturbations on gait with trans-tibial prostheses. Methods The gait of eight subjects with trans-tibial amputation was analyzed when walking with two different prosthesis alignments and two different physical exertion levels. The main and interaction effects were statistically evaluated. Results Bilateral step length symmetry and measures of step variability within the same leg were found to be affected by the intervention. There was no significant effect on index variables that combined kinematic or kinetic measures. Conclusion Findings showed that persons with trans-tibial prostheses responded heterogeneously to the interventions. For most variables, the research hypothesis could not be confirmed. PMID:25138114

  10. Sequential avulsions of the tibial tubercle in an adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying Chieh; Chao, Ying-Hao; Lien, Fang-Chieh

    2010-05-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon fracture in physically active adolescents. Sequential avulsion of tibial tubercles is extremely rare. We reported a healthy, active 15-year-old boy who suffered from left tibial tubercle avulsion fracture during a basketball game. He received open reduction and internal fixation with two smooth Kirschner wires and a cannulated screw, with every effort to reduce the plate injury. Long-leg splint was used for protection followed by programmed rehabilitation. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. Another avulsion fracture happened at the right tibial tubercle 3.5 months later when he was playing the basketball. From the encouragement of previous successful treatment, we provided him open reduction and fixation with two small-caliber screws. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. No genu recurvatum or other deformity was happening in our case at the end of 2-year follow-up. No evidence of Osgood-Schlatter disease or osteogenesis imperfecta was found. Sequential avulsion fractures of tibial tubercles are rare. Good functional recovery can often be obtained like our case if we treat it well. To a physically active adolescent, we should never overstate the risk of sequential avulsion of the other leg to postpone the return to an active, functional life.

  11. Cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique to achieve bony bridge in transtibial amputation: experience in nine adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mongon, Mauricio Leal; Piva, Felipe Alberto; Mistro Neto, Sylvio; Carvalho, Jose Andre; Belangero, William Dias; Livani, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Amputation, especially of the lower limbs, is a surgical procedure that gives excellent results when conducted under the appropriate conditions. In 1949 Ertl developed a technique for transtibial osteomyoplastic amputation which restored the intraosseous pressure through canal obliteration and expanded the area of terminal support through a bony bridge between the fibula and distal tibia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a modification of the original Ertl's technique in which a cortical osteoperiosteal flap created from the tibia is used to form a bony bridge during transtibial amputation in adults. Nine patients underwent leg amputations with the cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique for reconstruction of the stump. The average duration of follow-up was 30.8 (range, 18-41) months. The post-surgery examination included a clinical examination and radiography. A 6-min walk test (Enright in Respir Care 48(8):783-785, 2003) was performed in the 32nd week after amputation. At 24th week post-surgery, all patients had stumps that were painless and able to bear full weight through the end. The creation of a cortical osteoperiosteal flap from the tibia to the fibula during transtibial amputation is a safe and effective technique that provides a strong and painless terminal weight-bearing stump. This constitutes a useful option for young patients, athletes, and patients with high physical demands. PMID:23371841

  12. The Risk of Transphyseal Drilling in Skeletally Immature Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faunø, Peter; Rømer, Lone; Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in skeletally immature patients can result in growth plate injury, which can cause growth disturbances. Purpose: To evaluate radiological tibial and femoral length and axis growth disturbances as well as clinical outcomes in skeletally immature ACLR patients treated with a transphyseal drilling technique. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 39 pediatric patients with ACL injury and open physes at time of surgery, as diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were treated using transphyseal ACLR using hamstring graft. Mean patient age was 11.7 years (range, 9.0-14.0 years). Patients were evaluated with full extremity radiographs measuring leg length discrepancy and malalignment, as well as clinical evaluation with KT-1000 arthrometer measurements and Tegner activity scale and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) outcomes after follow-up of 68 months (range, 29-148 months). Results: Of the 39 initial patients, 33 were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. We found a mean femoral length shortening of 3.5 mm (P = .01) on the operated leg. Eight patients (24%) had a more than 10-mm shortening of the operated leg, whereas only 1 patient (3%) had a 10-mm shortening of the nonoperated leg. In 27 of 33 patients (82%; P < .001), the anatomic femoral axes of the operated leg were found to be more than 2° of valgus compared with the nonoperated leg. The tibial anatomic axes changed into a less pronounced varus angulation (P = .02). The femoral-tibial anatomic axes were not significantly different when comparing the 2 legs. We did not find any statistical difference in growth arrest comparing patients treated surgically at the ages of 13 to 14 years to patients younger than 13 years. Tegner and KOOS scores were significantly lower among girls compared with boys. Side-to-side KT-1000 arthrometer difference improved from 5.2 mm

  13. The Risk of Transphyseal Drilling in Skeletally Immature Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faunø, Peter; Rømer, Lone; Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in skeletally immature patients can result in growth plate injury, which can cause growth disturbances. Purpose: To evaluate radiological tibial and femoral length and axis growth disturbances as well as clinical outcomes in skeletally immature ACLR patients treated with a transphyseal drilling technique. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 39 pediatric patients with ACL injury and open physes at time of surgery, as diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were treated using transphyseal ACLR using hamstring graft. Mean patient age was 11.7 years (range, 9.0-14.0 years). Patients were evaluated with full extremity radiographs measuring leg length discrepancy and malalignment, as well as clinical evaluation with KT-1000 arthrometer measurements and Tegner activity scale and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) outcomes after follow-up of 68 months (range, 29-148 months). Results: Of the 39 initial patients, 33 were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. We found a mean femoral length shortening of 3.5 mm (P = .01) on the operated leg. Eight patients (24%) had a more than 10-mm shortening of the operated leg, whereas only 1 patient (3%) had a 10-mm shortening of the nonoperated leg. In 27 of 33 patients (82%; P < .001), the anatomic femoral axes of the operated leg were found to be more than 2° of valgus compared with the nonoperated leg. The tibial anatomic axes changed into a less pronounced varus angulation (P = .02). The femoral-tibial anatomic axes were not significantly different when comparing the 2 legs. We did not find any statistical difference in growth arrest comparing patients treated surgically at the ages of 13 to 14 years to patients younger than 13 years. Tegner and KOOS scores were significantly lower among girls compared with boys. Side-to-side KT-1000 arthrometer difference improved from 5.2 mm

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  16. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport.

  17. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport. PMID:25148470

  18. Symptomatic Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Causing Dysphagia: Case Report, Imaging, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kwang; Tharin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are found in 20-30% of elderly patients. Rarely, severe osteophytes can cause dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. Here, we illustrate a case of severe dysphagia caused by a large post-traumatic osteophyte with oropharyngeal swallow study showing a significant mass effect on the pharynx and resolution following osteophytectomy. We also review the literature regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophytes.  PMID:27004150

  19. Temporary bridging external fixation in distal tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Lavini, F; Dall'Oca, C; Mezzari, S; Maluta, T; Luminari, E; Perusi, F; Vecchini, E; Magnan, B

    2014-12-01

    Fractures that involve the distal area of the tibia are associated with a high percentage of complications. Soft tissue oedema, swelling, blisters, skin abrasions and open wounds could compromise the outcome of these lesions. The waiting time before surgery with ORIF is mostly due to soft tissue conditions. Early application of a simple joint-spanning external fixator would achieve the initial goal of stability and the respect of soft tissue, thereby decreasing the time necessary for definitive treatment. A total of 40 consecutive patients (22 male and 18 female) with a mean age of 52 years (range 17-82 years) with distal tibial fracture treated between January 2010 and January 2013 were evaluated. Early temporary external fixation was the first treatment step. Twenty patients had pilon fractures, characterised by the intra-articular involvement of the distal tibia with metaphyseal extension, and 20 patients had malleolar fracture-dislocation. Patients were divided into two groups, A and B. Group A comprised 10 patients with ankle fracture-dislocation and bone fragmentation, who were treated with a temporary bridging external fixation that was maintained after ORIF to exploit ligamentotaxis during the first phases of bone healing. In Group B (30 patients), the external fixation was removed after ORIF. The results of the study are in line with the recent literature: temporary external fixation in high-energy trauma and fracture-dislocation of the ankle enables soft tissue to be restored, which facilitates postoperative assessment of bone fragments by CT scan. The complication rate in this study was 5% in patients with malleolar fractures and 20% in patients with pilon fractures. The maintenance of temporary external fixation after ORIF synthesis during the entire first stage of bone healing seems to be a good method of treatment that has a low rate of soft tissue complications.

  20. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, R. D.; Malinzak, R. A.; Reyes, E. M.; Cook, P. L.; Farley, K. A.; Ritter, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Initial stability of tibial trays is crucial for long-term success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in both primary and revision settings. Rotating platform (RP) designs reduce torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface. We asked if this reduced torque transfer in RP designs resulted in subsequently reduced micromotion at the cemented fixation interface between the prosthesis component and the adjacent bone. Methods Composite tibias were implanted with fixed and RP primary and revision tibial trays and biomechanically tested under up to 2.5 kN of axial compression and 10° of external femoral component rotation. Relative micromotion between the implanted tibial tray and the neighbouring bone was quantified using high-precision digital image correlation techniques. Results Rotational malalignment between femoral and tibial components generated 40% less overall tibial tray micromotion in RP designs than in standard fixed bearing tibial trays. RP trays reduced micromotion by up to 172 µm in axial compression and 84 µm in rotational malalignment models. Conclusions Reduced torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface in RP tibial trays reduces relative component micromotion and may aid long-term stability in cases of revision TKA or poor bone quality. Cite this article: Mr S. R. Small. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:122–129. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000481. PMID:27095658

  1. The effect of tibial torsion on the dynamic function of the soleus during gait.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael; Lakin, Gaio

    2003-04-01

    An induced acceleration analysis (IAA) model was used to investigate the effect of tibial torsion on the ability of the soleus to support and propel the body during gait. The IAA approach is well suited for this study because it allows soleus action to be quantified in the presence of varying amounts of tibial torsion, while other factors such as body configuration and muscle activation are held constant. The results of the analysis showed that excess tibial torsion shifts the induced knee joint accelerations toward flexion, valgus and external rotation, and diminishes body center-of-mass support and propulsion. This analysis supports the concept that bony mal-alignment can lead to 'lever arm dysfunction'. The objective data correlate with previous clinical observations related to valgus stress, crouch and the role of the soleus in level walking. The IAA model provides a tool for examining various aspects of abnormal gait independently and quantitatively.

  2. Is There A Difference in Bone Ingrowth in Modular Versus Monoblock Porous Tantalum Tibial Trays?

    PubMed Central

    Hanzlik, Josa A.; Day, Judd S.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary total knee designs incorporating highly porous metallic surfaces have demonstrated promising clinical outcomes. However, stiffness differences between modular and monoblock porous tantalum tibial trays may affect bone ingrowth. This study investigated effect of implant design, spatial location and clinical factors on bone ingrowth in retrieved porous tantalum tibial trays. Three modular and twenty-one monoblock tibial trays were evaluated for bone ingrowth. Nonparametric statistical tests were used to investigate differences in bone ingrowth measurements by implant design, spatial location on the tray, substrate depth and clinical factors. Modular trays (5.3±3.2%) exhibited higher bone ingrowth than monoblock trays (1.6±1.9%, p=0.032). Bone ingrowth in both designs was highest in the initial 500 μm from the surface. Implantation time was positively correlated with bone ingrowth for monoblock trays. PMID:25743106

  3. A qualitative study of recovery from type III-B and III-C tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Shauver, Melissa S; Aravind, Maya S; Chung, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction after type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use of adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes.

  4. All-poly tibial component better than metal-backed: a randomized RSA study.

    PubMed

    Norgren, B; Dalén, T; Nilsson, K G

    2004-06-01

    The quality of the fixation of the tibial component in 21 patients (23 knees) undergoing a cemented total-knee arthroplasty of the Profix design was investigated using radiostereometric analysis during 24 months. The patients were randomized to either an all-polyethylene (AP) or a metal-backed (MB) tibial component. The articulating geometry and the stem design of the implants were identical, as were the operative technique and the postoperative regimen. The results showed no negative consequences as regards fixation using AP tibial components. In all aspects, the AP components displayed magnitudes of migration on par with, or sometimes even lower than their MB counterparts. Five of 11 MB components displayed continuous migration between 1 and 2 years, compared to none of the AP implants, a finding known to be of positive prognostic significance when predicting future aseptic loosening. PMID:15194094

  5. Total knee arthroplasty using cementless keels and cemented tibial trays: 10-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kolisek, Frank R.; Mont, Michael A.; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Jessup, Nenette M.; Siddiqui, Junaed A.; Monesmith, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The problem of early mechanical stability of cemented and cementless keels of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of a cohort of 51 TKAs using a cemented platform with cementless keel fixation. At a mean follow-up of 10.4 years (range, 7 to 14 years), the mean Knee Society Score (KSS) was 93 points (range, 59 to 100 points), and the mean functional score was 73 points (range, 0 to 100 points). Only one patient demonstrated progressive tibial radiolucencies at 13.1 years follow-up, which resolved with a revision with an exchange of components. The results of this study suggest that a proximally cemented tibial tray with a press-fit keel TKA provides excellent mean 10-year outcomes. PMID:18185931

  6. Oxidation and other property changes of retrieved sequentially annealed UHMWPE acetabular and tibial bearings.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Steven D; Currier, Barbara H; Van Citters, Douglas W; Levine, Rayna A; Collier, John P

    2015-04-01

    This investigation analyzed retrieved sequentially crosslinked and annealed (SXL) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings to determine whether the material is chemically stable in vivo. A series of retrieved tibial and acetabular components were analyzed for changes in ketone oxidation, crosslink density, and free radical concentration. Oxidation was observed to increase with in vivo duration, and the rate of oxidation in tibial inserts was significantly greater than in acetabular liners. SXL acetabular bearings oxidized at a rate comparable to gamma-sterilized liners, while SXL tibial inserts oxidized at a significantly faster rate than their gamma-sterilized counterparts. A significant decrease in crosslink density with increased mean ketone oxidation index was observed, suggesting that in vivo oxidation may be causing material degradation. Furthermore, a subsurface whitened damage region was also found in a subset of the bearings, indicating the possibility of a clinically relevant decrease in mechanical properties of these components.

  7. Chronic shin splints. Classification and management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Detmer, D E

    1986-01-01

    A clinical classification and treatment programme has been developed for chronic medial tibial stress syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome has been reported to be either tibial stress fracture or microfracture, tibial periostitis, or distal deep posterior chronic compartment syndrome. Three chronic types exist and may coexist: Type I (tibial microfracture, bone stress reaction or cortical fracture); type II (periostalgia from chronic avulsion of the periosteum at the periosteal-fascial junction); and type III (chronic compartment syndrome syndrome). Type I disease is treated nonoperatively. Operations for resistant types II and III medial tibial stress syndrome were performed in 41 patients. Bilaterality was common (type II, 50% type III, 88%). Seven had coexistent type II/III; one had type I/II. Preoperative symptoms averaged 24 months in type II, 6 months in type III, and 33 months in types II/III. Mean age was 22 years (15 to 51). Resting compartment pressures were normal in type II (mean 12 mm Hg) and elevated in type III and type II/III (mean 23 mm Hg). Type II and type II/III patients received fasciotomy plus periosteal cauterisation. Type III patients had fasciotomy only. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis using local anaesthesia. Follow up was complete and averaged 6 months (2 to 14 months). Improved performance was as follows: type II, 93%, type III, 100%; type II/III, 86%. Complete cures were as follows: type II, 78%; type III, 75%; and type II/III, 57%. This experience suggests that with precise diagnosis and treatment involving minimal risk and cost the athlete has a reasonable chance of return to full activity.

  8. Mechanical Failure of Revision Knee Prosthesis at both Femoral and Tibial Modular Metaphyseal Stem Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Woodgate, Ian G; Rooney, John; Mulford, Johnathan S; Gillies, R Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is a report of a mechanical failure of an S-ROM revision total knee prosthesis. The prosthesis was used as a revision implant following deep peri-prosthetic infection in a morbidly obese male. The prosthesis failed on both the femoral and tibial sides at the modular metaphyseal stem junctions and required a further revision using the same type of implant after infection was excluded. Case Presentation: A 57 year old male had previously undergone a left total knee arthroplasty in 1999 for osteoarthritis. He acquired a late deep peri-prosthetic infection with a multi-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The organism was sensitive to vancomycin and rifampicin. A two stage revision was undertaken after clinical signs of infection had resolved and blood parameters had normalized. Intra-operative gram stain was negative for micro-organisms and frozen section of deep tissue was less than five polymorphs per high power field. A cemented S-ROM prosthesis was implanted using a coronal tibial osteotomy and a lateral release for exposure. After three years of the second stage of revision, the patient again presented to the orthopaedic department after reportedly falling on a wet floor six weeks ago. Conclusion: Radiographically, there was a broken tibial wire, osteolysis and pedestal formation around both the femoral and distal tibial stem extensions. The prosthesis was bent at the proximal tibial sleeve and stem junction. The prosthesis was considered loose with mechanical failure. At implant removal, it was noted that the femoral and tibial components at the modular metaphyseal sleeve-stem junction were fractured. Surgeons should be cautious in the use of these implants in morbidly obese patients where the stresses generated maybe above the yield stress of the material and the frictional forces that may overcome the modular taper junction’s locking mechanism.

  9. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial alignment technique in total knee arthroplasty: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huan Bei; Ying, Xiao Zhou; Chen, Guang Jun; Yang, Xia Qing; Lin, Duo Duo; Li, Zhi Jie; Liu, Hai Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether the use of an extramedullary or intramedullary tibial cutting guide leads to superior mechanical leg axis and implant positioning. A meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials including 350 knees was performed. For the mechanical axis, frontal tibial component angle and tibial slope, there were no significant differences in the mean values or the number of outliers (±3°) between the extramedullary and intramedullary groups. A reduced tourniquet time was associated with the intramedullary guide. No significant difference in the complication rate was noted between the two groups. Neither extramedullary nor intramedullary tibial alignment was more accurate in facilitating the tibial cut. Use of an intramedullary guide results in a shorter tourniquet time and exhibits a similar complication rate as the extramedullary guide. PMID:26598086

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2010-09-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation.

  12. Defining the Collateral Flow of Posterior Tibial Artery and Dorsalis Pedis Artery in Ischemic Foot Disease: Is It a Preventing Factor for Ischemia?

    PubMed Central

    Tutar, Onur; Yildirim, Duzgun; Samanci, Cesur; Rafiee, Babak; Inan, Kaan; Dikici, Suleyman; Ustabasioglu, Fethi Emre; Kuyumcu, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    atherosclerotic disease of anterior tibial artery, PTA-based biphasic or triphasic retrograde collateral flow prevents ischemia, whereas monophasic support or no retrograde flow remains incapable. PMID:27127574

  13. Tibial artery false aneurysm: uncommon result of blunt injury occurring during athletics.

    PubMed

    Skudder, P A; Gelfand, M L; Blumenberg, R M; Fulco, J

    1999-11-01

    Two young men presented with symptoms following lower extremity injuries sustained in the normal course of participation in sports. One played baseball while the other competed in Tae Kwon Do. One case presented with digital ischemia, the other developed a pulsating hematoma. Each came to angiography, and each proved to have a false aneurysm of a tibial artery. The tibial artery was ligated in each case, without further complications. The patient with digital ischemia was thought to have sustained microemboli, and also underwent lumbar sympathectomy.

  14. Rehabilitation of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity following Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, G; Ozer, H; Tunay, V B

    2004-03-01

    A sixteen-year-old boy suffered from sharp pain in the knee during a jump while playing basketball. He had a positive history of Osgood Schlatter disease. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated an avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity Type III according to the classification of Watson-Jones. Rehabilitation after avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity is an important consideration for this relatively uncommon adolescent injury. In such avulsion fractures, landing on the ground with the knee fully extended after a jump is the most likely cause. This case report reviews the rehabilitation program, and selected functional outcome measures after rehabilitation are reported. The patient returned to sporting activity after 12 months.

  15. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it...

  16. Tantalum trabecular metal implants in anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion: 2-year prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    King, V; Swart, A; Winder, M J

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cervical decompression for two or more cervical spondylotic levels can be performed using either multiple anterior cervical discectomies and fusion or anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF). A variety of options for ACCF implants exist but to our knowledge, there is no clinical data for the use of tantalum trabecular metal implants (TTMI) for ACCF. A retrospective review was performed of prospectively collected data for ten patients undergoing ACCF with TTMI between 2011 and 2012. Radiological outcome was assessed by measuring the change in cervical (C) lordosis (fusion Cobb and C2-C7 Cobb), graft subsidence (anterior/posterior, determined by the subsidence of anterior/posterior body height of fused segments; cranial/caudal, determined by the cranial/caudal plate-to-disc distances) and rate of fusion using lateral cervical X-rays of patients at 0, 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) assessed clinical outcome pre-operatively and at 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively. Cervical lordosis (Cobb angle of fused segment) was 5.2° (± 4.2°) at 0months and 6.0° (± 5.7°) at 24months post-operatively. Graft subsidence was observed to occur at 6months post-operatively and continued throughout follow-up. Anterior, posterior and caudal subsidence occurred more in the first 12months post-operatively than in the following 12months (p<0.05). Average pre-operative NDI was 45%. Average NDIs were 18%, 13% and 10% at 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively, respectively. ACCF patients treated with TTMI demonstrated stable cervical lordosis over 2years of follow-up and 100% fusion rates after 2years. Measures of subsidence appeared to decrease with time. Patients experienced improved clinical outcomes over the 2-year period. PMID:27515543

  17. Spontaneous resolution of double anterior chamber with perforation of Descemet's membrane in deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Arvind

    2012-05-01

    Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using Dr. Anwar's big bubble technique was performed for a patient with granular dystrophy. Intraoperatively, a perforation of the Descemet's membrane (DM) was noted inferonasally. Though the surgery was completed, the donor graft appeared to have an intact endothelium, which was inadvertently left behind by the surgeon. Intraoperatively, there was a perforation of inferonasal DM and surgery was completed by inadvertently placing a donor with an intact endothelium. Postoperatively the patient presented with a complete DM detachment and a resultant double anterior chamber (DAC). In spite of two attempts at an air tamponade on the first and fifth post operative days, the DAC still persisted. Surprisingly, during the 6(th) week follow up visit, there was a complete resolution of the DAC as well as total recovery of vision. This interesting case clearly exemplifies that, in spite of failed attempts at air tamponade, a DM detachment and a DAC due to DM perforation following a DALK procedure can resolve spontaneously with good visual outcome.

  18. Effects of primary selective laser trabeculoplasty on anterior segment parameters

    PubMed Central

    Guven Yilmaz, Suzan; Palamar, Melis; Yusifov, Emil; Ates, Halil; Egrilmez, Sait; Yagci, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on the main numerical parameters of anterior segment with Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug camera in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Pentacam measurements of 45 eyes of 25 (15 females and 10 males) patients (12 with OHT, 13 with POAG) before and after SLT were obtained. Measurements were taken before and 1 and 3mo after SLT. Pentacam parameters were compared between OHT and POAG patients, and age groups (60y and older, and younger than 60y). RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 57.8±13.9 (range 20-77y). Twelve patients (48%) were younger than 60y, while 13 patients (52%) were 60y and older. Measurements of pre-SLT and post-SLT 1mo were significantly different for the parameters of central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber volume (ACV) (P<0.05). These parameters returned back to pre-SLT values at post-SLT 3mo. Decrease of ACV at post-SLT 1mo was significantly higher in younger than 60y group than 60y and older group. There was no statistically significant difference in Pentacam parameters between OHT and POAG patients at pre- and post-treatment measurements (P>0.05). CONCLUSION SLT leads to significant increase in CCT and decrease in ACV at the 1st month of the procedure. Effects of SLT on these anterior segment parameters, especially for CCT that interferes IOP measurement, should be considered to ensure accurate clinical interpretation. PMID:26558208

  19. Success of High Tibial Osteotomy in the United States Military

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Brian R.; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D.; Laughlin, Matthew D.; Burks, Robert; Pallis, Mark P.; Tokish, John M.; Belmont, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Historically, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been performed to treat isolated medial gonarthrosis with varus deformity. Purpose: To evaluate the occupational outcomes of HTO in a high-demand military cohort. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of active duty service members undergoing HTO for coronal plane malalignment and/or intra-articular pathology was performed using the Military Health System between 2003 and 2011. Demographic parameters and surgical variables, including rates of perioperative complications, secondary surgery, activity limitations, and medical discharge, were extracted from electronic medical records. For the current study, cumulative failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty or postoperative medical discharge for persistent knee dysfunction. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify statistical associations with cumulative failure after HTO. Results: A total of 181 service members (202 HTOs) were identified at an average follow-up of 47.5 months (range, 24-96 months). Mean age was 35.7 years (range, 19-55 years), and the majority were men (93%) and of enlisted rank (78%). All index procedures utilized a valgus-producing, opening wedge technique. Concomitant or staged procedures were performed in 87 patients (48%), including 40 ligamentous, 48 meniscal, and 48 chondral procedures. Complications occurred in 19.3% of knees (n = 39), with unplanned reoperation in 26 knees (12.8%). Fifty-three patients (40.7%) had minor activity limitations during military duty postoperatively. Eleven knees (5.4%) underwent conversion to total knee arthroplasty. The cumulative failure rate was 28.2% (n = 51) at 2- to 8-year follow-up. Patient age younger than 30 years at the time of surgery was associated with an independently higher risk of failure, whereas sex, concomitant/staged procedures, and perioperative complications were not significantly associated with

  20. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  1. Organic Mood Disorder Following Left Anterior Temporal Lobectomy with Amygdalohippocampectomy.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Nishanth J; Kalayil, Rajeesh V; Tharayil, Harish M; Rappai, Mary P

    2015-01-01

    One third of patients with antiepileptic-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) will have to undergo surgery for a better seizure control. Anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) is done for mesial temporal sclerosis that is the most common histopathological lesion associated with TLE. Psychiatric manifestations following ATL are not uncommon with depressive symptoms more common with left ATL and manic symptoms following right ATL. Mr. A is a 42-year-old left cerebral dominant (Confirmed by WADA test) male with no past history of psychiatric illness who had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy. He started having manic episodes post operatively which subsided with antipsychotics. He had multiple such episodes over the next 13 years with minimal inter episodic symptoms. This is a rare instance of manic symptoms following left-sided ATL that emphasizes the need for better understanding of the cerebral laterality of affective symptoms. PMID:26702178

  2. TIBIAL PLATEAU PROXIMAL AND DISTAL BONE BEHAVE SIMILARLY: BOTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FEATURES OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a growing imperative to understand how changes in peri-articular bone relate to pathological progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Peri-articular bone density can be measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) is associated with MRI and...

  3. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  4. Thiram-Induced Changes in the Expression of Genes Relating to Vascularization and Tibial Dyschondroplasia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), a major metabolic cartilage disease in poultry, is characterized by the distension of proximal growth plates of tibia which fail to form bone, lack blood vessels, and contain nonviable cells. Thiram, a carbamate pesticide, when fed to young broiler chicks induces TD wi...

  5. Cost implications of the physiotherapy management of complex tibial fractures treated with circular frames.

    PubMed

    Barron, E; Rambani, R; Bailey, H; Sharma, H K

    2013-11-01

    Seventy-three consecutive patients with complex tibial fractures treated with an Ilizarov frame or Taylor Spatial Frame received physiotherapy between April 2008 and April 2010. Data were collected prospectively, and physiotherapy input was recorded (in minutes) for the patients identified. This included treatment received as an inpatient as well as an outpatient. The data were categorized for proximal, middle and distal third tibial fractures for analysis. The average cost of physiotherapy for an inpatient with an Ilizarov frame is £121.82 per case, whereas that for an outpatient receiving treatment for trauma was calculated as £404.60. The combined average cost of physiotherapy to support treatment of a complex tibial fracture with a fine wire fixator is £546.27. Treatment involving circular frames is complex and expensive, and the high physiotherapy cost is not reflected in Healthcare Resource Group codes. This cost calculation will help service units, and NHS Trusts develop realistic costing plans to support treatment. Cost implications of the physiotherapy management of complex tibial fractures using the Ilizarov technique. PMID:23943063

  6. Compression of the Popliteal Artery after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Tibial Inlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung Suk; Kim, Do Hun; Park, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Popliteal artery compression rarely occurs after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique that allows for direct visualization of the surgical field. However, we experienced a popliteal artery compression after PCL reconstruction performed using the technique, which eventually required re-operation. Here, we report this rare case and discuss reasons of popliteal artery compression. PMID:26673356

  7. Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of the Tibial Plateau Through the Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Goulet, James A

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are challenging injuries to treat. The lateral tibial plateau is fractured more commonly than the medial plateau and the workhorse approach for these fractures is the anterolateral approach. This approach allows visualization of the lateral joint, metaphysis, and can be extensile if there is shaft extension. We present our technique for performing the anterolateral approach while treating a Schatzker III tibial plateau fracture. Special attention is given to performing a submeniscal arthrotomy to view the joint surface and judge the reduction. A femoral distractor is placed to assist with elevation the joint surface and visualization of the lateral plateau. A cortical window is created using a triple reamer from the sliding hip screw set. The reduction is performed and supported with cancellous bone chips. Finally, a lateral locking plate with rafting screws is placed. Knowledge of this approach and the strategies needed to address lateral and some bicondlar tibial plateau fractures are crucial to good patient outcomes. PMID:27441932

  8. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for treatment of overactive bladder and urinary retention in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Zinkgraf, Kristine; Quinn, Annette O'Leary; Ketterhagen, Debra; Kreuziger, Betty; Stevenson, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a treatment option for patients who present with urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, or urinary retention. When behavior modification and/or pharmacotherapy did not adequately relieve symptoms, this treatment was found to decrease incidence of overactive bladder or retention symptoms in the authors' patient population.

  9. Combined Total Ankle Arthroplasty With Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer for End-Stage Cavovarus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, John M; Bowlby, Melinda A; Christensen, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon transfer has been described to reduce and balance the cavovarus deformity in those patients who receive a total ankle replacement for end-stage arthritis. In this article, we discuss the indications and provide a detailed description of the technique for this powerful procedure. Case examples that demonstrate the utility of the procedure are provided. PMID:27095088

  10. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon Transfer and Modified Kidner Technique in Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maskill, James T; Pomeroy, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    The modified Kidner procedure and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer are common procedures used today when addressing posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. These techniques are often used in conjunction with a combination of osteotomies to correct flatfoot deformity, and have been proved to be reliable and predictable. PMID:26590720

  11. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ of Stenopelmatus (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Stenopelmatidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Stenopelmatidae (or "Jerusalem crickets") belong to the atympanate Ensifera, lacking hearing organs in the foreleg tibiae. Their phylogenetic position is controversial, either as a taxon in Tettigonioidea or within the clade of Gryllacridoidea. Similarly, the origin of tibial auditory systems in Ensifera is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the neuronal structures of the proximal tibiae of Stenopelmatus spec. with the hypothesis that internal sensory structures are similar to those in tympanate Ensifera. In Stenopelmatus the complex tibial organ consists of three neuronal parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and a third part with linearly arranged neurons. This tripartite organization is also found in tympanate Ensifera, verifying our hypothesis. The third part of the sense organ found in Stenopelmatus can be regarded by the criterion of position as homologous to auditory receptors of hearing Tettigonioidea. This crista acustica homolog is found serially in all thoracic leg pairs and contains 20 +/- 2 chordotonal neurons in the foreleg. The tibial organ was shown to be responsive to vibration, with a broad threshold of about 0.06 ms(-2) in a frequency range from 100-600 Hz. The central projection of tibial sensory neurons terminates into two equally sized lobes in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center. The data are discussed comparatively to those of other Ensifera and mapped phylogenetically onto recently proposed phylogenies for Ensifera. The crista acustica homolog could represent a neuronal rudiment of a secondarily reduced ear, but neuronal features are also consistent with an evolutionary preadaptation.

  12. Hexapod external fixator closed distraction in the management of stiff hypertrophic tibial nonunions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N; Marais, L C; Aldous, C

    2015-10-01

    Tibial nonunion represents a spectrum of conditions which are challenging to treat, and optimal management remains unclear despite its high rate of incidence. We present 44 consecutive patients with 46 stiff tibial nonunions, treated with hexapod external fixators and distraction to achieve union and gradual deformity correction. There were 31 men and 13 women with a mean age of 35 years (18 to 68) and a mean follow-up of 12 months (6 to 40). No tibial osteotomies or bone graft procedures were performed. Bony union was achieved after the initial surgery in 41 (89.1%) tibias. Four persistent nonunions united after repeat treatment with closed hexapod distraction, resulting in bony union in 45 (97.8%) patients. The mean time to union was 23 weeks (11 to 49). Leg-length was restored to within 1 cm of the contralateral side in all tibias. Mechanical alignment was restored to within 5° of normal in 42 (91.3%) tibias. Closed distraction of stiff tibial nonunions can predictably lead to union without further surgery or bone graft. In addition to generating the required distraction to achieve union, hexapod circular external fixators can accurately correct concurrent deformities and limb-length discrepancies. PMID:26430019

  13. Matched-pair analysis of all-polyethylene versus metal-backed tibial components.

    PubMed

    Udomkiat, P; Dorr, L D; Long, W

    2001-09-01

    Forty-eight matched pairs of osteoarthritic knees from patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with a round-on-round, Apollo Knee System were studied to evaluate the outcome between all-polyethylene and metal-backed tibial components. Patients were matched for patient factors, preoperative deformities, cruciate salvage or sacrifice, and surgical technique. At the last follow-up (average, 38.4 months), there was no statistically significant difference in terms of knee scores, patient self-assessment, and radiographic outcomes. No component required revision, and no revisions were pending. Maintenance of these results over time would project into better long-term success for all-polyethylene tibial components because of the amount of wear and osteolysis with current modular metal-backed tibial components. We advocate the use of a more cost-effective all-polyethylene tibial component in elderly patients (>70 years old) who are not likely to need the versatility of exchange of a modular polyethylene insert because of wear. PMID:11547366

  14. Total Knee Arthroplasty Following High Tibial Osteotomy – a Radiological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    ORBAN, Horia; MARES, Emil; DRAGUSANU, Mihaela; STAN, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a closed wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). A total of 16 TKAs were performed in 16 pacients who had previously undergone a closed wedge (HTO) as a treatement for knee osteoarthritis. The radiographic results were evaluated with respect to the femurotibial angle (FTA), joint line height (JLH), tibial bone resection and Insall-Salvati ratio. The FTA improved in average, from 6.5 degree of varus preoperatively at 5.7 degree of valgus postoperatively. The JLH averaged 14.34 mm preop and 13.81 mm at the last follow-up. The amount of tibial bone resection averaged 5.98 mm, face to 7.5 mm for knees without HTO. The Insall-Salvati ratio was 1.127 preop and 1.172 postop. A meticulous surgical technique may lead to satisfactory results in TKA after HTO, considering the correction of the deformity, the re-estabilish of JLH and the amount of the tibial bone resection. PMID:21977186

  15. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaña Neto, Frederico Carlos; de Paula Canal, Marina; Alves, Bernardo Aurélio Fonseca; Ferreira, Pablício Martins; Ayres, Jefferson Castro; Alves, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo–Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. Methods This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive); presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) index; mortality rate; and infection rate. Results 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%). Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75%) and IIIB (25%) predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. Conclusion The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions. PMID:27069881

  16. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  17. Combined Total Ankle Arthroplasty With Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer for End-Stage Cavovarus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, John M; Bowlby, Melinda A; Christensen, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon transfer has been described to reduce and balance the cavovarus deformity in those patients who receive a total ankle replacement for end-stage arthritis. In this article, we discuss the indications and provide a detailed description of the technique for this powerful procedure. Case examples that demonstrate the utility of the procedure are provided.

  18. Posterior tibial tendon entrapment within an intact ankle mortise: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Allison M; Bowlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The present case report demonstrates a rare finding associated with irreducible ankle fracture dislocations. To our knowledge, posterior tibial tendon entrapment with an intact ankle mortise has not yet been documented in published studies. In the case of our patient, a high-energy, 12-ft fall resulted in a comminuted intra-articular fracture of the medial malleolus, confirmed by the initial radiographs. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed the Achilles tendon to be ruptured and the posterior tibial tendon to be both displaced and entrapped between the medial malleolar fracture fragments, preventing initial closed reduction. At operative repair for the ruptured Achilles tendon and the medial malleolus fracture, the posterior tibial tendon was removed from the fracture site and was found to be intact with no evidence of laceration or rupture. The tendon was returned back to its anatomic position, and the tendon sheath was reapproximated. Although uncommon, it is important that entrapment of the posterior tibial tendon be considered in cases of irreducible ankle fracture. This injury type can be addressed during open reduction internal fixation to achieve reduction. PMID:25441277

  19. Neuroanatomy of the complex tibial organ in the splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris Irish 1986 (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Schizodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2010-11-15

    The subgenual chordotonal organ complex in insects is modified in ensiferan taxa like Gryllidae and Tettigoniidae into hearing organs with specific sets of auditory receptors. Here, this sensory organ complex is documented in the nonhearing splay-footed cricket Comicus calcaris. The tibial chordotonal organ consists of three parts: the subgenual organ, the intermediate organ, and the crista acustica homolog. The latter is an array of linearly organized neurons homologous to auditory receptors in the tibial hearing organs of Tettigoniidae. The tibial organ is structurally similar in all three leg pairs, with similar neuron numbers in the fore- and midleg, but lower numbers in the hindleg. The foreleg crista acustica homolog consists of 34±4 neurons, the highest number in an atympanate Ensiferan. Additionally, an accessory chordotonal organ with 15±5 neurons innervated by nerve 5B1 is present in the foreleg. The central projection of the tibial organreveals ipsilateral sensory terminals in the primary sensory neuropil, the medial ventral association center with terminations close to the midline. As determined from extracellular recordings, the entire tibial organ is vibrosensitive. The organization of the tibial organ is compared to other ensiferan auditory and nonauditory tibial organs. Spatial orientation of neurons in the crista acustica homolog is not reminiscent of auditory structures, and the neuroanatomy is discussed with respect to stridulation behavior and the evolutionary origin of hearing in Ensifera.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-Duo; Guo, Wan-Shou; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) still exist. Previous finite element (FE) studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile-bearing UKA. PMID

  1. Fatigue load of current tibial intramedullary nail designs: a simulated study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark; Liu, Qi; Ellis, Thomas J

    2011-06-14

    Comminuted tibial shaft fractures are traditionally treated with statically locked intramedullary nailing and protected weight bearing until fracture callous is evident. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a simulation of immediate full weight bearing following intramedullary nailing of these fractures does not result in implant failure.A comminuted fracture model was created using 2 pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. Ten-millimeter-diameter tibial nails (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania; Styker, Mahwah, New Jersey; Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) were inserted within the PVC pipe and secured proximally and distally with 2 or 3 locking bolts. The constructs were cycled in axial compression for 500,000 cycles or until implant failure. The tests were conducted using a modified staircase method (200 N per step), and the fatigue strength was identified for each of the tibial nail designs. When 2 interlocking bolts were placed proximally and distally, the fatigue strength was between 900 and 1100 N for the Stryker nail, 1100 and 1300 N for the Zimmer nail, 1200 and 1400 N for the Synthes nail, and 1400 and 1600 N for the Smith & Nephew nail. Adding a third interlocking bolt proximally and distally to the Smith & Nephew nail increased the fatigue strength by 13% to between 1700 and 1900 N. In all cases, implant failures occurred through the proximal or distal interlocking bolts.Biomechanical tests suggest that current tibial nail designs may permit immediate full weight bearing of comminuted tibial shaft fractures with minimal risk of implant failure. This may facilitate mobilization in the early postoperative period, especially in the multiply injured patient.

  2. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area. PMID:27489768

  3. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  4. Anterior femoroacetabular impingement: an update.

    PubMed

    Lequesne, Michel; Bellaïche, Laurence

    2012-05-01

    Anterior femoroacetabular impingement can cause early hip osteoarthritis. The typical patient is an adult younger than 50 years of age, often with a history of sporting activities. The main symptom is intermittent pain triggered by static flexion (low seats) or dynamic flexion (during sporting or occupational activities that require repeated hip flexion). The characteristic physical finding is pain triggered by placing the hip in internal rotation and 70 to 110° of flexion. In additional to anteroposterior and false-profile radiographs, lateral Dunn or Ducroquet views should be obtained on both sides to visualize the anterior part of the head-neck junction. Instead of being concave, the head-neck junction is either flat or convex, causing a cam effect that damages the labrum and anterosuperior cartilage. Non-sphericity of the femoral head with an anterior ovoid bulge induces a similar cam effect. In pincer impingement, which is less common, over-coverage by the anterosuperior acetabular rim pinches the labrum between the rim and the femoral head-neck junction when the hip is flexed. Pincer impingement is related to acetabular retroversion or protrusion. Arthrography coupled with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging visualizes the morphological abnormalities (e.g., ovoid shape of the femoral head or retroversion of the acetabulum) and detects secondary lesions such as labral tears or separation or damage to the anterosuperior cartilage. Arthroscopy allows removal of the damaged labrum and correction of the morphological abnormalities via femoroplasty to restore the normal concave shape of the neck and/or acetabuloplasty to eliminate over-coverage. Short- or mid-term results are satisfactory in 75 to 80% of patients. However, the presence of degenerative lesions in about two-thirds of patients at the time of arthroplastic surgery limits the probability of achieving good long-term results. PMID:22281229

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy. PMID:20721326

  6. Associations of tibial lead levels with BsmI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor in former organolead manufacturing workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, B S; Stewart, W F; Kelsey, K T; Simon, D; Park, S; Links, J M; Todd, A C

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated associations of tibial lead levels with polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in 504 former organolead manufacturing workers with past exposure to lead. In this cross-sectional study, we measured tibial lead by (109)Cd K-shell X-ray fluorescence. Tibial lead was evaluated in subjects with different VDR genotypes defined using the BsmI restriction enzyme, adjusting for confounding variables. Study participants had a mean age +/- SD of 57.4 +/- 7.6 years. A total of 169 (33.5%) subjects were homozygous for the BsmI restriction site (designated bb), 251 (49.8%) were heterozygous (Bb), and 84 (16.7%) were homozygous for the absence of the restriction site (BB). Among all of the study subjects, tibial lead concentrations were low, with a mean +/- SD of 14.4 +/- 9.3 microg Pb/g bone mineral. There were only small differences in tibial lead concentrations by VDR genotype, with mean +/- SD tibial lead concentrations of 13.9 +/- 7.9, 14.3 +/- 9.5, and 15.5 +/- 11.1 in subjects with bb, Bb, and BB, respectively. In a multiple linear regression model of tibial lead concentrations, the VDR genotype modified the relation between age and tibial lead concentrations; subjects with the B allele had larger increases in tibial lead concentrations with increasing age (0.37, 0.48, and 0.67 microg/g per year of age in subjects with bb, Bb, and BB, respectively; the adjusted p-value for trend in slopes = 0.04). The VDR genotype also modified the relation between years since last exposure to lead and tibial lead concentrations. Subjects with bb evidenced an average decline in tibial lead concentrations of 0.10 microg/g per year since their last exposure to lead, whereas subjects with Bb and BB evidenced average increases of 0.03 and 0.11 microg/g per year, respectively (the adjusted p-value for trend in slopes = 0.01). Polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor modified the relations of age and years since the last exposure to lead with tibial lead concentrations

  7. Development and Validation of an Instrument to Predict Functional Recovery in Tibial Fracture Patients: The Somatic Pre-Occupation and Coping (SPOC) Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Jason W.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Mandel, Scott; Sanders, David; Schemitsch, Emil; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Wai, Eugene; Walter, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of patients’ beliefs in their likelihood of recovery from severe physical trauma. Methods We developed and validated an instrument designed to capture the impact of patients’ beliefs on functional recovery from injury; the Somatic Pre-occupation and Coping (SPOC) questionnaire. At 6-weeks post-surgical fixation, we administered the SPOC questionnaire to 359 consecutive patients with operatively managed tibial shaft fractures. We constructed multivariable regression models to explore the association between SPOC scores and functional outcome at 1-year, as measured by return to work and short form-36 (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Results In our adjusted multivariable regression models that included pre-injury SF-36 scores, SPOC scores at 6-weeks post-surgery accounted for 18% of the variation in SF-36 PCS scores and 18% of SF-36 MCS scores at 1-year. In both models, 6-week SPOC scores were a far more powerful predictor of functional recovery than age, gender, fracture type, smoking status, or the presence of multi-trauma. Our adjusted analysis found that for each 14 point increment in SPOC score at 6-weeks (14 chosen on the basis of half a standard deviation of the mean SPOC score) the odds of returning to work at 1-year decreased by 40% (odds ratio = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.50 to 0.73). Conclusion The SPOC questionnaire is a valid measurement of illness beliefs in tibial fracture patients and is highly predictive of their long-term functional recovery. Future research should explore if these results extend to other trauma populations and if modification of unhelpful illness beliefs is feasible and would result in improved functional outcomes. PMID:22011635

  8. Early urbanization and mobility at Tell Brak, NE Syria: the evidence from femoral and tibial external shaft shape.

    PubMed

    Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz

    2015-04-01

    Urbanization at Tell Brak began in the late 5th millennium BCE and the site reached its maximum size in the Late Chalcolithic (LC) 3, ca. 3900-3600 BCE. During that time, a large midden was formed at the edge of the early city, now known as Tell Majnuna. Rescue excavations at Tell Majnuna revealed several clusters of commingled human remains and a cemetery on the top. Several human skeletons dated to the LC 3 and Early Bronze Age (EBA) were found also at Tell Brak itself and it was possible to investigate differences in cross-sectional femoral and tibial shaft shapes between LC 3 and EBA to test the hypothesis that rapid and extensive urbanization in the LC 3 induced increase in mobility. External midshaft and subtrochanteric measurements of at least 152 femora and measurements of 55 tibiae at the nutrient foramen were taken to investigate the differences in the level of terrestrial mobility between four LC 3 and one EBA chronological subsets. Also the correlation was examined between shaft cross-sectional shapes and frequency of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in canines, as a proxy indicator of population stress. Due to post-mortem damage, sex assessment was based only on the size of measured bones. In spite of the limited quality of the gathered data, significant differences in femoral midshaft shape in males were observed between the LC 3 and EBA subsets and the average shape index scores appeared to be correlated with the LEH frequencies. No such result was obtained for females, suggesting that only males were more mobile in the LC 3 and their mobility level was associated with general population stress. In contrast, in females the average shape of subtrochanteric femoral cross-section was more variable between temporal subsets. The patterns of temporal differences in tibial cross-section at the nutrient foramen were not conclusive due to the small sample size. Obtained results suggest that males in the LC 3, the period of rapid urbanization, were more mobile

  9. Human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) restores cancellous bone to the immobilized, osteopenic proximal tibial metaphysis in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. F.; Jee, W. S. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Lin, B. Y.; Liang, X. G.; Li, M.; Yamamoto, N.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if human parathyroid hormone-(1-38) (PTH) can restore cancellous bone mass to the established osteopenic, immobilized proximal tibial metaphyses (PTM) of female rats. The right hindlimbs of six-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were immobilized by bandaging the right hindlimbs to the abdomen. After 30 days of right hindlimb immobilization (RHLI), the rats were subcutaneously injected with 200 microgram hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 (short-term) or 75 (longer-term) days. Static bone histomorphometry was performed on the primary spongiosa, while both static and dynamic histomorphometry were performed on the secondary spongiosa of the right PTM. Immobilization for 30 days without treatment decreased trabecular bone area, number and thickness in both primary and secondary spongiosa, and induced an increase in eroded perimeter and a decrease in tissue referent-bone formation rate (BFR/TV) in the secondary spongios. These changes reached a new steady state thereafter. Treatment with 200 microgram hPTH(1-38)/kg/day for 15 days, beginning at 30 days post immobilization (IM), significantly increased trabecular bone area, thickness and number in both primary and secondary spongiosa despite continuous IM when compared to the age-related and IM controls. The short-term (15 days) PTH treatment significantly increased labeling perimeter, mineral apposition rate and BFR/TV in the secondary spongiosa and stimulated longitudinal bone growth as compared to the age-related and IM controls. PTH treatment for longer-term (75 days) further increased trabecular bone area, thickness and number as compared to aging and IM controls and short-term (15 days) PTH treated groups. The bone formation indices in the secondary spongiosa of these longer-term treated rats were lower than that of short-term (15 days) PTH treated group, but they were still higher than those of IM and age-related controls. Our findings indicate that PTH treatment stimulates

  10. Early urbanization and mobility at Tell Brak, NE Syria: the evidence from femoral and tibial external shaft shape.

    PubMed

    Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz

    2015-04-01

    Urbanization at Tell Brak began in the late 5th millennium BCE and the site reached its maximum size in the Late Chalcolithic (LC) 3, ca. 3900-3600 BCE. During that time, a large midden was formed at the edge of the early city, now known as Tell Majnuna. Rescue excavations at Tell Majnuna revealed several clusters of commingled human remains and a cemetery on the top. Several human skeletons dated to the LC 3 and Early Bronze Age (EBA) were found also at Tell Brak itself and it was possible to investigate differences in cross-sectional femoral and tibial shaft shapes between LC 3 and EBA to test the hypothesis that rapid and extensive urbanization in the LC 3 induced increase in mobility. External midshaft and subtrochanteric measurements of at least 152 femora and measurements of 55 tibiae at the nutrient foramen were taken to investigate the differences in the level of terrestrial mobility between four LC 3 and one EBA chronological subsets. Also the correlation was examined between shaft cross-sectional shapes and frequency of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in canines, as a proxy indicator of population stress. Due to post-mortem damage, sex assessment was based only on the size of measured bones. In spite of the limited quality of the gathered data, significant differences in femoral midshaft shape in males were observed between the LC 3 and EBA subsets and the average shape index scores appeared to be correlated with the LEH frequencies. No such result was obtained for females, suggesting that only males were more mobile in the LC 3 and their mobility level was associated with general population stress. In contrast, in females the average shape of subtrochanteric femoral cross-section was more variable between temporal subsets. The patterns of temporal differences in tibial cross-section at the nutrient foramen were not conclusive due to the small sample size. Obtained results suggest that males in the LC 3, the period of rapid urbanization, were more mobile

  11. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  12. Risk factors associated with infection in tibial open fractures.

    PubMed

    Almeida Matos, Marcos; Castro-Filho, Romulo Neves; Pinto da Silva, Bruno Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El objetivo del tratamiento de las fracturas abiertas es prevenir las infecciones, estabilizar el hueso e restaurar la función. En relación a los objetivos mencionados, la prevención de infecciones tiene mayor destaque y es el punto mas importante a ser alcanzado. Objetivo: El objetivo de este trabajo es identificar los factores de riesgo asociados con la infección en un grupo de pacientes con fracturas abierta de la tibia. Paciente y métodos. Fue realizado un análisis retrospectivo con pacientes que tuvieron fractura abierta tibial que estaban en tratamiento en el Hospital Roberto Santos-Geral-HGRS, Salvador, Bahía, Brasil, de marzo a octubre de 2009. Fueron excluidos de este estudio todos los niños menores de 8 años con fracturas múltiples o que tenían alguna enfermedad sistémica o en los huesos. De acuerdo con los datos clínicos y demográficos, los pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos: el grupo 1 estaba constituido por los que no tenían infección en las fracturas y el grupo 2 por los que tenían infección. En los dos grupos se investigo factores que podrían estar asociados a la infección. Resultados. De 50 pacientes estudiados la tasa de infección global fue de 14 (28%, IC95% = 15,5-40,5). El hecho de desenvolver infección fue asociado con el lugar del trauma (OR 3,78; IC 95% = 1,4-5,5, p = 0,02), y la demora en recibir tratamiento adecuado en tiempo superior a 24 horas (OR 3,4; IC95% 1.4-20.8 = p = 0,03). Las fracturas clasificadas como Gustilo I, II, IIIA tuvieron una menor chance de infección cuando comparadas como Gustilo IIIB y IIIC (OR 4.32; CI95%=1.3-19.1; p=0.01). Fracturas clasificadas como Tscherne III y IV tuvieron una mayor frecuencia de infección, lo que resulto ser el factor más importante e significativo (OR 8.07; CI95%=2.4-47.1; p p<0.00). Conclusión. En nuestros resultados observamos; una relación entre infección y la clasificación de Gustilo. También observamos asociación de infección cuando el

  13. Stereopsis after anterior temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Decramer, Thomas; van Loon, Johannes; Goffin, Jan; Van Paesschen, Wim; Janssen, Peter; Theys, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Brain areas critical for stereopsis have been investigated in non-human primates but are largely unknown in the human brain. Microelectrode recordings and functional MRI (fMRI) studies in monkeys have shown that in monkeys the inferior temporal cortex is critically involved in 3D shape categorization. Furthermore, some human fMRI studies similarly suggest an involvement of visual areas in the temporal lobe in depth perception. We aimed to investigate the role of the human anterior temporal neocortex in stereopsis by assessing stereoscopic depth perception before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Eighteen epilepsy surgery patients were tested, pre- and postoperatively, in 3 different depth discrimination tasks. Sensitivity for local and global disparity was tested in a near-far discrimination task and sensitivity for 3D curvature was assessed in a convex-concave discrimination task, where 3D shapes were presented at different positions in depth. We found no evidence that temporal lobe epilepsy surgery has a significant effect on stereopsis. In contrast with earlier findings, we conclude that local as well as global stereopsis is maintained after unilateral resection of the temporal pole in epilepsy surgery patients. Our findings, together with previous studies, suggest that in humans more posterior visual regions underlie depth perception. PMID:27344239

  14. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue.

    PubMed

    Wong Chung, J E R E; Ensink, R J H; Thijs, H F H; van den Hoogen, F J A

    2014-07-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth. Immediately after drainage the swelling disappeared. Congenital oral swellings are rare. Most of them are mucoceles. Post-partum treatment is surgically, but spontaneous remission has been described. High incidence of recurrence should be taken into account when (micro-)marsupialization or incision as sole treatment is performed.

  15. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  16. [FUNCTIONAL PLASTIC OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Grubnik, V V; Parfentyeva, N D; Parfentyev, R S

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the treatment efficacy of postoperative anterior abdominal wall hernias the method of plastic with restoration of anatomical and physiological properties of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall was used. After the intervention by the improved method, regardless of the location of the hernia defect yielded promising results for the conservation of anterior abdominal wall muscle function in 75% of cases completely restored functional ability of muscles recti abdomini. PMID:26591212

  17. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  18. Self-flip Technique of the TightRope RT Button for Soft-Tissue Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Harato, Kengo; Niki, Yasuo; Toyoda, Takashi; Kamata, Yusaku; Masumoto, Ko; Otani, Toshiro; Suda, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    The TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a suspensory device for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, there is a potential risk of the button being pulled too far off the lateral femoral cortex into the soft tissue because the adjustable loop is long. The purpose of this article is to present an easy and safe technique for self-flip. As to the preparation of the graft, we draw the first line in the loop of the TightRope RT at the same length as the femoral tunnel, and we draw the second line 7 mm longer than the length of the femoral tunnel as a self-flip line. Concerning passing of the graft, the side sutures are pulled from the lateral side. We stop pulling the sutures just at the self-flip line by holding the graft at the tibial end. The side suture is inclined to the medial side with strong pulling of the suture at full extension of the knee. Then the surgeon pulls the tibial end of the graft to feel a secure positioning of the button on the lateral femoral cortex. Although it has limitations, the present technique is easy and certainly helps surgeons achieve appropriate positioning of the button. PMID:27462539

  19. Tibial changes in experimental disuse osteoporosis in the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Niklowitz, W. J.; Steele, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanical properties and structural changes in the monkey tibia with disuse osteoporosis and during subsequent recovery are investigated. Bone mending stiffness is evaluated in relation to microscopic changes in cortical bone and Norland bone mineral analysis. Restraint in the semireclined position is found to produce regional losses of bone most obviously in the anterior-proximal tibiae. After six months of restraint, the greatest losses of bone mineral in the proximal tibiae range from 23 percent to 31 percent; the largest changes in bone stiffness range from 36 percent to 40 percent. Approximately eight and one-half months of recovery are required to restore the normal bending properties. Even after 15 months of recovery, however, the bone mineral content does not necessarily return to normal levels. Histologically, resorption cavities in cortical bone are seen within one month of restraint; by two and one-half months of restraint there are large resorption cavities subperiosteally, endosteally, and intracortically. After 15 months of recovery, the cortex consists mainly of first-generation haversian systems. After 40 months, the cortex appears normal, with numerous secondary and tertiary generations of haversian systems.

  20. The effect of polyethylene creep on tibial insert locking screw loosening and back-out in prosthetic knee joints.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-10-01

    A prosthetic knee joint typically comprises a cobalt-chromium femoral component that articulates with a polyethylene tibial insert. A locking screw may be used to prevent micromotion and dislodgement of the tibial insert from the tibial tray. Screw loosening and back-out have been reported, but the mechanism that causes screw loosening is currently not well understood. In this paper, we experimentally evaluate the effect of polyethylene creep on the preload of the locking screw. We find that the preload decreases significantly as a result of polyethylene creep, which reduces the torque required to loosen the locking screw. The torque applied to the tibial insert due to internal/external rotation within the knee joint during gait could thus drive locking screw loosening and back-out. The results are very similar for different types of polyethylene.