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Sample records for anterolateral thigh muscle

  1. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall Defects Using a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap including the Vastus Lateralis Muscle: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki; Ishiyama, Satoko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of abdominal wall reconstruction is to prevent hernias and protect the abdominal viscera. In cases involving full-thickness defects of the rectus abdominis muscle, the muscle layer should be repaired. We present 2 cases in which full-thickness lower rectus abdominis muscle defects were reconstructed using vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flaps. The pedicled vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flap provides skin, fascia, and muscle tissue. Furthermore, it has a long neurovascular pedicle and can reach up to the periumbilical area and cover large defects. We consider that this muscle flap is a good option for repairing full-thickness lower abdominal defects. PMID:28074168

  2. Trans-vastus Intermedius Transfer of the Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Posterior Thigh Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Batdorf, Niles J.; Lettieri, Salvatore C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Proximal, posterior thigh wounds from oncologic or traumatic defects can be difficult wounds to reconstruct if local flap options have been sacrificed during the trauma or oncologic resection. Free flap options to cover these defects are also difficult because of the lack of convenient recipient vessels in the region. The authors present 2 cases (oncologic and traumatic) wherein a myocutaneous anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap was harvested and tunneled from the anterior muscle compartment to the posterior muscle compartment of the thigh through a medially based transmuscular tunnel, decreasing the required pedicle distance to the wound. This technique of transmuscular tunneling of the ALT flap expands the indications and utility of the ALT flap to cover posterior thigh wounds. PMID:25289275

  3. Dynamic reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects using free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takuya; Mihara, Makoto; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Todokoro, Takeshi; Hara, Hisako; Yoshimatu, Hidehiko; Koshima, Isao; Kadono, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects remains a difficult surgical challenge. Although various reconstructive methods, including artificial mesh, pedicled and free flaps, have been reported, most reported reconstruction of only the fascia layer, leaving the resected rectus abdominis muscle unreconstructed. However, recent studies suggested the importance of dynamic reconstruction with functional muscle in preventing abdominal hernia in the long-term. According to the principle of reconstructive surgery, "replace lost tissue with similar tissue," a functionally and aesthetically ideal reconstruction is to reconstruct all components of the abdominal wall structure, including skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia, and muscle. We present 2 cases with full-thickness abdominal wall defects in the upper abdominal region, which we reconstructed with a free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The motor nerve of the vastus lateralis muscle was sutured with the intercostal nerve, and reinnervation was confirmed by electromyography. This method allows reconstruction of all components of the abdominal wall with a single flap, and dynamic reconstruction is achieved which will reduce the risk of postoperative hernia. We believe this method can be a good option for reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects with long-term stability.

  4. A systematic review of anterolateral thigh flap donor site morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jessica; Ayeni, Olubimpe; Thoma, Achilleas

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is widely used in reconstruction. Its advantage over other flaps is its purported minimal donor site morbidity. The present systematic review summarizes the types of complications and their incidence with this flap. A secondary objective is to delineate factors that influence these complications and make recommendations to avoid them. METHOD: Two independent assessors undertook a systematic review of the literature using multiple databases. All patients with ALT flap reconstruction for any defect were included. Donor site complications including lateral thigh paresthesia, musculoskeletal dysfunction, hypertrophic scarring, wound breakdown, infection, donor site pain, seroma, hematoma, compartment syndrome and muscle necrosis were extracted from identified articles and tabulated. Based on the number of pooled events and the number of cases performed, an incidence rate was calculated. RESULTS: Forty-two relevant articles were identified that included 2324 flaps. Of the 2324 flaps, the majority were fasciocutaneous (n=737), and 1303 of the flaps were used in head and neck reconstruction. The incidence of complications were: lateral thigh paresthesia (24.0%); musculoskeletal dysfunction (4.8%); hypertrophic scarring or wound dehiscence (4.8%); donor site pain (3.3%); seroma (2.4%); infection (2.2%); hematoma (0.7%); compartment syndrome (0.09%); and partial muscle necrosis (0.09%). CONCLUSION: Lateral thigh paresthesia is the most common complication. Severe complications such as compartment syndrome and muscle necrosis can occur, but are rare. Preservation of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, femoral motor nerve branches and deep fascia decreases the risk of complications. The degree of vastus lateralis disruption did not show a significant impact on musculoskeletal dysfunction. PMID:23598761

  5. Free anterolateral thigh flap for extremity reconstruction: clinical experience and functional assessment of donor site.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y R; Jeng, S F; Kuo, M H; Huang, M N; Liu, Y T; Chiang, Y C; Yeh, M C; Wei, F C

    2001-06-01

    From August of 1995 through July of 1998, 38 free anterolateral thigh flaps were transferred to reconstruct soft-tissue defects. The overall success rate was 97 percent. Among 38 anterolateral thigh flaps, four were elevated as cutaneous flaps based on the septocutaneous perforators. The other 34 were harvested as myocutaneous flaps including a cuff of vastus lateralis muscle (15 to 40 cm3), either because of bulk requirements (33 cases) or because of the absence of a septocutaneous perforator (one case). However, vastus lateralis muscle is the largest compartment of the quadriceps, which is the prime extensor of the knee. Losing a portion of the vastus lateralis muscle may affect knee stability. Objective functional assessments of the donor sites were performed at least 6 months postoperatively in 20 patients who had a cuff of vastus lateralis muscle incorporated as part of the myocutaneous flap; assessments were made using a kinetic communicator machine. The isometric power test of the ratios of quadriceps muscle at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion between donor and normal thighs revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05). The isokinetic peak torque ratio of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, including concentric and eccentric contraction tests, showed no significant difference (p > 0.05), except the concentric contraction test of the quadriceps muscle, which revealed mild weakness of the donor thigh (p < 0.05). In summary, the functional impairment of the donor thighs was minimal after free anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap transfer.

  6. Pre-expanded Anterolateral Thigh Perforator Flap for Phalloplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Arpa, Salvatore; Colebunders, Britt; Stillaert, Filip; Monstrey, Stan

    2017-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap for phalloplasty is gaining popularity because it avoids the well-known scars of the radial forearm flap. However, scars are not eliminated, just moved to a different location, the thigh, that can for some patients be of great sexual value. Preexpansion of the ALT flap allows primary donor site closure, thus avoiding not only the unsightly appearance of a skin grafted ALT donor site, but also the skin graft donor site scar. Preoperative perforator location by means of computed tomography angiography allows safe expander placement through 2 small remote incisions.

  7. Fascia-only anterolateral thigh flap for extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paige; Endress, Ryan; Sen, Subhro; Chang, James

    2014-05-01

    The ability to use the anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap as a vascularized fascial flap, without skin or muscle, was first documented by Koshima et al in 1989. The authors mention the possibility of using the fascia alone for dural reconstruction. Despite its description more than 20 years ago, little literature exists on the application of the ALT flap as a vascularized fascial flap. In our experience, the ALT flap can be used as a fascia-only flap for thin, pliable coverage in extremity reconstruction. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records and photographs of patients who had undergone fascia-only ALT free flaps for extremity reconstruction were reviewed. Photographic images of patients were then matched to patients who had undergone either a muscle-only or a fasciocutaneous free flap reconstruction of an extremity. Photographs of the final reconstruction were then given to medical and nonmedical personnel for analysis, focusing on aesthetics including color and contour. Review of cases performed over a 2-year period demonstrated similar ease of harvest for fascia-only ALT flaps compared to standard fasciocutaneous ALT flaps. Fascia-only flaps were used for thin, pliable coverage in the upper and lower extremities. There was no need for secondary procedures for debulking or aesthetic flap revision. In contrast to muscle flaps, which require muscle atrophy over time to achieve their final appearance, there was a similar flap contour from approximately 1 month postoperatively throughout the duration of follow-up. When a large flap is required, the fascia-only ALT has the advantage of a single-line donor-site scar. Photograph comparison to muscle flaps with skin grafts and fasciocutaneous flaps demonstrated improved color, contour, and overall aesthetic appearance of the fascia-only ALT over muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps. The fascia-only ALT flap provides reliable, thin, and pliable coverage with improved contour and color over

  8. Anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps as the preferred flaps for reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen-Hu; Wu, Han-Jiang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Sheng; Tan, Hong Yu; Gong, Zhao Jian

    2014-12-01

    The anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap is one of the most commonly used flaps in reconstructive procedures, but its application in oral and maxillofacial defects has not been fully determined. Herein, we summarize the application of 1212 anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps in the repair of oral and maxillofacial defects and examine their benefits in maxillofacial reconstruction of these defects. Patients were recruited from February 2002 to June 2013 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of Central South University. All patients underwent reconstructive surgery employing anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps. Patient ages ranged from 6 to 82 years with a mean age of 51.2 years. There are 1015 flaps showing single lobe and 197 flaps showing a multi-island pedicle and one of which carries the iliac bone. The largest area among the single flaps was 28 × 12 cm(2), and the smallest was 3 × 2 cm(2). Among the 1212 transferred flaps, 1176 survived and 36 showed necrosis, a survival rate of about 97.0%. The common complications at flap donor site were poor wound healing (10.1%), localized paraesthesia (50.1%), and altered quadriceps force (11.0%). No cases presented with local serious complications, and 90% of patients achieved good functional recovery and aesthetically acceptable results after reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial defects at various locations using anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps. The time (23-121 min; average 51 min) for anastomosis of one vein and one artery was significantly less than that for two veins and one artery (45-153 min, average 83 min; p = 0.0003), which indicates one vein anastomosis can significantly reduce the operating time. The anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps can be easily obtained and can provide a good amount of muscle for filling dead space and fascia lata. These flaps can be prepared into a separate fat flap, multi-island fascia with iliac bone, and other composite pedicle flaps to meet the

  9. [Hypogastric abdominal wall reconstruction with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Gonnelli, D; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Looking at a full-thickness abdominal wall defect, it is necessary to use reconstructive surgery techniques. The authors present an original case of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, using an anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) harvested with vascularised fascia lata. We describe the advantages of this technique, which has rarely been used for this indication. An 80-year-old woman presenting a full-thickness abdominal wall defect of 15×18cm was reconstructed by a pedicled ALT flap. Skin wound healing was obtained within 15 days, with no complication. There was no donor site sequela. The pedicled ALT flap appears to be a good solution for hypogastric abdominal wall defect in a one step procedure. Vacularised fascia lata bring with the cutaneous flap is useful to reconstruct the abdominal fascia.

  10. Free anterolateral thigh flaps for upper extremity soft tissue reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Nick; Al-Benna, Sammy; Ring, Andrej; Homann, Heinz; Steinsträsser, Lars; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Langer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Limb-threatening wounds of the upper extremity pose a challenge to the micro vascular surgeon. The aim of this study is to analyze the outcome of free anterolateral thigh flaps for upper extremity soft tissue reconstruction. Methods: A retrospective review of patients undergoing this procedure from 2005 to 2012 was performed. Case note analysis was performed to determine demographic and perioperative factors, and complications and outcomes. Results: Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 53 years (9–84 yrs) underwent upper extremity reconstruction with an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. There were 24 (75%) males and 8 (25%) females. The etiology of the soft tissue defects was: infection (44.6%); post-tumor ablation (40%); and trauma (15.6%). The defect site was most commonly in the forearm (53.1%), followed by the elbow (12.5 %), arm (12.5%) and hand (21.9%). The mean timing of free flap transfer was 6.8 days after admission to our institution (minimum 1 days, maximum 9 days). Mean operative time of surgery was 4 h 39 min (minimum 3 h 2 min, maximum 6 h 20 min). The mean hospitalization was 24.8 days (minimum 5, maximum 85). The ALT success rate was at 92.3%. Partial flap necrosis was documented in five cases (15.6%). Complete flap loss occurred in two post-traumatic cases who both lost their limbs. Discussion: This flap, in the hands of experienced surgeons, provides reliable coverage of upper extremity defects. PMID:26504734

  11. Usefulness of Harmonic Focus during anterolateral thigh flap elevation.

    PubMed

    Hamahata, Atsumori; Saitou, Takashi; Kubo, Kazuyuki; Beppu, Takeshi; Yamaki, Takashi; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Meticulous hemostasis and careful ligation of branches are necessary for pedicle dissection during flap elevation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Harmonic Focus handpiece (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc., Blue Ash, Cincinnati, OH, USA) in reducing operation time, bleeding volume, and volume of postoperative drainage during anterolateral thigh flap elevation. Ten patients requiring flap elevation were divided into two groups: (1) Harmonic Focus group (three men, two women), and (2) control group (three men, two women). Operating time was found to be lower in the Harmonic Focus group than in the control group. Bleeding volume and postoperative drainage volume were nearly identical in the Harmonic Focus group and the control group, and the number of silk ligatures was significantly lower in the Harmonic Focus group compared with the control group. Although somewhat costly, the Harmonic Scalpel with the Harmonic Focus handpiece is advantageous for flap elevation, and it is likely that Harmonic Scalpel use will increase in plastic surgery.

  12. Functional outcomes after laryngopharyngectomy with anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Jan S; Barringer, Denise A; May, Annette H; Gillenwater, Ann M; Arnold, Katherine A; Roberts, Dianna B; Yu, Peirong

    2006-02-01

    We examined speech and swallowing outcomes and complications in patients with anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap reconstruction of cervical esophageal defects. We retrospectively reviewed 29 patients treated with laryngopharyngectomy and ALT flap reconstruction at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from March 2002 to July 2004. We compared complication rates, nutritional intake, number of tracheoesophageal punctures (TEPs), speech fluency and use, operative defects, and radiotherapy effects. Twenty-two patients had circumferential defects, and seven had partial defects. Twenty-four patients had radiotherapy. Eleven patients underwent TEP. Higher complication rates in patients after TEP compared with those without TEP were not statistically significant (p = .268). Ninety percent of patients with TEP spoke fluently. Ninety percent of all patients returned to oral alimentation without significant effect from TEP (p = 1.00), complications (p = 1.00), radiation therapy (p = 1.00), or surgical defect (p = .56). The ALT flap successfully reconstructs laryngopharyngeal defects with excellent speech and swallowing results. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Extended Anterolateral Thigh Flaps for Reconstruction of Extensive Defects of the Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lifeng; Cao, Xuexin; Zou, Lin; Li, Zongyu; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2013-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been used for coverage of defects in the foot and ankle for years. Conventional extended anterolateral thigh flaps do not undergo thinning procedures, which limit their application. Here, a clinical series of 24 patients is reported in which extended anterolateral thigh flaps were used for posttraumatic foot and ankle reconstruction. Of the 24 flaps, 14 were simple extended anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flaps and 10 were thinned extended anterolateral thigh flaps. One artery and two veins, including a superficial vein and an accompanying vein, were anastomosed to vascularize each flap. Follow-up of the 24 patients ranged from 10 months to 4 years postoperatively. All 24 flaps survived successfully, except one case that had partial flap necrosis distally due to excessive thinning. The cutaneous flap territory ranged from 250 cm2 to 400 cm2 (mean, 297 cm2). Only one patient received a debulking procedure. No ulceration occurred in any of the flaps due to contact with the shoe. The extended anterolateral thigh flap is a good alternative for extensive soft tissue defects of the foot and ankle. This study also supports the high reliability and excellent vascular supply of moderate thinned extended ALT flaps. PMID:24376731

  14. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  15. Total Posterior Leg Open Wound Management With Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap: Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Soleiman; Chou, Stephanie; Rosing, James; Sahar, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue coverage of the exposed Achilles tendon is a unique reconstructive challenge. In this report, we describe the management of a large posterior leg wound with exposed Achilles tendon using a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. A careful review of alternative reconstructive options is included, along with their respective advantages and disadvantages. A 32-year-old white man suffered a fulminant right lower extremity soft tissue infection requiring extensive debridement of the entire posterior surface of the right leg. The resulting large soft tissue defect included exposure of the Achilles tendon. Reconstruction of the defect was achieved with an ALT flap and split-thickness skin graft for coverage of the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle, respectively. The patient was able to ambulate independently within 2 months of the procedure. PMID:24106563

  16. Reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defect by free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Livaoğlu, Murat; Karacal, Naci; Bektaş, Devrim; Bahadir, Osman

    2009-05-01

    Because of minimal donor region morbidity, pliability, the presence of long and large caliber vessels, and lack of visible scar, the free anterolateral thigh flap provides an ideal option for restoration of full-thickness nasal defects. Full-thickness nasal defect reconstruction requires internal nasal lining and external cover. In large defects, internal nasal lining replacement with traditional sources may not be expedient. We describe reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects with free anterolateral thigh flap. From August 2005 to July 2007, six patients with full-thickness nasal defects underwent nasal reconstruction using free anterolateral thigh flap. All defects resulted from tumor resections. Four patients had a basal cell carcinoma, one an epidermoid carcinoma, and the other patient had recurrent malignant fibrous histiocytoma. All flaps survived completely. The average hospitalization time was 3 days. No complication was observed.

  17. Functional results of microvascular reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: free anterolateral thigh flap versus free forearm flap.

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, A; Vietti, M V; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess functional outcomes after hemiglossectomy and microvascular reconstruction. Twenty-six patients underwent primary tongue microvascular reconstruction after hemiglossectomy. Twelve patients were reconstructed using a free radial forearm flap and 14 with an anterolateral thigh flap. Speech intelligibility, swallowing capacity and quality of life scores were assessed. Factors such as tumour extension, surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy appeared to be fundamental to predict post-treatment functional outcomes. The data obtained in the present study indicate that swallowing capacity after hemiglossectomy is better when an anterolateral thigh flap is used. No significant differences were seen for speech intelligibility or quality of life between free radial forearm flap and anterolateral thigh flap.

  18. [Resurfacing of a trochanteric pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, J; Faghahati, S; Burin Des Roziers, B; Daoud, G; Cartier, S

    2013-06-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap is usually used as a free flap for various kinds of reconstruction and resurfacing of distant areas. Cover of a deep trochanteric pressure sore is commonly made by muscular or musculocutaneous flaps such as tensor of fascia lata or vastus lateralis. We report the case of a trochanteric pressure sore covered by a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh flap after negative pressure therapy in a 58-year-old paraplegic patient. After 6 months, a good quality of coverage was obtained with minimal morbidity of donor site. The pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral flap appears as a reliable option for the treatment of trochanteric pressure sore. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Anterolateral thigh skinfold thickness and the European head and neck cancer patient: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Achal, Kulraj S; Farrell, C; Smith, Adam B; Mücke, T; Mitchell, David A; Kanatas, Anastasios N

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively assess this widely recognised problem of the bulky adipocutaneous Anterolateral thigh flap in the European population that may have implications in the reconstruction of head and neck cancer patients. We report 50 cases that underwent specific prospective thigh skinfold thickness assessment as part of assessment of suitability for ALT flap reconstruction following cancer ablation. The null hypothesis was that thigh skinfold thickness and circumference in an oral cancer population do not differ significantly from published sino-Asian norms. This study confirms anthropometrically the suspicion that European thigh skinfold thickness in a head and neck cancer population is greater than sino-Asian comparators. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Free anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction of car tire injuries of children's feet.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Yener; Neimetzade, Tale; Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Guneren, Ethem

    2010-01-01

    Grade IV and V car tire injuries occurring in children cause extensive soft tissue defects with exposure or loss of tendons and bone on the dorsum of the foot. Free tissue transfer is indicated for reconstruction of these defects because of the limited local tissue available. We describe our management of high-grade car tire foot injuries in children with free anterolateral thigh flap (ALT). Five pre-school children with car tire injuries (one grade IV and four grade V) were treated with free ALT flap in the last 4 years. The mean age was 4.8 years. In four patients, immediate flap coverage after initial debridement was performed and delayed reconstruction was used as a secondary procedure in one patient. One of the flaps was re-explored for hematoma evacuation and salvaged. All of the flaps survived completely and there were no donor site complications. None of the flaps required a debulking procedure and custom shoe wear has not been necessary in any of the patients. Minor gait abnormalities were detected in two of the patients. With minimal donor site morbidity, long vascular pedicle allowing anastomosis outside of the trauma zone, we believe free ALT flap provides the ideal soft tissue reconstruction for high grade car tire injuries of foot in children. ALT flap can be further thinned to adapt to the defect, contracts less than muscle flaps and contains a vascularized fascia which can be used for extensor tendon reconstruction.

  1. Algorithm for reconstruction of composite cranial defects using the fascial component of free anterolateral thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Oatari, Miwako; Matsuda, Kaho; Uehara, Miyuki; Sato, Seiichi; Kato, Aiko

    2013-09-01

    In case of composite cranial defect including the dura mater, the cranial bone, and the scalp, the fascial component of the anterolateral thigh flap can be used for dural reconstruction. However, the advantages and applications of the fascial component depending on the type of defect have not been thoroughly discussed. We made the algorithm for reconstruction of composite cranial defects using the fascial component of free anterolateral thigh flaps. Six cases of composite cranial defects were reconstructed using free anterolateral thigh flaps with the fascial component. The type of method used was classified into 3 types. Type 1 involves separating the fascia from the flap completely and using it as a nonvascularized component. In type 2, the fascia is not separated from the flap and is instead used as a vascularized component. Type 3 involves separating the vascularized adipofascial component from the skin paddle and using it as a chimeric pattern flap. The algorithm for determining the type of fascial component is applied depending on the condition of the defect. All flaps were transferred successfully in every case. In 4 cases, the type 1 method was used. The type 2 and 3 methods were used in 1 case each. Cranial bone reconstruction was performed in 3 cases. There were no major complications after the procedures. The fascial component is useful for dural reconstruction. The type of fascial component used is selected depending on the condition of the defect.

  2. Prelamination of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap With a Fibula Graft to Successfully Reconstruct a Mandibular Defect

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh, Parviz Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Flap prelamination is the process whereby a complex 3- dimensional construct is fashioned in a staged manner. We present a case whereby the tissues of the anterolateral thigh, nourished by perforators of the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery, were prelaminated with a fibula in the setting of salvage head and neck reconstruction. With a paucity of recipient vessels in the neck and a previous failed free fibula transfer secondary to osteoradionecrosis, a fibula was implanted into a suprafascial pocket created in the anterolateral thigh. This was allowed to pick up a blood supply from this rich vascular bed and mature over a period of 3 weeks before being transferred with the anterolateral thigh tissues as a prelaminated osteocutaneous composite free flap. A bone scan performed both before and after transfer confirmed uptake of radionucleotide by the fibula suggesting neovascularization. The composite mandibular defect was successfully reconstructed using this technique, and we believe this could represent a new strategy in the setting of salvage head and neck surgery. PMID:26495210

  3. Inverse relationship of the anterolateral and anteromedial thigh flap perforator anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peirong

    2014-09-01

    When anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforators are inadequate, exploration of the contralateral thigh or a new flap may be required. If the anteromedial thigh (AMT) perforators were useable in these instances, harvest could proceed from a single donor site. The purposes of this study were to define the AMT perforator anatomy and examine the relationships between the AMT and ALT perforators. A total of 100 consecutive thighs were explored. The ALT and AMT perforator size and number were documented. The relationship between ALT and AMT size and number was examined using Fisher exact test, logistic regression, and linear regression. The main blood supply to the AMT flap was the rectus femoris branch (RFB) off the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoris artery. AMT perforators were only present in 51% of the thighs and most likely a single perforator near the midpoint and 3.2 cm medial to the line connecting the anterior superior iliac spine and the patella (perforator B location). Patients with one or fewer ALT perforators had fourfold increased chance of an AMT perforator. Patients with small or no ALT perforators usually had a large AMT perforator. After assigning numeric values to perforators based on size, lower ALT perforator scores were significantly related to higher AMT scores. The RFB is the main vascular pedicle of the AMT flap. There is an inverse relationship between size and number of ALT and AMT perforators: when ALT perforators are inadequate, AMT perforators are typically useable. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. The combined free partial vastus lateralis with anterolateral thigh perforator flap reconstruction of extensive composite defects.

    PubMed

    Posch, N A S; Mureau, M A M; Flood, S J; Hofer, S O P

    2005-12-01

    Myocutaneous (MC) free flaps are useful for many reconstructive indications. Perforator flaps have become standard of care. The anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) donor site is popular. With the ALT flap varying sizes of vastus lateralis (VL) muscle can be harvested as a MC flap. The skin islands of these flaps have a great range of freedom when dissected on their perforator. It was hypothesised that the VL-ALT perforator flap would offer adequate tissue volume combining maximal freedom in planning with minimal donor site morbidity. From November 2001 to February 2003 a free partial VL with ALT perforator flap was used in 11 patients to reconstruct large defects. Indications for adding a muscular component were exposed bone, skull base, (artificial) dura, or osteosynthesis material, open sinuses, and lack of muscular bulk. Flaps were planned as standard ALT flaps, after which three types of dissection were performed: I. true MC flap; II. muscle flap with a skin island on one perforator, which could be rotated up to 180 degrees ; III. chimera skin perforator flap with muscle being harvested on a separate branch from the source vessel or on a side branch of the skin perforator. Mean skin size of the MC-ALT flaps was 131 cm2. Mean muscle part size of the MC-ALT flaps was 268 cm3. Muscular parts were custom designed for all defects. No total or partial flap failures were seen. Colour mismatch was seen in 6 of 8 patients, when skin was used in the facial area in this all white population. Excessive flap bulk was found in 8 of 11 patients at 6 weeks, however, only in 2 of 11 patients after 6 months. Patients were satisfied with the functional result (8 of 11 patients) as well as the cosmetic result of their reconstruction (7 of 11 patients). All less satisfied patients had received their flap for external facial skin reconstruction. Donor site morbidity was minimal. The combined free partial VL with ALT perforator flap proved valuable as a (chimera type) MC flap with maximal

  5. Microvascular free tissue transfer for tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: a functional assessment of radial forearm versus anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, Juan Carlos; de Villalaín, Lucas; Torre, Aintzane; Peña, Ignacio

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate tongue function and donor site morbidity in patients with oral cancer surgically treated and reconstructed with radial or anterolateral thigh free flaps. Twenty patients underwent primary reconstruction after hemiglossectomy between January 2002 and June 2004. Ten patients were reconstructed using a free forearm flap and the remaining with an anterolateral thigh flap. Eight patients on each group underwent postoperative radiotherapy (average, 60 Gy). All of them were followed postoperatively to determine after 6 months their functional outcome as it related to speech, deglutition, tongue mobility, and donor site morbidity. The intelligibility, deglutition, and tongue mobility were each scored on a scale ranging from 1 to 7 by an independent investigator. Data were analyzed by the 2-tail Mann-Whitney U test. No differences in mean speech intelligibility, tongue mobility, or deglutition mean scores were seen between radial forearm flap and anterolateral thigh flap (P > .05). In all anterolateral thigh flap-treated cases, the donor site was closed directly and no complications were seen. However, in all forearm flaps donor site closure was carried out with skin grafts and dorsal forearm splinting was applied for 1 week postoperatively. In 4 cases a partial skin graft failure was observed and donor sites healed for second intention. Anterolateral thigh flap, with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and low donor site morbidity, could be the ideal flap for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction.

  6. Radial forearm versus anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: functional assessment of swallowing and speech.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tao; Leu, Yi-Shing; Liu, Chung-Ji; Tung, Kwang-Yi; Lin, Chang-Ching

    2008-02-01

    The authors retrospectively compared the results of postoperative speech and swallowing in patients who had undergone hemiglossectomy for carcinoma of the anterior tongue. Immediate reconstruction in 16 patients was with a free radial forearm flap and in another 16 with an anterolateral thigh flap. Clinical speech pathology evaluation included the Fletcher time-to-time maximum syllable repetition rate, multiple rhyme test, and overall quality and intelligibility of the patients' speech. Evaluation of swallowing included deglutition duration, bolus volume, and ingestion rate. The functional results with both flaps were adequate, and the two groups did not differ significantly between each other for either speech or swallowing.

  7. Functional assessment: Free thin anterolateral thigh flap versus free radial forearm reconstruction for hemiglossectomy defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingxing; Hu, Qingang; Tang, Enyi; Wang, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare free thin anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with free radial forearm (FRF) flap in the reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects, and to introduce our methods and experience in the tongue reconstruction with free thin ALT flap. Material and Methods The clinicopathologic data of 46 tongue carcinoma cases hospitalized from December 2009 to April 2014 were obtained from Nangjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University. All the subjects were evaluated for the articulation and the swallowing function 3 months after the surgery. Results Among these 46 patients, 12 patients underwent tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy with ALT flap; 34 patients underwent tongue reconstruction with FRF flap. The differences in the incidence of vascular crisis, the speech and the swallowing function between two groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Thin ALT flap could be one of the ideal flaps for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and the neglectable donor site morbidity. Key words:Free thin anterolateral thigh flap, free radial forearm flap, hemiglossectomy, reconstruction, morbidity. PMID:26449437

  8. [Resurfacing of an ischial and trochanteric recurrent pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Ischial pressure sores, common in paraplegic patient, are the most difficult to treat, and poor prognosis associated with a high rate of postoperative recurrence. Many surgical techniques by muscular or myocutaneous flap coverage have been described. We report an original use of a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALTp) flap for coverage of an ischial pressure sore combined with a trochanteric pressure sore, exceeded beyond any conventional therapeutic solution. A 45-year-old paraplegic patient suffered from a trochanteric and ischial pressure sore, which had already received coverage by a muscular flap of biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. At 1 year, the result is satisfactory, with good coverage without recurrence. The fasciocutaneous ALTp flap can be a solution to cover recurrent ischial pressure sores beyond conventional methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of lateral forefoot using reversed medial plantar flap with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Masaki; Hayashida, Kenji; Senju, Chikako

    2014-01-01

    Skin defects of the heel have frequently been reconstructed using the medial plantar flap; however, forefoot coverage has remained a challenge, because the alternatives for flap coverage have been very limited. We describe a case of malignant melanoma on the lateral forefoot that was radically removed and reconstructed successfully with a distally based medial plantar flap, together with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The advantages of this flap include that it does not reduce the vascular supply to the foot owing to reconstruction of the medial plantar vascular systems, reduces the risk of flap congestion, minimizes donor site morbidity, and enables the transport of structurally similar tissues to the plantar forefoot. We believe this technique is a reasonable reconstructive option for large lateral plantar forefoot defects.

  10. Use of the anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction of the pediatric anophthalmic orbit.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Sally L; Forrest, Christopher R; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acquired anophthalmia pose unique reconstructive challenges. With implant-based reconstruction, the current standard of care, there is a tendency toward intraorbital and adnexal tissue contraction and an increasing volume discrepancy with orbital growth, resulting in enophthalmos and eyelid retraction, and also difficulty in retaining an ocular prosthesis. We describe a novel technique for secondary reconstruction of the pediatric anophthalmic orbit using a small free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. The technique involves release of retracted eyelids and restoration of orbital volume with an ALT flap based on the superficial temporal vessels. The purpose of this study is to detail the results of treatment of a series of four consecutive patients with unilateral acquired anophthalmia managed with ALT flaps. Improved symmetry, successful retention of an ocular prosthesis, and patient satisfaction were achieved in all cases.

  11. Functional assessment: Free thin anterolateral thigh flap versus free radial forearm reconstruction for hemiglossectomy defects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingxing; Sun, Guowen; Hu, Qingang; Tang, Enyi; Wang, Yujia

    2015-11-01

    To compare free thin anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with free radial forearm (FRF) flap in the reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects, and to introduce our methods and experience in the tongue reconstruction with free thin ALT flap. The clinicopathologic data of 46 tongue carcinoma cases hospitalized from December 2009 to April 2014 were obtained from Nangjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University. All the subjects were evaluated for the articulation and the swallowing function 3 months after the surgery. Among these 46 patients, 12 patients underwent tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy with ALT flap; 34 patients underwent tongue reconstruction with FRF flap. The differences in the incidence of vascular crisis, the speech and the swallowing function between two groups were not significant (P > 0.05). Thin ALT flap could be one of the ideal flaps for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and the neglectable donor site morbidity.

  12. Achieving Direct Closure of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap Donor Site—An Algorithmic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pachón Suárez, Jaime Eduardo; Sadigh, Parviz Lionel; Shih, Hsiang-Shun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Minimizing donor-site morbidity after free flap harvest is of paramount importance. In this article, we share our experience with achieving primary closure of 58 anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap donor sites using a simple algorithm in cases where primary closure would otherwise have not been possible. Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 58 patients who underwent free ALT flap reconstruction were included in the study. The inclusion criteria were those who had flap width requirements that were wider than 16% of the thigh circumference and had achieved direct primary closure of the donor site by the use of our technique. Results: Primary closure of the donor sites was facilitated in all cases by the use of 3 distinct techniques. This included the use of the V-Y advancement technique in 13 patients, split skin paddle technique in 7 patients, and the tubed skin paddle design in 38 patients. No episodes of postoperative wound dehiscence at the donor site were encountered; however, 2 cases were complicated by superficial wound infections that settled with a course of antibiotics. Conclusions: Direct primary closure of the ALT donor site can be facilitated by the use of our simple algorithm. Certain strategies need to be adopted at the design stage; however, the techniques used are simple and reliable, produce superior cosmetic results at the donor site, save time, and spare the patient the morbidity associated with the harvest of a skin graft. PMID:25426349

  13. Pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap for the reconstruction of a large postoncologic abdominal wall resection defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nthumba, Peter; Barasa, Jack; Cavadas, Pedro C; Landin, Luis

    2012-02-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been used to cover defects between the proximal third of the leg and lower abdomen, and with modification, may cover epigastric defects. We used the ALT flap to cover a full-thickness defect of over half the anterior abdominal wall. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction.

  14. Individual design of the anterolateral thigh flap for functional reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: experience with 238 patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Liu, K; Shao, Z; Shang, Z-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate tongue function in patients with oral cancer treated surgically and reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flaps (ALTFs). Patients (N=238) underwent primary reconstruction after hemiglossectomy between September 2012 and October 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the flap design: 'individual design' (ABC flap) and 'common design'. Patients were followed postoperatively and assessed after 6 months for the following functional outcomes: speech, deglutition, tongue mobility, and donor site morbidity. Intelligibility and deglutition were each scored by an independent investigator. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 software. No differences in mean speech intelligibility scores were observed between the two groups (good: P=0.908; acceptable: P=0.881). However, the ABC flap offered recovery advantages for swallowing capacity compared to the common design flap (MTF classification good: P=0.028; acceptable: P=0.001). The individualized ABC flap not only provides volume but also preserves mobility, speech intelligibility, and swallowing capacity. ALTFs require further improvement for the individualized functional reconstruction of the tongue after hemiglossectomy, but this work lays the foundation for these improvements. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconstruction of Postburn Contracture of the Forefoot Using the Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    An, Sung Jin; Kim, Nu Ri; Kim, Um Ji; Kim, Jeung Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe forefoot deformities, particularly those involving the dorsum of the foot, cause inconvenience in daily activities of living including moderate pain on the dorsal aspect of the contracted foot while walking and difficulty in wearing nonsupportive shoes due to toe contractures. This paper presents clinical results of reconstruction of severe forefoot deformity using the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap. Methods Severe forefoot deformities were reconstructed using ALT flaps in 7 patients (8 cases) between March 2012 and December 2015. The mean contracture duration was 28.6 years. Results All the flaps survived completely. The size of the flaps ranged from 8 cm × 5 cm to 19 cm × 8 cm. The mean follow-up period was 10 months (range, 7 to 15 months). There was no specific complication at both the recipient and donor sites. There was one case where the toe contracture could not be completely treated after surgery. All of the patients were able to wear shoes and walk without pain. Also, the patients were highly satisfied with cosmetic results. Conclusions The ALT flap may be considered ideal for the treatment of severe forefoot deformity. PMID:27904728

  16. Sandwich Fascial Anterolateral Thigh Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction: Evolution or Revolution?

    PubMed Central

    Berli, Jens; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Maggiulli, Francesca; Corno, Martina; Tamborini, Federico; Montrasio, Edoardo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Valdatta, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The anterolateral thigh perforator flap (ALT) represents the workhorse for most reconstructive efforts in the head and neck regions. The main advantages of this flap are its versatility, the length of the pedicle, and the low morbidity of the donor site. The major drawback is the bulkiness of this flap with the frequent need for secondary revisions. To overcome this, we have developed a novel way to harvest and inset the ALT, called the sandwich fascial ALT flap (SALT). Methods: All patients undergoing head and neck reconstruction using the SALT flap from January 2013 to March 2016 were included in this retrospective analysis. The SALT flap was harvested as a composite flap including the superficial fascia, the subscarpal fat, and the deep fascia. At the recipient site, the flap was inset with the deep fascia facing out. A split thickness skin graft (± dermal substitute) was used to cover the deep fascia and the pedicle. Results: Eleven patients were included: 8 cases of orbital exenteration, 1 case of forehead reconstruction, and 2 cases of palatal reconstruction after radical maxillectomy. Flap survival was 100%. One patient required an early take back for venous thrombosis. The reconstruction was effective in all cases, allowing a prosthetic rehabilitation when required. Donor-site morbidity was minimal. Conclusions: The reconstruction of head and neck defects with a bulky fasciocutaneous ALT flap might not be the best option in every case. The SALT flap could represent a valid alternative for selected cases, with encouraging functional and cosmetic outcomes. PMID:28203499

  17. Clinical outcome of reconstruction of the lateral oropharyngeal wall with an anterolateral thigh free flap.

    PubMed

    Helmiö, Päivi M; Suominen, Sinikka; Vuola, Jyrki; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2010-11-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap is widely used for various reconstructions in the head and neck. However, its use in the oropharynx has not been widely evaluated, so we have reviewed our experience. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 28 patients with oropharyngeal cancer, who were treated with immediate reconstruction with an ALT free flap after excision. We recorded history, stage of tumour, course of operation, postoperative period, oncological treatment, clinical outcome, and follow-up. The mean age of the patients was 61 years (range 44-83). Ten of the patients had clinically relevant coexisting conditions. Most of the patients had T3-4 tumours and involved neck nodes. The operations included resection of the tumour, neck dissection, and reconstruction of the oropharynx with an ALT free flap. All donor sites were closed primarily. Eight patients (29%) developed early local complications that required reoperation. Ten patients (36%) had postoperative cardiopulmonary problems. Twenty-seven flaps succeeded; one was lost. There were no other complications or late problems of the donor site except one seroma. Twenty-one patients were given postoperative radiotherapy. After the mean follow-up period of 40 months (range 13-68) 20 patients (71%) were disease-free. Three patients required a permanent gastrostomy and one a permanent tracheostomy. We conclude that the ALT free flap can be used successfully for reconstruction of a lateral oropharyngeal defect with manageable postoperative morbidity.

  18. Reconstruction of Postburn Contracture of the Forefoot Using the Anterolateral Thigh Flap.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyun; An, Sung Jin; Kim, Nu Ri; Kim, Um Ji; Kim, Jeung Il

    2016-12-01

    Severe forefoot deformities, particularly those involving the dorsum of the foot, cause inconvenience in daily activities of living including moderate pain on the dorsal aspect of the contracted foot while walking and difficulty in wearing nonsupportive shoes due to toe contractures. This paper presents clinical results of reconstruction of severe forefoot deformity using the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap. Severe forefoot deformities were reconstructed using ALT flaps in 7 patients (8 cases) between March 2012 and December 2015. The mean contracture duration was 28.6 years. All the flaps survived completely. The size of the flaps ranged from 8 cm × 5 cm to 19 cm × 8 cm. The mean follow-up period was 10 months (range, 7 to 15 months). There was no specific complication at both the recipient and donor sites. There was one case where the toe contracture could not be completely treated after surgery. All of the patients were able to wear shoes and walk without pain. Also, the patients were highly satisfied with cosmetic results. The ALT flap may be considered ideal for the treatment of severe forefoot deformity.

  19. Algorithmic approach to lower abdominal, perineal, and groin reconstruction using anterolateral thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Zelken, Jonathan A; AlDeek, Nidal F; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Lower abdominal, perineal, and groin (LAPG) reconstruction may be performed in a single stage. Anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps are preferred here and taken as fasciocutaneous (ALT-FC), myocutaneous (ALT-MC), or vastus lateralis myocutaneous (VL-MC) flaps. We aim to present the results of reconstruction from a series of patients and guide flap selection with an algorithmic approach to LAPG reconstruction that optimizes outcomes and minimizes morbidity. Lower abdomen, groin, perineum, vulva, vagina, scrotum, and bladder wounds reconstructed in 22 patients using ALT flaps between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively studied. Five ALT-FC, eight ALT-MC, and nine VL-MC flaps were performed. All flaps survived. Venous congestion occurred in three VL-MC flaps from mechanical cause. Wound infection occurred in six cases. Urinary leak occurred in three cases of bladder reconstruction. One patient died from congestive heart failure. The ALT flap is time tested and dependably addresses most LAPG defects; flap variations are suited for niche defects. We propose a novel algorithm to guide reconstructive decision-making. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Perforator-to-perforator musculocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction of a lumbosacral defect using the lumbar artery perforator as recipient vessel.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Marc A M; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2008-05-01

    Reconstruction of large-sized lumbosacral or sacral defects often is not possible using local or regional flaps, making the use of free flaps necessary. However, the difficulty of any microsurgical procedure in this region is complicated by the need to search for potential recipient vessels to revascularize the flap. In the present case, a free musculocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap to cover a large-sized and deep lumbosacral defect was used. Arterial anastomosis was performed, connecting the cutaneous anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator to the perforator of the second lumbar artery. In this fashion, the arterial circulation through the flap was flowing reversely through the muscle. The concomitant vein of the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery was hooked up to the thoracodorsal vein using a long interposition vein graft because the perforator of the second lumbar vein was too small. Postoperative healing was uneventful. In conclusion, a successful reconstruction of a lumbar defect has shown that local perforators in the lumbar area may be accessible for easier perforator-to-perforator anastomoses and that the muscular part of the musculocutaneous ALT flap can survive on retrograde arterial perfusion from a perforator of the skin island.

  1. Dorsal foot resurfacing using free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap in children.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Tarek A; El-Sayed, Amr; Kotb, Mohamed M; Saleh, Waleed Riad; Ragheb, Yasser Farouk; El-Refai, Omar; El Fahar, Mohammed Hassan Ali

    2013-05-01

    Very limited literature described the use of the free anterolateral thigh (ALT) among other flaps for pediatric lower limb reconstruction. The aim of this study is to present our experience using the free ALT flap for reconstruction of soft tissue defects over the dorsum of the foot and ankle in children. The study included 42 children aged 2.5-13 years with a mean of 6.18 years. Three children had crush injuries while the rest were victims of run over car accidents. All of the flaps were vascularized by at least two perforators; 88.23% were musculocutaneous and 11.77 were septocutaneous perforators. All flaps were raised in a subfascial plane. Initial thinning was performed in five flaps and 35% required subsequent debulking. Mean Flap surface area was 117.11 cm(2). The recipient arteries were the anterior tibial artery in 38 cases and posterior tibial artery in four cases. Venous anastomosis was performed to one vena commitant and in nine cases the long saphenous vein was additionally used. Mean ischemia time of the flap was 2 hours while total operative time averaged 6.3 hours. About 41% of donor sites were closed primarily while 59% required skin grafting. Primary flap survival rate was 92.8% (39/42 cases). Three flaps showed venous congestion. After venous reanastomosis, two flaps showed partial loss and one flap was lost completely. Post-operative hospital stay averaged 7.5 days. The free ALT flap could be as safe, reliable, and aesthetically appealing option for foot/ankle resurfacing in children after traumatic soft tissue loss.

  2. The Value of the "Papillon" Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Pharyngolaryngectomy Reconstruction: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Naseem; Hanna, Todd C; Dyalram, Donita; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    The tubed, buried anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a popular reconstruction method for total pharyngolaryngectomy defects. The "papillon"-designed ALT flap, described by Hayden et al, offers an alternative method of using the ALT flap in this situation. We report our early experience with the papillon ALT flap in a patient cohort. On retrospective review, all patients who underwent reconstruction of circumferential total pharyngolaryngectomy defects with the papillon ALT flap from February 2012 to February 2015 were identified from our departmental database. Demographic and clinical data, operative details, and complications were analyzed from the records. Seven patients were included in this study. The mean length of hospital stay was 15 days (range, 10 to 32 days). Acute complications occurred in 5 of 7 patients, namely, partial flap loss managed by a pectoralis flap (1 of 7 [14%]); an early pharyngocutaneous fistula (4 of 7 [57%]) managed by simple repair, wound packing, or delayed repair; and a donor-site hematoma (1 of 7 [14%]). At follow-up (range, 2 to 24 months), there was 1 stricture formation, but no chronic fistula. All patients were able to swallow orally. Early results using the papillon ALT flap suggest that this technique is a viable alternative to the standard tubed ALT flap design. The advantages of this design include the following: 1) it offers simultaneous vascularized skin to resurface anterior neck skin deficiency without resorting to additional tissue elsewhere; 2) direct monitoring of the ALT flap is possible; and 3) any pharyngocutaneous fistula is exteriorized to the surface without compromising the internal neck structures and can be easily identified and repaired directly in the office. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconstruction of foot and ankle defects with a free anterolateral thigh flap in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Acar, Mehmet Ali; Güleç, Ali; Aydin, Bahattin Kerem; Erkoçak, Ömer Faruk; Yilmaz, Güney; Şenaran, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    There are a limited number of published studies describing reconstruction with an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap following lower extremity injury in pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to present our experiences with the application of a free ALT flap not only in the reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the pediatric foot and ankle but also in patients with bone, tendon, and ligament injuries that require repair. Reconstruction with a free ALT flap was performed in 11 pediatric patients (mean age, 8.9 years; range, 3-15 years) between November 2010 and February 2013. The modes of injury were as follows: six traffic accidents, three firearm accidents, one agricultural machinery accident, and one bicycle chain accident. A retrospective evaluation of the applied surgical procedures was performed: flap size, perforator type and number, placement area, site of anastomosis, closure of the donor site, complications, and flap survival. The mean size of the skin flap was 83.2 mm(2) (range, 48-117 mm(2)). Except for two patients, there were two perforators in the obtained flaps, which were 75% musculocutaneous and 25% septocutaneous. To strengthen the Achilles tendon in one patient, the ALT, together with the fascia lata, was raised as a composite flap. This flap was used as a "sensate flap" in three patients with defects in the heel area and as a "perforator flap" in seven patients. Anastomosis was performed in the anterior tibial artery in five patients and in the posterior tibial artery in six patients. Primary closure was performed for the donor site in all patients. Due to venous thrombus after 24 hours in one patient, reexploration was performed, and blood flow was regained with a vein graft. In the same patient, partial necrosis developed on the lateral edge of the flap; after debridement of the necrotic areas, closure was performed with a split thickness skin graft. After the ALT flap procedure, the primary flap survival rate was 90.9%. The free ALT

  4. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  5. Reconstruction of the Lower Abdominal Region Using Bilateral Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flaps Combined With Poly-Surgical Mesh: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Zhou, Xiao; Li, Zan; Chen, Ju-Ying; Peng, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Li-Chang; Lv, Chun-Liu

    2015-12-01

    The en-bloc resection of neoplasms on the abdominal wall often causes extensive defects that are difficult to manage. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a widely used flap in reconstructive surgery of defects. In this article, we present a case using bilateral pedicle anterolateral thigh flaps combined with a surgical polymesh to repair a large defect (22 cm × 18 cm) caused by dissection of a recurrent fibromatosis with good functional and aesthetic effects. There were no obvious morbidities or complications during a 6-month follow-up period.We conclude that the bilateral pedicle anterolateral thigh flap is a good choice for reconstruction of large lower abdominal wall defects. It can afford sufficient soft tissue coverage without obvious donor site morbidity.

  6. Treating Parry-Romberg Syndrome Using Three-Dimensional Scanning and Printing and the Anterolateral Thigh Dermal Adipofascial Flap.

    PubMed

    Chai, Gang; Tan, Andy; Yao, Caroline A; Magee, William P; Junjun, Pan; Zhu, Ming; Bogari, Melia; Hsu, Yulung; Xu, Haisong; Zhang, Yan

    2015-09-01

    As three-dimensional technology becomes more ubiquitous, many plastic surgical applications have emerged. The authors investigate a three-dimensional scanning and printing system for facial soft tissue reconstruction in conjunction with an anterolateral thigh dermal adipofascial flap for the treatment of Parry-Romberg syndrome. Seven patients with facial atrophy of the zygomatic, buccal, and mandibular areas were included. Three-dimensional scanning of each patient's face in conjunction was analyzed with computer-aided design (CAD) to quantify areas of facial asymmetry. Models were then created using three-dimensional printing to map areas of soft tissue deficiency. Free anterolateral thigh (ALT) dermal adipofascial flaps were designed based on the three-dimensional models of soft tissue deficiency. All flaps survived. One case had a postoperative hematoma. Six patients had restored facial symmetry. One patient required fat injections to obtain symmetry. No patients required revision surgery of their healed flaps for contouring. Three-dimensional laser scanning and three-dimensional printing in combination with a free ALT dermal adipofascial flap offer surgeons a precise means to reconstruct facial contour deformities.

  7. Bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flap for simultaneous reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge to simultaneously reconstruct bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis. In this study, we report two cases where bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flaps were used to resurface two separate buccal defects. PMID:27619322

  8. [COMPARISON OF REPAIR EFFECT BETWEEN CHIMERIC ANTEROLATERAL THIGH FLAP AND SERIES-WOUND FLAPS FOR DEFECT AFTER RESECTION OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Yang, Heping; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Haidi; Yang, Shuxiong; Wang, Jun; Hu, Dawang

    2016-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of complex defects repair between using chimeric anterolateral thigh flap and series-wound flaps after resection of oral and maxillofacial cancer. After resection of oral and maxillofacial cancer, defect was repaired with chimeric anterolateral thigh flap in 39 patients between January 2011 and July 2014 (chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group); and defect was repaired with series-wound flaps in 35 patients between January 2009 and December 2010 (series-wound flaps group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, duration of disease, tumor type, tumor staging, defect location, and defect area between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The operation time, flap harvesting and microvascular anastomosis time, stomach tube extraction time, and oral feeding time were recorded and compared between 2 groups, and postoperative complications were observed; the effectiveness was evaluated according to clinical efficacy evaluation table of bone and soft tissue defects reconstruction surgery in oral and maxillofacial region. Vascular crisis occurred in 2 cases of chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group, and 4 cases of series-wound flaps group. Partial necrosis appeared at distal end of a series-wound flaps, and oral fistula and infection developed in 3 series-wound flaps. The other flaps and the grafted skin at donor site survived; wounds at recipient site healed by first intention. The operation time, stomach tube extraction time, and oral feeding time of chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group were significantly shorter than those of series-wound flaps group (P < 0.05), while the flap harvesting and microvascular anastomosis time was significantly longer than that of series-wound flaps group (P < 0.05). The patients were followed up 1-5 years (mean, 2.5 years). At 3 months after operation, the appearance, patients' satisfaction, working conditions, oral closure function, chew, language performance, and swallowing scores of the chimeric anterolateral

  9. Reverse Anterolateral Thigh Flap to Revise a Below-knee Amputation Stump at the Mid-tibial Level

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh, Parviz Lionel; Wu, Cheng-Jung; Shih, Hsiang-Shun

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The reconstruction of defects around the knee often poses a challenge due to the limited availability of local soft tissues. Indeed, this same problem is encountered when attempting to revise a below-knee amputation stump. Moreover, due to a paucity of recipient vessels in those who have undergone previous amputation secondary to trauma, free-flap reconstruction is often challenging and not always successful. We report a case of a reverse anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap used to revise a long below-knee amputation stump. Previous reports in the literature attest to the versatility of the reverse ALT to cover defects around the knee and proximal tibia, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of a reverse ALT reaching to the mid-tibial level. PMID:25289282

  10. Abdominal wall reconstruction after resection of an enterocutaneous fistula with an island pedicled anterolateral thigh perforator flap. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Safawi, E B; Zakaria, Z; Basiron, N

    2013-01-01

    Entero-cutaneous fistula resulting from a locally invasive large bowel carcinoma is a difficult surgical challenge. En-bloc resection of the involved organs and the entero-cutaneous fistula tract with a healthy tissue margin will result in a composite abdominal wall defect that requires closure. Reconstructive surgical options include primary closure, components separation and the use of local, regional or free flaps with or without prosthetic mesh. We report a case of an abdominal enterocutaneous fistula secondary to a locally invasive sigmoid carcinoma, which was reconstructed with a pedicled antero-lateral thigh perforator (ALT) flap. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a malignant entero-cutaneous fistula, which was reconstructed with an ALT flap.

  11. Combined Use of an Anterolateral Thigh Flap and Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap for Reconstruction of an Extensive Abdominal Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Yu; Arikawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstruction of large abdominal wall defects is challenging. We herein report the successful reconstruction of an extensive abdominal wall defect using a novel combination of flaps after sarcoma resection. A 74-year-old man presented with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma on his abdominal wall. He underwent excision of the tumor, which resulted in an extensive abdominal wall defect. The defect was reconstructed with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap with an iliotibial tract and a pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap. No skin graft was necessary. The wounds healed successfully, and no herniation occurred. The combination of an anterolateral thigh flap and a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is a versatile option for reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects. PMID:27975026

  12. Assessment of quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer who have had defects reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Yang, Yanjie; Xu, Zhongfei; Liu, Fayu; Cheng, Yusheng; Xu, Lei; Sun, Changfu

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL) in patients who have had resections of oral cancer and reconstruction by free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps. QoL was assessed by the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QoL) questionnaires 12 months postoperatively. Fifty-one of the 69 questionnaires were returned (74%). In the UW-QoL the best-scoring domain was pain, whereas the lowest scores were for chewing, saliva, and taste. In the OHIP-14 the lowest-scoring domain was handicap, followed by psychological disability, and social disability. Free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps for reconstruction of defects of the head and neck after resection for cancer significantly influenced the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Utilization of a continuous external tissue expansion system to assist in primary closure of a large anterolateral thigh donor site defect.

    PubMed

    Silver, Andrew G; Baynosa, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Primary closure of a large anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap donor site defect with the assistance of an external tissue expansion system is presented. The dimensions of this donor site (12 cm × 40 cm) and its percentage of leg circumference (34%) would make this site likely to require skin grafting or further flap coverage based on the results of previously published literature.

  14. Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joonchul; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Han, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects is a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. In this report, a case of reconstruction of a large abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is presented. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrent desmoid-type fibromatosis in the abdominal wall. The recurrent tumor was radically excised, and the en bloc excision resulted in a full-thickness, large abdominal wall defect (25 cm × 20 cm). An eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap, including wide fascial extension, was transferred to the abdominal defect; fascial portions were sutured to the remnant abdominal fascia. Plication of the fascia along the sutured portion was performed to relieve the skin tension between the flap and the marginal skin of the abdominal defect. Eight months after surgery, the reconstructed abdomen had an acceptable esthetic appearance without tumor recurrence or hernia. The use of an eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap may be an alternative method for the reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects.

  15. Aesthetic and functional outcomes of the innervated and thinned anterolateral thigh flap in reconstruction of upper limb defects.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ortíz Zermeño, Carlos Alberto; López Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been widely described in reconstruction of the upper extremity. However, some details require refinement to improve both functional and aesthetic results. Methods. After reconstruction of upper extremity defects using thinned and innervated ALT flaps, functional and aesthetic outcomes were evaluated with the QuickDASH scale and a Likert scale for aesthetic assessment of free flaps, respectively. Results. Seven patients with a mean follow-up of 11.57 months and average flap thickness of 5 mm underwent innervation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The average percentage of disability (QuickDASH) was 21.88% with tenderness, pain, temperature, and two-point discrimination present in 100% of cases, and the aesthetic result gave an overall result of 15.40 (good) with the best scores in color and texture. Conclusions. Simultaneous thinning and innervation of the ALT flap lead to a good cosmetic result and functional outcome with a low percentage of disability, which could result in minor surgical procedures and better recovery of motor and sensory function. Level of Evidence. IV.

  16. Treatment of Radial Nonunion with Corticocancellous Bone Graft and Fascia of Anterolateral Thigh Free Flap: The Wrap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ronga, Mario; Sallam, Davide; Fagetti, Alessandro; Valdatta, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The management of nonunion of the forearm bones is a challenging task. Multiple factors have been associated with the establishment of forearm nonunion, such as the fracture position and complexity, general condition of the patient, and the previously utilized surgical technique. The optimal surgical treatment of a bone gap remains a subject of discussion. Autogenous corticocancellous bone grafts and vascularized bone flaps have been used with differing results. The authors describe a technique for the treatment of posttraumatic nonunion of the radius with a 5-cm bone gap using the free anterolateral thigh fascial flap wrapped around a tricortical iliac bone graft. The fracture healed after 5 weeks. The use of a vascularized tissue wrapped around the bone graft resulted in a well-healed bone and no signs of resorption after 2 years of follow-up. A bone graft wrapped by a fascial flap could magnify the restorative effect on the bone defect because of its dual role of constructing vascularization and inducing tissue regeneration. PMID:28293506

  17. Soft tissue repair for tibialis anterior tendon ruptures using plate and screw fixation technique in combination with anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haijun; Xu, Guanyue

    2015-09-17

    Traumatic ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare but can cause substantial functional deficiencies. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a surgery for soft tissue repair of traumatic rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon by using a plate and screw fixation repair in combination with the free anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation. Eight consecutive patients with anterior tibialis tendon ruptures who visited orthopedics departments from February 2008 to February 2012 were included in our study. The ruptured tendon was reconstructed with plate and screw fixation technique, and the tissue defects were repaired with anterolateral thigh free flaps. The complications and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores were evaluated. Postoperative manual strength test was performed using a 0 to 5 scale. All flaps survived without any complications. The average preoperative and postoperative AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores of the patients were 51 and 95, respectively. Good ankle dorsiflexion strength against strong resistance was observed in eight ankles postoperatively (manual strength of one patient was 4/5, the others were 5/5), and a substantial improvement in strength was noted compared with the preoperative examination. Soft tissue repair for tibialis anterior tendon rupture using plate and screw fixation technique in combination with anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation is a feasible technique and yield satisfactory results.

  18. Vascularized free forearm flap versus free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps for reconstruction in patients with head and neck cancer: assessment of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Xu, Zhongfei; Liu, Fayu; Huang, Shaohui; Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with malignant tumors who had undergone immediate free flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap surgery and others who had received free anterolateral thigh perforator flap surgery. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires 12 months after reconstruction. A total of 121 of 163 questionnaires were returned (74.2%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the T classification (p < .005). Patients reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps performed better in the appearance and shoulder domains, and the role emotion and social functioning domains. Using either radial forearm free flaps or free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps for reconstruction of head and neck defects after cancer resection significantly influences a patient's quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Anterolateral papillary muscle rupture caused by myocardial infarction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Renteria, Anne S; Burzyantseva, Olga; Lokesh, Gowda; Thelusmond, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Background The rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle is less common than the posteromedial papillary muscle since the anterolateral muscle has dual blood supplies, while the posteromedial papillary muscle has a single blood supply. Case presentation We present a case report of a 42 year old male presenting with heart failure being diagnosed to have mitral regurgitation from the partial rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle due to coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a mitral valve replacement and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting of the first and the second obtuse marginal arteries. Conclusion Acute mitral regurgitation can be precipitated by acute myocardial infarction due to rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle. PMID:18803861

  20. Comparison of morbidity after reconstruction of tongue defects with an anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap compared with a radial forearm free-flap: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Zhou, N; Huang, X; Song, S

    2016-12-01

    Currently the radial forearm fasciocutaneous flap and the anterolateral thigh flap are among the most popular free flaps used for reconstruction of oral soft tissue. However, there is controversy about their efficacy after reconstruction of tongue defects because of their respective intrinsic properties, so we have compared them in reconstruction of tongue defects using meta-analysis. We conducted a search in Pubmed, EMBASE, OVID, Science Direct, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, which covered all papers published before January 2015. Twelve clinical papers, that included 366 patients with 198 radial forearm flaps and 168 anterolateral flaps, met the criteria. Relevant data were extracted and analysed using systematic meta-analyses. The results showed that the incidence of localised numbness at the donor site of the radial forearm flap postoperatively was significantly higher and satisfaction with the appearance of the donor site significantly lower than in the anterolateral thigh group. There were no differences in flap survival, incidence of vascular crises in the flap, complications, satisfaction with the appearance of the tongue, or the postoperative clarity of speech and swallowing ability. Results suggested that the anterolateral thigh flap is the ideal soft tissue flap for reconstructing defects in the tongue, as there was minimal numbness at the donor site and patients were much more satisfied. Further research is needed to address details of the site and the extent of surgical defects as well as the relations between dissection of the radial flap and repair of the skin graft. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of donor-site morbidity and satisfaction between anterolateral thigh and parascapular free flaps in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sebastian; Klinkenberg, Marek; Behr, Bjoern; Hirsch, Tobias; Kremer, Thomas; Hernekamp, Frederick; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kneser, Ulrich; Daigeler, Adrien

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare donor-site morbidity after anterolateral thigh (ALT) and parascapular (PS) free flap harvest in the same patient. A total of 13 patients were included in this study. Because of initial flap loss, each patient received ALT as well as PS free flap transplantation. A total of 10 patients were available for follow-up. The average follow-up time was 44.5 months. Besides physical examination, range of motion and scar dimensions were assessed to objectify donor-site deficiencies. The subjective donor-site morbidity was assessed by the patients using a self-report questionnaire. In addition, patients were requested to state their donor-site preference. ALT donor site revealed more sensitivity deficiencies compared with the PS harvest site (8 vs. 4). The latter provoked less functional impairments (1 vs. 2). Scar dimensions were larger at PS harvest site (25.8 × 4.3 cm vs. 23.3 × 3.6 cm). Patients' satisfaction was in favor of the PS donor site (1.9 vs. 2.7). Among the 10 patients, 7 patients preferred the PS and 3 patients preferred the ALT donor site. Comparison of donor-site morbidities in the same patient reveals a valuable tool to diminish individual bias. Despite the low number of cases, we were able to demonstrate the superiority of PS compared with ALT donor sites.The Level of Evidence of the study is III. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. A free anterolateral thigh flap and iliotibial band for reconstruction of soft tissue defects at children's feet and ankles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Ren, Yi-Jun; Yan, Li; Xiao, Zhi-Hong; Ding, Fan; Li, Fan; Han, Qiong; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Kan, Wu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    High-energy injury to children caused by a traffic accident is usually characterised by extensive soft tissue defects with exposure or loss of tendons and bone at the foot. Segmental loss of the Achilles tendon along with soft tissue defects is a great challenge for microsurgical reconstruction. Free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is indicated for reconstruction of such defects because limited local tissues are available. Additionally, iliotibial band in the donor area can be used to reconstruct the damaged tendon. Here we described our successful management of 25 paediatric patients with such high-energy injury at feet and ankles in one-stage transplantation of a free ALT flap and an iliotibial band from January 2008 to January 2013. The tendon defect, ranging from 3 to 16cm in length, was reconstructed with an iliotibial band. The flaps ranged from 5 to 12cm in width and 8 to 18cm in length. All the flaps survived completely and no donor site complications were observed. In two flaps there was a small area of distal necrosis which was healed by dressing changes. The mean follow-up time was 14.2 months (from 6 to 24 months). Limb function was assessed using the Maryland Foot Score. The excellent and good rate was 92%. We believe a free ALT flap is ideal for reconstruction of massive soft tissue defects at the foot and ankle in children and an iliotibial band from the same donor site can be used for reconstruction of a damaged tendon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Posterior thigh muscle injuries in elite track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Papacostas, Emmanuel; Kiritsi, Olga; Papalada, Agapi; Gougoulias, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-09-01

    Posterior thigh muscle injuries in athletes are common, and prediction of recovery time would be of value. Knee active range of motion deficit 48 hours after a unilateral posterior thigh muscle injury correlates with time to full recovery. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. One hundred sixty-five track and field athletes with acute, first-time, unilateral posterior thigh muscle injuries were prospectively evaluated regarding knee active range of motion deficit. This was compared with the uninjured side 48 hours after injury. A control group was also examined. Ultrasound was used to image the muscle lesion. All athletes were managed nonoperatively with the same rehabilitation protocol. The "full rehabilitation time" (interval from the injury to full athletic activities) was recorded. Range of motion of the affected leg was decreased in the 165 injured athletes compared with the uninjured side and the control group. Sonography identified abnormalities in 55% (90 of 165) of the injured athletes. The biceps femoris was the most commonly affected muscle (68 of 90 [75%]). The musculotendinous junction (proximal or distal) was involved in 93% (85 of 90) of lesions. Eighty-one percent (133 of 165) of athletes had active range of motion deficit of less than 20 degrees, and had returned to full performance at 2 weeks. In 6 of 165 athletes (3.6%), with active range of motion deficit of more than 30 degrees, recovery time exceeded 6 weeks, with a significant correlation between full rehabilitation time and active range of motion deficit (chi(2) = 152.560; P = .0001). Knee active range of motion deficit is an objective and accurate measurement, predicting recovery time in elite athletes.

  4. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power. PMID:27315060

  5. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Mohr, Christian; Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian; Becker, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power.

  6. Tripaddled anterolateral thigh flap for simultaneous reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects after buccal cancer ablation and severe oral submucous fibrosis release: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Canhua; Guo, Feng; Li, Ning; Huang, Pengxin; Jian, Xinchun; Munnee, Krishna

    2013-11-01

    For buccal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients accompanied with severe oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), it is a challenge to simultaneously reconstruct bilateral buccal defects created from cancer resection and contralateral OSF release to improve postoperative mouth opening. Herein, we present a case of reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects in a 46-year-old patient who had left buccal SCC accompanied with severe OSF. Extensive ablation involved the left full-thickness cheek as well as part of mandible and a release of right OSF tissue were performed. A tripaddled anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with three independent sets of perforators was harvested for reconstruction. The flap survived in its entirety. No donor or recipient site complication occurred. The preoperative inter-incisor distance (IID) was 1 mm, while the postoperative IID was 23 mm. This is the first report on the use of one tripaddled ALT flap for reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects created from cancer ablation and severe contralateral OSF release.

  7. Successful Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction for a Recurrent Ischial Pressure Ulcer: A Case With Multiple Recurrences Over a 7-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Yu; Shih, Yu-Jen; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult ulcers to treat and have a low treatment success rate compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers; regional flap failure further complicates the treatment. Reported here is a case of a 65-year-old man who experienced a spinal injury with paraplegia due to trauma 20 years ago. The patient experienced a recurrent ischial ulcer since 2007, and underwent several types of flap reconstruction with poor outcomes over a 7-year period. Therefore, the chosen intervention was a pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) fasciocutaneous flap reconstruction for the ischial ulcer via a subcutaneous route. Over the 10-month follow-up, the recurrent ischial ulcer healed without wound dehiscence. Island pALT reconstruction appears to be an alternative technique for treating recurrent ischial pressure ulcers. Though reconstruction of ischial ulcers via the pALT technique has been described previously, this may be the first case report to describe pALT flap in a patient with recurrent ischial ulcers after failed reconstructions using a gluteus maximus flap, V-Y advancement flap, and hatchet flap.Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult to treat and have a low treatment success rate1 compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers. In addition, there are many different techniques that can be used to treat ischial pressure ulcers, including primary wound closure, gluteus maximus flaps, V-Y advancement flaps, or inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps. However, several experts have recently described using the pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) flap for reconstruction of recurrent ischial pressure ulcers.1,2 In the presented case, the authors followed a single patient with paraplegia with a recurrent ischial ulcer who had undergone several types of wound treatment over a 7-year period. The indurated ulcer was ultimately resolved by pALT reconstruction.

  8. Usefulness of the anterolateral thigh flap with vascularized fascia lata for reconstruction of orbital floor and nasal surface after total maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Young-Hoon; Cho, Kwang-Jae; Park, Jun-Ook; Kim, Min-Sik

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a technique using the fascia lata (FL) component of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap to re-create the orbital floor and lateral nasal wall after total maxillectomy. Retrospective analysis of medical records. A total of 22 patients underwent maxillary reconstruction using a composite ALT-FL flap following cancer resection. All patients underwent total maxillectomies via the Weber-Ferguson approach. The ALT flap was harvested with the deep fascia of the thigh with the aim of using it for lining of the orbital floor and lateral nasal cavity. The FL was sutured to the palatine bone inferiorly, nasal bone and zygomatic bone superiorly, and nasopharyngeal mucosa posteriorly to provide an orbital floor and make a neonasal cavity. There was 100% free flap survival. Speech was normal in eight (36%) patients, near normal in 10 (46%), and intelligible in four (18%). Seventeen (77%) patients gained a good facial appearance, and five (23%) a fair appearance. Sixteen (73%) patients complained of mild nasal crust formation, and the rest (27%) developed moderate crust. Microvascular reconstruction using a composite ALT-FL flap provided a reliable fascial component for orbital floor and nasal surface reconstruction of total maxillectomy defects. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. [Repair of skin and soft tissue defects around the knee joints combined with patellar ligament defects using free anterolateral thigh flaps with iliotibial tracts].

    PubMed

    Han, Fu; Hu, Dahai; Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongliang; Ma, Shaojun; Wei, Guoxing; Zheng, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    To observe clinical efficacy of using free anterolateral thigh flaps with iliotibial tracts in repairing skin and soft tissue defects around the knee joints with patellar ligament defects. Twelve patients with skin and soft tissue defects around the knee joints and patellar ligament defects were hospitalized from June 2010 to June 2014. The defects of skin and soft tissue ranged from 7 cm × 6 cm to 16 cm × 12 cm in area, and patellar ligament ranged from 5 to 12 cm in length and 2.5 to 4.0 cm in width. Free anterolateral thigh flaps with iliotibial tracts were used to repair these defects. During reconstruction of patellar ligament, both ends of iliotibial tract were successively folded to form tendon-like three-layer structure at first, and then the newly formed structure was wrapped around the broken ends of patellar ligament and fixed with suture. The flap size ranged from 9 cm × 8 cm to 18 cm × 14 cm. The iliotibial tract ranged from 7 to 14 cm in length and 8 to 12 cm in width. The donor sites were closed by grafting with autologous split-thickness skin harvested from thigh or trunk, and parked with gauze. Immediately after operation, the knee joints were fixed in extension with orthosis for 6 weeks. Weight bearing training of affected limbs being kept in extension position was started from 2 weeks after operation, and flexion and extension exercise of affected knee joints was begun from 6 weeks after operation. Before operation and 12 months after operation, the degree of pain around the knee joints and knee joint function were evaluated with the international knee documentation committee knee uation form, and the ranges of flexion and extension of knee joints were also evaluated. The integrity of reconstructed patellar ligament was assessed by color Doppler ultrasound from 6 to 12 months after operation. The occurrence of surgery-related complications was observed in all patients within 12 months after operation. (1) After operation, all flaps survived

  10. Complete rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle caused by coronary spasm.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masataka; Fukui, Toshihiro; Mahara, Keitaro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-12-01

    Papillary muscle rupture usually occurs as a catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction in patients with coronary artery stenosis; it is therefore less common in patients without coronary artery stenosis. We report the case of a 67-year old woman without coronary artery stenosis who suffered an acute anterolateral papillary muscle rupture and was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement. Evidence of coronary spasm was found on a coronary vasomotion test, suggesting that a high sensitivity to coronary spasm may explain a mechanism of isolated papillary muscle infarction.

  11. A case series of flow-through free anterolateral thigh flap to augment the vascularity of ischaemic limbs with soft tissue defect

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aditya; Singh, Hardeep; Mahendru, Sanjay; Brajesh, Vimalendu; Singh, Sukhdeep; Krishnan, Srinivasan; Khazanchi, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In a world of fast moving vehicles, heavy machinery and industries crush injury to limbs with vascular compromise and soft tissue defect is common. The traditional treatment is a 2 step one dealing with vascular repair and soft tissue cover separately, in the same operation. We report a series of single step vascular repair and soft tissue cover with flow through anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) flap for limb salvage. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with soft tissue defect and vascular injury were included in this study. A two team approach was used to minimise operative time, team one prepared the vessels and team 2 harvested the flap. Observations and Results: Of the ten patients operated (8 males), eight flaps were done for upper limb and two for lower limb salvage. Six anastomosis were done with ulnar vessels, two with radial and two with posterior tibial vessels. Nine extremities could be salvaged while one patient developed progressive thrombosis leading to amputation. Conclusion: The ALT flow-through flap is a versatile single step procedure that can be used to salvage an ischemic limb with soft tissue loss avoiding the need for interpositional vein graft. PMID:27274120

  12. The effect of early detection of anterolateral thigh free flap crisis on the salvage success rate, based on 10 years of experience and 1072 flaps.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Ren, Z H; Chickooree, D; Wu, H J; Tan, H Y; Wang, K; He, Z J; Gong, C J; Ram, V; Zhang, S

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of early exploration of anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap compromise in head and neck reconstruction and to correlate this with the salvage success rate. The perioperative data of 1051 patients with 1072 ALT flap reconstructions were reviewed retrospectively for the period January 2002 to December 2012. Outcome measures included ethnicity, defect type, incidence and timing of flap compromise, type of flap compromise, causes of vascular occlusion, and salvage rate. The success rate of free flap reconstruction was 97.3% (1043/1072). Of the 29 failures, 21 were complete and eight were partial failures (10-40% of the flap). Venous occlusions occurred in 39 flaps (83.0%) and arterial occlusions in five flaps (17.0%). Six cases were detected within 8h postoperatively, 13 at 8-16 h postoperatively, seven at 16-24h postoperatively, and 18 at 24-48 h postoperatively, with respective salvage rates of 66.7%, 61.5%, 28.6%, and 22.2%; three cases detected after 48 h failed. The salvage rate at ≤16 h (62.2%) was much higher than that at >16 h (21.4%, P=0.0039). Early detection, re-exploration, and effective handling of the flap crisis increases the rate of flap salvage tremendously.

  13. [Application of anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap using computed tomography angiography for mouth-floor reconstruction after resection of middle-late stage carcinoma of mouth floor].

    PubMed

    Luo, Shihong; Xiao, Jingang; Sun, Libo; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Liangnan; Xia, Delin; Zhou, Hangyu; Zhang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of free anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap (ALTMF) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) for the reconstruction of mouth-floor defects after the resection of middle-late stage carcinoma of the mouth floor. Sixteen cases of middle-late stage carcinomas of the mouth floor underwent radical resection, and mouth-floor and tongue defects were reconstructed with ALTMF. CTA was applied to plan the lateral circumflex femoral artery (LCFA) and its perforating vessel, which was verified during the operation. The position of the perforating vessel in the operation was fully consistent with that designed by the preoperative CTA. All 16 flaps completely survived. The appearance and function of all cases were both satisfactory. All donor sites were primarily closed and healed without functional morbidity. During the follow-up period of 6-36 months, 15 cases survived with acceptable aesthetic and functional results in mouth floor and tongue reconstruction, except for 1 case (T4N2M0) that died of metastasis carcinoma 10 months after operation. CTA can accurately locate the LCFA and artery perforator. Preoperative perforator planning using CTA in ALTMF transplantation is a reliable and useful method thatresults in safe operation with optimal outcome. The ALTMF is an ideal choice for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects after the resection of middle-late staie carcinoma of the mouth floor

  14. Comparison between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps and pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in oral cancer patients--a quality of life analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Juanfang; Cai, Xiangping; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Haibin

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps (ALTFF) and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) for reconstruction in oral cancer patients. Method Patients: who received free flap or PMMF reconstruction after ablation surgeries were eligible for the current study. The patients' demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores(Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires were collected. 81 of 118 questionnaires were returned (68.64%). There was significant differences between two groups in the gender (P<0.005). Patients reconstructed with ALTFF had better appearance domains and better shoulders domains, in addition to better role emotion domains. Using either PMMF or ALTFF for reconstruction of oral defects after cancer resection significantly influences a patient's quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for oral cancers.

  15. Free anterolateral thigh flap with vascularized lateral femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuroma-in-continuity and recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Nana; Mihara, Makoto; Koshima, Isao

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is challenging, especially in a case with recurrent CTS and a neuroma formation. Resection of the neuroma causing the syndrome, reconstruction of the nerve gap of the median nerve, and covering up the reconstructed median nerve with well-vascularized soft tissue for prevention of CTS re-recurrence are the essential procedures. We report a case of recurrent CTS with severe pain due to a neuroma-in-continuity successfully treated using a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with a vascularized lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). A 2 cm neuroma existed in the median nerve and was resected. The nerve gap was repaired using a vascularized LFCN included in the ALT flap. The ALT flap was transferred to the wrist to cover the median nerve. The severe pain disappeared completely and the sensory and motor impairment of the median nerve improved 5 months after the free flap surgery, as the Tinel's sign moved distally away from the wrist and disappeared. The result of the Semmes-Weinstein test improved from 5.08 to 4.31 and she was able to flex and extend the right wrist and fingers without pain. CTS did not recur 15 months after the surgery. A free ALT flap with vascularized LFCN allows nerve reconstruction for the median nerve gap created after neuroma resection and coverage of the median nerve with well-vascularized soft tissue to prevent adhesion and CTS recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparison between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps and pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in oral cancer patients-A quality of life analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Cai, Xiangping; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps (ALTFF) and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) for reconstruction in oral cancer patients. Method and Patients: who received free flap or PMMF reconstruction after ablation surgeries were eligible for the current study. The patients’ demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores(Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires were collected. Results: 81 of 118 questionnaires were returned (68.64%). There was significant differences between two groups in the gender (P<0.005). Patients reconstructed with ALTFF had better appearance domains and better shoulders domains, in addition to better role emotion domains. Conclusions: Using either PMMF or ALTFF for reconstruction of oral defects after cancer resection significantly influences a patient’s quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for oral cancers. Key words:Quality of life, ALTFF,PMMF, oral cancer. PMID:24121914

  17. Aesthetic Multiple-Toe Reconstruction With Combined Iliac Bone Graft and Wraparound Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soo-Ha; Lao, William; Yen, Cheng-I; Lin, Yu-Te; Wu, Katie Pei-Hsuan; Chang, Tommy Nai-Jen

    2017-03-01

    Compared with upper extremity injuries, toe amputations and their replantations are rare because of the difficulty of their relatively thinner soft tissue envelope. Consequently, fewer reconstructive options are available for toes and they are rarely reported in the literature. In this study, we reported a case of right third to fifth toe amputations and their subsequent reconstruction with iliac bone grafts and a free anterolateral thigh flap. After serial debulking and division procedures, 3 toes were divided successfully. Ten months after the initial operation, the patient regained pain-free functional ambulation despite some bone resorption noted on follow-up radiographs. The patient showed high satisfaction on her new toes in terms of aesthetical and functional outcomes. She was able to stand for over 30 minutes without pain. At the 2-year follow-up, the Foot Function Index was 18.3%. Although toe reconstruction is frequently considered unnecessary because of its relative high demand of surgical techniques and little gain on gait; nonetheless, in selected cases, toe reconstruction may still be beneficial if the metatarsophalangeal joints were intact and there is a strong individual desire for aesthetical restoration.

  18. [Assessment of life quality of for patients after tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap, anterolateral thigh perforator flap or submental island flap].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Xiang, Jing-Zhou; Liu, Fa-Yu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate operation-related factors and quality of life (QOL) for patients after tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterolateral thigh perforator flap (ALT) or submental island flap (SIF). Totally 59 patients, diagnosed as tongue carcinoma, received glossectomy and simultaneous reconstruction with free flaps including RFFF, ALT or SIF in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, China Medical University from October 2004 to October 2014. All patients were followed up for 6 months and completed the University of Washington Quality of Life scale Version 4 questionnaires. The postoperative QOL was compared among the three groups. The data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 software package. The operation duration of SIF group was significantly shorter than those of RFFF group or ALT group (P<0.05). The ALT group had a longer hospitalization time. There were statistically differences among the 3 groups regarding to the size of reconstructed defects. Action QOL score of the ALT group was significantly lower than those of RFFF group and SIF group. There was no significant difference in the total QOL score including chewing, swallowing, speech and postoperative pain among the 3 groups. In summary, there may be functional disability for patients after glossectomy and simultaneous reconstruction. The quality of life would be acceptable after tongue reconstruction with RFFF, ALT and SIF.

  19. A comparison of free anterolateral thigh and latissimus dorsi flaps in soft tissue reconstruction of extensive defects in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Horn, Dominik; Jonas, Rene; Engel, Michael; Freier, Kolja; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Freudlsperger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Tailoring the most suitable reconstructive approach to each patient remains challenging especially in the head and neck region. To compare the applicability of the latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap, we retrospectively analyzed patients who had reconstruction of extensive and/or bulky composite tissue defects in the head and neck area. We performed 85 free tissue transfers (44 LD and 41 ALT flaps). LD mean flap surface was 115.8 cm(2). ALT mean flap surface was 67.0 cm(2). Pedicle length ranged from 8 to 16 cm in LD and 11-16 cm in ALT flaps. The survival rate was 93% in ALT and 91% in LD flaps. Donor site morbidity occurred in 5% (ALT) and 7% (LD). A Two-team-approach was possible in 24% of the LD group, whereas all ALT flaps were raised in a Two-team-approach. Both flaps present excellent opportunities for the reconstruction of extensive and/or bulky defects. They largely meet the requirements of an ideal soft tissue flap in terms of versatility, skin texture and tissue stock. Both flaps can be raised with a double skin paddle. The advantages and disadvantages of each flap have to be weighed up against each other and both flaps should be in the repertoire of every microvascular surgeon.

  20. Comparison of MRI and DXA to measure muscle size and age-related atrophy in thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Maden-Wilkinson, T M; Degens, H; Jones, D A; McPhee, J S

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were used to examine the thigh lean mass in young and old men and women. A whole-body DXA scan was used to estimate thigh lean mass in young (20 men; 22.4±3.1y; 18 women; 22.1±2.0y) and older adults (25 men; 72.3±4.9y; 28 women; 72.0±4.5y). Thigh lean mass determined with a thigh scan on the DXA or full thigh MRI scans were compared. Although the thigh lean mass quantified by DXA and MRI in young and older participants were correlated (R(2)=0.88; p<0.001) the magnitude of the differences in thigh lean mass between young and old was smaller with DXA than MRI (old vs. young men 79.5±13.1% and 73.4±11.2%; old vs. young women 88.6±11.8% and 79.4±12.3%, respectively). Detailed analysis of MRI revealed 30% smaller quadriceps muscles in the older than young individuals, while the other thigh muscles were only 18% smaller. DXA underestimates the age-related loss of thigh muscle mass in comparison to MRI. The quadriceps muscles were more susceptible to age-related atrophy compared with other thigh muscles.

  1. [Outcome of relaying anterolateral thigh perforator flap in resurfacing the donor site wound following free anteromedial thigh perforator flap transfer for reconstruction of defect after oral tumor radical resection].

    PubMed

    Song, D J; Li, Z; Zhou, X; Zhang, Y X; Peng, X W; Zhou, B; Lyu, C L; Yang, L C; Peng, W

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the outcome of relaying anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap in resurfacing the donor site wound following free anteromedial thigh (AMT) perforator flap transfer for reconstruction of defect after oral tumor radical resection. Methods: From January 2013 to January 2016, 28 patients with oral tumor underwent radical resection in our hospital, leaving defects with size ranged from 6.5 cm×3.5 cm to 11.0 cm×7.5 cm which were reconstructed by free AMT perforator flaps with size ranged from 7.0 cm×4.0 cm to 12.0 cm×8.0 cm. All the arteries of AMT perforators were anastomosed with superior thyroid arteries, while the venae comitants were anastomosed with superior thyroid venae or internal jugular venae. The donor site wounds of free AMT perforator flaps were reconstructed by relaying ALT perforator flaps with size ranged from 8.0 cm×3.5 cm to 14.0 cm×7.5 cm. The relaying ALT perforator flap and wound edge were closed directly with layer interrupted suture. Postoperatively, the patients stayed in bed and received diet through nasal feeding tube, and the ordinary diet and lower extremity exercise were carried out from one week after operation. Results: The AMT and ALT perforators existed consistently in all patients. In 16 patients the venae comitants of AMT perforator arteries were anastomosed with superior thyroid venae in end-to-end fashion, while in 12 patients with internal jugular venae in end-to-side fashion. All flaps survived uneventfully about 2 weeks after operation, and the wounds healed smoothly. All patients were followed up for 6 to 30 months after operation. The sites repaired with free AMT perforator flaps were not bulky in appearance, with two-point discrimination distances ranged from 8 to 15 mm. The movement of tongue was not obviously affected, and patients could speak and eat normally. The texture and color of the sites repaired with relaying ALT perforator flaps were close to those of the adjacent tissue, and the two

  2. Thigh muscle volume predicted by anthropometric measurements and correlated with physical function in the older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, B B; Shih, T T F; Hsu, C Y; Yu, C W; Wei, S Y; Chen, C Y; Wu, C H; Chen, C Y

    2011-06-01

    (1) to correlate thigh muscle volume measured by magnetic resonance image (MRI) with anthropometric measurements and physical function in elderly subjects; (2) to predict MRI-measured thigh muscle volume using anthropometric measurements and physical functional status in elderly subjects. Cross-sectional, nonrandomized study. Outpatient clinic in Taiwan. Sixty-nine elderly subjects (33 men and 36 women) aged 65 and older. The anthropometric data (including body height, body weight, waist size, and thigh circumference), physical activity and function (including grip strength, bilateral quadriceps muscle power, the up and go test, chair rise, and five meters walk time) and bioelectrical impedance analysis data (including total body fat mass, fat-free mass, and predictive muscle size) were measured. MRI-measured muscle volume of both thighs was used as the reference standard. The MRI-measured thigh volume was positively correlated with all anthropometric data, quadriceps muscle power and the up and go test as well as fat-free mass and predictive muscle mass, whereas it was negatively associated with age and walk time. In predicting thigh muscle volume, the variables of age, gender, body weight, and thigh circumference were significant predictors in the linear regression model: Muscle volume (cm3) =4226.3-42.5 × Age (year)-955.7 × gender (male=1, female=2) + 45.9 × body weight(kg) + 60.0 × thigh circumference (cm) (r2 = 0.745, P < 0.001; standard error of the estimate = 581.6 cm3). The current work provides evidence of a strong relationship between thigh muscle volume and physical function in the elderly. We also developed a prediction equation model using anthropometric measurements. This model is a simple and noninvasive method for everyday clinical practice and follow-up.

  3. Thigh muscle strength in senior athletes and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2009-12-01

    Exercise is commonly recommended to counteract aging-related muscle weakness. While numerous exercise intervention studies on the elderly have been performed, few have included elite senior athletes, such as those who participate in the National Senior Games. The extent to which participation in highly competitive exercise affects muscle strength is unknown, as well as the extent to which such participation mitigates any aging-related strength losses. The purpose of this study was to examine isometric thigh muscle strength in selected athletes of the National Senior Games and healthy noncompetitive controls of similar age, as well as to investigate strength changes with aging in both groups. In all, 95 athletes of the Games and 72 healthy controls participated. Of the senior athletes, 43 were runners, 12 cyclists, and 40 swimmers. Three trials of isometric knee flexion and extension strength were collected using a load cell affixed to a custom-designed chair. Strength data were normalized to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-obtained lean mass of the leg. A 3-factor multivariate analysis of variance (group x gender x age group) was performed, which included both the extension and flexion variables (alpha = 0.05). Athletes exhibited 38% more extension strength and 66% more flexion strength than the controls (p < 0.001). Strength did not decrease with advancing age in either the athletes or the controls (p = 0.345). In conclusion, senior athletes who participate in highly competitive exercise have greater strength than healthy aged-matched individuals who do not. Neither group displayed the expected strength losses with aging. Our subject cohorts, however, were not typical of those over age 65 years because individuals with existing health conditions were excluded from the study.

  4. Versatility of the Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap in the Reconstruction of Large Defects of the Weight-Bearing Foot: A Single-Center Experience with 20 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Marco; Jeng, Seng-Feng; Sadigh, Parviz L; Shih, Hsiang-Shun

    2016-09-01

    Background Reconstruction of the weight-bearing surface of the foot represents a challenging task. With very little scope to borrow glabrous tissue from adjacent areas means that achieving a "like for like" reconstruction is rarely possible. In this setting, alternative approaches need to be considered. In this article we present our experience with various differing designs of the anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) in the reconstruction of 20 large defects of the weight-bearing sole. Methods Twenty patients with complex soft tissue defects of the weight-bearing sole underwent reconstruction over a 5-year period. Five cases were complicated by osteomyelitis resulting in significant calcaneal defects. The follow-up period ranged from 8 to 48 months and outcomes were assessed by two-point discrimination and protective sensation, observation of gait, and the ability of the patient to return to wearing normal footwear. Results All flaps survived with the exception of two partial skin necrosis. Sensory nerve coaptation was performed in 12/20 cases. One patient underwent second-stage total calcaneal reconstruction with a fibula osteocutaneous flap. Five large defects were reconstructed with the split skin paddle technique to allow for direct donor-site closure. No evidence of postoperative ulceration was noted in any of the patients over the follow-up period and all were satisfied regarding the functional and aesthetic results achieved. Conclusion Complex defects of the weight-bearing sole can be successfully reconstructed using the free ALT flap resulting in very favorable functional outcomes. Even when calcaneal osteomyelitis has set in, excellent outcomes can be achieved.

  5. Outcomes of anterolateral thigh-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with bone grafting in gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Chung, Duke Whan; Han, Chung Soo

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the utility and the clinical outcomes of anterolateral thigh (ALT)-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with plating and bone grafting in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures. A total of 21 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean follow-up period was 18 months and the mean age was 46.7 years. There were 18 men and three women. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 11.6 days. The mean size of flaps used was 15.3 × 8.2 cm. The mean size of bone defects was 2.26 cm. Segmental bone defects were observed in 5 five cases, for which bone transport or vascularized fibular graft were performed. When flaps were successful and the fracture sites did not have any evidence of infection, internal fixation with plates and bone grafting were performed. Flaps survived in 20 cases. In the 20 cases with successful flaps, two cases developed osteomyelitis, but the 20 cases achieved solid bone union at a mean of 8.6 months after the injury, salvaging the lower extremity in 100% of the cases. At the last follow-up, 9 nine cases were measured excellent or good; 6, fair; and 6, poor in the functional assessment based on the method developed by Puno et al. ALT- free flaps to cover soft tissue defects in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures are considered as useful option for the treatment of composite defects. In addition, conversion to internal fixation and bone grafting can be an alternative method in order to reduce the risk of complications and inconvenience of external fixators.

  6. Estimation of the forces generated by the thigh muscles for transtibial amputee gait.

    PubMed

    Voinescu, M; Soares, D P; Natal Jorge, R M; Davidescu, A; Machado, L J

    2012-04-05

    The forces generated by the muscles with origin on the human femur play a major role in transtibial amputee gait, as they are the most effective of the means that the body can use for propulsion. By estimating the forces generated by the thigh muscles of transtibial amputees, and comparing them to the forces generated by the thigh muscles of normal subjects, it is possible to better estimate the energy output needed from prosthetic devices. The purpose of this paper is to obtain the forces generated by the thigh muscles of transtibial amputees and compare these with forces obtained from the same muscles in the case of normal subjects. Two transtibial amputees and four normal subjects similar in size to the amputees were investigated. Level ground walking was chosen as the movement to be studied, since it is a common activity that most amputees engage in. Inverse dynamics and a muscle recruitment algorithm (developed by AnyBody Technology(®)) were used for generating the muscle activation patterns and for computing the muscle forces. The muscle forces were estimated as two sums: one for all posterior muscles and one for the anterior muscles, based on the position of the muscles of the thigh relative to the frontal plane of the human body. The results showed that a significantly higher force is generated by the posterior muscles of the amputees during walking, leading to a general increase of the metabolic cost necessary for one step.

  7. Reverse-flow anterolateral thigh perforator: an ad hoc flap for severe post-burn knee contracture.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H A; El-Bassiony, L E

    2016-03-31

    We evaluate function outcomes of the reverse-flow ALT perforator flap to reconstruct severe post-burn knee contracture. Between October 2012 and December 2014, 10 patients with severe post-burn knee contracture were subjected to reconstruction with 10 ipsilateral reversed-flow ALT perforator flaps. All the patients were male. Ages ranged from 15 to 47 years (mean = 32 years). Time from burn injury to patient presentation ranged from 2-8 months. All patients demonstrated post-burn flexion contracture of the knee joint, ranging from 35 to 75 degrees. Flap sizes ranged from 8×16 to 12×26 cm. The flaps and skin grafts were carried out without major complications. Only minor complications occurred, such as transient, mild congestion immediately after inset in two flaps. Two flaps developed superficial necrosis at the distal edge. One case sustained partial skin graft loss due to haematoma. One case complained of skin hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scars around the graft. Secondary debulking procedures were required in two cases. The entire donor sites were closed by partial thickness skin graft with acceptable appearance, except one case that was closed primarily. Eight out of ten patients (80%) demonstrated gradual improvement in range of knee motion after a specialized rehabilitation program. Two patients (20%) did not get back full range of motion. RALT perforator flap is the cornerstone for the reconstruction of soft-tissue defects around the knee with acceptable aesthetic and functional results provided that the following items are fulfilled: inclusion of muscle cuff around the pedicle, the pivot point, prevention of pedicle compression after transfer and early surgical intervention on the post-burn knee contracture.

  8. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-04-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients' knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients' extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can't be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application.

  9. Thigh fat and muscle each contribute to excess cardiometabolic risk in South Asians, independent of visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Mayet, Jamil; Godsland, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare fat distribution and associations between fat depots and cardiometabolic traits in South Asians and Europeans. Methods Five hundred and fourteen South Asians and 669 Europeans, aged 56-86. Questionnaires, record review, blood testing, and coronary artery calcification scores provided diabetes and clinical plus subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD) diagnoses. Abdominal visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue, thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (TSAT), intermuscular and intramuscular thigh fat and thigh muscle were measured by CT. Results Accounting for body size, South Asians had greater VAT and TSAT than Europeans, but less thigh muscle. Associations between depots and disease were stronger in South Asians than Europeans. In multivariable analyses in South Asians, VAT was positively associated with diabetes and CHD, while TSAT and thigh muscle were protective for diabetes, and thigh muscle for CHD. Differences in VAT and thigh muscle only partially explained the excess diabetes and CHD in South Asians versus Europeans. Insulin resistance did not account for the effects of TSAT or thigh muscle. Conclusions Greater VAT and TSAT and lesser thigh muscle in South Asians contributed to ethnic differences in cardiometabolic disease. Effects of TSAT and thigh muscle were independent of insulin resistance. PMID:24862429

  10. Validity of an anthropometric estimate of thigh muscle cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Knapik, J J; Staab, J S; Harman, E A

    1996-12-01

    This study examined the validity of an anthropometric estimate of thigh muscle cross-sectional area using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anthropometric model assumed that a cross section of the thigh could be represented as a circle with concentric circular layers of fat-plus-skin, muscle, and bone tissue. On 18 healthy, active men and women (mean +/- SD age = 23 +/- 5 yr), total thigh circumference (CT) was measured with a fiberglass tape, fat-plus-skin thickness was measured over the quadriceps (SQ) using calipers, and the distance across the medial and lateral femoral epicondyle (dE) was measured with calipers. Direct measurements of each tissue were obtained by planimetry of an MRI image taken at the same site as the circumference and skinfolds. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area (AM) was estimated as follows: [equation: see text] Mean +/- SD AM from MRI and anthropometry were 121.9 +/- 35.1 cm2 and 149.1 +/- 34.1 cm2 (r = 0.96, SEE = 10.1 cm2), respectively. Errors in the anthropometric approximations of AM were due to an overestimate of the total thigh cross-sectional area and an underestimate of fat-plus-skin compartment. Because of the close relationship between MRI and anthropometric estimates of AM, zero-intercept regression was used to produce the following final equation, applicable for use in populations studies of young, healthy, active men and women: [equation: see text

  11. Return to play after thigh muscle injury in elite football players: implementation and validation of the Munich muscle injury classification

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Jan; Askling, Carl; Magnusson, Henrik; Mithoefer, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Background Owing to the complexity and heterogeneity of muscle injuries, a generally accepted classification system is still lacking. Aims To prospectively implement and validate a novel muscle injury classification and to evaluate its predictive value for return to professional football. Methods The recently described Munich muscle injury classification was prospectively evaluated in 31 European professional male football teams during the 2011/2012 season. Thigh muscle injury types were recorded by team medical staff and correlated to individual player exposure and resultant time-loss. Results In total, 393 thigh muscle injuries occurred. The muscle classification system was well received with a 100% response rate. Two-thirds of thigh muscle injuries were classified as structural and were associated with longer lay-off times compared to functional muscle disorders (p<0.001). Significant differences were observed between structural injury subgroups (minor partial, moderate partial and complete injuries) with increasing lay-off time associated with more severe structural injury. Median lay-off time of functional disorders was 5–8 days without significant differences between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the absence time between anterior and posterior thigh injuries. Conclusions The Munich muscle classification demonstrates a positive prognostic validity for return to play after thigh muscle injury in professional male football players. Structural injuries are associated with longer average lay-off times than functional muscle disorders. Subclassification of structural injuries correlates with return to play, while subgrouping of functional disorders shows less prognostic relevance. Functional disorders are often underestimated clinically and require further systematic study. PMID:23645834

  12. Fiber Composition of the Grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus, Temminck 1827) Thigh Muscle: An Enzyme-histochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakou, Serge Niangoran; Nteme Ella, Gualbert Simon; Aoussi, Serge; Guiguand, Lydie; Cherel, Yannick; Fantodji, Agathe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe de fiber composition in the thigh muscles of grass cutter (Thryonomys swinderianus, Temminck 1827). Ten 4 to 6-month-old (3 to 4 kg) male grasscutter were used in this study. Eleven skeletal muscles of the thigh [M. biceps femoris (BF), M. rectus femoris (RF), M. vastus lateralis (VL), M. vastus medialis (VM), M. tensor fasciae latae (TFL), M. semitendinosus (ST), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. semimembranosus accessorius (SMA), M. Sartorius (SRT), M. pectineus (PCT), M. adductor magnus (AM)] were collected after animals euthanasia and examined by light microscopy. Three muscle fiber types (I, IIB and IIA) were found in these muscles using enzyme histochemical techniques [myosine adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR)]. Ten of these eleven muscles are composed by 89% to 100% of fast contracting fibers (types IIA and IIB), while the SMA was almost exclusively formed by slow contracting fibers. PMID:26167391

  13. Broiler chicken thigh and breast muscle responses to cold stress during simulated transport before slaughter.

    PubMed

    Dadgar, S; Crowe, T G; Classen, H L; Watts, J M; Shand, P J

    2012-06-01

    The effect of acute cold exposure was assessed on broiler physiology, breast and thigh muscle metabolites, and meat quality. In total, 160 male birds at ages of 5 and 6 wk were exposed to temperatures of -9 to -15°C (cold stressed) and +20°C (control) in a simulated transport chamber for 3 h before slaughter followed by 0 or 2 h of lairage. Bird physiology parameters, including core body temperature, live shrink, blood glucose, and muscle temperature, were assessed. Core body temperature was monitored every minute using i-Button data loggers, and live shrink and blood glucose were assessed. Total glucose and lactate concentrations at 30 h postmortem, as well as ultimate pH (pH(u)), color, and water-holding attributes were evaluated on pectoralis major muscle of breast and iliotibialis muscle of thigh. Birds were grouped based on their microclimate temperature to control and cold-stressed groups (0 to -8, -8 to -11, and -11 to -14°C). Significant (P < 0.05) decreases in core body temperature and breast and thigh muscle temperatures were observed at simulated transport temperatures below 0°C. In addition, higher (P < 0.05) live shrink and lower blood glucose values were observed as a result of 3-h exposure to temperatures below 0°C, exacerbated as temperature decreased further below -8°C. Thigh muscle was almost depleted of glycogen reserve compared with a significant but small reduction in breast muscle glycogen when exposure temperature was below -8°C. Similarly, much greater effects were observed on thigh pH(u) and quality attributes compared with breast. In addition, 84% incidence of the dark, firm, dry quality defect was observed in thigh meat (pH(u) > 6.4, L* < 44) compared with 42% incidence of dark, firm, dry in breast meat (pH(u) > 6.1, L* < 46) when transportation temperature was below 0°C. Results of this study showed that thigh muscle was affected more severely than breast muscle by exposure to cold temperatures before slaughter.

  14. Sarcomere length changes in muscles of the human thigh during walking.

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, A

    1989-01-01

    In a previous investigation (Cutts, 1988a) sarcomere lengths were determined for muscles of the thigh in the anatomical position, and a method devised for the prediction of sarcomere lengths at other positions. In the present investigation, this information was used to predict the sarcomere length changes in the muscles of the thigh during walking, in conjunction with ciné film and bone models of experimental subjects. When compared with the length tension curve for human muscle (Walker & Schrodt, 1973), the results indicate that during walking the muscles operate at sarcomere lengths near the plateau of the curve, where maximum tension can be realised. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2621149

  15. Group I projections from intrinsic foot muscles to motoneurones of leg and thigh muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marque, Philippe; Nicolas, Guillaume; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Gautier, Julien; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel

    2001-01-01

    Group I projections from intrinsic plantar muscles to motoneurones (MNs) of human leg and thigh muscles were investigated. Changes in firing probability of single motor units (MUs) in the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus brevis (Per brev), soleus (Sol), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST) and biceps (Bi) were studied after electrical stimuli applied to: (i) the tibial nerve (TN) at ankle level, (ii) the corresponding homonymous nerve, and (iii) the skin of the heel, to mimic the TN-induced cutaneous sensation.Homonymous facilitation, attributable to monosynaptic Ia excitation, was found in all the sampled units. Early heteronymous excitation elicited by TN stimulation was found in many MUs. Later effects (3–5 ms central delay) were bigger and more frequently observed: excitation in most TA and Per brev MUs, and inhibition in most Sol, GM and Bi MUs and in many ST and VL MUs. The low threshold (∼0.5–0.6 × motor threshold) and the inability of a pure cutaneous stimulation to reproduce these effects (except the late excitation in TA MUs) indicate that they were due to stimulation of group I muscle afferents.The early excitation was accepted to be monosynaptic when its central delay differed from that of the homonymous Ia excitation by less than 0.5 ms. Such a significant TN-induced monosynaptic Ia excitation was found in MUs belonging to all leg and thigh motor nuclei tested. Although its mean strength was relatively weak, it is argued that these monosynaptic connections might affect already depolarized MNs.The late excitation found in TA and Per brev MUs is argued to be mediated through interneurones located rostral to MNs.The late suppression, found in most Sol, GM and Bi MUs, and in many ST and VL MUs, was the dominant effect. It was accompanied by an inhibition of the Sol and quadriceps H reflexes at rest, and therefore reflects an inhibition directed to MNs. Its long latency is argued to reflect transmission by

  16. Bone Mineral Density and Fatty Degeneration of Thigh Muscles Measured by Computed Tomography in Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Myung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, as an independent fracture factor from Bone mineral density (BMD), muscle weakness due to the fatty degeneration of thigh muscles have been attracting attentions as causes of hip fracture. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between the body composition and BMD and fatty degeneration of thigh muscles of the female patients over 65 years old with osteoporotic hip fracture. Methods This study was conducted with 178 female osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Total hip BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cross-sectional area (CSA), cross-sectional muscle area (CSmA), muscle attenuation coefficient (MAC), and intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) of gluteus maximus, hip abductors, quadriceps and hamstring muscle were measured with computed tomography. Normalized IMAT (nIMAT) was calculated by dividing the fat area in the muscle into the size of each muscle. The correlation between each measurement is examined then the differences between the intertrochanteric fracture group and the femoral neck fracture group were analyzed. Results CSmA and MAC of quadriceps were the largest and nIMAT was the lowest. CSA and CSmA of the four muscles showed a statistically significant positive correlation with weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and BMD. MAC of 2 gluteal muscles was positively correlated with weight, BMI and BMD. nIMAT of all four muscles was positively correlation with weight and BMI but nIMAT of 2 mid-thigh muscles was positively correlation with BMD. Conclusions Muscle size and fatty degeneration in the thigh muscles were most positively correlated with the body weight. BMD was positively correlation with CSA and CSmA of all thigh muscles, and MAC of 2 gluteal muscles and fatty degeneration of 2 mid-thigh muscles. There was no statistically significant difference in the size of the femoral muscle and the degree of fatty degeneration between the two fracture groups. PMID:27965943

  17. Heterogeneous characteristics of MRI changes of thigh muscles in patients with dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Suqin; Du, Jing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Meng, Lingchao; Xiao, Jiangxi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of thigh muscle MRI changes in a large cohort of patients with dysferlinopathy. MRI of the thigh was performed in 60 patients. We correlated the scale of muscle involvement on MRI with the modified Gardner-Medwin and Walton (GM-W) scale and disease duration. We also analyzed the relationship between muscle changes and genetic mutations. Fatty infiltration and edema were observed in 95.50% and 86.67% of patients, respectively. The hamstring muscles had the highest frequency and mean score of fatty infiltration, although a posterior-dominant pattern was found in only 56%. Edema most commonly and severely affected the quadriceps and adductor magnus muscles. Fatty infiltration score correlated positively with disease duration and GM-W scale. The pattern of fatty infiltration was heterogeneous in dysferlinopathy patients. Muscle edema was common. Fatty infiltration can be used to assess disease progression. Muscle Nerve 54: 1072-1079, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Differentiation of fat, muscle, and edema in thigh MRIs using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, William; Liu, Chia-Ying; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    There are many diseases that affect the distribution of muscles, including Duchenne and fascioscapulohumeral dystrophy among other myopathies. In these disease cases, it is important to quantify both the muscle and fat volumes to track the disease progression. There has also been evidence that abnormal signal intensity on the MR images, which often is an indication of edema or inflammation can be a good predictor for muscle deterioration. We present a fully-automated method that examines magnetic resonance (MR) images of the thigh and identifies the fat, muscle, and edema using a random forest classifier. First the thigh regions are automatically segmented using the T1 sequence. Then, inhomogeneity artifacts were corrected using the N3 technique. The T1 and STIR (short tau inverse recovery) images are then aligned using landmark based registration with the bone marrow. The normalized T1 and STIR intensity values are used to train the random forest. Once trained, the random forest can accurately classify the aforementioned classes. This method was evaluated on MR images of 9 patients. The precision values are 0.91+/-0.06, 0.98+/-0.01 and 0.50+/-0.29 for muscle, fat, and edema, respectively. The recall values are 0.95+/-0.02, 0.96+/-0.03 and 0.43+/-0.09 for muscle, fat, and edema, respectively. This demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing information from multiple MR sequences for the accurate quantification of fat, muscle and edema.

  19. Discrepancies between Skinned Single Muscle Fibres and Whole Thigh Muscle Function Characteristics in Young and Elderly Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to analyse the mechanical properties of skinned single muscle fibres derived from the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle in relation to those of the whole intact thigh muscle and to compare any difference between young and older adults. Sixteen young men (29.25 ± 4.65 years), 11 older men (71.45 ± 2.94 years), 11 young women (29.64 ± 4.88 years), and 7 older women (67.29 ± 1.70 years) were recruited. In vivo analyses were performed for mechanical properties such as isokinetic performance, isometric torque, and power. Specific force and maximum shortening velocity (Vo) were measured with single muscle fibres. Sex difference showed greater impact on the functional properties of both the whole muscle (p < 0.01) and single muscle fibres than aging (p < 0.05). Sex difference, rather than aging, yielded more remarkable differences in gross mechanical properties in the single muscle fibre study in which significant differences between young men and young women were found only in the cross-sectional area and Vo (p < 0.05). Age and sex differences reflect the mechanical properties of both single muscle fibres and whole thigh muscle, with the whole muscle yielding more prominent functional properties. PMID:28070513

  20. The use of MRI to evaluate posterior thigh muscle activity and damage during nordic hamstring exercise.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Arcos, Asier L; Garrues, Mirian A; Myer, Gregory D; Yanci, Javier; Idoate, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Nordic hamstring exercise on the biceps femoris long head (BFlh), biceps femoris short head (BFsh), semitendinosus (SMT), and semimembranosus (SMM) muscles. The Nordic hamstring strengthening exercise has been widely used in injury prevention, yet not much is known about the site-specific activation of this exercise on different muscles of the thigh. Eight male national-level referees were assigned to a Nordic hamstring exercise protocol (5 sets of 8 repetitions). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the subjects' thighs was performed before, within 3 minutes after, and repeated again 72 hours after the exercise intervention. Fifteen axial scans of the thigh interspaced by a distance of 1 of 15 right femur length were obtained from the level of 1 of 15 Lf to 15 of 15 Lf. The MRI data were analyzed for signal intensity changes. After 72 hours, significant changes in transverse (spin-spin) relaxation time signal intensity and cross-sectional area were maintained distally at BFsh cranial portion and concretely at the nondominant limb, whereas no significant changes were observed in transverse (spin-spin) relaxation time signal intensity at BFlh, SMM, or SMT. This study demonstrated that the Nordic hamstring exercise did not result in a uniform response (training stimulus) neither interhamstring (dominant vs. nondominant) nor intrahamstring muscles (same leg) and was better suited for loading proximal BFsh.

  1. Progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhu; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Jiangxi; Yuan, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the degree of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of 171 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mean age, 6.09 ± 2.30 years). Fatty infiltration was assigned using a modified Mercuri's scale 0-5 (normal-severe). The gluteus maximus and adductor magnus were affected in patients less than two years old, followed by the biceps femoris. Quadriceps and semimembranosus were first affected at the age of five to six years; the sartorius, gracilis and adductor longus remained apparently unaffected until seven years of age. Fatty infiltration of all the thigh muscles developed rapidly after seven years of age. The standard deviation of the fatty infiltration scores ranged from 2.41 to 4.87 before five years old, and from 6.84 to 11.66 between six and ten years old. This study provides evidence of highly variable degrees of fatty infiltration in children of different ages with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and indicates that fatty infiltration progresses more quickly after seven years of age. These findings may be beneficial for the selection of therapeutic regimens and the analysis of future clinical trials.

  2. Quantitative ultrasound tissue characterization in shoulder and thigh muscles – a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed; Jensen, Bente R; Darvann, Tron; Jørgensen, Kurt; Bakke, Merete

    2006-01-01

    Background The echogenicity patterns of ultrasound scans contain information of tissue composition in muscles. The aim was: (1) to develop a quantitative ultrasound image analysis to characterize tissue composition in terms of intensity and structure of the ultrasound images, and (2) to use the method for characterization of ultrasound images of the supraspinatus muscle, and the vastus lateralis muscle. Methods Computerized texture analyses employing first-order and higher-order grey-scale statistics were developed to objectively characterize ultrasound images of m. supraspinatus and m. vastus lateralis from 9 healthy participants. Results The mean grey-scale intensity was higher in the vastus lateralis muscle (p < 0.05) than in the supraspinatus muscle (average value of middle measuring site 51.4 compared to 35.0). Furthermore, the number of spatially connected and homogeneous regions (blobs) was higher in the vastus lateralis (p < 0.05) than in the supraspinatus (average for m. vastus lateralis: 0.092 mm-2 and for m. supraspinatus: 0.016 mm-2). Conclusion The higher intensity and the higher number of blobs in the vastus lateralis muscle indicates that the thigh muscle contained more non-contractile components than the supraspinatus muscle, and that the muscle was coarser. The image analyses supplemented each other and gave a more complete description of the tissue composition in the muscle than the mean grey-scale value alone. PMID:16420695

  3. HIV Infection Is Associated with Increased Fatty Infiltration of the Thigh Muscle with Aging Independent of Fat Distribution.

    PubMed

    Natsag, Javzandulam; Erlandson, Kristine M; Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Haberlen, Sabina A; Margolick, Joseph; Jacobson, Lisa P; Palella, Frank J; Koletar, Susan L; Lake, Jordan E; Post, Wendy S; Brown, Todd T

    2017-01-01

    Lower muscle density on computed tomography (CT) provides a measure of fatty infiltration of muscle, an aspect of muscle quality that has been associated with metabolic abnormalities, weakness, decreased mobility, and increased fracture risk in older adults. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between HIV serostatus, age, thigh muscle attenuation, and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Mean CT-quantified Hounsfield units (HU) of the thigh muscle bundle and CSA were evaluated in 368 HIV-infected and 145 HIV-uninfected men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Cardiovascular Substudy using multivariable linear regression. Models all were adjusted for HIV serostatus, age, race, and body mass index (BMI); each model was further adjusted for covariates that differed by HIV serostatus, including insulin resistance, hepatitis C, malignancy, smoking, alcohol use, and self-reported limitation in physical activity. HIV-infected men had greater thigh muscle CSA (p<0.001) but lower muscle density (p<0.001) compared to HIV-uninfected men. Muscle density remained lower in HIV-infected men (p = 0.001) when abdominal visceral adiposity, and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue area were substituted for BMI in a multivariable model. Muscle density decreased by 0.16 HU per year (p<0.001) of increasing age among the HIV-infected men, but not in the HIV-uninfected men (HIV x age interaction -0.20 HU; p = 0.002). HIV-infected men had lower thigh muscle density compared to HIV-uninfected men, and a more pronounced decline with increasing age, indicative of greater fatty infiltration. These findings suggest that lower muscle quality among HIV-infected persons may be a risk factor for impairments in physical function with aging.

  4. HIV Infection Is Associated with Increased Fatty Infiltration of the Thigh Muscle with Aging Independent of Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Haberlen, Sabina A.; Margolick, Joseph; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Palella, Frank J.; Koletar, Susan L.; Lake, Jordan E.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Lower muscle density on computed tomography (CT) provides a measure of fatty infiltration of muscle, an aspect of muscle quality that has been associated with metabolic abnormalities, weakness, decreased mobility, and increased fracture risk in older adults. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between HIV serostatus, age, thigh muscle attenuation, and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Methods Mean CT-quantified Hounsfield units (HU) of the thigh muscle bundle and CSA were evaluated in 368 HIV-infected and 145 HIV-uninfected men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Cardiovascular Substudy using multivariable linear regression. Models all were adjusted for HIV serostatus, age, race, and body mass index (BMI); each model was further adjusted for covariates that differed by HIV serostatus, including insulin resistance, hepatitis C, malignancy, smoking, alcohol use, and self-reported limitation in physical activity. Results HIV-infected men had greater thigh muscle CSA (p<0.001) but lower muscle density (p<0.001) compared to HIV-uninfected men. Muscle density remained lower in HIV-infected men (p = 0.001) when abdominal visceral adiposity, and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue area were substituted for BMI in a multivariable model. Muscle density decreased by 0.16 HU per year (p<0.001) of increasing age among the HIV-infected men, but not in the HIV-uninfected men (HIV x age interaction -0.20 HU; p = 0.002). Conclusion HIV-infected men had lower thigh muscle density compared to HIV-uninfected men, and a more pronounced decline with increasing age, indicative of greater fatty infiltration. These findings suggest that lower muscle quality among HIV-infected persons may be a risk factor for impairments in physical function with aging. PMID:28060856

  5. Hypoxia affects tissue oxygenation differently in the thigh and calf muscles during incremental running.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Takuya; Arimitsu, Takuma; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2017-08-17

    The present study was performed to determine the impact of hypoxia on working muscle oxygenation during incremental running, and to compare tissue oxygenation between the thigh and calf muscles. Nine distance runners and triathletes performed incremental running tests to exhaustion under normoxic and hypoxic conditions (fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.15). Peak pulmonary oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) were measured simultaneously in both the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius. Hypoxia significantly decreased peak running speed and [Formula: see text] (p < 0.01). During incremental running, StO2 in the vastus lateralis decreased almost linearly, and the rate of decrease from warm-up (180 m min(-1)) to [Formula: see text] was significantly greater than in the medial gastrocnemius under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions (p < 0.01). StO2 in both muscles was significantly decreased under hypoxic compared with normoxic conditions at all running speeds (p < 0.01). The rate at which StO2 was decreased by hypoxia was greater in the vastus lateralis as the running speed increased, whereas it changed little in the medial gastrocnemius. These results suggest that the thigh is more deoxygenated than the calf under hypoxic conditions, and that the effects of hypoxia on tissue oxygenation differ between these two muscles during incremental running.

  6. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Isokinetic thigh muscle performance after long-term recovery from patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, H; Latvala, K; Lehto, M U

    2000-01-01

    Eighty-two patients (50 women, 32 men) underwent isokinetic muscle testing on average 13 years after a conservatively treated unilateral primary patellar dislocation. Three study groups were formed according to the natural history of recovery: group A (n = 32), patients with only primary conservative treatment; group B (n = 34) patients with conservative (group B1; n = 24) or surgical (group B2; n = 10) treatment of redislocations; group C (n = 16) patients with other residual complaints (anterior knee, pain subluxations) requiring surgery. The Cybex 6000 dynamometer system was used as the testing machine for quadriceps and hamstrings muscles, with proportional deficits of peak torque as the test parameter. Isokinetic testing revealed both quadriceps and hamstring muscle atrophy even after long-term recovery from injury. There were statistically significant differences between the three study groups at both tested speeds of quadriceps muscles (60 rad/s, P < 0.002; 180 rad/s, P < 0.009). Groups B1 and B2 presented similar results. The muscle performance findings are probably due to more than one factor: primary immobilization, poor outcome, patellofemoral degeneration, redislocations, and residual knee complaints followed by surgery and deficiency in motor control of thigh muscle had--together or separately--an effect on muscle performance.

  8. Atrophy and Intramuscular Fat in Specific Muscles of the Thigh: Associated Weakness and Hyperinsulinemia in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Alice S.; Buscemi, Andrew; Forrester, Larry; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E.; Ivey, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Sarcopenia and increased fat infiltration in muscle may play a role in the functional impairment and high risk for diabetes in stroke. Our purpose was to compare muscle volume and muscle attenuation across 6 muscles of the paretic and nonparetic thigh and examine the relationships between intramuscular fat and insulin resistance and between muscle volume and strength in stroke patients. Methods Stroke participants (70; 39 men, 31 women) aged 40 to 84 years, BMI = 16 to 45 kg/m2 underwent multiple thigh CT scans, total body scan by DXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), peak oxygen intake (VO2peak) graded treadmill test, 6-minute walk, fasting blood draws, and isokinetic strength testing. Results Muscle volume is 24% lower and subcutaneous fat volume is 5% higher in the paretic versus nonparetic thigh. Muscle attenuation (index of amount of fat infiltration in muscle) is 17% higher in the nonparetic midthigh than the paretic. The semitendinosis/semimembranosis, biceps femoris, sartorius, vastus (medialis/lateralis), and rectus femoris have lower (between 9% and 19%) muscle areas on the paretic than the nonparetic thigh. Muscle attenuation is 15% to 25% higher on the nonparetic than the paretic side for 5 of 6 muscles. The nonparetic midthigh muscle attenuation is negatively associated with insulin. Eccentric peak torque of the nonparetic leg and paretic leg are associated with the corresponding muscle volume. Conclusions The skeletal muscle atrophy, increased fat around and within muscle, and ensuing muscular weakness observed in chronic stroke patients relates to diabetes risk and may impair functional mobility and independence. PMID:21734070

  9. Abdominal wall reconstruction using a combination of free tensor fasciae lata and anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap: a prospective study in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cao, Dongsheng; Guo, Fangfang; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Chen; Wang, Danru

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the abdominal wall continues to be a challenging problem for plastic surgeons. Transposition of well-vascularized flap tissue is the most effective way to repair composite abdominal wall defects. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment of such patients and assessed the reconstructive technique using combination of an inlay of bioprosthetic materials and a united thigh flap. A retrospective review of patients' records in the department was carried out. In total, 16 patients who underwent immediate abdominal wall reconstruction between 2000 and 2013 were identified. Patients' health status, defect sizes, and surgical technique were obtained from medical charts. The immediate reconstruction surgery of the abdominal wall was successful in all patients. One patient with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans experienced recurrences at the former site. One patient died because of liver metastases at 21 months after surgery. No incisional hernia or infection in this series of patients was observed. Full-thickness, giant defects of the complicated abdominal wall can be repaired successfully with relatively minor complications using this reconstructive technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonuniform changes in MRI measurements of the thigh muscles after two hamstring strengthening exercises.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Garrues, Mirian A; Cronin, John B; Contreras, Bret; Los Arcos, Asier; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Maffulli, Nicola; Idoate, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Although many different hamstring strengthening exercises exist, the effect on site specific activation of these exercises on different muscles of the leg is unclear. This study investigated the effects of the eccentric leg curl (LC) and lunge (L) exercises on the biceps femoris long head (BFl), biceps femoris short head (BFs), semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), and adductor magnus (AM). Each leg of 11 male professional soccer players was randomly assigned to an LC or L exercise protocol (3 sets of 6 repetitions). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the subjects' thighs were performed before and 48 hours after the intervention. Fifteen axial scans of the thigh interspaced by a distance of 1/15 right femur length (Lf) were obtained. The fMRI data were analyzed for signal intensity changes. No significant changes were observed in absolute short tau inversion recovery values for the SM and BFs. Significant changes for the ST (∼21-45%) from sections 4 to 10, AM (∼2-13%) at section 4, and BFl (∼ -3 vs. 8%) at section 7 were noted. LC exercises load all the regions of the ST muscle. The L exercises load the proximal regions of the BFl and AM. These findings may have relevance when designing protocols for prevention and rehabilitation of hamstring injuries.

  11. NMR imaging estimates of muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in the thigh: variations with muscle, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Barnouin, Yoann; Azzabou, Noura; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Moraux, Amélie; Leroux, Gaëlle; Behin, Anthony; McPhee, Jamie S; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-06-01

    Muscle mass is particularly relevant to follow during aging, owing to its link with physical performance and autonomy. The objectives of this work were to assess muscle volume (MV) and intramuscular fat (IMF) for all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy individuals using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the effect of gender and age on MV and IMF and to determine the best representative slice for the estimation of MV and IMF. The study enrolled 105 healthy young (range 20-30 years) and older (range 70-80 years) subjects. MRI scans were acquired along the femur length using a three-dimension three-point Dixon proton density-weighted gradient echo sequence. MV and IMF were estimated from all the slices. The effects of age and gender on MV and IMF were assessed. Predictive equations for MV and IMF were established using a single slice at various femur levels for each muscle in order to reduce the analysis process. MV was decreased with aging in both genders, particularly in the quadriceps femoris. IMF was largely increased with aging in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. Percentages of MV decrease and IMF increase with aging varied according to the muscle. Predictive equations to predict MV and IMF from single slices are provided and were validated. This study is the first one to provide muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy subjects.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Apoptotic Signaling Predicts Thigh Muscle Volume and Gait Speed in Community-Dwelling Older Persons: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Lees, Hazel A.; Manini, Todd M.; Buford, Thomas W.; Aranda, Juan M.; Calvani, Riccardo; Capuani, Giorgio; Marsiske, Michael; Lott, Donovan J.; Vandenborne, Krista; Bernabei, Roberto; Pahor, Marco; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical studies strongly suggest that accelerated apoptosis in skeletal myocytes may be involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. However, evidence in humans is sparse. In the present study, we investigated whether apoptotic signaling in the skeletal muscle was associated with indices of muscle mass and function in older persons. Methodology/Principal Findings Community-dwelling older adults were categorized into high-functioning (HF) or low-functioning (LF) groups according to their short physical performance battery (SPPB) summary score. Participants underwent an isokinetic knee extensor strength test and 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of the thigh. Vastus lateralis muscle samples were obtained by percutaneous needle biopsy and assayed for the expression of a set of apoptotic signaling proteins. Age, sex, number of comorbid conditions and medications as well as knee extensor strength were not different between groups. HF participants displayed greater thigh muscle volume compared with LF persons. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) regressions showed significant correlations between caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling proteins and the muscular percentage of thigh volume (R2 = 0.78; Q2 = 0.61) as well as gait speed (R2 = 0.81; Q2 = 0.56). Significant variables in the PLS model of percent muscle volume were active caspase-8, cleaved caspase-3, cytosolic cytochrome c and mitochondrial Bak. The regression model of gait speed was mainly described by cleaved caspase-3 and mitochondrial Bax and Bak. PLS predictive apoptotic variables did not differ between functional groups. No correlation was determined between apoptotic signaling proteins and muscle strength or quality (strength per unit volume). Conclusions/Significance Data from this exploratory study show for the first time that apoptotic signaling is correlated with indices of muscle mass and function in a cohort of community-dwelling older persons. Future larger

  13. Thigh muscle size and vascular function after blood flow-restricted elastic band training in older women

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Fukumura, Kazuya; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of elastic band training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on thigh muscle size and vascular function in older women. Older women were divided into three groups: low-intensity elastic band BFR training (BFR-Tr, n = 10), middleto high-intensity elastic band training (MH-Tr, n = 10), and no training (Ctrl, n = 10) groups. BFR-Tr and MH-Tr groups performed squat and knee extension exercises using elastic band, 2 days/week for 12 weeks. During BFR-Tr exercise session, subjects wore pressure cuffs around the most proximal region of both thighs. The following measurements were taken before (pre) and 3-5 days after (post) the final training session: MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at mid-thigh, maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of knee extension, central systolic blood pressure (c-SBP), central-augmentation index (c-AIx), cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Quadriceps muscle CSA (6.9%) and knee extension MVIC (13.7%) were increased (p < 0.05) in the BFR-Tr group, but not in the MH-Tr and the Ctrl groups. Regarding c-SBP, c-AIx, CAVI and ABI, there were no changes between pre- and post- results among the three groups. Elastic band BFR training increases thigh muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not decrease vascular function in older women. PMID:27244884

  14. Adaptive control for backward quadrupedal walking V. Mutable activation of bifunctional thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C A; Buford, J A; Smith, J L

    1996-02-01

    1. In this, the fifth article in a series to assess changes in posture, hindlimb dynamics, and muscle synergies associated with backward (BWD) quadrupedal walking, we compared the recruitment of three biarticular muscles of the cat's anterior thigh (anterior sartorius, SAa; medial sartorius, SAm; rectus femoris, RF) for forward (FWD) and BWD treadmill walking. Electromyography (EMG) records from these muscles, along with those of two muscles (semitendinosus, ST; anterior biceps femoris, ABF) studied previously in this series, were synchronized with kinematic data digitized from high-speed ciné film for unperturbed steps and steps in which a stumbling corrective reaction was elicited during swing. 2. During swing, the relative timing of EMG activity for the unifunctional SAm (hip and knee flexor) was similar for unperturbed steps of FWD and BWD walking. The SAm was active before paw lift off and remained active during most of swing (75%) for both forms of walking, but there was a marked decrease in EMG amplitude after paw off during BWD and not FWD swing. In contrast, the relative timing of EMG activity for the SAa and RF, two bifunctional muscles (hip flexors, knee extensors), was different for FWD and BWD swing. During FWD swing, the SAa and the RF (to a lesser extent) were coactive with the SAm; however, during BWD swing, the SAa and RF were active just before paw lift off and then inactive for the rest of swing until just before paw contact (see 3). Thus the swing-phase activity of the SAa and RF was markedly shorter for BWD than FWD swing. 3. Activity in SAa and RF was also different during FWD and BWD stance. The RF was consistently active from mid-to-late stance of FWD walking, and the SAa was also active during this period in some FWD steps. During the stance phase of BWD walking, however, the onset of activity in both muscles consistently shifted to early stance as both muscles became active just before paw contact (the E1 phase). Activity in RF

  15. Estimation of thigh muscle cross-sectional area by single- and multifrequency segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Ikenaga, Masahiro; Takeda, Noriko; Morimura, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Nobuyuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Kimura, Misaka; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-15

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been used to estimate skeletal muscle mass, but its application in the elderly is not optimal. The accuracy of BIA may be influenced by the expansion of extracellular water (ECW) relative to muscle mass with aging. Multifrequency BIA (MFBIA) can evaluate the distribution between ECW and intracellular water (ICW), and thus may be superior to single-frequency BIA (SFBIA) to estimate muscle mass in the elderly. A total of 58 elderly participants aged 65-85 years were recruited. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was obtained from computed tomography scans at the mid-thigh. Segmental SFBIA and MFBIA were measured for the upper legs. An index of the ratio of ECW and ICW was calculated using MFBIA. The correlation between muscle CSA and SFBIA was moderate (r = 0.68), but strong between muscle CSA and MFBIA (r = 0.85). ECW/ICW index was significantly and positively correlated with age (P < 0.001). SFBIA tends to significantly overestimate muscle CSA in subjects who had relative expansion of ECW in the thigh segment (P < 0.001). This trend was not observed for MFBIA (P = 0.42). Relative expansion of ECW was observed in older participants. The relative expansion of ECW affects the validity of traditional SFBIA, which is lowered when estimating muscle CSA in the elderly. By contrast, MFBIA was not affected by water distribution in thigh segments, thus rendering the validity of MFBIA for estimating thigh muscle CSA higher than SFBIA in the elderly.

  16. ¹³C MRS reveals a small diurnal variation in the glycogen content of human thigh muscle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kamei, Akiko; Osawa, Takuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Takizawa, Osamu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    There is marked diurnal variation in the glycogen content of skeletal muscles of animals, but few studies have addressed such variations in human muscles. (13)C MRS can be used to noninvasively measure the glycogen content of human skeletal muscle, but no study has explored the diurnal variations in this parameter. This study aimed to investigate whether a diurnal variation in glycogen content occurs in human muscles and, if so, to what extent it can be identified using (13)C MRS. Six male volunteers were instructed to maintain their normal diet and not to perform strenuous exercise for at least 3 days before and during the experiment. Muscle glycogen and blood glucose concentrations were measured six times in 24 h under normal conditions in these subjects. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle was determined noninvasively by natural abundance (13)C MRS using a clinical MR system at 3 T. Nutritional analysis revealed that the subjects' mean carbohydrate intake was 463 ± 137 g, being approximately 6.8 ± 2.4 g/kg body weight. The average sleeping time was 5.9 ± 1.0 h. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle at the starting point was 64.8 ± 20.6 mM. Although absolute and relative individual variations in muscle glycogen content were 7.0 ± 2.1 mM and 11.3 ± 4.6%, respectively, no significant difference in glycogen content was observed among the different time points. This study demonstrates that normal food intake (not fat and/or carbohydrate rich), sleep and other daily activities have a negligible influence on thigh muscle glycogen content, and that the diurnal variation of the glycogen content in human muscles is markedly smaller than that in animal muscles. Moreover, the present results also support the reproducibility and availability of (13)C MRS for the evaluation of the glycogen content in human muscles.

  17. Asymmetry in CT Scan Measures of Thigh Muscle 2 Months After Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies

    PubMed Central

    Eastlack, Marty; Hicks, Gregory E.; Alley, Dawn E.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Orwig, Denise L.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Chomentowski, Peter J.; Hawkes, William G.; Hochberg, Marc C.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Magaziner, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture is an important problem for older adults with significant functional consequences. After hip fracture, reduced muscle loading can result in muscle atrophy. Methods. We compared thigh muscle characteristics in the fractured leg to those in the nonfractured leg in participants from the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort using computed tomography scan imaging. Results. At 2 months postfracture, a single 10mm axial computed tomography scan was obtained at the midthigh level in 43 participants (23 men, 20 women) with a mean age of 79.9 years (range: 65–96 years), and thigh muscle cross-sectional area, cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue, and mean radiologic attenuation were measured. Total thigh muscle cross-sectional area was less on the side of the fracture by 9.46cm2 (95% CI: 5.97cm2, 12.95cm2) while the cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue was greater by 2.97cm2 (95% CI: 1.94cm2, 4.01cm2) on the fractured side. Mean muscle attenuation was lower on the side of the fracture by 3.66 Hounsfield Units (95% CI: 2.98 Hounsfield Units, 4.34 Hounsfield Units). Conclusions. The observed asymmetry is consistent with the effect of disuse and inflammation in the affected limb along with training effects in the unaffected limb due to the favoring of this leg with ambulation during the postfracture period. PMID:25969469

  18. Multiple muscular variations including tenuissimus and tensor fasciae suralis muscles in the posterior thigh of a human case.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kondo, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yuko; Terashima, Toshio; Miki, Akinori

    2017-09-01

    The posterior thigh muscles on the right side of an 81-year-old male cadaver had multiple variations, denoted muscles I-IV. Muscle I originated from the posteromedial surface of the greater trochanter and divided into two muscle bellies. These muscle bellies fused with the long head of the biceps femoris and were innervated by two branches from muscular branches of the semitendinosus and the long head of the biceps. Muscle II separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the proximal third and fused with the semitendinosus in the distal fourth. Muscle III was a biventer muscle. Its superior belly separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the distal third. The inferior belly of this muscle fused with the posterior surface of the crural fascia and was innervated by the tibial nerve. Muscle IV separated from the adductor magnus muscle, passed between the long and short heads of the biceps, fused with the inferior belly of muscle III, and was innervated by the muscular branch of the common fibular nerve to the short head of the biceps. Peeling off the epineurium of the muscular branches to the inferior belly of muscle III showed that this nerve fascicle divided from the common trunk with branches to the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. The inferior bellies of muscle III and muscle IV were thought to be equivalent to the tensor fasciae suralis and tenuissimus muscles, respectively.

  19. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thighmuscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  20. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, P; Söderlund, K; Relu, M U; Ferguson, R A; Bangsbo, J

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without (MOD; 29+/-4 W) and with thigh OCC, and moderate exercise followed by 90-s of intense exercise (HI; 65+/-8 W). Temperatures were continuously measured in m. vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) and successive muscle biopsies were obtained from VL. During MOD, muscle temperature increase (DeltaT(m)) in RF was 0.52+/-0.09 degrees C, which was 57% and 73% higher (P<0.05) than in VL and VM, respectively. During OCC, DeltaT(m) in RF was 0.39+/-0.05 degrees C, which was not different from VM but 54% higher (P<0.05) than in VL. After MOD, muscle CP in slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) fibres was 81% and 91% of resting levels, respectively, with lower (P<0.05) values after OCC (15% and 22%) and HI (24% and 13%). After MOD, OCC and HI, a total of 48%, 93% and 96% of the ST fibres had CP levels below mean-1 SD, respectively, with corresponding values for FT fibres being 41%, 89% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, a heterogeneous recruitment of the quadriceps muscle portions and muscle fibres was observed during submaximal knee-extensor exercise, whereas recruitment pattern was homogenous during intense exercise. Thigh OCC caused an altered recruitment of fibres and muscle portions, suggesting a significant afferent response affecting the activation of fibres in the contracting muscles.

  1. Washout studies of 11C in rabbit thigh muscle implanted by secondary beams of HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitani, T.; Pawelke, J.; Kanazawa, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, M.; Takami, A.; Koga, M.; Futami, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Urakabe, E.; Suda, M.; Mizuno, H.; Kanai, T.; Matsuura, H.; Shinoda, I.; Takizawa, S.

    2003-04-01

    Heavy ion therapy has two definite advantages: good dose localization and higher biological effect. Range calculation of the heavy ions is an important factor in treatment planning. X-ray CT numbers are used to estimate the heavy ion range by looking up values in a conversion table which relates empirically photon attenuation in tissues to particle stopping power; this is one source of uncertainty in the treatment planning. Use of positron emitting radioactive beams along with a positron emission tomograph or a positron camera gives range information and may be used as a means of checking in heavy ion treatment planning. However, the metabolism of the implanted positron emitters in a living object is unpredictable because the chemical forms of these emitters are unknown and the metabolism is dependent on the organ species and may be influenced by many factors such as blood flow rate and fluid components present. In this paper, the washout rate of 11C activity implanted by injecting energetic 11C beams into thigh muscle of a rear leg of a rabbit is presented. The washout was found to consist of two components, the shorter one was about 4.2 +/- 1.1 min and the longer one ranged from 91 to 124 min. About one third of the implanted β+ activity can be used for imaging and the rest was washed out of the target area.

  2. Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.

    PubMed

    Peeler, Jason; Christian, Mathew; Cooper, Juliette; Leiter, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of a 12-week lower body positive pressure (LBPP)-supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee joint pain, function, and thigh muscle strength in overweight patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community-based, multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients aged between 55 and 75 years, with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m and mild-to-moderate knee OA. Twelve-week LBPP-supported low-load treadmill walking regimen. Acute knee joint pain (visual analog scale) during full weight bearing treadmill walking, chronic knee pain, and joint function [Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire] during normal activities of daily living, and thigh muscle strength (isokinetic testing). Appropriate methods of statistical analysis were used to compare data from baseline and follow-up evaluation. Participants reported significant improvements in knee joint pain and function and demonstrated significant increases in thigh muscle strength about the degenerative knee. Participants also experienced significant reductions in acute knee pain during full weight bearing treadmill walking and required dramatically less LBPP support to walk pain free on the treadmill. Data suggest that an LBPP-supported low-load exercise regimen can be used to significantly diminish knee pain, enhance joint function, and increase thigh muscle strength, while safely promoting pain-free walking exercise in overweight patients with knee OA. These findings have important implications for the development of nonoperative treatment strategies that can be used in the management of joint symptoms associated with progressive knee OA in at-risk patient populations. This research suggests that LBPP-supported low-load walking is a safe user-friendly mode of exercise that can be successfully used in the management of day-to-day joint symptoms associated with knee OA, helping to improve the

  3. Asymmetry in CT Scan Measures of Thigh Muscle 2 Months After Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ram R; Eastlack, Marty; Hicks, Gregory E; Alley, Dawn E; Shardell, Michelle D; Orwig, Denise L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Chomentowski, Peter J; Hawkes, William G; Hochberg, Marc C; Ferrucci, Luigi; Magaziner, Jay

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture is an important problem for older adults with significant functional consequences. After hip fracture, reduced muscle loading can result in muscle atrophy. We compared thigh muscle characteristics in the fractured leg to those in the nonfractured leg in participants from the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort using computed tomography scan imaging. At 2 months postfracture, a single 10mm axial computed tomography scan was obtained at the midthigh level in 43 participants (23 men, 20 women) with a mean age of 79.9 years (range: 65-96 years), and thigh muscle cross-sectional area, cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue, and mean radiologic attenuation were measured. Total thigh muscle cross-sectional area was less on the side of the fracture by 9.46cm(2) (95% CI: 5.97cm(2), 12.95cm(2)) while the cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue was greater by 2.97cm(2) (95% CI: 1.94cm(2), 4.01cm(2)) on the fractured side. Mean muscle attenuation was lower on the side of the fracture by 3.66 Hounsfield Units (95% CI: 2.98 Hounsfield Units, 4.34 Hounsfield Units). The observed asymmetry is consistent with the effect of disuse and inflammation in the affected limb along with training effects in the unaffected limb due to the favoring of this leg with ambulation during the postfracture period. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Asymmetry in CT Scan Measures of Thigh Muscle 2 Months After Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ram R; Eastlack, Marty; Hicks, Gregory E; Alley, Dawn E; Shardell, Michelle D; Orwig, Denise L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Chomentowski, Peter J; Hawkes, William G; Hochberg, Marc C; Ferrucci, Luigi; Magaziner, Jay

    2015-06-01

    Hip fracture is an important problem for older adults with significant functional consequences. After hip fracture, reduced muscle loading can result in muscle atrophy. We compared thigh muscle characteristics in the fractured leg with those in the nonfractured leg in participants from the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort using computed tomography (CT) scan imaging. At 2 months postfracture, a single 10-mm axial CT scan was obtained at the midthigh level in 47 participants (26 men and 21 women) with a mean age of 80.4 years (range 65-96), and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), CSA of intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), as well as mean radiological attenuation were measured. Total thigh muscle CSA was less on the side of the fracture by 9.2 cm(2) (95% CI: 5.9, 12.4 cm(2)), whereas the CSA of IMAT was greater by 2.8 cm(2) (95% CI: 1.9, 3.8 cm(2)) on the fractured side. Mean muscle attenuation was lower on the side of the fracture by 3.61 HU (95% CI: 2.99, 4.24 HU). The observed asymmetry is consistent with the effect of disuse and inflammation in the affected limb along with training effects in the unaffected limb due to the favoring of this leg with ambulation during the postfracture period. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Influence of thigh muscles on the axial strains in a proximal femur during early stance in gait.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, L; Viceconti, M; Toni, A; Giunti, A

    1995-05-01

    This work is focused on the in vitro simulation of the loads occurring in the femur during early stance in gait, for hip prosthesis stress shielding test purposes. Ten thigh muscles (the three gluteal muscles, the three vasti, rectus femoris, adductor longus and magnus, biceps femoris), simulated by nylon straps, were tested in order to establish their influence on the strains in the proximal femur. Axial and hoop strains were recorded from 16 strain gauges for the effect of each muscle and compared to the strains recorded as a result of the hip joint reaction force only (i.e. without muscle simulation). It appears that the three glutei are the principal muscles in determining the vertical strains, however the rectus femoris, biceps femoris and the adductors were also seen to significantly affect the strain pattern. The inadequacy of increasing the adduction angle and applying the resultant force at the hip joint to simulate the abductors was also confirmed.

  6. COMPETITIVE ATHLETIC PARTICIPATION, THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH, AND BONE DENSITY IN ELITE SENIOR ATHLETES AND CONTROLS

    PubMed Central

    McCrory, Jean L.; Salacinski, Amanda J.; Hunt Sellhorst, Sarah E.; Greenspan, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between participation in highly competitive exercise, thigh muscle strength, and regional and total body bone mineral density (BMD) in elite senior athletes and healthy elderly controls was investigated. One hundred and four elite senior athletes (72.6±6.4yrs, 168.7±8.6cm, 72.6±13.5kg, 57M:47F) and 79 healthy controls (75.4±5.6yrs, 170.8±25.5cm, 79.5± 11.7kg, 46M:33F) participated in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D and calcium intake were assessed via a recall survey. Isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque was measured via a custom strength measurement device. Total body and regional BMD of the hip, radius, and spine were assessed with DXA. For each BMD site assessed, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed in four steps (α=0.10) to examine the contribution of (1) age, sex, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake (2) group (elite senior athlete, control), (3) knee extension peak torque and (4) knee flexion peak torque on BMD. Sex, age, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake explained a significant amount of variance in BMD in each site. Group was not significant. Knee extension peak torque explained an additional 3.8% of the variance in hip BMD (p=0.06). Knee flexion peak torque was not correlated to BMD at any of the sites assessed. In conclusion, participation in highly competitive athletics was not related to total body or regional BMD. Age, sex, bodyweight, and vitamin D and calcium intake were significantly related to BMD at all of the sites assessed. Quadriceps strength contributed slightly to hip BMD. Our results imply that participation in highly competitive senior athletics does not have a protective effect on BMD, perhaps because of a lower bodyweight or other confounding factors. PMID:23442279

  7. The contribution of visceral adiposity and mid-thigh fat-rich muscle to the metabolic profile in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Marie-Christine; Lemieux, Simone; Piché, Marie-Eve; Corneau, Louise; Bergeron, Jean; Riou, Marie-Eve; Weisnagel, Stanley J

    2011-05-01

    This study explored the relationship between muscle fat infiltration derived from mid-thigh computed tomography (CT) scan, central fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Mid-thigh CT scans were used to measure low attenuation muscle surface (LAMS) (0-34 Hounsfield units (HU)), which represented a specific component of fat-rich muscle. Whole-body insulin sensitivity (M/I) was evaluated by an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. A group of 103 women aged 57.0 ± 4.4 years was studied. Women with higher levels of LAMS presented higher metabolic risk features, particularly elevated fasting, 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations and diminished M/I (P < 0.05). To further study the contribution of muscle fat infiltration and central adiposity on metabolic parameters, we divided the whole group based on the median of LAMS and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). As expected, the best metabolic profile was found in the Low-LAMS/Low-VAT group and the worst in the High-LAMS/High-VAT group. Women with Low-LAMS/High-VAT presented similar metabolic risks to those with High-LAMS/High-VAT. There was no difference between High-LAMS/Low-VAT and Low-LAMS/Low-VAT, which presents the most healthy metabolic and glycemic profiles as reflected by the lowest levels of cardiovascular disease risk variables. This suggests that High-LAMS/Low-VAT is also at low risk of metabolic deteriorations and that High-LAMS, only in the presence of High-VAT seems associated with deteriorated risks. Although increased mid-thigh fat-rich muscle was related to a deteriorated metabolic profile, VAT appears as a more important contributor to alterations in the metabolic profile in postmenopausal women.

  8. Inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in exercising human thigh muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D Walter; Fadel, Paul J; Smith, Michael L; Raven, Peter; Sander, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic responses within exercising skeletal muscle remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to test whether α2-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction was more sensitive to metabolic inhibition than α1-vasoconstriction during dynamic knee-extensor exercise. We studied healthy volunteers using two protocols: (1) wide dose ranges of the α-adrenoreceptor agonists phenylephrine (PE, α1 selective) and BHT-933 (BHT, α2 selective) were administered intra-arterially at rest and during 27 W knee-extensor exercise (n = 13); (2) flow-adjusted doses of PE (0.3 μg kg−1 l−1) and BHT (15 μg kg−1 l−1) were administered at rest and during ramped exercise (7 W to 37 W; n= 10). Ultrasound Doppler and thermodilution techniques provided direct measurements of femoral blood flow (FBF). PE (0.8 μg kg−1) and BHT (40 μg kg−1) produced comparable maximal reductions in FBF at rest (−58 ± 6 versus−64 ± 4%). Despite increasing the doses, PE (1.6 μg kg−1 min−1) and BHT (80 μg kg−1 min−1) caused significantly smaller changes in FBF during 27 W exercise (−13 ± 4 versus−3 ± 5%). During ramped exercise, significant vasoconstriction at lower intensities (7 and 17 W) was seen following PE (−16 ± 5 and −16 ± 4%), but not BHT (−2 ± 4 and −4 ± 5%). At the highest intensity (37 W), FBF was not significantly changed by either drug. Collectively, these data demonstrate metabolic inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in large postural muscles of healthy humans. Both α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor agonists produce comparable vasoconstriction in the resting leg, and dynamic thigh exercise attenuates α1- and α2-mediated vasoconstriction similarly. However, α2-mediated vasoconstriction appears more sensitive to metabolic inhibition, because α2 is completely inhibited even at low workloads, whereas α1 becomes progressively inhibited with increasing workloads. PMID

  9. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Combined with Protein Ingestion Preserves Thigh Muscle Mass But Not Muscle Function in Healthy Older Adults During 5 Days of Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; McKenzie, Alec I; Brunker, Preston; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; Supiano, Mark; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2017-06-19

    Short-term bed rest in older adults is characterized by significant loss in leg lean mass and strength posing significant health consequences. The purpose of this study was to determine in healthy older adults if the daily combination of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and protein supplementation (NMES+PRO) would protect muscle mass and function after 5 days of bed rest. Twenty healthy older adults (∼70 years) were subjected to 5 days of continuous bed rest and were randomized into one of two groups: NMES+PRO (n = 10) or control (CON) (n = 10). The NMES+PRO group received bilateral NMES to quadriceps (40 minutes/session, 3 × /day; morning, afternoon, and evening) followed by an interventional protein supplement (17 g). The CON group received an isocaloric equivalent beverage. Before and after bed rest, vastus lateralis biopsies occurred before and after acute essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion for purposes of acutely stimulating mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTORC1) signaling, a major regulator of muscle protein synthesis, in response to bed rest and NMES+PRO. Baseline (pre and post bed rest) muscle samples were also used to assess myofiber characteristics and gene expression of muscle atrophy markers. Thigh lean mass and muscle function were measured before and after bed rest. Five days of bed rest reduced thigh lean mass, muscle function, myofiber cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, blunted EAA-induced mTORC1 signaling, and increased myostatin and MAFbx mRNA expression. Interestingly, NMES+PRO during bed rest maintained thigh lean mass, but not muscle function. Thigh muscle preservation during bed rest with NMES+PRO may partly be explained by attenuation of myostatin and MAFbx mRNA expression rather than restoration of nutrient-induced mTORC1 signaling. We conclude that the combination of NMES and protein supplementation thrice a day may be an effective therapeutic tool to use to preserve thigh muscle mass during periods of

  10. Competitive athletic participation, thigh muscle strength, and bone density in elite senior athletes and controls.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt Sellhorst, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between participation in highly competitive exercise, thigh muscle strength, and regional and total body bone mineral density (BMD) in elite senior athletes and healthy elderly controls was investigated. One hundred and four elite senior athletes (age: 72.6 ± 6.4 years, height: 168.7 ± 8.6 cm, mass: 72.6 ± 13.5 kg, 57 male:47 female) and 79 healthy controls (age: 75.4 ± 5.6 years, height: 170.8 ± 25.5 cm, mass: 79.5 ± 11.7 kg, 46 male:33 female) participated in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D and calcium intake were assessed via a recall survey. Isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque were measured via a custom strength measurement device. Total body and regional BMD of the hip, radius, and spine were assessed with a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometer. For each BMD site assessed, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed in 4 steps (α = 0.10) to examine the contribution of (a) age, sex, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake; (b) group (elite senior athlete, control); (c) knee extension peak torque; and (d) knee flexion peak torque on BMD. Sex, age, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake explained a significant amount of variance in BMD in each site. Group was not significant. Knee extension peak torque explained an additional 3.8% of the variance in hip BMD (p = 0.06). Knee flexion peak torque was not correlated to BMD at any of the sites assessed. In conclusion, participation in highly competitive athletics was not related to total body or regional BMD. Age, sex, bodyweight, and vitamin D and calcium intake were significantly related to BMD at all the sites assessed. Quadriceps strength contributed slightly to hip BMD. Our results imply that participation in highly competitive senior athletics does not have a protective effect on BMD, perhaps because of a lower bodyweight or other confounding factors.

  11. Effects of postmortem temperature and time on the water-holding capacity of hot-boned turkey breast and thigh muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, M T; Olson, D G; Lesiak, C A; Ahn, D U

    1996-05-01

    Turkey breast and thigh muscles were excised immediately after slaughter and held from 0.25 to 4 h postmortem at 0, 12 or 30 °C to determine postmortem time and temperature effect on muscle pH, drip loss, sarcomere length, homogenate supernatant weight, salt-soluble protein and cooking yields. Higher temperature and longer storage time induced greater drip losses in breast. Longer storage time induced greater drip losses but the least drip loss occurred at 12 °C in thigh muscle. High temperature increased the supernatant weight in breast but decreased that in thigh. Storage time increased supernatant weight and supernatant salt soluble protein levels in both muscles. Homogenate cooking yields of breast containing water, salt and phosphate (HWSP) were higher for 0 and 12 °C compared with 30 °C, and increased with storage. The low postmortem temperature (0 °C) decreased homogenate cooking yields in thigh. These findings indicate that lower postmortem temperatures (0 and 12 °C) and shorter storage time (24 h) produced the greatest water-holding capacity in turkey breast muscle, whereas high and low postmortem temperatures (30 and 0 °C) and longer storage (168 h) produced the least water-holding capacity in raw turkey thigh muscle.

  12. B1-insensitive T2 mapping of healthy thigh muscles using a T2-prepared 3D TSE sequence

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Weidlich, Dominik; Schlaeger, Sarah; Baum, Thomas; Cervantes, Barbara; Deschauer, Marcus; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To propose a T2-prepared 3D turbo spin echo (T2prep 3D TSE) sequence for B1-insensitive skeletal muscle T2 mapping and compare its performance with 2D and 3D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) for T2 mapping in thigh muscles of healthy subjects. Methods The performance of 2D MESE, 3D MESE and the proposed T2prep 3D TSE in the presence of transmit B1 and B0 inhomogeneities was first simulated. The thigh muscles of ten young and healthy subjects were then scanned on a 3 T system and T2 mapping was performed using the three sequences. Transmit B1-maps and proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps were also acquired. The subjects were scanned three times to assess reproducibility. T2 values were compared among sequences and their sensitivity to B1 inhomogeneities was compared to simulation results. Correlations were also determined between T2 values, PDFF and B1. Results The left rectus femoris muscle showed the largest B1 deviations from the nominal value (from 54.2% to 92.9%). Significant negative correlations between T2 values and B1 values were found in the left rectus femoris muscle for 3D MESE (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and 2D MESE (r = -0.71, p<0.001), but not for T2prep 3D TSE (r = -0.32, p = 0.09). Reproducibility of T2 expressed by root mean square coefficients of variation (RMSCVs) were equal to 3.5% in T2prep 3D TSE, 2.6% in 3D MESE and 2.4% in 2D MESE. Significant differences between T2 values of 3D sequences (T2prep 3D TSE and 3D MESE) and 2D MESE were found in all muscles with the highest values for 2D MESE (p<0.05). No significant correlations were found between PDFF and T2 values. Conclusion A strong influence of an inhomogeneous B1 field on the T2 values of 3D MESE and 2D MESE was shown, whereas the proposed T2prep 3D TSE gives B1-insensitive and reproducible thigh muscle T2 mapping. PMID:28196133

  13. B1-insensitive T2 mapping of healthy thigh muscles using a T2-prepared 3D TSE sequence.

    PubMed

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Weidlich, Dominik; Schlaeger, Sarah; Baum, Thomas; Cervantes, Barbara; Deschauer, Marcus; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C

    2017-01-01

    To propose a T2-prepared 3D turbo spin echo (T2prep 3D TSE) sequence for B1-insensitive skeletal muscle T2 mapping and compare its performance with 2D and 3D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) for T2 mapping in thigh muscles of healthy subjects. The performance of 2D MESE, 3D MESE and the proposed T2prep 3D TSE in the presence of transmit B1 and B0 inhomogeneities was first simulated. The thigh muscles of ten young and healthy subjects were then scanned on a 3 T system and T2 mapping was performed using the three sequences. Transmit B1-maps and proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps were also acquired. The subjects were scanned three times to assess reproducibility. T2 values were compared among sequences and their sensitivity to B1 inhomogeneities was compared to simulation results. Correlations were also determined between T2 values, PDFF and B1. The left rectus femoris muscle showed the largest B1 deviations from the nominal value (from 54.2% to 92.9%). Significant negative correlations between T2 values and B1 values were found in the left rectus femoris muscle for 3D MESE (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and 2D MESE (r = -0.71, p<0.001), but not for T2prep 3D TSE (r = -0.32, p = 0.09). Reproducibility of T2 expressed by root mean square coefficients of variation (RMSCVs) were equal to 3.5% in T2prep 3D TSE, 2.6% in 3D MESE and 2.4% in 2D MESE. Significant differences between T2 values of 3D sequences (T2prep 3D TSE and 3D MESE) and 2D MESE were found in all muscles with the highest values for 2D MESE (p<0.05). No significant correlations were found between PDFF and T2 values. A strong influence of an inhomogeneous B1 field on the T2 values of 3D MESE and 2D MESE was shown, whereas the proposed T2prep 3D TSE gives B1-insensitive and reproducible thigh muscle T2 mapping.

  14. "Target" and "Sandwich" Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-08-05

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A "target" sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a "sandwich" sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The "target" and "sandwich" signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0-3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0-1.5 in three of four patients with mutations in the N- or C-domain of the collagen VI genes

  15. Diagnostic and prognostic value of clinical findings in 83 athletes with posterior thigh injury: comparison of clinical findings with magnetic resonance imaging documentation of hamstring muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Verrall, Geoffrey M; Slavotinek, John P; Barnes, Peter G; Fon, Gerald T

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical features of posterior thigh injuries and their contribution to accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessment of hamstring muscle strain injury. The clinical features of posterior thigh injury can be used to diagnose hamstring muscle strain and to predict duration of absence from competition. Prospective clinical study. For two playing seasons, the clinical features of posterior thigh injury, timing of injury, and playing days lost were recorded for Australian Rules football players. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm hamstring muscle injury. Posterior thigh injuries associated with pain and tenderness were recorded for 83 players, with magnetic resonance imaging confirming hamstring injury in 68 (82%). Most of the hamstring injuries were sudden onset (62; 91%) and occurred after a significant warm-up period (57; 84%). Of the patients whose injuries were sudden onset and occurred after the warm-up period (N = 59), 57 (97%) had hamstring muscle strain detected on magnetic resonance imaging. Hamstring muscle injury confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging was associated with a longer absence from competition (mean, 27 days) than injuries where no hamstring injury was detected (mean, 16 days). The clinical features of hamstring injury typically include sudden onset, pain, and tenderness, although exceptions do occur. Muscle fatigue may be important in the pathogenesis of hamstring injury.

  16. Hip fractures risk in older men and women associated with DXA-derived measures of thigh subcutaneous fat thickness, cross-sectional muscle area, and muscle density

    PubMed Central

    Malkov, S.; Cawthon, P. M.; Peters, K. Wilt; Cauley, J. A.; Murphy, R. A.; Visser, M.; Wilson, J.P.; Harris, T.; Satterfield, S.; Cummings, S.; Shepherd, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-thigh cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), muscle attenuation, and greater trochanter soft tissue thickness have been shown to be independent risk factors of hip fracture. Our aim was to determine whether muscle and adipose tissue measures derived from DXA scans would have a similar risk association as those measured using other imaging methods. Using a case-cohort study design, we identified 169 incident hip fracture cases over an average of 13.5 years among participants from the Health ABC Study, a prospective study of 3,075 individuals initially aged 70–79. We modeled the thigh 3D geometry and compared DXA and CT measures. DXA-derived thigh CSA, muscle attenuation, and subcutaneous fat thickness were found to be highly correlated to their CT counterparts (Pearson’s r = 0.82, 0.45, and 0.91, respectively; p < 0.05). The fracture risk of men and women were calculated separately. We found that decreased subcutaneous fat, CT thigh muscle attenuation, and appendicular lean mass by height squared (ALM/Ht2) were associated with fracture risk in men, hazard ratios (HR) equal 1.44 (1.02, 2.02), 1.40 (1.05, 1.85), and 0.58 (0.36, 0.91) respectively after adjusting for age, race, clinical site, BMI, chronic disease, hip BMD, self-reported health, alcohol use, smoking status, education, physical activity, cognitive function. In a similar model for women, only decreases in subcutaneous fat and DXA CSA were associated with hip fracture risk, HR equal 1.39 (1.07, 1.82) and 0.78 (0.62, 0.97) respectively. Men with a high ALM/Ht2 and low subcutaneous fat thickness had over 8 times higher risk for hip fracture compared to those with low ALM/Ht2 and high subcutaneous fat. In women, ALM/Ht2 did not improve the model when subcutaneous fat included. We conclude that the DXA-derived subcutaneous fat thickness is a strong marker for hip fracture risk in both men and women, and especially men with high ALM/Ht2. PMID:25644748

  17. Thigh muscle MRI in immune-mediated necrotising myopathy: extensive oedema, early muscle damage and role of anti-SRP autoantibodies as a marker of severity.

    PubMed

    Pinal-Fernandez, Iago; Casal-Dominguez, Maria; Carrino, John A; Lahouti, Arash H; Basharat, Pari; Albayda, Jemima; Paik, Julie J; Ahlawat, Shivani; Danoff, Sonye K; Lloyd, Thomas E; Mammen, Andrew L; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to define the pattern of muscle involvement in patients with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy (IMNM) relative to those with other inflammatory myopathies and to compare patients with IMNM with different autoantibodies. All Johns Hopkins Myositis Longitudinal Cohort subjects with a thigh MRI (tMRI) who fulfilled criteria for IMNM, dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) or clinically amyopathic DM (CADM) were included in the study. Muscles were assessed for intramuscular and fascial oedema, atrophy and fatty replacement. Disease subgroups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with IMNM with anti-signal recognition particle (SRP) autoantibodies were compared with those with IMNM with anti-HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) autoantibodies. The study included 666 subjects (101 IMNM, 176 PM, 219 DM, 17 CADM and 153 IBM). Compared with DM or PM, IMNM was characterised by a higher proportion of thigh muscles with oedema, atrophy and fatty replacement (p<0.01). Patients with IMNM with anti-SRP had more atrophy (19%, p=0.003) and fatty replacement (18%, p=0.04) than those with anti-HMGCR. In IMNM, muscle abnormalities were especially common in the lateral rotator and gluteal groups. Fascial involvement was most widespread in DM. Fatty replacement of muscle tissue began early during the course of disease in IMNM and the other groups. An optimal combination of tMRI features had only a 55% positive predictive value for diagnosing IMNM. Compared with patients with DM or PM, IMNM is characterised by more widespread muscle involvement. Anti-SRP-positive patients have more severe muscle involvement than anti-HMGCR-positive patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Muscle-skeletal model of the thigh: a tool for understanding the biomechanics of gait in patients with cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Catalfamo Formento, Paola Andrea; José Crespo, Marcos; Andrés Braidot, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Cerebral Palsy represents the most common cause of physical disability in modern world and within the pediatrics orthopedics units. The gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders in CP. Giving a more comprehensive treatment plan, including or excluding surgical procedures that can potentially decrease the number of surgical interventions in the life of these patients. Recommendations for orthopedic surgery may be based on a quantitative description of how to alter the properties probably muscle force generation, and how this affects the action of the muscle to determine how these muscles, impaired by disease or surgery, contributing to the movement of the segments of the limb during crouch gait. So the causes and appropriate treatment of gait abnormalities are difficult to determine because the movements generated by the muscular forces of these patients are not clearly understood. A correct determination of the etiology of abnormal patterns of the knee is the key to select the appropriate therapy, presenting a major challenge at present since there is no theoretical basis to determine the biomechanical causes of abnormal gait of these patients. The potential and necessity of using correct biomechanical models that consistently study the abnormalities becomes clear. Reinforcing and correcting a simple gait analysis and eliminating the unknowns when selecting the appropriate treatment is crucial in clinical settings. In this paper a computer muscle-skeletal model is proposed. The model represents a person's thigh simulating the six most representative muscles and joints of the hip and knee. In this way you can have a better understanding of gait abnormalities present in these patients. So the quality of these estimates of individual muscle dynamics facilitate better understanding of the biomechanics of gait pathologies helping to reach better diagnosis prior to surgery and rehabilitation treatments.

  19. Effects of external pelvic compression on isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether application of a pelvic compression belt affects isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Randomized crossover, cross-sectional. Twenty sportsmen (age 22.0±1.5 years) with hamstring injuries (hamstring-injured group) and 29 (age 23.5±1.5 years) without hamstring injuries (control group) underwent isokinetic testing of the thigh muscles. Testing included five reciprocal concentric quadriceps and hamstring contractions, and five eccentric hamstring contractions at an angular velocity of 60°/s, with and without a pelvic compression belt in randomized order. The outcome measures were average torque normalized to bodyweight for terminal range eccentric hamstring contractions and peak torque normalized to bodyweight for concentric quadriceps, concentric hamstring and eccentric hamstring contractions. There was a significant increase in normalized average torque of eccentric hamstring contractions in the terminal range for both groups (p≤0.044) and normalized peak torque of eccentric hamstring contractions for injured hamstrings (p=0.025) while wearing the pelvic compression belt. No significant changes were found for other torque variables. Injured hamstrings were weaker than the contralateral uninjured hamstrings during terminal range eccentric hamstring (p=0.040), and concentric hamstring (p=0.020) contractions recorded without the pelvic compression belt. However, no between-group differences were found for any of the investigated variables. Wearing the pelvic compression belt appears to have a facilitatory effect on terminal range eccentric hamstring strength in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Future investigations should ascertain whether there is a role for using a pelvic compression belt for rehabilitation of hamstring injuries. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffusion-Tensor Imaging of Thigh Muscles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy Values With Fatty Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui Dian; Liang, Ying Yin; Xu, Ping; Ling, Jian; Chen, Ying Ming

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values with fatty infiltration in the thigh muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-one boys with DMD were recruited. The grade of fatty infiltration and the ADC and FA values of four thigh muscles (rectus femoris, semitendinosus, sartorius, and gracilis) were measured, and the FA and ADC values were compared with the grade of fatty infiltration. Twenty age-matched healthy boys were enrolled as the control group. The differences in the ADC and FA values of the thigh muscles between patients with DMD and the control group were compared. The patients with DMD showed lower FA values and higher ADC values in all measured muscles when compared with the control group. The FA and ADC values were correlated with the grade of fatty infiltration. For the rectus femoris muscle, r = -0.753 and p = 0.007 for FA, and r = 0.685 and p = 0.001 for ADC. For the semitendinosus muscle, r = -0.621 and p = 0.041 for FA, and r = 0.705 and p = 0.021 for ADC. For the sartorius muscle, r = -0.662 and p = 0.027 for FA, and r = 0.701 and p = 0.017 for ADC. For the gracilis muscle, r = -0.618 and p = 0.043 for FA, and r = 0.695 and p = 0.022 for ADC. Damage to the thigh muscles in patients with DMD can be detected by ADC and FA values using DTI. DTI can be used to assess the severity of the disease.

  1. Sex- and age-related differences in mid-thigh composition and muscle quality determined by computed tomography in middle-aged and elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takehiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Matsui, Yasumoto; Harada, Atsushi; Takemura, Marie; Yuki, Atsumu; Kato, Yuki; Otsuka, Rei; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Sex- and age-related differences in mid-thigh composition and muscle quality remain unclear. The present study aimed to clarify these differences using computed tomography in middle-aged and elderly Japanese. A total of 2310 participants (age 40-89 years), who were randomly selected from the local residents, underwent computed tomography examination of the right mid-thigh. Thigh circumference and cross-sectional areas of the thigh, muscle, quadriceps, non-quadriceps, fat, and bone were measured. Knee extension strength and muscle quality index (knee extension strength/quadriceps cross-sectional area) were also assessed. Sex- and age-related differences in these indices were analyzed. The thigh cross-sectional area in men and women decreased by 0.6% and 0.5%/year, respectively, because of a decrease in muscle cross-sectional area (men 75.2%, women 40.6%), fat cross-sectional area (men 24.4%, women 59.6%) and bone cross-sectional area (men 0.5%, women -0.2%). Muscle cross-sectional area in men and women decreased by 0.6% and 0.4%/year, respectively, because of a decrease in quadriceps cross-sectional area (men 65.6%, women 81.6%) and non-quadriceps cross-sectional area (men 34.4%, women 18.4%). Muscle quality in men and women decreased by 0.4% and 0.3%/year, respectively. Thigh cross-sectional area decreased with age mainly because of a decrease in muscle cross-sectional area in men and fat cross-sectional area in women. The rate of decrease in muscle cross-sectional area was 1.5-fold higher in men than in women. Muscle cross-sectional area decreased with age mainly because of a decrease in quadriceps cross-sectional area, especially in women. Decrease in muscle quality with age was similar in both sexes. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Donor-site Morbidity of Medial and Lateral Thigh-based Flaps: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Chad A.; Lewis, Kevin C.; Mioton, Lauren M.; Hanwright, Philip J.; Galiano, Robert D.; Dumanian, Gregory A.; Alghoul, Mohammed S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Free and pedicled medial and lateral thigh-based flaps are common reconstructive procedures. However, there have been no comparative studies of morbidity between medial and lateral donor sites. Methods: We conducted an Enterprise Data Warehouse-based review of all the senior authors’ (R.D.G., G.A.D., and M.S.A.) thigh-based free and pedicled flaps. Patient demographic data, donor-site complications, drain duration, and number of postoperative visits were collected and compared. Complications were also compared between fasciocutaneous flaps and muscle or myocutaneous flaps, and skin grafted donor sites. Results: We analyzed 352 flap donor sites, with 155 medial and 197 lateral. Two hundred seventeen (217) flaps were pedicled. Flap types included 127 gracilis, 27 rectus femoris, 134 anterolateral thigh, and 36 vastus lateralis-only flaps. There were no significant differences in complications between medial (17.4%) and lateral thigh (21.3%) donor sites, although lateral thigh flaps had a mean of 1 additional postoperative visit. Rates of wound dehiscence/healing issues were significantly higher in both gracilis myocutaneous flaps (25.9%) and flaps requiring a skin grafted donor site (31.2%). Postoperative therapeutic anticoagulation was the only significant risk factor for a donor-site complication. Flap complications resulted in increased drain duration and postoperative office visits. Conclusions: Donor-site morbidity is similar in both lateral and medial thigh-based flaps. The inclusion of muscle in the flap from either donor site does not seem to increase complications, but the inclusion of a skin paddle with gracilis muscle, or a skin grafted lateral thigh donor site, results in increased wound healing complications. PMID:27975004

  3. Evaluation of enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. on growth performance, meat quality, and oxidative stability of breast and thigh muscles in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wan, X L; Song, Z H; Niu, Y; Cheng, K; Zhang, J F; Ahmad, H; Zhang, L L; Wang, T

    2017-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of including enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. (EA) in broiler diets on growth performance, meat quality, and oxidative stability of breast and thigh muscles. A total of 256 one-d-old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were randomly allotted into four groups with eight replicates of eight birds each. Broilers in the four groups were offered basal diet supplemented with 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 g/kg EA during the 42-d experiment, respectively. The ADG, ADFI, and feed/gain ratio (F:G) were measured at 42 d of age. Breast and thigh muscle samples from eight birds per treatment were obtained at 42 d to determine meat quality, free radical scavenging activity, and lipid peroxidation. All treatment groups had similar ADG, ADFI, and F:G during the 42 d experiment (P > 0.05). Drip loss at 24 h and shearing force of breast muscle were linearly (P < 0.05) and quadratically (P < 0.05) decreased by EA addition. The drip loss at 24 h and 48 h, cooking loss and shearing force of thigh muscle followed the same fashion. The supplementation of EA quadratically increased 2, 2-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) (P = 0.004) and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (P = 0.035) free radical scavenging activities in breast muscle, and linearly (P < 0.05) and quadratically (P < 0.05) increased ABTS and DPPH scavenging activities of thigh muscle. Increasing levels of EA linearly (P < 0.05) or quadratically (P < 0.05) or both decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in breast and thigh muscle samples during 15 d of storage at 4°C. The results indicated that EA supplementation improved meat quality and oxidative stability of breast and thigh muscles in broilers. The inclusion level of 1.0 g/kg EA in broiler diet was recommended. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees. PMID:26745808

  5. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees.

  6. Clinical Experience With the Combination of a Biceps Femoris Muscle Turnover Flap and a Posterior Thigh Fasciocutaneous Hatchet Flap for the Reconstruction of Ischial Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Ceran, Candemir; Aksam, Berrak; Demiralp, Cemil Ozerk

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of ischial pressure ulcers is problematic because of the distinctive anatomical properties of the region and high recurrence rates. To date, no single technique has been proven to be effective in reducing recurrence of the ulcers. We present our experience with the combination of a biceps femoris muscle turnover flap and a posterior thigh fasciocutaneous hatchet flap and discuss the long-term results. A retrospective clinical analysis of 15 patients with grade 4 ischial pressure ulcers reconstructed with biceps femoris muscle turnover flaps and laterally based posterior thigh fasciocutaneous hatchet flaps was carried out between January 2010 and January 2013. Debridement and reconstruction of the ulcers were accomplished in a single stage. The posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap was elevated in a hatchet style. The long and/or short head of the biceps femoris muscle were dissected from their insertions, turned over on their major pedicles, and their distal portions were used to obliterate the cavitary defect. The skin defect over the muscles was covered by the fasciocutaneous hatchet flap. The average age of the patients was 42.6 years and the mean follow-up time was 27.2 months. Three patients had the following early postoperative complications: hematoma, suture dehiscence, and the necrosis of the short head of biceps muscle. Only 1 patient had a recurrent ulcer 15 months after surgery, which was treated with debridement and the readvancement of the fasciocutaneous flap. The overall recurrence rate was 6.6%. The biceps femoris muscle turnover flap combined with the posterior thigh fasciocutaneous hatchet flap is a worthwhile option to consider for the reconstruction of ischial pressure ulcers and this technique produces favorable results in terms of the lack of recurrence and complications. The use of the muscle and fasciocutaneous tissue as 2 different flaps, which have different roles in the early and late postoperative period, reduces the

  7. Analysis of thigh muscle stiffness from childhood to adulthood using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique.

    PubMed

    Debernard, Laëtitia; Robert, Ludovic; Charleux, Fabrice; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography has been performed in healthy and pathological muscles in order to provide clinicians with quantitative muscle stiffness data. However, there is a lack of data on pediatric muscle. Therefore, the present work studies age-related changes of the mechanical properties. 26 healthy subjects composed of 7 children (8-12 years), 9 young adults (24-29 years) and 10 middle-aged adults (53-58 years) underwent a magnetic resonance elastography test. Shear modulus (μ) and its spatial distribution, as well as the attenuation coefficient (α) were measured on the vastus medialis muscle at rest and at contracted conditions (10% and 20% of the maximum voluntary contraction) for each group. The shear modulus linearly increases with the degree of contraction for young adults while it is maximum at 10% of the maximum voluntary contraction for children (μ_(children_10%)=14.9kPa (SD 2.18)) and middle-aged adults (μ_(middle-aged_10%)=10.42kPa (SD 1.38)). Mapping of shear modulus revealed a diffuse distribution of colors reflecting differences in muscle physiological activity as a function of age. The attenuation coefficient showed a similar behavior for all groups, i.e. a decrease from the relaxed to the contracted states. This study demonstrates that the magnetic resonance elastography technique is sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle mechanical properties for children, middle-aged and young adults and could provide clinicians with a muscle reference data base as a function of age, improving the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Postmortem degradation of desmin and calpain in breast and leg and thigh muscles from Taiwan black-feathered country chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Shiou; Chou, Rong-Ghi R

    2010-12-01

    Several studies have reported that the postmortem changes are more rapid in breast muscles (BM) than in leg and thigh muscles (LM) of chickens. However, the reasons for the differences in postmortem proteolysis of BM and LM are still uncertain. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare the postmortem degradation of desmin and calpains in BM and LM from Taiwan black-feathered country chickens at 5 °C. The pH was lower (P < 0.05) in BM than in LM. Western blot indicated that postmortem desmin degradation was more rapid in BM than in LM. Casein zymograms showed that at-death µ-calpain activity was higher in BM than in LM. As postmortem time proceeded, µ-calpain was activated and autolyzed more extensively in BM than in LM. However, the µ/m-calpain activity remained stable during postmortem storage in both BM and LM. Our results suggest that the more rapid postmortem proteolysis found in BM than in LM at 5 °C similar with the previous study could be mainly explained by both greater amounts and faster activation and autolysis of µ-calpain in BM. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Effect of peanut protein isolate on functional properties of chicken salt-soluble proteins from breast and thigh muscles during heat-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingxin; Wu, Zhen; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Peng

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of peanut protein isolate (PPI) on the functional properties of chicken salt-soluble protein (SSP) prepared from breast and thigh muscles during heat-induced gelation. The addition of PPI increased the water-holding capacity, gel strength and elasticity of heat-induced chicken SSP mixed gel. Breast and thigh SSP had the best gel properties at the addition of 2.5% and 3.5% PPI, respectively. Rheology indicated that thigh SSP showed higher storage modulus (G') than breast SSP. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the addition of PPI changed transition temperatures (Tmax) and enthalpy of denaturation (ΔH) of chicken SSP. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the PPI-treated SSP gels had more compact ultrastructures than controls. The results suggested that PPI may be a potential protein additive for improve the characteristics of SSP gelations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Increase in group II excitation from ankle muscles to thigh motoneurones during human standing

    PubMed Central

    Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Nicolas, Guillaume; Marque, Philippe; Iglesias, Caroline; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    In standing subjects, we investigated the excitation of quadriceps (Q) motoneurones by muscle afferents from tibialis anterior (TA) and the excitation of semitendinosus (ST) motoneurones by muscle afferents from gastrocnemius medialis (GM). Standing with a backward lean stretches the anterior muscle pair (TA and Q) and they must be cocontracted to maintain balance. Equally, forward lean stretches the posterior muscle pair (GM and ST) and they must be cocontracted. We used these conditions of enhanced lean to increase the influence of γ static motoneurones on muscle spindle afferents, which enhances the background input from these afferents to extrafusal motoneurones. The effects of the conditioning volleys on motoneurone excitability was estimated using the modulation of the on-going rectified EMG and of the H reflex. Stimulation of afferents from TA in the deep peroneal nerve at 1.5–2 × MT (motor threshold) evoked early group I and late group II excitation of Q motoneurones. Stimulation of afferents in the GM nerve at 1.3–1.8 MT evoked only late group II excitation of ST motoneurones. The late excitation produced by the group II afferents was significantly greater when subjects were standing and leaning than when they voluntarily cocontracted the same muscle pairs at the same levels of activation. The early effect produced by the group I afferents was unchanged. We propose that this increase in excitation by group II afferents reflects a posture-related withdrawal of a tonic inhibition that is exerted by descending noradrenergic control and is specific to the synaptic actions of group II afferents. PMID:15860524

  11. A rapid approach for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging in thigh muscles using the pulsed saturation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D; Kroop, Susan F; Huston, Joseph W; Gochberg, Daniel F; Park, Jane H; Damon, Bruce M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging in skeletal muscle may be confounded by intramuscular adipose components, low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and voluntary and involuntary motion artifacts. Collectively, these issues could create bias and error in parameter fitting. In this study, technical considerations related to these factors were systematically investigated, and solutions were proposed. First, numerical simulations indicate that the presence of an additional fat component significantly underestimates the pool size ratio (F). Therefore, fat-signal suppression (or water-selective excitation) is recommended for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle. Second, to minimize the effect of motion and muscle contraction artifacts in datasets collected with a conventional 14-point sampling scheme, a rapid two-parameter model was adapted from previous studies in the brain and spinal cord. The consecutive pair of sampling points with highest accuracy and precision for estimating F was determined with numerical simulations. Its performance with respect to SNR and incorrect parameter assumptions was systematically evaluated. QMT data fitting was performed in healthy control subjects and polymyositis patients, using both the two- and five-parameter models. The experimental results were consistent with the predictions from the numerical simulations. These data support the use of the two-parameter modeling approach for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle as a means to reduce total imaging time and/or permit additional signal averaging.

  12. The 6-minute walk test, motor function measure and quantitative thigh muscle MRI in Becker muscular dystrophy: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dirk; Hafner, Patricia; Rubino, Daniela; Schmid, Maurice; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Jung, Hans; Bieri, Oliver; Haas, Tanja; Gloor, Monika; Fischmann, Arne; Bonati, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) has an incidence of 1 in 16 000 male births. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between validated functional scores and quantitative MRI (qMRI) of thigh muscles in 20 ambulatory BMD patients, aged 18.3-60 years (mean 31.2; SD 11.1). Clinical assessments included the motor function measure (MFM) and its subscales, as well as timed function tests such as the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and the timed 10-m run/walk test. Quantitative MRI of the thigh muscles included the mean fat fraction (MFF) using a 2-point Dixon (2-PD) technique, and transverse relaxation time (T2) measurements. The mean MFM value was 80.4%, SD 9.44 and the D1 subscore 54.5%, SD 19.9. The median 6MWT was 195m, IQR 160-330.2. The median 10-m run/walk test was 7.4 seconds, IQR 6.1-9.3. The mean fat fraction of the thigh muscles was 55.6%, SD 17.4%, mean T2 relaxation times of all muscles: 69.9 ms, SD 14.4. The flexors had the highest MFF and T2 relaxation times, followed by the extensors and the adductors. MFF and global T2 relaxation times were highly negatively correlated with the MFM total, D1-subscore and 6MWT, and positively correlated with the 10 m run/walk test time (p < 0.01). Age was not correlated with MFF, global T2 relaxation time or clinical assessments. Both MFF and T2 measures in the thigh muscle were well correlated with clinical function in BMD and may serve as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Weight training of the thigh muscles using closed vs. open kinetic chain exercises: a comparison of performance enhancement.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, J; Esko, A; Thomeé, R; Svantesson, U

    1998-01-01

    Resistance training is commonly used in sports for prevention of injuries and in rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to compare closed vs. open kinetic chain weight training of the thigh muscles and to determine which mode resulted in the greatest performance enhancement. Twenty-four healthy subjects were randomized into a barbell squat or a knee extension and hip adduction variable resistance weight machine group and performed maximal, progressive weight training twice a week for 6 weeks. All subjects were tested prior to training and at the completion of the training period. A barbell squat 3-repetition maximum, an isokinetic knee extension 1-repetition maximum, and a vertical jump test were used to monitor effects of training. Significant improvements were seen in both groups in the barbell squat 3-repetition maximum test. The closed kinetic chain group improved 23 kg (31%), which was significantly more than the 12 kg (13%) seen in the open kinetic chain group. In the vertical jump test, the closed kinetic chain group improved significantly, 5 cm (10%), while no significant changes were seen in the open kinetic chain group. A large increase of training load was observed in both subject groups; however, improvements in isotonic strength did not transfer to the isokinetic knee extension test. The results may be explained by neural adaptation, weight training mode, and specificity of tests.

  14. Short-term isokinetic training versus isotonic training: effects on asymmetry in strength of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Golik-Peric, Dragana; Drapsin, Miodrag; Obradovic, Borislav; Drid, Patrik

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two training protocols on the isokinetic performance of athletes. The study was conducted in 38 athletes, (age 23.3 ± 3.6 years) participating in national level leagues of different sports, whose initial concentric hamstrings-to-quadriceps (conH/Q) torque ratio was lower than 0.5. During seasonal testing, an isokinetic measurement of knee extensors and flexors was performed at 60°/s. The athletes were divided into two groups. Nineteen athletes performed the isokinetic training protocol (IT) while the second group of 19 athletes followed the isotonic training protocol (RT). Both protocols lasted 4 weeks. After completing the training protocols, both groups underwent a final isokinetic testing. The isokinetic data revealed significant increases after training in measures of peak torque in both extensor and flexor muscle groups, in both the IT and RT study groups (p < 0.05). There were significant increases (p< 0.05) in conH/Q ratio in both groups after the implemented protocols, but greater in IT group. Consequently, applied IT protocol induced changes in working muscles, thereby restoring detected asymmetry to an acceptable balance more efficiently compared to RT protocol.

  15. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hides, Julie A; Belavý, Daniel L; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J; Richardson, Carolyn A

    2009-03-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement ("slide") of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP.

  16. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J.; Richardson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement (“slide”) of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP. PMID:19015895

  17. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application.

  18. Dorsiflexion, Plantar-Flexion, and Neutral Ankle Positions During Passive Resistance Assessments of the Posterior Hip and Thigh Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ty B.; Akehi, Kazuma; Thiele, Ryan M.; Smith, Douglas B.; Warren, Aric J.; Thompson, Brennan J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Passive straight-legged–raise (SLR) assessments have been performed with the ankle fixed in dorsiflexion (DF), plantar-flexion (PF), or neutral (NTRL) position. However, it is unclear whether ankle position contributes to differences in the passive resistance measured during an SLR assessment. Objective: To examine the influence of ankle position during an SLR on the passive torque, range of motion (ROM), and hamstrings electromyographic (EMG) responses to passive stretch of the posterior hip and thigh muscles. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 13 healthy volunteers (5 men: age = 24 ± 3 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 85 ± 10 kg; 8 women: age = 21 ± 1 years, height = 163 ± 8 cm, mass = 60 ± 6 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 6 randomly ordered passive SLR assessments involving 2 assessments at each condition, which included the ankle positioned in DF, PF, and NTRL. All SLRs were performed using an isokinetic dynamometer programmed in passive mode to move the limb toward the head at 5°/s. Main Outcome Measure(s): During each SLR, maximal ROM was determined as the point of discomfort but not pain, as indicated by the participant. Passive torque and EMG amplitude were determined at 4 common joint angles (θ) separated by 5° during the final common 15° of ROM for each participant. Results: Passive torque was greater for the DF condition than the NTRL (P = .008) and PF (P = .03) conditions at θ3 and greater for the DF than NTRL condition (P = .02) at θ4. Maximal ROM was lower for the DF condition than the NTRL (P = .003) and PF (P < .001) conditions. However, we found no differences among conditions for EMG amplitude (P = .86). Conclusions: These findings suggest that performing SLRs with the ankle positioned in DF may elicit greater passive torque and lower ROM than SLRs with the ankle positioned in PF or NTRL. The greater passive torque and lower ROM induced by the DF

  19. Muscle mass and composition of the hip, thigh and abdominal muscles in women with and without hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Ikezoe, Tome; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Akiyama, Haruhiko; So, Kazutaka; Kuroda, Yutaka; Yoneyama, Tomohide; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare muscle mass and composition between individuals with and without hip osteoarthritis. Twenty-four women with hip osteoarthritis (OA group) and 16 healthy women (healthy group) participated in this study. Muscle thickness (MT) and echo intensity (EI) were measured as indices of muscle mass and composition, respectively, using ultrasound imaging. Seven muscles were examined: gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, quadriceps femoris, rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis. MT of only quadriceps femoris in the OA group was significantly thinner than that in the healthy group. EIs of gluteus medius, quadriceps femoris and rectus abdominis were significantly higher in the OA group than those in the healthy group. Thus, actual contractile tissue of gluteus medius and rectus abdominis substantially decreased, although muscle mass was similar, whereas both quantitative and qualitative changes occurred in quadriceps femoris in patients with hip OA. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-01-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanims are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n = 10), (4) femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n = 6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n = 7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (ΔLBF 7.4 ± 0.7 l min−1), cardiac output ( 8.7 ± 0.7 l min−1), mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP 51 ± 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast, femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.7 ± 0.1 l min−1), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for ∼5% of peak exercise hyperaemia. Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.5–0.7 l min−1) without altering , MAP or . These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure, stroke volume and or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans. Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  1. Longitudinal (4 year) change of thigh muscle and adipose tissue distribution in chronically painful vs. painless knees – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Dannhauer, Torben; Eckstein, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate 4-year longitudinal change in thigh muscle and adipose tissue content in chronically painful versus painless knees. Methods Knees from Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with non-acceptable symptom status (numerical rating scale ≥4) and frequent pain (≥6 months at baseline, year 2 and year 4 follow-up) were studied. These were matched with painless controls (bilateral NRS pain intensity≤1 and ≤infrequent pain at all 3 timepoints). 4-year longitudinal changes in thigh muscle anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs), isometric muscle strength, and in subcutaneous (SCF) and intermuscular fat (IMF) CSAs were obtained from magnetic resonance images (MRI) and were compared between groups (paired t-tests). Results 43 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria of chronic pain, had complete thigh muscle MRI acquisitions and strength measurements, and a matched control. Quadriceps CSAs, but not extensor strength, showed a significant longitudinal decrease in chronically painful knees (-3.9%; 95%confidence interval [95 CI] -6.3%,-1.5%) and in painless controls (-2.4%; 95% CI -4.1%, -0.7%); the difference in change was not statistically significant (p=0.33). There was a significant 4-year gain in SCF in painful knees (8.1%; 95% CI 3.1%, 13%) but not in controls (0.0%; 95%CI -4.4%, +4.4%) with the difference in change being significant (p=0.03). The gain in IMF (∼5.2%) was similar between painful and painless knees. Conclusion This is the first paper to show a significant impact of (chronic) knee pain on longitudinal change in local subcutaneous adipose tissue. The effect of pain on subcutaneous fat appeared stronger than that on intermuscular adipose tissue and on muscle status. PMID:25887367

  2. Effects of macronutrient intake on thigh muscle mass during home-based walking training in middle-aged and older women.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Yazawa, D; Goto, M; Kamijo, Y-I; Furihata, M; Gen-no, H; Hamada, K; Nose, H

    2013-10-01

    We examined whether post-exercise macronutrient supplementation during a 5-month home-based interval walking training (IWT) accelerated exercise-induced increases in skeletal muscle mass and strength in healthy middle-aged and older women. Thirty-five women (41-78 years) were randomly divided into two groups: IWT alone (CNT, n = 18) or IWT plus post-exercise macronutrient (7.6 g protein, 32.5 g carbohydrate, and 4.4 g fat) supplementation (NUT, n = 17). For IWT, all subjects were instructed to repeat five or more sets of 3-min low-intensity walking at 40% peak aerobic capacity (Vo2 peak ), followed by a 3-min high-intensity walking above 70% Vo2 peak per day for 4 or more days per week. We determined Vo2 peak , thigh muscle tissue area by computer tomography, and thigh muscle strength in all subjects before and after IWT. We found that an increase in hamstring muscle tissue area was 2.8 ± 1.2% in NUT vs -1.0 ± 0.7% in CNT and that in isometric knee flexion force was 16.3 ± 3.7% in NUT vs 6.5 ± 3.0% in CNT; both were significantly higher in NUT than in CNT (both, P < 0.001). Thus, post-exercise macronutrient supplementation enhanced the increases in thigh muscle mass and strength, although partially, in home-based IWT in middle-aged and older women.

  3. Effect of supplemental fermented Ginkgo biloba leaves at different levels on growth performance, meat quality, and antioxidant status of breast and thigh muscles in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Niu, Y; Wan, X L; Zhang, X H; Zhao, L G; He, J T; Zhang, J F; Zhang, L L; Wang, T

    2017-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of dietary supplementation with different levels of fermented Ginkgo biloba leaves (FGBL) on growth performance, slaughter performance, meat quality, antioxidant enzyme capacity, and free radical scavenging activities of muscles in broiler chickens. A total of 648 one-d-old broiler chickens were randomly allocated into six dietary treatments, including control group (CON group: basal diet), FGBL1, FGBL2, FGBL3, FGBL4, and FGBL5 groups (basal diet containing 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5 g/kg FGBL, respectively). Body weight gain and feed intake were recorded at 1, 21, and 42 d. At 42 d, 2 birds from each replicate were slaughtered. The results indicated that 3.5 g/kg FGBL diet significantly increased (P < 0.05) ADFI and ADG in 1 to 42 d and ADFI in 22 to 42 d compared with the CON group. In 1 to 21 d, 4.5 g/kg FGBL diet improved (P < 0.05) ADFI and ADG. With dietary FGBL increasing, the feed: gain ratio (F/G) in 1 to 21 d was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). However, birds fed with 5.5 g/kg FGBL had a higher (P < 0.05) F/G compared with other groups in 22 to 42 d and 1 to 42 d. In addition, FGBL3 and FGBL4 showed lower (P < 0.05) L* value in breast muscle, cooking loss in thigh muscle and lower 24 h and 48 h drip loss in both breast and thigh muscles than those of other groups. Furthermore, birds in the FGBL3 and FGBL4 groups increased (P < 0.05) the activity of total superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant capability in muscles, and the scavenging activities of 2,2΄-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic) acid radical, OH•, and O2•- in thigh muscle, decreased (P < 0.05) malondialdehyde concentration in thigh muscle, as compared to the CON group. In conclusion, FGBL had the potential to improve the growth performance, meat quality and antioxidant status of broiler chickens. The optimal dose in the present study of FGBL in broiler diets was from 3.5 to 4.5 g/kg. © 2016

  4. Lower Mitochondrial Energy Production of the Thigh Muscles in Patients With Low-Normal Ankle-Brachial Index.

    PubMed

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Zane, Ariel; Oberdier, Matt; Canepa, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie; Simonsick, Eleanor; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth; Reiter, David; Lakatta, Edward G; McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-08-30

    Lower muscle mitochondrial energy production may contribute to impaired walking endurance in patients with peripheral arterial disease. A borderline ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.91 to 1.10 is associated with poorer walking endurance compared with higher ABI. We hypothesized that in the absence of peripheral arterial disease, lower ABI is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production. We examined 363 men and women participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40. Muscle mitochondrial energy production was assessed by post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (kPCr) measured by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left thigh. A lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant reflects decreased mitochondria energy production.The mean age of the participants was 71±12 years. A total of 18.4% had diabetes mellitus and 4% were current and 40% were former smokers. Compared with participants with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40, those with an ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 had significantly lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (19.3 versus 20.8 ms(-1), P=0.015). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and cholesterol levels (P=0.028). Similarly, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant was linearly associated with ABI as a continuous variable, both in the ABI ranges of 0.90 to 1.40 (standardized coefficient=0.15, P=0.003) and 1.1 to 1.4 (standardized coefficient=0.12, P=0.0405). An ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production compared with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40. These data demonstrate adverse associations of lower ABI values with impaired mitochondrial activity even within the range of a clinically accepted definition of a normal ABI. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions in persons with ABIs of 0.90 to 1.10 can prevent subsequent

  5. Thigh muscle strength predicts knee replacement risk independent of radiographic disease and pain in women – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Culvenor, Adam; Wirth, Wolfgang; Ruhdorfer, Anja; Eckstein, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether thigh muscle strength predicts knee replacement (KR) risk, independent of radiographic severity and pain. Methods Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with KR at 12–60 month (M) follow-up (cases) were each matched with one control (no KR throughout 60M) by age, sex, height, body mass index, baseline radiographic stage, and location of joint space narrowing. Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength were recorded biennially. The strength examination prior to KR (≤2 years) was termed T0, that two years prior to T0 T−2, and that four years prior T−4. Muscle strength between cases and controls was compared using paired t-tests and conditional logistic regression adjusted for pain. Results 136 of 4796 participants (60% women, age 65±9 years, BMI 29±4 kg/m2) received a KR during follow-up, had at least T0 strength data, and a matched control. Knee extensor strength at T0 (primary outcome) was significantly lower in female cases than controls (p<0.001; pain-adjusted odds ratio [ORp] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16 to 2.56), but no difference was seen in men (p=0.451; ORp 0.80, 95%CI 0.50 to 1.27). Results were similar for knee flexor strength at T0, and for longitudinal change in extensor and flexor strength between T0 and T−2. Thigh muscle strength at T−2 or T−4, or change between T−2 and T−4, did not predict KR risk in men or women. Conclusion Thigh muscle strength predicted KR risk in women, but not in men. These results may identify a window for modifying risk of KR surgery in women. PMID:26663882

  6. Effects of milk product intake on thigh muscle strength and NFKB gene methylation during home-based interval walking training in older women: A randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Masuki, Shizue; Nishida, Kensei; Hashimoto, Shigenari; Morikawa, Mayuko; Takasugi, Satoshi; Nagata, Masashi; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Rokutan, Kazuhito; Nose, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Muscle atrophy with aging is closely associated with chronic systemic inflammation and lifestyle-related diseases. In the present study, we assessed whether post-exercise milk product intake during 5-month interval walking training (IWT) enhanced the increase in thigh muscle strength and ameliorated susceptibility to inflammation in older women. Subjects [n = 37, 66±5 (standard deviation) yrs] who had been performing IWT for >6 months participated in this study. They were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: IWT alone (CNT, n = 12), IWT + low-dose post-exercise milk product intake (LD, n = 12; 4 g protein and 3 g carbohydrate) or IWT + a 3-times higher dose of milk product intake than the LD group (HD, n = 13). They were instructed to repeat ≥5 sets of fast and slow walking for 3 min each at ≥70% and 40% peak aerobic capacity for walking, respectively, per day for ≥4 days/week. After IWT, thigh muscle strength increased in the HD group (8±2%) more than in the CNT group (-2±3%, P = 0.022), despite similar IWT achievements between the groups (P>0.15). Pyrosequencing analysis using whole blood showed that methylation of NFKB1 and NFKB2, master genes of inflammation, was enhanced in the HD group (29±7% and 44±11%, respectively) more than in the CNT group (-20±6% and -10±6%, respectively; P<0.001). Moreover, the genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that several inflammation-related genes were hyper-methylated in the HD group compared with that in the CNT group, suggesting greater pro-inflammatory cytokine gene suppression in the HD group. HD milk product intake after exercise produced a greater percent increase in thigh muscle strength and NFKB1 and NFKB2 gene methylation during IWT in physically active older women. UMIN-CTR No. UMIN000024544 and No. UMIN000024912.

  7. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  8. Medial thigh myocutaneous flap for covering extended hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Perez, P; Herrera, L

    1995-12-01

    When a large tumour involves the buttock and anterolateral upper thigh, modifications to the classical hemipelvectomy may be required for its removal. Herein, we report the use of a medial myocutaneous flap for coverage of soft tissue defects produced by such procedures.

  9. Association of knee pain with a reduction in thigh muscle strength - a cross-sectional analysis including 4553 osteoarthritis initiative participants.

    PubMed

    Ruhdorfer, A; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F

    2017-05-01

    To cross-sectionally determine the quantitative relationship of age-adjusted, sex-specific isometric knee extensor and flexor strength to patient-reported knee pain. Difference of thigh muscle strength by age, and that of age-adjusted strength per unit increase on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) knee pain scale, was estimated from linear regression analysis of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants (58% women). Strata encompassing the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in knee pain were compared to evaluate a potentially non-linear relationship between WOMAC pain levels and muscle strength. In OAI participants without pain, the age-related difference in isometric knee extensor strength was -9.0%/-8.2% (women/men) per decade, and that of flexor strength was -11%/-6.9%. Differences in age-adjusted strength values for each unit of WOMAC pain (1/20) amounted to -1.9%/-1.6% for extensor and -2.5%/-1.7% for flexor strength. Differences in torque/weight for each unit of WOMAC pain ranged from -3.3 to -2.1%. There was no indication of a non-linear relationship between pain and strength across the range of observed WOMAC values, and similar results were observed in women and men. Each increase by 1/20 units in WOMAC pain was associated with a ∼2% lower age-adjusted isometric extensor and flexor strength in either sex. As a reduction in muscle strength is known to prospectively increase symptoms in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and as pain appears to reduce thigh muscle strength, adequate therapy of pain and muscle strength is required in KOA patients to avoid a vicious circle of self-sustaining clinical deterioration. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. One plus one: Two free flaps from same donor thigh for simultaneous coverage of two different defects

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Susmitha; Koteswara Rao, Rayidi Venkata; Reddy, Damalacheruvu Mukunda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary microvascular reconstruction of multiple defects is challenging particularly if it has to be simultaneous. In trauma cases, harvesting two independent free flaps from different sites is very time-consuming and adds to morbidity. To eliminate these disadvantages, we sought to find out a reliable alternative method of harvesting two independent free flaps based on the descending branch of circumflex femoral artery, i.e., one anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap and one rectus femoris muscle flap. Aim: To study the feasibility of transferring two free flaps, i.e., ALT and rectus femoris muscle flap simultaneously from the same thigh for coverage of two different limb defects. Materials and Methods: From 2003 to 2012, five patients with two defects each were managed with a total of ten flaps harvested from five donor sites based on independent pedicles of descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery and used to cover severe injuries of extremities. Three cases had both lower limb defects and two cases had one upper limb and one lower limb defect. In each case, one ALT flap and one rectus femoris muscle flap were used for coverage. Results: All reconstructive procedures were completed without any major complications. All flaps survived well. There were no re-explorations and no complications related to donor sites. Conclusion: We conclude that our approach of simultaneous harvest of ALT and rectus femoris muscle from the same thigh offers two flaps for two different defects in terms of economy of donor site and operating time. PMID:27833281

  11. Development of a finite element model to study the effects of muscle forces on knee-thigh-hip injuries in frontal crashes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Rupp, Jonathan D; Kikuchi, Noboru; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2008-11-01

    A finite element (FE) model with knee-thigh-hip (KTH) and lower-extremity muscles has been developed to study the potential effects of muscle tension on KTH injuries due to knee bolster loadings in frontal crashes. This model was created by remeshing the MADYMO human lower-extremity FE model to account for regional differences in cortical bone thickness, trabecular bone, cortical bone with directionally dependent mechanical properties and Tsai-Wu failure criteria, and articular cartilage. The model includes 35 Hill-type muscles in each lower extremity with masses based on muscle volume. The skeletal response of the model was validated by simulating biomechanical tests without muscle tension, including cadaver skeletal segment impact tests documented in the literature as well as recent tests of seated whole cadavers that were impacted using knee-loading conditions similar to those produced in FMVSS 208 testing. Simulations of knee-to-knee-bolster impacts conducted with and without different levels of lower-extremity muscle activation reported in the literature for braking/bracing suggest that muscle tension has the potential to decrease the externally applied force required to cause KTH fracture, and the potential to increase the likelihood of femoral shaft fracture relative to hip fracture by increasing bending moments in the femoral shaft. However, more reliable and complete data on activation levels of muscles in the lower extremities during vehicle braking and bracing are needed before this effect of muscle tension can be confirmed and before the overall effects of muscle tension on KTH injury can be determined.

  12. Effects of Low-Intensity Cycle Training with Restricted Leg Blood Flow on Thigh Muscle Volume and VO2MAX in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Sakamaki, Mikako; Ozaki, Hayao; Ogasawara, Riki; Sugaya, Masato; Kudo, Maiko; Kurano, Miwa; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Sato, Yoshiaki; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishii, Naokata

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent improvements in aerobic capacity and muscle hypertrophy in response to a single mode of training have not been reported. We examined the effects of low-intensity cycle exercise training with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle size and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). A group of 19 young men (mean age ± SD: 23.0 ± 1.7 years) were allocated randomly into either a BFR-training group (n=9, BFR-training) or a non-BFR control training group (n=10, CON-training), both of which trained 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Training intensity and duration were 40% of VO2max and 15 min for the BFR-training group and 40% of VO2max and 45 min for the CON-training group. MRI-measured thigh and quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume increased by 3.4-5.1% (P < 0.01) and isometric knee extension strength tended to increase by 7.7% (p < 0.10) in the BFR-training group. There was no change in muscle size (~0.6%) and strength (~1.4%) in the CON-training group. Significant improvements in VO2max (6.4%) and exercise time until exhaustion (15.4%) were observed in the BFR-training group (p < 0.05) but not in the CON-training group (-0.1 and 3. 9%, respectively). The results suggest that low-intensity, short-duration cycling exercise combined with BFR improves both muscle hypertrophy and aerobic capacity concurrently in young men. Key pointsConcurrent improvements in aerobic capacity and muscle hypertrophy in response to a single mode of training have not been reported.In the present study, low-intensity (40% of VO2max) cycle training with BFR can elicit concurrent improvement in muscle hypertrophy and aerobic capacity.

  13. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  14. Acute calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius: an uncommon source for back, buttock, and thigh pain.

    PubMed

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to describe the imaging features and clinical manifestations in acute calcific tendinitis (CaT) of the gluteus medius muscle (GMe). A retrospective analysis was conducted, aimed at six patients with acute calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius muscle (CaT-GMe), who were seen between January 2011 and December 2012. Clinical presentations, radiologic data (radiography, CT, and MRI), and laboratory reports were all subject to review. All patients presented with pain and decreased range of motion (ROM) at the hip. Two of the six patients experienced pain in the anterolateral thigh and groin, with antalgic gait (anterior group). The other four complained of low back, buttock, and posterolateral thigh pain, accompanied by difficulty in standing and antalgic gait (posterior group). Edema within the GMe or effusion surrounding the muscle was regularly identified on MRIs. Calcific deposits were conspicuous in the gluteus medius tendon attachments to the lateral (anterior group) and superoposterior (posterior group) facets of the greater trochanter on radiography, CT, or MRI. Complete resolution of symptoms was uniformly achieved in 5-10 days with conservative management. Acute CaT-GMe should be considered in any patient suffering lateral hip pain (with either groin or low back pain) and ROM limitation. Images of the hip characteristically show edema of the gluteus medius and calcifications lateral or superior to the greater trochanter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal change in thigh muscle strength prior to and concurrent with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Kemnitz, J; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F; Ruhdorfer, A; Culvenor, A G

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether symptomatic and/or radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA) progression is associated with prior and/or concurrent change in thigh muscle strength in men or women. Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants with isometric muscle strength measurements at baseline, 2- and 4-year follow-up (n = 1785: 1016 women) were grouped into 1) those with vs without symptomatic progression (i.e., increase ≥9 in WOMAC-pain [scale: 0-100]); and 2) those with vs without radiographic progression (i.e., decrease in minimum joint space width (JSW) ≥0.7 mm) between year-two and year-four follow-up. Sex-specific changes in thigh muscle strength concurrent (between year-two and year-four follow-up) and prior to (between baseline and year-two follow-up) symptomatic and radiographic progression were compared between groups (progression vs no progression) using analysis of covariance, with adjustment for age and body mass index. In women, but not in men, loss in knee extensor and flexor strength was greater concurrent with symptomatic progression (extensors: -3.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.4, -0.9; flexors: -7.2% 95% CI -10.7, -3.7) than in women without symptomatic progression (extensors: -0.3%, 95% CI -1.9, 1.3, P = 0.030; flexors: -2.6%, 95% CI -4.7, -0.6, P = 0.018). No association was found between extensor or flexor strength loss concurrent to radiographic progression, in either men or women, nor any statistically significant association between prior change in muscle strength with symptomatic or radiographic progression. These findings suggest that there is concurrent but not prior longitudinal association between loss in muscle strength and symptomatic KOA progression that is specific to women. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute Effects of Constant-Angle and Constant-Torque Static Stretching on Passive Stiffness of the Posterior Hip and Thigh Muscles in Healthy, Young and Old Men.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ty B

    2017-07-24

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of constant-angle (CA) and constant-torque (CT) static stretching on passive stiffness of the posterior hip and thigh muscles in healthy, young and old men. Fifteen young (25±3 years) and 15 old (71±4 years) men underwent 2 passive straight-leg raise (SLR) assessments before and after 8 min of CA and CT stretching using an isokinetic dynamometer. Passive stiffness was calculated during each SLR as the slope of the final 10% of the angle-torque curve. The results indicated that passive stiffness decreased from pre- to post-stretching for both treatments (P≤0.001-0.002) and age groups (P≤0.001-0.046); however, greater decreases were observed for the CT than the CA stretching (P=0.045) and for the old than the young men (P<0.001). In addition, baseline stiffness was greater for the old compared to the younger men (P=0.010) and was also negatively related (r=-0.721;P<0.001) to the changes in stiffness from pre- to post-stretching. These findings suggest that holding stretches at a constant tension may be a more effective strategy for altering passive stiffness of the posterior hip and thigh muscles. The greater stretch-induced stiffness decreases observed for the older men provide support that acute static stretching may be particularly effective for reducing stiffness in the elderly. As a result, it may be advantageous to prescribe static stretching prior to exercise for older adults, as this may be used to elicit substantial declines in passive stiffness, which could help reduce the risk of subsequent injury events in this population.

  17. Thigh muscle function in stroke patients revealed by velocity-encoded cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hongmei; Dou, Zulin; Finni, Taija; Havu, Marko; Kang, Zhuang; Cheng, Shumei; Sipilä, Sarianna; Sinha, Shantanu; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Cheng, Sulin

    2008-06-01

    Current methods of clinical assessment of muscle coordination and function after stroke do not provide information on deep muscles. The objective of this study was to examine how stroke affects both superficial and deep muscles' coordination and whether muscle function improves after rehabilitation. Muscle function, coordination, and activity of quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstrings were evaluated in 10 stroke patients with mild hemiparesis and in 6 controls using velocity-encoded cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC MRI), surface electromyography (sEMG), and maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC). At baseline, the peak muscle velocity of the rectus femoris (RF) and the ratio between the peak velocities of the RF and vasti were lower in the affected limb (AL) of stroke patients than in controls. Co-contraction of agonists and antagonists was higher in the AL than in controls. Muscle activity measured by sEMG showed similar behavior. After rehabilitation, the activity ratio of hamstrings and adductors to QF decreased slightly toward normal so there were no significant differences between the AL and controls. Impaired biarticular RF muscle function in stroke patients is the limiting factor during knee extension-flexion movements. After rehabilitation, improved functional performance was partly explained by the fact that the activities of the RF and vasti became more synchronized. VE-PC MRI can provide quantitative in vivo measurements of both superficial and deep muscles, and the information acquired after stroke can be utilized to render therapy more efficient and individually tailored.

  18. Development of a phantom mimicking the functional and structural behaviors of the thigh muscles characterized with magnetic resonance elastography technique.

    PubMed

    Chakouch, Mashhour K; Charleux, Fabrice; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a non invasive technique based on the propagation of shear waves in soft tissues providing the quantification of the mechanical properties [1]. MRE was successfully applied to healthy and pathological muscles. However, the MRE muscle methods must be further improved to characterize the deep muscles. A way will be to develop phantom mimicking the muscle behavior in order to set up new MRE protocol. Thus, the purpose of this study is to create a phantom composed of a similar skeletal muscle architecture (fiber, aponorosis) and equivalent elastic properties as a function of the muscle state (passive or active). Two homogeneous phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of plastisol to simulate the elastic properties in relaxed (50% of plastisol) and contracted (70% of plastisol) muscle conditions. Moreover, teflon tubing pipes (D = 0.9 mm) were thread in the upper part of the phantom (50%) to represent the muscle fibers and a plastic sheet (8 × 15 cm) was also included in the middle of the phantom to mimic the aponeurosis structure. Subsequently, MRE tests were performed with two different pneumatic drivers, tube and round, (f = 90Hz) to analyze the effect of the type of driver on the wave propagation. Then, the wavelength was measured from the phase images to obtain the elastic properties (shear modulus). Both phantoms revealed elastic properties which were in the same range as in vivo muscle in passive (μ(50%) = 2.40 ± 0.18 kPa ) and active (6.24 ± 0.21 kPa) states. The impact of the type of driver showed higher values (about 1.2kPa) with the tube. The analysis of the wave behavior revealed a sliding along the plastic sheet as it was observed for in vivo muscle study. The wave was also sensitive to the presence of the fibers where gaps were identified. The present study demonstrates the ability of the phantom to mimic the structural and functional properties of the muscle.

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOMETRIC THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH AND MINIMAL CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES (MCIDS) IN KNEE FUNCTION IN OSTEOARTHRITIS – DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE

    PubMed Central

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between thigh muscle strength and clinically relevant differences in self-assessed lower limb function. Methods Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants (2651 women/1902 men) was related to Western Ontario McMasters Universities (WOMAC) physical function scores by linear regression. Further, groups of Male and female participant strata with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in WOMAC function scores (6/68) were compared across the full range of observed values, and to participants without functional deficits (WOMAC=0). The effect of WOMAC knee pain and body mass index on the above relationships was explored using stepwise regression. Results Per regression equations, a 3.7% reduction in extensor and a 4.0% reduction in flexor strength were associated with an MCID in WOMAC function in women, and a 3.6%/4.8% reduction in men. For strength divided by body weight, reductions were 5.2%/6.7% in women and 5.8%/6.7% in men. Comparing MCID strata across the full observed range of WOMAC function confirmed the above estimates and did not suggest non-linear relationships across the spectrum of observed values. WOMAC pain correlated strongly with WOMAC function, but extensor (and flexor) muscle strength contributed significant independent information. Conclusion Reductions of approximately 4% in isometric muscle strength and of 6% in strength/weight were related to a clinically relevant difference in WOMAC functional disability. Longitudinal studies will need to confirm these relationships within persons. Muscle extensor (and flexor) strength (per body weight) provided significant independent information in addition to pain in explaining variability in lower limb function. PMID:25303012

  20. Patellar bracing affects sEMG activity of leg and thigh muscles during stance phase in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salarie Sker, Fatemeh; Anbarian, Mehrdad; Yazdani, Amir H; Hesari, Pouria; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash

    2017-06-29

    Decreases in patellofemoral pain symptoms with bracing treatment have been established; but, the mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate and long-term effects of the patellar bracing on electromyography (EMG) activity of the Vastus Medialis (VM) and Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris, lateral Gastrocnemius, Biceps Femoris and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles during level walking. 12 eligible women aged 20-30 years with diagnosis of patellofemoral pain participated in the before and after study. Intervention consisted of 8 weeks of patellar bracing. First, patients were tested without brace, then with a brace, and finally eight weeks later without a brace. Surface EMG activation of the selected muscles during level walking was recorded. After eight weeks of patellar bracing, EMG activity of VM muscle was significantly higher when compared to first session without brace (p=0.011) at mid-stance sub-phase. Additionally, EMG activity of ST muscle during first session with brace was significantly lower when compared to first session without brace at mid-stance sub-phase (without brace) (p=0.012). EMG activity of VM muscle after eight weeks of patellar bracing was significantly higher than the first session without brace at late stance and preswing sub-phase (p=0.013). Long-term wearing of patellar bracing increases EMG activity of VM during mid-stance and late stance and preswing sub-phases of gait and immediate effect of patellar brace is decrease of EMG activity of ST muscle during mid-stance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thigh Muscle Activity, Knee Motion, and Impact Force During Side-Step Pivoting in Agility-Trained Female Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Objective: To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Design: Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age  =  21.07 ± 2.82 years, height  =  171.27 ± 4.66 cm, mass  =  66.36 ± 7.41 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Results: Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Conclusions: Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots. PMID

  2. Predicting the effects of muscle activation on knee, thigh, and hip injuries in frontal crashes using a finite-element model with muscle forces from subject testing and musculoskeletal modeling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Rupp, Jonathan D; Reed, Matthew P; Hughes, Richard E; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2009-11-01

    In a previous study, the authors reported on the development of a finite-element model of the midsize male pelvis and lower extremities with lower-extremity musculature that was validated using PMHS knee-impact response data. Knee-impact simulations with this model were performed using forces from four muscles in the lower extremities associated with two-foot bracing reported in the literature to provide preliminary estimates of the effects of lower-extremity muscle activation on knee-thigh-hip injury potential in frontal impacts. The current study addresses a major limitation of these preliminary simulations by using the AnyBody three-dimensional musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces produced in 35 muscles in each lower extremity during emergency one-foot braking. To check the predictions of the AnyBody Model, activation levels of twelve major muscles in the hip and lower extremities were measured using surface EMG electrodes on 12 midsize-male subjects performing simulated maximum and 50% of maximum braking in a laboratory seating buck. Comparisons between test results and the predictions of the AnyBody Model when it was used to simulate these same braking tests suggest that the AnyBody model appropriately predicts agonistic muscle activations but under predicts antagonistic muscle activations. Simulations of knee-to-knee-bolster impacts were performed by impacting the knees of the lower-extremity finite element model with and without the muscle forces predicted by the validated AnyBody Model. Results of these simulations confirm previous findings that muscle tension increases knee-impact force by increasing the effective mass of the KTH complex due to tighter coupling of muscle mass to bone. They also indicate that muscle activation preferentially couples mass distal to the hip, thereby accentuating the decrease in femur force from the knee to the hip. However, the reduction in force transmitted from the knee to the hip is offset by the increased force

  3. Alterations in the rheological flow profile in conduit femoral artery during rhythmic thigh muscle contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Rådegran, Göran

    2005-02-01

    The present study examined the rheological blood velocity profile in the conduit femoral artery during rhythmic muscle contractions at different muscle forces. Eight healthy volunteers performed one-legged, dynamic knee-extensor exercise at work rates of 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 W at 60 contractions per minute. The time and space-averaged, amplitude-weighted mean (V(mean)) and maximum (V(max)) blood flow velocities in the common femoral artery were measured during the cardiosystolic phase (CSP) and cardiodiastolic phase (CDP) by the Doppler ultrasound technique. The V(max)/V(mean) ratio was used as a flow profile index, in which a ratio of approximately 1 indicates a "flat velocity flow profile" and a ratio significantly >1 indicates a "parabolic velocity flow profile." At rest, the V(max)/V(mean) ratio was approximately 1.3 and approximately 1.8 during the CSP and CDP, respectively. The V(max)/V(mean) ratio was higher (p < 0.01) during the CDP than during the CSP, both at rest and at all work rates. The V(max)/V(mean) ratio during the CSP was higher (p < 0.01) at 30 and 40 W compared to at rest. The V(max)/V(mean) ratio during the CDP was lower (p < 0.05) at 5 and 10 W compared to at rest. There was a positive linear correlation between blood flow and incremental work rates during both the CSP and CDP, respectively. Thus under resting conditions, the findings indicate a "steeper" parabolic velocity profile during the CDP than during the CSP. The velocity profile during the CDP furthermore shifts to being less "steep" during rhythmic muscle contractions at lower intensities, but to being reelevated and normalized as at rest during higher intensities. The "steepness" of the parabolic velocity profile observed during the CSP at rest increased during muscle contraction at higher intensities. In conclusion, the blood velocity in the common femoral artery is parabolic both at rest and during exercise for both the CSP and CDP, indicating the persistence of laminar flow. The

  4. Multi-parametric MRI Characterization of Healthy Human Thigh Muscles at 3.0T - Relaxation, Magnetization Transfer, Fat/Water, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D.; Welch, E. Brian; Bryant, Nathan D.; Buck, Amanda K.W.; Towse, Theodore F.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.; Park, Jane H.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle diseases commonly have clinical presentations of inflammation, fat infiltration, fibrosis, and atrophy. However, the results of existing laboratory tests and clinical presentations are not well correlated. Advanced quantitative MRI techniques may allow the assessment of myo-pathological changes in a sensitive and objective manner. To progress towards this goal, an array of quantitative MRI protocols was implemented for human thigh muscles, their reproducibility was assessed, and the statistical relationships among parameters were determined. These quantitative methods included fat/water imaging, multiple spin-echo T2 imaging (with and without fat signal suppression, FS), selective inversion recovery for T1 and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging (with and without FS), and diffusion tensor imaging. Data were acquired at 3.0 T from nine healthy subjects. To assess the repeatability of each method, the subjects were re-imaged on an average of 35 days later. Pre-testing lifestyle restrictions were applied to standardize physiological conditions across scans. Strong between-day intra-class correlations were observed in all quantitative indices except for the macromolecular-to-free water pool size ratio (PSR) with FS, a metric derived from qMT data. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant between-day differences in the mean values for any parameter estimate. The repeatability was further assessed with Bland-Altman plots, and low repeatability coefficients were obtained for all parameters. Among-muscle differences in the quantitative MRI indices and inter-class correlations among the parameters were identified. There were inverse relationships between fractional anisotropy (FA) and the 2nd eigenvalue, the 3rd eigenvalue, and the standard deviation of first eigenvector. The FA was positively related to the PSR, while the other diffusion indices were inversely related to the PSR. These findings support the use of these T1, T2, fat

  5. Tissue reactivity and suture handling characteristics of “jimat” against silk and chromic gut in cat thigh muscle: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Tilahun; Bhokre, A. P.; Tesfaye, Abreha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the tissue reactivity and suture handling characteristics of chromic gut, silk, and ‘jimat’ suture materials in cat thigh muscle. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted from November, 2013 to April, 2014 in Kombolcha Animal Diseases Survey, Research and Diagnostic Laboratory, Kombolcha, Ethiopia. A total of 36 local breed male cats were randomly assigned into chromic gut, silk, and “jimat” groups of 12 cats each as A, B, and C, respectively. The hind leg muscle biceps femoris was incised and sutured with suture materials according to their groups. The muscle samples with its suture were collected at six different days interval i.e. 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 and processed histopathologically to assess the degree of leukocytic infiltration and fibrous and granulation tissue formation (GTF). In addition, all suture materials were evaluated intraoperatively about their handling characteristics, by rating the precision of knot tying, square knot positioning, and resistance to knot slippage. The statistical analysis was done with two-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Chi-square tests. Results: The histopathology showed that “jimat” thread (2.4±1.2) had produced least leukocytic infiltration than chromic gut (4.5±1.9) and silk (4.3±1.5) sutures during the study period. Higher GTF was seen at day 3 (6 [100%]), 7 (6 [100%]) and day 14 (4 [66.7%]) in all sutures, whereas “jimat” showed significantly (p<0.05) higher fibrous tissue formation (10 [83.3%]) than others. Moreover, “jimat” suture had equal suture handling characteristics (p>0.05) with both chromic gut and silk. Conclusion: The result indicated that a single strand “jimat” thread appears to be the most satisfactory suture material as regards to both tissue reaction and suture handling characteristics for skeletal muscle approximation in cats and provided that studies on its carcinogenic effects should be done. PMID

  6. The Fascia Lata Anterolateral Tenodesis Technique.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Andrea; Monaco, Edoardo; Fabbri, Mattia; Mazza, Daniele; De Carli, Angelo

    2017-02-01

    A technique for anatomic reconstruction of the anterolateral complex addressing anterolateral rotatory instability both in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and in revision cases is presented. The extra-articular reconstruction is performed with a pedicle strip of iliotibial tract, fixed on the anatomic origin and insertion points of the anterolateral ligament of the knee in a double-bundle V-shaped fashion.

  7. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength. PMID:28265161

  8. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength.

  9. Thigh Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Lamplot, Joseph D; Matava, Matthew J

    Quadriceps and hamstring injuries occur frequently in football and are generally treated conservatively. While return to competition following hamstring strains is relatively quick, a high rate of injury recurrence highlights the importance of targeted rehabilitation and conditioning. This review describes the clinical manifestations of thigh-related soft-tissue injuries seen in football players. Two of these-muscle strains and contusions-are relatively common, while a third condition-the Morel-Lavallée lesion-is a rare, yet relevant injury.

  10. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh after weight training.

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, J P; Gibbons, C E; Godsiff, S

    1996-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare but serious condition that is normally associated with closed trauma or compressive injury. A case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh occurred in a 16 year old boy after intensive weight training. There was no evidence of muscle tear or focal haemorrhage during subsequent fasciotomy. PMID:8889126

  11. Comparison of in vivo tissue temperature profile and lesion geometry for radiofrequency ablation with a saline-irrigated electrode versus temperature control in a canine thigh muscle preparation.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Yamanashi, W S; Pitha, J V; Arruda, M; Wang, X; Ohtomo, K; Beckman, K J; McClelland, J H; Lazzara, R; Jackman, W M

    1995-04-15

    It is thought that only a thin layer of tissue adjacent to the electrode is heated directly by electrical current (resistive heating) during radiofrequency ablation. Most of the thermal injury is thought to result from conduction of heat from the surface layer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lesion depth could be increased by producing direct resistive heating deeper in the tissue with higher radiofrequency power, allowed by cooling the ablation electrode with saline irrigation to prevent the rise in impedance that occurs when the electrode-tissue interface temperature reaches 100 degrees C. In 11 anesthetized dogs, the thigh muscle was exposed and bathed with heparinized canine blood (36 degrees C to 37 degrees C). A 7F catheter, with a central lumen, a 5-mm tip electrode with six irrigation holes, and an internal thermistor, was positioned perpendicular to the thigh muscle and held at a constant contact weight of 10 g. Radiofrequency current was delivered to 145 sites (1) at high constant voltage (66 V) without irrigation (CV group, n = 31), (2) at variable voltage (20 to 66 V) to maintain tip-electrode temperature at 80 degrees C to 90 degrees C without irrigation (temperature-control group, n = 39), and (3) at high CV (66 V) with saline irrigation through the catheter lumen and ablation electrode at 20 mL/min (CV irrigation group, n = 75). Radiofrequency current was applied for 60 seconds but was terminated immediately in the event of an impedance rise > or = 10 omega. Tip-electrode temperature and tissue temperature at depths of 3.5 and 7.0 mm were measured in all three groups (n = 145). In 33 CV irrigation group applications, temperature was also measured with a separate probe at the center (n = 18) or edge (n = 15) of the electrode-tissue interface. In all 31 CV group applications, radiofrequency energy delivery was terminated prematurely (at 11.6 +/- 4.8 seconds) owing to an impedance rise associated with an electrode temperature of 98

  12. The circumferential thigh lift and vertical extension circumferential thigh lift: maximizing aesthetics and safety in lower extremity contouring.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Adam R; Xipoleas, George D

    2011-05-01

    Excess skin and soft tissue of the thighs after massive weight loss (MWL) can present with varying degrees of severity. The classic medial thigh lift has considerable limitations in the postbariatric population, inspiring the quest for safer and more effective technical solutions. In this study, the circumferential thigh lift (CTL), and CTL with vertical extension, predicated on a theoretical and technical approach that improves safety and aesthetics in thighplasty after MWL, is described and evaluated. Nine patients were treated; all patients experienced MWL and all had previously undergone first-stage contouring with circumferential abdominal dermolipectomy. Patients were treated with a prone-to-supine approach with concomitant suction-assisted lipectomy (SAL). Lumbar and lateral thigh and infragluteal skin and fat were excised to the midaxillary lines and medial thigh meridians. Direct excision of anterolateral thigh skin was carried in a superficial plane into the medial thigh to confluence with the posterior excision. No direct undermining of any skin margin was performed. When soft-tissue excess is limited to the proximal third of the thigh, a horizontal excision pattern is used; with middle and lower one-third thigh excess, a vertical extension is employed. The medial superficial fascial system is anchored to the superficial perineal fascia. Data were reviewed retrospectively. In the 9 procedures performed, 3 achieved MWL by nonsurgical means, and 6 underwent bariatric surgery (bypass or band). Three patients were treated with CTL, and 6 with CTL with vertical extension. There were 3 seromas (33%) treated with percutaneous aspiration. There was 1 case of cellulitis (11%) treated successfully with in-office incision and drainage, and oral antibiotics. There were no hematomas, skin loss, wound dehiscences, lymphedema, or vulvar distortions. The circumferential excision of thigh excess without direct undermining allows for the maintenance of a rich blood supply

  13. Anterolateral rotatory instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Griffith, Chad; Lesniak, Bryson; Lopomo, Nicola; Grassi, Alberto; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Recent publications have generated renewed interest in the anatomy of the anterolateral capsule. Knowledge of the biomechanical function of the anterolateral components is lacking. Further research is required to evaluate the influence of the anterolateral capsule on rotatory laxity of the knee. The role of surgical procedures, such as an extra-articular tenodesis or lateral plasty, has to be defined based on quantification of the injury. This article seeks to summarize the current literature and discusses the role of the anterolateral capsule and reconstructive techniques in combined ligamentous knee trauma. Level of evidence V.

  14. [Experimental subendocardial anterolateral infarctions].

    PubMed

    Medrano, G A; de Micheli, A

    1989-01-01

    Epicardial and thoracic unipolar tracings were recorded in 44 dog hearts after chemical necrosis had been produced on the anterior face of the free left ventricular wall by intramural injection of 96 percent alcohol. The damaged area was transmural (22 cases), intramural (10 cases) or localized in the interior half of the left ventricular wall. The last is commonly described as subendocardial necrosis (12 cases). Generally, direct leads recorded QrS complexes, with the R wave delayed according to the degree of damage to the myocardial muscle. These complexes were registered in at least one of the direct or semi-direct leads when myocardial necrosis was transmural or subendocardial in the interior half of the wall. Nevertheless, a small subendocardial (3 mm or less) or intramural necrosis created tiny Q waves, somewhat slurred but of normal duration, followed by R waves of low voltage. These signs alone are not diagnostic of myocardial necrosis. However, the presence of these Q waves in V2 and V3 only, or from V2 to V4 with greater voltage than in V5 and V6, implies the existence of non-transmural necrosis. The same applies when polyphasic ventricular morphologies are recorded in two intermediate precordial leads in absence of intraventricular conduction disturbances. These can mask the manifestation of transmural myocardial necrosis. Electrophysiologic data are sufficient to establish diagnosis if the infarcted area involves a substantial part of the thickness of the ventricular wall. However, in cases of small subendocardial or intramural necrosis, there are not always signs of dead tissue. At the same time, if the extension of transmural necrosis is more longitudinal than transverse, there is less probability of recording QS complexes in the precordial leads.

  15. A new anterolateral surgical approach for total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRANO, GIOVANNI F.; PAVLIDOU, MARIA; TODESCO, ALBERTO; PALERMO, AUGUSTO; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of the present paper is to present the short-term results of a “detachment-free” (DF) anterolateral approach for primary total hip replacement (THR) performed in a large series of patients. Methods two hundred patients submitted to primary THR were retrospectively reviewed for the present study. In all cases, the surgery was performed using a minimally invasive DF anterolateral approach, which entails no disconnection of tendons and no muscle damage. The study population consisted of 96 men (48%) and 104 women (52%), with an average age of 69.4 years (range 38–75). Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed after 12 months. Results the clinical results, evaluated using the Harris Hip Score, were excellent in 95% of the cases and good in 5%; no cases had fair or poor results. X-rays taken at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery did not show heterotopic ossification, mobilization of the prosthetic components, or hip dislocation. No infections, deep vein thrombosis, or failure of the gluteal muscles were reported. Conclusions the DF anterolateral approach for THR proved safe and provided effective results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:27900306

  16. Overview of thigh injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Deleget, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Thigh injuries include musculotendinous strains of the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, iliotibial band (ITB), and bony injuries to the shaft of the femur. There is scant information in the literature regarding thigh injuries in dance, which appear to range from 5% to 16% of total injury incidence. Hamstring strains and ITB syndrome are the most commonly reported thigh injuries. Hamstring injuries occur most frequently during slow stretching when the dancer's hip is flexed and knee extended. Uniquely in dancers, adductor injury occurs concurrently with hamstring injuries in approximately one-third of cases. Snapping of the ITB at the lateral hip and knee may result from imbalance of thigh muscle strength and flexibility. To date no quadriceps strain injuries or stress injuries to the shaft of the femur have been reported in the dance medicine literature. As dancers notoriously underestimate time needed to return to dance, it can be suggested that early return to work is a contributing factor to chronic injury. Further research is needed regarding the incidence and nature of injury to the thigh among dancers.

  17. Lemaire extraarticular plasty in anterolateral knee instability

    PubMed Central

    Paús, Vicente; Graieb, Ariel; Torrengo, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Anterolateral instability of the knee results from injury to the lateral capsular complex and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and it should not be considered an isolated injury. Over the past years these structures have received renewed interest. The anterolateral ligament (ALL) recently described extends from the lateral side of the lateral femoral condyle to the antero-lateral edge of the tibia, and it is supposed to play a major role in anterolateral stability. ACL extra-articular tenodesis, initially developed as a single procedure, is now complementary to intra-articular plasty. Our indications are: pure rotational instability, symptomatic instability in non-athletes, and revision surgery. Lemaire-type plasty and post-opeartive care are described in detail. We suggest thorough patient history and clinical examination prior to surgical decision. Lemaire-type plasty effectively controls anterolateral instability.

  18. Pelvic primary staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess.

    PubMed

    Abbas, T O

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal disease can present as an extra-abdominal abscess and can follow several routes, including the greater sciatic foramen, obturator foramen, femoral canal, pelvic outlet, and inguinal canal. Nerves and vessels can also serve as a route out of the abdomen. The psoas muscle extends from the twelfth thoracic and fifth lower lumbar vertebrae to the lesser trochanter of the femur, which means that disease in this muscle group can migrate along the muscle, out of the abdomen, and present as a thigh abscess. We present a case of a primary pelvic staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess. The patient was a 60-year-old man who presented with left posterior thigh pain and fever. Physical examination revealed a diffusely swollen left thigh with overlying erythematous, shiny, and tense skin. X-rays revealed no significant soft tissue lesions, ultrasound was suggestive of an inflammatory process, and MRI showed inflammatory changes along the left hemipelvis and thigh involving the iliacus muscle group, left gluteal region, and obturator internus muscle. The abscess was drained passively via two incisions in the posterior left thigh, releasing large amounts of purulent discharge. Subsequent bacterial culture revealed profuse growth of Staphylococcus aureus. The patient recovered uneventfully except for a moderate fever on the third postoperative day.

  19. Thigh muscularity and strength in teenage soccer players.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, Y; Iida, T; Muramatsu, M; Ii, N; Nakajima, Y; Chumank, K; Kanehisa, H

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the thigh muscularity and strength capability in early adolescent soccer players. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the thigh muscles and dynamic strength during knee extension and flexion at 1.05 rad/s were determined twice at an interval of 6 months in 24 male soccer players aged 12-13 years and 11 age- and body height-matched non-athletes. After 6 months, muscle CSA and dynamic strength increased without significant interaction of time and group. Thigh total muscle CSA was not significantly affected by group, but the value relative to either thigh CSA or body mass was higher in soccer players. While knee flexion strength was similar between the 2 groups, knee extension strength was greater in soccer players than in non-athletes, even in terms of strength relative to CSA. The current results indicate that, compared with age- and body height-matched non-athletes, early adolescent soccer players are characterized by higher relative distribution of muscle mass within the thigh and higher knee extension strength relative to the quadriceps CSA. During the growth stage in which body height begins to increase markedly, however, participation in competitive soccer training does not increase the rate of development in thigh muscularity and strength.

  20. A Case of Acute Atraumatic Compartment Syndrome of the Thigh.

    PubMed

    Gutfraynd, Alexander; Philpott, Sheila

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of trauma, compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare. Several case reports have described compartment syndrome in the presence of trauma, comorbid medical conditions, and acute muscle overuse. Very few reports have demonstrated an acute onset of atraumatic thigh compartment syndrome. A 24-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a painful and swollen left thigh immediately after a night of dancing at a concert. He was found to have an elevated intracompartmental quadriceps pressure of 45 mm Hg in the ED, which led to his transfer to the operating room for an emergent fasciotomy. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Although acute, atraumatic compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare entity, failure to diagnose it promptly can lead to muscle necrosis, permanent neurologic deficits, and amputation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh in a rugby player

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard David James; Rust-March, Holly; Kluzek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of obvious trauma, diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the thigh can easily be delayed, as disproportional pain is not always present. We present a case of ACS of the anterior right thigh compartment in a healthy, semiprofessional rugby player with normal coagulation, who sustained a seemingly innocuous blow during a rugby match. Following early surgical fasciotomy, he returned to his preinjury playing standards within 12 months. Our literature review suggests that high muscle mass, young, athletic males participating in a contact sport are mostly at risk of developing ACS of the thigh. PMID:26250368

  2. MINIMALLY INVASIVE ANTEROLATERAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Sawaia, Rogério Naim; Galvão, Antonio Felipe Martensen; Oliveira, Fernando Machado; Secunho, Guilherme Rondinelli; Filho, Geraldo Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to present a minimally invasive anterolateral access route and to ascertain whether this enables total hip replacement without compromising the quality of the implant positioning, while maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on 260 patients (186 females and 74 males) with an average age of 62 years. There were 18 bilateral cases, totaling 278 hips. All the patients had osteoarthritis and had undergone non-cemented total hip arthroplasty (metal-metal or metal-polyethylene) between October 2004 and December 2007. A minimally invasive anterolateral access route was used, measuring 7 to 10 cm in length, according to body weight and the size of the femoral head. The patients were assessed clinically regarding age, sex and presence of the Trendelenburg sign, and radiologically regarding acetabular and femoral positioning. Results: The acetabular inclination was between 30° and 40° in 78 patients, between 41° and 50° in 189 patients, and 51° or over in 11 patients. On anteroposterior radiographs to study femoral positioning, the positioning was central in 209 cases, 41 presented valgus deviation and 28 presented varus deviation. On lateral views, 173 were central, 67 anterior and 38 posterior. The mean duration of the procedure was 63 minutes. Regarding complications, there were five cases of infection, three of deep vein thrombosis, two of hip dislocation, 80 of lengthening of the lower limbs and five of shortening of the operated limb. The Trendelenburg sign was present in four cases, of which one showed superior gluteal nerve injury. Conclusion: The minimally invasive anterolateral access route made it possible to perform total hip arthroplasty without compromising the positioning of the implants, thereby maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. PMID:27027008

  3. The vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    This article discusses management of the post-weight loss thigh deformity. Beginning with an explanation of the soft tissue variables contributing to the thigh and medial thigh deformity in the postbariatric individual, the article describes the important elements of selecting and screening candidates for surgery and the ideal sequence of procedures that should be followed to optimize results in this patient population. A detailed step-by-step description of the author's technique for medial thigh lift is provided along with multiple examples of outcomes. Aftercare is reviewed along with potential complications and their management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in sEMG parameters among trunk and thigh muscles during a fatiguing bilateral isometric multi-joint task in trained and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Boyas, S; Maïsetti, O; Guével, A

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to explore changes in the electrical activity distribution among synergist muscles involved in the maintenance of this bilateral multi-joint task. It also tested relations between changes in surface electromyographic (sEMG) parameters with endurance time. Eighteen subjects, trained and untrained in hiking, performed a submaximal (50% of maximal contraction) isometric hiking test until exhaustion. The electrical activity of main superficial muscles implicated in this posture was recorded bilaterally. Trained subjects sustained the hiking position for 315+/-82 s, versus 225+/-68 s for untrained subjects. Patterns of electrical activity and mean power frequency (MPF) were different between populations. MPF shift in abdominal muscles was higher than in other synergists for both groups. Although typical changes in sEMG parameters were observed, few relations with endurance time were found, and for untrained subjects only. Changes in the relative contribution among synergists were observed, mainly for trained subjects. It is hypothesized that the task (a complex multi-joint posture involving numerous joints and muscles) may allow some variability in the contribution of synergist muscles during fatigue especially for the trained group. This probably explains the absence of relationship between endurance time and sEMG changes for trained subjects.

  5. Pelvic reconstruction with pedicled thigh flaps: indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Sagebiel, Tara L; Faria, Silvana C; Balachandran, Aparna; Butler, Charles E; Garvey, Patrick B; Bhosale, Priya R

    2014-03-01

    This article will describe and illustrate the relevant anatomy and surgical techniques used in pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps, which is often necessary in oncologic surgeries. Examples of normal postoperative imaging and common complications that can accompany pelvic reconstruction with anterolateral, gracilis myocutaneous, and posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps will be provided. Pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps is often needed with extirpative oncologic surgeries to eliminate dead space, provide pelvic organ support, restore form and function, and introduce vascularized tissue to promote wound healing. Radiologists need to be aware of the normal postoperative appearance of these flaps so that the flaps are not mistaken for residual or recurrent disease and so that residual or recurrent disease can be identified and treated.

  6. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A duplication with severe paresis of the proximal lower limb muscles: a long‐term follow‐up study

    PubMed Central

    Berciano, J; Gallardo, E; García, A; Infante, J; Mateo, I; Combarros, O

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe a large pedigree with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) duplication in which severe pelvic and thigh musculature weakness occurred in two patients, detected by analysing the leg muscle atrophy pattern on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods The pedigree comprised 18 patients, aged between 15 and 85 (median 46) years, who were serially evaluated for up to three decades. All 18 patients and 13 non‐affected at‐risk people underwent electrophysiological examination. An MRI study of lower limb musculature was carried out in four patients. Three patients underwent sural‐nerve biopsy. Genetic testing was carried out in 17 patients and in all 13 at‐risk normal people. Results Fourteen patients were asymptomatic or slightly disabled. The two oldest patients, aged 84 and 80, showed a moderate phenotype. Two other patients, aged 70 and 53, showed late‐onset and gradually progressive peroneal paresis extending up to the thigh and pelvic musculature, resulting in waddling gait. MRI scans of all three patients with a mild phenotype showed subtle and subclinical fatty infiltration of calf anterolateral muscle compartments, with thigh muscle involvement in one patient, and extensive atrophy of intrinsic foot muscles. In the youngest patient with proximal leg weakness, the MRI scan showed massive fatty atrophy of all the calf muscles, posteromedial thigh muscle compartments, and internal and external hip rotator muscles. Sural‐nerve biopsy specimens showed hypertrophic neuropathy with no superimposed inflammation. Good correlation was seen between electrophysiological and genetic testing. Conclusions Late in the clinical course, a small proportion of patients with CMT1A develop severe proximal leg weakness, and long‐term follow‐up is essential for its detection. MRI scans may show subclinical involvement of the thigh musculature. PMID:16788010

  7. Inferiorly based thigh flap for reconstruction of defects around the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md. Sohaib; Khan, Arshad Hafeez; Khurram, Mohammed Fahud; Ahmad, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue defects around the knees are common in injured limbs and in the same injury the leg is often involved and the thigh is spared. Furthermore due to pliable and relatively lax skin, we have used inferiorly based thigh flap to reconstruct defects around knee joint. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of inferiorly based thigh flap to cover soft-tissue defects over the proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during the period between October 2011 and February 2013. Inferiorly based anteromedial thigh fasciocutaneous flap was performed on 12 patients and inferiorly based anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flap on four patients. The sites of the soft-tissue defects included patellar regions, infrapatellar region, upper one-third of leg, lower thigh, and over the knee joint. Results: Patients were evaluated post-operatively in terms of viability of flap, the matching of the flap with the recipient site, and donor site morbidity. All the flaps survived well except one which developed distal marginal flap loss, one in which wound dehiscence was noticed, and two in which mild venous congestion was observed. Venous congestion in two patients subsided on its own within 3 days. One patient with wound dehiscence achieved complete healing by secondary intention. Patient who developed distal flap loss required debridement and skin grafting. No appreciable donor site morbidity was encountered. Skin colour and texture of the flap matched well with the recipient site. Conclusions: The inferiorly based thigh flap is a reliable flap to cover the defect over proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. PMID:25190918

  8. Hot-boning enhances cook yield of boneless skinless chicken thighs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of postmortem deboning time on cook yield of boneless skinless chicken thighs. In Experiment 1 (3 replications), chicken thigh meat was separated from bones at 0.45 (hot-bone), 2, and 24 h and trimmed to obtain iliotibialis muscle. The iliotibiali...

  9. Meralgia paresthetica caused by entrapment of the lateral femoral subcutaneous nerve at the fascia lata of the thigh: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Omichi, Yasuyuki; Tonogai, Ichiro; Kaji, Shinsuke; Sangawa, Teruaki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica (MP) causes tingling, stinging or a burning sensation in the anterolateral part of the thigh, usually as a result of entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) at the inguinal ligament (IL) due to mechanical or iatrogenic injury. However, there are few reports on MP caused by entrapment of the LFCN at a more distal site from the IL. We report here a rare case of MP caused by entrapment of the LFCN at the fascia lata of the thigh level. A 23-year-old man felt numbness and sharp pain at the anterolateral aspects of both thighs soon after direct repair surgery for L5 isthmic spondylolisthesis. Although his symptoms were relieved a few days later, numbness and sharp pain in the right thigh recurred 6 months after the surgery. A diagnosis of MP was made, and decompression of the LFCN was performed because conservative treatment for MP was inadequate. Intraoperatively, it was noted that the LFCN was entrapped underneath the fascia lata of the thigh, not at the IL level. His symptoms disappeared after LFCN was released. This case demonstrates that it is necessary to consider the possibility of entrapment of the LFCN at the fascia lata at the thigh level in MP.

  10. Necrotising fasciitis secondary to perforated rectal adenocarcinoma presenting as a thigh swelling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, William David George; Winters, Conchubhair; Amin, Eshan

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to the medical admissions ward with right thigh pain presumed to be a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Subsequent duplex ultrasonography excluded a DVT but noted the presence of a significant amount of subcutaneous gas. A plain film radiograph was performed with the same finding raising the possibility of necrotising fasciitis (NF). Only at this point was digital rectal examination performed revealing a large rectal mass oozing pus and blood. CT imaging showed thickening of the rectum consistent with a tumour with gas and fluid in the perirectal space extending to the anterolateral right femur. Despite aggressive debridement and treatment, the patient deteriorated and died 6 weeks later. This case should serve as a reminder to consider digital rectal examination and the occurrence of a rectal perforation in all patients who present with suspicious thigh swellings. PMID:25824287

  11. Critical analysis of extra peritoneal antero-lateral approach for lumbar plexus.

    PubMed

    Martins, Roberto Sérgio; Monaco, Bernardo Assumpção; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Foroni, Luciano; Heise, Carlos Otto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2011-08-01

    Lesions of lumbar plexus are uncommon and descriptions of surgical access are derived from vertebral spine approaches. The extraperitoneal anterolateral approach to the lumbar plexus was performed in six adult fresh cadavers. The difficulties on dissection were related. An exposure of all distal elements of lumbar plexus was possible, but a cranial extension of the incision was needed to reach the iliohypogastric nerve in all cases. Ligation of vessels derived from common iliac artery was necessary for genitofemoral and obturator nerves exposure in two cases. The most proximal part of the lumbar roots could be identified only after dissection and clipping of most lumbar vessels. The extraperitoneal anterolateral approach allows appropriate exposure of terminal nerves of lumbar plexus laterallly to psoas major muscle. Cranial extension of the cutaneous incision may be necessary for exposure of iliohypogastric nerve. Roots exposure increases the risk of vascular damage.

  12. Management of the Postbariatric Medial Thigh Deformity.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F; Matarasso, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Thigh contour deformities-in particular, those of the medial thighs-are a common concern for many individuals seeking body contouring. Despite the frequency of this concern, some plastic surgeons have often been reluctant to embrace the medial thigh-lift procedure because of the risk for significant complications and relatively poor results. The authors' approach to medial thigh contouring is to address the variables outside of the medial thighs affecting the medial thighs before considering a medial thigh-lift procedure with a vertical component. In this article, the authors review the senior author's (J.F.C.) experience of 350 vertical medial thigh lifts in the weight-loss patient. The charts of 350 consecutive individuals who had undergone vertical medial thigh lifts were reviewed for complications and other variables. The procedures were all performed by the senior author between February of 2000 and February of 2014. The preoperative markings, current surgical technique, and postoperative care are described. There were 326 women and 24 men in the study, with an average age of 43 years. The overall complication rate was 45.14 percent. Skin dehiscence and seroma formation were the most frequent complications, at 31.14 percent and 18.18 percent, respectively. The vast majority of patients were pleased with the aesthetic and functional results of their surgery. The medial thigh deformities of the weight-loss patient are effectively addressed by a vertical medial thigh lift when the variables adjacent to the medial thighs are first treated by a body lift. Therapeutic, IV.

  13. Delayed presentation of compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to quadriceps trauma and vascular injury in a soccer athlete.

    PubMed

    How, Moo Ing; Lee, Puah Ken; Wei, Tan See; Chong, Chua Tai

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome isolated to the anterior thigh is a rare complication of soccer injury. Previous reports in the English literature on sports trauma-related compartment syndrome of the thigh are vague in their description of the response of thigh musculature to blunt trauma, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of high-risk features of compartment syndrome, vascular injury in quadriceps trauma, and the role of vascular study in blunt thigh injury. We present herein the rare case of a 30-year-old man who developed thigh compartment syndrome 8 days after soccer injury due to severe edema of vastus intermedius and large thigh hematoma secondary to rupture of the profunda femoris vein. MRI revealed "blow-out" rupture of the vastus lateralis. Decompressive fasciotomy and vein repair performed with subsequent split-skin grafting of the wound defect resulted in a good functional outcome at 2-years follow-up. A high index of suspicion for compartment syndrome is needed in all severe quadriceps contusion. Vascular injury can cause thigh compartment syndrome in sports trauma. MRI findings of deep thigh muscle swelling and "blow-out" tear of the vastus lateralis are strongly suggestive of severe quadriceps injury, and may be a harbinger of delayed thigh compartment syndrome. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of fatty infiltration and inflammation of the pelvic and thigh muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): grading of disease involvement on MR imaging and correlation with clinical assessments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Merrow, Arnold C; Shiraj, Sahar; Wong, Brenda L; Horn, Paul S; Laor, Tal

    2013-10-01

    Prior reports focus primarily on muscle fatty infiltration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, the significance of muscle edema is uncertain. To evaluate the frequency and degree of muscle fat and edema, and correlate these with clinical function. Forty-two boys (ages 5-19 years) with DMD underwent pelvic MRI. Axial T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were evaluated to grade muscle fatty infiltration (0-4) and edema (0-3), respectively. Degree and frequency of disease involvement were compared to clinical evaluations. Gluteus maximus had the greatest mean fatty infiltration score, followed by adductor magnus and gluteus medius muscles, and had the most frequent and greatest degree of fatty infiltration. Gluteus maximus also had the greatest mean edema score, followed by vastus lateralis and gluteus medius muscles. These muscles had the most frequent edema, although the greatest degree of edema was seen in other muscles. There was correlation between cumulative scores of fatty infiltration and all clinical evaluations (P < 0.05). In DMD, the muscles with the most frequent fatty infiltration had the greatest degree of fatty infiltration and correlated with patient function. However, the muscles with the most frequent edema were different from those with the greatest degree of edema. Thus, edema may not predict patient functional status.

  15. Posterior thigh compartment syndrome as a result of a basketball injury.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Gregory C; Stanat, Scott J C; Al-Humadi, Mohaned; Divaris, Nicholas

    2009-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is a serious although rare occurrence that was sparsely documented in the orthopedic literature until Schwartz et al reported on a series of 21 cases. Although classically associated with high-energy femur fracture, thigh contusion, or the use of military anti-shock trousers, compartment syndrome of the thigh has recently been diagnosed in seemingly low-energy injuries. A complete hamstring avulsion from its ischial origin during routine ambulation and rupture of the quadriceps tendon after a low-energy fall have been shown to result in compartment syndrome. In light of the potential medicolegal ramifications surrounding the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, emergency room consultations to rule out compartment syndrome are on the rise. Specifically, the time to fasciotomy was found to be linearly related to indemnity payment, and a fasciotomy performed within 8 hours was uniformly associated with a successful defense. This article describes a case of a 29-year-old healthy man who developed posterior thigh compartment syndrome as a result of an intrasubstance tear of the biceps femoris muscle sustained while attempting a lay-up during a recreational basketball game. His posterior thigh compartment pressure measured 70 mm Hg and he required emergent posterior thigh compartment fasciotomy.

  16. Compartment syndrome as a complication of a stab wound to the thigh: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, John J; Hacker, Andrew; Patel, Vipul

    2007-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare but potentially devastating condition, in which the pressure within the osseofascial compartment rises above the capillary perfusion gradient, leading to cellular anoxia, muscle ischaemia and death. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent long term disability. It is most often associated with crush injuries and femoral fracture. We present a previously unreported case of thigh compartment syndrome following a stab injury, treated by emergent fasciotomy. PMID:17954836

  17. A sonographic study of thigh telangiectasias.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Fabricio R; Piscoya, Mario; Chi, Yung-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To date, there are limited descriptive data on the ultrasonographic characteristics of reticular and perforator veins associated with telangiectasias of the thigh. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence, anatomic correlations of reticular and perforator veins associated with lateral thigh telangiectasias. Methods This was a cohort study performed between June and December of 2014. Twenty-four female patients (43 limbs) with telangiectasias of the lateral thigh were evaluated by duplex ultrasound. Reticular and perforator veins were characterized according to valvular competency, vein diameter and connection with perforator veins at the thigh. Body mass index, current use of oral contraceptive, and history of pregnancy correlation data were also collected. A non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and a Student's t-test test were used for analysis. Results All 43 limbs had incompetent reticular veins underlying telangiectasias sites. A total of 20 incompetent perforator veins were found to be connected to the reticular veins. Obese and overweight patients had a higher prevalence of incompetent perforator veins and larger reticular veins when compared to those with normal weight (P < 0.05). Lower extremities with telangiectasias had a higher frequency of total perforator veins (n = 33) and incompetent perforator veins (n = 16) than extremities without telangiectasias (p = 0.001). Conclusion Lateral thigh telangiectasias were associated with both incompetent reticular and perforator veins. Obese and overweight patients were especially affected.

  18. Anterolateral Tenodesis or Anterolateral Ligament Complex Reconstruction: Effect of Flexion Angle at Graft Fixation When Combined With ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Stephen, Joanna M; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-09-01

    Despite numerous technical descriptions of anterolateral procedures, knowledge is limited regarding the effect of knee flexion angle during graft fixation. To determine the effect of knee flexion angle during graft fixation on tibiofemoral joint kinematics for a modified Lemaire tenodesis or an anterolateral ligament (ALL) complex reconstruction combined with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig with kinematics recorded from 0° to 90° flexion. Loads applied to the tibia were 90-N anterior translation, 5-N·m internal tibial rotation, and combined 90-N anterior force and 5-N·m internal rotation. Intact, ACL-deficient, and combined ACL plus anterolateral-deficient states were tested, and then ACL reconstruction was performed and testing was repeated. Thereafter, modified Lemaire tenodeses and ALL procedures with graft fixation at 0°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion and 20-N graft tension were performed combined with the ACL reconstruction, and repeat testing was performed throughout. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni-adjusted t tests were used for statistical analysis. In combined ACL and anterolateral deficiency, isolated ACL reconstruction left residual laxity for both anterior translation and internal rotation. Anterior translation was restored for all combinations of ACL and anterolateral procedures. The combined ACL reconstruction and ALL procedure restored intact knee kinematics when the graft was fixed in full extension, but when the graft was fixed in 30° and 60°, the combined procedure left residual laxity in internal rotation ( P = .043). The combined ACL reconstruction and modified Lemaire procedure restored internal rotation regardless of knee flexion angle at graft fixation. When the combined ACL reconstruction and lateral procedure states were compared with the ACL-only reconstructed state, a significant reduction in internal rotation

  19. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.

  20. Anatomy and Histology of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common procedures in orthopaedic surgery. However, even with advances in surgical techniques and implants, some patients still have residual anterolateral rotatory laxity after reconstruction. A thorough study of the anatomy of the anterolateral region of the knee is needed. To study the anterolateral region and determine the measurements and points of attachments of the anterolateral ligament (ALL). Descriptive laboratory study. Dissections of the anterolateral structures of the knee were performed in 20 human cadavers. After isolating the ALL, its length, thickness, width, and points of attachments were determined. The femoral attachment of the ALL was based on the anterior-posterior and proximal-distal distances from the attachment of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The tibial attachment point was based on the distance from the Gerdy tubercle to the fibular head and the distance from the lateral tibial plateau. The ligaments from the first 10 dissections were sent for histological analysis. The ALL was found in all 20 knees. The femoral attachment of the ALL at the lateral epicondyle averaged 3.5 mm distal and 2.2 mm anterior to the attachment of the LCL. Two distal attachments were observed: one inserts into the lateral meniscus, the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, approximately 4.4 mm distal to the tibial articular cartilage. The mean measurements for the ligament were 37.3 mm (length), 7.4 mm (width), and 2.7 mm (thickness). The histological analysis of the ligaments revealed dense connective tissue. The ALL is consistently present in the anterolateral region of the knee. Its attachment to the femur is anterior and distal to the attachment of the LCL. Moving distally, it bifurcates at close to half of its length. The ALL features 2 distal attachments, one at the lateral meniscus and the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. The ALL may be

  1. Ehrlichia chaffeensis presenting with bilateral anterior thigh pain (Louria's sign).

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Petelin, Andrew; Hage, Jean E

    2012-09-01

    Bilateral anterior thigh pain may indicate bacteremia (Louria's Sign). We present a case of Ehrlichiosis due to Ehrlichia chaffeensis whose predominant presenting symptom was localized bilateral anterior thigh pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopy for anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Koczy, Bogdan; Pyda, Michał; Stołtny, Tomasz; Mielnik, Michał; Pajak, Jan; Hermanson, Jacek; Pasek, Jarosław; Widuchowski, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint is a common consequence of ankle sprain due to excessive supination and adduction of the foot, injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis and lateral malleolus fractures. Twenty-two arthroscopic procedures to treat anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint were performed at the Independent Public Regional Hospital of Trauma Surgery in Piekary Slaskie between 2006 and 2007. The study group included male patients at the mean age of 34 (17 to 55) years. Medical histories revealed ankle sprain in 13 patients, lateral malleolus fracture in 7, and isolated tibiofibular syndesmotic disruption in 2. The mean time from the injury to the arthroscopic treatment was 5 years (range 2 to 8 years). All patients that underwent arthroscopy were evaluated according to the AOFAS score at baseline (before surgery), and at 3 and 12 months after the treatment. The procedure consisted in the removal of hypertrophic, inflamed and scarred soft tissue from the lateral recess. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 75.4 points. Post-operatively, the AOFAS functional scores increased to 90.6 and 92 points in the third and twelfth month after the procedure respectively. One patient showed temporary neurapraxia of the dorsal intermediate nerve and the ramus cutaneus branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. These results show that arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint produces satisfactory early outcomes.

  3. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  4. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Shows Variable Anatomy in Pediatric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Milewski, Matthew D; Cannamela, Peter C; Ganley, Theodore J; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Styhl, Alexandra C; Anderson, Allen F; Polousky, John D

    2017-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure rates are highest in youth athletes. The role of the anterolateral ligament in rotational knee stability is of increasing interest, and several centers are exploring combined ACL and anterolateral ligament reconstruction for these young patients. Literature on the anterolateral ligament of the knee is sparse in regard to the pediatric population. A single study on specimens younger than age 5 years demonstrated the presence of the anterolateral ligament in only one of eight specimens; therefore, much about the prevalence and anatomy of the anterolateral ligament in pediatric specimens remains unknown. We sought to (1) investigate the presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament in prepubescent anatomic specimens; (2) describe the anatomic relationship of the anterolateral ligament to the lateral collateral ligament; and (3) describe the anatomic relationship between the anterolateral ligament and the physis. Fourteen skeletally immature knee specimens (median age, 8 years; range, 7-11 years) were dissected (12 male, two female specimens). The posterolateral structures were identified in all specimens, including the lateral collateral ligament and popliteus tendon. The presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament was documented in each specimen, along with origin, insertion, and dimensions, when applicable. The relationship of the anterolateral ligament origin to the lateral collateral ligament origin was recorded. The anterolateral ligament was identified in nine of 14 specimens. The tibial attachment point was consistently located in the same region on the proximal tibia, between the fibular head and Gerdy's tubercle; however, the femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament showed considerable variation with respect to the lateral collateral ligament origin. The median femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament was 10 mm (first interquartile 6 mm, third interquartile 13) distal to the distal

  5. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  6. Thigh burn associated with laptop computer use.

    PubMed

    Paulius, Karina; Napoles, Phyllis; Maguina, Pirko

    2008-01-01

    Laptop computers are an uncommon source of burns to the thighs and perineum. Burns can result from the prolonged contact of hot surfaces at the base of the computer with the user's lap. The authors report a case of second-degree burns to the thigh of an otherwise healthy patient that resulted from prolonged use of the laptop. We measured the temperatures of the patient's computer and the temperatures of other popular laptop computers. Laptops can develop temperatures that can pose a risk for burns if the skin is exposed for prolonged periods of time. Patients with impaired lower extremity sensation, altered consciousness, or decreased mobility are at higher risk for laptop burns. To their knowledge, this is the first case report of such a burn injury in the American literature.

  7. The Biomechanical Function of the Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Erin M.; Gee, Albert O.; Spiekerman, Charles; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent anatomic investigations of the lateral structures of the knee have identified a new ligament, called the anterolateral ligament (ALL). To date, the anterolateral ligament has not been biomechanically tested to determine its function. Hypothesis The ALL of the knee will resist internal rotation at high angles of flexion but will not resist anterior drawer forces. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Eleven cadaveric knees were subjected to 134 N of anterior drawer at flexion angles between 0° and 90° and separately to 5 N·m of internal rotation at the same flexion angles. The in situ forces of the ALL, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) were determined by the principle of superposition. Results The contribution of the ALL during internal rotation increased significantly with increasing flexion, whereas that of the ACL decreased significantly. At knee flexion angles greater than 30°, the contribution of the ALL exceeded that of the ACL. During anterior drawer, the forces in the ALL were significantly less than the forces in the ACL at all flexion angles (P < .001). The forces in the LCL were significantly less than those in either the ACL or the ALL at all flexion angles for both anterior drawer and internal rotation (P < .001). Conclusion The ALL is an important stabilizer of internal rotation at flexion angles greater than 35°; however, it is minimally loaded during anterior drawer at all flexion angles. The ACL is the primary resister during anterior drawer at all flexion angles and during internal rotation at flexion angles less than 35°. Clinical Relevance Damage to the ALL of the knee could result in knee instability at high angles of flexion. It is possible that a positive pivot-shift sign may be observed in some patients with an intact ACL but with damage to the ALL. This work may have implications for extra-articular reconstruction in patients with chronic anterolateral instability

  8. The biomechanical function of the anterolateral ligament of the knee.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Erin M; Gee, Albert O; Spiekerman, Charles; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    Recent anatomic investigations of the lateral structures of the knee have identified a new ligament, called the anterolateral ligament (ALL). To date, the anterolateral ligament has not been biomechanically tested to determine its function. The ALL of the knee will resist internal rotation at high angles of flexion but will not resist anterior drawer forces. Controlled laboratory study. Eleven cadaveric knees were subjected to 134 N of anterior drawer at flexion angles between 0° and 90° and separately to 5 N·m of internal rotation at the same flexion angles. The in situ forces of the ALL, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) were determined by the principle of superposition. The contribution of the ALL during internal rotation increased significantly with increasing flexion, whereas that of the ACL decreased significantly. At knee flexion angles greater than 30°, the contribution of the ALL exceeded that of the ACL. During anterior drawer, the forces in the ALL were significantly less than the forces in the ACL at all flexion angles (P < .001). The forces in the LCL were significantly less than those in either the ACL or the ALL at all flexion angles for both anterior drawer and internal rotation (P < .001). The ALL is an important stabilizer of internal rotation at flexion angles greater than 35°; however, it is minimally loaded during anterior drawer at all flexion angles. The ACL is the primary resister during anterior drawer at all flexion angles and during internal rotation at flexion angles less than 35°. Damage to the ALL of the knee could result in knee instability at high angles of flexion. It is possible that a positive pivot-shift sign may be observed in some patients with an intact ACL but with damage to the ALL. This work may have implications for extra-articular reconstruction in patients with chronic anterolateral instability. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Proximal Humerus Fracture Plating Through the Extended Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Several approaches to the proximal humerus for fracture fixation are possible. The traditional utilitarian approach to the shoulder, the deltopectoral, has distinct disadvantages when performing fracture reduction and locked plating. The anterolateral acromial approach exploits the intermuscular plane between the anterior and middle heads of the deltoid. After identifying the position of the axillary nerve as it crosses this interval, fracture reduction and fixation is performed. Direct access to both the greater and the lesser tuberosities is facilitated. The cancellous surface of the humeral head fragment provides an excellent surface for direct manipulation without further endangering the extraosseous soft tissue attachments.

  10. Island Posterior Thigh Flap Revisited in Covering Extensive Sacral Wounds: Our Experience with Two Patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Deep sacral wounds are best covered by flaps. Posterior thigh flaps have routinely been used to cover such wounds. The flap can however be modified as an island flap. Two patients with extensive sacral wounds were managed with island posterior thigh flaps. Both patients were admitted secondary to road traffic accident with subsequent soft tissue loss of the sacral area. The sacral defects in both patients were approximately 17 cm by 23 cm in dimensions. Unilateral island posterior thigh flap was raised and used to cover the wounds. Postoperatively both patients did well; the donor site and recipient sites healed without any complications. Island posterior thigh flap is thus an option in covering extensive defects of the sacral area. The flap is reliable and easy to raise and has minimal donor site morbidity. By raising it as an island flap the dog ear defect is avoided and the flap is able to be tunneled under the gluteal muscle. This maneuver enables the flap to be advanced further allowing it to cover more distal and extensive defects. PMID:28321356

  11. Examination of Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness in the Thigh Site for Intramuscular Injection in Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Zaybak, Ayten; İsmailoğlu, Elif Günay; İsmailoğlu, Eren

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the thickness of subcutaneous (SC) tissue in the dorsogluteal and thigh sites in obese adults and its suitability for intramuscular injection using a standard-length needle. The sample for this prospective study consisted of 54 obese adults who presented to the ultrasound unit of the radiology clinic of a university hospital in the province of İzmir, Turkey, between June 2012 and August 2013. The study received Institutional Review Board approval, and informed written consent was obtained from all participants. The thickness of the SC tissue in the dorsogluteal and thigh sites was measured by sonography. The sonographic measurements were performed by a radiology specialist. The mean thicknesses of the SC tissue were 61.70 ± 15.73 mm in the dorsogluteal site, 27.05 ± 8.52 mm in the rectus femoris site, and 23.23 ± 8.44 mm in vastus lateralis site. The SC tissue was thicker in the dorsogluteal than the thigh site (P < .001). A standard needle used in intramuscular injections to the thigh site would be effective in reaching the muscle in the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis sites in all men and in 77.8% of women, although it is not usually adequate for gluteal injection. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Structural Properties of the Anterolateral Capsule and Iliotibial Band of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Miller, R Matthew; Guenther, Daniel; Fu, Freddie H; Lesniak, Bryson P; Musahl, Volker; Debski, Richard E

    2016-04-01

    The role of the anterolateral capsule in knee stability has recently been advocated by studies reporting that a distinct ligament exists in this area. Defining the structural properties of the anterolateral capsule can provide insight into its contribution to joint stability. The structural properties of the iliotibial band also need to be determined, as it is a common graft used for extra-articular tenodesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the structural properties of the anterolateral capsule and iliotibial band. The hypothesis was that the iliotibial band will have comparable structural properties to the anterolateral capsule because it is generally an accepted graft for extra-articular reconstruction surgeries. Controlled laboratory study. Nine human cadaveric knees (average age, 57 ± 10 years) were dissected to assess the presence of a discrete capsular thickness originating from the lateral femoral epicondyle to the lateral tibial plateau between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. For each knee, 2 constructs were prepared: (1) a bone-anterolateral capsule-bone specimen and (2) a strip of iliotibial band attached to the Gerdy tubercle. Structural properties, including ultimate load, ultimate elongation, and stiffness, were determined for the anterolateral capsule and the iliotibial band. After tensile testing, plain radiographs were obtained for evaluation of the Segond fracture. A paired t test was used to compare the structural properties of the anterolateral capsule with the iliotibial band. Significance was set at P < .05. Two of the 9 specimens were found to have a discrete thickening of the anterolateral capsule. The iliotibial band had almost 50% higher ultimate load and nearly 3 times higher stiffness (487.9 ± 156.9 N and 73.2 ± 24.1 N/mm, respectively) compared with the anterolateral capsule (319.7 ± 212.6 N and 26.0 ± 11.5 N/mm, respectively) (P < .05 for both). The anterolateral capsule had about double the ultimate elongation

  13. [Evaluation of 99mTc-HM-PAO thigh accumulation in patients with cerebro-vascular disease].

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, H; Adachi, I; Komori, T; Tatsu, Y; Hisada, Y; Sueyoshi, K; Narabayashi, I

    1993-06-01

    99mTc-HM-PAO cerebral SPECT and whole body scintigraphy (WBS) were performed in 5 patients without cerebro-vascular disease (CVD) (Group 1), 31 patients with CVD but not hemiparesis (Group 2) and 18 patients with CVD and hemiparesis (Group 3). Four ROIs were drawn manually around the whole body (WB), brain (Br), right and left thigh (Th). We calculated some ratios: the total counts in the brain over the total counts in the whole body (Br/WB), the total counts in the thigh over the total counts in the whole body (Th/WB) and the mean counts in the thigh over the mean counts in the brain (Th/Br). The Br/WB was 6.9 +/- 1.8%, rt-Th/WB was 4.9 +/- 2.1%, lt-Th/WB was 5.1 +/- 1.3% and Th/Br was 0.46 +/- 0.17 in group 1. Whole body scintigraphies in group 1 revealed clear and similar images between right and left thigh. The Br/WB was 6.7 +/- 1.4%, Th/WB of paretic side was 4.6 +/- 1.0%, Th/WB of non-paretic side was 5.8 +/- 1.2% and Th/Br was 0.47 +/- 0.18 in group 3. The Th/WB in non paretic side was significantly higher than that in paretic side (p < 0.01). The thigh images in group 3 revealed clearly different between paretic and non-paretic thigh. In conclusion we could acquire the clear thigh images with 99mTc-HM-PAO. It was possible that we evaluated not only cerebral perfusion but also muscle atrophy and/or perfusion in patients with CVD using 99mTC-HM-PAO.

  14. The anterolateral approach for the transcranial resection of pituitary adenomas: technical note.

    PubMed

    Agazzi, Siviero; Youssef, Ashraf Sami; van Loveren, Harry R

    2010-05-01

    We sought to quantify the mean surface area of the exposed diaphragma sellae and the mean sellar volume in the subfrontal and anterolateral approaches to pituitary adenomas and to detail our expansion of the superficial and deep window in the anterolateral approach. We performed a retrospective data analysis and cadaveric study in a clinical and skull base laboratory. We studied eight patients who had anterolateral approach for transcranial resection of pituitary macroadenoma and seven cadaveric specimens. Main outcome measures were degree of tumor resection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, cranial nerve outcome, and quantification of the exposed sella via the anterior (subfrontal) and anterolateral approach. We observed complete resection in one; visual outcome: stable in three, improved in four, worsened in one; CSF leakage in two; transient CN III palsy in three; mean surface area (mm(2)) of exposed diaphragma sellae,115.3 (subfrontal approach) versus 94.7 (anterolateral approach; p = 0.1); mean sellar volume (mm(3)) exposed, 224.8 (subfrontal approach) versus 569.3 (anterolateral approach; p < 0.0001). Our technical note supports the increased exposure of sellar volume via the anterolateral approach. Despite the relatively high complication rate, complex cranial surgeons should maintain the skills and knowledge of transcranial approaches. Indeed, the rapid expansion of transsphenoidal techniques will continue to decrease the number of cases but will also continue to increase the complexity of those adenomas that are referred for transcranial resection.

  15. Anterolateral and Posterolateral Approaches to the Foramen Magnum

    PubMed Central

    George, Bernard; Lot, Guillaume

    1995-01-01

    Over a 12-year period (1981-1993), 97 lesions located in the foramen magnum area were treated using either the posterolateral or the anterolateral approach. The former is a lateral extent of the midline posterior approach; the latter is the technique of exposure of the cervical vertebral artery applied at the C-1 to C-2 level. The choice between the two types of lateral approaches was made following three modes of localization: anteroposterior attachment, relation to the dura, and relation to the vertebral artery. Both techniques are described in detail, with special attention paid to the bone and dural openings, which vary according to the localization. The treated lesions include 91 tumors, 4 craniocervical junction malformations, 1 synovial cyst, and 1 abcess. A complete resection was realized in 95% of the tumoral cases, with a very limited morbidity and mortality (3%). ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6p16-bFigure 7 PMID:17171152

  16. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Knee Anterolateral Ligament Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have recently characterized the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). So far, no study has focused on confirming whether the evaluated MRI parameters truly correspond with ALL anatomy. Purpose: To assess the validity of MRI in detecting the ALL using an anatomic evaluation as reference. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 13 cadaveric knees were subjected to MRI and then to anatomic dissection. Dissection was performed according to previous anatomic study methodology. MRIs were performed with a 0.6- to 1.5-mm slice thickness and prior saline injection. The following variables were analyzed: distance from the origin of the ALL to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), distance from the origin of the ALL to its bifurcation point, maximum length of the ALL, distance from the tibial insertion of the ALL to the articular surface of the tibia, ALL thickness, and ALL width. The 2 sets of measurements were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ) and Bland-Altman plots. Results: The ALL was clearly observed in all dissected knees and MRI scans. It originated anterior and distal to the LCL, close to the lateral epycondile center, and showed an anteroinferior path toward the tibia, inserting between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, around 5 mm under the lateral plateau. The ρ values tended to increase together for all studied variables between the 2 methods, and all were statistically significant, except for thickness (P = .077). Bland-Altman plots showed a tendency toward a reduction of ALL thickness and width by MRI compared with anatomic dissection. Conclusion: MRI scanning as described can accurately assess the ALL and demonstrates characteristics similar to those seen under anatomic dissection. Clinical Relevance: MRI can accurately characterize the ALL in the anterolateral region of the knee, despite the presence of structures that might

  17. Scrotal reconstruction with modified pudendal thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Nabil; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; Iwuagwu, Fortune C

    2016-02-01

    Scrotal skin loss can occur following trauma, Fournier's gangrene, post tumour excision, burns, etc. There are many techniques described in the literature including residual scrotal skin mobilization, skin grafts, pedicled and free flaps. The management is complex and challenging shown by the multiplicity of flaps and techniques described in the literature. We used a modified pudendal thigh flap to reconstruct scrotal defects in five patients. This study describes the vascularity of the flap, technique of elevation and the inset of the flap. The elevation and particularly the insetting make it different from other flaps raised on this vascular network for scrotal reconstruction. This pedicled flap is robust, reliable, resilient and produces a neo-scrotum that looks natural in appearance, offers good-quality skin cover and cushion to the testes as well as protective sensation.

  18. A case of delayed presentation of thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wardi, Gabriel; Görtz, Simon; Snyder, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Thigh compartment syndrome is a rare and devastating process. It generally occurs within hours to days of a traumatic event, although cases have been reported nearly 2 weeks after the initial event. To evaluate the literature describing the timing between inciting event and presentation of thigh compartment syndromes, with a focus on delayed presentations of this rare condition. To describe the unique properties of thigh compartments, and finally, to review the anatomy and techniques needed to measure the compartment pressures of the thigh. A case of a 54-year-old man is presented. He sustained trauma to his thigh 17 days prior to presenting to our ED with severe, sudden-onset pain in his right thigh. Compartment pressures were measured and confirmed the diagnosis of compartment syndrome caused by two large intramuscular hematomas. No other contributing events were identified. Compartment syndrome in the thigh should be considered in patients with a concerning examination and a history of recent trauma. This particular case represents the longest reported time between injury and development of a thigh compartment syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Finite element analysis to investigate variability of MR elastography in the human thigh.

    PubMed

    Hollis, L; Barnhill, E; Perrins, M; Kennedy, P; Conlisk, N; Brown, C; Hoskins, P R; Pankaj, P; Roberts, N

    2017-06-29

    To develop finite element analysis (FEA) of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the human thigh and investigate inter-individual variability of measurement of muscle mechanical properties. Segmentation was performed on MRI datasets of the human thigh from 5 individuals and FEA models consisting of 12 muscles and surrounding tissue created. The same material properties were applied to each tissue type and a previously developed transient FEA method of simulating MRE using Abaqus was performed at 4 frequencies. Synthetic noise was applied to the simulated data at various levels before inversion was performed using the Elastography Software Pipeline. Maps of material properties were created and visually assessed to determine key features. The coefficient of variation (CoV) was used to assess the variability of measurements in each individual muscle and in the groups of muscles across the subjects. Mean measurements for the set of muscles were ranked in size order and compared with the expected ranking. At noise levels of 2% the CoV in measurements of |G(*)| ranged from 5.3 to 21.9% and from 7.1 to 36.1% for measurements of ϕ in the individual muscles. A positive correlation (R(2) value 0.80) was attained when the expected and measured |G(*)| ranking were compared, whilst a negative correlation (R(2) value 0.43) was found for ϕ. Created elastograms demonstrated good definition of muscle structure and were robust to noise. Variability of measurements across the 5 subjects was dramatically lower for |G(*)| than it was for ϕ. This large variability in ϕ measurements was attributed to artefacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Pieter; De Smet, Eline; Lambrecht, Valérie; Heusdens, Christiaan H W; Van Glabbeek, Francis; Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Gielen, Jan L; Parizel, Paul M

    2016-02-01

    The anterolateral ligament (ALL) was recently identified as a distinct component of the anterolateral capsule of the human knee joint with consistent origin and insertion sites. Biomechanical studies revealed that the current association between the pivot shift and an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) should be loosened and that the rotational component of the pivot shift is significantly affected by the ALL. This may change the clinical approach toward ACL-injured patients presenting with anterolateral rotatory instability (ALRI), the most common instability pattern after ACL rupture. Radiologists should be aware of the importance of the ALL to ACL injuries. They should not overlook pathology of the anterolateral knee structures, including the ALL, when reviewing MR images of the ACL-deficient knee. In this article, the current knowledge regarding the anatomy, biomechanical function, and imaging appearance of the ALL of the knee is discussed with emphasis on the clinical implications of these findings.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lower Limbs in Late-onset Lipid Storage Myopathy with Electron Transfer Flavoprotein Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Yi; Jin, Ming; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Ni; He, Jun-Jie; Lin, Min-Ting; Fu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lipid storage myopathy (LSM) is a genetically heterogeneous group with variable clinical phenotypes. Late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) is a rather common form of LSM in China. Diagnosis and clinical management of it remain challenging, especially without robust muscle biopsy result and genetic detection. As the noninvasion and convenience, muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a helpful assistant, diagnostic tool for neuromuscular disorders. However, the disease-specific MRI patterns of muscle involved and its diagnostic value in late-onset MADD have not been systematic analyzed. Methods: We assessed the MRI pattern and fat infiltration degree of the lower limb muscles in 28 late-onset MADD patients, combined with detailed clinical features and gene spectrum. Fat infiltration degree of the thigh muscle was scored while that of gluteus was described as obvious or not. Associated muscular atrophy was defined as obvious muscle bulk reduction. Results: The mean scores were significantly different among the anterior, medial, and posterior thigh muscle groups. The mean of fat infiltration scores on posterior thigh muscle group was significantly higher than either anterior or medial thigh muscle group (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mean score on medial thigh muscle group was significantly higher than that of anterior thigh muscle group (P < 0.01). About half of the patients displayed fat infiltration and atrophy in gluteus muscles. Of 28 patients, 12 exhibited atrophy in medial and/or posterior thigh muscle groups, especially in posterior thigh muscle group. Muscle edema pattern was not found in all the patients. Conclusions: Late-onset MADD patients show a typical muscular imaging pattern of fat infiltration and atrophy on anterior, posterior, and medial thigh muscle groups, with major involvement of posterior thigh muscle group and gluteus muscles and a sparing involvement of anterior thigh compartment. Our findings also

  2. Influence of exercise training with thigh compression on heat-loss responses.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Inoue, Y; Koga, S; Nishiyasu, T; Kondo, N

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effect of thigh compression, which accelerates activation of central command and muscle metabo- and mechanoreceptors, on the adaptation of sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during exercise heat acclimation. Nine non-heat-acclimated male subjects were acclimated to heat (32 °C and 50% RH) while cycling [50% of maximum oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O 2 m a x )] 60 min/day for 7 days (control group). The experimental group (n = 9) conducted the same training while the proximal thighs were compressed by a cuff at 60 mmHg. V ˙ O 2 m a x , acetylcholine-induced forearm sweating rate (iontophoresis), and mean sweating and cutaneous vascular responses on the forehead, chest, and forearm (SRmean and CVCmean ) during passive heating were evaluated before and after training. Training significantly increased V ˙ O 2 m a x while did not affect acetylcholine-induced sweating rates in either group. Training significantly decreased Tb thresholds for SRmean and CVCmean during passive heating without the alternations of sensitivities in both groups. Although SRmean during passive heating at a given ΔTb was not improved in either group, CVCmean was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated after exercise training only in experimental group. Our results indicate that thigh cuff compression during exercise heat acclimation does not influence adaptation of the sweating response but attenuate cutaneous vasodilation.

  3. Anterolateral Versus Medial Plating of Distal Extra-articular Tibia Fractures: A Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Pirolo, Joseph M; Behn, Anthony W; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Bishop, Julius A

    2015-09-01

    Both medial and anterolateral plate applications have been described for the treatment of distal tibia fractures, each with distinct advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of medial and anterolateral plating constructs used to stabilize simulated varus and valgus fracture patterns of the distal tibia. In 16 synthetic tibia models, a 45° oblique cut was made to model an Orthopedic Trauma Association type 43-A1.2 distal tibia fracture in either a varus or valgus injury pattern. Each fracture was then reduced and plated with a precontoured medial or anterolateral distal tibia plate. The specimens were biomechanically tested in axial and torsional loading, cyclic axial loading, and load to failure. For the varus fracture pattern, medial plating showed less fracture site displacement and rotation and was stiffer in both axial and torsional loading (P<.05). For the valgus fracture pattern, there was no statistically significant difference between medial and anterolateral plating. There were no significant differences between the 2 constructs for either fracture pattern with respect to ultimate load, displacement, or energy absorption in load to failure testing. When used to stabilize varus fracture patterns, medial plates showed superior biomechanical performance compared with anterolateral plates. In this application, the medial plates functioned in anti-glide mode. For valgus fracture patterns, no biomechanical differences between anterolateral and medial plating were observed. In clinical practice, surgeons should take this biomechanical evidence into account when devising a treatment strategy for fixation of distal tibia fractures.

  4. The thigh and leg of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Damiano; Walker, Christopher S; Wei, Pianpian; Holliday, Trenton W; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R; DeSilva, Jeremy M

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the 108 femoral, patellar, tibial, and fibular elements of a new species of Homo (Homo naledi) discovered in the Dinaledi chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. Homo naledi possesses a mosaic of primitive, derived, and unique traits functionally indicative of a bipedal hominin adapted for long distance walking and possibly running. Traits shared with australopiths include an anteroposteriorly compressed femoral neck, a mediolaterally compressed tibia, and a relatively circular fibular neck. Traits shared with Homo include a well-marked linea aspera, anteroposteriorly thick patellae, relatively long tibiae, and gracile fibulae with laterally oriented lateral malleoli. Unique features include the presence of two pillars on the superior aspect of the femoral neck and a tubercular distal insertion of the pes anserinus on the tibia. The mosaic morphology of the H. naledi thigh and leg appears most consistent with a species intermediate between Australopithecus spp. and Homo erectus and, accordingly, may offer insight into the nature of the earliest members of genus Homo. These fossils also expand the morphological diversity of the Homo lower limb, perhaps indicative of locomotor diversity in our genus.

  5. [Laptop-thighs--laptop-induced erythema ab igne].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Flemming

    2010-02-22

    A 15-year-old boy presented with a livedo reticulares-like eruption on both thighs, but more pronounced on the left. The history revealed the diagnosis: ''Laptop-thighs'' i.e. laptop-induced erythema ab igne, the result of months of daily use of the laptop while placed on the thighs. Erythema ab igne is traditionally a disease of the elderly, caused by overuse of heat sources on tender backs etc. The recent popularity of laptop computers and other electronics emitting strong heat has made erythema ab igne a problem also in younger generations.

  6. Biomechanical Comparison of Anterolateral Procedures Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Stephen, Joanna M; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-02-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue structures of the knee have a role in controlling anterolateral rotational laxity, and they may be damaged at the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. To compare the kinematic effects of anterolateral operative procedures in combination with intra-articular ACL reconstruction for combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured knees. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve cadaveric knees were tested in a 6 degrees of freedom rig using an optical tracking system to record the kinematics through 0° to 90° of knee flexion with no load, anterior drawer, internal rotation, and combined loading. Testing was first performed in ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, and combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured (distal deep insertions of the iliotibial band and the anterolateral ligament [ALL] and capsule cut) states. Thereafter, ACL reconstruction was performed alone and in combination with the following: modified MacIntosh tenodesis, modified Lemaire tenodesis passed both superficial and deep to the lateral collateral ligament, and ALL reconstruction. Anterolateral grafts were fixed at 30° of knee flexion with both 20 and 40 N of tension. Statistical analysis used repeated-measures analyses of variance and paired t tests with Bonferroni adjustments. ACL reconstruction alone failed to restore native knee kinematics in combined ACL plus anterolateral-injured knees ( P < .05 for all). All combined reconstructions with 20 N of tension, except for ALL reconstruction ( P = .002-.01), restored anterior translation. With 40 N of tension, the superficial Lemaire and MacIntosh procedures overconstrained the anterior laxity in deep flexion. Only the deep Lemaire and MacIntosh procedures-with 20 N of tension-restored rotational kinematics to the intact state ( P > .05 for all), while the ALL underconstrained and the superficial Lemaire overconstrained internal rotation. The same procedures with 40 N of tension led to similar findings. In a combined ACL plus

  7. The anterolateral complex in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees demonstrate sonographic abnormalities on high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahito; Herbst, Elmar; Albers, Macio; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; Onishi, Kentaro

    2017-04-01

    The presence of anterolateral ligament of the knee is still controversial, and some physicians prefer to call this structure anterolateral complex (ALC) to infer plural nature of structures involved. The purpose of this study was to describe the scanning techniques and to classify various sonographic appearances of the tibial-side ALC of the knee in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. It was hypothesized that sonographic abnormity of the ALC would be associated with ACL injury history. Patients with a history of unilateral ACL injury were prospectively recruited, and the ALC was sonographically evaluated. During the evaluation, the lateral femoral epicondyle was visualized in anatomic transverse view first. At this location, the ALC was typically most conspicuous between the short head of the biceps femoris muscle and the posterior and deep aspect of the iliotibial band superficial to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament. The ALC was followed distally to the broad insertion centralizing to the area posterior to Gerdy's tubercle. The appearance of the distal insertion of the ALC was classified based both on echogenicity and on the presence of a Segond fracture as follows: Grade 0: isoechoic to the rest of the ALC, Grade 1: hypoechoic, Grade 2: anechoic, and Grade 3: Segond fracture. The uninjured side was similarly scanned for comparison. A total of 28 patients (13 men; mean age 22.1 ± 8.1 years old with range: 12-44; mean body mass index 25.0 with range: 18.9-39.2) were included in this study. The average time from injury to sonograhpic evaluation was 4 months (range: 2 days to 1 year). Of 28 ACL-deficient knees, 19 were (68%) graded as Grade 0 in the distal insertion of the ALC, 7 (25%) as Grade 1, 1 (3.5%) as Grade 2, and 1 (3.5%) as Grade 3. Contralateral knees showed 25 knees (89%) with Grade 0 and 3 knees (11%) with Grade 1. ACL injury history was associated with a higher incidence of sonographic abnormalities within the

  8. Thigh oxygen uptake at the onset of intense exercise is not affected by a reduction in oxygen delivery caused by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Nybo, Lars; Mortensen, Stefan P; Sander, Mikael; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-10-15

    In response to hypoxic breathing most studies report slower pulmonary oxygen uptake (Vo2) kinetics at the onset of exercise, but it is not known if this relates to an actual slowing of the Vo2 in the active muscles(.) The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether thigh Vo2 is slowed at the onset of intense exercise during acute exposure to hypoxia. Six healthy male subjects (25.8 ± 1.4 yr, 79.8 ± 4.0 kg, means ± SE) performed intense (100 ± 6 watts) two-legged knee-extensor exercise for 2 min in normoxia (NOR) and hypoxia [fractional inspired oxygen concentration (Fi(O2)) = 0.13; HYP]. Thigh Vo2 was measured by frequent arterial and venous blood sampling and blood flow measurements. In arterial blood, oxygen content was reduced (P < 0.05) from 191 ± 5 ml O2/l in NOR to 180 ± 5 ml O2/l in HYP, and oxygen pressure was reduced (P < 0.001) from 111 ± 4 mmHg in NOR to 63 ± 4 mmHg in HYP. Thigh blood flow was the same in NOR and HYP, and thigh oxygen delivery was consequently reduced (P < 0.05) in HYP, but femoral arterial-venous oxygen difference and thigh Vo(2) were similar in NOR and HYP. In addition, muscle lactate release was the same in NOR and HYP, and muscle lactate accumulation during the first 25 s of exercise determined from muscle biopsy sampling was also similar (0.35 ± 0.07 and 0.36 ± 0.07 mmol·kg dry wt(-1)·s(-1) in NOR and HYP). Thus the increase in thigh Vo2 was not attenuated at the onset of intense knee-extensor exercise despite a reduction in oxygen delivery and pressure.

  9. Cerebrovascular effects of the thigh cuff maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, N. P.; Robinson, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypotension can be induced by sudden release of inflated thigh cuffs (THC), but its effects on the cerebral circulation have not been fully described. In nine healthy subjects [aged 59 (9) yr], bilateral cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was recorded in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), noninvasive arterial blood pressure (BP) in the finger, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) with nasal capnography. Three THC maneuvers were performed in each subject with cuff inflation 20 mmHg above systolic BP for 3 min before release. Beat-to-beat values were extracted for mean CBFV, BP, ETCO2, critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP), and heart rate (HR). Time-varying estimates of the autoregulation index [ARI(t)] were also obtained using an autoregressive-moving average model. Coherent averages synchronized by the instant of cuff release showed significant drops in mean BP, CBFV, and RAP with rapid return of CBFV to baseline. HR, ETCO2, and ARI(t) were transiently increased, but CrCP remained relatively constant. Mean values of ARI(t) for the 30 s following cuff release were not significantly different from the classical ARI [right MCA 5.9 (1.1) vs. 5.1 (1.6); left MCA 5.5 (1.4) vs. 4.9 (1.7)]. HR was strongly correlated with the ARI(t) peak after THC release (in 17/22 and 21/24 recordings), and ETCO2 was correlated with the subsequent drop in ARI(t) (19/22 and 20/24 recordings). These results suggest a complex cerebral autoregulatory response to the THC maneuver, dominated by myogenic mechanisms and influenced by concurrent changes in ETCO2 and possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system and baroreflex. PMID:25659488

  10. Segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the thighs for a new National Institutes of Health initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzon, A.; Hemler, P. F.; Nalls, M.; Manini, T.; Clark, B. C.; Harris, T. B.; McAuliffe, M. J.

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes a new system for semi-automatically segmenting the background, subcutaneous fat, interstitial fat, muscle, bone, and bone marrow from magnetic resonance images (MRI's) of volunteers for a new osteoarthritis study. Our system first creates separate right and left thigh images from a single MR image containing both legs. The subcutaneous fat boundary is very difficult to detect in these images and is therefore interactively defined with a single boundary. The volume within the boundary is then automatically processed with a series of clustering and morphological operations designed to identify and classify the different tissue types required for this study. Once the tissues have been identified, the volume of each tissue is determined and a single, false colored, segmented image results. We quantitatively compare the segmentation in three different ways. In our first method we simply compare the tissue volumes of the resulting segmentations performed independently on both the left and right thigh. A second quantification method compares our results temporally with three image sets of the same volunteer made one month apart including a month of leg disuse. Our final quantification methodology compares the volumes of different tissues detected with our system to the results of a manual segmentation performed by a trained expert. The segmented image results of four different volunteers using images acquired at three different times suggests that the system described in this paper provides more consistent results than the manually segmented set. Furthermore, measurements of the left and right thigh and temporal results for both segmentation methods follow the anticipated trend of increasing fat and decreasing muscle over the period of disuse.

  11. A comparative study of the posterolateral and anterolateral approaches for isolated acetabular revision.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Moon, Young-Wan; Lim, Byung-Ho; Shon, Min-Soo; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2011-07-01

    Although isolated revision of the acetabular component has become an increasingly common option for revision hip surgery, opinions differ regarding the ideal surgical approach for reducing postoperative instability. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic results of isolated acetabular revision performed using a posterolateral and an anterolateral approach. The authors retrospectively compared the clinical and radiographic results of isolated acetabular revision performed in 33 hips using a posterolateral approach with those performed in 36 hips using an anterolateral approach. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon and all patients received the same postoperative protocol. Mean duration of follow-up was 4.6 years (range 2-13.2). Mean postoperative Harris hip scores were similar in the posterolateral and anterolateral groups (86.5 and 87.2 points, respectively). In the entire series of 69 hips, 6 (9%) underwent re-revision of the acetabular component because of aseptic cup loosening in 4, recurrent dislocation in 1, and deep infection in 1. No significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to complication or re-revision rates, but the dislocation rate in the anterolateral approach group was significantly lower than that in the posterolateral group (0 vs. 12%, p = 0.047). Isolated acetabular revision performed using an anterolateral approach seems to be the more viable option in selected patients, and in particular, it has a significantly lower postoperative dislocation rate than posterolateral acetabular revision.

  12. Effectiveness of thigh-to-thigh current path for the measurement of abdominal fat in bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki Hwan; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-12-01

    We present a new method measuring body impedance using a thigh-to-thigh current path, which can reflect the abdominal fat portion more sensitively and can be conveniently applied during the daily use on a toilet seat. Two pairs of electrodes were installed on a toilet seat to provide current and to permit voltage measurement through a thigh-to-thigh current path. The effectiveness of the method was compared with conventional foot-to-foot and hand-to-foot current paths by simulation and by experiments referenced to computed tomography (CT) image analysis. Body impedance using three different current paths was measured, and abdominal CT images were acquired for eight subjects. Measured body impedances were compared with the visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio (VF/SF) calculated from the CT-determined abdominal fat volume. The thigh-to-thigh current path was about 75% more sensitive in abdominal fat measurement than the conventional current paths in simulation experiments and displayed a higher VF/SF correlation (r = 0.768) than the foot-to-foot (r = 0.425) and hand-to-foot (r = 0.497) current paths.

  13. Pelvic and thigh musculature in frogs (Anura) and origin of anuran jumping locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Přikryl, Tomáš; Aerts, Peter; Havelková, Pavla; Herrel, Anthony; Roček, Zbyněk

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the anuran pelvic and thigh musculoskeletal system revealed that the thigh extensors, responsible for the initial phase of jump, the propulsive stroke in swimming and, if used asynchronously, also for walking, are least affected by the transformations observed between anurans and their temnospondyl ancestors (as reflected in contemporary caudates). The iliac shaft and urostyle, two of the most important anuran apomorphies, represent skeletal support for muscles that are mostly protractors of the femur or are important in attaining a crouching position, a necessary prerequisite for rapid escape. All of these muscles originate or insert on the iliac shaft. As the orientation of the pubis, ischium and ilium is the same in anurans, caudates and by inference also in their temnospondyl ancestors, it is probable that the pelvis was shifted from the sacral vertebra posteriorly along the reduced and stiffened tail (urostyle) by the elongation of the illiac shaft. Thus, the original vertical orientation of the ilium was maintained (which is also demonstrated by stable origins of the glutaeus maximus, iliofemoralis and iliofibularis on the tuber superius) and the shaft itself is a new structure. A review of functional analysis of anuran locomotion suggests some clear differences from that in caudates, suggesting that terrestrial jumping may have been a primary locomotor activity, from which other types of anuran locomotion are derived. PMID:19166476

  14. Development and Validation of a High Anatomical Fidelity FE Model for the Buttock and Thigh of a Seated Individual.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirini, Rami M A; Reed, Matthew P; Hu, Jingwen; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-09-01

    Current practices for designing new cushions for seats depend on superficial measurements, such as pressure mapping, which do not provide sufficient information about the condition of sub-dermal tissues. Finite element (FE) modelling offers a unique alternative to integrate assessment of sub-dermal tissue condition into seat/cushion design and development processes. However, the development and validation of such FE models for seated humans requires accurate representation of the anatomy and material properties, which remain challenges that are yet to be addressed. This paper presents the development and validation of a detailed 3D FE model with high anatomical fidelity of the buttock and thigh, for a specific seated subject. The developed model consisted of 28 muscles, the pelvis, sacrum, femur, and one layer of inter-muscular fat, subcutaneous fat and skin. Validation against in vivo measurements from MRI data confirmed that the FE model can simulate the deformation of soft tissues under sitting loads with an accuracy of (mean ± SD) 4.7 ± 4.4 mm. Simulation results showed that the maximum strains (compressive, shear and von-Mises) on muscles (41, 110, 79%) were higher than fat tissues (21, 62, 41%). The muscles that experienced the highest mechanical loads were the gluteus maximus, adductor magnus and muscles in the posterior aspect of the thighs (biceps femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles). The developed FE model contributes to the progression towards bio-fidelity in modelling the human body in seated postures by providing insight into the distribution of stresses/strains in individual muscles and inter-muscular fat in the buttock and thigh of seated individuals. Industrial applications for the developed FE model include improving the design of office and household furniture, automotive and airplane seats and wheelchairs as well as customisation and assessment of sporting and medical equipment to meet individual requirements.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of the human face using DICOM data and its application to facial contouring surgery using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Uehara, Miyuki; Oatari, Miwako; Kusatsu, Manami

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by surgeons performing reconstructive surgery in cases of facial asymmetry due to hemifacial atrophy or tumor surgery is the restoration of the natural contour of the face. Soft-tissue augmentation using free-flap transfer is one of the most commonly used methods for facial reconstruction. The most important part of a successful reconstruction is the preoperative assessment of the volume, position, and shape of the flap to be transplanted. This study focuses on three cases of facial deformity due to hemifacial progressive atrophy or tumor excision. For the preoperative assessment, digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data obtained from computed tomography was used and applied to a three-dimensional (3D) picture software program (ZedView, LEXI, Tokyo, Japan). Using computer simulation, a mirror image of the unaffected side of the face was applied to the affected side, and 3D visualization was performed. Using this procedure, a postoperative image of the face and precise shape, position, and amount of the flap that was going to be transferred was simulated preoperatively. In all cases, the postoperative shape of the face was acceptable, and a natural shape of the face could be obtained. Preoperative 3D visualization using computer simulation was helpful for estimating the reconstructive procedure and postoperative shape of the face. Using free-flap transfer, this procedure facilitates the natural shape after reconstruction of the face in facial contouring surgery.

  16. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  17. A cause of severe thigh injury: Battery explosion.

    PubMed

    Görgülü, Tahsin; Torun, Merve; Olgun, Abdulkerim

    2016-02-01

    In parallel with technological improvements, humankind encounter with equipments/devices transforming chemical energy to electrical energy. Especially automobile batteries, watch and mobile phone batteries are the most encountered ones. In the literature, there are mainly facial burn cases due to mobile phone battery explosion. On the other hand very few examples of serious lower limb. injury is present. 12-year-old female patient referred to emergency room with skin and soft tissue injuries on bilateral anteromedial thigh area as a result of battery explosion. The widest axis of skin defect was approximately 16 × 8 cm on the right side, and 17 × 4 cm on the left side. In addition, there were tattooing caused by chemical injury and multiple pin-point like lesions extending to dermal level on anterior region of thigh. Chemically dirty and necrotized dermal and subdermal tissues were debrided and foreign materials were removed from regions with multiple tattooing. Left thigh was closed primarily. In order to close the defect on right anterior thigh, skin flap from right medial thigh is advanced in Y-V fashion. Battery explosion causing lower extremity tissue defect is a type of injury that is rarely seen in the literature. Regardless of battery size and energy level, they should be considered as potential explosive material and protector masks, clothing should be worn during contact with this type of material.

  18. A cause of severe thigh injury: Battery explosion

    PubMed Central

    Görgülü, Tahsin; Torun, Merve; Olgun, Abdulkerim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In parallel with technological improvements, humankind encounter with equipments/devices transforming chemical energy to electrical energy. Especially automobile batteries, watch and mobile phone batteries are the most encountered ones. In the literature, there are mainly facial burn cases due to mobile phone battery explosion. On the other hand very few examples of serious lower limb. injury is present. Presentation of case 12-year-old female patient referred to emergency room with skin and soft tissue injuries on bilateral anteromedial thigh area as a result of battery explosion. The widest axis of skin defect was approximately 16 × 8 cm on the right side, and 17 × 4 cm on the left side. In addition, there were tattooing caused by chemical injury and multiple pin-point like lesions extending to dermal level on anterior region of thigh. Chemically dirty and necrotized dermal and subdermal tissues were debrided and foreign materials were removed from regions with multiple tattooing. Left thigh was closed primarily. In order to close the defect on right anterior thigh, skin flap from right medial thigh is advanced in Y–V fashion. Discussion Battery explosion causing lower extremity tissue defect is a type of injury that is rarely seen in the literature. Regardless of battery size and energy level, they should be considered as potential explosive material and protector masks, clothing should be worn during contact with this type of material. PMID:26862395

  19. Pancreatic Fistula Extending into the Thigh Caused by the Rupture of an Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Adenoma of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuki; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Erina; Saegusa, Makoto; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the first case of a pancreatic fistula extending into the thigh caused by the rupture of an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. An 80-year-old man was suspected to have necrotizing fasciitis because of right femoral pain. Computed tomography showed fluid retention from the pancreatic head to the right iliopsoas muscle and an IPMN at the pancreatic head. The findings of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography led to the suspicion of a minor leak and a pancreatic stent was placed. The patient died due to an uncontrollable infection. A pathological autopsy showed a pancreatic fistula extending into the thigh that had been caused by the rupture of the IPMN.

  20. Pancreatic Fistula Extending into the Thigh Caused by the Rupture of an Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Adenoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yuki; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Erina; Saegusa, Makoto; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the first case of a pancreatic fistula extending into the thigh caused by the rupture of an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. An 80-year-old man was suspected to have necrotizing fasciitis because of right femoral pain. Computed tomography showed fluid retention from the pancreatic head to the right iliopsoas muscle and an IPMN at the pancreatic head. The findings of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography led to the suspicion of a minor leak and a pancreatic stent was placed. The patient died due to an uncontrollable infection. A pathological autopsy showed a pancreatic fistula extending into the thigh that had been caused by the rupture of the IPMN. PMID:28154275

  1. Spontaneous Compartment Syndrome of the Thigh in the Absence of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Javedani, Parisa P; Ratnabalasuriar, Radhika; Grall, Kristi J H

    2016-07-01

    Compartment syndrome occurs when an increase in pressure results in vascular and functional impairment of the underlying nerve and muscles. Thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) is uncommon, but clinical suspicion warrants emergent surgical consultation and fasciotomy. We present a 42-year-old man evaluated for right lateral thigh pain, without a history of trauma, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), previous surgery, or intravenous drug use. He was febrile, tachycardic, with a mild leukocytosis, an elevated C-reactive protein level, and an elevated creatinine kinase level. Radiographs showed no abnormality and right lower extremity duplex ultrasound showed no DVT. A computed tomography scan of the right lower extremity was concerning for compartment syndrome. Surgical consultation was obtained, and the patient was taken to the operating room for fasciotomy. He was diagnosed with compartment syndrome intraoperatively. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: TCS is exceedingly rare, especially in the absence of underlying traumatic and nontraumatic etiologies. The diagnosis is challenging because more elastic fascia with larger space in the thigh allows for accommodation of acute increases in pressure. Consequently, there may not be the expected acute rise in compartment pressures; increased compartment pressure may only be a late sign, when underlying neurovascular damage has already occurred. TCS is complicated by high morbidity and mortality. Emergent surgical consultation should be obtained when there is a high clinical suspicion for TCS, and limb-saving fasciotomy should not be delayed. This case shows the importance of a high level of suspicion for TCS in patients with no identifiable etiology and no historical risk factors for development of compartment syndrome, because TCS may not present with classic symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute morbidity and complications of thigh compartment syndrome: A report of 26 cases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To describe the patient population, etiology, and complications associated with thigh compartment syndrome (TCS). TCS is a rare condition, affecting less than 0.3% of trauma patients, caused by elevated pressure within a constrained fascial space which can result in tissue necrosis, fibrosis, and physical impairment in addition to other complications. Compartment releases performed after irreversible tissue ischemia has developed can lead to severe infection, amputation, and systemic complications including renal insufficiency and death. Methods This study examines the course of treatment of 23 consecutive patients with 26 thigh compartment syndromes sustained during an eight-year period at two Level 1 trauma centers, each admitting more than 2,000 trauma patients yearly. Results Patients developing TCS were young (average 35.4 years) and likely to have a vascular injury on presentation (57.7%). A tense and edematous thigh was the most consistent clinical exam finding leading to compartment release (69.5%). Average time from admission to the operating room was 18 +/- 4.3 hours and 8/23 (34.8%) were noted to have ischemic muscle changes at the time of release. Half of those patients (4/8) developed local complications requiring limb amputations. Conclusion TCS is often associated with high energy trauma and is difficult to diagnose in uncooperative, obtunded and multiply injured patients. Vascular injuries are a common underlying cause and require prompt recognition and a multidisciplinary approach including the trauma and orthopaedic surgeons, intensive care team, vascular surgery and interventional radiology. Prompt recognition and treatment of TCS are paramount to avoid the catastrophic acute and long term morbidities. PMID:20723263

  3. Notes on longevity and flightlessness in bristle-thighed curlews

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, J.S.; Redmond, R.L.; Hendricks, P.; Clapp, R.B.; Gill, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Bristle-thighed Curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) are among the least-studied shorebirds in the world. They have a highly restricted breeding range in western Alaska and winter exclusively on remote islands in the central and south Pacific (AOU 1983, Kessel 1989). The status of these birds is not known, but they are considered to be rare throughout their range (Johnsgard 1981). We describe two unusual traits of Bristle-thighed Curlews - exceptional longevity and flightlessness during molt-and discuss their significance to the species' migration and nonbreeding ecology.

  4. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 2: Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nitri, Marco; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an extra-articular lateral knee structure, most recently referred to as the anterolateral ligament (ALL), contributes to overall rotational stability of the knee. However, the effect of anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) has not been biomechanically investigated or validated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical function of anatomic ALLR in the setting of a combined ACL and ALL injury. More specifically, this investigation focused on the effect of ALLR on resultant rotatory stability when performed in combination with concomitant ACLR. It was hypothesized that ALLR would significantly reduce internal rotation and axial plane translation laxity during a simulated pivot-shift test compared with isolated ACLR. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were evaluated with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Knee kinematics were evaluated with simulated clinical examinations including a simulated pivot-shift test consisting of coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques, a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, and an 88-N anterior tibial load. Kinematic differences between ACLR with an intact ALL, ACLR with ALLR, and ACLR with a deficient ALL were compared with the intact state. Single-bundle ACLR tunnels and ALLR tunnels were placed anatomically according to previous quantitative anatomic attachment descriptions. Combined anatomic ALLR and ACLR significantly improved the rotatory stability of the knee compared with isolated ACLR in the face of a concurrent ALL deficiency. During a simulated pivot-shift test, ALLR significantly reduced internal rotation and axial plane tibial translation when compared with ACLR with an ALL deficiency. Isolated ACLR for the treatment of a combined ACL and ALL injury was not able to restore stability of the knee, resulting in a significant increase in

  5. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the thighs in cardiac patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Cenik, Fadime; Schoberwalter, Dieter; Keilani, Mohammad; Maehr, Bruno; Wolzt, Michael; Marhold, Maximilian; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to update scientific knowledge concerning the safety of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to increase exercise capacity and prevent cardiac cachexia in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). A systematic review including the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS was conducted for the time period from 1966 to March 31, 2016. Only four articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (three original articles/safety studies and one case report). The three (safety) studies used NMES to increase muscle strength and/or endurance capacity of the thighs. NMES did not show electromagnetic interference (EMI) with ICD function. EMI was described in a case report of 2 patients with subpectoral ICDs and application of NMES on abdominal muscles. This review indicates that NMES may be applied in cardiac ICD patients if 1) individual risks (e. g., pacing dependency, acute heart failure, unstable angina, ventricular arrhythmic episode in the last 3 months) are excluded by performing a safety check before starting NMES treatment and 2) "passive" exercise using NMES is performed only for thighs and gluteal muscles in 3) compliant ICD patients (especially for home-based NMES) and 4) the treatment is regularly supervised by a physician and the device is examined after the first use of NMES to exclude EMI. Nevertheless, further studies including larger sample sizes are necessary to exclude any risk when NMES is used in this patient group.

  6. Diagnostic value of the muscle fiber conduction velocity for evaluation of muscle hypotrophy.

    PubMed

    Gechev, Antonin G; Ilieva, Elena M; Marinkev, Marin D; Hadjigeorgiev, Georgi H

    2004-01-01

    To find an objective method of evaluation of the thigh muscle hypothrophy in gonarthrosis. The subjects of the study were 24 patients with gonarthrosis (mean age 58.4 +/- 2.6 years). Of these 8 (33%) were males and 16 (67%) females. The following methods of examination were used: computed tomography (CT) of the thigh musculature--linear measurement and area of the cross-section of the vastus medialis muscle; electromyography--muscle fiber conduction velocity; and measurement of thigh girth. Significant reduction of the cross-section area and linear measurement of the vastus medialis muscle and significant delay of the muscle fiber conduction velocity was found in the symptomatic side compared with the asymptomatic side. No correlation was found between the tape measure of the thigh and cross-section area of the muscle. A significant correlation was found between the cross-section area of the muscle and the fast fiber conduction velocity as well as between the linear measurement of the vastus medialis muscle cross-section and fast fiber conduction velocity. The correlation between the macromorphological changes of the vastus medialis muscle assessed by computed tomography and the functional changes detected by electromyography allows the conclusion that the muscle fiber conduction velocity can be used as an objective method of evaluation of muscle atrophy in degenerative joint diseases.

  7. Pedicled posteromedial thigh (PMT) flap: A new alternative for groin defect reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Enrique Carrillo Jimenez, Leonardo; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2015-11-26

    The posterior medial thigh is mainly vascularized by the profunda femoris artery (PFA), which nourishes the adductor magnus muscle and overlying skin, to supply a number of perforators that can potentially be used as pedicles for local perforator flaps. Here we present two cases utilizing the pedicled posteromedial thigh flap (PMT) to reconstruct the groin defects. Two patients underwent resection for metastatic malignant melanoma resulting in large defects of the groin with exposure of major inguinal vessels; the dimensions of the skin defects were 15 cm × 5 cm and 16 cm × 6 cm, two ipsilateral pedicled PMT flaps were designed to cover the defects. The pedicled PMT flaps were based on perforators arising from the PFA and were transposed through a submuscular tunnel into the defect. The postoperative course was uneventful and the wounds were reconstructed successfully. The pedicled PMT flap may be an option for reconstruction of groin defects and could be incorporated into the armamentarium of the reconstructive microsurgeon. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery, 2015.

  8. Free medial thigh perforator-based flaps: new definition of the pedicle vessels and versatile application.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Hosoda, M; Inagawa, K; Moriguchi, T; Orita, Y

    1996-11-01

    The medial thigh flap is a perforator-based flap nourished with septocutaneous or muscle perforators originating from the femoral vessels. To date, 8 patients have been repaired with this flap and extended or connected flaps including this flap: 4 patients with lower leg defects and 4 patients with intraoral and neck defects. The advantages of this flap are (1) several pedicle perforators exist for this flap, which makes possible duplicated vascular anastomoses to establish reliable circulation of the transferred flap; (2) the flap can be extended or connected to other neighboring flaps in the anterior thigh, so that extensively wide defects can be closed in one stage; (3) the great saphenous vein can be simultaneously used as a vein graft or for venous drainage for the flap; (4) the anterior branch of the femoral nerve can be used for sensory potential; and (5) there is minimum morbidity of the donor defect and a large dominant vessel for the leg can be preserved. The suitable indications for this flap are defects after removal of skin cancer in the foot or lower leg and wide defects after resection of head and neck cancer, which can be reconstructed with the flap connected to neighboring skin flaps. The disadvantages of this flap are that it has a small, short vascular pedicle and the bulkiness of the flap's fatty tissue often requires thinning.

  9. Antipredator strategies in breeding Bristle-thighed Curlews

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCaffery, Brian J.; Gill, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Each fall the world’s breeding population of Bristle-thighed Curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) arrives on the central Pacific wintering grounds following a migration that entails a non- stop flight of over 5000 kilometers. Sun-drenched, palm-shrouded atolls will be their home for the ensuing eight months. Even in the avian world, however, such apparant luxury is not without costs. For the Bristle-thighed Curlew these costs are incurred on the breeding grounds. From the time they arrive there in early May until they depart again for the wintering grounds in August and September, curlews are exposed to a host of predators. Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus), Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), Rough-legged Hawks (Buteo lagopus), Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), Parasitic Jaegers (Stercorarius parasiticus), Short-eared Owls (Asio flammeus), Common Ravens (Corvus corax) and Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are potential predators of curlews and their offspring. To combat these threats, the Bristle-thighed Curlew has evolved an elaborate suite of antipredator defenses. Depending on the threat and the phase of the breeding cycle, Bristle-thighed Curlews may respond to potential predators by fleeing or flocking, by camouflage or combat. Given the variety of predators on the tundra, a variety of options is critical.

  10. Anthropometric prediction of skeletal muscle cross-sectional area in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wade, Rodney C; Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2017-03-02

    Finding an accurate and affordable method to quantify muscle size following spinal cord injury (SCI) could provide benefits clinically and in research settings. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of anthropometric measurements versus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and develop a field equation to predict muscle CSA specific to the SCI population. Twenty-two men with chronic (>1yr) motor complete SCI participated in the current study. Anthropometric measurements, including mid-thigh circumference and anterior skinfold thickness (SFT), were taken on the right thigh. The anthropometric muscle cross sectional area (Muscle CSAanthro) was predicted using the following equation: [π (r -SFT /2)(2); r = thigh circumference/2π]. MRI analysis yielded whole thigh CSA (Thigh CSAMRI), mid-thigh muscle CSA (Muscle CSAMRI), mid-thigh absolute muscle CSA after subtracting intramuscular fat and bone (Muscle CSA-IMFMRI), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SATT) measured at one site as well as at 4-sites and bone CSA. Anthropometric measurements were correlated to the thigh CSAMRI (r(2)=0.90, SEE=17.6cm(2), P<0.001). Muscle CSAanthro was correlated to muscle CSAMRI (r(2)=0.78, SEE=16.6cm(2), P<0.001) and muscle CSA-IMFMRI (r(2)=0.75, SEE=17.6cm(2) P<0.001). A single SFT was correlated to the polar 4-site SATT (r(2)=0.78, SEE=0.37cm, P<0.001). The average femur CSA and average IMF CSA derived from MRI led to the following field equation: Muscle CSApredicted = π[(Thighcircum/2π) - (SFT/2)](2) - 23.2. Anthropometric measurements of muscle CSA exhibited a good agreement with the gold standard MRI method and led to the development of a field equation for clinical use after accounting for bone and IMF.

  11. A prospective randomized study in 20 patients undergoing bilateral TKA comparing midline incision to anterolateral incision.

    PubMed

    Maniar, Rajesh N; Singhi, Tushar; Nanivadekar, Arun; Maniar, Parul R; Singh, Jaivardhan

    2017-02-11

    Lateral flap numbness is a known side-effect of midline skin incision in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and a cause of patient dissatisfaction. Anterolateral incision is an alternative approach which preserves the infrapatellar branches of the saphenous nerve and avoids numbness. Studies have compared both incisions, but in different patients. However, different patients may assess the same sensory deficit dissimilarly, because of individual variations in anatomy and healing responses. We compared the two incisions in the same patient at the same time, using an anterolateral incision on one knee and a midline incision on the other knee in simultaneous bilateral TKA. Other surgical steps including medial arthrotomy were idential. We also correlated subjective and objective findings. Twenty patients were prospectively randomized. Sensory loss and skin healing were assessed at 6, 12 and 52 weeks. Subjective preference for the knee with less numbness was charted on Wald's Sequential Probability Ratio Test. Sensation scores for touch, vibration, static and moving two-point discrimination were measured. Scar healing was evaluated using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). Functional scores were measured. A statistically significant difference favoring knees with anterolateral incision was observed in patient preference at all assessment points and this correlated with sensation scores. A statistically significant difference was observed in POSAS score favoring knees with anterolateral incision at 6 and 12 weeks which became statistically insignificant at 1 year. Functional scores remained comparable. We recommend anterolateral incision as a safe and effective method to circumvent the problem of lateral flap numbness with midline incision. I.

  12. Anterolateral corridor approach to the infratemporal fossa and central skull base in maxillectomy: rationale and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Jeremy D; Crowther, John; Taylor, William M; Wong, Ling Siew; Paterson, Tom; Devine, John; Wales, Craig; MacIver, Colin

    2015-11-01

    We describe the technical aspects and report our clinical experience of a surgical approach to the infratemporal fossa that aims to reduce local recurrence after operations for cancer of the posterior maxilla. We tested the technique by operating on 3 cadavers and then used the approach in 16 patients who had posterolateral maxillectomy for disease that arose on the maxillary alveolus or junction of the hard and soft palate (maxillary group), and in 19 who had resection of the masticatory compartment and central skull base for advanced sinonasal cancer (sinonasal group). Early proximal ligation of the maxillary artery was achieved in all but one of the 35 patients. Access to the infratemporal fossa enabled division of the pterygoid muscles and pterygoid processes under direct vision in all cases. No patient in the maxillary group had local recurrence at median follow up of 36 months. Four patients (21%) in the sinonasal group had local recurrence at median follow up of 27 months. Secondary haemorrhage from the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery resulted in the only perioperative death. The anterolateral corridor approach enables controlled resection of tumours that extend into the masticatory compartment. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 78 FR 36304 - Proposed Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ] Title: Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form...

  14. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  15. “Emergency” definitive reconstruction of a necrotising fasciitis thigh debridement defect with a pedicled TRAM flap

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Tom; Yu, Jonathan T.S.; Wong, Kai Yuen; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a rare, severe, rapidly progressing and life-threatening synergistic infection primarily affecting the superficial fascia. A novel method of definitive and aesthetic reconstruction of NF thigh defects by using a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap without recourse to temporising skin grafts is presented. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 30-year-old parous woman presented in extremis with fulminant NF of her left anteromedial thigh. Following emergency radical debridement and intensive care stabilisation she was reconstructed 48 h later in a single stage with a pedicled TRAM flap islanded on the ipsilateral deep inferior epigastric vessels. There was excellent contour restoration of her thigh and coverage of the exposed femoral vessels. DISCUSSION Pedicled flaps based on the rectus abdominis muscle provide a large, readily available reconstructive option for correction of substantial regional defects as herein illustrated. They are robust when based on dominant inferior vascular pedicle with a long reach and wide arc of rotation when designed transversely (as a TRAM flap). CONCLUSION This case also illustrates that definitive flap reconstruction of NF can be successfully undertaken in the emergent setting, thereby negating the need for large areas of skin grafting which can lead to contractures with consequent functional impairment and suboptimal aesthetic results. PMID:23548707

  16. The Effects of Anterolateral Tenodesis on Tibiofemoral Contact Pressures and Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Inderhaug, Eivind; Stephen, Joanna M; El-Daou, Hadi; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    Anterolateral tenodeses are increasingly popular in combination with intra-articular anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Despite the perception of risk of overconstraint and lateral osteoarthritis, evidence is lacking regarding the effect of graft tensioning on knee kinematics and intra-articular compartmental joint pressures. To investigate tibiofemoral joint contact pressures and kinematics related to an anterolateral lesion and the effectiveness of a MacIntosh tenodesis in restoring these when varying (1) graft tension and (2) tibial rotation during graft fixation. Controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were tested in a customized rig with femur fixed and tibia free to move from 0° to 90° of flexion. The quadriceps and iliotibial band were loaded by means of a weighted pulley system. At 30° intervals of knee flexion, tibiofemoral contact pressures were measured with a Tekscan sensor and tibiofemoral kinematics were recorded by use of an optical tracking system. The knee was tested intact and then with an anterolateral soft tissue transection. MacIntosh tenodeses were then tested in a randomized order with 20 N or 80 N of graft tension, each with the tibia held in neutral intact alignment or free to rotate. Tibial anterior translation and internal rotation were significantly increased and lateral contact pressures significantly reduced compared with the intact knee following anterolateral soft tissue cutting ( P < .05). Contact pressures were restored with fixed neutral tibial rotation combined with 20 N or 80 N of graft tension or by a free-hanging tibia with 20 N of graft tension (all P values > .5). Grafts tensioned with 80 N caused significant overconstraint both when the tibia was fixed and free hanging (all P values < .05). Increases in the lateral tibiofemoral contact pressures were also seen when the tibia was free hanging and 80 N was used for graft tension ( P < .05). Anterolateral soft tissue injury caused reduced

  17. Behavior of the anterolateral structures of the knee during internal rotation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, C; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Niglis, L; Freychet, B; Clavert, P; Imbert, P

    2015-09-01

    Since the recent descriptions of the anterolateral ligament (ALL), the role played by the anterolateral peripheral structures in the rotational control of the knee is again being debated. The objective of this study was to identify the structures during internal tibial rotation and then to define their anatomical characteristics. We hypothesized that internal rotation would tighten several anatomical formations, both superficial and deep, with the ALL one part of these structures. Nine fresh-frozen cadaver knee specimens were studied. The anterolateral structures tightened were identified from superficial to deep at 30° of flexion. Each was selectively dissected, identifying its insertions and orientations, and measuring its size. The length variations of the ALL during internal tibial rotation were measured by applying a 30-N force using a dynamometric torque wrench at the tibiofibular mortise. The superficial structures tightened were the iliotibial tract and the Kaplan fibers. In internal tibial rotation, the Kaplan fibers held the iliotibial tract against the lateral epicondyle, allowing it to play the role of a stabilizing ligament. The Kaplan fibers were 73.11±19.09mm long (range, 63-82mm) and at their femoral insertion they were 12.1±1.61mm wide (range, 10-15mm). The deep structures tightened covered a triangular area including the ALL and the anterolateral capsule. The ALL was 39.11±3.4mm long (range, 35-46mm) in neutral rotation and 49.88±5.3mm long (range, 42-58mm) in internal rotation (p<0.005). Its femoral insertion area was narrow at 5.27±1.06mm (range, 3.5-7mm) and was mainly proximal and posterior at the lateral epicondyle. Its tibial insertion zone was wide, with a clearly differentiated anterior limit but a posterior limit confused with the joint capsule. In the vertical plane, this insertion was located 6.44±2.37mm (range, 2-9) below the joint space. This study demonstrates two distinct anterolateral tissue planes tightened during internal

  18. Biochemical survey on episodic localized darkening in turkey deboned thigh meat packaged in modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Guidi, A; Castigliego, L; Benini, O; Armani, A; Iannone, G; Gianfaldoni, D

    2006-04-01

    The color of food, especially meat and meat products, is a parameter that strongly influences consumer choice. In Italy, repeated cases of darkening in deboned thigh meat of male turkeys packaged in modified atmosphere (MAP; 80% 02, 20% CO2) have been reported. The pH, lipid oxidation (TBARS), heme proteins, and iron content were investigated in MAP samples of turkey males, females, and in oxygen-permeable film-packaged males. Furthermore, the absorbance spectrum (400 to 700 nm) of the meat extracts was analyzed to better delineate the evolution and characteristics of the darkening process. Results showed that darkening occurred only in males with higher content of total iron, independently of the content of heme proteins, which differs only between males and females. Furthermore, pH was higher in muscles taken as controls, with respect to muscles involved in the darkening, as well as in females. Finally, TBARS values were found to be higher in darkened regions than in not darkened ones, as well as in MAP samples with respect to oxygen-permeable film-packaged samples. These findings suggest that darkening occurrence might depend on kind of muscle, sex, and individual characteristics of the animals raised under the same breeding conditions.

  19. Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch isolated from a thigh lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, I; Della-Latta, P; Housey, G; Rebatta, G

    1993-01-01

    Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch is presented for the first time as an etiologic agent of cutaneous zygomycosis in a patient with aplastic anemia on immunosuppressive therapy. This report also represents the third case caused by this species reported in the literature. A biopsy taken from a lesion on the patient's thigh revealed broad, nonseptate, nonbranching hyphae compatible in morphology with a Zygomycete; M. ramosissimus was cultured twice from the thigh lesion. The patient was treated successfully with amphotericin B. Identifying features of M. ramosissimus include the following: numerous sporangia lacking columellae and resembling those of Mortierella spp., short, erect sporangiophores repeatedly branching sympodially; tough, persistent, and diffluent sporangial walls; numerous oidia in chains; extremely low colonies; and restricted growth at 36 degrees C. This paper describes the isolate and strives to alert the clinical microbiologist to this rarely reported pathogen. Images PMID:8408580

  20. A New Reconstructive Technique of the Anterolateral Ligament with Iliotibial Band-Strip.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Victor, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a well-established surgical procedure for the correction of ACL ruptures. However, the incidence of instability following ACL reconstruction is substantial. Recent studies have led to greater insight into the anatomy and the radiographic characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL), along with its possible role in residual instability after ACL reconstruction. The current paper describes a lateral extra-articular tenodesis to reconstruct the ALL during ACL procedures, using a short iliotibial band strip. The distal insertion of this strip is left intact on the anterolateral side of the proximal tibia, and the proximal part is fixed at the anatomic femoral insertion of the ALL. Our technique avoids the sacrifice of one of the hamstring tendons for the ALL reconstruction. Additionally, there is no interference with the anatomical location or function of the LCL. Our technique offers a minimally invasive and nearly complete anatomical reconstruction of the ALL with minimal additional operative time.

  1. Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of the Tibial Plateau Through the Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Goulet, James A

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are challenging injuries to treat. The lateral tibial plateau is fractured more commonly than the medial plateau and the workhorse approach for these fractures is the anterolateral approach. This approach allows visualization of the lateral joint, metaphysis, and can be extensile if there is shaft extension. We present our technique for performing the anterolateral approach while treating a Schatzker III tibial plateau fracture. Special attention is given to performing a submeniscal arthrotomy to view the joint surface and judge the reduction. A femoral distractor is placed to assist with elevation the joint surface and visualization of the lateral plateau. A cortical window is created using a triple reamer from the sliding hip screw set. The reduction is performed and supported with cancellous bone chips. Finally, a lateral locking plate with rafting screws is placed. Knowledge of this approach and the strategies needed to address lateral and some bicondlar tibial plateau fractures are crucial to good patient outcomes.

  2. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  3. Influence of thigh activation on the VO₂ slow component in boys and men.

    PubMed

    Breese, Brynmor C; Barker, Alan R; Armstrong, Neil; Fulford, Jonathan; Williams, Craig A

    2014-11-01

    During constant work rate exercise above the lactate threshold (LT), the initial rapid phase of pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO₂) kinetics is supplemented by an additional VO₂ slow component (VO₂Sc) which reduces the efficiency of muscular work. The VO₂Sc amplitude has been shown to increase with maturation but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We utilized the transverse relaxation time (T₂) of muscle protons from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the hypothesis that a lower VO₂ slow component (VO₂Sc) amplitude in children would be associated with a reduced muscle recruitment compared to adults. Eight boys (mean age 11.4 ± 0.4) and eight men (mean age 25.3 ± 3.3 years) completed repeated step transitions of unloaded-to-very heavy-intensity (U → VH) exercise on a cycle ergometer. MRI scans of the thigh region were acquired at rest and after VH exercise up to the VO₂Sc time delay (ScTD) and after 6 min. T₂ for each of eight muscles was adjusted in relation to cross-sectional area and then summed to provide the area-weighted ΣT₂ as an index of thigh recruitment. There were no child/adult differences in the relative VO₂Sc amplitude [Boys 14 ± 7 vs. Men 18 ± 3 %, P = 0.15, effect size (ES) = 0.8] during which the change (∆) in area-weighted ΣT₂ between the ScTD and 6 min was not different between groups (Boys 1.6 ± 1.2 vs. Men 2.3 ± 1.1 ms, P = 0.27, ES = 0.6). A positive and strong correlation was found between the relative VO₂Sc amplitude and the magnitude of the area-weighted ∆ΣT₂ in men (r = 0.92, P = 0.001) but not in boys (r = 0.09, P = 0.84). This study provides evidence to show that progressive muscle recruitment (as inferred from T₂ changes) contributes to the development of the VO₂Sc during intense submaximal exercise independent of age.

  4. Mitral valve surgery using right anterolateral thoracotomy: is the aortic cannulation a safety procedure?

    PubMed

    Guedes, Marco Antonio Vieira; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Grinberg, Max; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    The right anterolateral thoracotomy is an alternative technique for surgical approach of mitral valve. In these cases, femoral-femoral bypass still has been used, rising occurrence of complications related to femoral cannulation. Describe the technique and results of mitral valve treatment by right anterolateral thoracotomy using aortic cannulation for cardiac pulmonary bypass (CPB). From 1983 e 2008, 100 consecutive female patients, with average age 35 ±13 years, 96 (96%) underwent mitral valve surgical treatment in the Heart Institute of São Paulo. A right anterolateral thoracotomy approach associated with aortic cannulation was used for CPB. Eighty (80%) patients had rheumatic disease and 84 (84%) patients presented functional class III or IV. Were performed 45 (45%) comissurotomies, 38 (38%) valve repairs, 7(7%) mitral valve replacements, seven (7%) recomissurotomies and three (3%) prosthesis replacement. Sparing surgery was performed in 90 (90%) patients. The average CPB and clamp time were 57 ± 27 min e 39 ± 19 min, respectively. There were no in-hospital death, reoperation due to bleeding and convertion to sternotomy. Introperative complications were related to heart harvest (5%), especially in reoperations (3%). The most important complications in postoperative period were related to pulmonary system (11%), followed by atrial fibrilation (10%) but without major systemic repercussions. The mean inhospital length of stay was 8 ± 3 days. Follow-up was 6.038 patients/month. Actuarial survival was 98.0 ± 1.9% and freedom from reoperation was 81.4 ± 7.8% in 180 months. The right anterolateral thoracotomy associated with aortic cannulation in mitral valve surgery is a simple technique, reproducible and safety.

  5. Anterolateral Popliteal Puncture Technique: A Novel Retrograde Approach for Chronic Femoropopliteal Occlusions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michinao; Urasawa, Kazushi; Koshida, Ryoji; Haraguchi, Takuya; Kitani, Shunsuke; Igarashi, Yasumi; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    To describe the feasibility and safety of an anterolateral popliteal puncture technique as a retrograde access to chronic total occlusions (CTOs) in the femoropopliteal segment. Twenty consecutive patients (mean age 75.1±10.9 years; 13 women) with symptomatic femoropopliteal occlusive disease underwent endovascular therapy via a retrograde access using the anterolateral popliteal puncture technique. With the patient supine, the P3 segment of the popliteal artery was accessed with a sheathless technique intended to provide minimally invasive access. Subsequent to a wire rendezvous technique in the CTO, the antegrade guidewire was advanced to the below-the-knee artery. Hemostasis across the P3 segment was secured with balloon inflation alone or combined with thrombin-blood patch (TBP) injection. Both the anterolateral popliteal puncture technique and subsequent revascularization were successful in all patients. Mean hemostasis time for balloon inflation only was 7.73±4.03 vs 4.78±0.78 minutes for balloon inflation with TBP injection. There were no in-hospital deaths or complications, including pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, hematomas, embolic complications, or nerve damage. The anterolateral popliteal puncture technique is useful as an alternative retrograde access vs a conventional transpopliteal approach for CTOs in the femoropopliteal segment if antegrade recanalization has failed. This technique may become one option for retrograde access in patients with severe below-the-knee lesions or with CTOs that extend to the P2 segment of the popliteal artery. Furthermore, this technique has the added benefit of allowing patients to remain in the supine position throughout treatment.

  6. Anterolateral Drawer Versus Anterior Drawer Test for Ankle Instability: A Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam G; Myers, Stuart H; Parks, Brent G; Guyton, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    The addition of unconstrained internal rotation to the physical examination could allow for detection of more subtle degrees of ankle instability. We hypothesized that a simulated anterolateral drawer test allowing unconstrained internal rotation of the ankle would provoke greater displacement of the lateral talus in the mortise versus the anterior drawer test. Ten cadaveric lower extremities were tested in a custom apparatus designed to reproduce the anterior drawer test and the anterolateral drawer test, in which the ankle was allowed to internally rotate about the intact deep deltoid ligament while being subluxed anteriorly. Specimens were tested intact and with anterior tibiofibular ligament sectioned. A differential variable reluctance transducer was used to measure lateral talar displacement with anterior forces of 25 and 50 N. No significant differences in talar displacement or ankle rotation were noted in intact specimens between the groups. Among sectioned specimens, significantly more talar displacement (25 N [6.5 ± 1.7 mm vs 3.8 ± 2.4 mm] and 50 N [8.7 ± 0.9 mm vs 4.5 ± 2.5 mm], P < .001) and ankle rotation (25 N [13.9 ± 8.0 degrees vs 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees] and 50 N [23.7 ± 5.8 degrees vs 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees], P < .001) were found in the anterolateral drawer versus anterior drawer group. In an ankle instability model, the anterolateral drawer test provoked almost twice the lateral talus displacement found with the anterior drawer test. Allowing internal rotation of the ankle while testing for ankle instability may allow the examiner to detect more subtle degrees of ankle instability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Triple pelvic osteotomy in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease using a single anterolateral incision.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Philip A; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kearns, Stephen R; Sheehan, Eoin; McCormack, Damien; Mullhall, Kevin J

    2003-11-01

    Pelvic osteotomy has a small role to play in the management of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Residual acetabular dysplasia or incongruity can be corrected by rotational acetabuloplasty. In skeletally immature patients this can be performed by complete or incomplete innominate osteotomies. We present the case of a 12-year-old child with residual acetabular dysplasia, resulting from Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, which was treated by a triple pelvic osteotomy performed by a small single anterolateral incision.

  8. Contributions of the anterolateral complex and the anterolateral ligament to rotatory knee stability in the setting of ACL Injury: a roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Musahl, Volker; Getgood, Alan; Neyret, Philippe; Claes, Steven; Burnham, Jeremy M; Batailler, Cecile; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Williams, Andy; Amis, Andrew; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Karlsson, Jón

    2017-03-12

    Persistent rotatory knee laxity is increasingly recognized as a common finding after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. While the reasons behind rotator knee laxity are multifactorial, the impact of the anterolateral knee structures is significant. As such, substantial focus has been directed toward better understanding these structures, including their anatomy, biomechanics, in vivo function, injury patterns, and the ideal procedures with which to address any rotatory knee laxity that results from damage to these structures. However, the complexity of lateral knee anatomy, varying dissection techniques, differing specimen preparation methods, inconsistent sectioning techniques in biomechanical studies, and confusing terminology have led to discrepancies in published studies on the topic. Furthermore, anatomical and functional descriptions have varied widely. As such, we have assembled a panel of expert surgeons and scientists to discuss the roles of the anterolateral structures in rotatory knee laxity, the healing potential of these structures, the most appropriate procedures to address rotatory knee laxity, and the indications for these procedures. In this round table discussion, KSSTA Editor-in-Chief Professor Jón Karlsson poses a variety of relevant and timely questions, and experts from around the world provide answers based on their personal experiences, scientific study, and interpretations of the literature. Level of evidence V.

  9. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction.

  10. Senile Cardiac Calcification Syndrome: A Rare Case of Extensive Calcification of Left Ventricular Papillary Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Song, Bong Gun; Sohn, Hyung Rae; Hong, Su-Min; Park, Dong Won; Heo, Seung Hye; Kim, Kye Yeon; Cho, Wook-Hyun; Choi, Suk-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Extensive papillary muscle calcification is uncommon and only scarce literature about causes and the clinical significance is available, whereas small calcific deposits are common findings in elderly people and are located most commonly at the apex. Papillary muscle calcification has been associated with coronary artery disease, dilated cardiomyopathy, mitral valve disease, hypercalcemia, and increased calcium phosphate product in end stage renal disease. We reported a rare case of extensive calcification of anterolateral papillary muscle diagnosed by echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography.

  11. [Hemangiopericytoma of the thigh. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Calvo Cascallo, J; Mundi Salvadó, N; Cardona Fontanet, M; Cañadell Mullerat, A M

    1993-01-01

    A case of Hemangiopericytoma at the thigh is reported. The Hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumour made with pericyties. This neoplasia is usually benign and it is located in the soft tissues. Tumour is profusely irrigated. The most common locations of the Hemangiopericytoma are the lower limbs and the abdominal cavity. The Hemangiopericytoma is difficult to be recognized by histological criteria. The high number of relapses and metastasis involve to an extent surgical ablation of the tumour and its borders. Present literature is reviewed and the different diagnostic and therapeutic options are discussed.

  12. Reconstruction of Temporal Hollowing Defect With Anterior-Lateral Thigh Free Flap Following Resection of Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Infratemporal Fossa and Right Mandible (a Case Report).

    PubMed

    Melville, James C; Hornberger, John C; Young, Simon; Shum, Jonathan W

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent invasive ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa is an uncommonly encountered phenomenon in the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery and presents many surgical challenges for the practitioner. This case report describes a patient who underwent previous resection of a mandibular ameloblastoma with multiple recurrences. The patient was diagnosed with a recurrent ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa that was subsequently resected and reconstructed using an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free tissue transfer. There are few reported cases of recurrent ameloblastomas in the infratemporal fossa and none that describe surgical resection and reconstruction of such a lesion. Owing to the uniqueness of the surgical defect, an ALT flap was used to correct the temporal hollowing. There have been multiple reported cases of reconstruction of temporal hollowing defects using autogenous fat or allograft; however, none have described the use of a de-epithelialized ALT microvascular reconstruction of a temporal hollowing defect. This case report describes a unique clinical situation of surgical resection and reconstruction that resulted in a satisfactory outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: description of technique and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Michael L; Hibbard, Jason C; Nuckley, David J; Braman, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis surgery is an important procedure for the correction of biceps tendonitis or in conjunction with rotator cuff repair with biceps symptoms. Recent trends have developed in placing the biceps tendon lower in the bicipital groove for a tenodesis. However, a more distal biceps tenodesis location is technically challenging when carried out arthroscopically with standard posterior and lateral portals. We aimed to establish the safety of a low-anterolateral portal location for direct access to the lowest aspect of the bicipital groove. An anatomical study design was used to examine portal to neurovascular structural measurements in 23 cadaveric shoulders. These shoulders had undergone low-anterolateral portal placement over the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove as determined by palpation and direct arthroscopic visualization. No arthroscopic irrigation was performed. Following this, the shoulders underwent open dissection with the cannula in place to evaluate for any potential damage to any portion of the axillary nerve. All of the resultant portals in this study provided direct access to the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove, and the dissection revealed that the portal was touching a small distal axillary nerve branch on the undersurface of the anterior deltoid in nearly half of the shoulders. The placement of a low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis at the distal bicipital groove does not produce significant neurovascular damage; the portal trajectory comes close to distal anterior branches of the axillary nerve. Given these findings, this portal should be placed bluntly to best protect these underlying neurovascular structures.

  14. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  15. The structure and function of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van der Watt, Leon; Khan, Moin; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Musahl, Volker; Getgood, Alan; Peterson, Devin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the anatomic structure and function of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee. The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were screened for all studies related to the ALL of the knee. Two reviewers independently reviewed all eligible articles and the references of these articles. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to all searched studies. Quality assessment was completed for the included studies. Nineteen studies were identified for final analysis. Pooled analysis identified the ALL in 430 of 449 knees (96%) examined. The ligament was found to originate from the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle and insert on the proximal tibia midway between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. The ALL was found to be 34.1 to 41.5 mm in length, 5.1 to 8.3 mm in width above the lateral meniscus, and 8.9 to 11.2 mm in width below the lateral meniscus. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, the ALL was identified in 93% of knees examined (clinical, 64 of 70; cadaveric, 16 of 16). In one case study the ligament was clearly visualized by ultrasound examination. Histologic analysis across 3 studies showed characteristics consistent with ligamentous tissue. Though not shown in biomechanical studies, it is hypothesized that the ALL provides anterolateral stability to the knee, preventing anterolateral subluxation of the proximal tibia on the femur. One study identified a network of peripheral nerves, suggesting a proprioceptive function of the ALL. This systematic review shows the ALL to be a distinct structure with a consistent origin and insertion sites. The ALL is an extra-articular structure with a clear course from the lateral femoral epicondyle region, running anteroinferiorly, to the proximal tibia at a site midway between the Gerdy tubercle and the head of the fibula. The function of this ligament is theorized to provide anterolateral knee stability. Level IV, systematic review of cadaveric and

  16. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  17. Outcomes of minimally invasive anterolateral THA are not superior to those of minimally invasive direct lateral and posterolateral THA.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Chihab, Samir; Garbuz, Donald S; Masri, Bassam A; Tanzer, Michael; Gross, Allan E; Duncan, Clive P

    2013-02-01

    There has been considerable interest in minimally invasive surgical (MIS) THA in recent years. The MIS anterolateral approach, or the MIS Watson-Jones approach, is a novel intermuscular abductor-sparing technique. Early reports from case series suggest the potential for superior function and reduced complications; however, the available information from clinical reports is inadequate to suggest surgeons should change from their accepted standard approach. We examined the potential superiority of this anterolateral approach, as judged by quality-of-life (QoL) measures, radiographic parameters, and complications, compared to limited-incision MIS direct lateral and MIS posterolateral approaches. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial involving five surgeons at three centers, recruiting 156 patients undergoing primary THA to receive either the MIS anterolateral or the surgeon's preferred approach (direct lateral or posterolateral). For the 135 patients we report, we collected patient-reported WOMAC, SF-36, Paper Adaptive Test in 5 Domains of Quality of Life in Arthritis Questionnaire [PAT5D], and patient satisfaction scores. We recorded complications and evaluated radiographs for prosthetic component position, subsidence, and fracture. Minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 30 months; range, 24-42 months). QoL and patient-reported satisfaction were similar between groups. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated no differences in acetabular component positioning; however, mean stem subsidence was 4.6 mm for the MIS anterolateral group and 4.1 mm for the alternate group, with differences observed among the three centers for stem subsidence and fracture. One center had increased rate of fracture requiring treatment and need for revision in the MIS anterolateral group. We found no superiority of the MIS anterolateral approach but observed intersite differences in painful stem subsidence and fracture. We have returned to the standard surgical approaches in

  18. Legacy effects of short-term intentional weight loss on total body and thigh composition in overweight and obese older adults.

    PubMed

    Chmelo, E A; Beavers, D P; Lyles, M F; Marsh, A P; Nicklas, B J; Beavers, K M

    2016-04-04

    Weight regain following intentional weight loss may negatively impact body composition, accelerating fat regain and increasing risk of physical disability. The purpose of this study was to compare long-term changes in whole body and thigh composition in obese older adults who intentionally lost and then partially regained weight to obese older adults who remained weight stable. This pilot study analyzed total body (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) and thigh (computed tomography (CT)) composition data collected from 24 older (65-79 years) adults 18 months after completion of a 5-month randomized trial that compared resistance training alone (RT) with RT plus caloric restriction (RT+CR). Mean loss of body mass in the RT+CR group (n=13) was 7.1±2.4 kg during the 5-month intervention (74% fat mass; 26% lean mass; all P<0.01), whereas RT (n=11) remained weight stable (+0.3±1.8 kg; P=0.64). Differential group effects were observed for all DXA and CT body composition measures at 5 months (all P⩽0.01); however, by 23 months, group differences persisted only for total body (RT+CR: 81.6±10.0 kg vs RT: 88.5±14.9 kg; P=0.03) and lean (RT+CR: 50.8±9.3 kg vs RT: 54.4±12.0 kg; P<0.01) mass. All RT+CR participants regained weight from 5 to 23 months (mean gain=+4.8±2.6 kg; P<0.01). Total fat mass and all thigh fat volumes increased, whereas thigh muscle volume decreased, during the postintervention follow-up in RT+CR (all P⩽0.01). In the RT group, body mass did not change from 5 to 23 months (-0.2±0.9 kg; P=0.87). Decreased total thigh volume, driven by the loss of thigh muscle volume, were the only postintervention body composition changes observed in the RT group (both P<0.04). Short-term body composition benefits of an RT+CR intervention may be lost within 18 months after completion of the intervention.

  19. Liposuction-Assisted Medial Thigh Lift in Obese and Non Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aboueldahab, Abdelmohsen Khalaf

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The abdomen, thighs and buttocks are often the areas of greatest concern to patients following massive weight loss due to bariatric surgery. The typical appearance of the patient who has lost a massive amount of weight derives from a combination of factors, including gender-dependent body morphology and a change in body mass index, which lead to skin and soft-tissue excess and poor skin tone. Thigh laxity and redundancy represents a great challenge to both patients and surgeons. Not only because of the difficulty to satisfy the patients, but also due to the higher incidence of complications especially, with those obese patients who have not undergone bariatric surgery before. The problems with such patients are due to the heavy thighs that require both debulking and tight anchorage to prevent scar migration or labial distortion. Aim of the Work: The aim of the present study is to improve the aesthetic outcome and avoid the complications of medial thigh lifting with simultaneous liposuction in obese and non-obese. Patients and Methods: A total of 25 female patients presented during the period from January 2007 to July 2011 complaining of moderate to severe thigh laxity with or without lipodystrophy. In 20 patients medial transverse thigh lift was performed, to treat medial thigh friction and laxity particularly in the upper half. Whereas, in the other five patients were suffering from upper and lower medial thigh bulkiness, vertical thigh lift was performed. Results: All patients recovered well in 2 weeks and showed improvement of thigh contour. Scar downward displacement in one patient. No skin necrosis or seroma. No labial distortion or separation encountered. Conclusion: Simultaneous liposuction and thigh lift gave good results provided proper patients selection, appropriate technique to each patient, meticulous, cautious liposuction and handling of the tissues and most importantly is the deep tight anchorage sutures to guard against the effect of

  20. The anterolateral incision for pilon fracture surgery: an anatomic study of cutaneous blood supply.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brent E; Nathan, Senthil T; Acland, Robert D; Roberts, Craig S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the blood supply to the adjacent skin and its vulnerability to anterolateral tibial plating performed with fibular plating through a single surgical incision. Ten lightly embalmed cadaver legs without a history of lower extremity trauma or surgery with a mean age of 71 years (range, 57 to 87 years) were used for this investigation. Each specimen was injected with a commercially available silicone compound through the popliteal artery. The left leg was plated through a modified extensile Böhler approach and the right leg served as the control. Each leg was anatomically dissected. All measurements were taken using a digital caliper by a single investigator. A mean of 93 (range, 4 to 17) perforating arteries were present and in the proximity of the fibula plate. Our findings suggest the potential for iatrogenic soft tissue breakdown along the posterior border of the anterolateral surgical incision in this procedure as a result of compromised blood supply to the skin.

  1. Analysis of the Müller anterolateral femorotibial ligament reconstruction using a computerized knee model.

    PubMed

    Gibson, M; Mikosz, R; Reider, B; Andriacchi, T

    1986-01-01

    Iliotibial tract tenodesis has been described by Müller as part of the surgical treatment for anterolateral rotatory instability in the ACL deficient knee. The aim of this study was to use a previously described and validated computer model of the knee to calculate the effectiveness of Müller's extraarticular anterolateral femorotibial ligament (ALFTL) graft as a substitute for the ACL or as an adjunct to an intraarticular ACL reconstruction in the ACL deficient knee. This effectiveness was tested by simulating the application of a torque sufficient to create 15 degrees of internal rotation or 5 mm of anterior displacement of the tibia on the femur at 0 degrees, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees of knee flexion. The effects of moving the graft's proximal fixation point 1 cm superior, inferior, and anterior to the current surgical attachment site were examined to determine the amount of permissible surgical error in graft placement. The model predicts that the ALFTL is a useful restraint to internal rotation when it is performed with or without an intraarticular ACL reconstruction. The ALFTL graft took up greater amounts of tension and became more effective at increasing angles of knee flexion. Placement of the ALFTL graft 1 cm anterior to the current surgical attachment site decreases the vector component that lies perpendicular to the long axis of the tibia and consequently reduces resistance to internal rotation. The ALFTL graft at any attachment site was ineffective in resisting pure anterior displacement between 0 degrees and 30 degrees.

  2. A New Reconstructive Technique of the Anterolateral Ligament with Iliotibial Band-Strip

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Victor, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a well-established surgical procedure for the correction of ACL ruptures. However, the incidence of instability following ACL reconstruction is substantial. Recent studies have led to greater insight into the anatomy and the radiographic characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL), along with its possible role in residual instability after ACL reconstruction. Method: The current paper describes a lateral extra-articular tenodesis to reconstruct the ALL during ACL procedures, using a short iliotibial band strip. The distal insertion of this strip is left intact on the anterolateral side of the proximal tibia, and the proximal part is fixed at the anatomic femoral insertion of the ALL. Results: Our technique avoids the sacrifice of one of the hamstring tendons for the ALL reconstruction. Additionally, there is no interference with the anatomical location or function of the LCL. Conclusion: Our technique offers a minimally invasive and nearly complete anatomical reconstruction of the ALL with minimal additional operative time. PMID:28553420

  3. [Comparation of the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Macedo, C A; Galia, C R; Rosito, R; Valin, M R; Kruel, A V; Muller, L; Rodríguez, F A

    1999-01-01

    Comparison between the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective study, 184 patients were enrolled, 95 submitted to the anterolateral (Watson jones) and 89 to the posterior approach (Moore) from June 1993 to June 1997. The outcomes assessed were perioperative data (operative time, hospital stay, time from surgery until hospital discharge, surgical bleeding and the need for blood transfusion), as well as late complications (deep venous thrombosis DVP, pulmonary embolism, periopheral nerve injury, prothesis instability and others). Both groups did not differ in terms of preoperative parameters. Those submitted to the posterior approach had shorter operative times (p < 0.001), as well as reduced bleeding (p < 0.05) and need for blood transfusion (p < 0.001) during surgery. The outcomes, such as late complications, had similar reduced frequency in both groups. The posterior approach has been successfully applied in our service and proves to be an excellent alternative surgical access to the total hip arthroplasty.

  4. Human anterolateral entorhinal cortex volumes are associated with cognitive decline in aging prior to clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Yeung, Lok-Kin; Noly-Gandon, Alix; D'Angelo, Maria C; Kacollja, Arber; Smith, Victoria M; Ryan, Jennifer D; Barense, Morgan D

    2017-09-01

    We investigated whether older adults without subjective memory complaints, but who present with cognitive decline in the laboratory, demonstrate atrophy in medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions associated with Alzheimer's disease. Forty community-dwelling older adults were categorized based on Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) performance. Total gray/white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, and white matter hyperintensity load were quantified from whole-brain T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging scans, whereas hippocampal subfields and MTL cortical subregion volumes (CA1, dentate gyrus/CA2/3, subiculum, anterolateral and posteromedial entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices) were quantified using high-resolution T2-weighted scans. Cognitive status was evaluated using standard neuropsychological assessments. No significant differences were found in the whole-brain measures. However, MTL volumetry revealed that anterolateral entorhinal cortex (alERC) volume-the same region in which Alzheimer's pathology originates-was strongly associated with MoCA performance. This is the first study to demonstrate that alERC volume is related to cognitive decline in undiagnosed community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Positioning for Endovenous Laser Ablation: Comparative Study with Thigh Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Hisao; Yunoki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamasawa, Takahiko; Takiuchi, Hiroki; Honda, Takeshi; Kuwada, Noriaki; Kojima, Kenji; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of surgical outcomes and venous functions between endovenous laser ablation with a 980-nm diode laser (EV group) and thigh stripping (ST group). There were no severe complications and initial success rates were 100% in both groups. In the EV group, preoperative symptoms improved in 94.3% of cases, the venous occlusion rate was 98%, and endovenous heat induced thrombosis had occurred in 11.9% (Class 3: 0.7%) at 12 months after the operation. Although comparative study of postoperative venous function by air plethysmography showed significant improvement in both groups, there was less recovery of postoperative venous function in the EV than in the ST group. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2015; 55: 13–20.) PMID:27738455

  6. Genicular Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Posterior Thigh Pain: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Lauren N; Goree, Johnathan H

    2017-07-10

    We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with 6 months of chronic unilateral posterior thigh pain after a total knee arthroplasty. The patient's pain was refractory to various treatments. After appropriate diagnostic tests, a genicular nerve block and subsequent radiofrequency ablation were performed. These procedures provided substantial pain relief of her thigh pain at 3 months follow-up.

  7. Automated assessment of thigh composition using machine learning for Dixon magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu Xin; Chong, Mei Sian; Tay, Laura; Yew, Suzanne; Yeo, Audrey; Tan, Cher Heng

    2016-10-01

    To develop and validate a machine learning based automated segmentation method that jointly analyzes the four contrasts provided by Dixon MRI technique for improved thigh composition segmentation accuracy. The automatic detection of body composition is formulized as a three-class classification issue. Each image voxel in the training dataset is assigned with a correct label. A voxel classifier is trained and subsequently used to predict unseen data. Morphological operations are finally applied to generate volumetric segmented images for different structures. We applied this algorithm on datasets of (1) four contrast images, (2) water and fat images, and (3) unsuppressed images acquired from 190 subjects. The proposed method using four contrasts achieved most accurate and robust segmentation compared to the use of combined fat and water images and the use of unsuppressed image, average Dice coefficients of 0.94 ± 0.03, 0.96 ± 0.03, 0.80 ± 0.03, and 0.97 ± 0.01 has been achieved to bone region, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), inter-muscular adipose tissue (IMAT), and muscle respectively. Our proposed method based on machine learning produces accurate tissue quantification and showed an effective use of large information provided by the four contrast images from Dixon MRI.

  8. Misdiagnosis of primary pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the right thigh in a young adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hucheng; Guo, Runsheng; Dai, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (PRMS) is a rare type of soft tissue tumor accounting for <2% of all adult sarcomas. The present study describes a case of a 28-year-old male patient with primary PRMS of the right thigh. The patient was initially diagnosed with a schwannoma and underwent conservative therapy at a local hospital. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient reported a marked increase in the size of the mass. Finally, the patient underwent fine-needle aspiration and total tumor resection. The tumor measured 11×9×5 cm3 in size and was located in the vastus intermedius muscle. According to histological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of PRMS was confirmed by an expert pathology consultant. Postoperative follow-up at 3 months revealed no evidence of recurrent disease or residual side effects from therapy. However, it is imperative that such cases are closely monitored following surgery, in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the procedure, since misdiagnosis may increase the risk of recurrence and metastasis. The present case is noteworthy due to the misdiagnosis of PRMS, the large size of the mass and the young age of the patient. PMID:27588141

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Thigh Secondary to Radiation Colitis in a Rectal Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyun; Choi, Jung Ran; Song, Ji Young; Kang, Kyu Keun; Yoo, Woong Sun; Han, Sung Wan

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis usually occurs after dermal injury or through hematogenous spread. To date, few cases have been reported as necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh secondary to rectal perforation in rectal cancer patients. A 66-year-old male complained of pelvic and thigh pain and subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis in his right thigh. Four years earlier, he had undergone a low anterior resection and radiotherapy due to of rectal cancer. An ulcerative lesion had been observed around the anastomosis site during the colonoscopy that had been performed two months earlier. Pelvic computed tomography and sigmoidoscopy showed rectal perforation and presacral abscess extending to buttock and the right posterior thigh fascia. Thus, the necrotizing fasciitis was believed to have occurred because of ulcer perforation, one of the complications of chronic radiation colitis, at the anastomosis site. When a rectal-cancer patient complains of pelvic and thigh pain, the possibility of a rectal perforation should be considered. PMID:23346513

  10. Exercise metabolism in human skeletal muscle exposed to prior eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Sven; Daugaard, Jens R; Kristiansen, Søren; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A

    1998-01-01

    The effects of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on exercise metabolism during a subsequent bout of graded concentric exercise were investigated in seven healthy male subjects. Arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheters were inserted 2 days after eccentric exercise of one thigh (eccentric thigh) and blood samples were taken before and during graded two-legged concentric knee-extensor exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the eccentric and control vastus lateralis before (rest) and after (post) the concentric exercise bout. Maximal knee-extensor concentric exercise capacity was decreased by an average of 23 % (P < 0.05) in the eccentric compared with the control thigh. The resting muscle glycogen content was lower in the eccentric thigh than in the control thigh (402 ± 30 mmol (kg dry wt)−1vs. 515 ± 26 mmol (kg dry wt)−1, means ± s.e.m., P < 0.05), and following the two-legged concentric exercise this difference substantially increased (190 ± 46 mmol (kg dry wt)−1vs. 379 ± 58 mmol (kg dry wt)−1, P < 0.05) despite identical power and duration of exercise with the two thighs. There was no measurable difference in glucose uptake between the eccentric and control thigh before or during the graded two-legged concentric exercise. Lactate release was higher from the eccentric thigh at rest and, just before termination of the exercise bout, release of lactate decreased from this thigh (suggesting decreased glycogenolysis), whereas no decrease was found from the contralateral control thigh. Lower glycerol release from the eccentric thigh during the first, lighter part of the exercise (P < 0.05) suggested impaired triacylglycerol breakdown. At rest, sarcolemmal GLUT4 glucose transporter content and glucose transport were similar in the two thighs, and concentric exercise increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 content and glucose transport capacity similarly in the two thighs. It is concluded that in muscle exposed to prior eccentric contractions, exercise at a

  11. The anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee-Part of the iliotibial tract or a truly separate structure?

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Höfer, Denis; Schäfer, Katja; Seil, Romain; Becker, Kurt; Paulsen, Friedrich; Kohn, Dieter; Tschernig, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    In this Short Communication, the issue is discussed whether the recently reported anterolateral ligament of the knee is a unique structure or just part of the iliotibial tract. The presented findings from investigations in body donors support the view of a unique structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomical variation in the anterolateral ligament of the knee and a new dissection technique for embalmed cadaveric specimens.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew; Smith, Heather F

    2016-12-18

    Claes et al. recently documented and described the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee, demonstrating its existence in 97% of their samples. Here, we further examined the anatomy of this ligament, documented its morphological variation, and assessed the feasibility of its dissection in preserved cadaveric specimens. To achieve this, we dissected 53 preserved cadaveric knees and documented their morphological variation in the anterolateral ligament. The originally described dissection technique for identifying and following the ALL requires flexion of the knee, a state which is often not possible in stiff, preserved cadavers. Here, we describe and confirm the feasibility of an alternate dissection technique in which the quadriceps femoris tendon is incised, for use on specimens in which flexion of the undissected knee is not possible. We also identify a novel technique for assessing whether the anterolateral ligament is absent from a specimen or has simply been obliterated or overlooked, using the lateral inferior genicular vasculature. These dissection techniques have great potential for the dissection of preserved cadavers used in gross anatomy laboratories, and we discuss the applications of such an approach in student-led dissections. Our dissections also uncovered noticeable variation in the anterolateral ligament course and position. Most notably, it often inserts significantly more laterally than the classical presentation (30.2%), or originates more proximally with superficial fibers extending superiorly and laterally over the distal femur (7.5%).

  13. Muscle temperature gradients in humans during cold water immersion hypothermia and rewarming

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, G.K.; Giesbrecht, G.G. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta )

    1991-03-11

    Muscle temperature gradients have not been measured in hypothermic man. Thigh and calf muscle temperatures were measured by indwelling multisensor thermocouples (deep (D) 4.5 cm, and superficial (S) 1.5 cm beneath the skin) on five healthy male subjects immersed in 8C water for 70 minutes on two occasions. Measurements continued during 55 minutes of rewarming by two methods; either treadmill exercise (EX) or shivering (SH). Esophageal temperature (T{sub es}) was also measured. Prior to immersion, deep thigh and calf temperatures were 36.1 and 34.8C respectively and temperature gradients were similar in both thigh and calf. At the end of cooling deep thigh temperature fell 3.0C and the gradient increased to 8.1C. Corresponding values for the calf were 10.3 and 6.4C respectively. Both rewarming methods were terminated at a T{sub es} of 35.7C. EX and SH caused similar changes in thigh temperatures; deep temperature increased 2.1 and 1.9C and gradients decreased to 2.7 and 2.6C respectively. However, an increase in deep calf temperature during EX was absent during SH. During cooling, muscle blood flow would appear to be better maintained in the thigh than the calf. Thigh blood flow increases similarly during EX and SH. However, in calf, blood flow increases during EX but not SH.

  14. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities are associated with peripheral ligament and osseous injuries in acute ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Leão, Renata Vidal; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have used MRI to identify the ALL. As it was shown that it is not possible to precisely characterize this ligament in all examination, it is important to identify concomitant lesions that can help in diagnosing ALL abnormalities. It is important to characterise this injury due to its association with anterolateral knee instability. Thus, the present study was performed to determine the frequency of ALL injuries in patients with acute ACL rupture and to analyse its associated knee lesions. Patients with acute ACL injuries were evaluated by MRI. Among this population, the ALL was classified as non-visualised, injured or normal. The possible abnormalities of the meniscus, collateral ligaments, popliteus tendon, posterior cruciate ligament, Iliotibial band (ITB), anterolateral capsule and osseus injuries were evaluated. The association of an ALL injury with these other knee structures as well as sex and age was calculated. Among the 228 knees evaluated, the ALL could not be entirely identified in 61 (26.7%). Of the remaining 167, 66 (39.5%) presented an ALL abnormality and only four (6.1%) were Segond fractures. ALL abnormalities were associated with lesions of the lateral collateral ligament, medial collateral ligament, popliteus tendon, ITB, anterolateral capsule and osseous contusions of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau. No correlation was found with medial meniscus, lateral meniscus and posterior cruciate ligament injuries. There was no association between ALL injuries and gender, and older patients were more likely to present an ALL injury. ALL injuries are present in approximately 40% of ACL injuries, and a minority of these are Segond fractures. These injuries are associated with peripheral ligament injuries, anterolateral structures lesions and bone contusions, but there is no association with meniscal injuries. Surgeons must be aware of these associations to consider an ALL lesion even if it is not completely clear in imaging evaluation

  15. Extensive retroperitoneal and right thigh abscess in a patient with ruptured retrocecal appendicitis: an extremely fulminant form of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Yang, Horng-Ren; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Jeng, Long-Bin; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2006-01-21

    As a disease commonly encountered in daily practice, acute appendicitis is usually diagnosed and managed easily with a low mortality and morbidity rate. However, acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening. A 56-year-old man, healthy prior to this admission, was brought to the hospital due to spiking high fever, poor appetite, dysuria, progressive right flank and painful swelling of the thigh for 3 d. Significant inflammatory change of soft tissue was noted, involving the entire right trunk from the subcostal margin to the knee joint. Painful disability of the right lower extremity and apparent signs of peritonitis at the right lower abdomen were disclosed. Laboratory results revealed leukocytosis and an elevated C-reactive protein level. Abdominal CT revealed several communicated gas-containing abscesses at the right retroperitoneal region with mass effect, pushing the duodenum and the pancreatic head upward, compressing and encasing inferior vena cava, destroying psoas muscle and dissecting downward into the right thigh. Laparotomy and right thigh exploration were performed immediately and about 500 mL of frank pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was the cause of the abscess. The patient fully recovered at the end of the third post-operation week. This case reminds us that acute appendicitis should be treated carefully on an emergency basis to avoid serious complications. CT scan is the diagnostic tool of choice, with rapid evaluation followed by adequate drainage as the key to the survival of the patient.

  16. Flap design and perfusion are keys of success: Axial fasciocutaneous posterior thigh flaps for deep small pelvic defect reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, Andreas; Lamby, Philipp; Miranda, Benjamin H; Prantl, Lukas; Dolderer, Juergen H

    2016-01-01

    Radical excisions of the rectum often result in large perineal and intrapelvic defects. Compromised wound healing can delay adjuvant therapies and limit the patient's prognosis. With current treatment, integrity of the abdominal wall may be maintained. The defect geometry is unique and requires extensive volume for reconstruction. This study describes the surgical technique and reports clinical outcomes of fasciocutaneous posterior thigh flaps as preliminary data for this indication. Thirteen posterior thigh flaps were used in eleven patients between 2013-2015. Patients were prospectively followed-up for the pursposes of this case series. Flap dimensions and volume were measured in two representative cases. The surgical technique is described in detail. Dead space occlusion was achieved in 100% of cases. No intestinal herniation was detected. Vaginal wall defects were concurrently reconstructed in two patients. Total flap volume was calculated as 315-360 cm3. The fasciocutaneous flaps were easy to harvest, versatile to manipulate and did not result in significant function deficits. In contrast to classic Vertical Rectus Abdominis Muscle (VRAM) flaps, the posterior thigh flaps preserve abdominal wall function and should be considered as a reliable alternative option in reconstruction of intrapelvic defects including neighboring organs. Future studies of larger patient series should be executed to verify our findings and determine the optimal point in time for reconstruction.

  17. Open antero-lateral dislocation of the elbow. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Juan A; Roy, Bibas R; Shaw, David L

    2002-01-01

    Background Open dislocations are infrequent, often associated with damage to the neuro vascular structures. We present an unusual case of an open antero-lateral dislocation of the elbow, which was not associated with any vascular or neural injury. Case presentation A 34 year female dance instructor sustained an open dislocation of her elbow. Surgical exploration was undertaken. No major neurovascular injury was present. There was almost complete disruption of all the muscular and ligamentous attachments to the distal humerus and the proximal radius and ulna, which were not formally repaired during surgery. The elbow was found to be very unstable, and was placed in a back slab. The functional recovery was complete in about six months, the patient regaining full range of elbow movement. Elbow dislocations without associate fractures are adequately treated by manipulation and reduction, in spite of the almost complete disruption of the soft tissues around the joint. PMID:11806760

  18. Reinforced iliotibial tenodesis for chronic anterolateral instability of the knee: a 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Nikos Ath; Sdrenias, Christos V; Tsaknis, Rizos N; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Tsigginou, Alexandra M

    2005-05-01

    Reinforced iliotibial tenodesis is an extra-articular procedure to eliminate anterolateral instability of an anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. The procedure carries a low complication rate and offers an easy rehabilitation program. This study evaluated the use of reinforced iliotibial tenodesis in a select group of 52 patients with a mean age of 41 years (range: 38-50 years). Obese patients, professional athletes, and patients with more complex injuries (eg, concomitant posterior cruciate or medial collateral ligament injuries) were excluded. Results are encouraging after a mean follow-up of 6 years (range: 2-10 years). Although 24 patients had a positive anterior drawer or Lachman test, none had a positive pivot test. In addition, all patients reported giving way was eliminated after surgery.

  19. A muscular imprint on the anterolateral surface of the proximal femurs of the Krapina Neandertal collection.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Mariotti, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report and interpret a feature on the anterolateral surface of the proximal femurs of the Krapina hominid collection that we briefly described in 2006 (Periodicum Biologorum, 108, 319-329). We recorded the presence or absence of the feature in all the proximal femurs of the Krapina collection (six specimens recordable) and in 622 modern human adult femurs. The feature consists in a series of crests delimitating three raised or depressed areas. This feature has been found in three out of four adult Neandertal femurs observable. The two observable subadult Neandertal femurs do not show this character. None of the modern femurs displayed the feature. We interpret this feature as a muscular imprint, probably representing the m. vastus intermedius origin and discuss a possible interpretation. We did not find any other references for such imprint in the existing literature regarding the Neandertal femurs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee by means of magnetic resonance examination☆

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Costa, Hugo Pereira; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Methods Thirty-three MRI examinations on patients’ knees that were done because of indications unrelated to ligament instability or trauma were evaluated. T1-weighted images in the sagittal plane and T2-weighted images with fat saturation in the axial, sagittal and coronal planes were obtained. The images were evaluated by two radiologists with experience of musculoskeletal pathological conditions. In assessing ligament visibility, we divided the analysis into three portions of the ligament: from its origin in the femur to its point of bifurcation; from the bifurcation to the meniscal insertion; and from the bifurcation to the tibial insertion. The capacity to view the ligament in each of its portions and overall was taken to be a dichotomous categorical variable (yes or no). Results The ALL was viewed with signal characteristics similar to those of the other ligament structures of the knee, with T2 hyposignal with fat saturation. The main plane in which the ligament was viewed was the coronal plane. Some portion of the ligament was viewed clearly in 27 knees (81.8%). The meniscal portion was evident in 25 knees (75.7%), the femoral portion in 23 (69.6%) and the tibial portion in 13 (39.3%). The three portions were viewed together in 11 knees (33.3%). Conclusion The anterolateral ligament of the knee is best viewed in sequences in the coronal plane. The ligament was completely characterized in 33.3% of the cases. The meniscal portion was the part most easily identified and the tibial portion was the part least encountered. PMID:26229919

  1. BONE FORMATION INDUCED IN MOUSE THIGH BY CULTURED HUMAN CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, H. Clarke; Coulter, P. R.

    1967-01-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. 35S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible 35S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-3H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts. PMID:4226746

  2. Bone formation induced in mouse thigh by cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H C; Coulter, P R

    1967-04-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. (35)S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible (35)S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-(3)H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts.

  3. Fat Replacement of Paraspinal Muscles with Aging in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R; Hedermann, Gitte; Thomsen, Carsten; Vissing, John

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the age-related changes in fatty replacement and cross-sectional area (CSA) of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar paraspinal muscles versus leg muscles in healthy adults and to test for association between muscle fat fraction and lifestyle factors. Fifty-three healthy adults (24-76 yr) were included. Dixon magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to determine CSA and to quantify the fat fraction of paraspinal and leg muscles. Muscle CSA and fat fractions were tested for association with age and muscle strength. The fat fractions were also tested for association with sex, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and lower back pain. Both paraspinal and leg fat fractions correlated directly with age (P < 0.0001). At all ages, fat fraction was higher in paraspinal than leg muscles. The age-related increase in fat fraction was higher in paraspinal muscles than leg muscles (P < 0.0001). The CSA of the muscles did not correlate with age. Knee extension strength correlated with fat fraction (P < 0.05), and the muscle strength of hip muscles, thigh muscles, and anterior calf muscles correlated with CSA (P < 0.05). Sex was associated with lumbar paraspinal fat fraction (P < 0.05) and BMI with thigh fat fraction (P < 0.001). There was no association between fat fraction and physical activity or lower back pain. The paraspinal muscles were more susceptible to age-related changes than leg muscles. Further, men had significantly lower fat fractions in lumbar paraspinal muscles, and BMI was positively associated with thigh, but not paraspinal, fat fraction.

  4. 78 FR 68906 - Agency Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs ACTION: Notice... announces that the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs, will submit the...

  5. Concurrent emphysematous pyelonephritis and thigh necrotizing fasciitis after intramuscular administration of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi; Foroughi, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infection. NF may result from any injury to the skin or from hematogenous spread. However, con-current emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh has not been reported. We report a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh after intramuscular administration of diclofenac that improved with aggressive management including broad-spectrum antibiotics, nephrectomy and surgical intervention.

  6. Cryolipolysis Conformable-Surface Applicator for Nonsurgical Fat Reduction in Lateral Thighs

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, W. Grant; Bachelor, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vacuum applicators have been effective for cryolipolysis of the abdomen, flanks, inner thighs, back, chest, and arms. However, the lateral thighs have not been easily treated because fat from this area cannot be easily drawn into a vacuum cup. Objectives The authors investigated the safety and efficacy of a prototype applicator for treatment of “nonpinchable” fat in the lateral thighs. Methods In this prospective, nonrandomized, interventional cohort, multicenter study, a 120-minute unilateral treatment with a prototype conformable-surface applicator was performed on 1 lateral thigh of 40 patients, with the contralateral thigh serving as the control. During follow-up visits at 2 and 4 months, fat reduction was assessed by ultrasound imaging and clinical photography, and patient satisfaction surveys were completed. Results Ultrasound data indicated a 2.6-mm mean normalized reduction in fat thickness—a statistically significant reduction vs the untreated control thigh (P = 7.8E-8). According to patient survey responses, 89% of patients would recommend the procedure to a friend; 86% were satisfied with cryolipolysis for the lateral thighs; 86% noticed visible fat reduction; and 97% were likely to undergo a second treatment. A panel of 3 independent blinded physicians correctly identified baseline and posttreatment clinical photographs in 87% of cases. There were no serious adverse events or unanticipated adverse device effects. Conclusions The cryolipolysis conformable-surface applicator was safe and efficacious for treatment of lateral thigh fat. Clinical photographs and ultrasound results showed significant reduction in fat thickness, and noticeable reduction in undesirable “saddlebag” bulges. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:25568236

  7. Thigh abscess caused by Eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus intermedius: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhiyong, Zong; Xiufang, Lin; Jiajie, Lu

    2007-01-01

    A 35-year-old Chinese female has a large thigh abscess without a clear source. No underlying diseases were revealed in the patient. The combination of clindamycin and cefazolin or vancomycin was administered but without a clinical response. Eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus intermedius were isolated from puncture drainage. Then, ceftriaxone was administered and a surgery of incision and further draining was carried. Eventually, the patient recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case of thigh abscess in a previous healthy adult.

  8. Gunshot wounds to the thigh. Evaluation of vascular and subclinical vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Payne, W K; Gabriel, R A; Massoud, R P

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective review of 173 patient charts, angiograms, surgical reports, and plain radiographs were performed for all patients admitted with gunshot wounds to the thigh from May 1988 to January 1991 at Martin Luther King, Jr. Hospital. A zonal classification of gunshot wounds to the thigh was created and defined to determine if a zonal classification was predictive of a positive angiogram. Associations and relationships of patients with vascular injury are presented.

  9. Can the upper inner side of the thigh become a new option for insulin injection?

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jingyun; Chen, Yan; Xuan, Yanting; Cao, Lihong; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Fenrong; Zhou, Xiaona; Ye, Qing; Liao, Liping; Zheng, Yun; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Xiaohui; Chen, Min; Zhou, Weibin

    2016-07-01

    Sites for subcutaneous insulin injections include the upper arms, abdomen, buttocks and outer sides of the thigh. No similar study has explored the feasibility of using the inner side of the thigh for insulin injection, since the 4 mm pen needles were introduced for clinical use. This study aimed to determine whether the inner side of the thigh is suitable for insulin injection. Seventy-five patients with diabetes under insulin therapy from the Inpatient Department of Endocrinology were recruited for this non-blinded, non-randomized observational study. Subcutaneous adipose layer thicknesses of the upper, middle and lower area of the inner and outer thighs of 35 patients were measured by ultrasound, distance from the skin surface to the femoral deep vessels in 20 patients was measured, and insulin was injected at the upper inner and outer sides of the thigh in 20 patients. Pain perception, bleeding or bruising, leakage at the injection sites, blood glucose changes after insulin injection, and preferred ratings of the patients were measured. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02307968. Subcutaneous adipose layer thicknesses at both the upper inner and outer thighs were more than 4 mm and the minimum distance was 10 mm. Among the 100 injections at the upper inner thigh, only three incidents of perceived pain occurred. No bleeding or bruising and leakage were observed from the inner or outer sides. Furthermore, the difference in blood glucose control between insulin injections at the inner side and outer sides was not statistically significant. Patient ratings for injections at the inner side were similar to injections at the outer side. The key limitation of this study was the small sample size of adult patients as well as the non-randomized controlled design of this study. The upper inner thigh might be a new option for insulin injection rotation.

  10. Abdomen-thigh contact during forward reaching tasks in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupinder; Brown, Thomas D; Callaghan, John J; Yack, H John

    2013-10-01

    During seated forward reaching tasks in obese individuals, excessive abdominal tissue can come into contact with the anterior thigh. This soft tissue apposition acts as a mechanical restriction, altering functional biomechanics at the hip, and causing difficulty in certain daily activities such as bending down, or picking up objects from the floor. The purpose of the study was to investigate the contact forces and associated moments exerted by the abdomen on the thigh during seated forward-reaching tasks in adult obese individuals. Ten healthy subjects (age 58.1 ± 4.4) with elevated BMI (39.04 ± 5.02) participated in the study. Contact pressures between the abdomen and thigh were measured using a Tekscan Conformat pressure-mapping sensor during forward-reaching tasks. Kinematic and force plate data were obtained using an infrared motion capture system. The mean abdomen-thigh contact force was 10.17 ± 5.18% of body weight, ranging from 57.8 N to 200 N. Net extensor moment at the hip decreased by mean 16.5 ± 6.44% after accounting for the moment generated by abdomen-thigh tissue contact. In obese individuals, abdomen-thigh contact decreases the net moment at the hip joint during seated forward-reaching activities. This phenomenon should be taken into consideration for accurate biomechanical modeling in these individuals.

  11. Validity of estimating muscle and fat volume from a single MRI section in older adults with sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y X; Chong, M S; Lim, W S; Tay, L; Yew, S; Yeo, A; Tan, C H

    2017-05-01

    To determine if there is a correlation between the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) in a single section and the volumes of muscles and fat in the thigh of sarcopenic and sarcopenic obesity (SO) populations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess the correlation between thigh MRI data and patient health status, i.e., normal, obese, sarcopenia, and SO. One hundred and ninety community-dwelling older adults were recruited and categorised into four subgroups based on Asian established criteria: normal, obese, sarcopenia, and SO. MRI images were acquired and muscles, subcutaneous fat (SF), and intermuscular fat (IMF) were automatically segmented in the thighs. Volumes of muscles and fat were calculated for the middle third of the thigh, while CSAs were assessed using a single section at 50% femur length. Correlation between CSA and volume were significantly high (p<0.001) for all components of muscle (0.907), SF (0.963), and IMF (0.939). Thigh CSA and volume both correlated significantly with a clinical diagnosis of normal, obesity, sarcopenia, and SO (p<0.03). A single CSA at 50% of femur length yields good estimation of muscle and fat volume in the thighs of older adults and correlates closely with the clinical criteria for sarcopenia and SO. This has the potential to greatly reduce costs, scan time, and post-processing time in clinical practice for the prediction of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Muscle strength and endurance following lowerlimb suspension in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Haggmark, Tom; Ohlsen, Hans; Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lower-limb suspension on the muscle strength and muscle endurance was investigated in six men subjected to four weeks of unilateral unloading of a lower limb (using of a harness attached to a modified shoe), followed by seven weeks of weight-bearing recovery. Results showed a decrease in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle and in the average peak torque (APT) during three bouts of 30 concentric knee extensions. While the the thigh muscle CSA returned to normal after seven weeks of recovery, the APT recovery was still reduced by 11 percent, suggesting that muscle metabolic function was severely affected by unloading and was not restored by ambulation.

  13. Muscle strength and endurance following lowerlimb suspension in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Haggmark, Tom; Ohlsen, Hans; Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lower-limb suspension on the muscle strength and muscle endurance was investigated in six men subjected to four weeks of unilateral unloading of a lower limb (using of a harness attached to a modified shoe), followed by seven weeks of weight-bearing recovery. Results showed a decrease in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle and in the average peak torque (APT) during three bouts of 30 concentric knee extensions. While the the thigh muscle CSA returned to normal after seven weeks of recovery, the APT recovery was still reduced by 11 percent, suggesting that muscle metabolic function was severely affected by unloading and was not restored by ambulation.

  14. The antero-lateral approach with corpectomy in the management of the ventral meningioma of the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Radek, Maciej; Grochal, Marek; Tomasik, Bartłomiej; Radek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the anterior approach to cervical spine, which enabled complete resection of tumor located in the anterior part of the spinal canal. Considering there are not many reports in the literature, the authors present a case of a meningioma at the level C5-C6 resected with good result through anterolateral approach. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of anterolateral rotatory instability in the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee using an open magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ken; Miura, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shuich; Yasunaga, Takefumi; Nakashima, Hideaki; Konishi, Kozo; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Hashizume, Makoto

    2007-07-01

    In the clinical evaluation of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, anterolateral rotatory instability is assessed by manual tests such as the pivot-shift test, which is subjective and not quantitative. The anterolateral rotatory instability in an anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee can be quantified by our newly developed method using open magnetic resonance imaging. Controlled laboratory study. Eighteen subjects with anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees and 18 with normal knees were recruited. We administered the Slocum anterolateral rotatory instability test in the open magnetic resonance imaging scanner and scanned the sagittal view of the knee. The anterior displacements of the tibia at the medial and lateral compartments were measured. Furthermore, we examined 14 anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees twice to assess intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility and evaluated the difference and interclass correlation coefficient of 2 measures. In the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, displacement was 14.4 +/- 5.5 mm at the lateral compartment and 1.6 +/- 2.3 mm at the medial compartment; in the normal knee, displacement was 0.7 +/- 1.9 mm and -1.1 +/- 1.2 mm, respectively. The difference and interclass correlation coefficient between 2 repeated measures at the lateral compartment were 1.0 +/- 0.7 mm and .98 for intraobserver reproducibility and 1.1 +/- 0.7 mm and .91 for interobserver reproducibility. This method is useful to assess the anterolateral rotatory instability of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. This method can be used in the clinical assessment of anterior cruciate ligament stability, such as comparing studies of graft positions or 2-bundle anatomic reconstruction and the conventional 1-bundle technique.

  16. Anterolateral ankle impingement in adolescents: outcomes of nonoperative and operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Eric W; Chambers, Reid; Kaufman, Elizabeth; Chambers, Henry G

    2010-03-01

    Ankle sprains in adolescents usually resolve with conservative management but a few patients may develop ankle impingement syndrome. There have been adult studies addressing surgical treatment of this pathology, but our study evaluated the surgical management of anterolateral ankle impingement in adolescents by comparing their outcomes after nonoperative treatment and subsequent surgical intervention. Thirteen patients (children and adolescents) diagnosed with ankle impingement by history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance imaging during a 9-year period at our institution underwent eventual arthroscopic debridement. A retrospective chart review of these patients was performed and they were evaluated using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) functional rating scale on 3 separate occasions: (1) initial presentation, (2) termination of nonoperative management, and (3) final postoperative follow-up visit. Thirteen adolescents (11 girls and 2 boys; 14 ankles) with a mean age of 15.6 (11.9-18.3) years met the inclusion criteria; of these, all had arthroscopic surgery. Mean duration of reported symptoms was 9.6 (4-15) months and mean duration of nonoperative management (physical therapy, activity modifications) was 6.9 (2-12) months. The mean AOFAS rating (out of 100 total) at initial presentation was 68.4 (40-84) and after nonoperative management was no better with a mean of 68.2 (63-76). The mean AOFAS rating at final follow-up was 90.6 (52-100), which was statistically significant (P

  17. [A comparison of operative invasiveness in minimally invasive anterolateral hip replacement (MIS-AL) and standard hip procedure, using biochemical markers].

    PubMed

    Musil, D; Stehlík, J; Verner, M

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare, by means of biochemical markers, the operative invasiveness of the standard total hip replacement with that of the minimally invasive anterolateral (MIS-AL) approach. Twenty-six randomly assigned patients with standard and 22 patients with MIS-AL total hip replacement were included in the study. Patients with elevated pre-operative levels of the markers evaluated or patients taking medication that might affect marker levels were not included. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen as markers of muscle damage and post-operative inflammatory changes, respectively. Blood samples were drawn before surgery (less than 24 hours) and after surgery at 24, 48 and 96 hours, which respected biological half-lives of the markers and permitted us to study their dynamics. The results were evaluated and statistically analyzed at the department of biochemistry, using the two sample t-test. Statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients were found for both markers. The average CRP values differed significantly (p < 0.05) at 48 and 96 hours post-operatively, being higher for the standard than MIS-AL total hip replacement by 28% and 44%, respectively. The average CPK values showed the most marked difference at 48 hours after surgery, when the level was higher by 62.5% in the standard than MIS-AL total hip replacement (p < 0.05). Our objective evaluation of the invasiveness of surgery in total hip replacement was based on the most frequently recommended markers for assessment of muscle tissue damage and post-operative inflammatory changes. The study was focused on the invasiveness of surgery only and neither subjective nor objective outcomes of implantation were evaluated. The use of the muscle sparing approach MIS-AL results in minimal damage to muscle tissue and, consequently, a lower degree of post-operative inflammation than is recorded in traditional hip replacement

  18. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  19. Clinical effects of thigh cuffs during a 7-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Maillet, Alain; Vasseur Clausen, Pascale; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Alferova, Irina; Gharib, Claude; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2001-08-01

    Thigh cuffs are used by Russian cosmonauts to limit the fluid shift induced by space flight. A ground simulation using the head-down bed rest (HDBR) model was performed to assess the effects of thigh cuffs on clinical tolerance and orthostatic adaptation. 8 male healthy volunteers (32.4±1.9 years) participated twice in a 7-day HDBR — one time with thigh cuffs (worm daily from 9 am to 7 pm) (TC) and one time without (WTC). Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a 10 minute stand test and by a LBNP test (5 min at -15, -30, -45 mmHg) before (BDC-1) and at the end of the HDBR period (R+1). Plasma volume was measured before and at the end of HDBR by the Evans blue dye dilution technique. Thigh cuffs limits headache due to fluid shift, as well as the loss in plasma volume (TC: -5.85±0.95%; WTC: -9.09±0.82%, p<0.05). The mean duration of the stand test (R+1) did not differ in the two group (TC 7.1±1.3 min; WTC 7.0±1.0 min). The increase in HR and decrease in diastolic blood pressure were slightly but significantly larger without thigh cuffs. Duration of the LBNP tests did not differ with thigh cuffs. Thigh cuffs limit the symptoms due to fluid shift and the loss in plasma volume. They partly reduced the increase in HR during orthostatic stress but had no effect on duration of orthostatic stress tests.

  20. Proprioception and Clinical Results of Anterolateral Single-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Remnant Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dung Chul; Kwack, Byung Hoon; Lee, Sung Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical and radiological results and proprioception following anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with an isolated PCL injury (16 males and 4 females) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 61 months (≥24 months) and the mean age of the patients was 36 years. Knee joint instability was evaluated using posterior drawer stress radiography. Knee function, level of activities, and individual satisfaction were assessed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity score, and 2000 International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Knee proprioception was assessed using an isokinetic machine. Results The mean ligament laxity assessed using the posterior drawer stress radiography was improved from 10.8-3.2 mm. The mean Lysholm knee score was improved from 70.0-88.9 points, and the mean Tegner activity score was improved from 2.7-6.2 points. Individual satisfaction assessed using the IKDC score was improved from 62.7-85.4 points (p<0.05). Knee proprioception was not significantly different between the treated and the uninjured knees. Conclusions Single-bundle PCL reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury exhibited satisfactory outcomes regarding functional outcome, joint stability, and proprioception. PMID:24032101

  1. Surgical treatment of anterolateral rotatory instability. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J R; Sanders, R A; Morin, B

    1985-01-01

    Anterolateral rotatory instability in 31 acutely injured knees and 31 chronically unstable knees was surgically stabilized with a previously unreported method of iliotibial band tenodesis. The anterior cruciate ligament was stretched, torn, or absent in all 62 knees. Thirty-one patients, 20 with acute injury and 11 with chronic instability, were reviewed at a minimum of 2 years. A meniscal tear was present in 80% of the acute and in 91% of the chronic injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament was repaired, in addition to the iliotibial band tenodesis in 16 of the 20 acute injuries; there was no difference in the overall results between those repaired and not repaired. The evaluation of the patients was based on four subjective criteria (including functional parameters) and five objective criteria. Ninety-three percent of the patients had returned to competitive or recreational athletic activities involving cutting or pivoting movements. Both subjective and objective results were excellent or good in 93.6% of the patients. These results, based on our evaluation, warrant continued use of this procedure, according to the prescribed indications and technique.

  2. Surgical anatomy of the diaphragm in the anterolateral approach to the spine: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Baaj, Ali A; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Amin, Anubhav G; Kretzer, Ryan M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory cadaveric study. To delineate the pertinent surgical anatomy of the diaphragm during access to the anterolateral thoracolumbar junction. The general anatomy of the thoracic diaphragm is well described. The specific surgical anatomy as it pertains to the lateral and thoracoabdominal approaches to the thoracolumbar junction is not well described. Dissections were performed on adult fresh cadaveric specimens. Special attention was paid to the diaphragmatic attachments to the lower rib cage and to the spinal thoracolumbar junction. The pertinent diaphragmatic attachments to the rib cage are at the 11th and 12th ribs. Whether the diaphragm is incised or mobilized ventrally, the pertinent spinal attachments are the lateral and medial arcuate ligaments. Identifying and sectioning these structures allows for direct access to the thoracolumbar junction, particularly the L1 vertebral body. An understanding of the diaphragmatic-costal and diaphragmatic-spinal attachments is key for the safe and effective implementation of diaphragm mobilization during the lateral and thoracoabdominal approaches to the spine.

  3. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Infections through Anterolateral Approaches Using Expandable Titanium Mesh Cage for Spine Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Tarantino; Daniele, Marruzzo; Martina, Cappelletti; Tiziano, De Giacomo; Roberto, Delfini

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) is still a rare pathology. However, its incidence is on the rise. This is due to an increasing population with predisposing factors. Also, the availability of more effective diagnostic tools has brought it increasingly to the surgeon's attention. In this study the patients were treated in the Neurosurgery Division of the Department of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry of the Sapienza University of Rome, between 2001 and 2009. They had thoracolumbar pyogenic spondylitis. This study was undertaken in order to identify the correct diagnostic and therapeutic treatment needed in such cases. From the cases studied here, it is evident that spinal infections can be extremely insidious and that diagnosis tends to be reached late. Surgery, along with the antibiotic treatment, allows for eradication of the causes of the pathology by the reclamation of the affected region. Surgery is also fundamental in helping to recover vital functions and in restoring as much as possible the correct curvature of the rachises. The use of an anterolateral approach is dictated by the necessity of obtaining 360° stability as well as by the need to clear away extensive infections, which are not always reachable using a posterior approach. PMID:23193382

  4. Proprioception and clinical results of anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with remnant preservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dung Chul; Shon, Oog Jin; Kwack, Byung Hoon; Lee, Sung Jun

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological results and proprioception following anterolateral single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury. Twenty patients with an isolated PCL injury (16 males and 4 females) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 61 months (≥24 months) and the mean age of the patients was 36 years. Knee joint instability was evaluated using posterior drawer stress radiography. Knee function, level of activities, and individual satisfaction were assessed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity score, and 2000 International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Knee proprioception was assessed using an isokinetic machine. The mean ligament laxity assessed using the posterior drawer stress radiography was improved from 10.8-3.2 mm. The mean Lysholm knee score was improved from 70.0-88.9 points, and the mean Tegner activity score was improved from 2.7-6.2 points. Individual satisfaction assessed using the IKDC score was improved from 62.7-85.4 points (p<0.05). Knee proprioception was not significantly different between the treated and the uninjured knees. Single-bundle PCL reconstruction with remnant preservation for PCL injury exhibited satisfactory outcomes regarding functional outcome, joint stability, and proprioception.

  5. Morphology of Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: A Cadaveric Observation with Clinical Insight

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Abdel Halim; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The morphology and function of anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee are not clearly understood even today with all the sophisticated techniques available. There have been differing descriptions of the ALL of the knee in literature, and not all of them have been named or described clearly. Aim. The present study was undertaken to provide a clear structure/relationship description on ALL. Materials and Methods. We used 24 formalin-fixed cadaveric limbs. Knee regions of the all the limbs were neatly dissected and the ALL was exposed. Its proximal and distal attachments were traced carefully. Middle portion of ALL was removed and processed for histological analysis. Results. ALL was found in one right knee (4.16%). It extended distally from the lateral femoral condyle to the lateral tibial plateau margin. Its attachment on the tibial plateau was located between head of the fibula and Gerdy's tubercle. A strong connection was identified between the ALL and the periphery of the middle third of the lateral meniscus. Histological analysis of ALL confirmed the presence of true ligamentous structure in it with dense connective tissue and plenty of fibroblasts. Conclusion. The prevalence of ALL in different populations along with its clinical significance has been discussed in detail in this paper. PMID:27847860

  6. Femoral Origin of the Anterolateral Ligament: An Anatomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Matthew; Ockuly, Andrew C; Cullen, Matthew; Busch, Kyle; Lutz, Christian; Imbert, Pierre; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-05-01

    To determine the location and variability of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) femoral origin. The ALL was dissected and examined in 52 embalmed specimens, and the femoral origin was isolated. The presence of a bony or soft-tissue attachment, the relation to the lateral collateral ligament, the average diameter of the proximal origin, and the specific location of the origin relative to the lateral femoral epicondyle were recorded. The ALL was present in all 52 specimens, with a mean diameter of 11.85 mm, and was consistently attached to bone in all specimens. The ALL consistently overlapped the lateral collateral ligament near its attachment, with the location of the origin directly on the lateral epicondyle in 12 specimens (23%), with a shared lateral femoral condyle and with the origin slightly posterior and proximal to the lateral epicondyle in 30 specimens (58%), and with the origin completely posterior and proximal to the lateral epicondyle in 10 specimens (19%). The ALL showed a consistent bony origin overlapping the lateral collateral ligament in all specimens, with some variability in the femoral attachment, ranging from directly on the lateral epicondyle to posterior to the lateral epicondyle. The identification and description of the femoral origin of the ALL are crucial in understanding its role in the stability of the knee, as well as determining the appropriate position for the femoral origin placement in ALL reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinematic characteristics of myositis ossificans of the semimembranosus muscle in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Ramirez, Gustavo; Spinella, Giuseppe; Martinez, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    A 6-year-old Doberman pinscher dog was presented with myositis ossificans of the semimembranosus muscle. Linear, temporal, and angular kinematic patterns were recorded and compared with those of sound dogs of the same breed. The results indicate that the specific gait compensations occurring with this disease may aid in the diagnosis of myositis ossificans of the caudal thigh muscles. PMID:20514253

  8. Subcutaneous Thigh Fat Assessment: A Comparison of Skinfold Calipers and Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Selkow, Noelle M.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Skinfold calipers (SC) typically are used to determine subcutaneous fat thicknesses. Identifying the exact separation of muscle and fat can complicate measurements. Ultrasound imaging (USI) might provide a better technique for analyzing subcutaneous fat thicknesses. Objective: To compare measurements from SC and USI in assessing subcutaneous thigh fat thickness. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients and Other Participants: Twenty healthy adults (13 men, 7 women; age  =  26.9 ± 5.4 years, height  =  173.9 ± 7.3 cm, mass  =  77.4 ± 16.1 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants were seated in 90° of knee flexion and 85° of trunk extension. A standardized template was used to identify measurement sites over the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), distal rectus femoris (dRF), proximal rectus femoris (pRF), and vastus lateralis (VL). Three measurements at each of the 4 sites were made in random order and were averaged for each measurement tool by the same investigator. Main Outcome Measure(s): Fat thickness was measured in millimeters with SC and USI. Measurements at each site were compared using Pearson product moment correlations and Bland-Altman plots. Results: Strong correlations between measures were found at the VMO (r  =  .90, P < .001), dRF (r  =  .93, P < .001), pRF (r  =  .93, P < .001), and VL (r  =  .91, P < .001). Mean differences between measures ranged from 1.7 ± 2.4 mm (dRF) to 3.7 ± 2.6 mm (pRF), indicating that the SC resulted in larger thicknesses compared with USI. Limits of agreement, as illustrated by the Bland-Altman plots, were fairly wide at each site: from −3.38 mm to 7.74 mm at the VMO, from −3.04 mm to 6.52 mm at the dRF, from −1.53 mm to 8.87 mm at the pRF, and from −3.73 mm to 8.15 mm at the VL. All plots except for the VL demonstrated increasing overestimation via the SC as fat thicknesses increased. Conclusions: We found strong

  9. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 1: Secondary Role of the Anterolateral Ligament in the Setting of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Matthew T; Nitri, Marco; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have described the structural and functional behavior of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee through pull-apart and isolated sectioning studies. However, the secondary stabilizing role of the ALL in the setting of a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has not been fully defined for common simulated clinical examinations, such as the pivot-shift, anterior drawer, and internal rotation tests. Combined sectioning of the ALL and ACL would lead to increased internal rotation and increased axial plane translation during a pivot-shift test when compared with isolated sectioning of the ACL. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were subjected to a simulated pivot-shift test with coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and a 5-N·m internal rotation torque and an 88-N anterior tibial load, both from 0° to 120° of knee flexion via a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Kinematic changes were measured and compared with the intact state for isolated sectioning of the ACL and combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL. Combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL resulted in a significant increase in axial plane tibial translation during a simulated pivot shift at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion and a significant increase in internal rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120° when compared with the intact and ACL-deficient states. Based on the model results, ALL sectioning resulted in an additional 2.1 mm (95% CI, 1.4-2.9 mm; P < .001) of axial plane translation during the pivot shift when compared with ACL-only sectioning, when pooling evidence over all flexion angles. Likewise, when subjected to IR torque, the ACL+ALL-deficient state resulted in an additional 3.2° of internal rotation (95% CI, 2.4°-4.1°; P < .001) versus the intact state, and the additional sectioning of the ALL increased internal rotation by 2.7° (95

  10. Response time, pistol fire position variability, and pistol draw success rates for hip and thigh holsters.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Amity; Roelofs, Andrea; Davey, Paul; Straker, Leon

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pistol holster position on pistol draw time and performance of police officers. Proficient use of the lethal force option is critical to an officer's ability to survive. Traditionally, pistols were worn in hip holsters; however, recently, thigh holsters have also become popular. The effect of holster position on pistol draw performance has not been investigated. For this study, 27 police officers, representing a range of holster familiarity, years of service, and gender, were assessed drawing a training pistol from both the thigh and hip holster positions via a 3-D motion analysis system. Participants were required to draw and fire toward a target as quickly and accurately as possible following a visual stimulus, three times successfully. Temporal characteristics, accuracy variability, and draw success rate were compared between the thigh and hip holster with repeated-measures ANOVA both unadjusted and adjusted for familiarity, years of service, and gender (p < .05). No differences in the temporal variables, accuracy variability, or success rate were detected between the hip and thigh holster positions, either adjusted or unadjusted. Holster familiarity was found to significantly affect draw success rate, with participants more successful when drawing from their familiar holster. Hip and thigh holster positions are both viable options in terms of draw time and accuracy. However, draw success rate will be negatively affected during initial use of an unfamiliar holster position. Further research should address the effect of familiarization on draw performance.

  11. A new extensile anterolateral retroperitoneal approach for lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to S1: a prospective series with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Sean; Butler, Joseph S; Benton, Adam; Malhotra, Karan; Selvadurai, Susanne; Agu, Obiekezie

    2016-06-01

    A variety of surgical approaches have been used for cage insertion in lumbar interbody fusion surgery. The direct anterior approach requires mobilization of the great vessels to access the intervertebral disc spaces cranial to L5/S1. With the lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach, it is difficult to access the L4/L5 intervertebral disc space due to the lumbar plexus and iliac crest, and L5/S1 is inaccessible. We describe a new anterolateral retroperitoneal approach, which is safe and reproducible to access the disc spaces from L1 to S1 inclusive, obviating the need for a separate direct anterior approach to access L5/S1. This paper had the following objectives: first, to report a reproducible novel single-incision, muscle-splitting, anterolateral pre-psoas surgical approach to the lumbar spine from L1 to S1; second, to highlight the technical challenges of this approach and highlight approach-related complications; and third, to evaluate clinical outcomes using this surgical technique in a prospective series of L1 to S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) performed as part of a 360-degree fusion for adult spinal deformity correction. This report used a prospective cohort study. A prospective series of patients (n=64) having ALIF using porous tantalum cages as part of a two-stage complex spinal reconstruction from L1 to S1 were studied. Data collected included blood loss, operative time, incision size, technical challenges, perioperative complications, and secondary procedures. Clinical outcome measures used included visual analogue scale (VAS) Back Pain, VAS Leg Pain, EuroQoL-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), EQ-5D VAS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22). Pre- and postoperative radiographic parameters and clinical outcome measures were assessed. Mean follow-up time was 1.8 years. Mean blood loss was 68±9.6 mL. The mean VAS Back Pain score improved from 7.5±1.25 preoperatively to 2.5±1.7 at 3 months (p=.02), 1.2±0.5 at 6

  12. A benign form of congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia associated with ipsilateral polydactyly of the hallux: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiuhui; Qu, Lei; Li, Yazhou; Luo, Junzhong; Cao, Jinchao; Zhao, Wanyu

    2012-07-01

    Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia is generally considered a precursor of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT), which is usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common autosomal dominant genetic disorder. In many cases, NF1 is initially suspected following the presentation of a child with anterolateral tibial bowing. The prognosis of CPT is poor, and amputation may be required. Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia combined with ipsilateral polydactyly of the hallux (CABTP) is a rare entity that resembles the anterolateral tibial bowing that occurs in association with CPT, and may be misdiagnosed as NF1. However, spontaneous correction of the tibial bowing with an almost normal fibula has been described in all previously reported cases. Here, we report three patients with CABTP and discuss the physical and imaging characteristics and follow-up results. We suggest that given the spontaneous resolution of bowing, the absence of neurocutaneous signs and the relatively favorable prognosis, CABTP is a distinct entity that merits its own place within the field of anterolateral bowing of the tibia and has no association with CPT or NF1. This should help avoid unnecessary investigations and interventions for NF1. This article shows for the first time tibial duplication in the area of bowing, with two medullary canals surrounded by well-defined cortex on CT.

  13. The Anterolateral Ligament: An Anatomic Study on Sex-Based Differences

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, Matt; Helito, Camilo; Cullen, Matthew; Ockuly, Andrew; Busch, Kyle; Granite, Joseph; Wright, Barth; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Background: The anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been shown to have an important role in rotatory stability of the knee. While there is abundant research on sex-based differences related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, there is a paucity of literature related to such differences in the ALL. Purpose: To define any sex-based differences in the ALL with regard to length, width, and thickness. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: The ALL was initially evaluated in 165 unpaired knees (92 males and 65 females after exclusion criteria applied). The length, width, and thickness of the ALL were measured using a digital caliper. Width and thickness were measured at the joint line just superior to the lateral meniscus. The Mann-Whitney test and Student t tests were used to compare measurements between males and females. The Pearson product-moment correlation was subsequently used to determine the correlation between height and weight and the statistically different morphometric variables. Results: The mean (±SD) thickness of the ALL in males was 2.09 ± 0.56 mm, almost twice as thick as females (1.05 ± 0.49 mm; P = 8.8 × 10−20). There was also a statistically significant difference in ALL length (P = 3.8 × 10−7), but no significant difference was found for width. A moderate association was found between donor height and ALL thickness and length. Conclusion: The anatomic measurements of the ALL demonstrate a difference between sexes, and the ALL is significantly thicker in males than females. Clinical Relevance: As the role of the ALL in rotatory stability of the knee becomes better understood, the difference in the thickness of the ALL we have found between the sexes may be another factor why female athletes have an increased incidence of ACL rupture compared with males. This may also help explain why females have issues with knee laxity and rotatory instability. PMID:28321423

  14. Digital Anatomical Measurement for Anterolateral Fixation of Middle and Lower Thoracic Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohe; En, He; Zhang, Yunfeng; Gao, Shang; Li, Guimin; Guo, Yu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Cai, Yongqiang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhijun; Li, Cunbao; Zhao, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Background The key to its successful application is to determine the best entry point for the vertebral screw(s). This study aimed to provide a reference for clinical anterolateral fixation through digital measurement of computed tomography (CT) data to identify relevant anatomical positions in the middle and lower thoracic vertebrae (T4–T12) of 30 adults. Material/Methods We performed digital measurement of anatomical positions in the middle and lower thoracic vertebrae (T4–T12) of 30 adults. Abbreviations: Left height of vertebral body, LHV; Right height of vertebral body, RHV; Anterior height of vertebral body, AHV; Middle height of vertebral body, MHV; Posterior height of vertebral body, PHV; Superior sagittal diameter of vertebral body, SSDV; Superior transverse diameter of vertebral body, STDV; inferior sagittal diameter of vertebral body, ISDV; Inferior transverse diameter of vertebral body, ITDV; (1) Left (right) height of vertebral body, [L(R)HV]; Anterior (middle, posterior) height of vertebral body [A(M,P)HV]; Superior (inferior) sagittal diameter of vertebral body, [S(I)SDV]; Superior (inferior) transverse diameter of vertebral body, [S(I)TDV]. Results The transverse diameters of vertebral bodies were always larger than the sagittal diameter for 3~4 mm. The distance between 2 vertebrae (interval of 1 vertebra) range were (52–56) mm for T4–T7 and (44–48) mm for T8–T12, and the surgeons could collate these data to choose a suitable stick length. Conclusions Bone graft should prune into laterigrade cuboid, it can recover A-P and bilateral physiological functions load, and the height of the vertebral body increased from T4 to T12. PMID:27997524

  15. Anatomic characteristics and radiographic references of the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Tschann, Peter; Künzel, Karl Heinz; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Anatomic graft tunnel placement is reported to be essential in double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A measurement system that correlates anatomy and radiographs is lacking so far. To define the femoral and tibial attachments of the anterolateral (AL) and posteromedial (PM) bundles and to correlate them with digital and radiographic images to establish a radiographic anatomy based on anatomic landmarks and evaluate whether radiographs can serve as an accurate method for intraoperative and postoperative assessments of tunnel placement. Descriptive laboratory study. Fifteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used. After preparation, the insertion areas of the 2 fiber bundles were marked with colorants, and high-definition digital images were obtained. With radiopaque tubes placed in the center of each bundle's footprint, anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were created. A measurement grid system was superimposed to determine the position of the AL and PM bundles' femoral and tibial insertion areas on both digital images and radiographs. The measurement zones were numbered 1 to 16, starting in the anterosuperior corner and ending in the posteroinferior corner. On radiographs and digital images, the femoral centers of the AL and PM bundles were found in zones 2 and 7, respectively. The tibial centers of the AL and PM bundles were found at 47.88% and 50.93%, respectively, of the total mediolateral diameter, 83.09% and 92.29%, respectively, of the total anteroposterior diameter, and 3.53 mm and 8.57 mm, respectively, inferior from the tibial plateau on radiographs. This study provides a geometric characterization of the AL and PM bundles of the PCL and establishes a reliable and feasible correlation system between anatomy and radiography based on anatomic landmarks. Accurate definition of the insertion sites of the PCL is essential for anatomic double-bundle reconstruction. The results of our study may be used as a reference for

  16. Relationship between BMI and Postoperative Complications with Free Flap in Anterolateral Craniofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunjiro; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nishio, Naoki; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although we have seen tremendous advancement in microsurgery over the last 2 decades and free tissue transfer has become standard for head and neck reconstruction, surgeons still struggle to prevent postoperative complications. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and postoperative complications in patients undergoing rectus abdominis free flap transfer after anterolateral craniofacial resection. Methods: This was a retrospective review of reconstructive surgery using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap in patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma from 2003 to 2014 (n = 35, 27 men and 8 women; average age, 60.9 ± 7.8 years). All patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction after anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base resection and maxillectomy (class IV, subtype a) with palatal resection. Patients were categorized based on sex, BMI, and other parameters. Results: Recipient-site infection occurred in 11 patients (31.4%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 6 (17.1%), partial flap necrosis in 2 (5.7%), total flap necrosis in 1 (2.9%), and facial fistula in 4 (11.4%). Women showed partial flap necrosis significantly more frequently (P = 0.047), probably owing to poor vascular supply of the subcutaneous fat layer. Patients with low BMI (<20 kg/m2) showed recipient-site infection (P = 0.02) and facial fistula (P = 0.01) significantly more frequently owing to insufficient tissue volume and poor vascular supply. Conclusion: Postoperative recipient-site infection and facial fistula occurred mainly in low-BMI patients. Surgeons should take care to achieve sufficient donor tissue on low-BMI patients. Using a prosthetic obturator in low-BMI patients for craniofacial reconstruction can be a good alternative option to reduce postoperative complications due to insufficient donor tissue volume. PMID:27257566

  17. Anterolateral Radical Debridement and Interbody Bone Grafting Combined With Transpedicle Fixation in the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing

  18. [Anterior and anterolateral approach in the treatment of thoracic and lumbar vertebral metastasis causing spinal cord compression].

    PubMed

    Vargas López, Antonio José; Fernández Carballal, Carlos; Panadero Useros, Teresa; Aracil González, Cristina; Garbizu Vidorreta, José Manuel; González Rodrigálvarez, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the results of the anterior and anterolateral approaches in the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spine metastasis. Patients who underwent surgery between 2003 and 2012 in our institution using an anterior or an anterolateral approach for the treatment of thoracic or lumbar spine metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-two patients with median age of 49.5 years (26-73 years) and median follow-up of 9.5 months (0-96 months) were analysed. The most common primary malignancies were renal cell carcinomas and breast adenocarcinomas. Before the intervention, 12 (54.5%) patients were able to walk (Frankel D and E). Preoperative arteriography was performed in 14 (63.6%) patients, and 7 (31.8%) of them underwent tumour embolisation. Medical complications occurred in 5 (22.7%) patients during the immediate postoperative period, 2 (9.1%) of whom died. At the end of follow-up, 16 (72%) of the remaining 20 patients were able to walk (Frankel D and E). Ninety percent of the patients could reduce at least 50% of their analgesic drug requirements. During follow-up 16 patients died, with a median survival of 10 months (range 0-48 months). Resection of thoracolumbar vertebral metastases by an anterior/anterolateral approach, despite its considerable risk of morbidity and mortality, offers the possibility of significant improvement in the quality of life of the patient; and it does so not only by preserving or restoring their ability to walk but also by ameliorating pain. Preoperative angiography, considering the embolisation of the lesion, is an important tool. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. An unusual presentation of autonomic dysreflexia in a patient with cold abscess of cervical spine for anterolateral decompression

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Susmita; Taneja, Dipali; Saxena, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    A young female having complaints of quadriparesis along with bladder and bowel involvement, diagnosed to have osseous destruction of C4, C6, C7, T2 vertebral bodies with pre- and para-vertebral abscess, was taken up for anterolateral decompression and fusion of cervical spine. She presented with anxiety, agitation, sweating and headache and was in hypertensive crisis which was refractory to antihypertensives, anxiolytics and analgesics but showed a reasonable response to intravenous dexmedetomidine and finally responded dramatically to rectal evacuation. Autonomic dysreflexia was suspected with stimulus arising from distended rectum as all other causes of hypertension were ruled out. PMID:28003699

  20. Anterolateral myocardial infarction induced by coronary-subclavian-vertebral steal syndrome successfully treated with stenting of the subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Pappy, Reji; Kalapura, Tomachan; Hennebry, Thomas A

    2007-08-01

    A female patient with graft-dependent coronary circulation presented with vertebrobasilar insufficiency and NSTEMI (Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) related to a 100 percent stenosis of the left subclavian artery. Our review of the medical literature indicates that this is the first reported case in which a patient presented with an anterolateral NSTEMI and dizziness with subsequent angiographic evidence of both coronary subclavian and vertebral subclavian steal syndromes successfully treated with angioplasty and stenting of the left subclavian artery without any intervention in the coronary arterial tree.

  1. Effect of postmortem deboning time on sensory descriptive flavor and texture profiles of cooked boneless skinless chicken thighs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three replicate trials were conducted to investigate the effect of deboning time on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked boneless skinless thigh meat (iliotibialis, iliofibularis and the femoritibialis). Carcasses (42-d old birds) were obtained from a commercial processing plant. Thighs were hot-b...

  2. Diabetic Muscle Infarction (Myonecrosis): Underdiagnosed or Underreported?

    PubMed

    Madhuvan, H S; Krishnamurthy, Ajoy; Prakash, P; Shariff, Shameem

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes. It is seen more in Type 1 DM than Type 2 DM, but in both it is associated with longer duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control with or without microvascular complications. We present a case report of a 47 year diabetic male, who presented with sudden onset of painful swelling of the left thigh muscles (vastus group). The patient had microvascular complications of diabetes. Apart for mild elevation of CPK and LDH other investigations were normal. MRI findings of left thigh showed T2 hyperintensities in the involved muscles which established the diagnosis. Muscle biopsy revealed necrosis of the muscle fibres, presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates and hyalinization of the blood vessels with luminal narrowing which is characteristic of diabetic muscle infarction. The patient was treated with immobilization, analgesics and adequate blood sugar control. This case highlights the rarity of finding vascular changes as well as the poor prognosis and the occurrence of fatal complications in near future.

  3. Reduction in thigh circumference and improvement in the appearance of cellulite with dual-wavelength, low-level laser energy and massage.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H; Khatri, Khalil A; Hails, Kelley; Weiss, Robert A; Fournier, Nathalie

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a low-level, dual-wavelength laser energy and massage device for improving the appearance of cellulite and reducing thigh circumference. Subjects (n = 83) with mild to moderate cellulite enrolled in this IRB-approved, open-label, multicenter study. Their right or left thighs received eight treatments with a low-level, dual-wavelength laser and massage device. The untreated contralateral thigh served as a control. Circumferences of the upper, middle, and lower thighs (treated and untreated) were measured before the fifth and eighth treatments and 1 month after the final treatment. Reduction in thigh circumference of the treated areas exceeded those of the control areas for the upper, middle, and lower thigh in most subjects. The maximum reduction (-0.82 cm) occurred in the upper thigh at 1 month. The mean reduction of the upper, middle, and lower thigh circumferences was -0.64 cm for the treated thighs compared to -0.20 cm for untreated thighs. The difference was significant (p < 0.0001). Fifty-nine (71.1%) treatment thighs lost circumference compared to 44 (53.0%) control thighs. Resolution of adverse effects including erythema, swelling, and increased urination was seen within 30 minutes after treatment. All were resolved without sequelae and within the expected duration. The low-level, dual-wavelength laser energy and massage device safely improves the appearance of cellulite while reducing thigh circumference.

  4. [A 35-year-old woman with fever, dyspnea, and pain in the left thigh].

    PubMed

    Picardi, A; Navajas, F; De Iorio, F; Amicarelli, M; Spoto, S; De Galasso, L; Vespaciani Gentilucci, U; Scarlata, S; Zardi, E; Di Cuonzo, G

    2001-01-01

    A thirty-five years old woman during her twelfth pregnancy presented fever and pain at the left thigh. After cesarean delivery dyspnea added to the first two symptoms and pulmonary embolism was suspected. A clinical history revaluation suggested a diagnosis of infectious endocarditis and femoural osteomielitis due to a septic embolus.

  5. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement.

  6. The relationships of waist and mid-thigh circumference with performance of college golfers

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seungbum; Han, Kunho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Our aim was to evaluate the relationships between waist and mid-thigh circumference, used as proxy measures of trunk and lower limb strengths, respectively, and selected parameters of driver and putting performance in Korean college golfers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 103 college golfers (81 male, 20 to 27 years old). Measurements of body composition, waist and mid-thigh circumference, and grip strength, as well as assessment of golf performance, including driver distance, driver swing speed, putting accuracy, and putting consistency, were performed at the golf performance laboratory at Konkuk University in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea. Average round score was obtained from 10 rounds of golf completed during the study period. The relationships between strength measures and golf performance were evaluated by partial correlation analysis, with adjustment for age, golf experience, and body mass index. [Results] Waist circumference did not correlate with any of the performance variables in both males and females. Mid-thigh circumference correlated with putting consistency (r = 0.364) in males and with putting consistency (r = 0.490) and accuracy (r = 0.547) in females. No other significant correlations between waist and mid-thigh circumference and golf performance were identified. [Conclusion] Lower limb strength may be an important component of putting performance. Further studies are needed to fully characterize the contributions of trunk strength to performance. PMID:27134346

  7. The relationships of waist and mid-thigh circumference with performance of college golfers.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungbum; Han, Kunho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Our aim was to evaluate the relationships between waist and mid-thigh circumference, used as proxy measures of trunk and lower limb strengths, respectively, and selected parameters of driver and putting performance in Korean college golfers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 103 college golfers (81 male, 20 to 27 years old). Measurements of body composition, waist and mid-thigh circumference, and grip strength, as well as assessment of golf performance, including driver distance, driver swing speed, putting accuracy, and putting consistency, were performed at the golf performance laboratory at Konkuk University in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea. Average round score was obtained from 10 rounds of golf completed during the study period. The relationships between strength measures and golf performance were evaluated by partial correlation analysis, with adjustment for age, golf experience, and body mass index. [Results] Waist circumference did not correlate with any of the performance variables in both males and females. Mid-thigh circumference correlated with putting consistency (r = 0.364) in males and with putting consistency (r = 0.490) and accuracy (r = 0.547) in females. No other significant correlations between waist and mid-thigh circumference and golf performance were identified. [Conclusion] Lower limb strength may be an important component of putting performance. Further studies are needed to fully characterize the contributions of trunk strength to performance.

  8. The appearance of angiolipomatosis after using laptop computer on the thighs: a relationship?

    PubMed

    Caucanas, Marie; Müller, Gebhard; Vanhooteghem, Olivier

    2011-08-03

    A 56-year-old patient developed angiolipomatosis of the anterior part of the thighs after repeated laptop contact localisation. Histological findings exhibit an unusual inflammatory infiltrate. We postulate that the computer could favour lipoma development by a physiopathological mechanism that remains to be clarified.

  9. The appearance of angiolipomatosis after using laptop computer on the thighs: a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Caucanas, Marie; Müller, Gebhard; Vanhooteghem, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient developed angiolipomatosis of the anterior part of the thighs after repeated laptop contact localisation. Histological findings exhibit an unusual inflammatory infiltrate. We postulate that the computer could favour lipoma development by a physiopathological mechanism that remains to be clarified. PMID:25386274

  10. Correlation between waist and mid-thigh circumference and cardiovascular fitness in Korean college students: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Sik; Chung, Jae-Soon; So, Wi-Young

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We investigated whether waist and mid-thigh circumference correlated with cardiovascular fitness (VO2max) in a selected sample of Korean college students. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 41 college students (25 males, 16 females; age, > 19 years) who visited the sports medicine laboratory at the Korea National University of Transportation in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea, to undergo measurements of body composition, cardiovascular fitness, and waist and mid-thigh circumference. [Results] VO2max did not correlate with waist circumference or mid-thigh circumference in males, whereas VO2max was negatively correlated with mid-thigh circumference, but not waist circumference, in females. [Conclusion] Mid-thigh circumference was not associated with cardiovascular fitness or waist in male college students. However, it was associated with cardiovascular fitness in female college students. Well-designed studies are needed to investigate this further.

  11. Superficial and deep infiltrating congenital juvenile xanthogranuloma involving multiple skeletal muscles and associated with ulceration and generalized postinvolution atrophy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye-Rim; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2015-01-01

    We present a 2-day-old boy with a deep-seated giant juvenile xanthogranuloma infiltrating the skeletal muscles on his right lower limb. Unlike typical juvenile xanthogranuloma, the lesion has shown only partial spontaneous regression with large atrophic scar. However, despite the involvement multiple muscle on the right thigh, the patient has no evidence of orthopaedic sequelae. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Overlap Between Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Anterolateral Meniscal Root Insertions: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Steineman, Brett D; Moulton, Samuel G; Haut Donahue, Tammy L; Fontboté, Cristián A; LaPrade, Christopher M; Cram, Tyler R; Dean, Chase S; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-02-01

    The anterolateral meniscal root (ALMR) has been reported to intricately insert underneath the tibial insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Previous studies have begun to evaluate the relationship between the insertion areas and the risk of iatrogenic injuries; however, the overlap of the insertions has yet to be quantified in the sagittal and coronal planes. To investigate the insertions of the human tibial ACL and ALMR using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to quantify the overlap of the ALMR insertion in the coronal and sagittal planes. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten cadaveric knees were dissected to isolate the tibial ACL and ALMR insertions. Specimens were prepared and imaged in the coronal and sagittal planes. After imaging, fiber directions were examined to identify the insertions and used to calculate the percentage of the ACL that overlaps with the ALMR instead of inserting into bone. Four-phase insertion fibers of the tibial ACL were identified directly medial to the ALMR insertion as they attached onto the tibial plateau. The mean percentage of ACL fibers overlapping the ALMR insertion instead of inserting into subchondral bone in the coronal and sagittal planes was 41.0% ± 8.9% and 53.9% ± 4.3%, respectively. The percentage of insertion overlap in the sagittal plane was significantly higher than in the coronal plane ( P = .02). This study is the first to quantify the ACL insertion overlap of the ALMR insertion in the coronal and sagittal planes, which supplements previous literature on the insertion area overlap and iatrogenic injuries of the ALMR insertion. Future studies should determine how much damage to the ALMR insertion is acceptable to properly restore ACL function without increasing the risk for tears of the ALMR. Overlap of the insertion areas on the tibial plateau has been previously reported; however, the results of this study demonstrate significant overlap of the insertions superior to the insertion sites on the

  13. Chronic exercise preserves lean muscle mass in masters athletes.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Andrew P; Amati, Francesca; Smiley, Mark A; Goodpaster, Bret; Wright, Vonda

    2011-09-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a loss of muscle mass and strength, resulting in falls, functional decline, and the subjective feeling of weakness. Exercise modulates the morbidities of muscle aging. Most studies, however, have examined muscle-loss changes in sedentary aging adults. This leaves the question of whether the changes that are commonly associated with muscle aging reflect the true physiology of muscle aging or whether they reflect disuse atrophy. This study evaluated whether high levels of chronic exercise prevents the loss of lean muscle mass and strength experienced in sedentary aging adults. A cross-section of 40 high-level recreational athletes ("masters athletes") who were aged 40 to 81 years and trained 4 to 5 times per week underwent tests of health/activity, body composition, quadriceps peak torque (PT), and magnetic resonance imaging of bilateral quadriceps. Mid-thigh muscle area, quadriceps area (QA), subcutaneous adipose tissue, and intramuscular adipose tissue were quantified in magnetic resonance imaging using medical image processing, analysis, and visualization software. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine age group differences. Relationships were evaluated using Spearman correlations. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.31) and lean mass (P = 0.15) did not increase with age and were significantly related to retention of mid-thigh muscle area (P < 0.0001). This occurred despite an increase in total body fat percentage (P = 0.003) with age. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.12), QA (P = 0.17), and quadriceps PT did not decline with age. Specific strength (strength per QA) did not decline significantly with age (P = 0.06). As muscle area increased, PT increased significantly (P = 0.008). There was not a significant relationship between intramuscular adipose tissue (P = 0.71) or lean mass (P = 0.4) and PT. This study contradicts the common observation that muscle mass and strength decline as a function of aging alone. Instead, these

  14. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; Faber, Gert S; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-04-11

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh. Ten healthy male subjects lifted a pencil and a crate from the floor, with four lifting techniques (free, squat, stoop and a Weight Lifters Technique (WLT)), each of which was performed with and without supporting with one hand on the thigh. A six Degrees of Freedom force transducer, with a comfortable surface to support the hand on, was mounted just above the subject׳s left knee. Hand forces, ground reaction forces, full body kinematics, and trunk EMG were measured. Using inverse dynamics and taking the forces between hand and thigh into account, we calculated 3D L5S1 joint moments, and subsequently estimated spine forces using an EMG-assisted trunk model. For lifting a pencil, hand support reduced average peak total moments by 17-25%, dependent on lifting technique. For crate lifting, hand support reduced total moments by 13-19% compared with one-handed lifting and by 14-26% compared to two-handed lifting. Hand support slightly increased asymmetric motions and caused a substantial increase in asymmetric moments in crate lifting. For compression forces, reductions (up to 28%) were seen in all techniques except in stoop lifts. It is concluded that leaning with a hand on the thigh can lead to substantial reductions of low back loading during lifting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ankle and thigh skin surface temperature changes with repeated ice pack application.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J E; Knight, K L

    1996-10-01

    Most of the research on cold applications has been performed on nonexercising supine subjects during a single cold pack application. Most athletic injuries occur during exercise, which increases skin temperature. Exercise before ice application will also increase ankle skin temperature during the rewarming phase. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of activity on subsequent ice pack applications and rewarming using standard immediate care procedures. Three experimental conditions (20-, 30-, and 40-minute ice pack applications) were applied to 12 subjects in a repeated measures design. Subjects rode a bicycle ergometer for 15 minutes before ice application to the ankle and opposite thigh, and were active (walking with crutches, simulated showering and dressing) for 20 minutes following application. Subjects rested with the limb elevated for an additional 40 minutes. Ice packs were then reapplied for the appropriate time (20, 30, or 40 minutes) followed by 60 minutes of rest with the limb elevated. Twelve (8 males, 4 females) college-aged volunteers. Only subjects with good-to-high fitness levels were accepted for this study. Ankle skin, thigh skin, and atmospheric temperatures were measured every minute using an Isothermex (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, OH). Thigh temperature changes during the first ice application were greater during the 30- and 40-minute conditions than the 20-minute condition. Ankle and thigh temperature changes during the first ice application and rewarming, and for the entire trial were greater during the 40-minute condition than the 20-or 30-minute conditions. Throughout the first ice application and rewarming, and the entire trial, thigh temperature changes were greater during the 30-minute condition than the 20-minute condition. During immediate care procedures following injury, ice packs should be reapplied immediately following showering, changing clothes, and returning home.

  16. Ankle and Thigh Skin Surface Temperature Changes With Repeated Ice Pack Application

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Janice E.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Most of the research on cold applications has been performed on nonexercising supine subjects during a single cold pack application. Most athletic injuries occur during exercise, which increases skin temperature. Exercise before ice application will also increase ankle skin temperature during the rewarming phase. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of activity on subsequent ice pack applications and rewarming using standard immediate care procedures. Design and Setting: Three experimental conditions (20-, 30-, and 40-minute ice pack applications) were applied to 12 subjects in a repeated measures design. Subjects rode a bicycle ergometer for 15 minutes before ice application to the ankle and opposite thigh, and were active (walking with crutches, simulated showering and dressing) for 20 minutes following application. Subjects rested with the limb elevated for an additional 40 minutes. Ice packs were then reapplied for the appropriate time (20, 30, or 40 minutes) followed by 60 minutes of rest with the limb elevated. Subjects: Twelve (8 males, 4 females) college-aged volunteers. Only subjects with good-to-high fitness levels were accepted for this study. Measurements: Ankle skin, thigh skin, and atmospheric temperatures were measured every minute using an Isothermex (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, OH). Results: Thigh temperature changes during the first ice application were greater during the 30- and 40-minute conditions than the 20-minute condition. Ankle and thigh temperature changes during the first ice application and rewarming, and for the entire trial were greater during the 40-minute condition than the 20-or 30-minute conditions. Throughout the first ice application and rewarming, and the entire trial, thigh temperature changes were greater during the 30-minute condition than the 20-minute condition. Conclusions: During immediate care procedures following injury, ice packs should be reapplied immediately following showering

  17. Can hip and knee kinematics be improved by eliminating thigh markers?

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Brian W.; Kimmel, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Marker sets developed for gait analysis are often applied to more dynamic tasks with little or no validation, despite known complications of soft tissue artifact. Methods This study presents a comparison of hip and knee kinematics as calculated by five concurrently-worn tracking marker sets during eight different tasks. The first three marker sets were based on Helen Hayes but used 1) proximal thigh wands, 2) distal thigh wands, and 3) patellar markers instead of thigh wands. The remaining two marker sets used rigid clusters on the 4) thighs and shanks and 5) only shanks. Pelvis and foot segments were shared by all marker sets. The first three tasks were maximal femoral rotations using different knee and hip positions to quantify the ability of each marker set to capture this motion. The remaining five tasks were walking, walking a 1m radius circle, running, jumping, and lunging. Findings In general, few and small differences in knee and hip flexion-extension were observed between marker sets, while many and large differences in adduction-abduction and external-internal rotations were observed. The shank-only tracking marker set was capable of detecting the greatest hip external-internal rotation, yet only did so during dynamic tasks where greater hip axial motions would be expected. All data are available as supplementary material. Interpretation Marker set selection is critical to non-sagittal hip and knee motions. The shank-only tracking marker set presented here is a viable alternative that may improve knee and hip kinematics by eliminating errors from thigh soft tissue artifact. PMID:20493599

  18. Associations of Upper Arm and Thigh Circumferences with Dementia and Depression in Korean Elders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Seong; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported an association between weight loss and cognitive impairment. Changes in anthropometric measurements, such as arm and thigh circumferences, are associated with body mass changes and physical activity. Our aim was to investigate the association of upper arm and thigh circumferences with dementia and depression in the community-dwelling elderly population. Methods In total, 2,498 community residents aged 65 years or over were clinically assessed for dementia using the Korean version of the Community Screening Interview for Dementia. Depression was also assessed using the Korean version of the Geriatric Mental State Schedule B3. Arm and thigh circumferences were measured. Complex sample logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations of changes in anthropometric measurements with dementia/depression after controlling for other covariates. Results In the adjusted analyses, there was an independent association between dementia and arm circumference (OR=1.12; 95% CI=1.06–1.19). This association was significant in the females (OR=1.12; 95% CI=1.05–1.19) but not in males (OR=1.07; 95% CI=0.93–1.28). The association between dementia and thigh circumference was not significant in the adjusted analysis (OR=1.03; 95% CI=0.99–1.07). No significant association was found between either upper arm or thigh circumference and depression. Conclusion In the older female Korean population, decreased upper arm circumference was associated with dementia and may represent a biological marker for this condition. This association may be explained by nutritional deficits or decreased physical activity. PMID:28326112

  19. [Paragliding-associated bilateral partial rupture of the rectus femoris muscle].

    PubMed

    Schulze Bertelsbeck, D; Veelken, D

    2004-12-01

    Pain in the thigh or groin due to a rupture of the rectus femoris muscle is rather uncommon. We report on a patient with a bilateral rupture of the rectus femoris muscle that occurred due to a landing maneuver while para-gliding. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound and MRI. Additionally, an old unilateral anterior cruciate ligament rupture was present. As a functional deficit of the quadriceps muscle could not be observed, a primarily conservative treatment seems to be appropriate.

  20. A review of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: current knowledge regarding its incidence, anatomy, biomechanics, and surgical dissection.

    PubMed

    Pomajzl, Ryan; Maerz, Tristan; Shams, Christienne; Guettler, Joseph; Bicos, James

    2015-03-01

    To systematically review current literature on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee. We searched the PubMed/Medline database for publications specifically addressing the ALL. We excluded studies not written in English, studies not using human cadavers or subjects, and studies not specifically addressing the ALL. Data extraction related to the incidence, anatomy, morphometry, biomechanics, and histology of the ALL and its relation to the Segond fracture was performed. The incidence of the ALL ranged from 83% to 100%, and this range occurs because of small discrepancies in the definition of the ALL's bony insertions. The ALL originates anterior and distal to the femoral attachment of the lateral collateral ligament. It spans the joint in an oblique fashion and inserts between the fibular head and Gerdy tubercle on the tibia. Exact anatomic and morphometric descriptions vary in the literature, and there are discrepancies regarding the ALL's attachment to the capsule and lateral meniscus. The ALL is a contributor to tibial internal rotation stability, and histologically, it exhibits parallel, crimped fibers consistent with a ligamentous microstructure. The footprint of the ALL has been shown to be at the exact location of the Segond fracture. The ALL is a distinct ligamentous structure at the anterolateral aspect of the knee, and it is likely involved in tibial internal rotation stability and the Segond fracture. Level IV, systematic review of anatomic and imaging studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automatic quantification of muscle volumes in magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd; Nambi, Vijay; Yang, Eric; Kumar, Anirudh; Virani, Salim S; Kougias, Panagiotis; Shah, Dipan; Lumsden, Alan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Morrisett, Joel D

    2011-10-01

    Muscle volume measurements are essential for an array of diseases ranging from peripheral arterial disease, muscular dystrophies, neurological conditions to sport injuries and aging. In the clinical setting, muscle volume is not routinely measured due to the lack of standardized ways for its repeatable quantification. In this paper, we present magnetic resonance muscle quantification (MRMQ), a method for the automatic quantification of thigh muscle volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. MRMQ integrates a thigh segmentation and nonuniform image gradient correction step, followed by feature extraction and classification. The classification step leverages prior probabilities, introducing prior knowledge to a maximum a posteriori classifier. MRMQ was validated on 344 slices taken from 60 MRI scans. Experiments for the fully automatic detection of muscle volume in MRI scans demonstrated an averaged accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for leave-one-out cross-validation of 88.3%, 93.6% and 87.2%, respectively.

  2. Traumatic Avulsion of the Serratus Anterior Muscle in a Collegiate Rower: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Carr, James B; John, Quincy E; Rajadhyaksha, Evan; Carson, Eric W; Turney, Kelly L

    2016-09-21

    A 19-year-old female collegiate rower presented with a new, painful mass along her right anterolateral chest wall after competition. The patient was diagnosed with a rupture of the serratus anterior muscle from its costal attachments, as confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The patient fully recovered after a period of rest followed by a graduated 2-month physical therapy regimen consisting of stretching and scapulothoracic and core strengthening. A traumatic rupture of the serratus anterior muscle should be suspected in athletes who present with a painful chest wall mass after exertion of large forces through the scapulothoracic region. Athletes can return to play after nonoperative management.

  3. Positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and their innervating nerves with special reference to the lateral pterygoid and the midmedial and discotemporal muscle bundles of temporalis

    PubMed Central

    AKITA, KEIICHI; SHIMOKAWA, TAKASHI; SATO, TATSUO

    2000-01-01

    For an accurate assessment of jaw movement, it is crucial to understand the comprehensive formation of the masticatory muscles with special reference to the relationship to the disc of the temporomandibular joint. Detailed dissection was performed on 26 head halves of 14 Japanese cadavers in order to obtain precise anatomical information of the positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and the branches of the mandibular nerve. After complete removal of the bony elements, the midmedial muscle bundle in all specimens and the discotemporal muscle bundle in 6 specimens, derivatives of the temporalis, which insert into the disc were observed. On the anterior area of the articular capsule and the disc of the temporomandibular joint, the upper head of the lateral pterygoid, the midmedial muscle bundle of temporalis and the discotemporal bundle of temporalis were attached mediolaterally, and in 3 specimens the posterosuperior margin of the zygomaticomandibularis was attached to the anterolateral area of the disc. It is suggested that these muscles and muscle bundles contribute to various mandibular movements. Although various patterns of the positional relationships between the muscles and muscle bundles and the their innervating nerves are observed in the present study, relative positional relationships of the muscles and muscle bundles and of nerves of the mandibular nerve are consistent. A possible scheme of the developmental formation of the masticatory muscles based on the findings of the positional relationships between the muscles and the nerves is presented. PMID:11005720

  4. Assessment of reproducibility of thigh marker ranking during walking and landing tasks.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Tony; Thouzé, Arsène; Pain, Matt T G; Begon, Mickaël

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the repeatability of marker deformation and marker ranking across subjects and motor tasks. A method based on the solidification of the thigh with optimized rototranslation was applied which used 26 markers placed on the left thigh. During five trials of landing and five trials of walking for eight participants, the deformation between the actual positions of the 26 markers and the recalled positions from solidification were calculated. Markers were then sorted and ranked from the most deformed to the least deformed. Like previous studies, marker deformation found in this paper is subject and movement-dependant. The reproducibility of the marker rankings was assessed using Kendall's coefficient of concordance. Results highlighted that the marker ranking was similar between the trials of landing and between the trials of walking. Moreover, for walking and landing the rankings were consistent across the eight subjects.

  5. Skeletal muscle injury induced by a pneumatic tourniquet: an enzyme- and immunohistochemical study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pedowitz, R A; Fridén, J; Thornell, L E

    1992-03-01

    The pathophysiology of skeletal muscle injury induced by compression beneath pneumatic tourniquets is poorly understood. Tourniquet hemostasis was induced in rabbit hindlimbs for 2 hr with a cuff inflation pressure of either 125 mm Hg (n = 5) or 350 mm Hg (n = 5). Skeletal muscle biopsies, taken 2 days later from tissue beneath and distal to the tourniquet, were frozen and analyzed using enzyme- and immunohistochemical techniques. In the 350 mm Hg tourniquet group, four of 10 thigh muscle samples demonstrated significant regional necrosis (mean 37.3% of the total cross-sectional area). Regional necrosis was not observed in thigh muscles of the 125 mm Hg tourniquet group or in any of the ischemic leg muscles. A topographic pattern of necrosis consistent with the arterial distribution of skeletal muscle suggested pathogenic events during the reperfusion period, such as granulocyte-mediated superoxide radical formation. Extremely large and rounded fibers (histochemically identified as Type IIB fibers) were observed in compressed thigh muscles, indicating differential fiber sensitivity to tourniquet compression and ischemia. The present study demonstrated significant skeletal muscle necrosis after a 2 hr tourniquet applied at a clinically relevant cuff inflation pressure. Recent studies of systemic changes associated with limb "ischemia" should be reassessed in consideration of the confounding effects of tissue compression induced beneath pneumatic tourniquets.

  6. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  7. Assessment of Intraocular and Systemic Vasculature Pressure Parameters in Simulated Microgravity with Thigh Cuff Countermeasure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Alex S.; Balasubramanian, Siva; Tepelus, Tudor; Sadda, Jaya; Sadda, Srinivas; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steve S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in vision have been well documented among astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. One hypothesis is that the space flight induced headward fluid alters posterior ocular pressure and volume and may contribute to visual acuity decrements. Therefore, we evaluated venoconstrictive thigh cuffs as a potential countermeasure to the headward fluid shift-induced effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) and cephalic vascular pressure and volumes.

  8. Knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis: influence of abdominal and thigh fat.

    PubMed

    Messier, Stephen P; Beavers, Daniel P; Loeser, Richard F; Carr, J Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J; Hunter, David J; Devita, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography, and total lean and fat mass were determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age, 66.3 yr; body mass index, 33.5 kg·m) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Higher total body mass was significantly associated (P ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (P < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (P < 0.006), and knee extensor moments (P = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (P = 0.0001), shear (P < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (P = 0.01) and knee extension moment (P = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (P = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found that both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (P ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with knee abduction (P = 0.03) and knee extension moment (P = 0.02). Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA.

  9. The Internal Pudendal Artery Perforator Thigh Flap: A New Freestyle Pedicle Flap for the Ischial Region

    PubMed Central

    Goishi, Keiichi; Abe, Yoshiro; Takaku, Mitsuru; Seike, Takuya; Harada, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrence and complication rates of pressure sores are highest in the ischial region, and other donor sites are needed for recurrent pressure sores. The potential of a new freestyle pedicle flap for ischial lesions, an internal pudendal artery perforator (iPap) thigh flap, was examined through anatomical and theoretical analyses and a case series using computed tomography angiography. Methods: The skin flap was designed in the thigh region based on an iPap. The skin perforators were marked with a Doppler probe. One patient underwent computed tomography angiography with fistulography to identify the damage to or effects on the pedicle vessels of the flap. Debridement of ischial lesions and flap elevation were performed in the jackknife position. Results: The iPap thigh flaps were performed in 5 patients, 4 with ischial pressure sores and 1 with calcinosis cutis of the ischial region. The width and length of the flaps ranged from 5 to 8 cm (mean, 6.6 cm) and 10 to 17 cm (mean, 12.6 cm), respectively. Three patients underwent partial osteotomy of the ischial bone. No complications, including flap necrosis or wound dehiscence of the donor and reconstructed sites, were observed. Conclusions: The perforator vessels of the internal pudendal artery are very close to the ischial tuberosity. Blood flow to the flap is reliable when careful debridement of the pressure sore is performed. The iPap thigh flap is a new option for soft-tissue defects in the ischial region, including ischial pressure sores. PMID:25289335

  10. The superomedial thigh flap in scrotal reconstruction: Technical steps to improve cosmetic results

    PubMed Central

    Oufkir, Ayat Allah; Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; El Alami, Mohammed Noureddine El Amine

    2013-01-01

    The superomedial thigh flap is a reliable and easy method for scrotal reconstruction described in 1980 and infrequently reported in the literature since its description. We used it for four patients presenting scrotal defects after Fournier's gangrene with some technical modifications to improve the esthetic results and to facilitate the closure of the donor area. We describe the technical steps and the results. PMID:24235804

  11. Associations of fat and muscle tissue with cognitive status in older adults: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

    PubMed

    Spauwen, Peggy J J; Murphy, Rachel A; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Garcia, Melissa E; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Lopez, Oscar L; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J

    2017-03-01

    studies on the association of dementia with specific body composition (BC) components are scarce. Our aim was to investigate associations of BC measures with different levels of cognitive function in late-life. we studied 5,169 participants (mean age 76 years, 42.9% men) in the AGES-Reykjavik Study of whom 485 (9.4%) were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 307 (5.9%) with dementia. Visceral fat, abdominal and thigh subcutaneous fat, and thigh muscle were assessed by computed tomography. MCI and dementia were based on clinical assessment and a consensus meeting; those without MCI or dementia were categorised as normal. Multinomial regression models assessed the associations stratified by sex and in additional analyses by midlife body mass index (BMI). among women, there was a decreased likelihood of dementia per SD increase in abdominal subcutaneous fat (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.59-0.88), thigh subcutaneous fat (0.81; 0.67-0.98) and thigh muscle (0.63; 0.52-0.76), but not visceral fat, adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, stroke and depression. Inverse associations of fat with dementia were attenuated by weight change from midlife and were strongest in women with midlife BMI <25. In men, one SD increase in thigh muscle was associated with a decreased likelihood of dementia (0.75; 0.61-0.92). BC was not associated with MCI in men or women. a higher amount of abdominal and thigh subcutaneous fat were associated with a lower likelihood of dementia in women only, while more thigh muscle was associated with a lower likelihood of dementia in men and women.

  12. Chicken muscle mitochondrial content appears co-ordinately regulated and is associated with performance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reverter, Antonio; Okimoto, Ron; Sapp, Robyn; Bottje, Walter G.; Hawken, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial content is a fundamental cellular bioenergetic phenotype. Previous work has hypothesised possible links between variation in muscle mitochondrial content and animal performance. However, no population screens have been performed in any production species. Here, we have designed a high throughput molecular approach to estimate mitochondrial content in commercial broilers. Technical validity was established using several approaches, including its performance in monoclonal DF-1 cells, cross-tissue comparisons in tissues with differing metabolic demands (white fatmusclemusclemuscle) and, as a negative control, a near absence of mtDNA amplification from whole blood. We screened breast muscle and thigh muscle in 80 birds individually phenotyped for 11 growth and development traits. Substantial individual variation (fivefold) was discovered in both breast and thigh muscle mitochondrial content. Interestingly, across birds we detected a very strong positive relationship between breast and thigh content (correlation coefficient 0.61; P<0.0001), consistent with coordinate regulatory control across the musculature. Further, breast muscle mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with breast muscle yield (−0.27; P=0.037), abdominal fat content (−0.31; P=0.017) and carcass yield (−0.26; P=0.045). Therefore, low breast muscle mitochondrial content is associated with more muscular birds possessing higher abdominal fat, the latter being in line with biomedical models of obesity. Finally, thigh mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with the bow out leg defect (−0.30; P=0.011). Overall, our data point to mitochondrial content as a promising consideration in predictive modelling of production traits. PMID:27934661

  13. Sentinel Node Mapping of VX2 Carcinoma in Rabbit Thigh with CT Lymphography Using Ethiodized Oil

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hye Seung; Jung, Seung Chai; Joo, Seung-Moon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) lymphography using ethiodized oil for sentinel node mapping in experimentally induced VX2 carcinoma in the rabbit thigh. Materials and Methods This experiment received approval from the institutional animal use and care administrative advisory committee. Twenty-three rabbits with VX2 carcinoma in the thigh underwent CT before and after (1 hour, 2 hour) peritumoral injection of 2 mL ethiodized oil. After the CT examination, sentinel nodes were identified by peritumoral injection of methylene blue and subsequently removed. The retrieved sentinel and non-sentinel lymph nodes were investigated with radiographic and pathologic examinations. Based on the comparison of CT findings with those of radiographic and pathologic examinations, the diagnostic performance of CT for sentinel node identification was assessed. Results All 23 rabbits showed 53 ethiodized oil retention nodes on post-injection CT and specimen radiography, and 52 methylene blue-stained nodes at the right femoroiliac area. Of the 52 blue-stained sentinel nodes, 50 nodes demonstrated ethiodized oil retention. Thus, the sentinel node detection rate of CT was 96% (50 of 52). On pathologic examination, 28 sentinel nodes in 17 rabbits (nodes/rabbit, mean ± standard deviation, 1.7 ± 0.6) harbored metastasis. Twenty seven of the 28 metastatic sentinel nodes were found to have ethiodized oil retention. Conclusion Computed tomography lymphography using ethiodized oil may be feasible for sentinel node mapping in experimentally induced VX2 carcinoma in the rabbit thigh. PMID:24497789

  14. Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Louise Bæk; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2016-08-01

    Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster. Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional gait analysis. Walking tests were conducted with nineteen active duty police officers under three different load carriage conditions: a) body armour and duty belt, b) load bearing vest, body armour and thigh holster and c) no equipment (control). No significant differences between testing conditions were found for temporospatial parameters. Range of trunk rotation was reduced for both load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). Range of hip rotation was more similar to the control condition when wearing thigh holster rather than the belt mounted hip holster (p<0.017). Moments and powers for both left and right ankles were significantly greater for both of the load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). This study confirms that occupational loads carried by police have a significant effect on gait kinematics and kinetics. Although small differences were observed between the two load carriage conditions investigated in this study, results do not overwhelmingly support selection of one design over the other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of burden on granulocyte clearance of bacteria in a mouse thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Fregeau, Christine; Liu, Weiguo; Brown, D L; Louie, Arnold

    2010-10-01

    We wished to delineate granulocytes' impact on the clearance of different bacterial burdens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in a granulocyte-replete mouse thigh infection model. A mouse thigh model was employed. Bacterial challenges from 10(5) to 3 × 10(7) CFU (S. aureus) and from 3 × 10(4) to 3 × 10(8) CFU (P. aeruginosa) were injected into murine posterior thighs. Organism quantitation was at baseline, 2 h (Pseudomonas only), and 24 h. A Michaelis-Menten population model was fit to the data for each organism. Breakpoints for microbial containment by granulocytes were identified. Bacterial burdens exceeding that breakpoint value resulted in organism multiplication. The Michaelis-Menten model fit the data well. For P. aeruginosa, the observed-predicted plot had a regression equation that explained over 98% of the variance (P ≪ 0.001). For S. aureus, this relationship explained greater than 94% of the variance (P ≪ 0.001). Maximal growth rate constants, maximal population burdens, and the bacterial loads at which granulocytes killed if half-saturated were not different. The kill rate constant for P. aeruginosa was almost 10 times that of S. aureus. Bacterial kill by granulocytes is saturable. No difference between saturation points of different isolates was seen. A higher bacterial burden means an increasing reliance on chemotherapy to drive bacterial clearance.

  16. A new approach to determine ligament strain using polydimethylsiloxane strain gauges: exemplary measurements of the anterolateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Zens, Martin; Ruhhammer, Johannes; Goldschmidtboeing, Frank; Woias, Peter; Feucht, Matthias J; Mayr, Herrmann O; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2014-12-01

    A thorough understanding of ligament strains and behavior is necessary to create biomechanical models, comprehend trauma mechanisms, and surgically reconstruct those ligaments in a manner that restores a physiological performance. Measurement techniques and sensors are needed to conduct this data with high accuracy in an in vitro environment. In this work, we present a novel sensor device that is capable of continuously recording ligament strains with high resolution. The sensor principle of this biocompatible strain gauge may be used for in vitro measurements and can easily be applied to any ligament in the human body. The recently rediscovered anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee joint was chosen to display the capability of this novel sensor system. Three cadaver knees were tested to successfully demonstrate the concept of the sensor device and display first results regarding the elongation of the ALL during flexion/extension of the knee.

  17. Multifocal diabetic muscle infarction: a rare complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Wafa; Jerbi, Saida; Klii, Rym; Alaya, Wafa; Mestiri, Sarra; Zantour, Baha; Sfar, Mohamed Habib

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare complication of long-standing poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old man with a 10-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus with multiple microvascular and macrovascular complications who presented with the sudden onset of left thigh pain and swelling. MRI suggested muscle infarction. A muscle biopsy demonstrated coagulation necrosis in the skeletal muscle with inflammation and infarction in the walls of small blood vessels. Physicians should consider DMI in the differential diagnosis of patients with diabetes who present with painful, swollen muscles without systemic signs of infection.

  18. Spinning Out of Control: A 19-Year-Old Female with Spinning-Related Exertional Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Daniel J; Han, Sukgu; Wong, Alex K

    2016-01-01

    Thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) is a rare condition caused by high pressures within the fascial compartments of the thigh, impeding capillary flow and leading to decreased perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and necrosis. TCS is most frequently associated with trauma and anticoagulation but has also rarely been associated with exercise-related injury. We present the case of a 19-year-old female who reported painful swelling in her thighs and darkening of her urine after participating in a spinning class. On physical examination, the patient was found to have tight, painful thigh compartments with extreme tenderness on passive motion. Labs revealed a marked elevation of creatine kinase and leukocytosis. The patient was diagnosed with TCS and underwent emergent decompression fasciotomy and aggressive IV fluids for protection against myoglobinuria. Due to high clinical suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early surgery, the patient experienced excellent recovery without functional deficits.  PMID:28123920

  19. Spinning Out of Control: A 19-Year-Old Female with Spinning-Related Exertional Thigh Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, Daniel J; Badash, Ido; Han, Sukgu; Wong, Alex K

    2016-12-24

    Thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) is a rare condition caused by high pressures within the fascial compartments of the thigh, impeding capillary flow and leading to decreased perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and necrosis. TCS is most frequently associated with trauma and anticoagulation but has also rarely been associated with exercise-related injury. We present the case of a 19-year-old female who reported painful swelling in her thighs and darkening of her urine after participating in a spinning class. On physical examination, the patient was found to have tight, painful thigh compartments with extreme tenderness on passive motion. Labs revealed a marked elevation of creatine kinase and leukocytosis. The patient was diagnosed with TCS and underwent emergent decompression fasciotomy and aggressive IV fluids for protection against myoglobinuria. Due to high clinical suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early surgery, the patient experienced excellent recovery without functional deficits.

  20. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftazidime and Avibactam in Neutropenic Mice with Thigh or Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Maria J.; van Mil, Anita C.; Lagarde, Claudia M.; Schuck, Virna J.; Nichols, Wright W.

    2015-01-01

    Avibactam is a new non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that shows promising restoration of ceftazidime activity against microorganisms producing Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases such as KPCs, class C β-lactamases (AmpC), and some class D enzymes. To determine optimal dosing combinations of ceftazidime-avibactam for treating infections with ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pharmacodynamic responses were explored in murine neutropenic thigh and lung infection models. Exposure-response relationships for ceftazidime monotherapy were determined first. Subsequently, the efficacy of adding avibactam every 2 h (q2h) or q8h to a fixed q2h dose of ceftazidime was determined in lung infection for two strains. Dosing avibactam q2h was significantly more efficacious, reducing the avibactam daily dose for static effect by factors of 2.7 and 10.1, whereas the mean percentage of the dosing interval that free drug concentrations remain above the threshold concentration of 1 mg/liter (%fT>CT 1 mg/liter) yielding bacteriostasis was similar for both regimens, with mean values of 21.6 (q2h) and 18.5 (q8h). Dose fractionation studies of avibactam in both the thigh and lung models indicated that the effect of avibactam correlated well with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. This parameter of avibactam was further explored for four P. aeruginosa strains in the lung model and six in the thigh model. Parameter estimates of %fT>CT 1 mg/liter for avibactam ranged from 0 to 21.4% in the lung model and from 14.1 to 62.5% in the thigh model to achieve stasis. In conclusion, addition of avibactam enhanced the effect of ceftazidime, which was more pronounced at frequent dosing and well related with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. The thigh model appeared more stringent, with higher values, ranging up to 62.5% fT>CT 1 mg/liter, required for a static effect. PMID:26525790

  1. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftazidime and Avibactam in Neutropenic Mice with Thigh or Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Johanna; Melchers, Maria J; van Mil, Anita C; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Lagarde, Claudia M; Schuck, Virna J; Nichols, Wright W; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-11-02

    Avibactam is a new non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that shows promising restoration of ceftazidime activity against microorganisms producing Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases such as KPCs, class C β-lactamases (AmpC), and some class D enzymes. To determine optimal dosing combinations of ceftazidime-avibactam for treating infections with ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pharmacodynamic responses were explored in murine neutropenic thigh and lung infection models. Exposure-response relationships for ceftazidime monotherapy were determined first. Subsequently, the efficacy of adding avibactam every 2 h (q2h) or q8h to a fixed q2h dose of ceftazidime was determined in lung infection for two strains. Dosing avibactam q2h was significantly more efficacious, reducing the avibactam daily dose for static effect by factors of 2.7 and 10.1, whereas the mean percentage of the dosing interval that free drug concentrations remain above the threshold concentration of 1 mg/liter (%fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter) yielding bacteriostasis was similar for both regimens, with mean values of 21.6 (q2h) and 18.5 (q8h). Dose fractionation studies of avibactam in both the thigh and lung models indicated that the effect of avibactam correlated well with %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter. This parameter of avibactam was further explored for four P. aeruginosa strains in the lung model and six in the thigh model. Parameter estimates of %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter for avibactam ranged from 0 to 21.4% in the lung model and from 14.1 to 62.5% in the thigh model to achieve stasis. In conclusion, addition of avibactam enhanced the effect of ceftazidime, which was more pronounced at frequent dosing and well related with %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter. The thigh model appeared more stringent, with higher values, ranging up to 62.5% fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter, required for a static effect. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Long-term outcomes of arteriovenous thigh grafts in hemodialysis patients: a comparison with tunneled dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Ong, Song; Barker-Finkel, Jill; Allon, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Arteriovenous thigh grafts are a potential vascular access option in hemodialysis patients who have exhausted all upper-limb sites. This study compared the outcomes of thigh grafts with outcomes obtained with dialysis catheters. A prospective vascular access database was queried to identify 209 thigh grafts placed from January 1, 2003, to June 30, 2011. The following were calculated: secondary graft survival (from graft creation to permanent failure), assisted primary graft survival (from graft creation to first thrombosis), and infection-free graft survival (from graft creation to first graft infection). Graft outcomes were compared with those observed with 472 tunneled internal jugular dialysis catheters. The median duration of patient follow-up was 340 days for grafts and 91 days for catheters. The surgical technical failure rate of thigh grafts was 8.1% and was higher in patients with vascular disease (hazard ratio [HR], 2.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-8.04; P=0.03). Secondary and assisted primary graft survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 62%, 54%, and 38% and 38%, 27%, and 17%, respectively. Infection-free graft survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 79%, 73%, and 61%. Secondary survival was much worse for dialysis catheters than thigh grafts (HR, 4.44; 95% CI, 3.65-5.22; P<0.001). Likewise, infection-free survival was far worse for catheters than for thigh grafts (HR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.80-4.82; P<0.001). Thigh grafts are a viable vascular option in patients who have exhausted upper-extremity options. Outcomes with thigh grafts are superior to those obtained with dialysis catheters.

  3. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  4. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  5. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  6. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  7. An improved dual approach to post bariatric contouring — Staged liposuction and modified medial thigh lift: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Jandali, Zaher; Loh, Charles Yuen Yung; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Following massive weight loss (MWL) medial contouring of the thigh is frequently requested to improve appearance and function. Thigh lifting can be associated with significant complications. We present a case series of post bariatric patients undergoing thigh lift using staged the liposuction, a modified T incision and a buried de-epithelialised dermal flap. Materials and Methods: From January to December 2012, 21 consecutive patients underwent a modified medial thigh lift. A retrospective review of the case notes was performed to assess complications that occurred. Results: There were no major post-operative complications in terms of reoperation, hematoma, thromboembolism and no seromas. Seven patients, all of which were smokers had minor superficial wound healing complications. Aesthetic outcomes were satisfactory for all patients at a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Conclusions: The modified ‘T’ incision with staged liposuction is described. We have found the technique to be useful for a variety of different thighs. It is a reproducible method for contouring the medial thigh in MWL patients. In this series, our overall complications were low, and no seromas occurred. PMID:25190920

  8. Quality of breast and thigh meats when broilers are fed rations containing graded levels of sugar syrup.

    PubMed

    Hashim, I B; Hussein, A S; Afifi, H S

    2013-08-01

    The dietary energy for broiler chicken is provided through the inclusion of cereal grains and vegetable oil in the ration. The cost of corn is increasing exponentially, whereas sugar syrup (SS) is available with reasonable cost. Sugar syrup can be used as a substitute for starch/grains and vegetable oil. No research has been reported on the effect of SS on broiler meat quality. In this study, Hubbard commercial broiler chicks were fed a control basal diet (corn-soy basal diet on an ad libitum basis) alone or with graded levels of SS. A completely randomized design with 3 replications (n = 3, treatments = 4 with 4 subsamples per treatment) were used to investigate the effect of replacing part of the corn and oil in broiler chicken rations with graded levels of SS (5, 10, and 15%) on breast and thigh meat quality (proximate analysis, cooking loss, instrumental color, and texture and sensory properties). Rations containing up to 15% SS had a slight effect on proximate composition of raw and cooked broiler breast and thigh meats. Cooking loss of thigh meat decreased significantly with increasing SS but increased significantly for breast meats. No significant differences were detected (P > 0.05) among breast or thigh meats fed rations with a different level of SS on all sensory properties, except that cooked thigh meat had a slightly harder texture. Overall, results suggest that feeding broilers with SS rations (up to 15%) produced high-quality breast and thigh meats with minimal differences.

  9. Selenium regulates gene expression of selenoprotein W in chicken skeletal muscle system.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hongfeng; Zhang, Ziwei; Wu, Qiong; Yao, Haidong; Li, Jinlong; Li, Shu; Xu, Shiwen

    2012-01-01

    Selenoprotein W (SelW) is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscles of mammals and necessary for the metabolism of skeletal muscles. However, its expression pattern in skeletal muscle system of birds is still uncovered. Herein, to investigate the distribution of SelW mRNA in chicken skeletal muscle system and its response to different selenium (Se) status, 1-day-old chickens were exposed to various concentrations of Se as sodium selenite in the feed for 35 days. In addition, myoblasts were treated with different concentrations of Se in the medium for 72 h. Then the levels of SelW mRNA in skeletal muscles (wing muscle, pectoral muscle, thigh muscle) and myoblasts were determined on days 1, 15, 25, and 35 and at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. The results showed that SelW was detected in all these muscle components and it increased both along with the growth of organism and the differentiation process of myoblasts. The thigh muscle is more responsive to Se intake than the other two skeletal muscle tissues while the optimal Se supplementation for SelW mRNA expression in chicken myoblasts was 10(-7) M. In summary, Se plays important roles in the development of chicken skeletal muscles. To effect optimal SelW gene expression, Se must be provided in the diet and the media in adequate amounts and neither at excessive nor deficient levels.

  10. Chemical composition and amino acid profiles of goose muscles from native Polish breeds.

    PubMed

    Okruszek, A; Woloszyn, J; Haraf, G; Orkusz, A; Werenska, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the chemical and amino acid composition of breast (pectoralis major) and thigh (biceps femoris) muscles in 17-wk-old geese from 2 Polish conservative flocks: Rypińska (Ry, n = 20) and Garbonosa (Ga, n = 20). The geese were fed ad libitum during the experimental period on the same complete feed. Genotypes affected the moisture and fat content of breast and thigh meat. The Ga geese were characterized by higher moisture as well as lower fat lipid content compared with the Ry breast and thigh muscles. The amino acid proportions of meat proteins depended on the goose flock and type of muscles, where significant differences were found. The proteins of Ga breast muscles contained more glutamic acid, glycine, lysine, tryptophan, histidine, and methionine, and less aspartic acid, proline, serine, leucine, valine, phenyloalanine, tyrosine, and threonine than the Ry geese (P ≤ 0.05). The proteins of Ry thigh muscles were characterized by higher content of proline, serine, and essential amino acids (without lysine and methionine) and lower glutamic and asparagine acid, alanine, and glycine compared with the Ga flock. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (1991) standard, tryptophan was the amino acid limiting the nutritional value of meat proteins of Ry breast muscles (amino acid score for tryptophan = 90%). Except for tryptophan, the meat proteins of the investigated raw materials contained more essential amino acids than the standard. The total content of essential amino acids for all investigated muscles was also higher (52.51 to 55.54%) than the standard (33.90%). It is evident that muscle protein from both flocks of geese have been characterized by high nutritional value. The values of the essential amino acid index of breast muscle proteins were similar in both flocks.

  11. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  12. Role of fascia in maintenance of muscle tension and pressure.

    PubMed

    Garfin, S R; Tipton, C M; Mubarak, S J; Woo, S L; Hargens, A R; Akeson, W H

    1981-08-01

    The effect of fasciotomy on muscle tension (measured by a force transducer attached to the tendon) and interstitial fluid pressure (measured by Wick catheters in the muscle belly) was studied in the anterolateral compartments of 13 dog hindlimbs. Muscle tension and pressure were monitored in the tibialis cranialis muscle after low- and high-frequency stimulation of the peroneal nerve to produce twitch- and tetanic-type contractions. Fasciotomy decreased muscle force during the low-frequency stimulation by 16% (35.3 +/- 4.9 to 28.4 +/- 3.9 N) and during the high-frequency stimulation by 10% (60.8 %/- 4.9 to 54.8 +/- 3.9 N). Muscle pressure decreased 50% after fasciotomy under both conditions, 15 +/- 2 to 6 +/- 1 mmHg and 84 +/- 17 to 41 +/- 8 mmHg), respectively. Repeated functional evaluations during the testing procedure indicated that muscle fatigue was not a major factor in these results. It was concluded that fascia is important in the development of muscle tension and changes in interstitial pressure. Furthermore, the results raised questions concerning the merits of performing a fasciotomy for athletes with a compartment syndrome.

  13. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  14. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  15. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  16. The effect of electrical muscle stimulation on the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy in patients with consciousness disturbance in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoya; Shiozaki, Tadahiko; Shimizu, Kentaro; Mouri, Tomoyoshi; Noguchi, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2013-08-01

    Disuse atrophy of the lower limbs of patients with consciousness disturbance has often been recognized as "an unavoidable consequence," such that the mechanism was not investigated diligently. In this study, we examined the preventive effects of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) against disuse atrophy of the lower limbs in patients in coma after stroke or traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit. We evaluated changes in cross-sectional area of lower limb muscles weekly with computed tomography in 6 control group patients and 9 EMS group patients. Electrical muscle stimulation was performed daily from day 7 after admission. We evaluated the anterior thigh muscle compartment, posterior thigh muscle compartment, anterior leg muscle compartment, and posterior leg muscle compartment. In the control group, the decrease in cross-sectional area progressed in all compartments every week (P < .0001). Cross-sectional areas of all compartments at day 14 were significantly decreased in the control group compared with those in the EMS group at day 7 (P < .001). We were able to limit the rate of muscle atrophy as measured in the cross-sectional areas to within 4% during the period of EMS (days 7-42) in 5 patients. The difference between the control and the EMS groups was statistically significant (P < .001). Electrical muscle stimulation is effective in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy in patients with consciousness disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of pelvic arterial calcification with arteriovenous thigh graft failure in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Mark E; Robbin, Michelle L; McNamara, Michelle M; Allon, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Arterial calcification is a common problem in patients with chronic kidney disease, and has been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether pelvic artery calcifications are associated with technical failure of arteriovenous thigh grafts in haemodialysis patients. From 1 January 1999 to 30 June 2002, thigh grafts were placed in 54 haemodialysis patients who had exhausted all options for permanent vascular access in the upper extremities. Perioperative computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis was obtained in 32 of the patients for diagnostic purposes unrelated to vascular access planning. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the graft outcomes, scored the vascular calcifications on CT of the distal aorta, common iliac, external iliac and common femoral arteries on a semi-quantitative 5-point scale. The association between technical graft failure (inability to complete the anastomosis) and the vascular calcification score was analysed. There was a high inter-observer agreement in scoring vascular calcification (kappa = 0.801). Among 26 patients with absent or mild pelvic arterial calcifications (grade 1-2) on CT, none (0%) experienced technical graft failure. In contrast, three of six patients (50%) with moderate to severe calcification (grade 3-5) had technical graft failures (P = 0.004 by Fisher's exact test). The cumulative 1 year graft patency was lower in the group with grade 3-5 calcification (33 vs 81%, P = 0.09). The two groups were similar in age, gender, race, diabetes, duration of dialysis, serum calcium, serum phosphorus and serum parathyroid hormone. There is a strong association between pelvic artery calcifications and technical failure of thigh grafts. The presence of moderate to severe vascular calcification is predictive of poor cumulative 1 year graft patency.

  18. Carnosine, anserine, creatine, and inosine 5'-monophosphate contents in breast and thigh meats from 5 lines of Korean native chicken.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Bae, Young Sik; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Lee, Jun Heon; Park, Hee Bok; Heo, Kang Nyung; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chicken line on the contents of endogenous compounds, including carnosine, anserine, creatine, and inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), in breast and thigh meats from 5 lines of Korean native chicken for the development of high-quality meat breeds. Additionally, the effects of sex (male or female) and meat type (breast or thigh meat) were examined. In total, 595 F1 progeny [black: 90 (male: 45, female: 45); gray-brown: 110 (male: 52, female: 58); red-brown: 136 (male: 68, female: 68); white: 126 (male: 63, female: 63); and yellow-brown: 133 (male: 62, female: 71)] from 70 full-sib families were used. The male chicken from the red-brown line and the female chicken from the black line showed the highest BW among the 5 lines. Carnosine content was higher in female chicken and breast meat than in male chicken and thigh meat, respectively. Breast meat contained higher anserine content compared with thigh meat. The sex effect on anserine was not consistent between breast and thigh meat. Creatine content was not consistently influenced by sex between breast and thigh meat, and no meat type effect was observed. The IMP contents were higher in female chicken and breast meat compared with male chicken and thigh meat, respectively. In addition, we clearly observed line effects by the comparison of the contents of carnosine, anserine, creatine, and IMP for each meat type according to each sex. These data are useful for selection and development of high-quality, meat-type chicken breeds.

  19. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the thigh in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zainal Abidin; Chan, Wai Hoong; Wong, Siong Lung; Ong, Eng Joe; Narihan, M Zulkarnaen A

    2014-12-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is aggressive in children. The condition in children differs to that in adults and to skeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. We report on a 9-year-old girl with EMC in her left thigh. She underwent above-knee amputation. Five months later, a small mass was noted at the right lower lobe of the lung. The patient underwent one course of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide chemotherapy, followed by resection of the mass and 8 more courses of chemotherapy. At the 2-year follow-up, she was in remission radiologically.

  20. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  1. PET/CT and MRI Imaging of a Eumycetoma of the Right Thigh.

    PubMed

    Besson, Florent L; Blanc-Durand, Paul; Meyer, Céline; Grimon, Gilles; Durand, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a chronic tropical fungal disease that infiltrates subcutaneous tissues, mainly in the feet and legs. Standard antifungal drugs are ineffective, and mutilating surgery is common. Morphological imaging is useful for assessing the local extent of the disease before surgery. FDG PET/CT may be of potential interest for the general extent, but PET descriptions remain scarce and mostly relate to the feet. Here, the authors present FDG PET/CT and MRI study of a very rare case of an extensive, biopsy-proven eumycetoma of the right thigh that was performed to guide potential surgery.

  2. Inhibition of lung metastasis of osteosarcoma cell line POS-1 transplanted into mice by thigh ligation.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Akira; Koshino, Tomihisa; Uesugi, Masaaki; Nitto, Hironori; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2002-12-15

    Using a model with external ligation of the thigh, the effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury on tumor growth and the activity of lung metastasis was investigated in mice inoculated a spontaneous murine osteosarcoma cell line (POS-1) in vivo. POS-1 cell suspension was inoculated into the right hind footpad of 70 mice. Four weeks after inoculation, the ipsilateral thigh was ligated for 3 h in 15 mice and the contralateral thigh in 15 mice. Another ten mice were inoculated with POS-1 without ligating the thigh. The number of metastatic foci on the lung surface 6 weeks after inoculation was 2.29+/-0.98 (mean+/-SE) foci/lungs in mice with ipsilateral ligation and 6.25+/-2.41 in mice with contralateral ligation, which were significantly lower than control (13.40+/-1.42 in mice no ligation) (P<0.01). The number of metastatic foci on the lung surface in mice with intraperitoneal injection of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase was 3.25+/-0.65 (mean+/-SE) foci/lungs in mice with ligation which was significantly greater than that in mice without SOD and catalase injection 1.29+/-0.97 (P=0.04). Cell viability was 9.12+/-4.07% with 100 microM H(2)O(2) in 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. It revealed that at concentrations of 100 microM H(2)O(2) or higher was cytotoxic to POS-1. In cell invasion assay, the number of invading cells with 10 microM H(2)O(2) was 2.80+/-0.53 cells/field, which was significantly lower than control (5.93+/-0.18) (mean+/-SE), indicating that low-dose H(2)O(2) suppressed invasion of POS-1. These results suggested that reperfusion injury had selective cytotoxicity to POS-1 through producing reactive oxygen species. Activated oxygen was considered to inhibit the regional growth and the ability of lung metastasis of POS-1 cells.

  3. Imaging diagnosis--seminoma causing liver compression in a spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca).

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Ludewig, Eberhard; Plenz, Bastian; Schmidt, Volker

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old male spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with anorexia, apathy, and prolapse of penile tissue. Ultrasonography revealed a large heterogeneous mass in the coelomic cavity, and fine-needle aspiration demonstrated sperm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sharply defined mass originating from the left testis. Appearance and signal intensities were similar to those reported in testicular neoplasms in humans, in particular sharing similarities with seminomas. Necropsy results and histopathological findings were consistent with a seminoma. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of the diagnosis of testicular neoplasia in a reptile using imaging techniques.

  4. [The use of hydroxyapatite substance for the ostheosynthesis after comminuted thigh fractures].

    PubMed

    Protsenko, A I; Gazhev, A Kh; Gordeev, G G; Zheltikov, D I

    2012-01-01

    The surgical tactics was analyzed in 102 patients operated on the comminuted thigh fractures. 95 patients were administered in a state of shock; 48 patients had multiple and combined injuries. All patients were operated on with the use of modern metal constructions. Bone fragments' fixation was performed with the use of splint (n=75) or adaptive ostheosynthesis (n=27), in aggreagation with the "KollapAn" fixation substance. Excellent results were acquired in 64 patients, good - in 25 patients and satisfactory - in 12 patients. The long-term results after the year were obtained in 82 patients. The results of the follow-up coincided with those, achieved in postoperative rehabilitation period.

  5. Multiple congenital malformations in a dicephalic spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca ibera).

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Selleri, P; Di Girolamo, N; Montani, A; Della Salda, L

    2013-01-01

    A 22-day-old dicephalic spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca ibera) died following a history of lethargy, anorexia and absence of defecation. The two heads were anatomically similar with independent reaction to external stimuli. The carapace showed doubled first and extra second vertebral scutes. Radiography and transplastronal ultrasonography, performed when the animal was alive, revealed two symmetrical stomachs and two asynchronous hearts. These findings were confirmed by necropsy examination. Oesophagus, liver, gallbladder and trachea were also duplicated. Other malformations included pyloric valve atresia of the left stomach, focal stenosis of the transverse colon and liver hypoplasia. Dicephalism rarely occurs in Testudinidae and its pathogenesis, still unclear, is discussed.

  6. Why Do Authors Differ With Regard to the Femoral and Meniscal Anatomic Parameters of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament?

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; do Amaral, Carlos; Nakamichi, Yuri da Cunha; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Natalino, Renato José Mendonça; Pécora, José Ricardo; Cardoso, Tulio Pereira; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2016-01-01

    Background: No consensus exists regarding the anatomic characteristics of the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). A critical analysis of the dissections described in previous studies allows the division of the ALL into 2 groups with similar characteristics. The presence of considerable variability suggests that the authors may not be referring to the same structure. Purpose/Hypothesis: To perform a lateral anatomic dissection, by layers, seeking to characterize the 2 variants described for the ALL on the same knee. We hypothesized that we would identify the 2 variants described for the ALL and that these variants would have distinct characteristics. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirteen unpaired cadaveric knees were used in this study. The dissection protocol followed the parameters described in previous studies. Immediately below the iliotibial tract, we isolated a structure designated as the superficial ALL, whereas between this structure and the articular capsule, we isolated a structure designated as the deep ALL. The 2 structures were measured for length at full extension and at 90° of flexion and for distance from the tibial insertion relative to the Gerdy tubercle. Potential contact with the lateral meniscus was also evaluated. After measurements were obtained, the 2 dissected structures underwent histologic analysis. Results: The superficial ALL presented a posterior and proximal origin to the center of the lateral epicondyle, its length increased on knee extension, and it exhibited no contact with the lateral meniscus. The deep ALL was located in the center of the lateral epicondyle, its length increased on knee flexion, and it presented a meniscal insertion. Both structures had a similar tibial insertion site; however, the insertion site of the deep ALL was located more posteriorly. The analysis of the histological sections for both structures indicated the presence of dense and well-organized collagen fibers. Conclusion: This

  7. The anterolateral ligament (ALL) and its role in rotational extra-articular stability of the knee joint: a review of anatomy and surgical concepts.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Philip P; Schüttler, Karl F; Heyse, Thomas J; Wirtz, Dieter C; Efe, Turgay

    2016-03-01

    The anterolateral ligament of the knee (ALL) has caused a lot of rumors in orthopaedics these days. The structure that was first described by Segond back in 1879 has experienced a long history of anatomic descriptions and speculations until its rediscovery by Claes in 2013. Its biomechanical properties and function have been examined recently, but are not yet fully understood. While the structure seems to act as a limiter of internal rotation and lateral meniscal extrusion its possible proprioceptive effect remains questionable. Its contribution to the pivot shift phenomenon has been uncovered in parts, therefore it has been recognized that a concomitant anterolateral stabilization together with ACL reconstruction may aid in prevention of postoperative instability after severe ligamentous knee damages. However, there are a lot of different methods to perform this procedure and the clinical outcome has yet to be examined. This concise review will give an overview on the present literature to outline the long history of the ALL under its different names, its anatomic variances and topography as well as on histologic examinations, imaging modalities, arthroscopic aspects and methods for a possible anterolateral stabilization of the knee joint.

  8. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  9. Effect of Dietary Supplementation of the Combination of Gallic and Linoleic Acid in Thigh Meat of Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Haeng; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Il Suk; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the combined effect of dietary supplementation of gallic and linoleic acid (GL) on the antioxidative effect and quality of thigh meat from broilers. Broilers received 3 dietary treatments: i) commercial finisher diet (control), ii) 0.5% GL (gallic:linoleic acid = 1 M:1 M), and iii) 1.0% GL during the 22 to 36 d. The pH value of broiler thigh meat was increased by GL supplementation. Water holding capacity of the thigh meat was enhanced by the 1.0% dietary GL supplementation. Antioxidative effect (total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS+ reducing activity, reducing power, and TBARS value) in the thigh from the broilers improved significantly with 1.0% GL. Linoleic acid and docosahexaenoic acids were higher in the broilers fed both levels of dietary GL. However, volatile basic nitrogen content and microbiological quality was not shown to be different between control and treated group. Results indicate that 1.0% dietary supplementation of GL can improve the antioxidant activity of broiler thigh meat and may enhance the meat quality. PMID:25049528

  10. Effect of thawing and cold storage on frozen chicken thigh meat quality by high-voltage electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Lai, Cheng-Hung; Ho, Wai-Jane; Huang, Su-Chen; Ko, Wen-Ching

    2010-05-01

    One of the most popular issues in electrostatic biology is the effects of a high-voltage electrostatic field (HVEF) on the thawing of chicken thigh meat. In this study, chicken thigh meat was treated with HVEF (E-group), and compared to samples stored in a common refrigerator (R-group), to investigate how HVEF affects chicken thigh meat quality after thawing at low temperature storage (-3 and 4 degrees C). The results showed that there were no significant differences in biochemical and microorganism indices at -3 degrees C. However, the HVEF can significantly shorten thawing time for frozen chicken thigh meat at -3 degrees C. After thawing chicken thigh meat and storing at 4 degrees C, the total viable counts reached the Intl. Commission on Microbiological Specification for Foods limit of 10(7) CFU/g on the 6 and 8 d for the R- and E-group, respectively. On the 8th d, the volatile basic nitrogen had increased from 11.24 mg/100 g to 21.9 mg/100 g for the E-group and 39.9 mg/100 g for the R-group, respectively. The biochemical and microorganism indices also indicated that the E-group treatment yielded better results on thawing than the R-group treatment. The application of this model has the potential to keep products fresh.

  11. Higher incidence of injection site reactions after subcutaneous bortezomib administration on the thigh compared with the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Tomohiko; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Yokota, Noriko; Takashima, Shuichiro; Chong, Yong; Ito, Yoshikiyo; Akashi, Koichi

    2013-02-01

    Subcutaneous (sc) rather than intravenous administration of bortezomib (Bor) is becoming more common for treating multiple myeloma (MM) because scBor results in lower incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy and has equivalent efficacy. Bor is an irritant cytotoxic agent when it leaks out; therefore, it is recommended that injections of scBor should be rotated among eight different sites on the abdomen and thigh. However, detailed information about injection site reaction (ISR) has not been sufficiently documented. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence and severity of ISR following scBor administration in 15 Japanese patients with MM. Grade 1 ISR occurred following 40 of 158 (25.3%) scBor injections in ten patients, whereas grade 2 ISRs occurred following seven injections (4.4%) in five patients. Five patients did not develop ISR. Of note, grade 2 ISR was documented in 6 of 65 (9.2%) thigh injections but only in 1 of 93 (1.1%) abdominal injections. These data show that grade 2 ISRs were more common in the thigh compared with the abdomen possibly because the thigh contains lesser adipose tissue than the abdomen. Grade 2 ISRs resolved without any sequela within a median of 7 d. scBor administration on the abdomen instead of the thigh should be considered, especially for emaciated patients, because ISR rapidly resolves within the interval before the next injection even if it occurs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Surgical reconstitution of a unilaterally avulsed symptomatic puborectalis muscle using autologous fascia lata.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, S Abbas; Chimpiri, A Rao; Allen, Ariel; Nihira, Mikio A; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2009-08-01

    The puborectalis muscle is an important muscle for the maintenance of fecal continence. We present a novel surgical technique for repair of symptomatic avulsed puborectalis muscle. This woman presented with dyspareunia and fecal incontinence since the vaginal birth of her child 2 years before. The diagnosis of an avulsed right puborectalis was made by physical examination and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional ultrasonography. Fascia lata was harvested from the patient's thigh and used to reconstitute the missing portion of the puborectalis muscle. At 12 months postoperatively, the patient was continent of stool and relieved of dyspareunia. The patient's dyspareunia and fecal incontinence were alleviated by restoring normal anatomy.

  13. Giant pseudocyst of the rectus femoris muscle--repetitive strain injury in recreational soccer player.

    PubMed

    Cicvarić, Tedi; Lucin, Ksenija; Roth, Sandor; Ivancić, Aldo; Marinović, Marin; Santić, Veljko

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a traumatic pseudocyst, in a recreational soccer player, after rupture of rectus femoris muscle. 37-year-old male, with history of repetitive painful accidents, was examined because of a double fist-sized mass in the anterior thigh. Ultrasound examination revealed a cystic mass in the rectus femoris muscle. Surgical removal of the mass and proximal remnant of muscle was done. Primary healing and functional recovery was achieved. Histological analysis revealed pseudocyst filled with degenerating clot and surrounded with thick fibrous capsule. The repetitive strain muscle injury, with prolonged period of healing, can occur like pseudocyst.

  14. The calf muscle pump revisited.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine J; Ayekoloye, Olufemi; Moore, Hayley M; Davies, Alun H

    2014-07-01

    clinical practice, these results would need to be replicated in appropriate clinical trials. It would also be logical to look at other modifiable muscle pumps, such as the thigh and foot, and to explore the potential benefit of electrical devices acting on the leg (eg, electrical muscular or neuromuscular stimulation), especially for those patients in whom exercise capacity is limited. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Robotic Powered Transfer Mechanism modeling on Human Muscle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio

    It is considered in engineering that one power source can operate one joint. However, support movement mechanism of living organism is multi joint movement mechanism. Considerably different from mechanical movement mechanism, two pairs of uni-articular muscles and a pair of bi-articular muscles are involved in it. In leg, movements observed in short run including leg idling, heel contact and toeing are operated by bi-articular muscles of the thigh showing strong legs to support body weight. Pursuit of versatility in welfare robot brings its comparison with conventional machinery or industrial robot to the fore. Request for safety and technology allowing elderly people to operate the robot is getting stronger in the society. The robot must be safe when it is used together with other welfare equipment and simpler system avoiding difficult operation has to be constructed. Appearance of recent care and assistance robot is getting similar to human arm in comparison with industrial robot. Being easily able to imagine from industrial robot, mid-heavyweight articulated robot to support 60-70kgf combined with large output motor and reduction gears is next to impossible to be installed in the bath room. This research indicated that upper limb arm and lower limb thigh of human and animals are holding coalitional muscles and movement of uni-artcular muscle and bi-articular muscle conjure the image of new actuators.

  16. Posteromedial thigh (PMT) propeller flap for perineoscrotal reconstruction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Chen, Yen-Chou; Yang, Johnson Chia-Shen

    2015-10-01

    Fournier's gangrene can lead to extensive defects of the perineoscrotal area with exposure of the testes. Such defect poses challenging tasks for both functional and cosmetic reconstruction. Due to its proximity, medial thigh skin appeared to be the most versatile donor site for perineoscrotal reconstruction. In this report, we present a case of reconstruction of a large perineoscrotal defect because of Fournier's gangrene using a posteromedial thigh (PMT) perforator propeller flap. A 58 year-old male who suffered from Fournier's gangrene resulted in a scrotal defect of 10 × 12 cm(2) with a large dead space. A pedicled PMT propeller flap measuring 9 × 23 cm(2) with two perforators that originated from the profunda femoris artery (PFA) was harvested for scrotal defect reconstruction and dead space obliteration. The flap survived completely, with no recipient or donor site morbidity. The length of followup was 3 months and was uneventful. The pedicled PMT propeller flap may be considered as a valid option for perineoscrotal reconstruction.

  17. Steady state and transient temperature distributions in the human thigh covered with a cooling pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, R. J.; Shitzer, A.; Chato, J. C.; Hertig, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was done on the performance of cooling pads attached to a human thigh. Each cooling pad consisted of a long, water cooled tube formed into a serpentine shape with uniform spacing between the parallel sections. The analytical work developed a cylindrical model for the human thigh. The transient times predicted by this model ranged from 25 to 80 minutes, which is reasonably close to the experimental results. Calculated and measured steady state temperature profiles were in fair agreement. The transient times associated with a change from a high metabolic rate of 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) to a low level of 300 Btu/hr (88 w), were found to be about 120 minutes. A change from 300 Btu/hr (264 w) to 300 Btu/hr (88 w) resulted in 90 to 100 minute transients. However, the transient times for a change in metabolic rate in the opposite direction from 300 Btu/hr (88 w) to 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) were 40 to 60 minutes.

  18. Infestation of the spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) by Hyalomma aegyptium in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Mohamed; Rjeibi, Mohamed Ridha; Rouatbi, Mariem; Mabrouk, Moez; Mhadhbi, Moez; Amairia, Safa; Amdouni, Yosra; Boussaadoun, Mohamed Anis

    2015-04-01

    We examined 210 spur-thighed tortoises (Testudo graeca) for the presence of ticks in Tunisia during May 2014. A total number of 602 adult ticks were collected and identified leading to the estimation of parasitological indicators. All the ticks belonged to a single species: Hyalomma aegyptium. The mean infestation prevalence was 66.2%, mean overall infestation intensity and abundance were 4.33 and 2.86 ticks/tortoise respectively. Our survey showed that tortoises were significantly more infested by male ticks than females (p<0.001). The ticks were mainly present in the posterior limbs compared to other body regions (p<0.05). There was no significance variation of length and weight of tortoises according to sex (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the tortoises' size (length and weight) and tick infestation. This study showed high tick burdens of spur-thighed tortoises in Tunisia; further investigations are needed to determine exactly the role of this tick species in the transmission of different zoonotic pathogens.

  19. Thigh rotation and the anterior approach to the sciatic nerve: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Colin Scott; Sheppard, Declan; Wildsmith, John Anthony W

    2004-01-01

    The anterior approach to the sciatic nerve block may be associated with a high failure rate because the nerve lies posterior to the lesser trochanter of the femur at the level of needle insertion. However, previous work using cadavers demonstrated that internal rotation of the leg renders the nerve more accessible to the anterior approach. Ten volunteers consented to undergo magnetic resonance imaging. Markers were placed on the surface where a needle would have been inserted for an anterior approach to the sciatic nerve. Three scans were then performed: the first with both legs in the neutral position, the second with maximal bilateral internal rotation at the hip, and the third with maximal bilateral external rotation at the hip. Examination of the scans by a consultant radiologist showed that, as the thigh is rotated, the number of scans showing an unobstructed needle passage from the skin marker to the sciatic nerve rate increased from 5% in external rotation to 85% in internal rotation. The number of times the needle path passed through femoral neurovascular bundle also fell from 55% in external rotation to 15% in internal rotation. The results confirm that, as the thigh is moved from an externally to an internally rotated position, the sciatic nerve becomes more accessible by the anterior approach at the level of the lesser trochanter, and the risk of femoral artery or nerve puncture is reduced but not eliminated.

  20. Determination of optimal placements of markers on the thigh during walking and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouzé, A.; Monnet, T.; Begon, M.; Pain, M. T. G.

    2010-06-01

    Kinematics of skin markers are affected by skin tissue artefact with respect to the bone during sports activities or locomotion. The purpose of this study is to determine the less disturbed marker’s location for walking and landing. Twenty-six markers were put on the thigh of nine male subjects. Each subject performed a static trial, a setup movement for determining a functional hip joint centre and five walking and landing trials. The marker displacements were obtained by comparing recorded marker positions and solidified marker positions based on the geometry of the static acquisition. The markers were subsequently ranked from the worst to the least deformed. The ranking of each trial for each subject was analyzed with the concordance coefficient of Kendall and descriptive statistics were used to determine the most and the least disturbed markers. The results show reproducibility between trials for each subject for the two movements. Statistical analysis shows that the most deformed markers during walking were located close to the hip and knee joints whereas the least disturbed were on the mid-thigh. The landing analysis does not permit to determine the best markers from the worst.

  1. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  2. Topographic Anatomy of the Anal Sphincter Complex and Levator Ani Muscle as It Relates to Intersphincteric Resection for Very Low Rectal Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Yuichiro; Ito, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Kojima, Motohiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Akita, Keiichi; Saito, Norio

    2016-05-01

    Intersphincteric resection has become a widely used treatment for patients with rectal cancer. However, the detailed anatomy of the anal canal related to this procedure has remained unclear. The purpose of this study was to clarify the detailed anatomy of the anal canal. This is a descriptive study. Histologic evaluations of paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were conducted at a tertiary referral hospital. Tissue specimens were obtained from cadavers of 5 adults and from 13 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. Sagittal sections from 9 circumferential portions of the cadaveric anal canal (histologic staining) and 3 circumferential portions from patients were studied (immunohistochemistry for smooth and skeletal muscle fibers). Longitudinal fibers between the internal and external anal sphincters consisted primarily of smooth muscle fibers that continued from the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. The levator ani muscle attached directly to the lateral surface of the longitudinal smooth muscle of the rectum. The length of the attachment was longer in the anterolateral portion and shorter in the posterior portion of the anal canal. In the lateral and posterior portions, the levator ani muscle partially overlapped the external anal sphincter; however, there was less overlap in the anterolateral portion. In the posterior portion, thick smooth muscle was present on the surface of the levator ani muscle and it continued to the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. We observed only limited portions in some surgical specimens because of obstruction by tumors. The levator ani muscle attaches directly to the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. The spatial relationship between the smooth and skeletal muscles differed in different portions of the anal canal. For intersphincteric resection, dissection must be performed between the longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the levator ani muscle/external anal sphincter, and the appropriate surgical lines

  3. Muscle biopsies show that FES of denervated muscles reverses human muscle degeneration from permanent spinal motoneuron lesion.

    PubMed

    Kern, Helmut; Rossini, Katia; Carraro, Ugo; Mayr, Winfried; Vogelauer, Michael; Hoellwarth, Ursula; Hofer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents biopsy analyses in support of the clinical evidence of muscle recovery induced by a new system of life-long functional-electrical-stimulation (FES) training in permanent spinal-motoneuron-denervated human muscle. Not earlier than 1 year after subjects experienced complete conus cauda lesion, their thigh muscles were electrically stimulated at home for several years with large skin surface electrodes and an expressly designed stimulator that delivered much longer impulses than those presently available for clinical use. The poor excitability of long-term denervated muscles was first improved by several months of twitch-contraction training. Then, the muscles were tetanically stimulated against progressively increased loads. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis from long-term denervated subjects showed severe myofiber atrophy or lipodystrophy beginning 2 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Muscle biopsies from a group of 3.6- to 13.5-year denervated subjects, who underwent 2.4 to 9.3 years of FES, show that this progressive training almost reverted long-term muscle atrophy/degeneration.

  4. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  5. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A; Tanner, Rebecca J; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2014-11-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190- -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29-150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes.

  6. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R.; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190– -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29–150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72–0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes. PMID:24993908

  7. An in vitro study of the Müller anterolateral femorotibial ligament tenodesis in the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Draganich, L F; Reider, B; Miller, P R

    1989-01-01

    The biomechanical effectiveness of the Müller anterolateral femorotibial ligament (ALFTL) iliotibial band tenodesis on anterior stability and internal rotational stability of the ACL deficient knee was investigated in six cadaver knees. Anterior drawer and internal rotation of the tibia were measured at 15 degrees increments from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in response to 50 N of anteriorly applied tibial force and 3 Nm of internally applied internal torque, respectively, in the intact knee, the ACL excised knee, and following the ALFTL reconstruction. A strain gage was used to measure the resting graft tension and to measure strain in the graft during the load-displacement tests. The Müller ALFTL tenodesis failed to return normal anterior stability to the ACL deficient knee (P less than 0.05). The tenodesis did, however, reduce the anterior laxity of the ACL deficient knee from 30 degrees to 90 degrees of knee flexion (P less than 0.05). The tenodesis overconstrained internal tibial rotation of the ACL excised knee from 30 degrees to 90 degrees (P less than 0.05). Measurements of strain in the tenodesis supported the load-displacement findings that the tenodesis was most effective in constraining anterior drawer and internal tibial rotation from 30 degrees to 90 degrees of knee flexion.

  8. Accessory Anterolateral Talar Facet as an Etiology of Painful Talocalcaneal Impingement in the Rigid Flatfoot: A New Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Martus, Jeffrey E.; Femino, John E.; Caird, Michelle S.; Kuhns, Lawrence R.; Craig, Clifford L.; Farley, Frances A.

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective review identified six patients with seven painful rigid flatfeet. In each case, pain was localized laterally to an accessory facet of the anterolateral talus. cross-sectional imaging demonstrated no evidence of tarsal coalition. In five of the six, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained and in each case demonstrated focal abutting bone marrow edema consistent with impingement between the accessory facet and the anterior calcaneus. Seven feet in six patients underwent resection of the accessory facet with additional subtalar joint-sparing reconstructive procedures. At an average follow-up of 11 months, clinical results were graded as four good and two fair. An association between this accessory facet and pain in the rigid flatfoot has not been previously reported. Obesity was universal and may represent a risk factor for facet impingement. At early follow-up, facet resection with subtalar joint-sparing flatfoot reconstruction provided good results with symptomatic and functional improvement in the majority of patients. PMID:19223941

  9. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Pieter; Clockaerts, Stefan; Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Lambrecht, Valérie; Wouters, Kristien; De Smet, Eline; Gielen, Jan L; Parizel, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. • ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture. • ALL injuries are highly associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries. • MRI assessment of ACL-injured knees should include evaluation of the ALL.

  10. Hypermetabolism of skeletal muscles following sexual activity: a normal variation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-09-01

    A 46-year-old man with early gastric cancer at the gastric antrum underwent an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-computer tomography (CT) scan for staging. No definite abnormal FDG uptake of the stomach was shown. Incidentally, variable FDG uptake at the bilateral serratus muscles, abdominal muscles and muscles of both thighs (Fig. 1) was observed. He had no significant past medical history except recently diagnosed stomach cancer. On personal interview, he described having had sexual activity the night before the F-18 FDG PET/CT scan, although he was aware of needing to avoid physical activity before a PET scan. The F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was done at 2:00 p.m. Therefore, the hypermetabolism of individual skeletal muscles following sexual activity lasted over 12 h. This case illustrates the hypermetabolism of skeletal muscles following sexual activity as a normal variation.

  11. Characteristics of Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Infraspinatus Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junbeom; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chunung; Lee, Sang Chul

    2017-08-01

    To report the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle and evaluate the therapeutic effect of trigger-point injections. Medical records of 297 patients (221 women; age, 53.9±11.3 years) with MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle were reviewed retrospectively. Because there were 83 patients with MTrPs in both infraspinatus muscles, the characteristics of total 380 infraspinatus muscles with MTrPs (214 one side, 83 both sides) were investigated. Specific characteristics collected included chief complaint area, referred pain pattern, the number of local twitch responses, and distribution of MTrPs in the muscle. For statistical analysis, the paired t-test was used to compare a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 2 weeks after the first injection. The most common chief complaint area of MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle was the scapular area. The most common pattern of referred pain was the anterolateral aspect of the arm (above the elbow). Active MTrPs were multiple rather than single in the infraspinatus muscle. MTrPs were frequently in the center of the muscle. Trigger-point injection of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased the pain intensity. Mean VAS score decreased significantly after the first injection compared to the baseline (7.11 vs. 3.74; p<0.001). Characteristics of MTrPs and the therapeutic effects of trigger-point injections of the infraspinatus muscle were assessed. These findings could provide clinicians with useful information in diagnosing and treating myofascial pain syndrome of the infraspinatus muscle.

  12. Control of arachidonic acid release in chick muscle cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Wright, W.

    1985-01-01

    Cultures from thigh muscles of 12 day old embryonic chicks are utilized to examine arachidonic release, prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis, and protein synthesis. The preparation of the cultures is described. It is observed that exogenous arachidonic acid is formed into photsphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine, is released by a calcium ionosphere or phospholiphase simulator, and is the substrate for the biosynthesis of PG; the epidermal growth factor and PGF do not stimulate protein synthesis over the basal levels. The relationship between arachidonate release and melittin is studied. The data reveal that a change in intracellular calcium stimulates phospholiphase activity, arachidonate release, and PG synthesis in chick muscle culture.

  13. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and decreased intramuscular fat after unilateral resistance training in spinal cord injury: case report.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Shepherd, Collin

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common adaptation after spinal cord injury (SCI) that results in numerous health-related complications. Neuromuscular electr