Science.gov

Sample records for anterolateral thigh muscle

  1. The innervated anterolateral thigh flap: anatomical study and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Cigna, Emanuele; Gargano, Francesco; Spalvieri, Cristina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2005-02-01

    During the past 20 years, the neural anatomy of many flaps has been investigated, although no extensive studies have been reported yet on the anterolateral thigh flap. The goal of this study was to describe the sensory territories of the nerves supplying the anterolateral thigh flap with dissections on fresh cadavers and with local anesthetic injections in living subjects. The sensate anterolateral thigh flap is typically described as innervated by the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve. Two other well-known nerves, the superior perforator nerve and the median perforator nerve, which enter the flap at its medial border, might have a role in anterolateral thigh flap innervation. Twenty-nine anterolateral thigh flaps were elevated in 15 cadavers, and the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, the superior perforator nerve, and median perforator nerve were dissected. In the injection study, the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, superior perforator nerve, and median perforator nerve in 16 thighs of eight subjects were sequentially blocked. The resulting sensory deficit from each injection was mapped on the skin and superimposed on the marked anterolateral thigh flap territory. The study shows that the sensate anterolateral thigh flap is basically innervated by all three nerves. The lateral cutaneous femoral nerve was present in 29 of 29 thighs, whereas the superior perforator nerve was present in 25 of 29 and the median perforator nerve in 24 of 29 thighs. Furthermore, in the proximal half of the flap, the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve lies deep, whereas the superior perforator nerve and median perforator nerve lie more superficially. Whereas the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve innervates the entire flap, the superior perforator nerve innervates 25 percent of the flap and the median perforator nerve innervates 60 percent of the flap. Clinically, a small anterolateral thigh flap (7 x 5 cm) can be raised sparing the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and using only the selective

  2. First web-space reconstruction by the anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Adani, Roberto; Tarallo, Luigi; Marcoccio, Ignazio; Fregni, Umberto

    2006-04-01

    Four patients with severe contracture of the first web space were treated with an anterolateral thigh perforator flap. The flap size ranged from 10 to 13 cm in length and from 7 to 8 cm in width. The donor site was closed directly and thinning of the flap was performed in all cases. All flaps survived and there were no re-explorations. Web space opening was maintained over the follow-up period. There was an average postoperative increase of the angle of the first web space of 61 degrees. The thinned anterolateral thigh flap provides a pliable vascularized tissue for resurfacing the skin after release of severe contracture of the first web space and represents a reliable alternative to other flaps.

  3. Bilateral anterolateral thigh flaps for large-volume breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jason J; Chandawarkar, Rajiv; Ross, Merrick I; Chevray, Pierre M

    2004-01-01

    Autologous tissue reconstruction of a large breast in patients who are not candidates for a TRAM flap is a difficult problem. We present a case report of the use of bilateral free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps for immediate reconstruction of a unilateral large breast in a patient who had a previous abdominoplasty. Use of ALT flaps allows two or three surgical teams to work simultaneously, does not require intraoperative patient repositioning, has minimal donor-site morbidity, and can provide ample malleable soft tissue for breast reconstruction. These are advantages compared to the use of gluteal donor sites. The disadvantages include more conspicuous donor-site scarring on the anterior thighs.

  4. Angio computed tomography preoperative evaluation for anterolateral thigh flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Atzeni, Matteo; Saba, Luca; Milia, Arianna; Guerra, Maristella; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2009-04-01

    The vascular anatomy of the anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has many possible variations, and none of the currently used mapping techniques (eg, Echo Color Doppler) gives a thorough knowledge of all details. Among the last generation of angiographic diagnostic techniques, multi detector computed tomography, popularly known as Angio CT, has emerged as an outstanding noninvasive operator independent option, and has been described for deep inferior epigastric perforator and pedicled transverse rectus abdominis muscle planning. This study was conducted to evaluate its usefulness prior to ALTF harvesting.Nine consecutive patients were considered for oral or lower extremity reconstruction with the ALTF. After written informed consent was obtained from all patients, a preoperative Angio-CT study was performed for surgical planning. Accurate identification of septocutaneous or musculocutaneous perforator vessels was achieved and their location, course, and anatomic variations were reported and influenced surgery. Angio CT allows a complete vascular study of the donor area of the ALTF and evaluation of the best perforator vessels before surgery allows surgeons to get an ideal planning of the flap. This imaging method is currently proposed to every patient undergoing ALT flap reconstruction. PMID:19325338

  5. Anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flap in the difficult perineogenital reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Luo, S; Raffoul, W; Piaget, F; Egloff, D V

    2000-01-01

    A pedicled anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flap that was used to cover a complicated perineogenital defect after bilateral gracilis myocutaneous flap for perineal reconstruction is presented. The indications and advantages of this approach are outlined. This technique offers to the plastic surgeon and gynecologic oncologist a new option in the armamentarium for reconstruction of the perineum, and it offers the patient reduced donor-site morbidity. PMID:10626987

  6. Free anterolateral thigh flap harvesting from paralytic limbs in post-polio syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Chen; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report two cases of poliomyelitis in which an anterolateral thigh myocutaneous free flap was harvested from the paralytic limb for oral reconstruction. We observed a decrease in the pedicle diameter of the anterolateral thigh flap, but the blood supply to the skin paddle was adequate. PMID:27583272

  7. Knee and Ankle Reconstruction With Reverse Anterolateral Thigh and Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap From One Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Choi, KyeongBeom; Cho, JaeHo; Park, MyongChul; Park, Dong Ha; Lee, Il Jae

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap is used in distal lower extremity reconstruction. Reverse ALT flap has become one of the most popular choices for knee joint soft tissue defects. A 53-year-old man sustained a degloving injury in the right lateral side of the lower extremity from the lateral malleolar area to the knee joint area. The contamination was severe, necessitating serial debridement and negative pressure wound therapy. After 4 weeks, no more soft tissue necrosis was evident. No more microorganism growth was confirmed by swab culture. ALT free flap using proximal perforator was planned for lateral malleolar area reconstruction and reverse ALT flap using distal perforator was planned to cover knee joint after confirming the pedicle length was sufficient for simultaneous knee and lateral malleolar area reconstruction. PMID:27317019

  8. Lower extremity reconstruction with the anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Naveed; Chao, Albert H; Chang, David W; Yu, Peirong

    2012-05-01

    The versatility and location of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap make it well suited for lower extremity reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgical and functional outcomes by specific anatomic regions in the lower extremity to better define the role of the ALT flap in lower extremity reconstruction. A retrospective review of patients undergoing lower extremity reconstruction with an ALT flap between July 2002 and December 2010 was performed. Total 46 patients underwent lower extremity reconstruction with an ALT flap, of whom 29 (63%) had a pedicled flap and 17 (37%) a microvascular free flap. Defects were located in the hip/buttocks (n = 8), groin (n = 13), thigh (n = 8), knee (n = 5), leg (n = 6), and foot/ankle (n = 6). The mean postoperative follow-up was 4 months. Total flap loss occurred in two patients (4%). There were 11 recipient site complications (24%). The most common complication was recipient site seroma, which occurred in five patients (11%), all of whom had hip/buttock or groin defects. Overall, 38 patients (83%) returned to their preoperative functional status. The ALT flap is an effective method of lower extremity reconstruction. It can be performed as a pedicled or free flap, with good surgical and functional outcomes. PMID:22399252

  9. Reconstruction of Chopart's Amputation Stump Using Artificial Dermis Combined with Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mari; Matsumine, Hajime; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    A 63-year-old man dropped a metal chunk onto his left foot during his work and suffered a crush injury of the left forefoot. He underwent Chopart's amputation followed by stump coverage with sole skin at the orthopedic department on the same day. He was referred to our department for reconstruction because of poor vascularization and subsequent necrosis of tissue at the stump. After the necrotic tissue was debrided, exposure of the talus bone was noted. An artificial dermis was then applied to the stump wound, followed by local negative pressure wound therapy. After 3 weeks, the generation of a strong dermis-like tissue was observed at the site of artificial dermis grafting. We then performed flow-through free anterolateral thigh flap grafting to reconstruct the stump wound. This procedure involved suturing of the peroneal muscle group and tibialis anterior muscle, which were cut off during Chopart's amputation, and suturing the soft tissue surrounding the calcaneus firmly to the fascia lata of the anterolateral thigh flap, followed by suturing of the flap to the skin defect of the left foot. There were neither postoperative complications, such as skin ulcer and equinus/varus deformity, nor need for secondary repair of the grafted flap, so the patient was able to smoothly enter a rehabilitation program including gait training. The current reconstruction technique for the tissue defect following Chopart's amputation, consisting of artificial dermis grafting, negative pressure wound therapy, and flow-through free anterolateral thigh flap grafting, enabled safe and smooth gait rehabilitation with a forefoot prosthesis. PMID:26893983

  10. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  11. [Resurfacing of a trochanteric pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, J; Faghahati, S; Burin Des Roziers, B; Daoud, G; Cartier, S

    2013-06-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap is usually used as a free flap for various kinds of reconstruction and resurfacing of distant areas. Cover of a deep trochanteric pressure sore is commonly made by muscular or musculocutaneous flaps such as tensor of fascia lata or vastus lateralis. We report the case of a trochanteric pressure sore covered by a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh flap after negative pressure therapy in a 58-year-old paraplegic patient. After 6 months, a good quality of coverage was obtained with minimal morbidity of donor site. The pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral flap appears as a reliable option for the treatment of trochanteric pressure sore.

  12. Sensate anterolateral thigh perforator flap for ischiatic sores reconstruction in meningomyelocele patients.

    PubMed

    Santanelli Di Pompeo, Fabio; Longo, Benedetto; Pagnoni, Marco; Laporta, Rosaria

    2015-05-01

    Recidivating pressure sores are a frequent complication in meningomyelocele patients because of their limitation in motility and their scarce ability to monitor the pressure applied on insensate areas while seated. We report the utilization of the sensate pedicled anterolateral thigh perforator flap for reconstruction of ischiatic sores in meningomyelocele patients. Between May 2011 and September 2013, five patients underwent transfer of a sensate pedicled anterolateral thigh flap, by an intermuscular passageway through the upper thigh, to reach the ischial defect. Flap was properly harvested from the thigh after assessment of the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve sensitive area with the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device. In all cases the flap reached the ischial defect harmlessly, healing was uneventful with no immediate nor late complications. Each patient showed persistence of sensitivity at the reconstructed area and no recurrent ischiatic sore was observed at mean follow-up of 26.4 months. The sensate pedicled anterolateral thigh flap is a valuable solution for coverage of recurrent ischial sores in meningomyelocele patients, in which pressure consciousness is fundamental. The intermuscular passageway allows to reduce the distance between flap's vascular pedicle origin and the ischial defect, hence to use the more reliable skin from the middle third of the anterolateral thigh.

  13. Free thin anterolateral thigh flap for post-burn neck contractures - a functional and aesthetic solution.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Raghavendra, S; Jeelani Naiyer, M G; Bhattacharya, D; Dutta, G; Bain, J; Asha, J

    2014-12-31

    Neck contractures after burn injuries produce restrictions in motion and unacceptable aesthetic outcomes. Although different methods of reconstruction have been used in the treatment of this ailment, a limited and unsatisfactory outcome often results. Free thin anterolateral flaps have been found to be a good single stage option for reconstruction of post-burn contractures of the neck. In our study, 11 patients with post flame burn contractures of the neck underwent surgical release and coverage by a free thin anterolateral thigh flap. Patients were followed up for an average of five years and various aspects of functional and aesthetic rehabilitation were assessed. Our findings revealed that the free thin anterolateral flaps covered the defects over anterior and lateral aspects of the neck with good colour match and contour. Furthermore, none of the flaps had any significant early or delayed complications. Two cases had to be reoperated for partial loss of flaps and all patients were satisfied with functional and aesthetic outcomes. We therefore consider free thin anterolateral thigh flaps to provide a good single stage reconstruction for post-burn cervical contractures with good functional and aesthetic outcomes.

  14. Anterolateral thigh flap salvage following failed deep inferior epigastric artery perforator breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krochmal, Daniel J; Rebecca, Alanna M; Casey, William J; Smith, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap is an option for women desiring autologous tissue breast reconstruction. If this reconstruction fails, other autologous tissue flaps, including the gluteal artery perforator and latissimus dorsi flaps, may be used for salvage. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap offers adequate tissue volume for breast reconstruction, acceptable fat quality and a long vascular pedicle. Other advantages include obviating the need for intraoperative position changes and harvesting tissue outside of the radiation field. Two cases involving ALT flaps used in the setting of deep inferior epigastric artery perforator failure are presented with favourable results. A review of the anatomy of the ALT flap is included. PMID:22379371

  15. Functional assessment: Free thin anterolateral thigh flap versus free radial forearm reconstruction for hemiglossectomy defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingxing; Hu, Qingang; Tang, Enyi; Wang, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare free thin anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with free radial forearm (FRF) flap in the reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects, and to introduce our methods and experience in the tongue reconstruction with free thin ALT flap. Material and Methods The clinicopathologic data of 46 tongue carcinoma cases hospitalized from December 2009 to April 2014 were obtained from Nangjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University. All the subjects were evaluated for the articulation and the swallowing function 3 months after the surgery. Results Among these 46 patients, 12 patients underwent tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy with ALT flap; 34 patients underwent tongue reconstruction with FRF flap. The differences in the incidence of vascular crisis, the speech and the swallowing function between two groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Thin ALT flap could be one of the ideal flaps for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and the neglectable donor site morbidity. Key words:Free thin anterolateral thigh flap, free radial forearm flap, hemiglossectomy, reconstruction, morbidity. PMID:26449437

  16. Combined Use of Anterolateral Thigh and Gluteal Fold Flaps for Complex Groin Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shimpei; Arikawa, Masaki; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of an epithelioid sarcoma of the right groin in which wide resection resulted in a complex groin defect involving the full thickness of the abdominal wall and the perineum. We reconstructed the defect using a combination of pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap and gluteal fold flap. The functional and aesthetic results were satisfactory. The ALT flap with a robust iliotibial tract is the flap of choice for abdominal wall reconstruction; however, the area covered by the skin island of the flap is restricted because the skin island is tethered to the iliotibial tract. In such cases, a gluteal fold flap is ideal for an ALT flap. Therefore, using a combination of a pedicled ALT flap and a gluteal fold flap could be a reliable option for the reconstruction of a complex groin defect. PMID:26579347

  17. Use of the anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction of the pediatric anophthalmic orbit.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Sally L; Forrest, Christopher R; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acquired anophthalmia pose unique reconstructive challenges. With implant-based reconstruction, the current standard of care, there is a tendency toward intraorbital and adnexal tissue contraction and an increasing volume discrepancy with orbital growth, resulting in enophthalmos and eyelid retraction, and also difficulty in retaining an ocular prosthesis. We describe a novel technique for secondary reconstruction of the pediatric anophthalmic orbit using a small free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. The technique involves release of retracted eyelids and restoration of orbital volume with an ALT flap based on the superficial temporal vessels. The purpose of this study is to detail the results of treatment of a series of four consecutive patients with unilateral acquired anophthalmia managed with ALT flaps. Improved symmetry, successful retention of an ocular prosthesis, and patient satisfaction were achieved in all cases.

  18. The anterolateral thigh flap for complicated abdominal wall reconstruction after giant incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Berrevoet, F; Martens, T; Van Landuyt, K; de Hemptinne, B

    2010-01-01

    In the management of giant incisional hernias with loss of domain several surgical obstacles have to be addressed. Adequate coverage of the defect using mesh, sufficient local tissue advancement and prevention of wound and mesh infections are prerequisites for success. We present a case of a complicated giant incisional hernia repair after oncologic surgery, in which we chose for an intraabdominal mesh repair using a composite mesh. The patient developed a wound dehiscence and mesh infection, successfully treated with negative pressure therapy followed by a free ALT perforator flap. Several surgical techniques are discussed to manage these complicated hernias, such as progressive pneumoperitoneum, the component separation technique and the importance of soft tissue coverage (e.g. anterolateral thigh flap). In cases of wound complications, negative pressure therapy and new soft tissue coverage are discussed.

  19. Anterolateral thigh adipofascial flap for the restoration of facial contour deformities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaolei; Teng, Li; Xu, Jiajie; Lu, Jianjian; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Zhenmin

    2010-07-01

    From January 2000 to May 2008, 50 patients with facial contour deformities underwent soft tissue augmentation with 51 anterolateral thigh (ALT) adipofascial flaps. Fifty flaps survived with no complications; partial fat necrosis occurred in one flap. Mean follow-up was 16 months. Flaps ranged from 10 x 6 cm to 20 x 12 cm. Perforators were found in 50 flaps, 43 musculocutaneous perforators (84.3%) and 7 septocutaneous perforators (13.7%), with a mean of 2.5 perforators per flap. In one flap (2.0%), no perforator was found. In this case, we used an anteromedial thigh adipofascial flap using the medial branch of the descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery as the vascular pedicle. Relatively symmetric facial contour was achieved in 20 cases. In 30 cases, adjunctive procedures including flap debulking, fat injection, and resuspension were necessary, and 23 patients achieved satisfactory outcomes. We conclude that the ALT adipofascial flap can be successfully elevated and transplanted for the correction of soft tissue facial defects. This flap can provide tissue to fill large defects, and posses the qualities of pliability, an excellent blood supply, ease of suspension and fixation, and minimal morbidity at the donor site. PMID:20049917

  20. Algorithmic approach to lower abdominal, perineal, and groin reconstruction using anterolateral thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Zelken, Jonathan A; AlDeek, Nidal F; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Lower abdominal, perineal, and groin (LAPG) reconstruction may be performed in a single stage. Anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps are preferred here and taken as fasciocutaneous (ALT-FC), myocutaneous (ALT-MC), or vastus lateralis myocutaneous (VL-MC) flaps. We aim to present the results of reconstruction from a series of patients and guide flap selection with an algorithmic approach to LAPG reconstruction that optimizes outcomes and minimizes morbidity. Lower abdomen, groin, perineum, vulva, vagina, scrotum, and bladder wounds reconstructed in 22 patients using ALT flaps between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively studied. Five ALT-FC, eight ALT-MC, and nine VL-MC flaps were performed. All flaps survived. Venous congestion occurred in three VL-MC flaps from mechanical cause. Wound infection occurred in six cases. Urinary leak occurred in three cases of bladder reconstruction. One patient died from congestive heart failure. The ALT flap is time tested and dependably addresses most LAPG defects; flap variations are suited for niche defects. We propose a novel algorithm to guide reconstructive decision-making.

  1. Outcomes following pharyngolaryngectomy reconstruction with the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap.

    PubMed

    Ho, M W; Houghton, L; Gillmartin, E; Jackson, S R; Lancaster, J; Jones, T M; Blackburn, T K; Homer, J J; Loughran, S; Ascott, F M; Shaw, R J

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of pharyngolaryngectomy for advanced laryngeal carcinoma reconstructed with the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap. Thirteen patients had primary surgery and adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy), and two had salvage surgery. Thirteen had stage III or IV disease, and eight had cervical nodal extracapsular spread. In this series all the flaps survived, and at median follow-up of 14.5 months (range 3.7-31.2), 12 of the 15 patients were alive. One patient developed a chronic pharyngocutaneous fistula, and five required repeat balloon dilatations for late pharyngeal strictures. Six patients enjoyed restoration of full oral intake, seven were able to take a soft diet, and two were dependent on feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Four patients developed adequate tracheo-oesophageal speech, and one successfully developed oesophageal speech. In this series many of the surgical problems associated with pharyngolaryngectomy reconstruction were addressed successfully by the ALT, but late dysphagia remained troublesome in an appreciable minority. While adjuvant radiotherapy could have contributed to this, future innovations will focus on the reduction of late strictures. PMID:21055852

  2. Tissue expansion techniques to minimize morbidity of the anterolateral thigh perforator flap donor site.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2013-11-01

    Selection of any free flap donor site must not only meet the requirements of the recipient site but also minimize untoward sequela at the donor site itself. Although the anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap is an ideal soft tissue donor site, a major drawback can be its nonesthetic appearance if a skin graft was needed. This detriment can be ameliorated by using traditional tissue expansion techniques. In a retrospective review over the past decade, 14 patients had ALT free flap donor site tissue expansion. These were subcategorized as pretransfer, concurrent, or posttransfer tissue expansion. In this group, mean ALT flap width was 12.2 ± 4.2 cm, which precluded direct donor site closure. Rectangular expanders were generally recommended. Multiple expanders are suggested for larger defects. The duration of expansion averaged 291.4 ± 163.9 days. The mean instilled volume ratio exceeded 2.43 ± 0.9 times the maximum vendor recommendation. Small skin graft residua were still left in four patients. Tissue expansion proved to be an important modality to consider for minimizing the stigmata of the skin grafted ALT free flap donor site. However, this process is time consuming and requires an additional surgical procedure. As such, this option must be reserved for the most motivated and compliant patients.

  3. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  4. An ideal and versatile material for soft-tissue coverage: experiences with most modifications of the anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Omer; Coşkunfirat, O Koray; Ozgentaş, H Ege

    2004-07-01

    Free anterolateral thigh flaps are a popular flap used for the reconstruction of various soft-tissue defects. From April, 2002 to June, 2003, 32 free anterolateral thigh flaps were used to reconstruct soft-tissue defects. Twenty-three of these flaps were used for lower extremity reconstruction, and nine were used for head and neck reconstruction. There were 24 male and eight female patients, with ages between nine and 82 years. The size of the flaps ranged from 11 to 32 cm in length and 6 to 18 cm in width. Five flaps required reoperation for vascular compromise in four patients and for twisting of the pedicle in another patient. While four of these were salvaged, one flap was lost due to recipient vessel problems. Musculocutaneous perforators were found in 23 cases, and septocutaneous perforators were found in nine cases. In four cases, thinning of the flap was performed. The flap was used as a flow-through type for lower extremity reconstruction in three patients. In two patients, the flap was used as a neurosensory type for foot reconstruction. Eighteen cases underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the donor site and, in the remaining cases, the donor sites were closed primarily. In three patients, the donor areas required a partial skin regrafting procedure. No infections or hematomas were observed. Despite some variations in its vascular anatomy, the anterolateral thigh flap offers the following advantages: 1) it has a long and large-caliber vascular pedicle; 2) it has a wide, reliable skin paddle; 3) it may be harvested as a neurosensory flap; 4) it can be harvested whether its pedicle is septocutaneous or musculocutaneous; 5) it can be designed as a flow-through flap; 6) it can be elevated as a thin or musculocutaneous flap; and 7) the procedure can be performed by two teams working simultaneously, and no positional changes are required.

  5. Bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flap for simultaneous reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge to simultaneously reconstruct bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis. In this study, we report two cases where bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flaps were used to resurface two separate buccal defects.

  6. Bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flap for simultaneous reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge to simultaneously reconstruct bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis. In this study, we report two cases where bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flaps were used to resurface two separate buccal defects. PMID:27619322

  7. Metachronous carcinoma of rectum with reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect using a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Amy Siu Yan

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of large, complex defects of the abdominal wall after resection of malignant tumors can be challenging. The transfer of an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a feasible and effective option. However, no report has been published on the use of ALT flap after metachronous colonic tumor resection so far. We present an original case of resection of metachronous carcinoma of rectum with reconstruction of the abdominal wall defect using an ALT flap harvested with its aponeurosis. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. Functional and esthetic results were satisfactory. There was no postoperative incisional hernia or tumor recurrence. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction. PMID:27161142

  8. Comparison of the radial forearm flap and the thinned anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap for reconstruction of tongue defects: an evaluation of donor-site morbidity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Hung-Chi; Huang, Yau-Lin; Mardini, Samir; Feng, Guan-Ming

    2004-12-01

    The radial forearm flap is commonly used for reconstruction of tongue defects following tumor extirpation. This flap is easy to harvest and offers thin tissue with large-caliber vessels. However, its use leaves behind a conspicuous aesthetic deformity in the forearm and requires the sacrifice of a major artery of that limb, the radial artery. The anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap has found clinical applications in the reconstruction of soft-tissue defects requiring thin tissue. More recently, in a thinned form, the anterolateral thigh flap has been used for reconstructing defects of the tongue with functional results equivalent to that of the radial forearm flap. For the reconstruction of tongue defects, these two flaps could provide similar soft-tissue coverage, but they seem to result in different donor-site appearances. The donor site is closed primarily, leaving only a linear scar that is inconspicuous with normal clothing, and no functional deficit is left behind in the thigh. Thus, for the supply of flaps for tongue defects, a comparison between the radial forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap donor sites is provided in this study. Between December of 2000 and August of 2002, 41 patients who underwent reconstruction of defects of the tongue using either a radial forearm flap or an anterolateral thigh flap were evaluated. The focus was on the evaluation of the functional and aesthetic outcome of the donor site after harvesting these flaps for the purpose of reconstructing either total or partial tongue defects. Finally, a comparison was performed between the donor sites of the two flaps. The disadvantages of the radial forearm flap include the conspicuous unattractive scar in the forearm region, pain, numbness, and the sacrifice of a major artery of the limb. In some patients, the donor-site scar of the forearm acted as a social stigma, preventing these patients from leading a normal life. In contrast, the anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap, after

  9. Microvascular reconstruction of the tongue using a free anterolateral thigh flap: Three-dimensional evaluation of volume loss after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, Achille; Battaglia, Salvatore; Cipriani, Riccardo; Marchetti, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    The goal of tongue microvascular reconstruction is to maximise oral function with less morbidity while preserving speech and swallowing. This kind of reconstruction often requires a bigger flap volume than is actually needed to repair the defect. This is because every reconstructive flap is subject to a shrinking process due to oedema reduction and differences among individual tissue healing processes. Moreover, patients with advanced cancers often need adjuvant radiation therapy, which can result in further flap volume loss. For these reasons, we designed this study to assess the three-dimensional flap volume loss after tongue reconstruction using an anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF). Our aim was to analyse the effects of radiotherapy on flap volume loss. The volume of ALTF was evaluated using the following protocol: an initial (T1) post operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was acquired between 3 and 8 weeks after the reconstructive procedure; a second (T2) MRI scan was obtained 6 months later; and a third (T3) MRI scan was performed 1 year after the end of treatment. Three-dimensional flap contouring was carried out, with outlining of the graft margin and comparison of its tissue density with that of the surrounding structures. Flap volume was calculated using dedicated software. In total, 20 patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Adjuvant radiation therapy was administered in 11 of the 20 patients. In the patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy, the mean flap volume loss was 16.5 cm(3). The patients who were not irradiated postoperatively showed a mean flap volume loss of 6.9 cm(3); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.041). Our study indicated that 12 months after the end of treatment, patients reconstructed with an anterolateral thigh free flap had an average volume loss of 44.2% if treated with radiotherapy, whereas an average flap shrinkage of 19.8% occurred in patients who did not undergo

  10. Comparison of donor-site morbidity and satisfaction between anterolateral thigh and parascapular free flaps in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sebastian; Klinkenberg, Marek; Behr, Bjoern; Hirsch, Tobias; Kremer, Thomas; Hernekamp, Frederick; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kneser, Ulrich; Daigeler, Adrien

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare donor-site morbidity after anterolateral thigh (ALT) and parascapular (PS) free flap harvest in the same patient. A total of 13 patients were included in this study. Because of initial flap loss, each patient received ALT as well as PS free flap transplantation. A total of 10 patients were available for follow-up. The average follow-up time was 44.5 months. Besides physical examination, range of motion and scar dimensions were assessed to objectify donor-site deficiencies. The subjective donor-site morbidity was assessed by the patients using a self-report questionnaire. In addition, patients were requested to state their donor-site preference. ALT donor site revealed more sensitivity deficiencies compared with the PS harvest site (8 vs. 4). The latter provoked less functional impairments (1 vs. 2). Scar dimensions were larger at PS harvest site (25.8 × 4.3 cm vs. 23.3 × 3.6 cm). Patients' satisfaction was in favor of the PS donor site (1.9 vs. 2.7). Among the 10 patients, 7 patients preferred the PS and 3 patients preferred the ALT donor site. Comparison of donor-site morbidities in the same patient reveals a valuable tool to diminish individual bias. Despite the low number of cases, we were able to demonstrate the superiority of PS compared with ALT donor sites.The Level of Evidence of the study is III.

  11. Simultaneous anterolateral thigh flap and temporalis tendon transfer to optimize facial form and function after radical parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Revenaugh, Peter C; Knott, P Daniel; Scharpf, Joseph; Fritz, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Background Extirpation of aggressive parotid or cutaneous facial tumors often involves facial nerve sacrifice and the creation of a large soft-tissue defect. We describe a method for single-stage reconstruction during radical parotidectomy to restore facial form and function without additional morbidity. Methods We conducted a review of immediate reconstruction/reanimation of radical parotidectomy defects with the use of anterolateral thigh (ALT) fat and fascia flaps for facial contouring, orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer (OTTT), cable grafting of the facial nerve, and fascia lata lower lip suspension. Results Five patients (mean age, 67.4 years) underwent extirpation of malignant tumors with facial nerve sacrifice resulting in large soft-tissue deficits. All patients had ALT free tissue transfer to correct facial contour defects and OTTT to restore facial form and function. Four patients underwent cable grafting of facial nerve branches. Branches of the motor nerve to the vastus lateralis harvested from the ALT surgical site were used for cable nerve grafting in 3 patients. Fascia lata from the same ALT harvest site was used for lower lip suspension to the OTTT in 4 patients. There were no donor site complications. All patients achieved midfacial symmetry at rest, oral competence with dynamic corner-of-mouth movement, and full eye closure. Conclusions Tumor clearance, symmetric facial appearance, as well as dynamic facial rehabilitation were accomplished in a single-stage procedure using the method described herein. The ALT free flap provides versatile options for soft-tissue defects as well as access to motor nerves optimal for grafting without additional morbidity. Patients undergoing extirpation of malignant tumors requiring facial nerve sacrifice can undergo immediate free tissue contour reconstruction and facial reanimation procedures with no additional morbidity.

  12. Perspectives for patients. Knee pain: safely strengthening your thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Quadriceps are the muscles on the front of your thigh that help you straighten your knee. When these muscles are not strong, you may feel pain under your kneecap. Quadriceps can be strengthened by performing squats and leg extensions. However, when you do not perform these exercises properly, you may also feel knee pain. Understanding the load and stress under the kneecap when you execute squats and leg extensions can help you perform these exercises better and with less pain while you strengthen your quadriceps. A study published in the May 2014 issue of JOSPT provides information intended to help physical therapists and their patients use these exercises to strengthen thigh muscles while minimizing the load under the kneecap.

  13. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power. PMID:27315060

  14. Successful Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction for a Recurrent Ischial Pressure Ulcer: A Case With Multiple Recurrences Over a 7-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Yu; Shih, Yu-Jen; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult ulcers to treat and have a low treatment success rate compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers; regional flap failure further complicates the treatment. Reported here is a case of a 65-year-old man who experienced a spinal injury with paraplegia due to trauma 20 years ago. The patient experienced a recurrent ischial ulcer since 2007, and underwent several types of flap reconstruction with poor outcomes over a 7-year period. Therefore, the chosen intervention was a pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) fasciocutaneous flap reconstruction for the ischial ulcer via a subcutaneous route. Over the 10-month follow-up, the recurrent ischial ulcer healed without wound dehiscence. Island pALT reconstruction appears to be an alternative technique for treating recurrent ischial pressure ulcers. Though reconstruction of ischial ulcers via the pALT technique has been described previously, this may be the first case report to describe pALT flap in a patient with recurrent ischial ulcers after failed reconstructions using a gluteus maximus flap, V-Y advancement flap, and hatchet flap.Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult to treat and have a low treatment success rate1 compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers. In addition, there are many different techniques that can be used to treat ischial pressure ulcers, including primary wound closure, gluteus maximus flaps, V-Y advancement flaps, or inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps. However, several experts have recently described using the pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) flap for reconstruction of recurrent ischial pressure ulcers.1,2 In the presented case, the authors followed a single patient with paraplegia with a recurrent ischial ulcer who had undergone several types of wound treatment over a 7-year period. The indurated ulcer was ultimately resolved by pALT reconstruction.

  15. Neoprene Thigh Sleeves and Muscle Cooling After Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Alison A; Knight, Kenneth L; Feland, J. Brent; Draper, David O

    2005-01-01

    Context: Neoprene sleeves are alleged to increase heat in skeletal muscle, but no published research supports this belief. Objectives: To quantify anterior thigh skin and intramuscular temperature changes in varsity athletes wearing a neoprene thigh sleeve. Design: A 2 × 2 × 3 × 5 factorial design with replicated measures on 3 variables. Independent variables included sex (male or female), neoprene sleeve (yes or no), exercise intensity (control, 50% intensity bicycle, 70% intensity bicycle), and exercise phase (5 minutes pre-exercise, 15 minutes of exercise, 0–10 minutes postexercise, 11–20 minutes postexercise, 21– 30 minutes postexercise). Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 12 male (23 ± 0.95 years) and 12 female (20.59 ± 1.44 years) National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate athletes actively engaged in offseason strength and conditioning programs. Intervention(s): We sampled skin and muscle temperatures every 10 seconds for 50 minutes with a telethermometer interfaced to a personal computer. Each 60-minute session included 15 minutes pre-exercise (temperatures recorded during the last 5 minutes), 15 minutes of exercise (control, 50% intensity, and 70% intensity), and 30 minutes postexercise. Skin temperature was measured on the anterior aspect of the thigh using surface thermocouples. Intramuscular temperature was measured in the vastus lateralis muscle at a depth of 2 cm below the subcutaneous fat using implantable thermocouples. Main Outcome Measure(s): Skin and intramuscular temperature. Results: Skin temperature was greater when subjects were wearing neoprene sleeves (1.4°C during control, 3.1°C during 70% exercise). Wearing a thigh sleeve had no effect on intramuscular temperature before or during exercise, but postexercise temperatures averaged 0.5°C higher. Exercise intensity showed 1.3°C to 2.0°C increases in temperature with the sleeve. Females had higher intramuscular temperatures than

  16. Complete rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle caused by coronary spasm.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masataka; Fukui, Toshihiro; Mahara, Keitaro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-12-01

    Papillary muscle rupture usually occurs as a catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction in patients with coronary artery stenosis; it is therefore less common in patients without coronary artery stenosis. We report the case of a 67-year old woman without coronary artery stenosis who suffered an acute anterolateral papillary muscle rupture and was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement. Evidence of coronary spasm was found on a coronary vasomotion test, suggesting that a high sensitivity to coronary spasm may explain a mechanism of isolated papillary muscle infarction.

  17. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for anterolateral thigh flap outlining: A retrospective case series of 68 patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunjing; Lin, Ping; Fu, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jiner; Li, Huimin; Hu, Xiaogang; He, Jianrong; Ding, Mingxing

    2016-01-01

    Flap transfer is increasingly used for repairing limb defects secondary to trauma or tumor, and appropriate preoperative planning plays a critical role. The present study aimed to examine the use of three-dimensional (3D) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in evaluating the blood supply distribution and perforating branch pattern of anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps. Bilateral donor lower limbs were scanned in 68 patients (136 limbs) using a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a 3D fast low-angle shot sequence, following the thin-slab maximum intensity projection (TS-MIP) technique. The lateral femoral circumflex artery (LFCA) was visualized in all patients: 101 limbs (101/136, 74.3%) were type I; 20 limbs (20/136, 14.7%) were type II; 3 limbs (3/136, 2.2%) were type III; and 12 limbs (12/136, 8.8%) were type IV. Tertiary branches were identified in 94 limbs (94/136, 69.1%). Donor flaps were outlined according to MRA TS-MIP findings in 4 patients. All flaps survived uneventfully following the transfer. In donor flap outlining, 3D CE-MRA with the TS-MIP technique allowed an accurate, direct visualization of the branching pattern and distribution profile of the LFCA supplying the ALT flap. PMID:27446322

  18. A case series of flow-through free anterolateral thigh flap to augment the vascularity of ischaemic limbs with soft tissue defect

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aditya; Singh, Hardeep; Mahendru, Sanjay; Brajesh, Vimalendu; Singh, Sukhdeep; Krishnan, Srinivasan; Khazanchi, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In a world of fast moving vehicles, heavy machinery and industries crush injury to limbs with vascular compromise and soft tissue defect is common. The traditional treatment is a 2 step one dealing with vascular repair and soft tissue cover separately, in the same operation. We report a series of single step vascular repair and soft tissue cover with flow through anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) flap for limb salvage. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with soft tissue defect and vascular injury were included in this study. A two team approach was used to minimise operative time, team one prepared the vessels and team 2 harvested the flap. Observations and Results: Of the ten patients operated (8 males), eight flaps were done for upper limb and two for lower limb salvage. Six anastomosis were done with ulnar vessels, two with radial and two with posterior tibial vessels. Nine extremities could be salvaged while one patient developed progressive thrombosis leading to amputation. Conclusion: The ALT flow-through flap is a versatile single step procedure that can be used to salvage an ischemic limb with soft tissue loss avoiding the need for interpositional vein graft. PMID:27274120

  19. Thigh Muscle Strength in Senior Athletes and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is commonly recommended to counteract aging-related muscle weakness. While numerous exercise intervention studies on the elderly have been performed, few have included elite senior athletes, such as those who participate in the National Senior Games. The extent to which participation in highly competitive exercise affects muscle strength is unknown, as well as the extent to which such participation mitigates any aging-related strength losses. The purpose of this study was to examine isometric thigh muscle strength in selected athletes of the National Senior Games and healthy noncompetitive controls of similar age, as well as to investigate strength changes with aging in both groups. In all, 95 athletes of the Games and 72 healthy controls participated. Of the senior athletes, 43 were runners, 12 cyclists, and 40 swimmers. Three trials of isometric knee flexion and extension strength were collected using a load cell affixed to a custom-designed chair. Strength data were normalized to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-obtained lean mass of the leg. A 3-factor multivariate analysis of variance (group × gender × age group) was performed, which included both the extension and flexion variables ([alpha] = 0.05). Athletes exhibited 38% more extension strength and 66% more flexion strength than the controls (p < 0.001). Strength did not decrease with advancing age in either the athletes or the controls (p = 0.345). In conclusion, senior athletes who participate in highly competitive exercise have greater strength than healthy aged-matched individuals who do not. Neither group displayed the expected strength losses with aging. Our subject cohorts, however, were not typical of those over age 65 years because individuals with existing health conditions were excluded from the study. PMID:19972628

  20. Case report: necrosis of the anterolateral papillary muscle--an unusual mechanical complication of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Aljabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Ramchandani, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with no significant past medical history who presented to the Emergency Department at Houston Methodist Hospital with 24 hours of chest pain. An electrocardiogram was done, an electrocardiogram confirmed a posterolateral ST elevation myocardial infarction. An immediate and successful percutaneous coronary intervention of a totally occluded ramus intermedius was performed. Six hours later she developed pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, severe acidosis, and anuria. Echocardiography showed severe mitral regurgitation due to a ruptured anterolateral papillary muscle, and emergency surgery revealed necrosis of this muscle. A bioprosthetic mitral valve was placed, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was needed for 3 days. This is a rare mechanical complication of myocardial infarction, which usually affects the posteromedial papillary muscle. The patient subsequently made a good recovery. One month later, just prior to discharge home, the patient developed pneumonia and sepsis, and she expired from multiorgan failure. PMID:25793030

  1. Thigh fat and muscle each contribute to excess cardiometabolic risk in South Asians, independent of visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Mayet, Jamil; Godsland, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare fat distribution and associations between fat depots and cardiometabolic traits in South Asians and Europeans. Methods Five hundred and fourteen South Asians and 669 Europeans, aged 56-86. Questionnaires, record review, blood testing, and coronary artery calcification scores provided diabetes and clinical plus subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD) diagnoses. Abdominal visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue, thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (TSAT), intermuscular and intramuscular thigh fat and thigh muscle were measured by CT. Results Accounting for body size, South Asians had greater VAT and TSAT than Europeans, but less thigh muscle. Associations between depots and disease were stronger in South Asians than Europeans. In multivariable analyses in South Asians, VAT was positively associated with diabetes and CHD, while TSAT and thigh muscle were protective for diabetes, and thigh muscle for CHD. Differences in VAT and thigh muscle only partially explained the excess diabetes and CHD in South Asians versus Europeans. Insulin resistance did not account for the effects of TSAT or thigh muscle. Conclusions Greater VAT and TSAT and lesser thigh muscle in South Asians contributed to ethnic differences in cardiometabolic disease. Effects of TSAT and thigh muscle were independent of insulin resistance. PMID:24862429

  2. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-04-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients' knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients' extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can't be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application.

  3. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients’ knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients’ extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can’t be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application. PMID:25960982

  4. Thigh muscle volume in relation to age, sex and femur volume.

    PubMed

    Maden-Wilkinson, T M; McPhee, J S; Rittweger, J; Jones, D A; Degens, H

    2014-02-01

    Secular changes and intra-individual differences in body shape and size can confound cross-sectional studies of muscle ageing. Normalising muscle mass to height squared is often suggested as a solution for this. We hypothesised that normalisation of muscle volume to femur volume may be a better way of determining the extent of muscle lost with ageing (sarcopenia). Thigh and femur muscle volumes were measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging sections in 20 recreationally active young men (mean age 22.4 years), 25 older men (72.3 years), 18 young women (22.1 years) and 28 older women (72.0 years). There were no age-related differences in femur volume. The relationship between thigh muscle volume and femur volume (R (2) = 0.76; exponent of 1.12; P < 0.01) was stronger than that with height (R (2) = 0.49; exponent of 3.86; P < 0.01) in young participants. For young subjects, the mean muscle/bone ratios were 16.0 and 14.6 for men and women, respectively. For older men and women, the mean ratios were 11.6 and 11.5, respectively. The Z score for the thigh muscle/bone volume ratio relative to young subjects was -2.2 ± 0.7 for older men and -1.4 ± 0.8 for older women. The extent of sarcopenia judged by the muscle/bone ratio was approximately twice that determined when normalising to height squared. These data suggest that the muscle/bone ratio captures the intra-individual loss of muscle mass during ageing, and that the age-related loss of muscle mass may be underestimated when normalised to height squared. The quadriceps seems relatively more affected by ageing than other thigh muscles. PMID:23934008

  5. Coordination among thigh muscles including the vastus intermedius and adductor magnus at different cycling intensities.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Watanabe, Kohei; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Although many studies have been focused on muscle synergies in the lower limbs, synergies of the thigh muscles during cycling have not been investigated in detail. We examined synergies of the thigh muscles including the vastus intermedius (VI) and adductor magnus (AM) while cycling. Eight healthy men pedaled at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of maximal aerobic power output at a constant cadence of 60 rpm. Surface electromyography (EMG) recorded signals from the deep VI and the three superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles, the two hamstrings and the AM. The root mean square of the EMG signal was averaged every 2° of crank rotation and normalized by the peak value for each muscle. We used factor analysis to assess normalized EMG recordings while cycling and to identify thigh muscle synergies. The VI, the superficial QF muscles and the AM dominated the first muscle synergy at all power output levels. The AM also formed a second synergy with the two hamstrings at all power output levels. These results suggest that the VI coordinates with the other QF and AM muscles, and that the AM coordinates with the QF and hamstring muscles while cycling.

  6. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation attenuates thigh skeletal muscles atrophy but not trunk muscles after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Dolbow, David R; Cifu, David X; Gater, David R

    2013-08-01

    The current study examined the effects of 12weeks of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and ankle weights on the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of three thigh [Gracilis (Gra), Sartorious (Sar) and Adductor (Add)] as well as two trunk [hip flexor (HF) and back extensor (BE)] muscle groups in men with spinal cord injury (SCI). Seven individuals with chronic motor complete SCI were randomly assigned into a resistance training +diet (RT+diet; n=4) or diet control (n=3) groups. The RT+diet group underwent twice weekly training with surface NMES and ankle weights for 12weeks. Training composed of four sets of 10 repetitions of leg extension exercise while sitting in their wheelchairs. Both groups were asked to monitor their dietary intake. Magnetic resonance images were captured before and after 12weeks of interventions. Gra muscle CSA showed no change before and after interventions. A significant interaction (P=0.001) was noted between both groups as result of 9% increase and 10% decrease in the Gra muscle CSA of the RT+diet and diet groups, respectively. Sar muscle CSA increased [1.7±0.4-2.5±0.5cm(2); P=0.029] in the RT+diet group with no change [2.9±1.4-2.6±1.3cm(2)] in the diet group; with interaction noted between both groups (P=0.002). Analysis of covariance indicated that Add muscle CSA was 38% greater in the RT+diet compared to the diet group (P=0.025) after 12weeks; a trend of interaction was also noted between both groups (P=0.06). HF and BE muscle groups showed no apparent changes in CSA in both groups. The results suggested that surface NMES can delay the process of progressive skeletal muscle atrophy after chronic SCI. However, the effects are localized to the trained thigh muscles and do not extend to the proximal trunk muscles.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging in evaluation of thigh muscles in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, K; Gao, L; Zhang, P; Goerner, F; Runge, V M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) characteristics of thigh muscles in patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). Methods: 12 patients with known PM/DM and 10 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Both DTI and conventional MR sequences were performed on both thighs of all subjects. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and three eigenvalues were compared between the PM/DM group and the healthy group. One-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test were used for statistical analyses with a significance of p < 0.05. Results: In the healthy group, the vastus intermedius muscle showed the highest ADC value and the gracilis (GA) muscle showed the lowest ADC value. These results were statistically significant when compared with other muscles (p < 0.05). The GA, semi-tendinosus and semi-membranosus muscles showed higher FA values than the other three thigh muscles (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value and three eigenvalues of oedematous muscles in the PM/DM group were higher on average and showed a statistically significant difference when compared with unaffected (non-oedematous muscles in patients) and normal muscles (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the mean FA value between oedematous and normal muscles. The mean ADC, FA and three eigenvalues in unaffected muscles (in patients) showed no statistical differences from those in normal muscles (p > 0.05). Conclusion: DTI can be used to quantitatively evaluate the anisotropic diffusion characteristics of muscles in patients with PM/DM. Advances in knowledge: A new application of DTI is proposed for inflammatory myopathies. The results show that ADC and the three eigenvalues were significantly different between diseased and normal muscles, a finding of potential value in both diagnosis and treatment monitoring of myopathies. PMID:25183381

  8. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'.

  9. Use of digital image correlation and ultrasound: analysis of thigh muscle displacement fields.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Feissel, Pierre; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of the mechanical behavior of the muscle tissue is an important field of investigation with different applications in medicine, car crash and sport. Currently, few in vivo imaging techniques are able to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle. Thus, the development of an in vivo identification method is a current thematic where the displacement field measurements could be used for further interpretations. This study aims at presenting the displacement fields measured in the anterior, posterior, lateral and medial parts of the thigh muscles using ultrasound and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques. The results of the displacement field measurements confirmed and are correlated with the ultrasound observations.

  10. Differentiation of fat, muscle, and edema in thigh MRIs using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, William; Liu, Chia-Ying; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    There are many diseases that affect the distribution of muscles, including Duchenne and fascioscapulohumeral dystrophy among other myopathies. In these disease cases, it is important to quantify both the muscle and fat volumes to track the disease progression. There has also been evidence that abnormal signal intensity on the MR images, which often is an indication of edema or inflammation can be a good predictor for muscle deterioration. We present a fully-automated method that examines magnetic resonance (MR) images of the thigh and identifies the fat, muscle, and edema using a random forest classifier. First the thigh regions are automatically segmented using the T1 sequence. Then, inhomogeneity artifacts were corrected using the N3 technique. The T1 and STIR (short tau inverse recovery) images are then aligned using landmark based registration with the bone marrow. The normalized T1 and STIR intensity values are used to train the random forest. Once trained, the random forest can accurately classify the aforementioned classes. This method was evaluated on MR images of 9 patients. The precision values are 0.91+/-0.06, 0.98+/-0.01 and 0.50+/-0.29 for muscle, fat, and edema, respectively. The recall values are 0.95+/-0.02, 0.96+/-0.03 and 0.43+/-0.09 for muscle, fat, and edema, respectively. This demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing information from multiple MR sequences for the accurate quantification of fat, muscle and edema.

  11. Electromyographic analysis of thigh muscles during track cycling on a velodrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Sato, Takayuki; Mukaimoto, Takahiro; Takashima, Wataru; Yamagishi, Michio; Nishiyama, Tetsunari

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate neuromuscular activation of thigh muscles during track cycling at various speeds. Eight male competitive cyclists volunteered to participate in this study. Surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and adductor magnus muscles of the bilateral legs was recorded during track cycling on velodromes with a 250-m track. The participants were instructed to maintain three different lap times: 20, 18 and 16 s. The average rectified value (ARV) was calculated from the sampled surface electromyography. Significantly higher ARVs were observed in the right compared to left leg for the biceps femoris muscle during both straight and curved sections at 18- and 16-s lap times (P < 0.05). In the biceps femoris muscle, significant changes in ARVs during the recovery phase with an increase in speed were seen in the right leg only (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in ARVs between the straight and curved sections for all three muscles (P > 0.05). From our findings, it was suggested that during track cycling on a velodrome the laterality of the biceps femoris muscle activity is a key strategy to regulate the speed, and fixed neuromuscular strategies are adopted between straight and curved sections for thigh muscles.

  12. Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma Originating in the Thigh Skeletal Muscle of a Larry Breed Hen.

    PubMed

    Kheirandish, Reza; Azizi, Shahrzad; Salehi, Mahmoud; Shojaeepour, Saeedeh; Hassanzadeh, Saeed

    2016-06-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant tumor arising from the smooth muscle of any soft tissue. Occurrence of this tumor in the skeletal muscles is rare. A 6-year-old Larry hen was examined because of lameness in one leg. A firm mass was palpable in its right thigh muscle, and radiographs showed extensive involvement of the surrounding soft tissues. The chicken was euthanatized. At postmortem examination, the primary tumor in the thigh skeletal muscles was firm and pink on its cut surface, and metastatic nodules were observed in the liver, spleen, kidneys, heart, and lungs. On histopathologic examination, the primary mass consisted of elongated spindle cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and blunt-end nuclei arranged as interwoven bundles. Malignancy of the tumor was determined by the presence of pleomorphism, bizarre cells, and high numbers of mitotic figures. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin, desmin, and α-smooth muscle actin but negative for myogenin. Leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed based on the histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings. To our knowledge, this is the first report in a fowl of leiomyosarcoma in the skeletal muscle with widespread metastasis to other organs. PMID:27315381

  13. Progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhu; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Jiangxi; Yuan, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the degree of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of 171 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mean age, 6.09 ± 2.30 years). Fatty infiltration was assigned using a modified Mercuri's scale 0-5 (normal-severe). The gluteus maximus and adductor magnus were affected in patients less than two years old, followed by the biceps femoris. Quadriceps and semimembranosus were first affected at the age of five to six years; the sartorius, gracilis and adductor longus remained apparently unaffected until seven years of age. Fatty infiltration of all the thigh muscles developed rapidly after seven years of age. The standard deviation of the fatty infiltration scores ranged from 2.41 to 4.87 before five years old, and from 6.84 to 11.66 between six and ten years old. This study provides evidence of highly variable degrees of fatty infiltration in children of different ages with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and indicates that fatty infiltration progresses more quickly after seven years of age. These findings may be beneficial for the selection of therapeutic regimens and the analysis of future clinical trials.

  14. Morphometry of human thigh muscles. Determination of fascicle architecture by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, S H; Engstrom, C M; Loeb, G E

    1993-01-01

    A previous investigation suggested that striation patterns spanning individual muscles in longitudinally oriented MR images may represent the orientation of its fascicles. In this study, we confirmed that these striation patterns could be used to infer fascicle orientation and to compute other architectural features of muscles from MR images. The volumes of 14 muscles within a cadaveric thigh were shown to be estimated accurately from cross-sectional MR images by comparison with direct measures from muscle mass. The angles of striations were measured at several positions within vastus medialis and semimembranosus from sagittal and frontal-plane MR images. Mathematical techniques were developed to infer the 3-dimensional orientation of fascicles based on these striation angles. The angle of striations in a 3rd oblique plane was shown to agree with mathematical predictions based on these computed orientations. The pennation angle, defined as the angle between the fascicles and the line of action of the muscle, predicted from the MR images, was similar to directly measured values. Interestingly, the pennation angle of these fascicles varied along the length of the muscle; in vastus medialis, pennation angle ranged from 5 degrees to 50 degrees in a proximodistal direction. Procedures were developed and validated to compute fascicle length by projection of fascicle orientation across the 3D shape of the muscles. The use of MR images to estimate muscle morphometry could improve greatly the predictive capabilities of musculoskeletal modelling by reducing the number of unknown model parameters. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8376199

  15. A comparison between the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap and the free anterolateral thigh perforator flap for reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: assessment of the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Meng-Jie; Fang, Qi-Gen; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    Our study investigated the quality of life (QoL) of Chinese patients after immediate reconstruction surgery on individuals with head and neck cancer. In addition, we compared the differences between pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) and anterolateral thigh free flap (ALTFF). The University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire, version 4, was used to assess the QoL. Assessments were performed at least 24 months postoperatively. A total of 110 patients' records were obtained. Among them, 86 patients completed a QoL questionnaire (78.2%). No significant differences could be found in age, primary site, T stage, N stage, and postoperative radiotherapy between PMMF and ALTFF groups. However, there were significant differences between both groups in sex, operation time, and complication. A matched analysis was performed to compare the differences in QoL between patients with head and neck cancers reconstructed with PMMF or ALTFF. Patients reconstructed with ALTFF had better shoulder but worse speech functions. There was a significant effect on the QoL of head and neck cancer patients who had undergone either PMMF or ALTFF reconstruction. The result of this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of treatment modalities for head and neck cancers.

  16. Quantifying the Elastic Property of Nine Thigh Muscles Using Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chakouch, Mashhour K.; Charleux, Fabrice; Bensamoun, Sabine F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathologies of the muscles can manifest different physiological and functional changes. To adapt treatment, it is necessary to characterize the elastic property (shear modulus) of single muscles. Previous studies have used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), a technique based on MRI technology, to analyze the mechanical behavior of healthy and pathological muscles. The purpose of this study was to develop protocols using MRE to determine the shear modulus of nine thigh muscles at rest. Methods Twenty-nine healthy volunteers (mean age = 26 ± 3.41 years) with no muscle abnormalities underwent MRE tests (1.5 T MRI). Five MRE protocols were developed to quantify the shear moduli of the nine following thigh muscles at rest: rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), vastus intermedius (VI), vastus lateralis (VL), sartorius (Sr), gracilis (Gr), semimembranosus (SM), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps (BC). In addition, the shear modulus of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was analyzed. Results The gracilis, sartorius, and semitendinosus muscles revealed a significantly higher shear modulus (μ_Gr = 6.15 ± 0.45 kPa, μ_ Sr = 5.15 ± 0.19 kPa, and μ_ ST = 5.32 ± 0.10 kPa, respectively) compared to other tissues (from μ_ RF = 3.91 ± 0.16 kPa to μ_VI = 4.23 ± 0.25 kPa). Subcutaneous adipose tissue had the lowest value (μ_adipose tissue = 3.04 ± 0.12 kPa) of all the tissues tested. Conclusion The different elasticities measured between the tissues may be due to variations in the muscles' physiological and architectural compositions. Thus, the present protocol could be applied to injured muscles to identify their behavior of elastic property. Previous studies on muscle pathology found that quantification of the shear modulus could be used as a clinical protocol to identify pathological muscles and to follow-up effects of treatments and therapies. These data could also be used for modelling purposes. PMID:26397730

  17. NMR imaging estimates of muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in the thigh: variations with muscle, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Barnouin, Yoann; Azzabou, Noura; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Moraux, Amélie; Leroux, Gaëlle; Behin, Anthony; McPhee, Jamie S; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-06-01

    Muscle mass is particularly relevant to follow during aging, owing to its link with physical performance and autonomy. The objectives of this work were to assess muscle volume (MV) and intramuscular fat (IMF) for all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy individuals using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the effect of gender and age on MV and IMF and to determine the best representative slice for the estimation of MV and IMF. The study enrolled 105 healthy young (range 20-30 years) and older (range 70-80 years) subjects. MRI scans were acquired along the femur length using a three-dimension three-point Dixon proton density-weighted gradient echo sequence. MV and IMF were estimated from all the slices. The effects of age and gender on MV and IMF were assessed. Predictive equations for MV and IMF were established using a single slice at various femur levels for each muscle in order to reduce the analysis process. MV was decreased with aging in both genders, particularly in the quadriceps femoris. IMF was largely increased with aging in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. Percentages of MV decrease and IMF increase with aging varied according to the muscle. Predictive equations to predict MV and IMF from single slices are provided and were validated. This study is the first one to provide muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy subjects. PMID:26040416

  18. Nonuniform changes in MRI measurements of the thigh muscles after two hamstring strengthening exercises.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Garrues, Mirian A; Cronin, John B; Contreras, Bret; Los Arcos, Asier; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Maffulli, Nicola; Idoate, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Although many different hamstring strengthening exercises exist, the effect on site specific activation of these exercises on different muscles of the leg is unclear. This study investigated the effects of the eccentric leg curl (LC) and lunge (L) exercises on the biceps femoris long head (BFl), biceps femoris short head (BFs), semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), and adductor magnus (AM). Each leg of 11 male professional soccer players was randomly assigned to an LC or L exercise protocol (3 sets of 6 repetitions). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the subjects' thighs were performed before and 48 hours after the intervention. Fifteen axial scans of the thigh interspaced by a distance of 1/15 right femur length (Lf) were obtained. The fMRI data were analyzed for signal intensity changes. No significant changes were observed in absolute short tau inversion recovery values for the SM and BFs. Significant changes for the ST (∼21-45%) from sections 4 to 10, AM (∼2-13%) at section 4, and BFl (∼ -3 vs. 8%) at section 7 were noted. LC exercises load all the regions of the ST muscle. The L exercises load the proximal regions of the BFl and AM. These findings may have relevance when designing protocols for prevention and rehabilitation of hamstring injuries. PMID:23443215

  19. Atlas-registration based image segmentation of MRI human thigh muscles in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ezak; Yap, Moi Hoon; Degens, Hans; McPhee, Jamie S.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of anatomic structures of magnetic resonance thigh scans can be a challenging task due to the potential lack of precisely defined muscle boundaries and issues related to intensity inhomogeneity or bias field across an image. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination framework of atlas construction and image registration methods to propagate the desired region of interest (ROI) between atlas image and the targeted MRI thigh scans for quadriceps muscles, femur cortical layer and bone marrow segmentations. The proposed system employs a semi-automatic segmentation method on an initial image in one dataset (from a series of images). The segmented initial image is then used as an atlas image to automate the segmentation of other images in the MRI scans (3-D space). The processes include: ROI labeling, atlas construction and registration, and morphological transform correspondence pixels (in terms of feature and intensity value) between the atlas (template) image and the targeted image based on the prior atlas information and non-rigid image registration methods.

  20. Effect of exercise intervention on thigh muscle volume and anatomical cross-sectional areas--quantitative assessment using MRI.

    PubMed

    Hudelmaier, Martin; Wirth, Wolfgang; Himmer, Maria; Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne; Sänger, Alexandra; Eckstein, Felix

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the location-specific magnitudes of an exercise intervention on thigh muscle volume and anatomical cross-sectional area, using MRI. Forty one untrained women participated in strength, endurance, or autogenic training for 12 weeks. Axial MR images of the thigh were acquired before and after the intervention, using a T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence (10 mm sections, 0.78 mm in-plane resolution). The extensor, flexor, adductor, and sartorius muscles were segmented between the femoral neck and the rectus femoris tendon. Muscle volumes were determined, and anatomical cross-sectional areas were derived from 3D reconstructions at 10% (proximal-to-distal) intervals. With strength training, the volume of the extensors (+3.1%), flexors (+3.5%), and adductors (+3.9%) increased significantly (P < 0.05) between baseline and follow-up, and with endurance training, the volume of the extensor (+3.7%) and sartorius (+5.1%) increased significantly (P < 0.05). No relevant or statistically significant change was observed with autogenic training. The greatest standardized response means were observed for the anatomical cross-sectional area in the proximal aspect (10-30%) of the thigh and generally exceeded those for muscle volumes. The study shows that MRI can be used to monitor location-specific effects of exercise intervention on muscle cross-sectional areas, with the proximal aspect of the thigh muscles being most responsive. PMID:20665894

  1. Subcutaneous abdominal fat and thigh muscle composition predict insulin sensitivity independently of visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, B H; Thaete, F L; Simoneau, J A; Kelley, D E

    1997-10-01

    Whether visceral adipose tissue has a uniquely powerful association with insulin resistance or whether subcutaneous abdominal fat shares this link has generated controversy in the area of body composition and insulin sensitivity. An additional issue is the potential role of fat deposition within skeletal muscle and the relationship with insulin resistance. To address these matters, the current study was undertaken to measure body composition, aerobic fitness, and insulin sensitivity within a cohort of sedentary healthy men (n = 26) and women (n = 28). The subjects, who ranged from lean to obese (BMI 19.6-41.0 kg/m2), underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to measure fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM), computed tomography to measure cross-sectional abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, and computed tomography (CT) of mid-thigh to measure muscle cross-sectional area, muscle attenuation, and subcutaneous fat. Insulin sensitivity was measured using the glucose clamp technique (40 mU.m-2.min-1), in conjunction with [3-3H]glucose isotope dilution. Maximal aerobic power (VO2max) was determined using an incremental cycling test. Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) ranged from 3.03 to 16.83 mg.min-1.kg-1 FFM. Rd was negatively correlated with FM (r = -0.58), visceral fat (r = -0.52), subcutaneous abdominal fat (r = -0.61), and thigh fat (r = -0.38) and positively correlated with muscle attenuation (r = 0.48) and VO2max (r = 0.26, P < 0.05). In addition to manifesting the strongest simple correlation with insulin sensitivity, in stepwise multiple regression, subcutaneous abdominal fat retained significance after adjusting for visceral fat, while the converse was not found. Muscle attenuation contributed independent significance to multiple regression models of body composition and insulin sensitivity, and in analysis of obese subjects, muscle attenuation was the strongest single correlate of insulin resistance. In summary, as a component of

  2. Relationship between site-specific loss of thigh muscle and gait performance in women: the HIREGASAKI study.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Ogawa, Madoka; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loftin, Mark; Mitsukawa, Naotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is observed as a site-specific loss of skeletal muscle mass, however, it is unknown whether the site-specific sarcopenia is associated with development of physical disability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between age-related thigh muscle loss and gait performance. Fifty-three women aged 52-83 years had their thigh muscle thickness (MTH) measured by ultrasound at five sites on the anterior (30%, 50%, and 70% of thigh length) and posterior (50% and 70% of thigh length) aspects of their thigh. Maximum and normal walking speeds, zig-zag walking time, and maximal voluntary isometric knee extension and flexion strength were measured. Age was inversely correlated to the anterior and posterior MTH ratio (e.g., anterior 50%:posterior 70% MTH ratio [r=-0.426, p=0.002]), thus the site-specific muscle loss of the thigh was observed in the present sample. There were no significant correlations between the anterior/posterior MTH ratio and maximum and normal walking speeds. However, the ratios of anterior 50%:posterior 70% MTH (r=-0.430) and anterior 30%:posterior 70% MTH (r=-0.444) were correlated (p=0.001) to zig-zag walking test. After adjusting for age, height and weight, the anterior 30%:posterior 70% MTH (r=-0.292, p=0.040) was inversely correlated to zig-zag walking performance. Isometric knee extension strength was also inversely correlated to zig-zag walking. Our results suggest that an age-related loss of adductor/quadriceps muscles may be associated with a decrease in a relatively difficult task performance such as zig-zag walking. PMID:22795673

  3. Thigh muscle size and vascular function after blood flow-restricted elastic band training in older women

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Fukumura, Kazuya; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of elastic band training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on thigh muscle size and vascular function in older women. Older women were divided into three groups: low-intensity elastic band BFR training (BFR-Tr, n = 10), middleto high-intensity elastic band training (MH-Tr, n = 10), and no training (Ctrl, n = 10) groups. BFR-Tr and MH-Tr groups performed squat and knee extension exercises using elastic band, 2 days/week for 12 weeks. During BFR-Tr exercise session, subjects wore pressure cuffs around the most proximal region of both thighs. The following measurements were taken before (pre) and 3-5 days after (post) the final training session: MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at mid-thigh, maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of knee extension, central systolic blood pressure (c-SBP), central-augmentation index (c-AIx), cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Quadriceps muscle CSA (6.9%) and knee extension MVIC (13.7%) were increased (p < 0.05) in the BFR-Tr group, but not in the MH-Tr and the Ctrl groups. Regarding c-SBP, c-AIx, CAVI and ABI, there were no changes between pre- and post- results among the three groups. Elastic band BFR training increases thigh muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not decrease vascular function in older women. PMID:27244884

  4. Adaptive control for backward quadrupedal walking V. Mutable activation of bifunctional thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C A; Buford, J A; Smith, J L

    1996-02-01

    1. In this, the fifth article in a series to assess changes in posture, hindlimb dynamics, and muscle synergies associated with backward (BWD) quadrupedal walking, we compared the recruitment of three biarticular muscles of the cat's anterior thigh (anterior sartorius, SAa; medial sartorius, SAm; rectus femoris, RF) for forward (FWD) and BWD treadmill walking. Electromyography (EMG) records from these muscles, along with those of two muscles (semitendinosus, ST; anterior biceps femoris, ABF) studied previously in this series, were synchronized with kinematic data digitized from high-speed ciné film for unperturbed steps and steps in which a stumbling corrective reaction was elicited during swing. 2. During swing, the relative timing of EMG activity for the unifunctional SAm (hip and knee flexor) was similar for unperturbed steps of FWD and BWD walking. The SAm was active before paw lift off and remained active during most of swing (75%) for both forms of walking, but there was a marked decrease in EMG amplitude after paw off during BWD and not FWD swing. In contrast, the relative timing of EMG activity for the SAa and RF, two bifunctional muscles (hip flexors, knee extensors), was different for FWD and BWD swing. During FWD swing, the SAa and the RF (to a lesser extent) were coactive with the SAm; however, during BWD swing, the SAa and RF were active just before paw lift off and then inactive for the rest of swing until just before paw contact (see 3). Thus the swing-phase activity of the SAa and RF was markedly shorter for BWD than FWD swing. 3. Activity in SAa and RF was also different during FWD and BWD stance. The RF was consistently active from mid-to-late stance of FWD walking, and the SAa was also active during this period in some FWD steps. During the stance phase of BWD walking, however, the onset of activity in both muscles consistently shifted to early stance as both muscles became active just before paw contact (the E1 phase). Activity in RF

  5. Age-related site-specific muscle loss in the thigh and zigzag walking performance in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Ogawa, M; Mitsukawa, N

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the relationships between site-specific muscle loss in the thigh, muscle quality and zigzag walking performance, 40 men and 41 women aged 65-79 years had muscle thickness (MTH) measured by ultrasound at nine sites on the anterior and posterior aspects of the body. Skeletal muscle mass (SM) was estimated from an ultrasound-derived prediction equation. Site-specific thigh sarcopenia was calculated using ultrasound-measured MTH at the anterior/posterior aspects of the thigh (AP-MTH ratio). Zigzag walking time (ZWT) and maximum isometric knee extension (KE) and flexion (KF) torques were measured. Muscle quality (torque/thigh SM) and knee joint strength index (torque/body mass) were calculated. There were no significant correlations between SM index and ZWT. However, AP-MTH ratio was inversely correlated (P < 0.05) to ZWT in men (r = -0.335) and women (r = -0.309). ZWT was also inversely correlated (P < 0.05) to KE-strength index in both sexes (men, r = -0.328; women, r = -0.372). Similarly, ZWT was correlated to KF-strength index (r = -0.497) and muscle quality (r = -0.322) in women, but not in men. After adjusting for age, height and body mass, AP-MTH ratio was inversely correlated to ZWT in men (r = -0.325) and tended to be correlated to ZWT in women (r = -0.263). Zigzag walking performance may be associated with site-specific thigh sarcopenia in older men and women.

  6. Intermuscular adipose tissue and thigh muscle area dynamics during an 18-month randomized weight loss trial.

    PubMed

    Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Shelef, Ilan; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Gepner, Yftach; Tene, Lilac; Zelicha, Hila; Tsaban, Gal; Bilitzky, Avital; Komy, Oded; Cohen, Noa; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Zeller, Lior; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Thiery, Joachim; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear whether intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) has any metabolic influence or whether it is merely a marker of abnormalities, as well as what are the effects of specific lifestyle strategies for weight loss on the dynamics of both IMAT and thigh muscle area (TMA). We followed the trajectory of IMAT and TMA during 18-mo lifestyle intervention among 278 sedentary participants with abdominal obesity, using magnetic resonance imaging. We measured the resting metabolic rate (RMR) by an indirect calorimeter. Among 273 eligible participants (47.8 ± 9.3 yr of age), the mean IMAT was 9.6 ± 4.6 cm(2) Baseline IMAT levels were directly correlated with waist circumference, abdominal subdepots, C-reactive protein, and leptin and inversely correlated with baseline TMA and creatinine (P < 0.05 for all). After 18 mo (86.3% adherence), both IMAT (-1.6%) and TMA (-3.3%) significantly decreased (P < 0.01 vs. baseline). The changes in both IMAT and TMA were similar across the lifestyle intervention groups and directly corresponded with moderate weight loss (P < 0.001). IMAT change did not remain independently associated with decreased abdominal subdepots or improved cardiometabolic parameters after adjustments for age, sex, and 18-mo weight loss. In similar models, 18-mo TMA loss remained associated with decreased RMR, decreased activity, and with increased fasting glucose levels and IMAT (P < 0.05 for all). Unlike other fat depots, IMAT may not represent a unique or specific adipose tissue, instead largely reflecting body weight change per se. Moderate weight loss induced a significant decrease in thigh muscle area, suggesting the importance of resistance training to accompany weight loss programs. PMID:27402560

  7. ¹³C MRS reveals a small diurnal variation in the glycogen content of human thigh muscle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kamei, Akiko; Osawa, Takuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Takizawa, Osamu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    There is marked diurnal variation in the glycogen content of skeletal muscles of animals, but few studies have addressed such variations in human muscles. (13)C MRS can be used to noninvasively measure the glycogen content of human skeletal muscle, but no study has explored the diurnal variations in this parameter. This study aimed to investigate whether a diurnal variation in glycogen content occurs in human muscles and, if so, to what extent it can be identified using (13)C MRS. Six male volunteers were instructed to maintain their normal diet and not to perform strenuous exercise for at least 3 days before and during the experiment. Muscle glycogen and blood glucose concentrations were measured six times in 24 h under normal conditions in these subjects. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle was determined noninvasively by natural abundance (13)C MRS using a clinical MR system at 3 T. Nutritional analysis revealed that the subjects' mean carbohydrate intake was 463 ± 137 g, being approximately 6.8 ± 2.4 g/kg body weight. The average sleeping time was 5.9 ± 1.0 h. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle at the starting point was 64.8 ± 20.6 mM. Although absolute and relative individual variations in muscle glycogen content were 7.0 ± 2.1 mM and 11.3 ± 4.6%, respectively, no significant difference in glycogen content was observed among the different time points. This study demonstrates that normal food intake (not fat and/or carbohydrate rich), sleep and other daily activities have a negligible influence on thigh muscle glycogen content, and that the diurnal variation of the glycogen content in human muscles is markedly smaller than that in animal muscles. Moreover, the present results also support the reproducibility and availability of (13)C MRS for the evaluation of the glycogen content in human muscles.

  8. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thighmuscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  9. Effect of thigh muscle fatigue on the biomechanical factors of the lower limbs when walking in a squatted position

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wan-Ki; Lee, Chul-Gab; Ko, Dae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare and analyze the effects of thigh muscle fatigue caused by walking in a squatted position on biomechanical factors, to evaluate the risk of a job performed sitting in a squatted position for a long period of time. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen right foot dominant women without any injuries in their joints and body in the last 6 months were selected. They walked in a squatted position, and then muscle fatigue was induced by using an isokinetic muscular function measuring device (CSMI, USA). After the CSMI measurement, the participants performed walking in a squatted position again. [Results] After inducing thigh muscle fatigue, the knee joint maximum adduction moment significantly increased and the required duration was reduced. The muscle fatigue index was positively correlated with adduction moment and negatively with the duration. It influenced the changes of maximum adduction moment; 55.0% of the adduction moment change was explained by the degree of fatigue. [Conclusion] A quantitative analysis of working in a squatted position was performed. The thigh muscle fatigue index negatively the knee joint during walking in a squatted position. Therefore, this experiment can be used as an ergonomic analysis tool of general farm work. PMID:27134402

  10. Site-specific thigh muscle loss as an independent phenomenon for age-related muscle loss in middle-aged and older men and women.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Patterson, Kaitlyn M; Stover, Caitlin D; Geddam, David A R; Tribby, Aaron C; Lajza, David G; Young, Kaelin C

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-determined appendicular lean mass (aLM) and ultrasound-measured thigh muscle thickness (MTH) ratio and between aLM or thigh MTH ratio and zigzag walking performance. Eighty-one middle-aged and older adults (41 men and 40 women) aged 50 to 74 years volunteered for the study. Approximately two thirds of the subjects (34 men and 17 women) carried out regular sports activity (at least >2 times a week) including running and cycling exercise. MTH was measured using B-mode ultrasound at two sites on the anterior (A50) and posterior (P50) aspects of the mid-thigh. A50:P50 MTH ratio was calculated to evaluate site-specific thigh muscle loss. aLM and percent body fat were also determined using a DXA. Men had lower body fat and higher aLM than women. Anterior and posterior thigh MTH as well as A50:P50 MTH ratio was higher in men than in women. Zigzag walking time was faster in men than in women. Anterior and posterior thigh MTH was positively (p < 0.001) correlated to aLM and aLM index in men and women. However, A50:P50 MTH ratio was not significantly correlated with aLM and aLM index in both sexes. There was no significant correlation between aLM index and zigzag walking time in men and women. A50:P50 MTH ratio was inversely (p < 0.05) correlated to zigzag walking time in both men and women. Our results suggest that thigh MTH ratio is independent of age-related muscle mass loss detected by aLM.

  11. Thigh musculature in relation to chronic anterior cruciate ligament tear: muscle size, morphology, and mechanical output before reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lorentzon, R; Elmqvist, L G; Sjöström, M; Fagerlund, M; Fuglmeyer, A R

    1989-01-01

    Eighteen male patients who had untreated chronic ACL rupture were studied in order to evaluate thigh muscle size, morphology, and isokinetic performance of the quadriceps muscle. Computed tomography disclosed a 5.1% mean atrophy of the quadriceps (P less than 0.05), 2.1% slight hypertrophy of the hamstrings (P less than 0.05), and also nonsignificant changes of all other muscle areas of the injured thigh. Muscle morphology (m. vastus lateralis) was normal in 11 biopsy specimens, whereas minor abnormalities (irregular shape or hypotrophy) could be seen in the rest. Isokinetic mechanical output of the knee extensors was 71% to 87% of that of the noninjured limb (P less than 0.01), and the mechanical output corrected for differences in quadriceps cross-sectional area was significantly lower in the injured than the uninjured limb. As there were no significant correlations between isokinetic performance and muscle size or qualitative morphology or morphometric data, the strength decrease cannot be explained by muscle atrophy or structural changes per se. We conclude that nonoptimal activation of the muscles during voluntary contractions is probably the most important causative mechanism of the strength decrease found in patients who have chronic symptomatic ACL tear.

  12. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Methods Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20–45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an “upright standing” reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. Results In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Conclusion Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may

  13. COMPETITIVE ATHLETIC PARTICIPATION, THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH, AND BONE DENSITY IN ELITE SENIOR ATHLETES AND CONTROLS

    PubMed Central

    McCrory, Jean L.; Salacinski, Amanda J.; Hunt Sellhorst, Sarah E.; Greenspan, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between participation in highly competitive exercise, thigh muscle strength, and regional and total body bone mineral density (BMD) in elite senior athletes and healthy elderly controls was investigated. One hundred and four elite senior athletes (72.6±6.4yrs, 168.7±8.6cm, 72.6±13.5kg, 57M:47F) and 79 healthy controls (75.4±5.6yrs, 170.8±25.5cm, 79.5± 11.7kg, 46M:33F) participated in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D and calcium intake were assessed via a recall survey. Isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque was measured via a custom strength measurement device. Total body and regional BMD of the hip, radius, and spine were assessed with DXA. For each BMD site assessed, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed in four steps (α=0.10) to examine the contribution of (1) age, sex, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake (2) group (elite senior athlete, control), (3) knee extension peak torque and (4) knee flexion peak torque on BMD. Sex, age, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake explained a significant amount of variance in BMD in each site. Group was not significant. Knee extension peak torque explained an additional 3.8% of the variance in hip BMD (p=0.06). Knee flexion peak torque was not correlated to BMD at any of the sites assessed. In conclusion, participation in highly competitive athletics was not related to total body or regional BMD. Age, sex, bodyweight, and vitamin D and calcium intake were significantly related to BMD at all of the sites assessed. Quadriceps strength contributed slightly to hip BMD. Our results imply that participation in highly competitive senior athletics does not have a protective effect on BMD, perhaps because of a lower bodyweight or other confounding factors. PMID:23442279

  14. Inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in exercising human thigh muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D Walter; Fadel, Paul J; Smith, Michael L; Raven, Peter; Sander, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic responses within exercising skeletal muscle remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to test whether α2-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction was more sensitive to metabolic inhibition than α1-vasoconstriction during dynamic knee-extensor exercise. We studied healthy volunteers using two protocols: (1) wide dose ranges of the α-adrenoreceptor agonists phenylephrine (PE, α1 selective) and BHT-933 (BHT, α2 selective) were administered intra-arterially at rest and during 27 W knee-extensor exercise (n = 13); (2) flow-adjusted doses of PE (0.3 μg kg−1 l−1) and BHT (15 μg kg−1 l−1) were administered at rest and during ramped exercise (7 W to 37 W; n= 10). Ultrasound Doppler and thermodilution techniques provided direct measurements of femoral blood flow (FBF). PE (0.8 μg kg−1) and BHT (40 μg kg−1) produced comparable maximal reductions in FBF at rest (−58 ± 6 versus−64 ± 4%). Despite increasing the doses, PE (1.6 μg kg−1 min−1) and BHT (80 μg kg−1 min−1) caused significantly smaller changes in FBF during 27 W exercise (−13 ± 4 versus−3 ± 5%). During ramped exercise, significant vasoconstriction at lower intensities (7 and 17 W) was seen following PE (−16 ± 5 and −16 ± 4%), but not BHT (−2 ± 4 and −4 ± 5%). At the highest intensity (37 W), FBF was not significantly changed by either drug. Collectively, these data demonstrate metabolic inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in large postural muscles of healthy humans. Both α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor agonists produce comparable vasoconstriction in the resting leg, and dynamic thigh exercise attenuates α1- and α2-mediated vasoconstriction similarly. However, α2-mediated vasoconstriction appears more sensitive to metabolic inhibition, because α2 is completely inhibited even at low workloads, whereas α1 becomes progressively inhibited with increasing workloads. PMID

  15. Competitive athletic participation, thigh muscle strength, and bone density in elite senior athletes and controls.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Jean L; Salacinski, Amanda J; Hunt Sellhorst, Sarah E; Greenspan, Susan L

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between participation in highly competitive exercise, thigh muscle strength, and regional and total body bone mineral density (BMD) in elite senior athletes and healthy elderly controls was investigated. One hundred and four elite senior athletes (age: 72.6 ± 6.4 years, height: 168.7 ± 8.6 cm, mass: 72.6 ± 13.5 kg, 57 male:47 female) and 79 healthy controls (age: 75.4 ± 5.6 years, height: 170.8 ± 25.5 cm, mass: 79.5 ± 11.7 kg, 46 male:33 female) participated in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D and calcium intake were assessed via a recall survey. Isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque were measured via a custom strength measurement device. Total body and regional BMD of the hip, radius, and spine were assessed with a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometer. For each BMD site assessed, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed in 4 steps (α = 0.10) to examine the contribution of (a) age, sex, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake; (b) group (elite senior athlete, control); (c) knee extension peak torque; and (d) knee flexion peak torque on BMD. Sex, age, bodyweight, and calcium and vitamin D intake explained a significant amount of variance in BMD in each site. Group was not significant. Knee extension peak torque explained an additional 3.8% of the variance in hip BMD (p = 0.06). Knee flexion peak torque was not correlated to BMD at any of the sites assessed. In conclusion, participation in highly competitive athletics was not related to total body or regional BMD. Age, sex, bodyweight, and vitamin D and calcium intake were significantly related to BMD at all the sites assessed. Quadriceps strength contributed slightly to hip BMD. Our results imply that participation in highly competitive senior athletics does not have a protective effect on BMD, perhaps because of a lower bodyweight or other confounding factors.

  16. Identification of hyperelastic properties of passive thigh muscle under compression with an inverse method from a displacement field measurement.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Feissel, Pierre; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-11-26

    The mechanical behavior of muscle tissue is an important field of investigation with different applications in medicine, car crash and sport, for example. Currently, few in vivo imaging techniques are able to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle. Thus, this study presents an in vivo method to identify a hyperelatic behavior from a displacement field measured with ultrasound and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques. This identification approach was composed of 3 inter-dependent steps. The first step was to perform a 2D MRI acquisition of the thigh in order to obtain a manual segmentation of muscles (quadriceps, ischio, gracilis and sartorius) and fat tissue, and then develop a Finite Element model. In addition, a Neo-Hookean model was chosen to characterize the hyperelastic behavior (C10, D) in order to simulate a displacement field. Secondly, an experimental compression device was developed in order to measure the in vivo displacement fields in several areas of the thigh. Finally, an inverse method was performed to identify the C10 and D parameters of each soft tissue. The identification procedure was validated with a comparison with the literature. The relevance of this study was to identify the mechanical properties of each investigated soft tissues.

  17. Hip Fractures Risk in Older Men and Women Associated With DXA-Derived Measures of Thigh Subcutaneous Fat Thickness, Cross-Sectional Muscle Area, and Muscle Density.

    PubMed

    Malkov, Serghei; Cawthon, Peggy M; Peters, Kathy Wilt; Cauley, Jane A; Murphy, Rachel A; Visser, Marjolein; Wilson, Joseph P; Harris, Tamara; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steve; Shepherd, John A

    2015-08-01

    Mid-thigh cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), muscle attenuation, and greater trochanter soft tissue thickness have been shown to be independent risk factors of hip fracture. Our aim was to determine whether muscle and adipose tissue measures derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans would have a similar risk association as those measured using other imaging methods. Using a case-cohort study design, we identified 169 incident hip fracture cases over an average of 13.5 years among participants from the Health ABC Study, a prospective study of 3075 individuals initially aged 70 to 79 years. We modeled the thigh 3D geometry and compared DXA and computed tomography (CT) measures. DXA-derived thigh CSA, muscle attenuation, and subcutaneous fat thickness were found to be highly correlated to their CT counterparts (Pearson's r = 0.82, 0.45, and 0.91, respectively; p < 0.05). The fracture risk of men and women were calculated separately. We found that decreased subcutaneous fat, CT thigh muscle attenuation, and appendicular lean mass by height squared (ALM/Ht(2)) were associated with fracture risk in men; hazard ratios (HR) = 1.44 (1.02, 2.02), 1.40 (1.05, 1.85), and 0.58 (0.36, 0.91), respectively, after adjusting for age, race, clinical site, body mass index (BMI), chronic disease, hip bone mineral density (BMD), self-reported health, alcohol use, smoking status, education, physical activity, and cognitive function. In a similar model for women, only decreases in subcutaneous fat and DXA CSA were associated with hip fracture risk; HR = 1.39 (1.07, 1.82) and 0.78 (0.62, 0.97), respectively. Men with a high ALM/Ht(2) and low subcutaneous fat thickness had greater than 8 times higher risk for hip fracture compared with those with low ALM/Ht(2) and high subcutaneous fat. In women, ALM/Ht(2) did not improve the model when subcutaneous fat was included. We conclude that the DXA-derived subcutaneous fat thickness is a strong marker for hip fracture

  18. Muscle-skeletal model of the thigh: a tool for understanding the biomechanics of gait in patients with cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Catalfamo Formento, Paola Andrea; José Crespo, Marcos; Andrés Braidot, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Cerebral Palsy represents the most common cause of physical disability in modern world and within the pediatrics orthopedics units. The gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders in CP. Giving a more comprehensive treatment plan, including or excluding surgical procedures that can potentially decrease the number of surgical interventions in the life of these patients. Recommendations for orthopedic surgery may be based on a quantitative description of how to alter the properties probably muscle force generation, and how this affects the action of the muscle to determine how these muscles, impaired by disease or surgery, contributing to the movement of the segments of the limb during crouch gait. So the causes and appropriate treatment of gait abnormalities are difficult to determine because the movements generated by the muscular forces of these patients are not clearly understood. A correct determination of the etiology of abnormal patterns of the knee is the key to select the appropriate therapy, presenting a major challenge at present since there is no theoretical basis to determine the biomechanical causes of abnormal gait of these patients. The potential and necessity of using correct biomechanical models that consistently study the abnormalities becomes clear. Reinforcing and correcting a simple gait analysis and eliminating the unknowns when selecting the appropriate treatment is crucial in clinical settings. In this paper a computer muscle-skeletal model is proposed. The model represents a person's thigh simulating the six most representative muscles and joints of the hip and knee. In this way you can have a better understanding of gait abnormalities present in these patients. So the quality of these estimates of individual muscle dynamics facilitate better understanding of the biomechanics of gait pathologies helping to reach better diagnosis prior to surgery and rehabilitation treatments.

  19. Analysis of shear wave propagation derived from MR elastography in 3D thigh skeletal muscle using subject specific finite element model.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tien Tuan; Pouletaut, Philippe; Charleux, Fabrice; Tho, Marie-Christine Ho Ba; Bensamoun, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a subject specific finite element model derived from MRI images to numerically analyze the MRE (magnetic resonance elastography) shear wave propagation within skeletal thigh muscles. A sagittal T2 CUBE MRI sequence was performed on the 20-cm thigh segment of a healthy male subject. Skin, adipose tissue, femoral bone and 11 muscles were manually segmented in order to have 3D smoothed solid and meshed models. These tissues were modeled with different constitutive laws. A transient modal dynamics analysis was applied to simulate the shear wave propagation within the thigh tissues. The effects of MRE experimental parameters (frequency, force) and the muscle material properties (shear modulus: C10) were analyzed through the simulated shear wave displacement within the vastus medialis muscle. The results showed a plausible range of frequencies (from 90Hz to 120 Hz), which could be used for MRE muscle protocol. The wave amplitude increased with the level of the force, revealing the importance of the boundary condition. Moreover, different shear displacement patterns were obtained as a function of the muscle mechanical properties. The present study is the first to analyze the shear wave propagation in skeletal muscles using a 3D subject specific finite element model. This study could be of great value to assist the experimenters in the set-up of MRE protocols. PMID:25570875

  20. Reliability of manual versus automated techniques for assessing passive stiffness of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ty B; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Cramer, Joel T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of passive stiffness, passive torque, range of motion (ROM), and electromyography (EMG) of the biceps femoris during passive thigh flexion motions intended to assess the ROM of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh during manual versus automated assessment techniques. Eleven healthy men (mean ± s age = 22 ± 4 years; mass = 85 ± 12 kg; and height = 178 ± 4 cm) and nine healthy women (age = 19 ± 1 years; mass = 66 ± 15 kg; and height = 164 ± 5 cm) completed four randomly ordered passive straight-legged ROM assessments. Two ROM assessments were performed using a manual technique, which consisted of the primary investigator applying slow passive resistance against a load cell attached to the heel while the foot was moved toward the head. Two automated ROM assessments were also performed using a Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer programmed in passive mode to move the foot toward the head at 0.087 rad · s(-1). The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for passive stiffness measured with the manual technique ranged from 0.81-0.86, while for the automated technique they were 0.72-0.92. Standard error of measurement (SEM) values for passive stiffness expressed as a percentage of the mean ranged from 15.5-21.7% for the manual and 17.8-23.7% for the automated technique. Both techniques (manual and automated) were comparably reliable across the three trials, which suggested that the manual technique could be applied outside the laboratory.

  1. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees.

  2. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees. PMID:26745808

  3. Signal intensity of MR-images of thigh muscles following acute open- and closed chain kinetic knee extensor exercise - index of muscle use.

    PubMed

    Enocson, A G; Berg, H E; Vargas, R; Jenner, G; Tesch, P A

    2005-07-01

    Exercise-induced shifts in signal intensity (SI) of magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined to assess indirectly muscle use in closed- and open-chain knee extensor exercises. Eight men performed five sets of 8-12 repetitions in the leg press (LP) and the seated knee extension (KE) exercises at 50, 75 and 100%, respectively of the 5 x 10 repetition maximum (RM) load. Prior to exercise and after each load setting, images of the thigh were obtained. The increase in SI (Delta SI) of the quadriceps at 100% load was greater (P < 0.05) after KE (32.1 +/- 9.0%) than after LP (21.9 +/- 9.2%). Regardless of load, the four individual muscles of the quadriceps showed similar changes in SI after LP. The three vastii muscles showed comparable increases in SI after KE. M. rectus femoris showed greater (P < 0.05) Delta SI than the vastii muscles at 100%. Neither exercise produced increase in SI of mm. semimembranosus, semitendinosus, gracilis or biceps femoris. Mm. adductor magnus and longus showed increased (13.3 +/- 6.5%; P < 0.05) SI after LP, but not after KE, at 100% load. The present data also infer greater involvement of the quadriceps muscle in the open-chain knee extension than in the closed-chain leg press exercise. The results of the current investigation also indicate similar over-all use among the three vastii muscles in LP and KE, but differential m. rectus femoris use between the two exercises. This report extends the merits of the MR imaging technique as an aid to study individual muscle involvement in a particular exercise task. PMID:15918061

  4. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J.; Richardson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement (“slide”) of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP. PMID:19015895

  5. A rapid approach for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging in thigh muscles using the pulsed saturation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D; Kroop, Susan F; Huston, Joseph W; Gochberg, Daniel F; Park, Jane H; Damon, Bruce M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging in skeletal muscle may be confounded by intramuscular adipose components, low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and voluntary and involuntary motion artifacts. Collectively, these issues could create bias and error in parameter fitting. In this study, technical considerations related to these factors were systematically investigated, and solutions were proposed. First, numerical simulations indicate that the presence of an additional fat component significantly underestimates the pool size ratio (F). Therefore, fat-signal suppression (or water-selective excitation) is recommended for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle. Second, to minimize the effect of motion and muscle contraction artifacts in datasets collected with a conventional 14-point sampling scheme, a rapid two-parameter model was adapted from previous studies in the brain and spinal cord. The consecutive pair of sampling points with highest accuracy and precision for estimating F was determined with numerical simulations. Its performance with respect to SNR and incorrect parameter assumptions was systematically evaluated. QMT data fitting was performed in healthy control subjects and polymyositis patients, using both the two- and five-parameter models. The experimental results were consistent with the predictions from the numerical simulations. These data support the use of the two-parameter modeling approach for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle as a means to reduce total imaging time and/or permit additional signal averaging. PMID:25839394

  6. Patterns of strain and activation in the thigh muscles of goats across gaits during level locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Gary B; Flynn, John P; McGuigan, Polly; Biewener, Andrew A

    2005-12-01

    Unlike homologous muscles in many vertebrates, which appear to function similarly during a particular mode of locomotion (e.g. red muscle in swimming fish, pectoralis muscle in flying birds, limb extensors in jumping and swimming frogs), a major knee extensor in mammalian quadrupeds, the vastus lateralis, appears to operate differently in different species studied to date. In rats, the vastus undergoes more stretching early in stance than shortening in later stance. In dogs, the reverse is true; more substantial shortening follows small amounts of initial stretching. And in horses, while the vastus strain trajectory is complex, it is characterized mainly by shortening during stance. In this study, we use sonomicrometry and electromyography to study the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris of goats, with three goals in mind: (1) to see how these muscles work in comparison to homologous muscles studied previously in other taxa; (2) to address how speed and gait impact muscle actions and (3) to test whether fascicles in different parts of the same muscle undergo similar length changes. Results indicate that the biceps femoris undergoes substantial shortening through much of stance, with higher strains in walking and trotting [32-33% resting length (L0)] than galloping (22% L0). These length changes occur with increasing biceps EMG intensities as animals increase speed from walking to galloping. The vastus undergoes a stretch-shorten cycle during stance. Stretching strains are higher during galloping (15% L0) than walking and trotting (9% L0). Shortening strains follow a reverse pattern and are greatest in walking (24% L0), intermediate in trotting (20% L0) and lowest during galloping (17% L0). As a result, the ratio of stretching to shortening increases from below 0.5 in walking and trotting to near 1.0 during galloping. This increasing ratio suggests that the vastus does relatively more positive work than energy absorption at the slower speeds compared with galloping

  7. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application. PMID:26705066

  8. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application.

  9. Relationships of thigh muscle contractile and non-contractile tissue with function, strength, and age in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Akima, Hiroshi; Lott, Donovan; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Arpan, Ishu; Bendixen, Roxanna; Lee Sweeney, H; Walter, Glenn; Vandenborne, Krista

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the contractile and non-contractile content in thigh muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationship with functional abilities. Magnetic resonance images of the thigh were acquired in 28 boys with DMD and 10 unaffected boys. Muscle strength, timed functional tests, and the Brookes Lower Extremity scale were also assessed. Non-contractile content in the DMD group was significantly greater than in the control group for six muscles, including rectus femoris, biceps femoris-long head and adductor magnus. Non-contractile content in the total thigh musculature assessed by MRI correlated with the Brookes scale (r(s)=0.75) and supine-up test (r(s)=0.68), as well as other functional measures. An age-related specific torque increase was observed in the control group (r(s)=0.96), but not the DMD (r(s)=0.06). These findings demonstrate that MRI measures of contractile and non-contractile content can provide important information about disease progression in DMD. PMID:21807516

  10. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-01-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanims are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n = 10), (4) femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n = 6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n = 7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (ΔLBF 7.4 ± 0.7 l min−1), cardiac output ( 8.7 ± 0.7 l min−1), mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP 51 ± 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast, femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.7 ± 0.1 l min−1), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for ∼5% of peak exercise hyperaemia. Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.5–0.7 l min−1) without altering , MAP or . These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure, stroke volume and or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans. Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  11. Effects of macronutrient intake on thigh muscle mass during home-based walking training in middle-aged and older women.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Yazawa, D; Goto, M; Kamijo, Y-I; Furihata, M; Gen-no, H; Hamada, K; Nose, H

    2013-10-01

    We examined whether post-exercise macronutrient supplementation during a 5-month home-based interval walking training (IWT) accelerated exercise-induced increases in skeletal muscle mass and strength in healthy middle-aged and older women. Thirty-five women (41-78 years) were randomly divided into two groups: IWT alone (CNT, n = 18) or IWT plus post-exercise macronutrient (7.6 g protein, 32.5 g carbohydrate, and 4.4 g fat) supplementation (NUT, n = 17). For IWT, all subjects were instructed to repeat five or more sets of 3-min low-intensity walking at 40% peak aerobic capacity (Vo2 peak ), followed by a 3-min high-intensity walking above 70% Vo2 peak per day for 4 or more days per week. We determined Vo2 peak , thigh muscle tissue area by computer tomography, and thigh muscle strength in all subjects before and after IWT. We found that an increase in hamstring muscle tissue area was 2.8 ± 1.2% in NUT vs -1.0 ± 0.7% in CNT and that in isometric knee flexion force was 16.3 ± 3.7% in NUT vs 6.5 ± 3.0% in CNT; both were significantly higher in NUT than in CNT (both, P < 0.001). Thus, post-exercise macronutrient supplementation enhanced the increases in thigh muscle mass and strength, although partially, in home-based IWT in middle-aged and older women.

  12. The effect of stance width on the electromyographical activity of eight superficial thigh muscles during back squat with different bar loads.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Antonio; Marcolin, Giuseppe; Petrone, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Many strength trainers believe that varying the stance width during the back squat can target specific muscles of the thigh. The aim of the present work was to test this theory measuring the activation of 8 thigh muscles while performing back squats at 3 stance widths and with 3 different bar loads. Six experienced lifters performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions of squats, each one with a different stance width, using 3 resistances: no load, 30% of 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and 70% 1RM. Sets were separated by 6 minutes of rest. Electromyographic (EMG) surface electrodes were placed on the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, semitendinosus, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, gluteus medium, and adductor maior. Analysis of variance and Scheffè post hoc tests indicated a significant difference in EMG activity only for the gluteus maximus; in particular, there was a higher electrical activity of this muscle when back squats were performed at the maximum stance widths at 0 and 70% 1RM. There were no significant differences concerning the EMG activity of the other analyzed muscles. These findings suggest that a large width is necessary for a greater activation of the gluteus maximus during back squats. PMID:19130646

  13. Mid-thigh cortical bone structural parameters, muscle mass and strength, and association with lower limb fractures in older men and women (AGES-Reykjavik Study).

    PubMed

    Johannesdottir, Fjola; Aspelund, Thor; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur G; Lang, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Gunnar

    2012-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between muscle and bone parameters in the mid-thigh in older people using data from a single axial computed tomographic section through the mid-thigh. Additionally, we studied the association of these variables with incident low-trauma lower limb fractures. A total of 3,762 older individuals (1,838 men and 1,924 women), aged 66-96 years, participants in the AGES-Reykjavik study, were studied. The total cross-sectional muscular area and knee extensor strength declined with age similarly in both sexes. Muscle parameters correlated most strongly with cortical area and total shaft area (adjusted for age, height, and weight) but explained <10 % of variability in those bone parameters. The increment in medullary area (MA) and buckling ratio (BR) with age was almost fourfold greater in women than men. The association between MA and muscle parameters was nonsignificant. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 113 women and 66 men sustained incident lower limb fractures. Small muscular area, low knee extensor strength, large MA, low cortical thickness, and high BR were significantly associated with fractures in both sexes. Our results show that bone and muscle loss proceed at different rates and with different gender patterns. PMID:22451219

  14. Mid-thigh cortical bone structural parameters, muscle mass and strength, and association with lower limb fractures in older men and women (AGES-Reykjavik Study).

    PubMed

    Johannesdottir, Fjola; Aspelund, Thor; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur G; Lang, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Gunnar

    2012-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between muscle and bone parameters in the mid-thigh in older people using data from a single axial computed tomographic section through the mid-thigh. Additionally, we studied the association of these variables with incident low-trauma lower limb fractures. A total of 3,762 older individuals (1,838 men and 1,924 women), aged 66-96 years, participants in the AGES-Reykjavik study, were studied. The total cross-sectional muscular area and knee extensor strength declined with age similarly in both sexes. Muscle parameters correlated most strongly with cortical area and total shaft area (adjusted for age, height, and weight) but explained <10 % of variability in those bone parameters. The increment in medullary area (MA) and buckling ratio (BR) with age was almost fourfold greater in women than men. The association between MA and muscle parameters was nonsignificant. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 113 women and 66 men sustained incident lower limb fractures. Small muscular area, low knee extensor strength, large MA, low cortical thickness, and high BR were significantly associated with fractures in both sexes. Our results show that bone and muscle loss proceed at different rates and with different gender patterns.

  15. Efficacy of thigh protectors in preventing thigh haematomas.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B

    2000-03-01

    Thigh haematomas are extremely common in Australian Rules Football (ARF). This is in contrast to contact sports overseas, the likely reason is the increased use of thigh protectors as part of team uniforms in contact sports such as American football. Thigh haematomas can have a significant impact on an athlete's performance, ranging from short term performance impairment, muscle deconditioning and compartment syndromes, to long term problems, such as career threatening myositis ossificans and possibly muscle tears. To assess the efficacy of thigh protectors made for Australian Football, a prospective study was undertaken involving two teams in the elite junior (U 18) VSFL competition in SE Australia. One team wore thigh protectors over the course of the season while the other team acted as controls and did not wear thigh protectors. The control group suffered nine thigh haematomas, while the protected group had none (p<0.01). The possible de-conditioning effect of the haematomas was evidenced by two of the control group suffering torn quadriceps within four weeks of the haematoma. The protectors were generally well tolerated by all but one player, except in hot conditions, when they were uncomfortable. PMID:10839226

  16. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  17. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-05-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanism are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output ((.)Q) during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n=10), (4)femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n=6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n=7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (DeltaLBF 7.4 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), cardiac output (Delta (.)Q 8.7 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), mean arterial pressure (DeltaMAP 51 +/- 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and (.)VO2 . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in (.)Q , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast,femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, (.)Q or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.7 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for approximately 5% of peak exercise hyperaemia.Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.5-0.7 l min(-1)) without altering (.)Q, MAP or (.)VO2. These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure,stroke volume and (.)Q or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans.Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  18. Delayed onset thigh compartment syndrome secondary to contusion.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Siddharth B; Rehman, Saqib

    2009-08-01

    While thigh compartment syndrome is relatively uncommon, it can occur in various situations. Multiple reports document thigh contusions as a cause of acute compartment syndrome; however, compartment syndrome of the thigh presenting primarily in a delayed fashion secondary to a contusion has not been described. This article reports a case of thigh compartment syndrome. A 39-year-old man sustained a left thigh contusion while playing basketball. He continued to play and also worked at the office over the next 2 days. Fifty-two hours postinjury, he developed severe pain in the thigh after a long walk. Increased swelling of the thigh followed, with numbness in the anterolateral thigh and pain with knee motion. He presented 60 hours postinjury with a compartment syndrome, and a lateral decompressive fasciotomy of the thigh was performed 62 hours postinjury. The wound was closed after 5 days. Three months postoperatively, the patient returned to playing basketball with no deficits. Treatment of established compartment syndrome in such cases is controversial, with some reports recommending nonoperative management. Contusion-related compartment syndromes are frequently associated with intramuscular bleeding in the involved compartment, which may accumulate slowly or worsen with further activity. Guidelines regarding return to sports need to be established in individuals sustaining severe contusions during sports-related activities to prevent compartment syndrome. Any individual sustaining such an injury should be under surveillance for delayed onset symptoms or signs of this potentially devastating syndrome.

  19. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Hammer, Steven; van Beek, Edwin J R; Brown, Colin; Roberts, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ≤ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G', in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G' increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G' was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance.

  20. Partial rupture of the quadriceps muscle in a child

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The quadriceps femoris muscle ruptures usually occur in the middle-aged population. We present a 4-year-old patient with partial rupture of the quadriceps femoris muscle. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported with a quadriceps femoris muscle rupture. Case Presentation A 4-year-old girl admitted to our clinic with left knee pain and limitation in knee movements. Her father reported that she felt pain while jumping on sofa. There was no direct trauma to thigh or knee. We located a palpable soft tissue swelling at distal anterolateral side of thigh. The history revealed that 10 days ago the patient was treated for upper tract respiratory infection with intramuscular Clindamycin for 7 days. When we consulted the patient with her previous doctor and nurse, we learnt that multiple daily injections might be injected to same side of left thigh. MRI showed a partial tear of vastus lateralis muscle matching with the injection sites. The patient treated with long leg half-casting for three weeks. Clinical examination and knee flexion had good results with conservative treatment. Conclusions Multiple intramuscular injections may contribute to damage muscles and make prone to tears with muscle contractions. Doctors and nurses must be cautious to inject from different parts of both thighs. PMID:20849662

  1. VO2 response at the onset of heavy exercise is accelerated not by diathermic warming of the thigh muscles but by prior heavy exercise.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Shinhara, Yuko; Houman, Toshiko; Endo, Masako Yamaoka; Yamada, Masako; Miura, Akira; Hayashi, Naoyuki; Sato, Hironori; Koga, Shunsaku; Yoshida, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether the elevated muscle temperature induced by the first bout influenced the VO2 response during a second-bout of heavy exercise. The control conditions were two consecutive 6-min leg cycling bouts (work rate: Δ50% between LT and VO2max) separated by a 6-min baseline at 20 W (L1-ex to L2-ex). In the experimental conditions prior to the main bout (H2-ex), the diathermic warming to the front thigh was substituted for the first-bout. The VO2 response for the second bout was significantly accelerated compared with the first bout (mean ± SD of the τ by monoexponential fitting: L1-ex: 53.8 ± 11.6, L2-ex: 38.7 ± 7.9 s, P < 0.05). The diathermic warm-up, however, could not accelerate VO2 response for subsequent supra-LT leg exercise (τ for H2-ex: 52.3 ± 7.7 s). It was concluded that the facilitation of [VO2 response during supra-LT exercise after prior heavy exercise does not seem to be caused by increased muscle temperature per se and its related factors. PMID:22242734

  2. Predicting the effects of muscle activation on knee, thigh, and hip injuries in frontal crashes using a finite-element model with muscle forces from subject testing and musculoskeletal modeling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Rupp, Jonathan D; Reed, Matthew P; Hughes, Richard E; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2009-11-01

    In a previous study, the authors reported on the development of a finite-element model of the midsize male pelvis and lower extremities with lower-extremity musculature that was validated using PMHS knee-impact response data. Knee-impact simulations with this model were performed using forces from four muscles in the lower extremities associated with two-foot bracing reported in the literature to provide preliminary estimates of the effects of lower-extremity muscle activation on knee-thigh-hip injury potential in frontal impacts. The current study addresses a major limitation of these preliminary simulations by using the AnyBody three-dimensional musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces produced in 35 muscles in each lower extremity during emergency one-foot braking. To check the predictions of the AnyBody Model, activation levels of twelve major muscles in the hip and lower extremities were measured using surface EMG electrodes on 12 midsize-male subjects performing simulated maximum and 50% of maximum braking in a laboratory seating buck. Comparisons between test results and the predictions of the AnyBody Model when it was used to simulate these same braking tests suggest that the AnyBody model appropriately predicts agonistic muscle activations but under predicts antagonistic muscle activations. Simulations of knee-to-knee-bolster impacts were performed by impacting the knees of the lower-extremity finite element model with and without the muscle forces predicted by the validated AnyBody Model. Results of these simulations confirm previous findings that muscle tension increases knee-impact force by increasing the effective mass of the KTH complex due to tighter coupling of muscle mass to bone. They also indicate that muscle activation preferentially couples mass distal to the hip, thereby accentuating the decrease in femur force from the knee to the hip. However, the reduction in force transmitted from the knee to the hip is offset by the increased force

  3. A new anterolateral approach for type C fractures of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Bin, Zhang; Song, Luo; Binghua, Wu; Ping, Qiu; Min, Dai

    2014-01-01

    To provide an anatomic basis for treating type C distal femoral fractures by a new anterolateral approach. Twenty surgical procedures were performed in 10 adult cadaveric specimens using a new anterolateral approach followed by dissection of all lower limbs. The main anterolateral muscles and ligaments were observed. Vessels and nerves related to the new anterolateral approach were also evaluated. Full exposure of the distal femur was achieved. The iliotibial band was protected, and damage to the quadriceps femoris was reduced. The distance between the common peroneal nerve and the new incision line at the level of the lateral epicondyle of the femur was (χ̄ ± s) 8.19 ± 0.79 cm (range, 7.48-9.57 cm). This new anterolateral approach to the distal femur is safe. Although it induces slight soft tissue damage, its exposure is excellent. Knee rehabilitation can be performed in the early postoperative period. PMID:25437603

  4. A New Anterolateral Approach for Type C Fractures of the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Zhang; Song, Luo; Binghua, Wu; Ping, Qiu; Min, Dai

    2014-01-01

    To provide an anatomic basis for treating type C distal femoral fractures by a new anterolateral approach. Twenty surgical procedures were performed in 10 adult cadaveric specimens using a new anterolateral approach followed by dissection of all lower limbs. The main anterolateral muscles and ligaments were observed. Vessels and nerves related to the new anterolateral approach were also evaluated. Full exposure of the distal femur was achieved. The iliotibial band was protected, and damage to the quadriceps femoris was reduced. The distance between the common peroneal nerve and the new incision line at the level of the lateral epicondyle of the femur was (χ̄ ± s) 8.19 ± 0.79 cm (range, 7.48–9.57 cm). This new anterolateral approach to the distal femur is safe. Although it induces slight soft tissue damage, its exposure is excellent. Knee rehabilitation can be performed in the early postoperative period. PMID:25437603

  5. Quantifying thigh muscle co-activation during isometric knee extension contractions: within- and between-session reliability.

    PubMed

    Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Threlkeld, A Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Muscle co-activation around the knee is important during ambulation and balance. The wide range of methodological approaches for the quantification of co-activation index (CI) makes comparisons across studies and populations difficult. The present study determined within- and between-session reliability of different methodological approaches for the quantification of the CI of the knee extensor and flexor muscles during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). Eight healthy volunteers participated in two repeated testing sessions. A series of knee extension MVICs of the dominant leg with concomitant torque and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were captured. CI was calculated utilizing different analytical approaches. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that within-session measures displayed higher reliability (ICC>0.861) and lower variability (Coefficient of variation; CV<21.8%) than between-session measures (ICC<0.645; CV>24.2%). A selection of a 500ms or larger window of RMS EMG activity around the PT delivered more reliable and less variable results than other approaches. Our findings suggest that the CI can provide a reliable measure for comparisons among conditions and is best utilized for within-session experimental designs.

  6. Multi-parametric MRI Characterization of Healthy Human Thigh Muscles at 3.0T - Relaxation, Magnetization Transfer, Fat/Water, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D.; Welch, E. Brian; Bryant, Nathan D.; Buck, Amanda K.W.; Towse, Theodore F.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.; Park, Jane H.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle diseases commonly have clinical presentations of inflammation, fat infiltration, fibrosis, and atrophy. However, the results of existing laboratory tests and clinical presentations are not well correlated. Advanced quantitative MRI techniques may allow the assessment of myo-pathological changes in a sensitive and objective manner. To progress towards this goal, an array of quantitative MRI protocols was implemented for human thigh muscles, their reproducibility was assessed, and the statistical relationships among parameters were determined. These quantitative methods included fat/water imaging, multiple spin-echo T2 imaging (with and without fat signal suppression, FS), selective inversion recovery for T1 and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging (with and without FS), and diffusion tensor imaging. Data were acquired at 3.0 T from nine healthy subjects. To assess the repeatability of each method, the subjects were re-imaged on an average of 35 days later. Pre-testing lifestyle restrictions were applied to standardize physiological conditions across scans. Strong between-day intra-class correlations were observed in all quantitative indices except for the macromolecular-to-free water pool size ratio (PSR) with FS, a metric derived from qMT data. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant between-day differences in the mean values for any parameter estimate. The repeatability was further assessed with Bland-Altman plots, and low repeatability coefficients were obtained for all parameters. Among-muscle differences in the quantitative MRI indices and inter-class correlations among the parameters were identified. There were inverse relationships between fractional anisotropy (FA) and the 2nd eigenvalue, the 3rd eigenvalue, and the standard deviation of first eigenvector. The FA was positively related to the PSR, while the other diffusion indices were inversely related to the PSR. These findings support the use of these T1, T2, fat

  7. Anterolateral Extra-articular Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Anterolateral Rotatory Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Kernkamp, Willem A; van de Velde, Samuel K; Bakker, Eric W P; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2015-12-01

    Anterolateral rotatory instability (ALRI) occurs after injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the anterolateral structures of the knee. We present a technique for anterolateral extra-articular soft-tissue (ALES) reconstruction of the knee that can be used in revision ACL reconstruction cases, cases of persistent ALRI after adequate ACL reconstruction, and cases with severe ALRI after primary ACL rupture. The surgeon performs ALES reconstruction with a strip of iliotibial tract autograft while respecting the anatomic origin and insertion of the anterolateral ligament. The purpose of this reconstruction is to restore the normal anterolateral rotatory stability of the knee in ALES-deficient patients. PMID:27284525

  8. Overview of thigh injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Deleget, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Thigh injuries include musculotendinous strains of the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, iliotibial band (ITB), and bony injuries to the shaft of the femur. There is scant information in the literature regarding thigh injuries in dance, which appear to range from 5% to 16% of total injury incidence. Hamstring strains and ITB syndrome are the most commonly reported thigh injuries. Hamstring injuries occur most frequently during slow stretching when the dancer's hip is flexed and knee extended. Uniquely in dancers, adductor injury occurs concurrently with hamstring injuries in approximately one-third of cases. Snapping of the ITB at the lateral hip and knee may result from imbalance of thigh muscle strength and flexibility. To date no quadriceps strain injuries or stress injuries to the shaft of the femur have been reported in the dance medicine literature. As dancers notoriously underestimate time needed to return to dance, it can be suggested that early return to work is a contributing factor to chronic injury. Further research is needed regarding the incidence and nature of injury to the thigh among dancers. PMID:21067687

  9. Overview of thigh injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Deleget, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Thigh injuries include musculotendinous strains of the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, iliotibial band (ITB), and bony injuries to the shaft of the femur. There is scant information in the literature regarding thigh injuries in dance, which appear to range from 5% to 16% of total injury incidence. Hamstring strains and ITB syndrome are the most commonly reported thigh injuries. Hamstring injuries occur most frequently during slow stretching when the dancer's hip is flexed and knee extended. Uniquely in dancers, adductor injury occurs concurrently with hamstring injuries in approximately one-third of cases. Snapping of the ITB at the lateral hip and knee may result from imbalance of thigh muscle strength and flexibility. To date no quadriceps strain injuries or stress injuries to the shaft of the femur have been reported in the dance medicine literature. As dancers notoriously underestimate time needed to return to dance, it can be suggested that early return to work is a contributing factor to chronic injury. Further research is needed regarding the incidence and nature of injury to the thigh among dancers.

  10. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh in a rugby player.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard David James; Rust-March, Holly; Kluzek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of obvious trauma, diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the thigh can easily be delayed, as disproportional pain is not always present. We present a case of ACS of the anterior right thigh compartment in a healthy, semiprofessional rugby player with normal coagulation, who sustained a seemingly innocuous blow during a rugby match. Following early surgical fasciotomy, he returned to his preinjury playing standards within 12 months. Our literature review suggests that high muscle mass, young, athletic males participating in a contact sport are mostly at risk of developing ACS of the thigh.

  11. Inferiorly based thigh flap for reconstruction of defects around the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md. Sohaib; Khan, Arshad Hafeez; Khurram, Mohammed Fahud; Ahmad, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue defects around the knees are common in injured limbs and in the same injury the leg is often involved and the thigh is spared. Furthermore due to pliable and relatively lax skin, we have used inferiorly based thigh flap to reconstruct defects around knee joint. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of inferiorly based thigh flap to cover soft-tissue defects over the proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during the period between October 2011 and February 2013. Inferiorly based anteromedial thigh fasciocutaneous flap was performed on 12 patients and inferiorly based anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flap on four patients. The sites of the soft-tissue defects included patellar regions, infrapatellar region, upper one-third of leg, lower thigh, and over the knee joint. Results: Patients were evaluated post-operatively in terms of viability of flap, the matching of the flap with the recipient site, and donor site morbidity. All the flaps survived well except one which developed distal marginal flap loss, one in which wound dehiscence was noticed, and two in which mild venous congestion was observed. Venous congestion in two patients subsided on its own within 3 days. One patient with wound dehiscence achieved complete healing by secondary intention. Patient who developed distal flap loss required debridement and skin grafting. No appreciable donor site morbidity was encountered. Skin colour and texture of the flap matched well with the recipient site. Conclusions: The inferiorly based thigh flap is a reliable flap to cover the defect over proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. PMID:25190918

  12. Supine Extensile Approach to the Anterolateral Humerus.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Michael A; Friess, Darin

    2016-01-01

    The radial nerve is at risk of injury during surgical approaches to the humeral shaft. Previous authors have described an anterolateral approach to the humerus limited by the radial nerve, requiring that distal dissection be carried anterior into a neurovascularly crowded interval. A novel extensile approach is described using a neuromuscular bridge to protect the radial nerve, thus enabling safe distal extension of the anterolateral humerus approach. The authors present a case series of 7 patients who required an extensile humeral exposure. To date, there have been no complications, including loss of reduction, malunion, nonunion, or nerve palsy. PMID:26726979

  13. The Gluteus Medius Vs. Thigh Muscles Strength Ratio and Their Relation to Electromyography Amplitude During a Farmer’s Walk Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Petr; Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar, Amr; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana; Pietraszewski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The strength ratio between hamstrings and quadriceps (H/Q) is associated with knee injuries as well as hip abductor muscle (HAB) weakness. Sixteen resistance trained men (age, 32.5 ± 4.2 years) performed 5 s maximal isometric contractions at 75° of knee flexion/extension and 15° of hip abduction on a dynamometer. After this isometric test they performed a Farmer’s walk exercise to find out if the muscle strength ratio predicted the electromyography amplitude expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC). The carried load represented a moderate intensity of 75% of the exercise six repetitions maximum (6RM). Electromyography data from the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF) and gluteus medius (Gmed) on each leg were collected during the procedure. The groups selected were participants with H/Q ≥ 0.5, HQ < 0.5, HAB/H ≥ 1, HAB/H < 1, HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 and HAB/Q < 0.5. One way ANOVA showed that Gmed activity was significantly greater in the group with HAB/H < 1 (42 ± 14 %MVIC) as compared to HAB/H ≥ 1 (26 ± 10 %MVIC) and HAB/Q < 0.5 (47 ± 19 %MVIC) compared to HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 (26 ± 12 %MVIC). The individuals with HAB/H < 1 were found to have greater activation of their Gmed during the Farmer’s walk exercise. Individuals with HAB/Q < 0.5 had greater activation of the Gmed. Gmed strength ratios predict the muscle involvement when a moderate amount of the external load is used. The Farmer’s walk is recommended as an exercise which can strengthen the gluteus medius, especially for individuals with a HAB/H ratio < 1 and HAB/Q < 0.5. PMID:25964819

  14. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings.

  15. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings. PMID:27595080

  16. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mo; Joo, Yong-Bum; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-09-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings.

  17. Effects of Home-Based Interval Walking Training on Thigh Muscle Strength and Aerobic Capacity in Female Total Hip Arthroplasty Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Yutaka; Mizushima, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Morikawa, Mayuko; Masuki, Shizue; Nose, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to the reduced physical activity of patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA), there are no home-based exercise training regimens for preventing muscle atrophy and aerobic capacity impairment in these patients. We examined whether interval walking training (IWT) could prevented these issues. Twenty-eight female patients (∼60 years of age) who had undergone THA more than 2 months prior were randomly divided into IWT (n = 14) and control (CNT, n = 14) groups. The IWT subjects trained at a target of 60 min of fast walking at >70% peak aerobic capacity for walking (O2peak) per wk for 12 wk, while those in the CNT maintained their previous sedentary life during the same period. We measured the energy expenditure of the daily physical activity, except during sleeping and bathing, every minute and every day during the intervention. We also measured the isometric knee extension (FEXT) and flexion (FFLX) forces, O2peak, and anaerobic threshold during the graded cycling exercise (O2AT) before and after the intervention. All subjects, except for one in IWT, completed the protocol. FFLX increased by 23% on the operated side (P = 0.003) and 14% on the non-operated side of IWT (P = 0.006), while it only increased on the operated side of CNT (P = 0.03). The O2peak and O2AT in IWT increased by 8% (P = 0.08) and 13% (P = 0.002), respectively, and these changes were significantly higher in the IWT than in CNT group (both, P<0.05). In conclusion, IWT might be an effective home-based training regimen for preventing the muscle atrophy from reduced daily physical activity in THA patients. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000013172 PMID:25268505

  18. Hot-boning enhances cook yield of boneless skinless chicken thighs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of postmortem deboning time on cook yield of boneless skinless chicken thighs. In Experiment 1 (3 replications), chicken thigh meat was separated from bones at 0.45 (hot-bone), 2, and 24 h and trimmed to obtain iliotibialis muscle. The iliotibiali...

  19. Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Technique: An Anatomic-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Restoration of anteroposterior laxity after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been predictable with traditional open and endoscopic techniques. However, anterolateral rotational stability has been difficult to achieve in a subset of patients, even with appropriate anatomic techniques. Therefore, differing techniques have attempted to address this rotational laxity by augmenting or reconstructing lateral-sided structures about the knee. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the anterolateral ligament as a potential contributor to residual anterolateral rotatory instability in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients. Numerous anatomic and biomechanical studies have been performed to further define the functional importance of the anterolateral ligament, highlighting the need for surgical techniques to address these injuries in the unstable knee. This article details our technique for an anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon allograft. PMID:27656361

  20. Bone scanning in the adductor insertion avulsion syndrome ("thigh splints").

    PubMed

    Charkes, N D; Siddhivarn, N; Schneck, C D

    1987-12-01

    Shin splints is a defined clinical entity resulting from extreme tension on muscles inserting on the tibia, resulting in periosteal elevation which is detectable by bone scanning. The clinical equivalent in the thigh has been described. We found scintigraphic changes in the femurs of seven short, female, basic trainees at the Fort Dix Army base, most of whom were referred for stress fractures elsewhere in the lower extremities. The scan findings were generally noted in the upper or mid femurs, always involved the anteromedial cortex, and were bilateral in five of the seven subjects. The abnormalities were linear and suggested periosteal elevation, and did not have the typical appearance of stress fracture. Since the findings correspond to the insertion of one or more adductor muscle groups, the descriptive term "adductor insertion avulsion syndrome" or "thigh splints" is proposed for this entity.

  1. Surgical Dissection of the Anterolateral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Matthew; Busch, Kyle; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations into the structure and function of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) have resulted in renewed interest in the role of the lateral extra-articular structures in rotational control of the knee. With increased focus on the ALL, debate about the anatomic characteristics, the functional role in knee stability, and even the existence of this lateral structure has ensued. This article describes our dissection method for the ALL. Through careful dissection and precise elevation of the iliotibial band, the ALL can be clearly identified as a distinct structure with an attachment near the lateral epicondyle on the femur and an insertion in a fan-like fashion onto the tibia, between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. This investigation provides the surgeon with anatomic landmarks to use during surgical reconstruction of the ALL. PMID:27274451

  2. Extradigital Glomus Tumor of Thigh

    PubMed Central

    Beksaç, Kemal; Dogan, Lutfi; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dilek, Gulay; Akgul, Gokhan Giray; Ozaslan, Cihangir

    2015-01-01

    Glomus tumors are benign neoplasms that arise from neuromyoarterial glomus bodies. They represent around 1–5% of all soft-tissue tumors. High temperature, sensitivity, and pain and localized tenderness are the classical triad of symptoms. Most glomus tumors represent in the subungual area of digits. Extradigital glomus tumors are a very rare entity. There are rare cases of these tumors reported to be in shoulder, elbow, knee, wrist, even stomach, colon, and larynx. We are reporting a case of a glomus tumor on thigh and discuss the histological and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26236537

  3. Anterolateral Biplanar Proximal Tibial Opening-Wedge Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moulton, Samuel G; Nitri, Marco; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Proximal tibial anterolateral opening-wedge osteotomies have been reported to achieve successful biplanar lower-extremity realignment. Indications for a proximal tibial anterolateral osteotomy include symptomatic genu recurvatum with genu valgus alignment, usually in patients with a flat sagittal-plane tibial slope. The biplanar approach is able to simultaneously address both components of a patient's malalignment with a single procedure. The correction amount is verified with spacers and intraoperative imaging, while correction of the patient's heel height is simultaneously measured. A plate is secured into the osteotomy site, and the site is filled with bone allograft. The anterolateral tibial osteotomy has been reported to be an effective surgical procedure for correcting concomitant genu recurvatum and genu valgus malalignment. PMID:27656374

  4. Posterior thigh compartment syndrome as a result of a basketball injury.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Gregory C; Stanat, Scott J C; Al-Humadi, Mohaned; Divaris, Nicholas

    2009-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is a serious although rare occurrence that was sparsely documented in the orthopedic literature until Schwartz et al reported on a series of 21 cases. Although classically associated with high-energy femur fracture, thigh contusion, or the use of military anti-shock trousers, compartment syndrome of the thigh has recently been diagnosed in seemingly low-energy injuries. A complete hamstring avulsion from its ischial origin during routine ambulation and rupture of the quadriceps tendon after a low-energy fall have been shown to result in compartment syndrome. In light of the potential medicolegal ramifications surrounding the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, emergency room consultations to rule out compartment syndrome are on the rise. Specifically, the time to fasciotomy was found to be linearly related to indemnity payment, and a fasciotomy performed within 8 hours was uniformly associated with a successful defense. This article describes a case of a 29-year-old healthy man who developed posterior thigh compartment syndrome as a result of an intrasubstance tear of the biceps femoris muscle sustained while attempting a lay-up during a recreational basketball game. His posterior thigh compartment pressure measured 70 mm Hg and he required emergent posterior thigh compartment fasciotomy.

  5. Donor-Site Morbidity Following Free Tissue Harvest from the Thigh: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of Complications.

    PubMed

    Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; DeFazio, Michael V; Han, Kevin; Falola, Reuben; Evans, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Background Donor-site morbidity significantly influences patient satisfaction and quality of life following reconstructive surgery. The relevant donor-site morbidities associated with more commonly utilized thigh-based flaps are reviewed. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1994 to 2014 was conducted to identify all reports of "anterolateral thigh (ALT)," "vastus lateralis (VL)," "anteromedial thigh (AMT)," "transverse upper gracilis (TUG)," tensor fascia latae (TFL)," "gracilis," and "rectus femoris (RF)," flaps. Only studies that investigated donor-site outcomes related to pain, paresthesia, wound dehiscence, infection, hematoma, seroma, contour deformity, and/or objective functional performance were included. Case series or anecdotal reports with less than five flaps, non-English, and animal studies were excluded. Results A total of 116 articles representing 4,554 flaps were reviewed, including 2,922 ALT/VL, 148 AMT, 436 TUG, 278 TFL, 527 gracilis, and 243 RF flaps. The most frequently cited donor-site complication was paresthesia (range: 0-36.4%), followed by wound dehiscence (range: 0.9-8.3%), contour deformity (range: 0-5.2%), pain (range: 0-6.3%), and seroma (range: 0.4-2.0%). Despite mixed results regarding functional performance, pooled-analysis of dynamometric studies demonstrated a significant reduction in strength only after RF flap harvest (21%). Conclusions Donor-site morbidity for thigh-flaps is minimal and appears to be well-tolerated by the majority of patients. Nevertheless, the appropriate flap selection is highly individualized, and patients must be informed of potential complications and morbidities specific to each flap. We have established the most current review of donor-site morbidity for thigh-based flaps to aid the surgeon in this important discussion.

  6. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. PMID:22495847

  7. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.

  8. Recurrent spontaneous compartment syndrome of the thigh.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Lebur; Chan, Sheung; Hadi, Saifullah; Maruszewski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Acute comparment syndrome (ACS) is a surgical emergency, in which tissue pressure becomes greater than perfusion pressure leading to tissue ischaemia. It is typically a consequence of trauma. We present a case in which a patient suffers blunt trauma to the thigh, but develops ACS 2 years after this injury and consequently endures 10-episodes of ACS (no perciptating event or cause) in the same thigh over 10 years. On the 10th presentation the patient was found to have arteriovenous malformation on MR angiography which were embolised and the fasciotomy wound closed with a split-thickness skin graft. A thorough literature search deemed this case to be the first reported recurrent spontaneous ACS of the thigh. Prompt recognition and treatment of ACS is vital. Clinicians should thoroughly investigate such patients postoperatively and involve vascular/plastic surgeons and interventianal radiologist to provide optimum care and prevent recurrence.

  9. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  10. Myositis Ossificans in the Thigh of a Lacrosse Player.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Kamal; Pettis, Christopher R; Bancroft, Ashley E; Wasyliw, Christopher W; Scherer, Kurt F

    2015-08-01

    An 18-year-old man presented with mid left thigh pain after sequential lacrosse injuries 1 month and 2 weeks prior. Physical examination was significant for a tender mass in the mid left thigh. PMID:26313164

  11. Proximal Humerus Fracture Plating Through the Extended Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Several approaches to the proximal humerus for fracture fixation are possible. The traditional utilitarian approach to the shoulder, the deltopectoral, has distinct disadvantages when performing fracture reduction and locked plating. The anterolateral acromial approach exploits the intermuscular plane between the anterior and middle heads of the deltoid. After identifying the position of the axillary nerve as it crosses this interval, fracture reduction and fixation is performed. Direct access to both the greater and the lesser tuberosities is facilitated. The cancellous surface of the humeral head fragment provides an excellent surface for direct manipulation without further endangering the extraosseous soft tissue attachments. PMID:27441923

  12. [Anterolateral extension of the lateral suboccipital approach: an anatomical study].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Roberto Leal; Gusmao, Sebastião

    2002-06-01

    We studied the extensions of the lateral suboccipital approach (LSOA) in seven cadaver heads, in the microsurgical laboratory, in order to establish the extensions necessary to approach the anterolateral area of the foramen magnum and the jugular foramen. The extensions (bone resection) were accomplished in five progressive steps: 1) suboccipital retrossigmoid craniectomy (LSOA retrocondylar); 2) extending the craniectomy with removal of half the occipital condyle (LSOA partial transcondylar); 3) extending the drilling of the occipital condyle to open the hypoglossal foramen, followed by removal of the jugular tubercle and opening the jugular foramen (LSOA transcondylar-transjugular); 4) complete drilling of the occipital condyle (LSOA complete transcondylar); 5) LSOA complete transcondylar plus removal of the atlas lateral mass up to the odontoid process (ASOL transcondylar-transjugular). We concluded that the extensions of LSOA should be adapted to the topography of the lesion: the LSOA retrocondylar for the lateral area of the foramen magnum; the LSOA partial transcondylar for the anterolateral portion; the LSOA transcondylar-transjugular to reach the jugular foramen; the LSOA complete transcondylar for the anterior part, and the LSOA complete transcondylar/translateral mass of the atlas for extradural lesions anterior to the foramen magnum.

  13. Skeletal Muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lower Limbs in Late-onset Lipid Storage Myopathy with Electron Transfer Flavoprotein Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Yi; Jin, Ming; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Ni; He, Jun-Jie; Lin, Min-Ting; Fu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lipid storage myopathy (LSM) is a genetically heterogeneous group with variable clinical phenotypes. Late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) is a rather common form of LSM in China. Diagnosis and clinical management of it remain challenging, especially without robust muscle biopsy result and genetic detection. As the noninvasion and convenience, muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a helpful assistant, diagnostic tool for neuromuscular disorders. However, the disease-specific MRI patterns of muscle involved and its diagnostic value in late-onset MADD have not been systematic analyzed. Methods: We assessed the MRI pattern and fat infiltration degree of the lower limb muscles in 28 late-onset MADD patients, combined with detailed clinical features and gene spectrum. Fat infiltration degree of the thigh muscle was scored while that of gluteus was described as obvious or not. Associated muscular atrophy was defined as obvious muscle bulk reduction. Results: The mean scores were significantly different among the anterior, medial, and posterior thigh muscle groups. The mean of fat infiltration scores on posterior thigh muscle group was significantly higher than either anterior or medial thigh muscle group (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mean score on medial thigh muscle group was significantly higher than that of anterior thigh muscle group (P < 0.01). About half of the patients displayed fat infiltration and atrophy in gluteus muscles. Of 28 patients, 12 exhibited atrophy in medial and/or posterior thigh muscle groups, especially in posterior thigh muscle group. Muscle edema pattern was not found in all the patients. Conclusions: Late-onset MADD patients show a typical muscular imaging pattern of fat infiltration and atrophy on anterior, posterior, and medial thigh muscle groups, with major involvement of posterior thigh muscle group and gluteus muscles and a sparing involvement of anterior thigh compartment. Our findings also

  14. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Knee Anterolateral Ligament Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have recently characterized the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). So far, no study has focused on confirming whether the evaluated MRI parameters truly correspond with ALL anatomy. Purpose: To assess the validity of MRI in detecting the ALL using an anatomic evaluation as reference. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 13 cadaveric knees were subjected to MRI and then to anatomic dissection. Dissection was performed according to previous anatomic study methodology. MRIs were performed with a 0.6- to 1.5-mm slice thickness and prior saline injection. The following variables were analyzed: distance from the origin of the ALL to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), distance from the origin of the ALL to its bifurcation point, maximum length of the ALL, distance from the tibial insertion of the ALL to the articular surface of the tibia, ALL thickness, and ALL width. The 2 sets of measurements were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ) and Bland-Altman plots. Results: The ALL was clearly observed in all dissected knees and MRI scans. It originated anterior and distal to the LCL, close to the lateral epycondile center, and showed an anteroinferior path toward the tibia, inserting between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, around 5 mm under the lateral plateau. The ρ values tended to increase together for all studied variables between the 2 methods, and all were statistically significant, except for thickness (P = .077). Bland-Altman plots showed a tendency toward a reduction of ALL thickness and width by MRI compared with anatomic dissection. Conclusion: MRI scanning as described can accurately assess the ALL and demonstrates characteristics similar to those seen under anatomic dissection. Clinical Relevance: MRI can accurately characterize the ALL in the anterolateral region of the knee, despite the presence of structures that might

  15. [Comparison of total hip arthroplasty via a posterior mini-incision versus a classic anterolateral approach].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; Peters, A

    2006-07-01

    Surgical approaches to the hip for total hip arthroplasty (THA) are termed minimally invasive when allowing for a skin incision length of 10 cm or less. The aim of this study was to explore if a minimally invasive posterior approach compared to a classic anterolateral approach negatively influenced surgical time, blood loss, implant position, or perioperative complications. Two groups of THA patients mainly differing with respect to the surgical approach were compared. Results of 76 consecutive THA via a posterior mini-incision approach were recorded prospectively and those of 76 controls operated via a classic anterolateral approach were recorded retrospectively. THA was performed by the same surgeon in every case. Surgical time or intraoperative blood loss were not different among the groups. Total 24-h blood loss was significantly less in patients undergoing THA via minimally invasive posterior approaches. Median cup inclination was 45 degrees in both groups. Cup anteversion was 15 degrees (classic anterolateral) and 12 degrees (minimally invasive posterior), respectively. Stem position was regarded as neutral in 80% of THA through classic anterolateral and in 76 % through minimally invasive dorsal incisions. Complications occurred in 8% (classic anterolateral) and 9% (minimally invasive posterior) of THA patients. Surgical time, blood loss, risk of malpositioned implants, or complications were not increased for THA patients operated through minimally invasive posterior incisions compared to those operated via classic anterolateral approaches.

  16. Influence of exercise training with thigh compression on heat-loss responses.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Inoue, Y; Koga, S; Nishiyasu, T; Kondo, N

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effect of thigh compression, which accelerates activation of central command and muscle metabo- and mechanoreceptors, on the adaptation of sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during exercise heat acclimation. Nine non-heat-acclimated male subjects were acclimated to heat (32 °C and 50% RH) while cycling [50% of maximum oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O 2 m a x )] 60 min/day for 7 days (control group). The experimental group (n = 9) conducted the same training while the proximal thighs were compressed by a cuff at 60 mmHg. V ˙ O 2 m a x , acetylcholine-induced forearm sweating rate (iontophoresis), and mean sweating and cutaneous vascular responses on the forehead, chest, and forearm (SRmean and CVCmean ) during passive heating were evaluated before and after training. Training significantly increased V ˙ O 2 m a x while did not affect acetylcholine-induced sweating rates in either group. Training significantly decreased Tb thresholds for SRmean and CVCmean during passive heating without the alternations of sensitivities in both groups. Although SRmean during passive heating at a given ΔTb was not improved in either group, CVCmean was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated after exercise training only in experimental group. Our results indicate that thigh cuff compression during exercise heat acclimation does not influence adaptation of the sweating response but attenuate cutaneous vasodilation.

  17. Compartment syndrome of thigh and lower leg with disruption of the popliteal vascular bundle after being run over by a 25-ton truck.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Rolf D; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Siebenlist, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare condition, potentially resulting in devastating functional outcome. Increasing intracompartmental pressure which suppresses microcirculation and capillary perfusion may lead to cellular anoxia and muscle ischemia. The muscle compartments in the thigh have a more compliant fascia and blend anatomically into the open compartments of the pelvis, thus compensating higher volumes than the compartments in the lower leg. We present a previously unreported case in which the limb of a 36-year-old man was run over by a 25-ton truck. He presented with a sensomotor deficit in his left lower leg with full paralysis of the shank muscles and absence of all foot pulses. CT scan showed a huge haematoma in the thigh with active bleeding out of the popliteal artery into the haematoma which has already expanded into the muscle compartments of the lower leg. The limb had a disastrous compartment syndrome of the thigh and lower leg with disruption of the popliteal neurovascular bundle; however, no bones in the limb were fractured. A complete fasciotomy of all the lower limb muscle compartments was immediately performed. The artery was reconstructed with interposition of the smaller saphenous vein, which was already interrupted through the initial trauma. PMID:24103831

  18. High intensity electrical stimulation effect on thigh musculature during immobilization for knee sprain. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nitz, A J; Dobner, J J

    1987-02-01

    We conducted high intensity electrical stimulation of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups daily during a three-week period of lower extremity cast immobilization for an athlete who sustained Grade II medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament sprains. Thigh muscle hypertrophy of the injured (stimulated) leg was suggested by an increase in girth measurement on the day of cast removal. Three weeks after cast removal, single-leg, vertical-leap height was 92% of that accomplished by the dominant, uninjured leg, and the patient was able to return to athletic competition. This case report documents the usefulness of high intensity electrical stimulation for maintaining limb motor function during cast immobilization. Limb stabilization during stimulation and simultaneous excitation of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs also are discussed.

  19. Antero-lateral partial sternotomy for extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Noboru; Omoto, Tadashi; Ono, Masahiro; Miyauchi, Tadamasa; Oi, Masaya; Maruta, Kazuto; Iizuka, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Surgical strategies for patients with aortic arch aneurysm extending to the descending aorta remain controversial. The antero-lateral partial sternotomy (ALPS) approach has been developed as a less invasive alternative single-stage strategy for extensive thoracic arch aneurysm (ETAA). METHODS From September 2007 to April 2011, 18 patients underwent elective total arch replacement for ETAA by the ALPS approach (ALPS group). In this approach, a skin incision was made from the bottom of the xiphoid to the anterior axillary line at the third intercostal space with a convex curved line. The thorax was entered through the third intercostal space and a partial lower sternotomy was done. Surgical outcomes were compared with those of 22 patients with ETAA who underwent elective total arch replacement by median sternotomy alone (MS) with regard to the level of distal anastomosis, postoperative complications and mortality. RESULTS In the ALPS group, no hospital mortality occurred and one patient experienced pneumonia. No significant difference between the ALPS and MS groups was seen in operative time (384.1 ± 41.6 min vs 402.3 ± 85.3 min P = 0.423) and cardiopulmonary bypass time (220.8 ± 47.1 min vs 236.9 ± 45.4 min P = 0.286). In contrast, distal anastomosis was at a significantly lower vertebral level in the ALPS than in the MS group (5.5 ± 0.4 vs 4.3 ± 0.9, respectively: P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The ALPS approach provides good surgical exposure for distal aortic arch aneurysms extending to the descending aorta and ensures the accurate reconstruction of the distal anastomosis without major complications. PMID:23243031

  20. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, R H; Haverkamp, D; Campo, M M; van der Vis, H M

    2012-03-01

    A 62year old man developed a compartment syndrome of the thigh after total knee arthroplasty. Twelve years previously he had a HTO of the same knee complicated by a compartment syndrome of the calf. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed with intracompartmental pressure measurement. Following fasciotomy pressures were normalized and further course was uncomplicated. Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare, but potentially devastating, complication following total knee arthroplasty. A previous compartment syndrome of the calf is identified as a risk factor.

  1. Development and Validation of a High Anatomical Fidelity FE Model for the Buttock and Thigh of a Seated Individual.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirini, Rami M A; Reed, Matthew P; Hu, Jingwen; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-09-01

    Current practices for designing new cushions for seats depend on superficial measurements, such as pressure mapping, which do not provide sufficient information about the condition of sub-dermal tissues. Finite element (FE) modelling offers a unique alternative to integrate assessment of sub-dermal tissue condition into seat/cushion design and development processes. However, the development and validation of such FE models for seated humans requires accurate representation of the anatomy and material properties, which remain challenges that are yet to be addressed. This paper presents the development and validation of a detailed 3D FE model with high anatomical fidelity of the buttock and thigh, for a specific seated subject. The developed model consisted of 28 muscles, the pelvis, sacrum, femur, and one layer of inter-muscular fat, subcutaneous fat and skin. Validation against in vivo measurements from MRI data confirmed that the FE model can simulate the deformation of soft tissues under sitting loads with an accuracy of (mean ± SD) 4.7 ± 4.4 mm. Simulation results showed that the maximum strains (compressive, shear and von-Mises) on muscles (41, 110, 79%) were higher than fat tissues (21, 62, 41%). The muscles that experienced the highest mechanical loads were the gluteus maximus, adductor magnus and muscles in the posterior aspect of the thighs (biceps femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles). The developed FE model contributes to the progression towards bio-fidelity in modelling the human body in seated postures by providing insight into the distribution of stresses/strains in individual muscles and inter-muscular fat in the buttock and thigh of seated individuals. Industrial applications for the developed FE model include improving the design of office and household furniture, automotive and airplane seats and wheelchairs as well as customisation and assessment of sporting and medical equipment to meet individual requirements.

  2. Pelvic and thigh musculature in frogs (Anura) and origin of anuran jumping locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prikryl, Tomás; Aerts, Peter; Havelková, Pavla; Herrel, Anthony; Rocek, Zbynek

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the anuran pelvic and thigh musculoskeletal system revealed that the thigh extensors, responsible for the initial phase of jump, the propulsive stroke in swimming and, if used asynchronously, also for walking, are least affected by the transformations observed between anurans and their temnospondyl ancestors (as reflected in contemporary caudates). The iliac shaft and urostyle, two of the most important anuran apomorphies, represent skeletal support for muscles that are mostly protractors of the femur or are important in attaining a crouching position, a necessary prerequisite for rapid escape. All of these muscles originate or insert on the iliac shaft. As the orientation of the pubis, ischium and ilium is the same in anurans, caudates and by inference also in their temnospondyl ancestors, it is probable that the pelvis was shifted from the sacral vertebra posteriorly along the reduced and stiffened tail (urostyle) by the elongation of the illiac shaft. Thus, the original vertical orientation of the ilium was maintained (which is also demonstrated by stable origins of the glutaeus maximus, iliofemoralis and iliofibularis on the tuber superius) and the shaft itself is a new structure. A review of functional analysis of anuran locomotion suggests some clear differences from that in caudates, suggesting that terrestrial jumping may have been a primary locomotor activity, from which other types of anuran locomotion are derived.

  3. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  4. The anterolateral ligament of the knee: MRI appearance, association with the Segond fracture, and historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Jack; Maloney, Ezekiel; Richardson, Michael; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Ha, Alice; Chew, Felix S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. A recent publication has drawn attention to the anterolateral ligament, a structure of the knee with which most radiologists are unfamiliar. We evaluate this structure on MRI; clarify its origin, insertion, meniscal relationship, and morphologic appearance; and identify its relationship with the Segond fracture. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A total of 53 routine knee MRI studies interpreted as normal were reviewed to characterize the anterolateral ligament. A further 20 knee MRI studies with a Segond fracture were assessed to determine a relationship between the fracture and the anterolateral ligament. RESULTS. In all 53 cases, a structure was present along the lateral knee connecting the distal femur to the proximal tibia, with meniscofemoral and meniscotibial components. This structure was somewhat ill defined and sheetlike, inseparable from the adjacent fibular collateral ligament proximally and iliotibial band distally. Aside from one case limited by anatomic distortion, all cases with a Segond fracture exhibited attachment of this structure to the fracture fragment (19/20 cases). CONCLUSION. An ill-defined sheetlike structure along the lateral knee exists attaching the distal femur, body of lateral meniscus, and proximal tibia. This structure has been referenced in the literature dating back to Paul Segond's original description of the Segond fracture in 1879. The structure is identifiable on MRI and appears to be attached to the Segond fracture fragment. For the radiologist, it may be best to forgo an attempt to separate this structure into discrete divisions, such as the anterolateral ligament, because these individual components are inseparable on routine MRI. PMID:25615760

  5. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thigh with epithelioid features: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Miguel; Pérez-Vallés, Ana; Gozalbo, Francisco; Garcia-Garcia, Jose Angel; Gutierrez, Jair; Gaona, John

    2007-01-01

    Background Extrapleural Solitary Fibrous tumors (SFTs) have been increasingly reported. The retroperitoneum, deep soft tissues of proximal extremities, abdominal cavity, trunk, head and neck are the most common extraserosal locations reported. Microscopically they show a wide range of morphological features, and so the differential diagnosis is extensive. Immunohistochemically, they commonly express CD34, vimentin, bcl-2 and CD99. Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and smooth muscle actin (SMA) may occasionally be expressed. Epithelioid morphology in extrapleural SFT has only very occasionally been described (five cases reported), some of them with biphasic pattern and others with malignant characteristics. Case presentation A SFT of the thigh with epithelioid areas in a 63 year old woman is reported. Microscopically the tumor showed areas hypo and hipercellular. At the periphery of the hipercellular areas there were nodules composed of epithelioid cells. Immunohistochemically both the spindle and epithelioid cells were positive for CD34, vimentin, bcl-2 and CD99. Epithelial, neural and muscular markers were negative. Molecular study was done and ruled out a synovial sarcoma. Conclusion Ten cases of SFT of the thigh have been reported but to our knowledge this is the first case with epithelioid morphology affecting the extremities. Identification of this pattern of SFT is of importance, to avoid misdiagnosis with other more aggressive conditions in soft tissue. PMID:17577399

  6. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Child, Jeremy R; Young, Colin R; Amini, Behrang

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:27594953

  7. 78 FR 68906 - Agency Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie... and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Hip...

  8. 78 FR 36304 - Proposed Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ] Title: Hip and Thigh Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form...

  9. [Total hip arthroplasty with a less invasive anterolateral approach].

    PubMed

    Bopp, F

    2014-04-01

    Soft tissue injury in total hip replacements has recently developed into a main topic of orthopaedic surgery. The M. glutaeus medius is at risk to be injured in Watson-Jones' approach to the hip. A special technique in positioning of the leg offers the possibility to save the integrity of the muscles. While profiling the femur shaft the leg is held underneath the opposite leg in outer rotation, hyperextention and forced adduction. The advantage in comparison to other less invasive techniques is the common supine position of the patient on the table. The different technical steps are easy to achieve.

  10. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  11. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  12. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  13. Percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty for metastatic lytic lesions of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Lykomitros, Vasilis; Anagnostidis, Kleovoulos S; Alzeer, Ziad; Kapetanos, George A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our report is to describe a new application of kyphoplasty, the percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty that we performed in two cases of metastatic osteolytic lesions in cervical spine. The first patient, aged 48 years, with primary malignancy in lungs had two metastatic lesions in C2 and C6 vertebrae. Patient's complaints were about pain and restriction of movements (due to the pain) in the cervical spine. The second patient, aged 70 years, with primary malignancy in stomach, had multiple metastatic lesions in thoracolumbar spine and C3, C4 and C5 vertebrae without neurological symptoms. The main symptoms were from cervical spine with severe pain even in bed rest and systematic use of opiate-base analgesic. The preoperative status was evaluated with X-rays, CT scan, MRI scan and with Karnofsky score and visual analogue pain (VAS) scale. Both patients underwent percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty via the anterolateral approach in cervical spine under general anaesthesia. No clinical complications occurred during or after the procedure. Both patients experienced pain relief immediately after balloon kyphoplasty and during the following days. The stiffness also resolved rapidly and cervical collars were removed. VAS score significantly improved from 85 and 95 preoperatively to 30 in both patients. Karnofsky score showed also improvement from 40 and 30 preoperatively to 80 and 70, respectively, at the final follow-up (7 months after the procedure). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty proved to be safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for metastatic osteolytic lesions of the cervical spine, reducing pain and avoiding vertebral collapse. Experience and attention are necessary in order to avoid complications.

  14. Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia with ipsilateral polydactyly of the great toe.

    PubMed

    Kitoh, H; Nogami, H; Hattori, T

    1997-12-31

    We report on two cases of congenital unilateral anterolateral bowing and focal defect of the tibia associated with ipsilateral polydactyly of the great toe. Computed tomographic examination showed an unusual partial cleft of the tibia at the site of bowing. A long follow-up of one patient showed spontaneous resolution of the bowing without progression to pseudoarthrosis. These anomalies should be considered as a new entity related to the tibial developmental field. PMID:9415465

  15. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  16. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction.

  17. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction. PMID:27354943

  18. Muscle oxygen saturation heterogeneity among leg muscles during ramp exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether O(2) saturation in several leg muscles changes as exercise intensity increases. Twelve healthy young males performed 20 W/min ramp bicycle exercise until exhaustion. Pulmonary O(2) uptake (VO(2)) was monitored continuously during the experiments to determine peak oxygen uptake. Muscle O(2) saturation (SmO(2)) was also monitored continuously at the belly of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, and tibialis anterior by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. Although the VL muscle mainly contributes during cycling exercise, deoxygenation was enhanced not only in the VL muscle but also in the other thigh muscles and lower leg muscles with increased exercise intensity. Furthermore, SmO(2) response during ramp cycling exercise differed considerably between leg muscles.

  19. MR imaging of sports-related muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Yang, C W; Liu, G C; Chen, H Y; Wang, M L; Lin, M B; Kuo, Y T

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thighs of 26 baseball athletes and one softball athlete were studied to evaluate muscle injuries. We documented the abnormalities present in MR imaging after a muscle injury and evaluated the role of MR imaging in muscle injuries. Fifteen of the athletes showed muscle abnormalities in MR images. These include muscle strains without tear, muscle tear, scar and chronic tendon injury. Having the advantages of high tissue contrast and multiplanar display capability, MR allowed direct visualization of the injured muscles and characterization of traumatic lesions. We conclude that MR could be a good imaging modality for evaluating muscle injuries.

  20. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  1. Reconstruction of Temporal Hollowing Defect With Anterior-Lateral Thigh Free Flap Following Resection of Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Infratemporal Fossa and Right Mandible (a Case Report).

    PubMed

    Melville, James C; Hornberger, John C; Young, Simon; Shum, Jonathan W

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent invasive ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa is an uncommonly encountered phenomenon in the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery and presents many surgical challenges for the practitioner. This case report describes a patient who underwent previous resection of a mandibular ameloblastoma with multiple recurrences. The patient was diagnosed with a recurrent ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa that was subsequently resected and reconstructed using an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free tissue transfer. There are few reported cases of recurrent ameloblastomas in the infratemporal fossa and none that describe surgical resection and reconstruction of such a lesion. Owing to the uniqueness of the surgical defect, an ALT flap was used to correct the temporal hollowing. There have been multiple reported cases of reconstruction of temporal hollowing defects using autogenous fat or allograft; however, none have described the use of a de-epithelialized ALT microvascular reconstruction of a temporal hollowing defect. This case report describes a unique clinical situation of surgical resection and reconstruction that resulted in a satisfactory outcome for the patient. PMID:27244274

  2. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  3. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation. PMID:27517028

  4. Morphological and functional relationships with ultrasound measured muscle thickness of the lower extremity: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound is a potential method for assessing muscle size of the extremity and trunk. In a large muscle, however, a single image from portable ultrasound measures only muscle thickness (MT), not anatomical muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) or muscle volume (MV). Thus, it is important to know whether MT is related to anatomical CSA and MV in an individual muscle of the extremity and trunk. In this review, we summarize previously published articles in the lower extremity demonstrating the relationships between ultrasound MT and muscle CSA or MV as measured by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. The relationship between MT and isometric and isokinetic joint performance is also reviewed. A linear relationship is observed between MT and muscle CSA or MV in the quadriceps, adductor, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles. Intrarater correlation coefficients range from 0.90 to 0.99, except for one study. It would appear that anterior upper-thigh MT, mid-thigh MT and posterior thigh MT are the best predictors for evaluating adductor, quadriceps, and hamstrings muscle size, respectively. Despite a limited number of studies, anterior as well as posterior lower leg MT appear to reflect muscle CSA and MV of the lower leg muscles. Based on previous studies, ultrasound measured anterior thigh MT may be a valuable predictor of knee extension strength. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between lower extremity function and MT. PMID:27433253

  5. Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of the Tibial Plateau Through the Anterolateral Approach.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Goulet, James A

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are challenging injuries to treat. The lateral tibial plateau is fractured more commonly than the medial plateau and the workhorse approach for these fractures is the anterolateral approach. This approach allows visualization of the lateral joint, metaphysis, and can be extensile if there is shaft extension. We present our technique for performing the anterolateral approach while treating a Schatzker III tibial plateau fracture. Special attention is given to performing a submeniscal arthrotomy to view the joint surface and judge the reduction. A femoral distractor is placed to assist with elevation the joint surface and visualization of the lateral plateau. A cortical window is created using a triple reamer from the sliding hip screw set. The reduction is performed and supported with cancellous bone chips. Finally, a lateral locking plate with rafting screws is placed. Knowledge of this approach and the strategies needed to address lateral and some bicondlar tibial plateau fractures are crucial to good patient outcomes. PMID:27441932

  6. Legacy effects of short-term intentional weight loss on total body and thigh composition in overweight and obese older adults

    PubMed Central

    Chmelo, E A; Beavers, D P; Lyles, M F; Marsh, A P; Nicklas, B J; Beavers, K M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Weight regain following intentional weight loss may negatively impact body composition, accelerating fat regain and increasing risk of physical disability. The purpose of this study was to compare long-term changes in whole body and thigh composition in obese older adults who intentionally lost and then partially regained weight to obese older adults who remained weight stable. Subjects/Methods: This pilot study analyzed total body (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) and thigh (computed tomography (CT)) composition data collected from 24 older (65–79 years) adults 18 months after completion of a 5-month randomized trial that compared resistance training alone (RT) with RT plus caloric restriction (RT+CR). Results: Mean loss of body mass in the RT+CR group (n=13) was 7.1±2.4 kg during the 5-month intervention (74% fat mass; 26% lean mass; all P<0.01), whereas RT (n=11) remained weight stable (+0.3±1.8 kg; P=0.64). Differential group effects were observed for all DXA and CT body composition measures at 5 months (all P⩽0.01); however, by 23 months, group differences persisted only for total body (RT+CR: 81.6±10.0 kg vs RT: 88.5±14.9 kg; P=0.03) and lean (RT+CR: 50.8±9.3 kg vs RT: 54.4±12.0 kg; P<0.01) mass. All RT+CR participants regained weight from 5 to 23 months (mean gain=+4.8±2.6 kg; P<0.01). Total fat mass and all thigh fat volumes increased, whereas thigh muscle volume decreased, during the postintervention follow-up in RT+CR (all P⩽0.01). In the RT group, body mass did not change from 5 to 23 months (−0.2±0.9 kg; P=0.87). Decreased total thigh volume, driven by the loss of thigh muscle volume, were the only postintervention body composition changes observed in the RT group (both P<0.04). Conclusions: Short-term body composition benefits of an RT+CR intervention may be lost within 18 months after completion of the intervention. PMID:27043417

  7. Measures of Functional Performance and Their Association With Hip and Thigh Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kollock, Roger; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Ringleb, Stacie I.; Oñate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Insufficient hip and thigh strength may increase an athlete's susceptibility to injury. However, screening for strength deficits using isometric and isokinetic instrumentation may not be practical in all clinical scenarios. Objective: To determine if functional performance tests are valid indicators of hip and thigh strength. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixty-two recreationally athletic men (n = 30, age = 21.07 years, height = 173.84 cm, mass = 81.47 kg) and women (n = 32, age = 21.03 years, height = 168.77 cm, mass = 68.22 kg) participants were recruited. Intervention(s): During session 1, we measured isometric peak force and rate of force development for 8 lower extremity muscle groups, followed by an isometric endurance test. During session 2, participants performed functional performance tests. Main Outcome Measure(s): Peak force, rate of force development, fatigue index, hop distance (or height), work (joules), and number of hops performed during the 30-second lateral-hop test were assessed. The r values were squared to calculate r 2. We used Pearson correlations to evaluate the associations between functional performance and strength. Results: In men, the strongest relationship was observed between triple-hop work and hip-adductor peak force (r2 = 50, P ≤ .001). Triple-hop work also was related to hip-adductor (r2 = 38, P ≤ .01) and hip-flexor (r2 = 37, P ≤ .01) rate of force development. For women, the strongest relationships were between single-legged vertical-jump work and knee-flexor peak force (r2 = 0.44, P ≤ .01) and single-legged vertical-jump height and knee-flexor peak force (r2 = 0.42, P ≤ .01). Single-legged vertical-jump height also was related to knee-flexor rate of force development (r2 = 0.49, P ≤ .001). The 30-second lateral-hop test did not account for a significant portion of the variance in strength endurance. Conclusions: Hop tests alone did not

  8. Muscle temperature gradients in humans during cold water immersion hypothermia and rewarming

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, G.K.; Giesbrecht, G.G. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta )

    1991-03-11

    Muscle temperature gradients have not been measured in hypothermic man. Thigh and calf muscle temperatures were measured by indwelling multisensor thermocouples (deep (D) 4.5 cm, and superficial (S) 1.5 cm beneath the skin) on five healthy male subjects immersed in 8C water for 70 minutes on two occasions. Measurements continued during 55 minutes of rewarming by two methods; either treadmill exercise (EX) or shivering (SH). Esophageal temperature (T{sub es}) was also measured. Prior to immersion, deep thigh and calf temperatures were 36.1 and 34.8C respectively and temperature gradients were similar in both thigh and calf. At the end of cooling deep thigh temperature fell 3.0C and the gradient increased to 8.1C. Corresponding values for the calf were 10.3 and 6.4C respectively. Both rewarming methods were terminated at a T{sub es} of 35.7C. EX and SH caused similar changes in thigh temperatures; deep temperature increased 2.1 and 1.9C and gradients decreased to 2.7 and 2.6C respectively. However, an increase in deep calf temperature during EX was absent during SH. During cooling, muscle blood flow would appear to be better maintained in the thigh than the calf. Thigh blood flow increases similarly during EX and SH. However, in calf, blood flow increases during EX but not SH.

  9. Solitary fibrous tumor in the thigh: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Anders, J O; Aurich, M; Lang, T; Wagner, A

    2006-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) of extremities, especially the thighs are very rare. Despite SFTs are generally benign, well-circumscribed soft tissue tumors new cases should be presented and followed up carefully to monitor their biological behavior. In general for tumor classification a biopsy is state of the art. Histological including immunohistochemical patterns for SFTs are defined. MRI and ultrasound are not sufficient for differential diagnosis. Once property identified and defined by size and location, resection with intact tumor capsule may result in full recovery of the patient. Reviewing the literature there are no validated reasons for a wider resection. The current patient was a 41-year-old male. Four years after an arthroscopy of the left knee the patient has been suffering an ongoing swelling of the lateral thigh. Because MRI scan data suggested a synovial sarcoma a biopsy was performed. The tumor was classified as a benign SFT. The diagnosis based on histological findings and the presence of the positive immunohistochemical markers Vimentin, CD34, and CD99. The complete tumor resection with intact capsule was achieved in a final operation. Clinical and in MRI after 54-month outcome period there were no local recurrences.

  10. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh 10 days following an elective primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Elsorafy, Kareem R; Jm Stone, Andrew; Nicol, Stephen G

    2013-06-28

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the thigh is an uncommon condition usually treated surgically by emergency dermofasciotomy. We report a rare case of acute delayed compartment syndrome of the anterior compartment of the thigh following an uncemented Total Hip Replacement (THR). Surgical decompression was performed and patient had full recovery.

  11. Misdiagnosis of primary pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the right thigh in a young adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hucheng; Guo, Runsheng; Dai, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (PRMS) is a rare type of soft tissue tumor accounting for <2% of all adult sarcomas. The present study describes a case of a 28-year-old male patient with primary PRMS of the right thigh. The patient was initially diagnosed with a schwannoma and underwent conservative therapy at a local hospital. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient reported a marked increase in the size of the mass. Finally, the patient underwent fine-needle aspiration and total tumor resection. The tumor measured 11×9×5 cm3 in size and was located in the vastus intermedius muscle. According to histological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of PRMS was confirmed by an expert pathology consultant. Postoperative follow-up at 3 months revealed no evidence of recurrent disease or residual side effects from therapy. However, it is imperative that such cases are closely monitored following surgery, in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the procedure, since misdiagnosis may increase the risk of recurrence and metastasis. The present case is noteworthy due to the misdiagnosis of PRMS, the large size of the mass and the young age of the patient. PMID:27588141

  12. Vaginal reconstruction using perineal-thigh flaps with subcutaneous pedicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Chen, C; Chen, M; Zhang, J; Wu, N; Wang, J

    1991-03-01

    A technique of vaginal reconstruction using bilateral, perineal-thigh flaps with subcutaneous pedicle is described. In this procedure, the flaps were raised bilaterally and introduced into an artificial space between the urinary bladder and rectum. The blood supply for the flaps flows from the perineal artery through anastomotic branches to the external pudendal artery. The authors used the technique on four patients, and all the flaps survived entirely. There was no complication. According to a more than two-year follow-up survey, the reconstructed vaginas are expansible and contract little. No stent is needed. There is good sensitivity in the wall of the artificial vagina because sensory nerves run through the flaps.

  13. Positioning for Endovenous Laser Ablation: Comparative Study with Thigh Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Hisao; Yunoki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamasawa, Takahiko; Takiuchi, Hiroki; Honda, Takeshi; Kuwada, Noriaki; Kojima, Kenji; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of surgical outcomes and venous functions between endovenous laser ablation with a 980-nm diode laser (EV group) and thigh stripping (ST group). There were no severe complications and initial success rates were 100% in both groups. In the EV group, preoperative symptoms improved in 94.3% of cases, the venous occlusion rate was 98%, and endovenous heat induced thrombosis had occurred in 11.9% (Class 3: 0.7%) at 12 months after the operation. Although comparative study of postoperative venous function by air plethysmography showed significant improvement in both groups, there was less recovery of postoperative venous function in the EV than in the ST group. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2015; 55: 13–20.) PMID:27738455

  14. Vitamin C prevents the effects of high rearing temperatures on the quality of broiler thigh meat1.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, I B; Matos Junior, J B; Sgavioli, S; Vicentini, T I; Morita, V S; Boleli, I C

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of incubation temperatures and vitamin C injections into eggs (treatments: 37.5ºC, 39ºC, 39ºC+vitamin C) on resultant chick pectoralis major and sartorius muscle fiber hypertrophy, as well as their effects on the quality of breast and over-thigh meat of broilers reared under cold, control, or hot temperatures. Incubation at 39ºC increased the shear force and reduced meat redness in breast meat (P < 0.05). Vitamin C prevented these high temperature incubation effects [shear force (kgf cm(-2)): 37.5ºC = 2.34, 39ºC = 2.79, 39ºC+vitamin C = 2.44; redness: 37.5ºC = 2.64, 39ºC = 1.90, 39ºC+vitamin C = 2.30], but reduced water content (37.5ºC = 74.81%, 39ºC = 74.53%, 39ºC+vitamin C = 69.39%) (P < 0.05). Cold rearing temperatures increased breast meat redness (a*: cold = 2.78, control = 2.12, hot = 1.98), while hot rearing temperatures reduced the muscle fiber area (cold = 5.413 μm(2), control = 5.612 μm(2), hot = 4.448 μm(2)) (P < 0.05) without altering meat quality (P > 0.05). Hot rearing temperatures increased the cooking loss (cold = 30.10%, control = 33.66%, hot = 37.01%), shear force (cold = 3.05 kgf cm(-2), control = 3.43 kgf cm(-2), hot = 4.29 kgf cm(-2)) and redness (a*: cold = 4.63, control = 3.55, hot = 3.20) in the over-thigh meat of broilers from eggs incubated at 37.5ºC, increasing the area of muscle fibers, while cold rearing temperatures diminished cooking loss and shear force, reducing the muscle fiber area (P < 0.05). Incubation at 39ºC and 39ºC+vitamin C prevented the effects of hot and cold rearing temperatures, by diminishing and increasing the muscle fiber area, respectively.

  15. Vitamin C prevents the effects of high rearing temperatures on the quality of broiler thigh meat1.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, I B; Matos Junior, J B; Sgavioli, S; Vicentini, T I; Morita, V S; Boleli, I C

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of incubation temperatures and vitamin C injections into eggs (treatments: 37.5ºC, 39ºC, 39ºC+vitamin C) on resultant chick pectoralis major and sartorius muscle fiber hypertrophy, as well as their effects on the quality of breast and over-thigh meat of broilers reared under cold, control, or hot temperatures. Incubation at 39ºC increased the shear force and reduced meat redness in breast meat (P < 0.05). Vitamin C prevented these high temperature incubation effects [shear force (kgf cm(-2)): 37.5ºC = 2.34, 39ºC = 2.79, 39ºC+vitamin C = 2.44; redness: 37.5ºC = 2.64, 39ºC = 1.90, 39ºC+vitamin C = 2.30], but reduced water content (37.5ºC = 74.81%, 39ºC = 74.53%, 39ºC+vitamin C = 69.39%) (P < 0.05). Cold rearing temperatures increased breast meat redness (a*: cold = 2.78, control = 2.12, hot = 1.98), while hot rearing temperatures reduced the muscle fiber area (cold = 5.413 μm(2), control = 5.612 μm(2), hot = 4.448 μm(2)) (P < 0.05) without altering meat quality (P > 0.05). Hot rearing temperatures increased the cooking loss (cold = 30.10%, control = 33.66%, hot = 37.01%), shear force (cold = 3.05 kgf cm(-2), control = 3.43 kgf cm(-2), hot = 4.29 kgf cm(-2)) and redness (a*: cold = 4.63, control = 3.55, hot = 3.20) in the over-thigh meat of broilers from eggs incubated at 37.5ºC, increasing the area of muscle fibers, while cold rearing temperatures diminished cooking loss and shear force, reducing the muscle fiber area (P < 0.05). Incubation at 39ºC and 39ºC+vitamin C prevented the effects of hot and cold rearing temperatures, by diminishing and increasing the muscle fiber area, respectively. PMID:25810411

  16. Muscle strength and endurance following lowerlimb suspension in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Haggmark, Tom; Ohlsen, Hans; Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lower-limb suspension on the muscle strength and muscle endurance was investigated in six men subjected to four weeks of unilateral unloading of a lower limb (using of a harness attached to a modified shoe), followed by seven weeks of weight-bearing recovery. Results showed a decrease in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle and in the average peak torque (APT) during three bouts of 30 concentric knee extensions. While the the thigh muscle CSA returned to normal after seven weeks of recovery, the APT recovery was still reduced by 11 percent, suggesting that muscle metabolic function was severely affected by unloading and was not restored by ambulation.

  17. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  18. Skeletal muscle metastasis from uterine leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J M; Brennan, D D; Taylor, D H; Holloway, D P; Hurson, B; O'Keane, J C; Eustace, S J

    2004-11-01

    A case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with a rapidly enlarging painful right thigh mass is presented. She had a known diagnosis of uterine leiomyosarcoma following a hysterectomy for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. She subsequently developed a single hepatic metastatic deposit that responded well to radiofrequency ablation. Whole-body MRI and MRA revealed a vascular mass in the sartorius muscle and a smaller adjacent mass in the gracilis muscle, proven to represent metastatic leiomyosarcoma of uterine origin. To our knowledge, metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma to the skeletal muscle has not been described previously in the English medical literature.

  19. Muscle Size Not Density Predicts Variance in Muscle Strength and Neuromuscular Performance in Healthy Adult Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Benjamin K; Gerrits, Tom A J; Horan, Sean A; Beck, Belinda R

    2016-06-01

    Weeks, BK, Gerrits, TAJ, Horan, SA, and Beck, BR. Muscle size not density predicts variance in muscle strength and neuromuscular performance in healthy adult men and women. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1577-1584, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT)-derived measures of muscle area and density and markers of muscle strength and performance in men and women. Fifty-two apparently healthy adults (26 men, 26 women; age 33.8 ± 12.0 years) volunteered to participate. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (XR-800; Norland Medical Systems, Inc., Trumbull, CT, USA) was used to determine whole body and regional lean and fat tissue mass, whereas pQCT (XCT-3000; Stratec, Pforzheim, Germany) was used to determine muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and muscle density of the leg, thigh, and forearm. Ankle plantar flexor and knee extensor strengths were examined using isokinetic dynamometry, and grip strength was examined with dynamometry. Impulse generated during a maximal vertical jump was used as an index of neuromuscular performance. Thigh, forearm, and leg MCSA strongly predicted variance in knee extensor (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and grip strength (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and weakly predicted variance in ankle plantar flexor strength (R = 0.20, p < 0.001), respectively, whereas muscle density was only a weak predictor of variance in knee extensor strength (R = 0.18, p < 0.001). Thigh and leg MCSA accounted for 79 and 69% of the variance in impulse generated from a maximal vertical jump (p < 0.001), whereas thigh muscle density predicted only 18% of the variance (p < 0.002). In conclusion, we found that pQCT-derived muscle area is more strongly related to strength and neuromuscular performance than muscle density in adult men and women.

  20. Primary subcutaneous hydatid cyst in the left distal thigh.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rachidi, Charifa Alaoui; Khattala, Khalid; Chater, Lamiae; Bouabdallah, Youssef; Afifi, My Abderrahmane

    2012-11-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis, a zoonotic infection caused by Echinococcus granulosus, remains a largely extended public health problem in endemic regions. Hydatid cyst disease can occur in all viscera and soft tissues, although the liver and the lungs are the most commonly involved organs. Primary hydatid disease of the soft tissue is extremely rare, even in endemic areas, and accounts for 0.5-5.4 % of all hydatid disease cases, with very little data on the incidence of subcutaneous echinococcosis. The paper will be focused on analyzing this extremely rare disease. A 14-year-old girl came to our Department of pediatric Surgery with a painless, round, palpable mass in the subcutaneous tissue of the distal anteromedial side of the left thigh. Based on clinical and laboratory findings and imaging techniques, we suspected a hydatid cyst. She was treated successfully with complete cyst excision. The macroscopic appearance suggested a hydatid cyst. Histopathologic examination of the specimen revealed a hydatid cyst. No other organ involvement has been detected. Hydatid disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all cystic masses in all anatomic locations, especially in regions where the disease is endemic.

  1. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  2. Regional fat loss from the thigh in obese women after adrenergic modulation.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A

    1987-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic stimulation and alpha 2-adrenergic inhibition increase lipolysis from fat cells. Twenty-eight obese women were placed on a calorie-restricted diet and one of five treatments was applied to one thigh three to five times per week for four weeks: (1) isoproterenol injections; (2) cream containing colforsin (forskolin), aminophylline, and yohimbine; (3) yohimbine cream; (4) colforsin cream; or (5) aminophylline cream. The opposite thigh was treated with a placebo (injection or cream). The treated thighs lost significantly more girth after treatment, both by injection and by cream. No adverse reactions were attributable to either the cream or the injections. It is concluded that local fat reduction from the thigh can be safely accomplished. PMID:2894247

  3. Medial thigh pain: An unusual presentation of giant calculi in sigmoid neobladder

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Gupta, Narmada; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Calculi in a neobladder usually present with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain, and haematuria. We report a case of giant stones in a sigmoid neobladder, who presented with medial thigh pain. PMID:21814323

  4. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  5. Bilateral compartment syndrome of the anterior thigh following functional fitness exercises: a case report.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lucas S; Mitchell, Ronald J; Deaton, Travis G

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of delayed, acute bilateral exertional compartment syndrome of the anterior thigh induced by callisthenic exercise. Symptoms consisted of pain out of proportion to examination findings, inability to ambulate, and severe pain with knee flexion. Treatment consisted of bilateral thigh fasciotomies and supportive therapy for concomitant rhabdomyolysis. Full strength, range of motion, and return to all military duties were achieved by 4 months postinjury.

  6. Gunshot wounds to the thigh. Evaluation of vascular and subclinical vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Payne, W K; Gabriel, R A; Massoud, R P

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective review of 173 patient charts, angiograms, surgical reports, and plain radiographs were performed for all patients admitted with gunshot wounds to the thigh from May 1988 to January 1991 at Martin Luther King, Jr. Hospital. A zonal classification of gunshot wounds to the thigh was created and defined to determine if a zonal classification was predictive of a positive angiogram. Associations and relationships of patients with vascular injury are presented.

  7. Angle-specific torques of thigh muscles: variability analysis in 200 healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Kaplan, M

    1991-12-01

    This study evaluated the variability of the isokinetic angle-specific torques (ASTs) at 15 and 75 degrees of knee flexion and assessed the relationship between them and the isokinetic peak torque (PT) in 200 healthy adults. The results showed that the value of these AST measurements was lower than of the PT measurements. This was due to larger variability of the AST (male and female coefficient of variation [cv] 34 and 43% in the ASTs vs. 19 and 31% in the PTs); unequal variation in the results between men and women (mean cv 27% in men vs. 34% in women); and fairly poor prediction of the ASTs from the PT (PT accounted for only 39 and 62% for the variation seen in the men's and women's AST results). Furthermore, in regression analysis the standard errors of the estimates were unacceptably high, averaging 26%. AST measurements should not be used routinely.

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles.

  9. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles. PMID:27492180

  10. Two cases of lower body contouring with a spiral and vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Han, Hyun Ho; Seo, Je Won; Lee, Jung Ho; Oh, Deuk Young; Ahn, Sang Tae; Rhie, Jong Won

    2012-01-01

    Massive weight loss results in skin excess, leading to an unsatisfying body contour. Various thigh lift procedures can correct flabby skin in the lower leg. We present a lower body contouring technique with a report on two patients. The procedure is determined by the body contour of the patient. As the skin excess in the thigh area tended to appear mostly on the medial side, a vertical medial thigh lift was considered. Moreover, for patients with a pear/guitar-shaped body contour, we added the spiral thigh lift for skin excess in the buttocks and the lateral thigh area. The extent of tissue to excise was determined by pinching the patient in a standing position. The inferior skin flap was fixed to non-movable tissue, which was helpful for lifting the tissue and preventing the widening of the scar. After the operation, a drain was kept for 3 to 4 days. A compressive garment was used after removing the drain. There were no complications. The patients were discharged 6 to 8 days after the operation. In conclusion, skin excess, especially in the lower body, can be corrected by a thigh lift combining several procedures, varying from person to person.

  11. Two Cases of Lower Body Contouring with a Spiral and Vertical Medial Thigh Lift

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Wha; Han, Hyun Ho; Seo, Je Won; Lee, Jung Ho; Oh, Deuk Young; Ahn, Sang Tae

    2012-01-01

    Massive weight loss results in skin excess, leading to an unsatisfying body contour. Various thigh lift procedures can correct flabby skin in the lower leg. We present a lower body contouring technique with a report on two patients. The procedure is determined by the body contour of the patient. As the skin excess in the thigh area tended to appear mostly on the medial side, a vertical medial thigh lift was considered. Moreover, for patients with a pear/guitar-shaped body contour, we added the spiral thigh lift for skin excess in the buttocks and the lateral thigh area. The extent of tissue to excise was determined by pinching the patient in a standing position. The inferior skin flap was fixed to non-movable tissue, which was helpful for lifting the tissue and preventing the widening of the scar. After the operation, a drain was kept for 3 to 4 days. A compressive garment was used after removing the drain. There were no complications. The patients were discharged 6 to 8 days after the operation. In conclusion, skin excess, especially in the lower body, can be corrected by a thigh lift combining several procedures, varying from person to person. PMID:22783496

  12. Two cases of lower body contouring with a spiral and vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Han, Hyun Ho; Seo, Je Won; Lee, Jung Ho; Oh, Deuk Young; Ahn, Sang Tae; Rhie, Jong Won

    2012-01-01

    Massive weight loss results in skin excess, leading to an unsatisfying body contour. Various thigh lift procedures can correct flabby skin in the lower leg. We present a lower body contouring technique with a report on two patients. The procedure is determined by the body contour of the patient. As the skin excess in the thigh area tended to appear mostly on the medial side, a vertical medial thigh lift was considered. Moreover, for patients with a pear/guitar-shaped body contour, we added the spiral thigh lift for skin excess in the buttocks and the lateral thigh area. The extent of tissue to excise was determined by pinching the patient in a standing position. The inferior skin flap was fixed to non-movable tissue, which was helpful for lifting the tissue and preventing the widening of the scar. After the operation, a drain was kept for 3 to 4 days. A compressive garment was used after removing the drain. There were no complications. The patients were discharged 6 to 8 days after the operation. In conclusion, skin excess, especially in the lower body, can be corrected by a thigh lift combining several procedures, varying from person to person. PMID:22783496

  13. Exertional compartment syndrome of the thigh: a rare diagnosis and literature review.

    PubMed

    King, Timothy W; Lerman, Oren Z; Carter, Joseph J; Warren, Stephen M

    2010-08-01

    Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is an uncommon entity. We present a rare case of bilateral exercise-induced three-compartment syndrome of the thighs that required fasciotomies. The objective of this study was to understand the history, physical examination, signs, symptoms, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of compartment syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. A 42-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining of worsening pain and swelling in both thighs 45 h after performing a lower extremity exercise regimen. The patient's thighs were tender and swollen, but there was no ecchymosis or evidence of trauma. Admitting serum creatinine kinase (CK) was 106,289 U/L. Treatment for rhabdomyolysis was initiated. The next day, he complained of escalating bilateral thigh pain. Repeat serum CK was 346,580 U/L. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral thigh compartment syndrome and immediately taken to the operating room for fasciotomies. Postoperatively, the patient's symptoms improved rapidly and his serum CK quickly returned to normal. His incisions were closed and he returned to normal activities of daily living. Because exercise-induced compartment syndrome is an extremely rare diagnosis with a high risk of poor outcome, this article serves to emphasize the importance of considering this diagnosis during the work-up of patients presenting to the ED with rhabdomyolysis.

  14. Composite versus conventional coronary artery bypass grafting strategy for the anterolateral territory: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In severe coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is indicated to re-establish an adequate blood supply to the ischemic myocardium. Effectiveness of CABG surgery for symptom relief and mortality decrease should therefore depend on bypass graft patency. As bypass using a left internal mammary artery (LIMA)-to-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) anastomosis allows the best results in terms of graft patency, we designed a new surgical technique using a saphenous vein graft as a venous bridge to distribute the LIMA flow to the cardiac anterolateral territory. This novel strategy could extend the patency benefits associated to the LIMA. Other potential benefits of this technique include easier surgical technique, possibility to use saphenous vein grafts as vein patch angioplasty, shorter saphenous vein grafts requirement and reduced or eliminated manipulations of the ascendant aorta (and associated stroke risk). Methods/Design Between July 2012 and 2016, 200 patients undergoing a primary isolated CABG surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass with a LAD bypass graft and at least another target on the anterolateral territory will be randomized (1:1) according to 1) the new composite strategy and 2) the conventional strategy with a LIMA-to-LAD anastomosis and revascularization of the other anterolateral target(s) with a separated aorto-coronary saphenous vein graft. The primary objective of the trial is to assess whether the composite strategy allows non-inferior anterolateral graft patency index (proportion of non-occluded CABGs out of the total number of CABGs) compared to the conventional technique. The primary outcome is the anterolateral graft patency index, evaluated at one year by 256-slice computed tomography angiography. Ten years of clinical follow-up is planned to assess clinical outcomes including death, myocardial infarction and need for revascularization. Discussion This non-inferiority trial has the potential

  15. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Infections through Anterolateral Approaches Using Expandable Titanium Mesh Cage for Spine Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Tarantino; Daniele, Marruzzo; Martina, Cappelletti; Tiziano, De Giacomo; Roberto, Delfini

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) is still a rare pathology. However, its incidence is on the rise. This is due to an increasing population with predisposing factors. Also, the availability of more effective diagnostic tools has brought it increasingly to the surgeon's attention. In this study the patients were treated in the Neurosurgery Division of the Department of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry of the Sapienza University of Rome, between 2001 and 2009. They had thoracolumbar pyogenic spondylitis. This study was undertaken in order to identify the correct diagnostic and therapeutic treatment needed in such cases. From the cases studied here, it is evident that spinal infections can be extremely insidious and that diagnosis tends to be reached late. Surgery, along with the antibiotic treatment, allows for eradication of the causes of the pathology by the reclamation of the affected region. Surgery is also fundamental in helping to recover vital functions and in restoring as much as possible the correct curvature of the rachises. The use of an anterolateral approach is dictated by the necessity of obtaining 360° stability as well as by the need to clear away extensive infections, which are not always reachable using a posterior approach. PMID:23193382

  16. The Synergistic Role of the Lateral Meniscus Posterior Root and the ALL in Providing Anterolateral Rotational Stability of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Getgood, Alan M.; Lording, Timothy; Corbo, Gillian; Burkhart, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Injury to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been reported to contribute to high-grade anterolateral laxity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Failure to address ALL injury has been suggested as a cause of persistent rotational laxity following ACL reconstruction. However, lateral meniscus posterior root (LMPR) tears have also has been shown to cause increased internal rotation and anterior translation of the knee. Due to the anatomic relationship of the ALL and the lateral meniscus, we hypothesize that the ALL and lateral meniscus work synergistically, and that a tear to the LMPR will have the same effect on anterolateral laxity as an ALL tear in the ACL deficient knee. Methods: Sixteen fresh frozen cadaveric knee specimens (mid -femur to mid-tibia) were potted into a hip simulator (femur) and a six degree-of-freedom load cell (tibia). Two rigid optical trackers were inserted into the proximal femur and distal tibia, allowing for the motion of the tibia with respect to the femur to be tracked during biomechanical tests. A series of points on the femur and tibia were digitized to create bone coordinate systems that were used to calculate the kinematic variables. Biomechanical testing involved applying a 5 Nm internal rotation moment to the tibia while the knee was in full extension and tested sequentially in the following three conditions: i) ACLintact; ii) Partial ACL injury (ACLam) -anteromedial bundle sectioned; iii) Full ACL injury (ACLfull). The specimens were then randomized to either have the ALL sectioned first (ALLsec) followed by the LMPRsec or vice versa. Internal rotation and anterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur were calculated. A mixed two-way (serial sectioning by ALL section order) repeated measures ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: Compared to the ACLintact condition, internal rotation was found to be 1.78° (p=0.06), 3.74° (p=0.001), and 3.84° (p=0.001) greater following ACLfull, LMPRsec and ALLsec

  17. Nonmammalian vertebrate skeletal muscles express two triad junctional foot protein isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, E B; Tanksley, S J; Airey, J A; Beck, C F; Ouyang, Y; Deerinck, T J; Ellisman, M H; Sutko, J L

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles express a single triad junctional foot protein, whereas avian muscles have two isoforms of this protein. We investigated whether either case is representative of muscles from other vertebrate classes. We identified two foot proteins in bullfrog and toadfish muscles on the basis of (a) copurification with [3H]epiryanodine binding; (b) similarity to avian muscle foot proteins in native and subunit molecular weights; (c) recognition by anti-foot protein antibodies. The bullfrog and toadfish proteins exist as homooligomers. The subunits of the bullfrog muscle foot protein isoforms are shown to be unique by peptide mapping. In addition, immunocytochemical localization established that the bullfrog muscle isoforms coexist in the same muscle cells. The isoforms in either bullfrog and chicken muscles have comparable [3H]epiryanodine binding capacities, whereas in toadfish muscle the isoforms differ in their levels of ligand binding. Additionally, chicken thigh and breast muscles differ in the relative amounts of the two isoforms they contain, the amounts being similar in breast muscle and markedly different in thigh muscle. In conclusion, in contrast to mammalian skeletal muscle, two foot protein isoforms are present in amphibian, avian, and piscine skeletal muscles. This may represent a general difference in the architecture and/or a functional specialization of the triad junction in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrate muscles. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:1873458

  18. Intramuscular haemangioma of the thigh in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Brown, R A; Crichton, K; Malouf, G M

    2004-06-01

    Haemangioma is a common benign soft tissue tumour. Intramuscular haemangiomas may present as a perceived sporting injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is the investigation of choice. Intramuscular haemangioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain and swelling in a muscle.

  19. Diabetic Muscle Infarction (Myonecrosis): Underdiagnosed or Underreported?

    PubMed

    Madhuvan, H S; Krishnamurthy, Ajoy; Prakash, P; Shariff, Shameem

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes. It is seen more in Type 1 DM than Type 2 DM, but in both it is associated with longer duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control with or without microvascular complications. We present a case report of a 47 year diabetic male, who presented with sudden onset of painful swelling of the left thigh muscles (vastus group). The patient had microvascular complications of diabetes. Apart for mild elevation of CPK and LDH other investigations were normal. MRI findings of left thigh showed T2 hyperintensities in the involved muscles which established the diagnosis. Muscle biopsy revealed necrosis of the muscle fibres, presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates and hyalinization of the blood vessels with luminal narrowing which is characteristic of diabetic muscle infarction. The patient was treated with immobilization, analgesics and adequate blood sugar control. This case highlights the rarity of finding vascular changes as well as the poor prognosis and the occurrence of fatal complications in near future.

  20. Clinical effects of thigh cuffs during a 7-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Maillet, Alain; Vasseur Clausen, Pascale; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Alferova, Irina; Gharib, Claude; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2001-08-01

    Thigh cuffs are used by Russian cosmonauts to limit the fluid shift induced by space flight. A ground simulation using the head-down bed rest (HDBR) model was performed to assess the effects of thigh cuffs on clinical tolerance and orthostatic adaptation. 8 male healthy volunteers (32.4±1.9 years) participated twice in a 7-day HDBR — one time with thigh cuffs (worm daily from 9 am to 7 pm) (TC) and one time without (WTC). Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a 10 minute stand test and by a LBNP test (5 min at -15, -30, -45 mmHg) before (BDC-1) and at the end of the HDBR period (R+1). Plasma volume was measured before and at the end of HDBR by the Evans blue dye dilution technique. Thigh cuffs limits headache due to fluid shift, as well as the loss in plasma volume (TC: -5.85±0.95%; WTC: -9.09±0.82%, p<0.05). The mean duration of the stand test (R+1) did not differ in the two group (TC 7.1±1.3 min; WTC 7.0±1.0 min). The increase in HR and decrease in diastolic blood pressure were slightly but significantly larger without thigh cuffs. Duration of the LBNP tests did not differ with thigh cuffs. Thigh cuffs limit the symptoms due to fluid shift and the loss in plasma volume. They partly reduced the increase in HR during orthostatic stress but had no effect on duration of orthostatic stress tests.

  1. Superficial and deep infiltrating congenital juvenile xanthogranuloma involving multiple skeletal muscles and associated with ulceration and generalized postinvolution atrophy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye-Rim; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2015-01-01

    We present a 2-day-old boy with a deep-seated giant juvenile xanthogranuloma infiltrating the skeletal muscles on his right lower limb. Unlike typical juvenile xanthogranuloma, the lesion has shown only partial spontaneous regression with large atrophic scar. However, despite the involvement multiple muscle on the right thigh, the patient has no evidence of orthopaedic sequelae.

  2. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee Leads to Overconstraint at any Fixation Angle

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Jason; Brady, Alex; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cruz, Raphael; Chahla, Jorge; Dornan, Grant; Turnbull, Travis L.; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are one of the most common injuries among athletes. However, the ability to fully restore rotational stability with ACL reconstruction (ACLR) remains a challenge because up to 25% of patients may present with a residual pivot shift following surgery. Advocacy for reconstruction of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is rapidly increasing because biomechanical studies have reported that the ALL is a significant contributor to internal rotational stability of the knee. Although several graft fixation angles for the anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) have been reported in literature, none have been biomechanically validated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ALLR graft fixation angle on knee joint kinematics in the clinically relevant setting of a concomitant ACLR. The goal was to find the optimal knee flexion angle for fixation of the ALLR graft that would most accurately restore native knee kinematics without introducing overconstraint to the knee. It was hypothesized that all fixation angles would significantly reduce rotational laxity compared to the sectioned ALL state and that fixation at 30° would best reproduce native joint kinematics. Methods: Eight non-paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees with no prior injury, surgical history, or gross anatomic abnormality were evaluated with a 6 degree-of-freedom robotic system. Each specimen underwent a full kinematic assessment in each of the following states: 1) intact, 2) anatomic single-bundle (SB) ACLR with intact ALL, 3) anatomic SB ACLR with sectioned ALL, 4) 7 anatomic SB ACLR and ALLR states utilizing ALL graft fixation knee flexion angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90°, and 5) sectioned ACL and ALL. Internal rotation during a 5 N-m internal rotation torque and anterior displacement during an 88 N anterior load were recorded at 15° intervals between 0° and 120° of knee flexion. Axial plane displacement and

  3. Chronic exercise preserves lean muscle mass in masters athletes.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Andrew P; Amati, Francesca; Smiley, Mark A; Goodpaster, Bret; Wright, Vonda

    2011-09-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a loss of muscle mass and strength, resulting in falls, functional decline, and the subjective feeling of weakness. Exercise modulates the morbidities of muscle aging. Most studies, however, have examined muscle-loss changes in sedentary aging adults. This leaves the question of whether the changes that are commonly associated with muscle aging reflect the true physiology of muscle aging or whether they reflect disuse atrophy. This study evaluated whether high levels of chronic exercise prevents the loss of lean muscle mass and strength experienced in sedentary aging adults. A cross-section of 40 high-level recreational athletes ("masters athletes") who were aged 40 to 81 years and trained 4 to 5 times per week underwent tests of health/activity, body composition, quadriceps peak torque (PT), and magnetic resonance imaging of bilateral quadriceps. Mid-thigh muscle area, quadriceps area (QA), subcutaneous adipose tissue, and intramuscular adipose tissue were quantified in magnetic resonance imaging using medical image processing, analysis, and visualization software. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine age group differences. Relationships were evaluated using Spearman correlations. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.31) and lean mass (P = 0.15) did not increase with age and were significantly related to retention of mid-thigh muscle area (P < 0.0001). This occurred despite an increase in total body fat percentage (P = 0.003) with age. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.12), QA (P = 0.17), and quadriceps PT did not decline with age. Specific strength (strength per QA) did not decline significantly with age (P = 0.06). As muscle area increased, PT increased significantly (P = 0.008). There was not a significant relationship between intramuscular adipose tissue (P = 0.71) or lean mass (P = 0.4) and PT. This study contradicts the common observation that muscle mass and strength decline as a function of aging alone. Instead, these

  4. Relationship between BMI and Postoperative Complications with Free Flap in Anterolateral Craniofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunjiro; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nishio, Naoki; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although we have seen tremendous advancement in microsurgery over the last 2 decades and free tissue transfer has become standard for head and neck reconstruction, surgeons still struggle to prevent postoperative complications. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and postoperative complications in patients undergoing rectus abdominis free flap transfer after anterolateral craniofacial resection. Methods: This was a retrospective review of reconstructive surgery using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap in patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma from 2003 to 2014 (n = 35, 27 men and 8 women; average age, 60.9 ± 7.8 years). All patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction after anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base resection and maxillectomy (class IV, subtype a) with palatal resection. Patients were categorized based on sex, BMI, and other parameters. Results: Recipient-site infection occurred in 11 patients (31.4%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 6 (17.1%), partial flap necrosis in 2 (5.7%), total flap necrosis in 1 (2.9%), and facial fistula in 4 (11.4%). Women showed partial flap necrosis significantly more frequently (P = 0.047), probably owing to poor vascular supply of the subcutaneous fat layer. Patients with low BMI (<20 kg/m2) showed recipient-site infection (P = 0.02) and facial fistula (P = 0.01) significantly more frequently owing to insufficient tissue volume and poor vascular supply. Conclusion: Postoperative recipient-site infection and facial fistula occurred mainly in low-BMI patients. Surgeons should take care to achieve sufficient donor tissue on low-BMI patients. Using a prosthetic obturator in low-BMI patients for craniofacial reconstruction can be a good alternative option to reduce postoperative complications due to insufficient donor tissue volume. PMID:27257566

  5. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to isolated common femoral vessel injury: an unusual etiology.

    PubMed

    Davaine, Jean-Michel; Lintz, François; Cappelli, Marc; Chaillou, Philippe; Gouin, François; Patra, Philippe; Gouëffic, Yann

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to common femoral vessel injury. The lesion was associated with common femoral artery dissection and common femoral vein rupture. Emergency surgical treatment consisted of resection-anastomosis of the arterial dissection, vein ligature, and fasciotomies. The patient is symptom-free after 15 months of follow-up. Isolated vascular injury is an unusual cause of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh. This case serves to increase awareness that isolated vascular injury, without femoral fracture or multiple injury, can result in thigh compartment syndrome. Early recognition and treatment of vascular involvement contributes to better functional outcome of this rare condition, but treatment modalities remain subject to discussion.

  6. Body vectoring technique with Radiesse® for tightening of the abdomen, thighs, and brachial zone

    PubMed Central

    Cogorno Wasylkowski, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and subject satisfaction of the calcium hydroxylapatite-based dermal filler Radiesse® in a novel body vectoring technique to correct skin flaccidity in the thighs, abdomen, and brachial zones. Methods Female subjects with self-evaluated flaccidity scores ≥3 on a 6-point scale (0, no flaccidity; 5, very severe flaccidity) in the zones of interest were included. Radiesse was injected according to predesigned vector maps (3 mL per thigh, 1.5 mL per hemiabdomen or brachial zone). Clinical assessments (skin density and thickness) were made by an independent reviewer at an exact position before and 5 weeks after treatment using a cutometer and an ultrascan. Subjects rated skin flaccidity before and 5 weeks after treatment on the 6-point scale and performed a pinch test to self-assess changes in skin thickness. All adverse events were recorded. Results Twenty females (aged 28–67 years) were enrolled, contributing 36 treatment zones. Across all zones, 78% of flaccidity measurements improved after treatment. Improvements in skin flaccidity were most common in the thighs (82% of cases). An improvement in skin density versus baseline was observed in the majority across all zones, most frequently in the abdomen (88% of cases). Skin thickness in each zone also improved versus baseline for the majority, most frequently in the thighs (88% of cases). Mean self-assessed flaccidity scores at baseline were 3.6 (thighs), 3.7 (abdomen), and 3.8 (brachial zone), and 2.6, 2.7, and 3.0, respectively, posttreatment. All subjects reported a positive pinch test. In total, 47.0% of subjects had bruising after treatment, which resolved within a week. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Using this novel technique, Radiesse had notable results on skin flaccidity, density and thickness in the thighs, abdomen, and brachial zones, and was well tolerated. PMID:26056483

  7. Effect of postmortem deboning time on sensory descriptive flavor and texture profiles of cooked boneless skinless chicken thighs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three replicate trials were conducted to investigate the effect of deboning time on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked boneless skinless thigh meat (iliotibialis, iliofibularis and the femoritibialis). Carcasses (42-d old birds) were obtained from a commercial processing plant. Thighs were hot-b...

  8. Influence of the thigh cuffs countermeasure on the cardiovascular adaptation to 0.g (14 and 21 day Mir spaceflights).

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P h; Fomina, G; Pottier, J M; Achaibou, F; Kotovskaya, A

    1995-01-01

    Assess the 0.g induced cardiac and vascular changes at rest on two cosmonauts: one using thigh cuffs from flight day 1 to 8 (Mir 14d flight) the second one not using thigh cuffs (Mir 21d flight). Both were not using intensively any other countermeasure. The ultrasound device onboard Mir with Echo, Doppler, and TM, modes was used.

  9. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  12. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  13. Multifocal diabetic muscle infarction: a rare complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Wafa; Jerbi, Saida; Klii, Rym; Alaya, Wafa; Mestiri, Sarra; Zantour, Baha; Sfar, Mohamed Habib

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare complication of long-standing poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old man with a 10-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus with multiple microvascular and macrovascular complications who presented with the sudden onset of left thigh pain and swelling. MRI suggested muscle infarction. A muscle biopsy demonstrated coagulation necrosis in the skeletal muscle with inflammation and infarction in the walls of small blood vessels. Physicians should consider DMI in the differential diagnosis of patients with diabetes who present with painful, swollen muscles without systemic signs of infection.

  14. The relationships of waist and mid-thigh circumference with performance of college golfers.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungbum; Han, Kunho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Our aim was to evaluate the relationships between waist and mid-thigh circumference, used as proxy measures of trunk and lower limb strengths, respectively, and selected parameters of driver and putting performance in Korean college golfers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 103 college golfers (81 male, 20 to 27 years old). Measurements of body composition, waist and mid-thigh circumference, and grip strength, as well as assessment of golf performance, including driver distance, driver swing speed, putting accuracy, and putting consistency, were performed at the golf performance laboratory at Konkuk University in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea. Average round score was obtained from 10 rounds of golf completed during the study period. The relationships between strength measures and golf performance were evaluated by partial correlation analysis, with adjustment for age, golf experience, and body mass index. [Results] Waist circumference did not correlate with any of the performance variables in both males and females. Mid-thigh circumference correlated with putting consistency (r = 0.364) in males and with putting consistency (r = 0.490) and accuracy (r = 0.547) in females. No other significant correlations between waist and mid-thigh circumference and golf performance were identified. [Conclusion] Lower limb strength may be an important component of putting performance. Further studies are needed to fully characterize the contributions of trunk strength to performance. PMID:27134346

  15. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement. PMID:26928458

  16. The relationships of waist and mid-thigh circumference with performance of college golfers.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungbum; Han, Kunho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Our aim was to evaluate the relationships between waist and mid-thigh circumference, used as proxy measures of trunk and lower limb strengths, respectively, and selected parameters of driver and putting performance in Korean college golfers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 103 college golfers (81 male, 20 to 27 years old). Measurements of body composition, waist and mid-thigh circumference, and grip strength, as well as assessment of golf performance, including driver distance, driver swing speed, putting accuracy, and putting consistency, were performed at the golf performance laboratory at Konkuk University in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea. Average round score was obtained from 10 rounds of golf completed during the study period. The relationships between strength measures and golf performance were evaluated by partial correlation analysis, with adjustment for age, golf experience, and body mass index. [Results] Waist circumference did not correlate with any of the performance variables in both males and females. Mid-thigh circumference correlated with putting consistency (r = 0.364) in males and with putting consistency (r = 0.490) and accuracy (r = 0.547) in females. No other significant correlations between waist and mid-thigh circumference and golf performance were identified. [Conclusion] Lower limb strength may be an important component of putting performance. Further studies are needed to fully characterize the contributions of trunk strength to performance.

  17. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement.

  18. The relationships of waist and mid-thigh circumference with performance of college golfers

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seungbum; Han, Kunho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Our aim was to evaluate the relationships between waist and mid-thigh circumference, used as proxy measures of trunk and lower limb strengths, respectively, and selected parameters of driver and putting performance in Korean college golfers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 103 college golfers (81 male, 20 to 27 years old). Measurements of body composition, waist and mid-thigh circumference, and grip strength, as well as assessment of golf performance, including driver distance, driver swing speed, putting accuracy, and putting consistency, were performed at the golf performance laboratory at Konkuk University in Chungju-si, Republic of Korea. Average round score was obtained from 10 rounds of golf completed during the study period. The relationships between strength measures and golf performance were evaluated by partial correlation analysis, with adjustment for age, golf experience, and body mass index. [Results] Waist circumference did not correlate with any of the performance variables in both males and females. Mid-thigh circumference correlated with putting consistency (r = 0.364) in males and with putting consistency (r = 0.490) and accuracy (r = 0.547) in females. No other significant correlations between waist and mid-thigh circumference and golf performance were identified. [Conclusion] Lower limb strength may be an important component of putting performance. Further studies are needed to fully characterize the contributions of trunk strength to performance. PMID:27134346

  19. Acute anterior compartment syndrome in the thigh: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    An, H S; Simpson, J M; Gale, S; Jackson, W T

    1987-01-01

    An unusual case of acute anterior thigh compartment syndrome promptly recognized and successfully treated in a young athletic patient is presented and the literature reviewed. With the increased interest in physical fitness in today's society, this condition may occur more frequently than it is recognized. Prompt diagnosis and treatment can reduce morbidity.

  20. Fasciotomy of the posterior femoral muscle compartment in athletes.

    PubMed

    Orava, S; Rantanen, J; Kujala, U M

    1998-01-01

    Over a period of 13 years fasciotomy was performed on 46 athletes with chronic pain located at the posterior femoral muscle compartment. The patients could be divided, according to the etiology, in two groups: exertion (26 patients) and trauma (20 patients). In the first group the symptoms appeared without any sudden trauma and most of the athletes competed in endurance sports (e.g. 16 long distance runners). In the second group there was a history of hamstring muscle rupture or recurrent injuries. The symptoms were dull pain, stiffness, cramps and weakness of the posterior thigh during and after training. Conservative treatment methods did not help to eliminate the symptoms during a long preoperative follow-up period. Posterior fasciotomy (minimum 20 cm) to the thigh was performed through one or two incisions. In four patients a simultaneous liberation, division or suturation of the muscle scar was done. The patients were followed up for 19 months and the results of the fasciotomy were good or excellent in 39 cases. Pain at the posterior thigh muscle compartment may sometimes become chronic and hamper the training of athletes. Fasciotomy seems to be an effective method to help these patients return to their previous level of sports.

  1. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; Faber, Gert S; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-04-11

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh. Ten healthy male subjects lifted a pencil and a crate from the floor, with four lifting techniques (free, squat, stoop and a Weight Lifters Technique (WLT)), each of which was performed with and without supporting with one hand on the thigh. A six Degrees of Freedom force transducer, with a comfortable surface to support the hand on, was mounted just above the subject׳s left knee. Hand forces, ground reaction forces, full body kinematics, and trunk EMG were measured. Using inverse dynamics and taking the forces between hand and thigh into account, we calculated 3D L5S1 joint moments, and subsequently estimated spine forces using an EMG-assisted trunk model. For lifting a pencil, hand support reduced average peak total moments by 17-25%, dependent on lifting technique. For crate lifting, hand support reduced total moments by 13-19% compared with one-handed lifting and by 14-26% compared to two-handed lifting. Hand support slightly increased asymmetric motions and caused a substantial increase in asymmetric moments in crate lifting. For compression forces, reductions (up to 28%) were seen in all techniques except in stoop lifts. It is concluded that leaning with a hand on the thigh can lead to substantial reductions of low back loading during lifting.

  2. Ankle and Thigh Skin Surface Temperature Changes With Repeated Ice Pack Application

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Janice E.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Most of the research on cold applications has been performed on nonexercising supine subjects during a single cold pack application. Most athletic injuries occur during exercise, which increases skin temperature. Exercise before ice application will also increase ankle skin temperature during the rewarming phase. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of activity on subsequent ice pack applications and rewarming using standard immediate care procedures. Design and Setting: Three experimental conditions (20-, 30-, and 40-minute ice pack applications) were applied to 12 subjects in a repeated measures design. Subjects rode a bicycle ergometer for 15 minutes before ice application to the ankle and opposite thigh, and were active (walking with crutches, simulated showering and dressing) for 20 minutes following application. Subjects rested with the limb elevated for an additional 40 minutes. Ice packs were then reapplied for the appropriate time (20, 30, or 40 minutes) followed by 60 minutes of rest with the limb elevated. Subjects: Twelve (8 males, 4 females) college-aged volunteers. Only subjects with good-to-high fitness levels were accepted for this study. Measurements: Ankle skin, thigh skin, and atmospheric temperatures were measured every minute using an Isothermex (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, OH). Results: Thigh temperature changes during the first ice application were greater during the 30- and 40-minute conditions than the 20-minute condition. Ankle and thigh temperature changes during the first ice application and rewarming, and for the entire trial were greater during the 40-minute condition than the 20-or 30-minute conditions. Throughout the first ice application and rewarming, and the entire trial, thigh temperature changes were greater during the 30-minute condition than the 20-minute condition. Conclusions: During immediate care procedures following injury, ice packs should be reapplied immediately following showering

  3. Chemical composition and amino acid profiles of goose muscles from native Polish breeds.

    PubMed

    Okruszek, A; Woloszyn, J; Haraf, G; Orkusz, A; Werenska, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the chemical and amino acid composition of breast (pectoralis major) and thigh (biceps femoris) muscles in 17-wk-old geese from 2 Polish conservative flocks: Rypińska (Ry, n = 20) and Garbonosa (Ga, n = 20). The geese were fed ad libitum during the experimental period on the same complete feed. Genotypes affected the moisture and fat content of breast and thigh meat. The Ga geese were characterized by higher moisture as well as lower fat lipid content compared with the Ry breast and thigh muscles. The amino acid proportions of meat proteins depended on the goose flock and type of muscles, where significant differences were found. The proteins of Ga breast muscles contained more glutamic acid, glycine, lysine, tryptophan, histidine, and methionine, and less aspartic acid, proline, serine, leucine, valine, phenyloalanine, tyrosine, and threonine than the Ry geese (P ≤ 0.05). The proteins of Ry thigh muscles were characterized by higher content of proline, serine, and essential amino acids (without lysine and methionine) and lower glutamic and asparagine acid, alanine, and glycine compared with the Ga flock. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (1991) standard, tryptophan was the amino acid limiting the nutritional value of meat proteins of Ry breast muscles (amino acid score for tryptophan = 90%). Except for tryptophan, the meat proteins of the investigated raw materials contained more essential amino acids than the standard. The total content of essential amino acids for all investigated muscles was also higher (52.51 to 55.54%) than the standard (33.90%). It is evident that muscle protein from both flocks of geese have been characterized by high nutritional value. The values of the essential amino acid index of breast muscle proteins were similar in both flocks.

  4. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  5. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  6. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  7. Thigh-calf contact: does it affect the loading of the knee in the high-flexion range?

    PubMed

    Zelle, J; Barink, M; De Waal Malefijt, M; Verdonschot, N

    2009-03-26

    Recently, high-flexion knee implants have been developed to provide for a large range of motion (ROM>120 degrees ) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since knee forces typically increase with larger flexion angles, it is commonly assumed that high-flexion knee implants are subjected to larger loads than conventional knee implants. However, most high-flexion studies do not consider thigh-calf contact which occurs during high-flexion activities such as squatting and kneeling. In this study, we hypothesized that thigh-calf contact reduces the knee forces during deep knee flexion as the tibio-femoral load shifts from occurring inside the knee towards the thigh-calf contact interface. Hence, the effect of thigh-calf contact on the knee loading was evaluated using a free body diagram and a finite element model and both the knee forces and polyethylene stresses were analyzed. Thigh-calf contact force characteristics from an earlier study were included and a squatting movement was simulated. In general, we found thigh-calf contact considerably reduced both the knee forces and polyethylene stresses during deep knee flexion. At maximal flexion (155 degrees ), the compressive knee force decreased from 4.89 to 2.90 times the bodyweight (BW) in case thigh-calf contact was included and the polyethylene contact stress at the tibial post decreased from 49.3 to 28.1MPa. Additionally, there was a clear correlation between a subject's thigh and calf circumference and the force reduction at maximal flexion due to thigh-calf contact (R=0.89). The findings presented in this study can be used to optimize the mechanical behavior of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty designs. PMID:19200996

  8. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  9. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  10. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  11. Giant pseudocyst of the rectus femoris muscle--repetitive strain injury in recreational soccer player.

    PubMed

    Cicvarić, Tedi; Lucin, Ksenija; Roth, Sandor; Ivancić, Aldo; Marinović, Marin; Santić, Veljko

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a traumatic pseudocyst, in a recreational soccer player, after rupture of rectus femoris muscle. 37-year-old male, with history of repetitive painful accidents, was examined because of a double fist-sized mass in the anterior thigh. Ultrasound examination revealed a cystic mass in the rectus femoris muscle. Surgical removal of the mass and proximal remnant of muscle was done. Primary healing and functional recovery was achieved. Histological analysis revealed pseudocyst filled with degenerating clot and surrounded with thick fibrous capsule. The repetitive strain muscle injury, with prolonged period of healing, can occur like pseudocyst.

  12. Robotic Powered Transfer Mechanism modeling on Human Muscle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio

    It is considered in engineering that one power source can operate one joint. However, support movement mechanism of living organism is multi joint movement mechanism. Considerably different from mechanical movement mechanism, two pairs of uni-articular muscles and a pair of bi-articular muscles are involved in it. In leg, movements observed in short run including leg idling, heel contact and toeing are operated by bi-articular muscles of the thigh showing strong legs to support body weight. Pursuit of versatility in welfare robot brings its comparison with conventional machinery or industrial robot to the fore. Request for safety and technology allowing elderly people to operate the robot is getting stronger in the society. The robot must be safe when it is used together with other welfare equipment and simpler system avoiding difficult operation has to be constructed. Appearance of recent care and assistance robot is getting similar to human arm in comparison with industrial robot. Being easily able to imagine from industrial robot, mid-heavyweight articulated robot to support 60-70kgf combined with large output motor and reduction gears is next to impossible to be installed in the bath room. This research indicated that upper limb arm and lower limb thigh of human and animals are holding coalitional muscles and movement of uni-artcular muscle and bi-articular muscle conjure the image of new actuators.

  13. Muscle biopsies show that FES of denervated muscles reverses human muscle degeneration from permanent spinal motoneuron lesion.

    PubMed

    Kern, Helmut; Rossini, Katia; Carraro, Ugo; Mayr, Winfried; Vogelauer, Michael; Hoellwarth, Ursula; Hofer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents biopsy analyses in support of the clinical evidence of muscle recovery induced by a new system of life-long functional-electrical-stimulation (FES) training in permanent spinal-motoneuron-denervated human muscle. Not earlier than 1 year after subjects experienced complete conus cauda lesion, their thigh muscles were electrically stimulated at home for several years with large skin surface electrodes and an expressly designed stimulator that delivered much longer impulses than those presently available for clinical use. The poor excitability of long-term denervated muscles was first improved by several months of twitch-contraction training. Then, the muscles were tetanically stimulated against progressively increased loads. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis from long-term denervated subjects showed severe myofiber atrophy or lipodystrophy beginning 2 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Muscle biopsies from a group of 3.6- to 13.5-year denervated subjects, who underwent 2.4 to 9.3 years of FES, show that this progressive training almost reverted long-term muscle atrophy/degeneration.

  14. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R.; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190– -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29–150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72–0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes. PMID:24993908

  15. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A; Tanner, Rebecca J; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2014-11-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190- -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29-150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes.

  16. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftazidime and Avibactam in Neutropenic Mice with Thigh or Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Maria J.; van Mil, Anita C.; Lagarde, Claudia M.; Schuck, Virna J.; Nichols, Wright W.

    2015-01-01

    Avibactam is a new non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that shows promising restoration of ceftazidime activity against microorganisms producing Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases such as KPCs, class C β-lactamases (AmpC), and some class D enzymes. To determine optimal dosing combinations of ceftazidime-avibactam for treating infections with ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pharmacodynamic responses were explored in murine neutropenic thigh and lung infection models. Exposure-response relationships for ceftazidime monotherapy were determined first. Subsequently, the efficacy of adding avibactam every 2 h (q2h) or q8h to a fixed q2h dose of ceftazidime was determined in lung infection for two strains. Dosing avibactam q2h was significantly more efficacious, reducing the avibactam daily dose for static effect by factors of 2.7 and 10.1, whereas the mean percentage of the dosing interval that free drug concentrations remain above the threshold concentration of 1 mg/liter (%fT>CT 1 mg/liter) yielding bacteriostasis was similar for both regimens, with mean values of 21.6 (q2h) and 18.5 (q8h). Dose fractionation studies of avibactam in both the thigh and lung models indicated that the effect of avibactam correlated well with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. This parameter of avibactam was further explored for four P. aeruginosa strains in the lung model and six in the thigh model. Parameter estimates of %fT>CT 1 mg/liter for avibactam ranged from 0 to 21.4% in the lung model and from 14.1 to 62.5% in the thigh model to achieve stasis. In conclusion, addition of avibactam enhanced the effect of ceftazidime, which was more pronounced at frequent dosing and well related with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. The thigh model appeared more stringent, with higher values, ranging up to 62.5% fT>CT 1 mg/liter, required for a static effect. PMID:26525790

  17. Effect of unloading on muscle volume with and without resistance training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akima, Hiroshi; Ushiyama, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Junjiro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2007-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resistance training on the volume of four muscle groups and/or 17 individual muscles of the human lower limb during 20 days of 6∘ head-down tilt bed rest. Twelve healthy men were divided into two groups: the resistance training group: BR-Tr (n=6) and the control group: BR-Cont (n=6). The volumes of the knee extensor, knee flexor, adductor, plantar flexor, and dorsiflexor muscle groups and their individual muscles were calculated. After the bed rest, the BR-Tr subjects showed no significant change in the volume in almost all tested muscles; in contrast, the volumes of the four muscle groups significantly decreased in the BR-Cont group ( -12% to -8%). These results suggest that resistance training during bed rest can prevent the deteriorating of thigh muscles and calf muscles.

  18. Dietary inclusion level and time effects of taurine on broiler performance, meat quality, oxidative status and muscle taurine content.

    PubMed

    Huang, C X; Wang, B; Min, Z; Yuan, J

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of taurine on growth performance, meat quality, oxidative status and muscle taurine content in broilers. In Experiment 1, 50 one-day-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 0, 0.125, 0.50, 2.00 or 8.00 g/kg taurine from 1 to 42 d of age. In Experiment 2, 80 22-d-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 4.00 g/kg taurine for 0, 1, 2 or 3 weeks. Taurine contents of thigh and breast muscle increased linearly with increasing dietary taurine. Taurine supplementation for 1, 2 and 3 weeks significantly increased the taurine content of breast muscle. The taurine contents of liver and thigh meat were significantly increased by taurine supplementation for 3 weeks. The taurine contents of thigh and breast meat from broilers given a diet supplemented with 4 g/kg taurine for 3 weeks increased to 1.89 times the concentrations of the control group. There were no detrimental effects on growth performance, breast or thigh muscle yield, pH value or drip-water loss, and taurine supplementation did not affect the serum carbonyl content. Serum malondialdehyde concentration was significantly decreased by taurine supplementation for 1, 2 or 3 weeks. PMID:25022619

  19. Effects of different rearing systems on muscle and meat quality traits of slow- and medium-growing male chickens.

    PubMed

    Almasi, A; Andrassyne, B G; Milisits, G; Kustosne, P O; Suto, Z

    2015-01-01

    1. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of production system on the meat quality of slow- and medium-growing chickens. A total of 1075 1-d-old male chicks were equally divided into 6 experimental groups, represented by three strains (SG: TETRA-H, MG1: TETRA HB Color, MG2: Shaver Farm) and were reared in a poultry house in floor pens (12 males/m(2)). 2. On d 49, 150 healthy birds (50/genotype) were placed in a free-range family farm while the rest of the birds remained indoors. All birds were fed ad libitum and consumed the same diet. On d 70, 20 birds of each experimental group were slaughtered and muscle samples were taken from the left breast and thigh muscles. 3. Thigh muscle of SG males kept on free range was darker (L* = 75.12 vs. 78.33) with lower frying loss (45.9% vs. 55.9%) compared with the indoor group. Similar results were obtained from the MG1 group. Free-range MG2 males had lighter thigh meat (L* = 50.7 vs. 57.8) and lower frying loss compared to the indoor group. 4. In general, the indoor treatment had a lower impact on breast meat than the outdoor system. Regardless of the rearing system, genotypic differences were more pronounced in thigh than in breast muscle.

  20. Efficiency of work production by spastic muscles.

    PubMed

    Stoquart, G G; Detrembleur, C; Nielens, H; Lejeune, T M

    2005-12-01

    The present study compared the muscular efficiency in spastic and healthy lower limbs producing the same mechanical work. Sixteen chronic post-stroke hemiparetic and spastic patients and 14 age-matched healthy subjects were submitted to a submaximal stepwise exercise testing on a bicycle ergometer, pedalling with only one lower limb. Net energetic expenditure was computed from oxygen consumption above resting values. Electrical activity of antagonistic muscles in the thigh and in the shank was recorded and co-contraction was defined as the percentage of the pedalling cycle when antagonistic muscles were activated simultaneously. The efficiency was calculated as the ratio between the mechanical work done on the ergometer and the net energetic expenditure. Spasticity was quantitatively evaluated by measuring passive ankle plantar flexor muscle stiffness. The working capacity of the patients' paretic lower limb was very low (<40W). The energy expenditure increased linearly as a function of work intensity, without statistical difference between the patients paretic lower limb (PPL), the patients healthy lower limb (PHL) and the healthy subjects lower limb (HSL). Shank co-contraction was 2.9 times greater in PPL (p<0.05) and 2.3 times greater in PHL (p<0.05) than in HSL. Thigh co-contraction was also 1.8 times greater in PPL than in HSL (p<0.05). The ankle plantar flexor muscle stiffness was statistically greater in PPL than in PHL and HSL (p<0.05). The efficiency was not statistically different between the three groups (p=0.155). In conclusion, the efficiency of work production by paretic and spastic lower limb muscles was normal ( congruent with 20%) despite significant neurological impairments.

  1. Skeletal muscle responses to lower limb suspension in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hather, Bruce M.; Adams, Gregory R.; Tesch, Per A.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphological responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting were assessed by analyzing multiple transaxial magnetic resonance (MR) images of both lower limbs and skeletal muscle biopsies of the unweighted lower limb before and after six weeks of unilaterial (left) lower limb suspension (ULLS). Results indicated that, as a results of 6 weeks of unweighting (by the subjects walking on crutches using only one limb), the cross sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle of the unweighted left limb decreased 12 percent, while the CSA of the right thigh muscle did not change. The decrease was due to a twofold greater response of the knee extensors than the knee flexors. The pre- and post-ULLS biopsies of the left vastus lateralis showed a 14 percent decrease in average fiber CSA due to unweighting. The number of capillaries surrounding the different fiber types was unchanged after ULLS. Results showed that the adaptive responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting are qualitatively, but not quantitatively, similar to those of lower mammals and not necessarily dependent on the fiber-type composition.

  2. Proximal placement of lateral thigh skin markers reduces soft tissue artefact during normal gait using the Conventional Gait Model.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, John; Louw, Quinette; Baker, Richard

    2016-11-01

    A primary source of measurement error in gait analysis is soft-tissue artefact. Hip and knee angle measurements, regularly used in clinical decision-making, are particularly prone to pervasive soft tissue on the femur. However, despite several studies of thigh marker artefact it remains unclear how lateral thigh marker height affects results using variants of the Conventional Gait Model. We compared Vicon Plug-in Gait hip and knee angle estimates during gait using a proximal and distal thigh marker placement for ten healthy subjects. Knee axes were estimated by optimizing thigh rotation offsets to minimize knee varus-valgus range during gait. Relative to the distal marker, the proximal marker produced 37% less varus-valgus range and 50% less hip rotation range (p < 0.001), suggesting that it produced less soft-tissue artefact in knee axis estimates. The thigh markers also produced different secondary effects on the knee centre estimate. Using whole gait cycle optimization, the distal marker showed greater minimum and maximum knee flexion (by 6° and 2° respectively) resulting in a 4° reduction in range. Mid-stance optimization reduced distal marker knee flexion by 5° throughout, but proximal marker results were negligibly affected. Based on an analysis of the Plug-in Gait knee axis definition, we show that the proximal marker reduced sensitivity to soft-tissue artefact by decreasing collinearity between the points defining the femoral frontal plane and reducing anteroposterior movement between the knee and thigh markers. This study suggests that a proximal thigh marker may be preferable when performing gait analysis using the Plug-in Gait model.

  3. Proximal placement of lateral thigh skin markers reduces soft tissue artefact during normal gait using the Conventional Gait Model.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, John; Louw, Quinette; Baker, Richard

    2016-11-01

    A primary source of measurement error in gait analysis is soft-tissue artefact. Hip and knee angle measurements, regularly used in clinical decision-making, are particularly prone to pervasive soft tissue on the femur. However, despite several studies of thigh marker artefact it remains unclear how lateral thigh marker height affects results using variants of the Conventional Gait Model. We compared Vicon Plug-in Gait hip and knee angle estimates during gait using a proximal and distal thigh marker placement for ten healthy subjects. Knee axes were estimated by optimizing thigh rotation offsets to minimize knee varus-valgus range during gait. Relative to the distal marker, the proximal marker produced 37% less varus-valgus range and 50% less hip rotation range (p < 0.001), suggesting that it produced less soft-tissue artefact in knee axis estimates. The thigh markers also produced different secondary effects on the knee centre estimate. Using whole gait cycle optimization, the distal marker showed greater minimum and maximum knee flexion (by 6° and 2° respectively) resulting in a 4° reduction in range. Mid-stance optimization reduced distal marker knee flexion by 5° throughout, but proximal marker results were negligibly affected. Based on an analysis of the Plug-in Gait knee axis definition, we show that the proximal marker reduced sensitivity to soft-tissue artefact by decreasing collinearity between the points defining the femoral frontal plane and reducing anteroposterior movement between the knee and thigh markers. This study suggests that a proximal thigh marker may be preferable when performing gait analysis using the Plug-in Gait model. PMID:26929983

  4. Postinjection Muscle Fibrosis from Lupron

    PubMed Central

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A.; Ballock, Tracy; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G.; Schweiger, B. Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 6.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty (CPP), which signifies the onset of secondary sexual characteristics before the age of eight in females and the age of nine in males as a result of stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Her case is likely related to her adoption, as children who are adopted internationally have much higher rates of CPP. She had left breast development at Tanner Stage 2, adult body odor, and mildly advanced bone age. In order to halt puberty and maximize adult height, she was prescribed a gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, the first line treatment for CPP. She was administered Lupron (leuprolide acetate) Depot-Ped (3 months) intramuscularly. After her second injection, she developed swelling and muscle pain at the injection site on her right thigh. She also reported an impaired ability to walk. She was diagnosed with muscle fibrosis. This is the first reported case of muscle fibrosis resulting from Lupron injection. PMID:26101682

  5. Postinjection Muscle Fibrosis from Lupron.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Raissouni, Nouhad; Ballock, Tracy; Blatnik, Terra; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G; Schweiger, B Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 6.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty (CPP), which signifies the onset of secondary sexual characteristics before the age of eight in females and the age of nine in males as a result of stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Her case is likely related to her adoption, as children who are adopted internationally have much higher rates of CPP. She had left breast development at Tanner Stage 2, adult body odor, and mildly advanced bone age. In order to halt puberty and maximize adult height, she was prescribed a gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, the first line treatment for CPP. She was administered Lupron (leuprolide acetate) Depot-Ped (3 months) intramuscularly. After her second injection, she developed swelling and muscle pain at the injection site on her right thigh. She also reported an impaired ability to walk. She was diagnosed with muscle fibrosis. This is the first reported case of muscle fibrosis resulting from Lupron injection.

  6. Validity of estimating limb muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Miyatani, M; Kanehisa, H; Masuo, Y; Ito, M; Fukunaga, T

    2001-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the validity of estimating muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Bioelectrical impedance and series cross-sectional images of the forearm, upper arm, lower leg, and thigh on the right side were determined in 22 healthy young adult men using a specially designed bioelectrical impedance acquisition system and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, respectively. The impedance index (L(2)/Z) for every segment, calculated as the ratio of segment length squared to the impedance, was significantly correlated to the muscle volume measured by MRI, with r = 0.902-0.976 (P < 0.05). In these relationships, the SE of estimation was 38.4 cm(3) for the forearm, 40.9 cm(3) for the upper arm, 107.2 cm(3) for the lower leg, and 362.3 cm(3) for the thigh. Moreover, isometric torque developed in elbow flexion or extension and knee flexion or extension was significantly correlated to the L(2)/Z values of the upper arm and thigh, respectively, with correlation coefficients of 0.770-0.937 (P < 0.05), which differed insignificantly from those (0.799-0.958; P < 0.05) in the corresponding relationships with the muscle volume measured by MRI of elbow flexors or extensors and knee flexors or extensors. Thus the present study indicates that bioelectrical impedance analysis may be useful to predict the muscle volume and to investigate possible relations between muscle size and strength capability in a limited segment of the upper and lower limbs.

  7. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  8. Multiple congenital malformations in a dicephalic spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca ibera).

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Selleri, P; Di Girolamo, N; Montani, A; Della Salda, L

    2013-01-01

    A 22-day-old dicephalic spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca ibera) died following a history of lethargy, anorexia and absence of defecation. The two heads were anatomically similar with independent reaction to external stimuli. The carapace showed doubled first and extra second vertebral scutes. Radiography and transplastronal ultrasonography, performed when the animal was alive, revealed two symmetrical stomachs and two asynchronous hearts. These findings were confirmed by necropsy examination. Oesophagus, liver, gallbladder and trachea were also duplicated. Other malformations included pyloric valve atresia of the left stomach, focal stenosis of the transverse colon and liver hypoplasia. Dicephalism rarely occurs in Testudinidae and its pathogenesis, still unclear, is discussed.

  9. Imaging diagnosis--seminoma causing liver compression in a spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca).

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Ludewig, Eberhard; Plenz, Bastian; Schmidt, Volker

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old male spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with anorexia, apathy, and prolapse of penile tissue. Ultrasonography revealed a large heterogeneous mass in the coelomic cavity, and fine-needle aspiration demonstrated sperm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sharply defined mass originating from the left testis. Appearance and signal intensities were similar to those reported in testicular neoplasms in humans, in particular sharing similarities with seminomas. Necropsy results and histopathological findings were consistent with a seminoma. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of the diagnosis of testicular neoplasia in a reptile using imaging techniques.

  10. Propeller Flap Reconstruction in Post Oncological Thigh Defect: "The Move in Flap".

    PubMed

    Nambi, G I; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the limb after tumor resection is challenging question for oncosurgeons. The management differs from reconstruction of post traumatic defects due to the complexity of the primary surgery and subsequent radiation. The conventional propeller flap is based on a perforator which is located close to the defect; but in present case the perforator was located far away from the defect. So we describe it as "Move in flap" as the flap rotated a large volume of soft tissue lying between the defect and the perforator. We present a case of post oncological thigh defect with reconstruction using a propeller flap based on distal anteromedial perforator.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of a fibrosarcoma of the thigh: a case report.

    PubMed

    Durin, Luc; Jeanne-Pasquier, Corinne; Bailleul, Patrick; Eboué, Cyril; Aicardi, Stéphanie; Herlicoviez, Michel; Dreyfus, Michel

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of fibrosarcoma of the thigh suspected prenatally. At 27 weeks of gestation a voluminous, vascularised mass was discovered at ultrasound on the foetus' left leg, suggestive of haemangioma or a fibrosarcoma. There were no signs of heart failure. A rapid increase in the tumour mass was noted and a caesarean section was carried out at 39 weeks because of abnormal foetal heart rate. Postnatal ultrasound examination was comparable to that carried out prenatally; pathological examination of the mass biopsied and immunohistochemical investigation provided a diagnosis of congenital fibrosarcoma. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery the infant is now in complete remission without amputation. PMID:16968999

  12. Regional changes in muscle mass following 17 weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian D.; Schneider, Victor S.; Evans, Harlan J.; Pientok, Colette; Rowe, Roger; Spector, Elisabeth

    1992-01-01

    This work reports on the muscle loss and recovery after 17 wk of continuous bed rest and 8 wk of reambulation in eight normal male volunteers. Muscle changes were assessed by urinary levels of 3-methylhistidine (3-MeH), nitrogen balance, dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and isokinetic muscle performance. The total body lean tissue loss during bed rest calculated from nitrogen balance was 3.9 +/- 2.1 kg. Although the total loss is minimal, DPA scans showed that nearly all of the lean tissue loss occurred in the lower limbs. Similarly, MRI muscle volume measurements showed greater percent loss in the limbs relative to the back muscles. MRI, DPA, and nitrogen balance suggest that muscle atrophy continued throughout bed rest with rapid recovery after reambulaton. Isokinetic muscle strength decreased significantly in the thigh and calf with no loss in the arms and with rapid recovery during reambulation.

  13. Ring-Noose-String Technique Allows Adjustable Papillary Muscle Repositioning During Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Repair in Patients with Functional/Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Doenst, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    In patients with functional/ischemic mitral regurgitation (FMR/IMR), mitral annuloplasty alone frequently results in recurrent regurgitation because of ongoing left ventricular dilatation and recurrent leaflet tethering. Adjunctive subvalvular approaches exist, but the technical shortcomings limit their clinical acceptance. A novel adjunctive technique was applied in three patients: A polytetrafluoroethylene string and noose were anchored to the posteromedial and anterolateral papillary muscle, respectively. The string ends were guided through the noose, exteriorized through the midposterior annulus into the left atrium, and length-adjusted during the saline test. The procedure allowed safe and straightforward papillary muscle repositioning and may stabilize repair results in FMR/IMR patients.

  14. Muscle Quantitative MR Imaging and Clustering Analysis in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lareau-Trudel, Emilie; Le Troter, Arnaud; Ghattas, Badih; Pouget, Jean; Attarian, Shahram; Bendahan, David; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) is the third most common inherited muscular dystrophy. Considering the highly variable clinical expression and the slow disease progression, sensitive outcome measures would be of interest. Methods and Findings Using muscle MRI, we assessed muscular fatty infiltration in the lower limbs of 35 FSHD1 patients and 22 healthy volunteers by two methods: a quantitative imaging (qMRI) combined with a dedicated automated segmentation method performed on both thighs and a standard T1-weighted four-point visual scale (visual score) on thighs and legs. Each patient had a clinical evaluation including manual muscular testing, Clinical Severity Score (CSS) scale and MFM scale. The intramuscular fat fraction measured using qMRI in the thighs was significantly higher in patients (21.9 ± 20.4%) than in volunteers (3.6 ± 2.8%) (p<0.001). In patients, the intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with the muscular fatty infiltration in the thighs evaluated by the mean visual score (p<0.001). However, we observed a ceiling effect of the visual score for patients with a severe fatty infiltration clearly indicating the larger accuracy of the qMRI approach. Mean intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with CSS scale (p≤0.01) and was inversely correlated with MMT score, MFM subscore D1 (p≤0.01) further illustrating the sensitivity of the qMRI approach. Overall, a clustering analysis disclosed three different imaging patterns of muscle involvement for the thighs and the legs which could be related to different stages of the disease and put forth muscles which could be of interest for a subtle investigation of the disease progression and/or the efficiency of any therapeutic strategy. Conclusion The qMRI provides a sensitive measurement of fat fraction which should also be of high interest to assess disease progression and any therapeutic strategy in FSHD1 patients. PMID:26181385

  15. Body contouring by combined abdominoplasty and medial vertical thigh reduction: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Ellabban, M G; Hart, N B

    2004-04-01

    The common perception of beauty in the human body has shown a dramatic change over the past few decades culminating in a preoccupation not only with body weight, but also with body image. Obesity is becoming prevalent in our society, and yet generalised redundancy of skin following massive weight reduction can also be an affliction. Localised fat deposits in one or more regions of the trunk, upper arms and thighs are common and are virtually impossible to correct by diet, weight loss or exercise. Excision of the excess pendulous skin and/or the localised fat deposits are able to reduce or even eliminate the physical problems associated with the condition and contribute significantly to patient self-esteem. These procedures are usually multiple and extensive. Combining and reducing the number of such procedures while obtaining optimal results would be most beneficial to both the surgeon and the patient. We report our experience of 14 patients who underwent body contouring operations using combined abdominoplasty and medial thigh reduction with analysis of the results and discussion of the requirements and the advantages of the technique.

  16. Steady state and transient temperature distributions in the human thigh covered with a cooling pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, R. J.; Shitzer, A.; Chato, J. C.; Hertig, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was done on the performance of cooling pads attached to a human thigh. Each cooling pad consisted of a long, water cooled tube formed into a serpentine shape with uniform spacing between the parallel sections. The analytical work developed a cylindrical model for the human thigh. The transient times predicted by this model ranged from 25 to 80 minutes, which is reasonably close to the experimental results. Calculated and measured steady state temperature profiles were in fair agreement. The transient times associated with a change from a high metabolic rate of 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) to a low level of 300 Btu/hr (88 w), were found to be about 120 minutes. A change from 300 Btu/hr (264 w) to 300 Btu/hr (88 w) resulted in 90 to 100 minute transients. However, the transient times for a change in metabolic rate in the opposite direction from 300 Btu/hr (88 w) to 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) were 40 to 60 minutes.

  17. Determination of optimal placements of markers on the thigh during walking and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouzé, A.; Monnet, T.; Begon, M.; Pain, M. T. G.

    2010-06-01

    Kinematics of skin markers are affected by skin tissue artefact with respect to the bone during sports activities or locomotion. The purpose of this study is to determine the less disturbed marker’s location for walking and landing. Twenty-six markers were put on the thigh of nine male subjects. Each subject performed a static trial, a setup movement for determining a functional hip joint centre and five walking and landing trials. The marker displacements were obtained by comparing recorded marker positions and solidified marker positions based on the geometry of the static acquisition. The markers were subsequently ranked from the worst to the least deformed. The ranking of each trial for each subject was analyzed with the concordance coefficient of Kendall and descriptive statistics were used to determine the most and the least disturbed markers. The results show reproducibility between trials for each subject for the two movements. Statistical analysis shows that the most deformed markers during walking were located close to the hip and knee joints whereas the least disturbed were on the mid-thigh. The landing analysis does not permit to determine the best markers from the worst.

  18. Posteromedial thigh (PMT) propeller flap for perineoscrotal reconstruction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Chen, Yen-Chou; Yang, Johnson Chia-Shen

    2015-10-01

    Fournier's gangrene can lead to extensive defects of the perineoscrotal area with exposure of the testes. Such defect poses challenging tasks for both functional and cosmetic reconstruction. Due to its proximity, medial thigh skin appeared to be the most versatile donor site for perineoscrotal reconstruction. In this report, we present a case of reconstruction of a large perineoscrotal defect because of Fournier's gangrene using a posteromedial thigh (PMT) perforator propeller flap. A 58 year-old male who suffered from Fournier's gangrene resulted in a scrotal defect of 10 × 12 cm(2) with a large dead space. A pedicled PMT propeller flap measuring 9 × 23 cm(2) with two perforators that originated from the profunda femoris artery (PFA) was harvested for scrotal defect reconstruction and dead space obliteration. The flap survived completely, with no recipient or donor site morbidity. The length of followup was 3 months and was uneventful. The pedicled PMT propeller flap may be considered as a valid option for perineoscrotal reconstruction.

  19. Infestation of the spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) by Hyalomma aegyptium in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Mohamed; Rjeibi, Mohamed Ridha; Rouatbi, Mariem; Mabrouk, Moez; Mhadhbi, Moez; Amairia, Safa; Amdouni, Yosra; Boussaadoun, Mohamed Anis

    2015-04-01

    We examined 210 spur-thighed tortoises (Testudo graeca) for the presence of ticks in Tunisia during May 2014. A total number of 602 adult ticks were collected and identified leading to the estimation of parasitological indicators. All the ticks belonged to a single species: Hyalomma aegyptium. The mean infestation prevalence was 66.2%, mean overall infestation intensity and abundance were 4.33 and 2.86 ticks/tortoise respectively. Our survey showed that tortoises were significantly more infested by male ticks than females (p<0.001). The ticks were mainly present in the posterior limbs compared to other body regions (p<0.05). There was no significance variation of length and weight of tortoises according to sex (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the tortoises' size (length and weight) and tick infestation. This study showed high tick burdens of spur-thighed tortoises in Tunisia; further investigations are needed to determine exactly the role of this tick species in the transmission of different zoonotic pathogens.

  20. Housing system influences abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, H D; Li, D Y; Zhang, L; Yang, M Y; Zhao, X L; Wang, Y; Liu, Y P; Zhu, Q

    2014-06-01

    Paired box (Pax) proteins 3 and 7 are associated with activation of muscle satellite cells and play a major role in hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of housing system on abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles. At 42 d, 1,200 chickens with similar BW were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range group. The mRNA abundance was measured in pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d 56, 70, and 84, and the protein expression was quantified at d 84. Increases in mRNA abundance of PAX3 and PAX7 with age were less pronounced in caged system chickens than in pen and free-range chickens from d 56 to 84, and free-range chickens showed a more pronounced increase in gene expression with age compared with penned chickens. At d 84, quantities of PAX3 and PAX7 mRNA and protein were highest in both pectoralis major and thigh muscle of chickens raised in the free-range group, lowest in penned chickens, and intermediate in caged chickens (P < 0.05). These data indicate that housing system may influence muscle fiber muscle accretion by coordinating the expression of Pax3 and Pax7 in adult chicken skeletal muscles.

  1. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Skeletal muscle mass, bone mineral density, and walking performance in masters cyclists.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Nahar, Vinayak K; Young, Kaelin C; Patterson, Kaitlyn M; Stover, Caitlin D; Lajza, David G; Tribby, Aaron C; Geddam, David A R; Ford, M Allison; Bass, Martha A; Loftin, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Exercise mode and intensity/duration are important factors for influencing muscle morphology and function as well as bone. However, it is unknown whether masters cyclists who undergo regular moderate- to high-intensity exercise maintain lower-body skeletal muscle mass (SM) and function and bone health when compared with young adults. The purpose of this study was to compare SM, areal bone mineral density (aBMD), and gait performance between masters cyclists and young adults. Fourteen male masters cyclists (aged 53-71 years) and 13 moderately active young men (aged 20-30 years, exercising less than twice a week) volunteered. The masters cyclists were all training actively (four to five times per week, ∼200 miles per week) for on average the last 17 years (range 7-38 years). Thigh SM was estimated from an ultrasound-derived prediction equation using muscle thickness (MTH). Appendicular lean mass (aLM) and aBMD were also estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in thigh SM, anterior and posterior thigh MTH ratio, or aLM between masters cyclists and young men. Maximum straight and zigzag walking times were also similar between groups. Lumbar spine (L1-L4) aBMD was not different between groups, but femoral neck aBMD was lower (p<0.05) in the cyclists than in the young men. Our results suggest that appendicular as well as site-specific thigh muscle loss with aging were not observed in masters cyclists. This maintenance of muscle mass in masters cyclists may preserve walking performance to similar levels as moderately active young adults. However, long-term cycling does not preserve femoral neck aBMD. PMID:24460174

  3. Skeletal muscle mass, bone mineral density, and walking performance in masters cyclists.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Nahar, Vinayak K; Young, Kaelin C; Patterson, Kaitlyn M; Stover, Caitlin D; Lajza, David G; Tribby, Aaron C; Geddam, David A R; Ford, M Allison; Bass, Martha A; Loftin, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Exercise mode and intensity/duration are important factors for influencing muscle morphology and function as well as bone. However, it is unknown whether masters cyclists who undergo regular moderate- to high-intensity exercise maintain lower-body skeletal muscle mass (SM) and function and bone health when compared with young adults. The purpose of this study was to compare SM, areal bone mineral density (aBMD), and gait performance between masters cyclists and young adults. Fourteen male masters cyclists (aged 53-71 years) and 13 moderately active young men (aged 20-30 years, exercising less than twice a week) volunteered. The masters cyclists were all training actively (four to five times per week, ∼200 miles per week) for on average the last 17 years (range 7-38 years). Thigh SM was estimated from an ultrasound-derived prediction equation using muscle thickness (MTH). Appendicular lean mass (aLM) and aBMD were also estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in thigh SM, anterior and posterior thigh MTH ratio, or aLM between masters cyclists and young men. Maximum straight and zigzag walking times were also similar between groups. Lumbar spine (L1-L4) aBMD was not different between groups, but femoral neck aBMD was lower (p<0.05) in the cyclists than in the young men. Our results suggest that appendicular as well as site-specific thigh muscle loss with aging were not observed in masters cyclists. This maintenance of muscle mass in masters cyclists may preserve walking performance to similar levels as moderately active young adults. However, long-term cycling does not preserve femoral neck aBMD.

  4. Two Different Minimally Invasive Techniques for Female Patients with Atrial Septal Defects: Totally Thoracoscopic Technique and Right Anterolateral Thoracotomy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Zhu, Shaoping; Wang, Xianguo; Huang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the outcomes of totally thoracoscopic technique (TTS) vs. right anterolateral thoracotomy technique (RALT) in female patients undergoing minimal invasive atrial septal defect (ASD) correction. Methods: From March 2011 to January 2013, 125 female patients underwent minimally invasive atrial septal defect closure, of whom 62 patients were in the TTS group and 63 were in the RALT group. Results: Procedures were performed successfully in all patients without in-hospital mortality or major complications. cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time were 48.95 ± 15.63 min in TTS group, 31.4 ± 8.04 min in RALT group (p <0.001); the cross-clamp time were 26.92 ± 11.84 min in TTS group and 18.51 ± 6.11 min in RALT group (p <0.001). The length of incision in RALT group (6.02 ± 1.03 cm) was longer than TTS group (5.31 ± 0.68 cm) and the difference was significant (p <0.001). The overall satisfaction rate for the cosmetic results of TTS was 100% and was 96.83% (61/63 patients) in RALT patients. During follow-up, all patients in TTS group were satisfied expect two patients complained that scar was too long at groin. Reasons for a lower score in RALT group included the long scar in the chest; a RALT incision that was located too medially (coming off the bra line) and asymmetrical breast development. Conclusions: Both TTS and RALT are valid and reliable cosmetic surgical techniques for repairing ASDs in female patients. Both techniques allow excellent cosmetic and functional results in most female patients. The totally thoracoscopic technique may gain shorter incision and cosmetic results compared with RALT. PMID:26004113

  5. Low Physical Function in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients is Independent of Muscle Mass and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Ikizler, T. Alp; Wei, Guo; Giri, Ajay; Chen, Xiaorui; Morrell, Glen; Painter, Patricia; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is unknown whether muscle wasting accounts for impaired physical function in adults on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Design Observational study Setting Outpatient dialysis units and a fall clinic Subjects 108 MHD and 122 elderly non-hemodialysis (non-HD) participants Exposure variable Mid-thigh muscle area was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Main outcome measure Physical function was measured by distance walked in six minutes (6MW). Results Compared to non-HD elderly participants, MHD participants were younger (49.2 ± 15.8 yrs vs. 75.3 ± 7.1 yrs, p<0.001) and had higher mid-thigh muscle area (106.2 ± 26.8 cm2 vs. 96.1 ± 21.1 cm2, p=0.002). However, the 6MW distance was lower in MHD participants (322.9 ± 110.4 m vs. 409.0 ± 128.3 m, p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis adjusted for demographics, comorbid conditions and mid-thigh muscle area, MHD patients walked significantly less distance (−117 m, 95% −177 to −56 m, p<0.001) than the non-HD elderly. Conclusions Even when compared to elderly non-HD participants, younger MHD participants have poorer physical function that was not explained by muscle mass or comorbid conditions. We speculate that the uremic milieu may impair muscle function independent of muscle mass. The mechanism of impaired muscle function in uremia needs to be established in future studies. PMID:25836339

  6. Identification of Histone Deacetylase 2 as a Functional Gene for Skeletal Muscle Development in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shahjahan, Md.; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Wang, Fangjie; Zheng, Maiqing; Zhang, Jingjing; Song, Jiao; Wen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) exposed histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) as a possible candidate gene for breast muscle weight in chickens. The present research has examined the possible role of HDAC2 in skeletal muscle development in chickens. Gene expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in breast and thigh muscles during both embryonic (four ages) and post-hatch (five ages) development and in cultures of primary myoblasts during both proliferation and differentiation. The expression of HDAC2 increased significantly across embryonic days (ED) in breast (ED 14, 16, 18, and 21) and thigh (ED 14 and 18, and ED 14 and 21) muscles suggesting that it possibly plays a role in myoblast hyperplasia in both breast and thigh muscles. Transcript abundance of HDAC2 identified significantly higher in fast growing muscle than slow growing in chickens at d 90 of age. Expression of HDAC2 during myoblast proliferation in vitro declined between 24 h and 48 h when expression of the marker gene paired box 7 (PAX7) increased and cell numbers increased throughout 72 h of culture. During induced differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes, the abundance of HDAC2 and the marker gene myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1), both increased significantly. Taken together, it is suggested that HDAC2 is most likely involved in a suppressive fashion in myoblast proliferation and may play a positive role in myoblast differentiation. The present results confirm the suggestion that HDAC2 is a functional gene for pre-hatch and post-hatch (fast growing muscle) development of chicken skeletal muscle. PMID:26949948

  7. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M.; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw–bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p < 0.02). We detected no significant correlation between bone mineral density and yield load in this setting. Conclusion Our results indicate that PMMA augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw–bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability. PMID:26835201

  8. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw-bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p < 0.02). We detected no significant correlation between bone mineral density and yield load in this setting. Conclusion Our results indicate that PMMA augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw-bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability. PMID:26835201

  9. Age-Related Differences in Muscle Shear Moduli in the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Yamashita, Yota; Ueyasu, Yuta

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the age-related differences in shear moduli of the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle (LG) and the soleus muscle (SOL) using shear wave ultrasound elastography. Thirty-one young individuals and 49 elderly individuals volunteered for this study. The shear modulus of RF was determined at 50% of the thigh length, and those of LG and SOL were determined at 30% of the lower leg length. RF and LG shear moduli were significantly higher in young individuals than in elderly individuals, but there was no age-related difference in SOL shear modulus. From the standpoint of an index reflecting muscle mechanical properties, it is suggested that the lower muscle shear moduli of RF and LG are the reason for the decreased explosive muscle strength in the lower extremity and the increased risk of falls for elderly individuals.

  10. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation.

    PubMed

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity do not distinguish between occupational and leisure time physical activity. However, in this body of literature, attention has not been paid to the extensive documentation on occupational physical activity imposing a risk of impairment of health - in particular musculoskeletal health in terms of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational tasks and may underlie muscle pain development in spite of rather low relative muscle load. Causal mechanisms include a stereotype recruitment of low threshold motor units (activating type 1 muscle fibers) characterized by a lack of temporal as well as spatial variation in recruitment. In contrast during physical activities at leisure and sport the motor recruitment patterns are more dynamic including regularly relatively high muscle forces - also activating type 2 muscles fibers - as well as periods of full relaxation even of the type 1 muscle fibers. Such activity is unrelated to muscle pain development if adequate recovery is granted. However, delayed muscle soreness may develop following intensive eccentric muscle activity (e.g. down-hill skiing) with peak pain levels in thigh muscles 1-2 days after the exercise bout and a total recovery within 1 week. This acute pain profile is in contrast to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of

  11. Neuroendocrine tumor arising de novo in the left upper thigh: a case report.

    PubMed

    Păun, Ion; Costin, Andrei; Păun, Mariana; Ţenovici, Mihaela; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Georgescu, Corneliu Cristian; Constantin, Vlad Denis

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate in the neuroendocrine cells of the neural crest (Kulchitsky cells). If neuroendocrine tumors arising in the digestive tract or lung may occasionally result in skin metastases, primary soft tissue or skin NETs are infrequent. The current paper presents the case of an elderly woman patient with neuroendocrine tumors arising de novo in the left upper thigh, accompanied by lymph nodes metastases in the left groin and in the left pelvic sidewall, in close vicinity of the iliac vessels. The diagnosis of NET was performed based on immunohistochemical tests. Such tumors show a slow growth and, generally, have a good prognosis. It is emphasized that complete surgical excision, in some cases associated with adjuvant external radiotherapy is the optimal therapeutic modality in dealing with such lesions. PMID:26429186

  12. Neuroendocrine tumor arising de novo in the left upper thigh: a case report.

    PubMed

    Păun, Ion; Costin, Andrei; Păun, Mariana; Ţenovici, Mihaela; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Georgescu, Corneliu Cristian; Constantin, Vlad Denis

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate in the neuroendocrine cells of the neural crest (Kulchitsky cells). If neuroendocrine tumors arising in the digestive tract or lung may occasionally result in skin metastases, primary soft tissue or skin NETs are infrequent. The current paper presents the case of an elderly woman patient with neuroendocrine tumors arising de novo in the left upper thigh, accompanied by lymph nodes metastases in the left groin and in the left pelvic sidewall, in close vicinity of the iliac vessels. The diagnosis of NET was performed based on immunohistochemical tests. Such tumors show a slow growth and, generally, have a good prognosis. It is emphasized that complete surgical excision, in some cases associated with adjuvant external radiotherapy is the optimal therapeutic modality in dealing with such lesions.

  13. Benign solitary fibrous tumour of the thigh: morphological, chromosomal and differential diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Krismann, M; Adams, H; Jaworska, M; Müller, K M; Johnen, G

    2000-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare and usually benign neoplasms of mesenchymal origin that are often found in the visceral pleura (fibrous pleural tumour, FPT) or other serosal surfaces. They have also been found in soft tissues. We report the case of an SFT localised in the thigh of an 86-year-old woman. The tumour specimen was examined morphologically, immunohistochemically and molecular genetically, using comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH). The latter detects unbalanced chromosomal alterations in human neoplasms by competitive nucleic acid hybridisation and consecutive computer image analysis. The tumour consists of fibroblast-like cells, arranged in a typical "patternless pattern". Immunohistochemically, the tumour stained positively for vimentin, CD34, CD99, and focally for actin and desmin. No reaction occurred with keratin or S100 protein antibodies. CGH detected a single loss on chromosome 13q.

  14. Differential diagnosis in physical therapy evaluation of thigh pain in an adolescent boy.

    PubMed

    Pellecchia, G L; Lugo-Larcheveque, N; Deluca, P A

    1996-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a condition of the adolescent hip in which the femoral head displaces relative to the femoral neck. This disorder is characterized by a synovitis of the hip joint or a mechanical limitation of motion with pain referred to the thigh or knee. The case described in this report is typical of an adolescent with SCFE. A brief review of epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, and treatment is presented to facilitate the physical therapist's knowledge of this condition and its proper management. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of SCFE may result in progression of the slip and chronic disability from osteoarthritis. It is imperative, therefore, that a patient suspected of having this condition be promptly referred to an orthopaedic surgeon for radiographic evaluation.

  15. Comparison of Activity Type Classification Accuracy from Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Wrists, and Thigh in Young, Apparently Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Alexander H. K.; Pivarnik, James M.; Mudd, Lanay M.; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare accuracy of activity type prediction models for accelerometers worn on the hip, wrists, and thigh. Forty-four adults performed sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle, and exercise activities (14 total, 10 categories) for 3-10 minutes each in a 90-minute semi-structured laboratory protocol. Artificial neural…

  16. Glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principle of licorice, can reduce the thickness of subcutaneous thigh fat through topical application.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Francini-Pesenti, Francesco; Battagin, Giuliana; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Fiore, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    Cortisol is involved in the distribution and deposition of fat, and its action is regulated by the activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principle of licorice root, blocks 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, thus reducing the availability of cortisol at the level of adipocytes. We evaluated the effect of topical application of a cream containing glycyrrhetinic acid in the thickness of fat at the level of the thigh. Eighteen healthy women (age range 20-33 years) with normal BMI were randomly allocated to treatment, at the level of the dominant thigh, with a cream containing 2.5% glycyrrhetinic acid (n=9) or with a placebo cream containing the excipients alone (n=9). Before and after 1 month of treatment both the circumference and the thickness of the superficial fat layer of the thighs (by ultrasound analysis) were measured. The circumference and the thickness of the superficial fat layer were significantly reduced in comparison to the controlateral untreated thigh and to control subjects treated with the placebo cream. No changes were observed in blood pressure, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone or cortisol. The effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on the thickness of subcutaneous fat was likely related to a block of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 at the level of fat cells; therefore, glycyrrhetinic acid could be effectively used in the reduction of unwanted local fat accumulation. PMID:15894038

  17. The effect of load and sex on kinematic and kinetic variables during the mid-thigh clean pull.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Jones, Paul A; Udall, Rebecca

    2015-06-01

    Power is a fundamental component for many sporting activities; while the load that elicits peak power during different exercises and differences between sexes remains unclear. This study aims to determine the effect of sex and load on kinematic and kinetic variables during the mid-thigh clean pull. Men (n = 10) and women (n = 10) performed the mid-thigh clean pull at intensities of 40%, 60%, 80%, 100%, 120%, and 140% of one repetition maximum (1RM) power clean in a randomised and counter-balanced order, while assessing bar velocity, bar displacement, power, force, and impulse. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that men demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.05) values for all variables across loads, excluding bar velocity. Men demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.05) bar velocities with 40-80% 1RM; in contrast, women demonstrated significantly (p < 0.05) higher velocities with 120-140% 1RM. Irrespective of sex significantly greater (p < 0.05), system peak power, bar velocity, and displacement occurred with 40% 1RM. In contrast, peak force and impulse were significantly (p < 0.05) greater with 140% 1RM. When performing the mid-thigh clean pull, to maximise system power or bar velocity, lower loads (40-60% 1RM) are recommended. When training force production or impulse, higher loads (120-140% 1RM) are recommended, when using the mid-thigh clean pull.

  18. The validity of anthropometric leg muscle volume estimation across a wide spectrum: from able-bodied adults to individuals with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Venturelli, Massimo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of muscle volume, and changes over time, have significant clinical and research-related implications. Methods to assess muscle volume vary from simple and inexpensive to complex and expensive. Therefore this study sought to examine the validity of muscle volume estimated simply by anthropometry compared with the more complex proton magnetic resonance imaging ((1)H-MRI) across a wide spectrum of individuals including those with a spinal cord injury (SCI), a group recognized to exhibit significant muscle atrophy. Accordingly, muscle volume of the thigh and lower leg of eight subjects with a SCI and eight able-bodied subjects (controls) was determined by anthropometry and (1)H-MRI. With either method, muscle volumes were significantly lower in the SCI compared with the controls (P < 0.05) and, using pooled data from both groups, anthropometric measurements of muscle volume were strongly correlated to the values assessed by (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (r(2) = 0.89; P < 0.05) and lower leg (r(2) = 0.98; P < 0.05). However, the anthropometric approach systematically overestimated muscle volume compared with (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (mean bias = 2407cm(3)) and the lower (mean bias = 170 cm(3)) leg. Thus with an appropriate correction for this systemic overestimation, muscle volume estimated from anthropometric measurements is a valid approach and provides acceptable accuracy across a spectrum of adults with normal muscle mass to a SCI and severe muscle atrophy. In practical terms this study provides the formulas that add validity to the already simple and inexpensive anthropometric approach to assess muscle volume in clinical and research settings.

  19. Eccentric exercise decreases glucose transporter GLUT4 protein in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Asp, S; Daugaard, J R; Richter, E A

    1995-01-01

    1. Eccentric exercise causes impaired postexercise glycogen resynthesis. To study whether changes in muscle concentration of the glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein might be involved, seven healthy young men performed one-legged eccentric exercise by resisting knee flexion enforced by a motor-driven device. 2. The GLUT4 protein concentration in the exercised and in the control thigh was unchanged immediately after exercise. On days 1 and 2 after exercise, the GLUT4 protein concentration in the exercised muscle was 68 +/- 10 and 64 +/- 10% (means +/- S.E.M.; P < 0.05), respectively, of the concentration in the control muscle, and had returned to control values on days 4 and 7. 3. The muscle glycogen concentration decreased from 404 +/- 44 to 336 +/- 44 mmol (kg dry wt)-1 (P < 0.05) during exercise. The glycogen concentration remained significantly lower than in the control thigh on days 1 and 2 after exercise but on days 4 and 7 no differences were found. 4. Although no cause-effect relationship was established, these findings may suggest that decreased muscle concentrations of GLUT4 protein, and, hence, a decreased rate of glucose transport into muscle cells, may be involved in the sustained low glycogen concentration seen after eccentric exercise. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7738859

  20. Efficacy of thigh volume ratios assessed via stereovision body imaging as a predictor of visceral adipose tissue measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jane J; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Pepper, M Reese; Yu, Wurong; Xu, Bugao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The research examined the efficacy of regional volumes of thigh ratios assessed by stereovision body imaging (SBI) as a predictor of visceral adipose tissue measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Body measurements obtained via SBI also were utilized to explore disparities of body size and shape in men and women. Method 121 participants were measured for total/regional body volumes and ratios via SBI and abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue areas by MRI. Results Thigh to torso and thigh to abdomen-hip volume ratios were the most reliable parameters to predict the accumulation of visceral adipose tissue depots compared to other body measurements. Thigh volume in relation to torso [odds ratios (OR) 0.44] and abdomen-hip (OR 0.41) volumes were negatively associated with increased risks of greater visceral adipose tissue depots, even after controlling for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). Irrespective of BMI classification, men exhibited greater total body (80.95L vs. 72.41L), torso (39.26L vs. 34.13L), and abdomen-hip (29.01L vs. 25.85L) volumes than women. Women had higher thigh volumes (4.93L vs. 3.99L) and lower-body volume ratios [thigh to total body (0.07 vs. 0.05), thigh to torso (0.15 vs. 0.11), and thigh to abdomen-hip (0.20 vs. 0.15); p<0.05]. Conclusions The unique parameters of the volumes of thigh in relation to torso and abdomen-hip, by SBI were highly effective in predicting visceral adipose tissue deposition. The SBI provided an efficient method for determining body size and shape in men and women via total and regional body volumes and ratios. PMID:25645428

  1. Correcting radiofrequency inhomogeneity effects in skeletal muscle magnetisation transfer maps.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Morrow, J M; Hanna, M G; Reilly, M M; Yousry, T A; Golay, X; Thornton, J S

    2012-02-01

    The potential of MRI to provide quantitative measures of neuromuscular pathology for use in therapeutic trials is being increasingly recognised. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging shows particular promise in this context, being sensitive to pathological changes, particularly in skeletal muscle, where measurements correlate with clinically measured muscle strength. Radiofrequency (RF) transmit field (B(1)) inhomogeneities can be particularly problematic in measurements of the MT ratio (MTR) and may obscure genuine muscle MTR changes caused by disease. In this work, we evaluate, for muscle imaging applications, a scheme previously proposed for the correction of RF inhomogeneity artefacts in cerebral MTR maps using B(1) information acquired in the same session. We demonstrate the theoretical applicability of this scheme to skeletal muscle using a two-pool model of pulsed quantitative MT. The correction scheme is evaluated practically in MTR imaging of the lower limbs of 28 healthy individuals and in two groups of patients with representative neuromuscular diseases: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and inclusion body myositis. The correction scheme was observed to reduce both the within-subject and between-subject variability in the calf and thigh muscles of healthy subjects and patient groups in histogram- and region-of-interest-based approaches. This method of correcting for RF inhomogeneity effects in MTR maps using B(1) data may markedly improve the sensitivity of MTR mapping indices as measures of pathology in skeletal muscle.

  2. Rupture of the gastrocnemius muscle in neonatal thoroughbred foals: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sato, Fumio; Shibata, Ryo; Shikichi, Mitsumori; Ito, Katsumi; Murase, Harutaka; Ueno, Takanori; Furuoka, Hidehumi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    Rupture of the gastrocnemius muscle is occasionally found in neonatal foals associated with dystocia and assisted delivery. In this report, 3 cases of gastrocnemius muscle disruption in newborn Thoroughbred foals (6, 5 and 2 days old) are reported. In all cases, the foals were presented with inability to rise unassisted postpartum, a dropped tarsus and swelling in the caudal aspect of the thigh accompanied by a hematoma. Ultrasonography, radiography, computerized tomography (CT) and subsequent autopsy were performed to confirm the clinical and pathological features of these cases.

  3. A recurrent solitary fibrous tumor of the thigh with malignant transformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Yasuo; Sano, Kenji; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Aoki, Kaoru; Kito, Munehisa; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We describe an unusual case of a uniformly high-grade malignant solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the thigh with recurrence after wide resection in a 31-year-old man. Presentation of case Our current case showed a long-term benign course before the operation, although the subcutaneous tumor was larger than 10 cm at presentation. The SFT was diagnosed by needle biopsy, and wide resection was performed. Histological findings showed proliferation of capillaries surrounded by masses of spindle-shaped cells without any cytologic atypia, and the percentage of MIB-1-positive nuclei was 2.1%. However, a rapidly enlarging recurrent tumor was observed 11 months after the operation. A second wide resection for the recurrent tumor was performed. Histologically, the tumor cells uniformly displayed significant cytologic atypia and pleomorphism, and had 40–50 mitoses per 10 high-power fields. The proportion of MIB-1-positive nuclei was 48%. Consequently, the tumor was diagnosed as a SFT with malignant transformation. Discussion The malignant transformation described in past studies showed high-grade areas within benign, low-grade, or intermediate-grade SFTs. Therefore, in contrast to our case, uniformly high-grade malignant histological findings at recurrence were not described. Conclusion Even if a tumor is non-malignant during the clinical course, as confirmed by tissue biopsy, the possibility of tumor progression to high-grade sarcoma at recurrence should be considered, and the treatment strategy should be determined carefully. PMID:26967903

  4. Determination of thigh volume in youth with anthropometry and DXA: agreement between estimates.

    PubMed

    Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Malina, Robert M; Simões, Filipe; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Martins, Raul A; Vaz Ronque, Enio R; Petroski, Edio L; Minderico, Claudia; Silva, Analiza M; Baptista, Fátima; Sardinha, Luís B

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the agreement between estimates of thigh volume (TV) with anthropometry and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in healthy school children. Participants (n=168, 83 boys and 85 girls) were school children 10.0-13.9 years of age. In addition to body mass, height and sitting height, anthropometric dimensions included those needed to estimate TV using the equation of Jones & Pearson. Total TV was also estimated with DXA. Agreement between protocols was examined using linear least products regression (Deming regressions). Stepwise regression of log-transformed variables identified variables that best predicted TV estimated by DXA. The regression models were then internally validated using the predicted residual sum of squares method. Correlation between estimates of TV was 0.846 (95%CI: 0.796-0.884, Sy·x=0.152 L). It was possible to obtain an anthropometry-based model to improve the prediction of TVs in youth. The total volume by DXA was best predicted by adding body mass and sum of skinfolds to volume estimated with the equation of Jones & Pearson (R=0.972; 95%CI: 0.962-0.979; R (2)=0.945).

  5. Aquacel Surgical Dressing after Thigh Lift: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bocchiotti, Maria A.; Baglioni, Elisabetta A.; Spaziante, Luca; Frenello, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The postoperative dressing in patients undergoing thigh lift is often difficult, not very resistant to movement, and uncomfortable for the patient, and often exposes surgical site to infection, maceration, or delay in wound healing. Methods: We included 40 patients in a case–control crossover study with no period effects, who were treated both by Aquacel Surgical and a traditional wound dressing. Surveys with a 10-point scale evaluation were used to assess nontraumatic removal level, ease of application, adhesion, and strength of the 2 treatments. We reported the number of days necessary for wound healing, the number of infection cases, and wound-related complications. Costs of the 2 medications were also considered. Ten days after surgery, patients answered a questionnaire with 6 multiple-choice questions to assess comfort, pain at dressing change, pruritus, strength, and number of dressing changes. Results: Compared with controls, surveys revealed Aquacel Surgical to be less traumatic to remove, easier to apply, and to be more adherent and stronger. Significant acceleration of the wound healing was also evident with Aquacel Surgical compared with the traditional dressing. Nonsignificant differences were reported about the risk of infection and wound-related complications between the 2 treatments. A statistical analysis of costs revealed that Aquacel Surgical is significantly more expensive than the traditional medication. Conclusion: We recommend the use of Aquacel Surgical in all the surgery procedures where the risk of wound dehiscence and maceration is high. PMID:27757328

  6. A case of extrapleural solitary fibrous tumor of the thigh with eight years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hariga, Cristian Sorin; Achim, Sanda Claudia; Savu, Adina Carmen; Enache, Valentin; Jecan, Cristian Radu

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare neoplasia. Now classified as SFT, it was first described in 1942 as "hemangiopericytoma" (HPC), and its origin was supposed to be the pericytes. The location outside the pleura is considered uncommon and the tumor situation on the thigh is much more unusual. In this article, we present a case of a SFT located in the hip. Even if the limb situation of the SFT is considered rare, some tumors in lower limb were reported in the past few years. Our initial clinical diagnosis, in this case, was a variant of lipoma (fibrolipoma), so no further investigations were performed before surgery at that time, and the surgery was planned as a simple procedure. The mimics of SFT with a large variety of benign tumors, especially in long-term evolution cases, make the preoperative diagnosis much more difficult. After the excision of the tumor and histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) tests, the diagnosis was finally stated. Even the findings in the exam conducted us to a most likely benign evolution, the eight years follow-up allowed us to strongly correlate the evolution with laboratory findings in this case. Further follow-up in this case can and will be performed. PMID:27151726

  7. Pseudosarcoma of the thigh: a rare case of massive localized lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Ronaghan, Joseph Edward; O-Yurvati, A H

    2015-03-01

    Massive localized lymphedema, also called pseudosarcoma, is a rare condition associated with morbid obesity. Accurate identification of this entity helps the physician make the distinction between this condition and other soft tissue tumors, especially with the increasing rate of obesity worldwide. Obesity and increased caloric intake lead to storage of the excess energy in the form of adipose tissue. The excess adipose tissue disturbs the lymphatic vessels, leading to massive edema localized mostly in the lower extremity, reaching a substantial size and weight that interferes with the quality of life of the individual in question. The mass can cause cosmetic but more importantly functional and structural defects, leading to altered biomechanics with increased risk of deep vein thromboembolism. Below is a presentation of a patient presenting with complaint of a massive medial thigh mass. After much investigation, consultation, and use of diagnostic radiologic modalities it was diagnosed as what is referred to in the literature as massive localized lymphedema, or pseudosarcoma. This mass was managed by surgical excision and the diagnosis was further confirmed by pathologic analysis. After the excision, our patient regained his ability to ambulate on his own, with the help of a rehabilitation program and physical therapy. Massive localized lymphedema needs to be on the differential diagnosis of any morbidly obese patient presenting with mass, especially in the lower extremities. Adequate knowledge about this condition enables the physician to make the distinction between pseudosarcoma and true soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:25785328

  8. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery. PMID:24467313

  9. A case of extrapleural solitary fibrous tumor of the thigh with eight years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hariga, Cristian Sorin; Achim, Sanda Claudia; Savu, Adina Carmen; Enache, Valentin; Jecan, Cristian Radu

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare neoplasia. Now classified as SFT, it was first described in 1942 as "hemangiopericytoma" (HPC), and its origin was supposed to be the pericytes. The location outside the pleura is considered uncommon and the tumor situation on the thigh is much more unusual. In this article, we present a case of a SFT located in the hip. Even if the limb situation of the SFT is considered rare, some tumors in lower limb were reported in the past few years. Our initial clinical diagnosis, in this case, was a variant of lipoma (fibrolipoma), so no further investigations were performed before surgery at that time, and the surgery was planned as a simple procedure. The mimics of SFT with a large variety of benign tumors, especially in long-term evolution cases, make the preoperative diagnosis much more difficult. After the excision of the tumor and histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) tests, the diagnosis was finally stated. Even the findings in the exam conducted us to a most likely benign evolution, the eight years follow-up allowed us to strongly correlate the evolution with laboratory findings in this case. Further follow-up in this case can and will be performed.

  10. An Optimized Mouse Thigh Infection Model for Enterococci and Its Impact on Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Agudelo, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier M.; Vesga, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Negligible in vivo growth of enterococci and high-level dispersion of data have led to inaccurate estimations of antibiotic pharmacodynamics (PD). Here we improved an in vivo model apt for PD studies by optimizing the in vitro culture conditions for enterococci. The PD of vancomycin (VAN), ampicillin-sulbactam (SAM), and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) against enterococci were determined in vivo, comparing the following different conditions of inoculum preparation: aerobiosis, aerobiosis plus mucin, and anaerobiosis plus mucin. Drug exposure was expressed as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug to the MIC (fAUC/MIC) (VAN) or the time in a 24-h period that the drug concentration for the free, unbound fraction exceeded the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (fT>MIC) (SAM and TZP) and linked to the change in log10 CFU/thigh. Only anaerobiosis plus mucin enhanced the in vivo growth, yielding significant PD parameters with all antibiotics. In conclusion, robust in vivo growth of enterococci was crucial for better determining the PD of tested antibacterial agents, and this was achieved by optimizing the procedure for preparing the inoculum. PMID:25348523

  11. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery.

  12. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction. PMID:17328735

  13. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction.

  14. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of sulbactam against Acinetobacter baumannii in in vitro and murine thigh and lung infection models.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ikawa, Kazuro; Watanabe, Erika; Shigemi, Akari; Umezaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Koyo; Ueno, Keiichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has become globally associated with nosocomial infections. Sulbactam, a potent inhibitor of β-lactamases, was previously shown to be active against A. baumannii strains in vitro and effective against A. baumannii infections. However, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of sulbactam against A. baumannii infections has not yet been performed. This is necessary because optimisation of dosing regimens should be based on PK/PD analysis. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo PK/PD analyses of sulbactam were performed using murine thigh and lung infection models of A. baumannii to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulbactam. Sulbactam showed time-dependent bactericidal activity in vitro against A. baumannii. The PK/PD index that best correlated with its in vivo effects was the time that the free drug concentration remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (fT>MIC) both in the thigh (R(2)=0.95) and lung (R(2)=0.96) infection models. Values of fT>MIC for a static effect and 1, 2 and 3log10 kill, respectively, were 21.0%, 32.9%, 43.6% and 57.3% in the thigh infection model and 20.4%, 24.5%, 29.3% and 37.3% in the lung infection model. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo time-dependent activities of sulbactam against A. baumannii infection and demonstrate that sulbactam was sufficiently bactericidal when an fT>MIC of >60% against A. baumannii thigh infection and >40% against A. baumannii lung infection was achieved.

  15. Effects of mass and momentum of inertia alternation on individual muscle forces during swing phase of transtibial amputee gait.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Najarian, Siamak; Eslami, M Reza; Zahedi, Saeed; Moser, David; Shirzad, Elham; Allami, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    A computer simulation was carried out to investigate the forces of lower extremity muscles in the swing phase of a transtibial amputee gait. With each muscle as an ideal force generator, the lower extremity was simulated as a two-degrees of freedom linkage with the hip and knee as its joints. Kinematic data of hip and knee joints were recorded by a motion analysis system. Through a static optimization approach, the forces exerted by muscles were determined so that recorded hip and knee joint angles were produced. Simulation results showed that when the mass of prosthetic foot is increased, muscle forces increase, too. This result is in accord with experimental and theoretical studies that reported an increase in leg mass lead to higher electromyography activity of muscles, and energetic of walking. However, since prosthetic foot moment of inertia is smaller than that of thigh and prosthetic shank, its alternation does not have noticeable effect on muscle forces. PMID:21063155

  16. The physicochemical properties and antioxidative potential of raw thigh meat from broilers fed a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture

    PubMed Central

    Shirzadegan, K.; Falahpour, P.

    2014-01-01

    A 6-wk feeding study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative potential, indices such as quality of the thigh meat and liver of broiler chickens fed with a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture (HEM, consisting: Iranian green tea, cinnamon, garlic and chicory at a ratio of 25:15:45:15). A total of 320, one-d-old Ross (male) broiler chickens were used to investigate the effects of 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g/kg HEM in the diet, on aforementioned factors. The HEM supplementation did not influence the composition of raw thigh meat except for the total phenols and crude ash (P<0.05). Furthermore, pH, water-holding capacity (WHC) and acceptability of thigh meat were affecting by administration of HEM in diets (P<0.05). Meat flavor increased in the supplemented groups (P<0.05). According to our data, HEM supplementation decreased the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in various times of storage and improved the liver lipid peroxides and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities at week 6 (P<0.05), but did not influence the catalase activity. Our results reveal that the addition of 7.5 g/kg or higher HEM in diet could be sufficient to increase the antioxidative activity and 2.5 g/kg for meat taste of broilers in maximum levels. PMID:26623342

  17. The physicochemical properties and antioxidative potential of raw thigh meat from broilers fed a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture.

    PubMed

    Shirzadegan, K; Falahpour, P

    2014-01-01

    A 6-wk feeding study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative potential, indices such as quality of the thigh meat and liver of broiler chickens fed with a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture (HEM, consisting: Iranian green tea, cinnamon, garlic and chicory at a ratio of 25:15:45:15). A total of 320, one-d-old Ross (male) broiler chickens were used to investigate the effects of 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g/kg HEM in the diet, on aforementioned factors. The HEM supplementation did not influence the composition of raw thigh meat except for the total phenols and crude ash (P<0.05). Furthermore, pH, water-holding capacity (WHC) and acceptability of thigh meat were affecting by administration of HEM in diets (P<0.05). Meat flavor increased in the supplemented groups (P<0.05). According to our data, HEM supplementation decreased the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in various times of storage and improved the liver lipid peroxides and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities at week 6 (P<0.05), but did not influence the catalase activity. Our results reveal that the addition of 7.5 g/kg or higher HEM in diet could be sufficient to increase the antioxidative activity and 2.5 g/kg for meat taste of broilers in maximum levels.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid and sarcomatoid features presented as a metastatic thigh mass with an unusual immunohistochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Kandil, Mona; Elshakhs, Soliman; El-Dien, Marwa Serag; Abdallah, Rania

    2014-01-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may metastasize anywhere in the body and sometimes the primary tumor is missing and necessitates extensive investigations to detect. In this report, we describe a case of RCC metastasizing to the thigh in a 70 year old male with a highly pleomorphic morphology suggesting a high grade sarcoma that showed unequivocal positivity for desmin directing the diagnosis for pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. After completion of 33 cycles of radiotherapy, the patient developed large intraabdominal mass that showed conventional areas of RCC with immunoreactivity for CD10, CK, EMA, carbonic anhydrase IX and vimentin. The tumor cells in other areas resembled that of thigh mass which raised suspicions whether the two masses represented the same tumor or not. Surprisingly, the tumor cells of thigh mass showed diffuse positivity for CD10 and focal expression for CK, EMA and carbonic anhydrase IX. Extensive investigations failed to detect any primary renal lesions. The present case demonstrated that RCC can metastasize to virtually any body site and can have significant morphologic overlap with other non-renal neoplasms. Absence of primary origin of RCC according to radiological and operative data should not hinder the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features carries aggressive behavior manifested by great metastatic potential and short survival time. PMID:24711903

  19. Small Multifidus Muscle Size Predicts Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hides, Julie A.; Stanton, Warren R.; Mendis, M. Dilani; Franettovich Smith, Melinda M.; Sexton, Margot J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Australian football, lower limb injuries have had the highest incidence and prevalence rates. Previous studies have shown that football players with relatively more severe preseason and playing season hip, groin, and thigh injuries had a significantly smaller multifidus muscle compared with players with no lower limb injuries. Rehabilitation of the multifidus muscle, with restoration of its size and function, has been associated with decreased recurrence rates of episodic low back pain and decreased numbers of lower limb injuries in football players. Assessment of multifidus muscle size and function could potentially be incorporated into a model that could be used to predict injuries in football players. Purpose: To examine the robustness of multifidus muscle measurements as a predictor of lower limb injuries incurred by professional football players. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Ultrasound examinations were carried out on 259 male elite football players at the start of the preseason and 261 players at the start of the playing season. Injury data were obtained from records collected by the Australian Football League (AFL) club staff during the preseason and the playing season. Results: Decreased size of the multifidus muscle at L5 consistently predicted injury in the preseason and playing season. Asymmetry of the multifidus muscle and low back pain were significantly related to lower limb injuries in the preseason, and having no preferred kicking leg was related to season injuries. Seasonal change in the size of the multifidus muscle indicating a decrease in muscle mass was linked to injury. Sensitivity and specificity of the model were 60.6% and 84.9% for the preseason and 91.8% and 45.8% for the playing season, respectively. Conclusion: A model was developed for prediction of lower limb injuries in football players with potential utility for club medical staff. Of particular note is the finding that changes in muscle

  20. Progressive, Site-Specific Loss of Muscle Mass in Older, Frail Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Nobuo; Shimada, Keizo; Islam, Mohammod M; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Ishida, Yoshie; Brechue, William F

    2015-07-01

    To clarify the progression of muscle loss in nursing home residents, frail women (n = 16; age: 85 ± 9 years; residence time: 764 days) were assessed for physical activity, caloric intake, and site-specific muscle thickness (MTH) and subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) using B-mode ultrasound at nine anatomical sites at four intervals over one year. Height, body weight, and BMI did not change. Physical activity (246 steps/ day) and nutritional intake (1,441 kcal, 60.3 g protein/day) were unaltered throughout the study. Subjects experienced a significant, progressive loss of muscle indicated by decrements in anterior upper arm (20%), posterior upper arm (25%), abdomen (20%), subscapular (33%), anterior thigh (15%), posterior thigh (22%), anterior lower leg (11%), posterior lower leg (13%), and forearm (15%) MTH. At study inception, prevalence of sarcopenia was related to muscle loss in the upper leg, while upper body muscle wasting contributed to sarcopenia later and was unrelated to physical activity, nutritional input, or duration of residence.

  1. Measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J M; Roberts, N; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method for measurement of the cross sectional area and volume of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with stereology, and to compare the results of measurements obtained by the MRI method with those obtained by the conventional method of static B-mode ultrasound in order to evaluate whether MRI is a reliable alternative to ultrasound. METHODS: A preliminary MRI study was undertaken on a single female volunteer in order to optimise the scanning technique and sampling design for estimating the muscle volume using the Cavalieri method. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the method comparison study. Each volunteer underwent static B-mode ultrasonography, immediately followed by MRI. The cross sectional area of the quadriceps femoris was estimated at the junction of the proximal one third and distal two thirds of the thigh, and seven systematic sections of the thigh were obtained in order to estimate muscle volume by both modalities. RESULTS: Seven sections through the muscle are required to achieve a coefficient of error of 4-5%. There was no significant difference in the cross sectional area estimates or volume estimates when ultrasound and MRI were compared. CONCLUSION: Muscle cross sectional area and volume can be measured without bias by MRI in conjunction with stereological methods and the method is a reliable alternative to static B-mode ultrasound for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9132215

  2. Changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) eigenvalues of skeletal muscle due to hybrid exercise training.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Kemp, Graham J; Isobe, Tomonori; Sato, Eisuke; Hirano, Yuji; Shoda, Junichi; Minami, Manabu

    2014-12-01

    Several studies have proposed the cell membrane as the main water diffusion restricting factor in the skeletal muscle cell. We sought to establish whether a particular form of exercise training (which is likely to affect only intracellular components) could affect water diffusion. The purpose of this study is to characterise prospectively the changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) eigenvalues of thigh muscle resulting from hybrid training (HYBT) in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Twenty-one NAFLD patients underwent HYBT for 30 minutes per day, twice a week for 6 months. Patients were scanned using DTI of the thigh pre- and post-HYBT. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the three eigenvalues lambda 1 (λ1), λ2, λ3, and the maximal cross sectional area (CSA) were measured in bilateral thigh muscles: knee flexors (biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), semimembranous (SM)) and knee extensors (medial vastus (MV), intermediate vastus (IV), lateral vastus (LV), and rectus femoris (RF)), and compared pre- and post-HYBT by paired t-test. Muscle strength of extensors (P<0.01), but not flexors, increased significantly post-HYBT. For FA, ADC and eigenvalues, the overall picture was of increase. Some (P<0.05 in λ2 and P<0.01 in λ1) eigenvalues of flexors and all (λ1-λ3) eigenvalues of extensors increased significantly (P<0.01) post-HYBT. HYBT increased all 3 eigenvalues. We suggest this might be caused by enlargement of muscle intracellular space.

  3. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  4. Bioluminescence and 19F magnetic resonance imaging visualize the efficacy of lysostaphin alone and in combination with oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in murine thigh and catheter-associated infection models.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K; Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by (19)F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies.

  5. Bioluminescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualize the Efficacy of Lysostaphin Alone and in Combination with Oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Thigh and Catheter-Associated Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K.; Jakob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by 19F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  6. Responsiveness of muscle size and strength to physical training in very elderly people: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stewart, V H; Saunders, D H; Greig, C A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether very elderly muscle (>75 years) hypertrophies in response to physical training. The databases MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL Plus and SPORTDiscus were systematically literature searched with reference lists of all included studies and relevant reviews. Controlled trials (inactive elderly control group) involving healthy elderly participants over 75 years participating in an intervention complying with an established definition of physical training were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the PEDro scale. Data analysis was performed on muscle size and strength using RevMan (software version 5.1). Four studies were included of which four of four measured changes in gross muscle size. Training induced increases in muscle size from 1.5%-15.6% were reported in three of four studies, and one of four studies reported a decrease in muscle size (3%). The greatest gain in muscle mass was observed in a study of whole body vibration training. Meta-analysis of three studies found an increase of thigh muscle cross-sectional area (mean difference 2.31 cm(2) or 0.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62 to 4.00; P = 0.008) and muscle strength (standardized mean difference 1.04, 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.43; P < 0.001). Physical training when delivered as resistance training has the ability to elicit hypertrophy and increase muscle strength in very elderly muscle.

  7. Muscle power of lower extremities in relation to functional ability and nutritional status in very elderly people.

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, M; Jauffret, M; Jusot, J F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leg power and functional and nutritional status in very elderly people. A cross sectional analysis was conducted. Participants were men and women (n = 30, age: 82 +/- 5,3 years). Leg extension maximal power was measured. Physical performance measures included chair rise time, time to walk 6 meters, and steps number (SN) necessary to cover a 6 meters walk at habitual gait speed. Nutritional status measurement included Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Body Mass Index (BMI), calf circumference, and thigh volume. Leg extension power was significantly correlated with all the performance measures: chair rise time (r= - 0.57, p < 0.01), time to walk six meters (r = - 0.56, p < 0.01), number of steps to cover a six meters walk (r = - 0.46, p < 0.01). A curvilinear association was found between SN and maximal power (r2 = 0.43, p < 0.001). Maximal power and thigh volume explained significantly time to walk 6 meters in a non-linear regression analysis (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.001). In conclusion, a low level of muscle power is associated with poor functional performances. Both weak muscle power and thigh volume are predictive of poor functional status. Because a decline in functional performances is highly predictive of subsequent disability and adverse events as falls, future studies should evaluate the effects of specific training designed to improve muscle power on disability and falls prevention.

  8. Differential effect of denervation on free radical scavenging enzymes in slow and fast muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asayama, K.; Dettbarn, W. D.; Burr, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of denervation on the free radical scavenging systems in relation to the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the slow twitch soleus and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed in the mid-thigh region and the muscle tissue levels of 5 enzymes were studied 2 and 5 weeks following crush. Radioimmunoassays were utilized for the selective measurement of cuprozinc (cytosolic) and mangano (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutases. These data represent the first systematic report of free radical scavening systems in slow and fast muscles in response to denervation. Selective modification of cuprozinc and manganosuperoxide dismutases and differential regulation of GSH-peroxidase was demonstrated in slow and fast muscle.

  9. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002thigh (0.0008muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity.

  10. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  11. Thigh length versus knee length antiembolism stockings for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in postoperative surgical patients; a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ros; Paton, Fiona; Rice, Stephen; Stansby, Gerard; Millner, Peter; Flavell, Hayley; Fox, Dave; Woolacott, Nerys

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the clinical effectiveness of thigh length versus knee length antiembolism stockings for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in surgical patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis using direct methods and network meta-analysis. Methods Previous systematic reviews and electronic databases were searched to February 2014 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of thigh length or knee length antiembolism stockings in surgical patients. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The primary outcome was incidence of DVT. Analysis of the DVT data was performed using ORs along with 95% CIs. The I2 statistic was used to quantify statistical heterogeneity. Results 23 RCTs were included; there was substantial variation between the trials and many were poorly reported with an unclear risk of bias. Five RCTs directly comparing thigh length versus knee length stockings were pooled and the summary estimate of effect favouring thigh length stockings was not statistically significant (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.80 to 2.73). 13 RCTs were included in the network meta-analysis; thigh length stockings with pharmacological prophylaxis were more effective than knee length stockings with pharmacological prophylaxis, but again results were not statistically significant (OR 1.76, 95% credible intervals 0.82 to 3.53). Conclusions Thigh length stockings may be more effective than knee length stockings, but results did not reach statistical significance and the evidence base is weak. Further research to confirm this finding is unlikely to be worthwhile. While thigh length stockings appear to have superior efficacy, practical issues such as patient acceptability may prevent their wide use in clinical practice. Systematic review registration number CRD42014007202. PMID:26883236

  12. Numerical Investigations of Interactions between the Knee-Thigh-Hip Complex with Vehicle Interior Structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sun; Choi, Hyeong Ho; Cho, Young Nam; Park, Yong Jae; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2005-11-01

    Although biomechanical studies on the knee-thigh-hip (KTH) complex have been extensive, interactions between the KTH and various vehicular interior design parameters in frontal automotive crashes for newer models have not been reported in the open literature to the best of our knowledge. A 3D finite element (FE) model of a 50(th) percentile male KTH complex, which includes explicit representations of the iliac wing, acetabulum, pubic rami, sacrum, articular cartilage, femoral head, femoral neck, femoral condyles, patella, and patella tendon, has been developed to simulate injuries such as fracture of the patella, femoral neck, acetabulum, and pubic rami of the KTH complex. Model results compared favorably against regional component test data including a three-point bending test of the femur, axial loading of the isolated knee-patella, axial loading of the KTH complex, axial loading of the femoral head, and lateral loading of the isolated pelvis. The model was further integrated into a Wayne State University upper torso model and validated against data obtained from whole body sled tests. The model was validated against these experimental data over a range of impact speeds, impactor masses and boundary conditions. Using Design Of Experiment (DOE) methods based on Taguchi's approach and the developed FE model of the whole body, including the KTH complex, eight vehicular interior design parameters, namely the load limiter force, seat belt elongation, pretensioner inlet amount, knee-knee bolster distance, knee bolster angle, knee bolster stiffness, toe board angle and impact speed, each with either two or three design levels, were simulated to predict their respective effects on the potential of KTH injury in frontal impacts. Simulation results proposed best design levels for vehicular interior design parameters to reduce the injury potential of the KTH complex due to frontal automotive crashes. This study is limited by the fact that prediction of bony fracture was

  13. MRI-guided gas bubble enhanced ultrasound heating in in vivo rabbit thigh.

    PubMed

    Sokka, S D; King, R; Hynynen, K

    2003-01-21

    In this study, we propose a focused ultrasound surgery protocol that induces and then uses gas bubbles at the focus to enhance the ultrasound absorption and ultimately create larger lesions in vivo. MRI and ultrasound visualization and monitoring methods for this heating method are also investigated. Larger lesions created with a carefully monitored single ultrasound exposure could greatly improve the speed of tumour coagulation with focused ultrasound. All experiments were performed under MRI (clinical, 1.5 T) guidance with one of two eight-sector, spherically curved piezoelectric transducers. The transducer, either a 1.1 or 1.7 MHz array, was driven by a multi-channel RF driving system. The transducer was mounted in an MRI-compatible manual positioning system and the rabbit was situated on top of the system. An ultrasound detector ring was fixed with the therapy transducer to monitor gas bubble activity during treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery exposures were delivered to the thighs of seven New Zealand while rabbits. The experimental, gas-bubble-enhanced heating exposures consisted of a high amplitude 300 acoustic watt, half second pulse followed by a 7 W, 14 W or 21 W continuous wave exposure for 19.5 s. The respective control sonications were 20 s exposures of 14 W, 21 W and 28 W. During the exposures, MR thermometry was obtained from the temperature dependency of the proton resonance frequency shift. MRT2-enhanced imaging was used to evaluate the resulting lesions. Specific metrics were used to evaluate the differences between the gas-bubble-enhanced exposures and their respective control sonications: temperatures with respect to time and space, lesion size and shape, and their agreement with thermal dose predictions. The bubble-enhanced exposures showed a faster temperature rise within the first 4 s and higher overall temperatures than the sonications without bubble formation. The spatial temperature maps and the thermal dose maps derived from the MRI

  14. In vivo activity of cefquinome against Escherichia coli in the thighs of neutropenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qi; Liang, Chaoping; Wang, Jing; Li, Jufeng; Zeng, Zhenling

    2014-10-01

    Cefquinome is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against enteric Gram-negative bacilli such as Escherichia coli. We utilized a neutropenic mouse model of colibacillosis to examine the pharmacodynamic (PD) characteristics of cefquinome, as measured by organism number in homogenized thigh cultures after 24 h of therapy. Serum drug levels following 4-fold-escalating single doses of cefquinome were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of cefquinome were linear over a dose range of 10 to 640 mg/kg of body weight. Serum half-lives ranged from 0.29 to 0.32 h. Dose fractionation studies over a 24-h dose range of 2.5 to 320 mg/kg were conducted every 3, 6, 12, or 24 h. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to determine which pharmacodynamic parameter best correlated with efficacy. The free percentage of the dosing interval that the serum levels exceed the MIC (fT>MIC) was the PK-PD index that best correlated with efficacy (R(2) = 73% for E. coli, compared with 13% for the maximum concentration of the free drug in serum [fCmax]/MIC and 45% for the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [fAUC0-24]/MIC). Subsequently, we employed a similar dosing strategy by using 4-fold-increasing total cefquinome doses administered every 4 h to treat animals infected with four additional E. coli isolates. A sigmoid maximum-effect (Emax) model was used to estimate the magnitudes of the %fT>MIC associated with net bacterial stasis, a 1-log10 CFU reduction from baseline, and a 2-log10 CFU reduction from baseline; the corresponding values were 28.01% ± 2.27%, 37.23% ± 4.05%, and 51.69% ± 9.72%. The potent bactericidal activity makes cefquinome an attractive option for the treatment of infections caused by E. coli.

  15. In Vivo Activity of Cefquinome against Escherichia coli in the Thighs of Neutropenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Qi; Liang, Chaoping; Wang, Jing; Li, Jufeng

    2014-01-01

    Cefquinome is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against enteric Gram-negative bacilli such as Escherichia coli. We utilized a neutropenic mouse model of colibacillosis to examine the pharmacodynamic (PD) characteristics of cefquinome, as measured by organism number in homogenized thigh cultures after 24 h of therapy. Serum drug levels following 4-fold-escalating single doses of cefquinome were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of cefquinome were linear over a dose range of 10 to 640 mg/kg of body weight. Serum half-lives ranged from 0.29 to 0.32 h. Dose fractionation studies over a 24-h dose range of 2.5 to 320 mg/kg were conducted every 3, 6, 12, or 24 h. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to determine which pharmacodynamic parameter best correlated with efficacy. The free percentage of the dosing interval that the serum levels exceed the MIC (fT>MIC) was the PK-PD index that best correlated with efficacy (R2 = 73% for E. coli, compared with 13% for the maximum concentration of the free drug in serum [fCmax]/MIC and 45% for the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [fAUC0-24]/MIC). Subsequently, we employed a similar dosing strategy by using 4-fold-increasing total cefquinome doses administered every 4 h to treat animals infected with four additional E. coli isolates. A sigmoid maximum-effect (Emax) model was used to estimate the magnitudes of the %fT>MIC associated with net bacterial stasis, a 1-log10 CFU reduction from baseline, and a 2-log10 CFU reduction from baseline; the corresponding values were 28.01% ± 2.27%, 37.23% ± 4.05%, and 51.69% ± 9.72%. The potent bactericidal activity makes cefquinome an attractive option for the treatment of infections caused by E. coli. PMID:25070101

  16. MRI-guided gas bubble enhanced ultrasound heating in in vivo rabbit thigh.

    PubMed

    Sokka, S D; King, R; Hynynen, K

    2003-01-21

    In this study, we propose a focused ultrasound surgery protocol that induces and then uses gas bubbles at the focus to enhance the ultrasound absorption and ultimately create larger lesions in vivo. MRI and ultrasound visualization and monitoring methods for this heating method are also investigated. Larger lesions created with a carefully monitored single ultrasound exposure could greatly improve the speed of tumour coagulation with focused ultrasound. All experiments were performed under MRI (clinical, 1.5 T) guidance with one of two eight-sector, spherically curved piezoelectric transducers. The transducer, either a 1.1 or 1.7 MHz array, was driven by a multi-channel RF driving system. The transducer was mounted in an MRI-compatible manual positioning system and the rabbit was situated on top of the system. An ultrasound detector ring was fixed with the therapy transducer to monitor gas bubble activity during treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery exposures were delivered to the thighs of seven New Zealand while rabbits. The experimental, gas-bubble-enhanced heating exposures consisted of a high amplitude 300 acoustic watt, half second pulse followed by a 7 W, 14 W or 21 W continuous wave exposure for 19.5 s. The respective control sonications were 20 s exposures of 14 W, 21 W and 28 W. During the exposures, MR thermometry was obtained from the temperature dependency of the proton resonance frequency shift. MRT2-enhanced imaging was used to evaluate the resulting lesions. Specific metrics were used to evaluate the differences between the gas-bubble-enhanced exposures and their respective control sonications: temperatures with respect to time and space, lesion size and shape, and their agreement with thermal dose predictions. The bubble-enhanced exposures showed a faster temperature rise within the first 4 s and higher overall temperatures than the sonications without bubble formation. The spatial temperature maps and the thermal dose maps derived from the MRI

  17. Muscle MRI reveals distinct abnormalities in genetically proven non-dystrophic myotonias☆

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Matthews, Emma; Raja Rayan, Dipa L.; Fischmann, Arne; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Reilly, Mary M.; Thornton, John S.; Hanna, Michael G.; Yousry, Tarek A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the presence, frequency and pattern of MRI abnormalities in non-dystrophic myotonia patients. We reviewed T1-weighted and STIR (short-tau-inversion-recovery) 3T MRI sequences of lower limb muscles at thigh and calf level in 21 patients with genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia: 11 with CLCN1 mutations and 10 with SCN4A mutations, and 19 healthy volunteers. The MRI examinations of all patients showed hyperintensity within muscles on either T1-weighted or STIR images. Mild extensive or marked T1-weighted changes were noted in 10/21 patients and no volunteers. Muscles in the thigh were equally likely to be affected but in the calf there was sparing of tibialis posterior. Oedema was common in calf musculature especially in the medial gastrocnemius with STIR hyperintensity observed in 18/21 patients. In 10/11 CLCN1 patients this included a previously unreported “central stripe”, also present in 3/10 SCN4A patients but no volunteers. Degree of fatty infiltration correlated with age (rho = 0.46, p < 0.05). Muscle MRI is frequently abnormal in non-dystrophic myotonia providing evidence of fatty infiltration and/or oedema. The pattern is distinct from other myotonic disorders; in particular the “central stripe” has not been reported in other conditions. Correlations with clinical parameters suggest a potential role for MRI as a biomarker. PMID:23810313

  18. Muscle MRI reveals distinct abnormalities in genetically proven non-dystrophic myotonias.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Jasper M; Matthews, Emma; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Fischmann, Arne; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Reilly, Mary M; Thornton, John S; Hanna, Michael G; Yousry, Tarek A

    2013-08-01

    We assessed the presence, frequency and pattern of MRI abnormalities in non-dystrophic myotonia patients. We reviewed T1-weighted and STIR (short-tau-inversion-recovery) 3T MRI sequences of lower limb muscles at thigh and calf level in 21 patients with genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia: 11 with CLCN1 mutations and 10 with SCN4A mutations, and 19 healthy volunteers. The MRI examinations of all patients showed hyperintensity within muscles on either T1-weighted or STIR images. Mild extensive or marked T1-weighted changes were noted in 10/21 patients and no volunteers. Muscles in the thigh were equally likely to be affected but in the calf there was sparing of tibialis posterior. Oedema was common in calf musculature especially in the medial gastrocnemius with STIR hyperintensity observed in 18/21 patients. In 10/11 CLCN1 patients this included a previously unreported "central stripe", also present in 3/10 SCN4A patients but no volunteers. Degree of fatty infiltration correlated with age (rho=0.46, p<0.05). Muscle MRI is frequently abnormal in non-dystrophic myotonia providing evidence of fatty infiltration and/or oedema. The pattern is distinct from other myotonic disorders; in particular the "central stripe" has not been reported in other conditions. Correlations with clinical parameters suggest a potential role for MRI as a biomarker.

  19. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  20. Muscle mass of competitive male athletes.

    PubMed

    Spenst, L F; Martin, A D; Drinkwater, D T

    1993-02-01

    The recent publication of the first validated equation for the estimation of muscle mass (MM) in men has made possible a comparison of MM in athletes from different sports. Limb girths and skinfold thicknesses were measured in 62 male athletes (aged 17-38 years) and 13 non-athletic males (aged 22-36 years). The MM (g) was calculated from the equation MM = S(0.0553 Gt2 + 0.0987 Gf2 + 0.0331 Gc2)-2445, where S is stature, Gt is the mid-thigh girth corrected for the front thigh skinfold thickness, Gc is the maximum calf girth corrected for the calf skinfold thickness and Gf is the uncorrected maximum forearm girth (all in cm). The athletes were classified as gymnasts (n = 10), basketball players (n = 10), body-builders (n = 10), track and field power athletes (n = 12), track and field long sprinters (n = 10) or distance runners (n = 10). The MM means ranged from 38.4 kg for the distance runners to 58.7 kg for the body-builders. Both body-builders and basketball players had significantly greater MM than gymnasts, long sprinters, non-athletic males and distance runners (P < 0.01). Also, MM was greater in track and field power athletes than in distance runners (P < 0.05). The MM as a percentage of body mass (%MM) ranged from 56.5% in the non-athletic group to 65.1% in the body-builders; body-builders scored higher than basketball players (P < 0.05), distance runners (P < 0.01) and the non-athletic group (P < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Surface Electromyographic Analysis of Core Trunk and Hip Muscles During Selected Rehabilitation Exercises in the Side-Bridge to Neutral Spine Position

    PubMed Central

    Youdas, James W.; Boor, Mallory M.P.; Darfler, Arynn L.; Koenig, Margaret K.; Mills, Katherine M.; Hollman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Strengthening of core hip, trunk, and abdominal muscles has been utilized with injury prevention and low back pain and has the potential to improve athletic performance. Hypothesis: During a side-bridge, trunk and thigh muscles on the ipsilateral weightbearing side would produce greater activation than their counterparts on the contralateral nonweightbearing side. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twelve females and 13 males participated. Electromyography (EMG) signals were gathered for 5 right-sided muscles (rectus abdominis [RA], external oblique [EO], longissimus thoracis [LT], lumbar multifidus [LM], and gluteus medius [GM]) during 3 repetitions of 4 side-bridging exercises (trunk-elevated side support [TESS], foot-elevated side support [FESS], clamshell, and rotational side-bridge [RSB]) performed bilaterally in random order using surface electrodes. EMG signals were normalized to peak activity in maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials and expressed as a percentage. Descriptive EMG data were calculated for EMG recruitment (% MVIC) and compared between right side up and right side down conditions and between exercises with 2-way repeated-measures analyses of variance at α = 0.05. Results: RSB created the most muscle activation in 3 of 4 recorded trunk muscles (RA, 43.9% MVIC; EO, 62.8 % MVIC; and LT, 41.3% MVIC). Activation of the GM exceeded 69% MVIC for TESS, FESS, and RSB. With the exception of the RA in RSB and LT in TESS, recruitment within muscles of the ipsilateral weightbearing trunk and thigh (% MVIC) was significantly greater than their counterparts on the nonweightbearing trunk and thigh for all muscles during the side-bridge exercise conditions. Conclusion: Muscle recruitment was greater within muscles of the ipsilateral weightbearing trunk and thigh for all examined muscles except RA during RSB and LT during TESS. Activation at or above 50% MVIC is needed for strengthening. Activation of the GM and EO

  2. Leptin receptors in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Santana, Alfredo; Fuentes, Teresa; Delgado-Guerra, Safira; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, Jose A L

    2007-05-01

    Human skeletal muscle expresses leptin receptor mRNA; however, it remains unknown whether leptin receptors (OB-R) are also expressed at the protein level. Fourteen healthy men (age = 33.1 +/- 2.0 yr, height = 175.9 +/- 1.7 cm, body mass = 81.2 +/- 3.8 kg, body fat = 22.5 +/- 1.9%; means +/- SE) participated in this investigation. The expression of OB-R protein was determined in skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue, and hypothalamus using a polyclonal rabbit anti-human leptin receptor. Three bands with a molecular mass close to 170, 128, and 98 kDa were identified by Western blot with the anti-OB-R antibody. All three bands were identified in skeletal muscle: the 98-kDa and 170-kDa bands were detected in hypothalamus, and the 98-kDa and 128-kDa bands were detected in thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue. The 128-kDa isoform was not detected in four subjects, whereas in the rest its occurrence was fully explained by the presence of intermuscular adipose tissue, as demonstrated using an anti-perilipin A antibody. No relationship was observed between the basal concentration of leptin in serum and the 170-kDa band density. In conclusion, a long isoform of the leptin receptor with a molecular mass close to 170 kDa is expressed at the protein level in human skeletal muscle. The amount of 170-kDa protein appears to be independent of the basal concentration of leptin in serum.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen reduces edema and necrosis of skeletal muscle in compartment syndromes associated with hemorrhagic hypotension

    SciTech Connect

    Skyhar, M.J.; Hargens, A.R.; Strauss, M.B.; Gershuni, D.H.; Hart, G.B.; Akeson, W.H.

    1986-10-01

    This study examined the effect of exposures to hyperbaric oxygen on the development of the edema and necrosis of muscle that are associated with compartment syndromes that are complicated by hemorrhagic hypotension. A compartment syndrome (twenty millimeters of mercury for six hours) was induced by infusion of autologous plasma in the anterolateral compartment of the left hind limb of seven anesthetized dogs while the mean arterial blood pressure was maintained at sixty-five millimeters of mercury after 30 per cent loss of blood volume. These dogs were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (two atmospheres of pure oxygen) and were compared with six dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and hypotensive condition but were not exposed to hyperbaric oxygen. Forty-eight hours later, edema was quantified by measuring the weights of the muscles (the pressurized muscle compared with the contralateral muscle), and necrosis of muscle was evaluated by measuring the uptake of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate. The ratio for edema was significantly (p = 0.01) greater in dogs that had not been exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (1.15 +/- 0.01) than in the dogs that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.01 +/- 0.03), and the ratio for necrosis of muscle was also significantly (p = 0.04) greater in dogs that had not had hyperbaric oxygen (1.96 +/- 0.41) than in those that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.05 +/- 0.11). Comparisons were also made with the muscles of four normal control dogs and separately with the muscles of six normotensive dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and normal blood pressure and were not treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

  4. Relative shank to thigh length is associated with different mechanisms of power production during elite male ergometer rowing.

    PubMed

    Greene, Andrew J; Sinclair, Peter J; Dickson, Michael H; Colloud, Floren; Smith, Richard M

    2009-11-01

    The effect of anthropometric differences in shank to thigh length ratio upon timing and magnitude of joint power production during the drive phase of the rowing stroke was investigated in 14 elite male rowers. Rowers were tested on the RowPerfect ergometer which was instrumented at the handle and foot stretcher to measure force generation, and a nine segment inverse dynamics model used to calculate the rower's joint and overall power production. Rowers were divided into two groups according to relative shank thigh ratio. Time to half lumbar power generation was significantly earlier in shorter shank rowers (p = 0.028) compared to longer shank rowers, who showed no lumbar power generation during the same period of the drive phase. Rowers with a relatively shorter shank demonstrated earlier lumbar power generation during the drive phase resulting from restricted rotation of the pelvic segment requiring increased lumbar extension in these rowers. Earlier lumbar power generation and extension did not appear to directly affect performance measures of the short shank group, and so can be attributed to a technical adaptation developed to maximise rowing performance.

  5. Alterations in thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue gene expression in protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Juan; Reeds, Dominic N.; Wen, Weidong; Xueping, E.; Klein, Samuel; Semenkovich, Clay F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Quirk, Erin K.; Powderly, William G.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Li, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Use of protease inhibitor (PI)–based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with altered regional fat distribution, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemias. To assess how PI-based HAART affects adipocyte gene expression in male HIV-1–infected patients, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify messenger RNA expression of adipocyte transcription factors and adipocytokines in thigh and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from male (1) HIV-1 seronegative subjects (control, n = 9), (2) asymptomatic treatment-naive HIV-1–infected patients (naive, n = 6), (3) HIV-1–infected patients who were receiving antiretroviral agents but never received PIs (PI naive, n = 5), (4) HIV-1–infected patients who were receiving PI-based HAART (PI, n = 7), and (5) HIV-1–infected patients who discontinued the PI component of their antiviral therapy more than 6 months before enrollment (past PI, n =7). In the PI group, the messenger RNA expression levels of the CCAAT/enhancer–binding protein α, leptin, and adiponectin (18%, P < .01; 23%, P < .05; and 13%, P < .05, respectively) were significantly lower than the levels measured in the PI-naive group. These results are consistent with previous studies on the effects of PIs on cultured adipocytes. Prospective longitudinal studies of thigh fat adipose tissue gene expression could provide further insights on the pathogenesis of metabolic complications associated with PI-based HAART. PMID:15877283

  6. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  7. Relative shank to thigh length is associated with different mechanisms of power production during elite male ergometer rowing.

    PubMed

    Greene, Andrew J; Sinclair, Peter J; Dickson, Michael H; Colloud, Floren; Smith, Richard M

    2009-11-01

    The effect of anthropometric differences in shank to thigh length ratio upon timing and magnitude of joint power production during the drive phase of the rowing stroke was investigated in 14 elite male rowers. Rowers were tested on the RowPerfect ergometer which was instrumented at the handle and foot stretcher to measure force generation, and a nine segment inverse dynamics model used to calculate the rower's joint and overall power production. Rowers were divided into two groups according to relative shank thigh ratio. Time to half lumbar power generation was significantly earlier in shorter shank rowers (p = 0.028) compared to longer shank rowers, who showed no lumbar power generation during the same period of the drive phase. Rowers with a relatively shorter shank demonstrated earlier lumbar power generation during the drive phase resulting from restricted rotation of the pelvic segment requiring increased lumbar extension in these rowers. Earlier lumbar power generation and extension did not appear to directly affect performance measures of the short shank group, and so can be attributed to a technical adaptation developed to maximise rowing performance. PMID:20169760

  8. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  9. Maximal anaerobic performance of the knee extensor muscles during growth.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, C; Lagassé, P; Bouchard, C; Simoneau, J A

    1991-09-01

    The extent of the growth changes in maximal work output during 10 s (MWO10), 30 s (MWO30), and 90 s (MWO90) of maximal repetitive knee flexions and extensions assessed on a modified Hydra-Gym machine was investigated in 84 boys and 83 girls, 9-19 yr of age. Body weight, fat mass and fat free mass by underwater weighing, and thigh volume and cross-sectional area were also determined. No difference was observed in the absolute MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 between girls and boys at 9 and 11 yr of age. However, significant differences appeared between genders from 13 yr of age onward, anaerobic performances of the knee extensor muscles of girls representing about 75% or even less of those of boys. The analysis of variance revealed that maximal work ouput during the three knee extension tests was significantly greater in males as well as in females from 9 to 18 yr, regardless how performance was related to morphological characteristics. Performance in absolute values or expressed per unit of body weight, fat free mass, and thigh cross-sectional area for the MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 tests were almost always significantly lower in both genders when performances of the 9-yr-old group were compared with those of the 13-yr-old group or older groups. Improvement in maximal work output during the 10-s, 30-s, or 90-s knee extension tests with age occurred mainly between 9 and 15 yr in both genders. The results of the present study show that there are gender differences in predominantly anaerobic performances during growth and reveal that increase in muscle mass does not appear to be the only factor responsible for the age-related increment in the anaerobic working capacity of the knee extensor muscles.

  10. Effects of diet, packaging, and irradiation on protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, and color of raw broiler thigh meat during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Xiao, S; Zhang, W G; Lee, E J; Ma, C W; Ahn, D U

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of dietary treatment, packaging, and irradiation singly or in combination on the oxidative stability of broiler chicken thigh meat. A total of 120 four-week-old chickens were divided into 12 pens (10 birds/pen), and 4 pens of broilers were randomly assigned to a control oxidized diet (5% oxidized oil) or an antioxidant-added diet [500 IU of vitamin E + 200 mg/kg of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA)] and fed for 2 wk. After slaughter, thigh meats were separated, ground, packaged in either oxygen-permeable or oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, and irradiated at 0 or 3 kGy. Lipid oxidation (TBA-reactive substances), protein oxidation (carbonyl), and color of the meat were measured at 1, 4, and 7 d of refrigerated storage. The lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meats from birds fed the diet supplemented with antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) was significantly lower than the lipid and protein oxidation of birds fed the control diet, whereas the lipid and protein oxidation of broilers fed the oxidized oil diet was higher than that of birds fed the control diet. Vacuum packaging slowed, but irradiation accelerated, the lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meat during storage. Dietary antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) and irradiation treatments showed a stronger effect on lipid oxidation than on protein oxidation. A significant correlation between lipid and protein oxidation in meat was found during storage. Dietary supplementation of vitamin E + BHA and the irradiation treatment increased the lightness and redness of thigh meat, respectively. It is suggested that appropriate use of dietary antioxidants in combination with packaging could be effective in minimizing oxidative changes in irradiated raw chicken thigh meat.

  11. The effects of knee injury on skeletal muscle function, Na+, K+-ATPase content, and isoform abundance

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Ben D; Levinger, Pazit; Morris, Hayden G; Petersen, Aaron C; Garnham, Andrew P; Levinger, Itamar; McKenna, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    While training upregulates skeletal muscle Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA), the effects of knee injury and associated disuse on muscle NKA remain unknown. This was therefore investigated in six healthy young adults with a torn anterior cruciate ligament, (KI; four females, two males; age 25.0 ± 4.9 years; injury duration 15 ± 17 weeks; mean ± SD) and seven age- and BMI-matched asymptomatic controls (CON; five females, two males). Each participant underwent a vastus lateralis muscle biopsy, on both legs in KI and one leg in CON. Muscle was analyzed for muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA), NKA content ([3H]ouabain binding), and α1–3 and β1–2 isoform abundance. Participants also completed physical activity and knee function questionnaires (KI only); and underwent quadriceps peak isometric strength, thigh CSA and postural sway assessments in both injured and noninjured legs. NKA content was 20.1% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg and 22.5% lower than CON. NKA α2 abundance was 63.0% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg, with no differences in other NKA isoforms. Isometric strength and thigh CSA were 21.7% and 7.1% lower in the injured leg than the noninjured leg, respectively. In KI, postural sway did not differ between legs, but for two-legged standing was 43% higher than CON. Hence, muscle NKA content and α2 abundance were reduced in severe knee injury, which may contribute to impaired muscle function. Restoration of muscle NKA may be important in rehabilitation of muscle function after knee and other lower limb injury. PMID:25677549

  12. Muscle Quality and Myosteatosis: Novel Associations With Mortality Risk: The Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Ilse; Murphy, Rachel A; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Visser, Marjolein; Launer, Lenore; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lang, Thomas F; Harris, Tamara B

    2016-01-01

    Muscle composition may affect mortality risk, but prior studies have been limited to specific samples or less precise determination of muscle composition. We evaluated associations of thigh muscle composition, determined using computed tomography imaging, and knee extension strength with mortality risk among 4,824 participants aged 76.4 (standard deviation (SD), 5.5) years from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios. After 8.8 years of follow-up, there were 1,942 deaths. For men, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 11% and 22%. Each SD-increment increase in intermuscular adipose tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with higher mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.22) and HR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30), respectively). For women, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 12% and 19%. Greater intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with an 8% higher mortality risk (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16). This study shows that muscle composition is associated with mortality risk. These results also show the importance of improving muscle strength and area and lowering muscle adipose tissue infiltration.

  13. Insulin resistance and muscle insulin receptor substrate‐1 serine hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Cartwright, Brian M.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Lee, Michelle L.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects is profound in spite of muscle insulin receptor and insulin‐responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression being nearly normal. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 (IRS‐1) at Tyr896 is a necessary step in insulin stimulation of translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. Serine phosphorylation of IRS‐1 by some kinases diminishes insulin action in mice. We evaluated the phosphorylation status of muscle IRS‐1 in 33 subjects with the metabolic syndrome and seventeen lean controls. Each underwent euglycemic insulin clamps and a thigh muscle biopsy before and after 8 weeks of either strength or endurance training. Muscle IRS‐1 phosphorylation at six sites was quantified by immunoblots. Metabolic syndrome muscle IRS‐1 had excess phosphorylation at Ser337 and Ser636 but not at Ser307, Ser789, or Ser1101. Ser337 is a target for phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and Ser636 is phosphorylated by c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Exercise training without weight loss did not change the IRS‐1 serine phosphorylation. These data suggest that baseline hyperphosphorylation of at least two key serines within muscle IRS‐1 diminishes the transmission of the insulin signal and thereby decreases the insulin‐stimulated translocation of GLUT4. Excess fasting phosphorylation of muscle IRS‐1 at Ser636 may be a major cause of the insulin resistance seen in obesity and might prevent improvement in insulin responsiveness when exercise training is not accompanied by weight loss. PMID:25472611

  14. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  15. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  16. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans.

  17. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  18. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  19. Muscle pathology and whole-body MRI in a polyglucosan myopathy associated with a novel glycogenin-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sushan; Zhu, Wenhua; Yue, Dongyue; Lin, Jie; Wang, Yin; Zhu, Zhen; Qiu, Wenjuan; Lu, Jiahong; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Oldfors, Anders; Zhao, Chongbo

    2015-10-01

    We report a 46-year-old female with late-onset skeletal myopathy affecting proximal limb muscles. Muscle biopsy revealed a polyglucosan myopathy with PAS-positive inclusions predominantly in glycogen-depleted fibers, which were demonstrated as type I fibers by ATPase staining. Whole-body magnetic imaging disclosed that the paravertebral, scapular, and pelvic girdle muscles, the anterior compartment of the arms, and the posterior compartment of the thighs were preferentially involved. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous novel mutation in exon 6 of the glycogenin-1 gene (GYG1) (c.634C>T, p.His212Tyr). Protein analysis revealed normal levels of glycogenin-1 even before alpha-amylase digestion indicating preserved protein expression but impaired glucosylation. In vitro functional assay demonstrated that this variant impaired the autoglucosylating ability resulting in a non-functional protein. We report a glycogenin-1 related myopathy with a distinct histopathology and unique muscle imaging pattern.

  20. Encoding of compressive stress during indentation by group III and IV muscle mechano-nociceptors in rat gracilis muscle.

    PubMed

    Ge, Weiqing; Khalsa, Partap S

    2003-02-01

    The mechanical state encoded by group III and IV muscle afferents, putative mechano-nociceptors, during indentation was examined using an isolated muscle-nerve preparation in a rat model. Gracilis muscle and its intact innervation were surgically removed from the medial thigh of the rat hindlimb and placed in a dish containing rodent synthetic interstitial fluid. The tendons of the muscle were coupled to an apparatus that could stretch and apply compression to the muscle. Using a standard teased-nerve preparation, the neural responses of single mechanically sensitive group III or IV afferents were identified. Afferents were classified as mechano-nociceptors on the basis of their graded response to noxious levels of compressive stress (or strain) as well as, in some cases, their polymodal response to noxious thermal stimuli. Mechano-nociceptors (n = 13) were stimulated using controlled compressive stress (10-30 kPa) or strain (40-80%) while simultaneously measuring displacement and force by compressing the muscle between a flat cylinder and a hard platform. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between neural response and mechanical stress, force, strain, and displacement. The mean neural response (threshold: 1.1 +/- 0.4 kPa; sensitivity: 0.5 +/- 0.1 Hz/kPa; means +/- SE) was significantly and substantially more highly correlated with compressive stress than force, strain, or displacement. The data from this study support the hypothesis that muscle nociceptors stimulated by indentation encode compressive stress rather than force, strain, or displacement. PMID:12574456

  1. Stress fracture in military recruits: gender differences in muscle and bone susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Beck, T J; Ruff, C B; Shaffer, R A; Betsinger, K; Trone, D W; Brodine, S K

    2000-09-01

    A total of 693 female U.S. Marine Corps recruits were studied with anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of the midthigh and distal third of the lower leg prior to a 12 week physical training program. In this group, 37 incident stress fracture cases were radiologically confirmed. Female data were compared with male data from an earlier study of 626 Marine recruits extended with additional cases for a total of 38 stress fracture cases. Using DXA data, bone structural geometry and cortical dimensions were derived at scan locations and muscle cross-sectional area was computed at the midthigh. Measurements were compared within gender between pooled fracture cases and controls after excluding subjects diagnosed with shin splints. In both genders, fracture cases were less physically fit, and had smaller thigh muscles compared with controls. After correction for height and weight, section moduli (Z) and bone strength indices (Z/bone length) of the femur and tibia were significantly smaller in fracture cases of both genders, but patterns differed. Female cases had thinner cortices and lower areal bone mineral density (BMD), whereas male cases had externally narrower bones but similar cortical thicknesses and areal BMDs compared with controls. In both genders, differences in fitness, muscle, and bone parameters suggest poor skeletal adaptation in fracture cases due to inadequate physical conditioning prior to training. To determine whether bone and muscle strength parameters differed between genders, all data were pooled and adjusted for height and weight. In both the tibia and femur, men had significantly larger section moduli and bone strength indices than women, although women had higher tibia but lower femur areal BMDs. Female bones, on average, were narrower and had thinner cortices (not significant in the femur, p = 0.07). Unlike the bone geometry differences, thigh muscle cross-sectional areas were virtually identical to those of the men

  2. Effect of commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations on ground chicken thigh meat quality packaged in a high-oxygen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Keokamnerd, T; Acton, J C; Han, I Y; Dawson, P L

    2008-01-01

    Four commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations were added to ground chicken thigh meat at the recommended levels of the manufacturer then packaged in 80% O(2)-20% CO(2) modified atmosphere trays. The rosemary preparations differed in oil and water solubility, dispersion properties, or both. Addition of rosemary to ground chicken had an overall positive effect on raw meat appearance during storage and cooked meat flavor. No effect on bacterial growth was observed due to rosemary addition. However, oxidation was slowed in meat with added rosemary as indicated by lower TBA values, lower hexanal concentrations, and sensory scores. Color (redness) was more stable in meat with added rosemary compared with meat without rosemary, as reflected in redness (a*) values, hue angles, and visual scores. Of the 4 rosemary preparations tested, the oil-soluble, most concentrated preparation (HT-O) was most effective in maintaining meat quality compared with the other 3 types tested.

  3. Differences in Physicochemical and Nutritional Properties of Breast and Thigh Meat from Crossbred Chickens, Commercial Broilers, and Spent Hens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulian; Qiao, Yan; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Haochun; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the physicochemical and nutritional properties of breast and thigh meat from commercial Chinese crossbred chickens (817 Crossbred chicken, 817C), imported commercial broilers (Arbor Acres broiler, AAB), and commercial spent hens (Hyline Brown, HLB). The crossbred chickens, commercial broilers and spent hens were slaughtered at their typical market ages of 45 d, 40 d, and 560 d, respectively. The results revealed that several different characteristic features for the three breeds. The meat of the 817C was darker than that of the other two genotypes. The 817C were also characterized by higher protein, lower intramuscular fat, and better texture attributes (cooking loss, pressing loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force [WBSF]) compared with AAB and HLB. The meat of the spent hens (i.e. HLB) was higher in WBSF and total collagen content than meat of the crossbred chickens and imported broilers. Furthermore, correlation analysis and principal component analysis revealed that there was a clear relationship among physicochemical properties of chicken meats. With regard to nutritional properties, it was found that 817C and HLB exhibited higher contents of essential amino acids and essential/non-essential amino acid ratios. In addition, 817C were noted to have highest content of microelements whereas AAB have highest content of potassium. Besides, 817C birds had particularly higher proportions of desirable fatty acids, essential fatty acids, polyunsaturated/saturated and (18:0+18:1)/16:0 ratios. The present study also revealed that there were significant differences on breast meat and thigh meat for the physicochemical and nutritional properties, regardless of chicken breeds. In conclusion, meat of crossbred chickens has some unique features and exhibited more advantages over commercial broilers and spent hens. Therefore, the current investigation would provide valuable information for the chicken meat product processing, and

  4. Differences in Physicochemical and Nutritional Properties of Breast and Thigh Meat from Crossbred Chickens, Commercial Broilers, and Spent Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulian; Qiao, Yan; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Haochun; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the physicochemical and nutritional properties of breast and thigh meat from commercial Chinese crossbred chickens (817 Crossbred chicken, 817C), imported commercial broilers (Arbor Acres broiler, AAB), and commercial spent hens (Hyline Brown, HLB). The crossbred chickens, commercial broilers and spent hens were slaughtered at their typical market ages of 45 d, 40 d, and 560 d, respectively. The results revealed that several different characteristic features for the three breeds. The meat of the 817C was darker than that of the other two genotypes. The 817C were also characterized by higher protein, lower intramuscular fat, and better texture attributes (cooking loss, pressing loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force [WBSF]) compared with AAB and HLB. The meat of the spent hens (i.e. HLB) was higher in WBSF and total collagen content than meat of the crossbred chickens and imported broilers. Furthermore, correlation analysis and principal component analysis revealed that there was a clear relationship among physicochemical properties of chicken meats. With regard to nutritional properties, it was found that 817C and HLB exhibited higher contents of essential amino acids and essential/non-essential amino acid ratios. In addition, 817C were noted to have highest content of microelements whereas AAB have highest content of potassium. Besides, 817C birds had particularly higher proportions of desirable fatty acids, essential fatty acids, polyunsaturated/saturated and (18:0+18:1)/16:0 ratios. The present study also revealed that there were significant differences on breast meat and thigh meat for the physicochemical and nutritional properties, regardless of chicken breeds. In conclusion, meat of crossbred chickens has some unique features and exhibited more advantages over commercial broilers and spent hens. Therefore, the current investigation would provide valuable information for the chicken meat product processing, and

  5. Differences in Physicochemical and Nutritional Properties of Breast and Thigh Meat from Crossbred Chickens, Commercial Broilers, and Spent Hens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulian; Qiao, Yan; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Haochun; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the physicochemical and nutritional properties of breast and thigh meat from commercial Chinese crossbred chickens (817 Crossbred chicken, 817C), imported commercial broilers (Arbor Acres broiler, AAB), and commercial spent hens (Hyline Brown, HLB). The crossbred chickens, commercial broilers and spent hens were slaughtered at their typical market ages of 45 d, 40 d, and 560 d, respectively. The results revealed that several different characteristic features for the three breeds. The meat of the 817C was darker than that of the other two genotypes. The 817C were also characterized by higher protein, lower intramuscular fat, and better texture attributes (cooking loss, pressing loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force [WBSF]) compared with AAB and HLB. The meat of the spent hens (i.e. HLB) was higher in WBSF and total collagen content than meat of the crossbred chickens and imported broilers. Furthermore, correlation analysis and principal component analysis revealed that there was a clear relationship among physicochemical properties of chicken meats. With regard to nutritional properties, it was found that 817C and HLB exhibited higher contents of essential amino acids and essential/non-essential amino acid ratios. In addition, 817C were noted to have highest content of microelements whereas AAB have highest content of potassium. Besides, 817C birds had particularly higher proportions of desirable fatty acids, essential fatty acids, polyunsaturated/saturated and (18:0+18:1)/16:0 ratios. The present study also revealed that there were significant differences on breast meat and thigh meat for the physicochemical and nutritional properties, regardless of chicken breeds. In conclusion, meat of crossbred chickens has some unique features and exhibited more advantages over commercial broilers and spent hens. Therefore, the current investigation would provide valuable information for the chicken meat product processing, and

  6. The Impact of Chocolate Goat's and Cow's Milk on Postresistance Exercise Endocrine Responses and Isometric Mid-Thigh Pull Performance.

    PubMed

    Bellar, David; LeBlanc, Nina R; Murphy, Kellie; Moody, Kaitlyn M; Buquet, Gina

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation examined the effects of chocolate cow's and goat's milk on endocrine responses and isometric mid-thigh pull performance post back squat exercise. Twelve college-aged males volunteered to participate and reported to the lab on four occasions. The first visit included anthropometric measurement, one-repetition back squat (1RM), and familiarization with the isometric mid-thigh pull assessment (IMTP). During the subsequent three visits, five sets of eight repetitions of the back squat exercise at 80% of 1RM were performed. For these trials, the participants performed an IMTP and gave a saliva sample prior to, immediately after, 1 hr and 2 hr post exercise. After exercise, a treatment of low-fat chocolate goat's milk (355 ml, 225 kcal), low-fat chocolate cow's milk (355 ml, 225 kcal), or control (water 355 ml, 0 kcal) was given in a counterbalanced order. Saliva samples were analyzed for testosterone, cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Cortisol and DHEA hormone were unaffected by exercise; however, testosterone values did increase significantly post exercise. For IMTP, there was a significant main effect for time (F = 8.41, p = .007) but no treatment or interactions effects. N changes were noted post supplementation for cortisol or DHEA, but testosterone was found to be significantly reduced in both diary treatments compared to control (F = 4.27, p = .022). Based upon these data, it appears that a single treatment of chocolate goat's or cow's milk results in similar endocrine alterations but both fail to enhance postexercise isometric strength following resistance exercise. PMID:26900896

  7. Image-based Tissue Distribution Modeling for Skeletal Muscle Quality Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, K. W.; Moore, A. Z.; Spencer, R. G.; Ferrucci, L.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterization of regional body tissues is essential to understand changes that occur with aging and age-related metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity and how these diseases affect trajectories of health and functional status. Imaging technologies are frequently used to derive volumetric, area, and density measurements of different tissues. Despite the significance and direct applicability of automated tissue quantification and characterization techniques, these topics have remained relatively under-explored in the medical image analysis literature. We present a method for identification and characterization of muscle and adipose tissue in the mid-thigh region using MRI. We propose an image-based muscle quality prediction technique that estimates tissue-specific probability density models and their eigenstructures in the joint domain of water- and fat-suppressed voxel signal intensities along with volumetric and intensity-based tissue characteristics computed during the quantification stage. We evaluated the predictive capability of our approach against reference biomechanical muscle quality measurements using statistical tests and classification performance experiments. The reference standard for muscle quality is defined as the ratio of muscle strength to muscle mass. The results show promise for the development of non-invasive image-based muscle quality descriptors. PMID:26336111

  8. The use of the greater trochanter marker in the thigh segment model: implications for hip and knee frontal and transverse plane motion

    PubMed Central

    Graci, Valentina; Salsich, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Background The greater trochanter marker is commonly used in 3-dimensional models; however, its influence on hip and knee kinematics during gait is unclear. Understanding the influence of the greater trochanter marker is important when quantifying frontal and transverse plane hip and knee kinematics, parameters which are particularly relevant to investigate in individuals with conditions such as patellofemoral pain, knee osteoarthritis, ACL injury and hip pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of including the greater trochanter in the construction of the thigh segment on hip and knee kinematics during gait. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics were collected in 19 healthy subjects during walking using a surface marker system. Hip and knee angles were compared across two thigh segment definitions (with and without greater trochanter) at two time points during stance: peak knee flexion (PKF) and minimum knee flexion (MinKF). Results Hip and knee angles differed in magnitude and direction in the transverse plane at both time points. In the thigh model with the greater trochanter the hip was more externally rotated than in the thigh model without the greater trochanter, (PKF −9.34°±5.21° vs 1.40°±5.22°, MinKF −5.68°±4.24° vs 5.01°±4.86°, p<0.001). In the thigh model with the greater trochanter, the knee angle was more internally rotated compared to the knee angle calculated using the thigh definition without the greater trochanter (PKF 14.67°±6.78° vs 4.33°±4.18°, MinKF 10.54°±6.71° vs −0.01°±2.69°, p<.001). Small but significant differences were detected in the sagittal and frontal plane angles at both time points (p<.001). Conclusion Hip and knee kinematics differed across different segment definitions including or excluding the greater trochanter marker, especially in the transverse plane. Therefore when considering whether to include the greater trochanter in the thigh segment model when using a surface markers to

  9. Lower Extremity Muscle Thickness During 30-Day 6 degrees Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Kirby, L. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Muscle thickness was measured in 19 Bed-Rested (BR) men (32-42 year) subjected to IsoTonic (ITE, cycle orgometer) and IsoKi- netic (IKE, torque orgometer) lower extremity exercise training, and NO Exercise (NOE) training. Thickness was measured with ultrasonography in anterior thigh-Rectus Femoris (RF) and Vastus Intermadius (VI), and combined posterior log-soleus, flexor ballucis longus, and tibialis posterior (S + FHL +TP) - muscles. Compared with ambulatory control values, thickness of the (S + FHL + TP) decreased by 90%-12% (p less than 0.05) In all three test groups. The (RF) thickness was unchanged in the two exercise groups, but decreased by 10% (p less than 0.05) in the NOE. The (VI) thickness was unchanged In the ITE group, but decreased by 12%-l6% (p less than 0.05) in the IKE and NOE groups. Thus, intensive, alternating, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise training is as effective as intensive, intermittent, isokinetic exercise training for maintaining thicknesses of rectus femoris and vastus lntermedius anterior thigh muscles, but not posterior log muscles, during prolonged BR deconditioning.

  10. Single-versus two-incision technique in anterior cruciate ligament replacement: influence on postoperative muscle function.

    PubMed

    Hess, Thomas; Duchow, Jochen; Roland, Stephan; Kohn, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether the single-incision technique for anterior cruciate ligament repair has advantages over the two-incision technique in terms of muscular function up to 1 year postoperatively. Twenty patients who underwent unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts were randomly assigned to one of the two procedures. Both groups (10 patients in each) were followed up at 1 year. Lysholm and International Knee Documentation scores and thigh circumferences were markedly reduced after surgery in both groups but improved up until the last follow-up examination at 12 months postoperatively. Clinical examination, functional scores, stabilometry measurements, and thigh circumferences did not differ between the two groups. Isokinetic evaluation revealed a significant reduction of extensor peak torques in both groups that was most pronounced at 3 months, then improved continuously but was still present 12 months postoperatively. A significant reduction of peak torques, up to 35%, was seen in the flexor muscles of the involved legs compared with the contralateral legs, but this deficit vanished completely after 12 months in both groups. At 3 and 6 months, for the flexor as well as the extensor muscles, the deficits in peak torque on the injured sides were found to have improved faster in the single-incision group. These results indicate improved dynamic muscle function with use of the single-incision technique because the dissection of the vastus lateralis muscle that occurs in the two-incision technique is avoided.

  11. Hoffmann's syndrome with unusually long duration: Report on clinical, laboratory and muscle imaging findings in two cases

    PubMed Central

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Govindaraju, C.; Kalra, Pramila; Kadukar, Prashanth

    2014-01-01

    Two adult men presented with the rare Hoffmann's syndrome (HS). Case 1: A 35-year-old male patient had progressive stiffness of lower limbs of 13 years and generalized muscle hypertrophy and myalgia of 3 years duration. Had periorbital edema, dry skin, generalized muscle hypertrophy and spastic dysarthria with hoarseness. Muscle power was normal. Jaw jerk and deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated. Case 2: A 24-year-old male patient presented with muscle hypertrophy from childhood, slowness in motor activities and hearing impairment. For 6 months, he had severe muscle pains, cramps and further increase in hypertrophy. He had yellow tinged, dry skin, hoarseness of voice, gross muscle hypertrophy and minimal weakness. Both had markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) levels and high thyroid stimulating hormone, low free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels. Levothyroxine treatment demonstrated remarkable reduction in muscle bulk at 2 months in both and no symptoms at 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging of lower limbs in both cases revealed almost identical features with involvement of the muscles of posterior and adductor compartment of thighs and posterior and lateral compartments of the legs. Differential diagnosis of long duration muscle pseudohypertrophy and elevated CK levels should include HS. PMID:25024579

  12. Musculotendon variability influences tissue strains experienced by the biceps femoris long head muscle during high-speed running.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Blemker, Silvia S

    2014-10-17

    The hamstring muscles frequently suffer injury during high-speed running, though the factors that make an individual more susceptible to injury remain poorly understood. The goals of this study were to measure the musculotendon dimensions of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) muscle, the hamstring muscle injured most often, and to use computational models to assess the influence of variability in the BFlh's dimensions on internal tissue strains during high-speed running. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired over the thigh in 12 collegiate athletes, and musculotendon dimensions were measured in the proximal free tendon/aponeurosis, muscle and distal free tendon/aponeurosis. Finite element meshes were generated based on the average, standard deviation and range of BFlh dimensions. Simulation boundary conditions were defined to match muscle activation and musculotendon length change in the BFlh during high-speed running. Muscle and connective tissue dimensions were found to vary between subjects, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 17±6% across all dimensions. For all simulations peak local strain was highest along the proximal myotendinous junction, which is where injury typically occurs. Model variations showed that peak local tissue strain increased as the proximal aponeurosis width narrowed and the muscle width widened. The aponeurosis width and muscle width variation models showed that the relative dimensions of these structures influence internal muscle tissue strains. The results of this study indicate that a musculotendon unit's architecture influences its strain injury susceptibility during high-speed running.

  13. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  14. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations. PMID:24332615

  15. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations.

  16. Influence of Gender and Muscle Architecture Asymmetry on Jump and Sprint Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; LaMonica, Michael B.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle architecture is a determinant for sprinting speed and jumping power, which may be related to anaerobic sports performance. In the present investigation, the relationships between peak (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) vertical jump power, 30m maximal sprinting speed (30M), and muscle architecture were examined in 28 college-aged, recreationally-active men (n = 14; 24.3 ± 2.2y; 89.1 ± 9.3kg; 1.80 ± 0.07 m) and women (n = 14; 21.5 ± 1.7y; 65.2 ± 12.4kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m). Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness (MT), pennation angle (PNG), cross-sectional area (CSA), and echo intensity (ECHO) were collected from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of both legs; fascicle length (FL) was estimated from MT and PNG. Men possessed lower ECHO, greater muscle size (MT & CSA), were faster, and were more powerful (PVJP & MVJP) than women. Stepwise regression indicated that muscle size and quality influenced speed and power in men. In women, vastus lateralis asymmetry negatively affected PVJP (MT: r = –0.73; FL: r = –0.60) and MVJP (MT: r = –0.76; FL: r = –0.64), while asymmetrical ECHO (VL) and FL (RF) positively influenced MVJP (r = 0.55) and 30M (r = 0.57), respectively. Thigh muscle architecture appears to influence jumping power and sprinting speed, though the effect may vary by gender in recreationally-active adults. Appropriate assessment of these ultrasound variables in men and women prior to training may provide a more specific exercise prescription. Key points The manner in which thigh muscle architecture affects jumping power and sprinting speed varies by gender. In men, performance is influenced by the magnitude of muscle size and architecture. In women, asymmetrical muscle size and architectural asymmetry significantly influence performance. To develop effective and precise exercise prescription for the improvement of jumping power and/or sprinting speed, muscle architecture assessment prior to the onset of a training program is advised. PMID

  17. Influence of gender and muscle architecture asymmetry on jump and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Mangine, Gerald T; Fukuda, David H; LaMonica, Michael B; Gonzalez, Adam M; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-12-01

    Muscle architecture is a determinant for sprinting speed and jumping power, which may be related to anaerobic sports performance. In the present investigation, the relationships between peak (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) vertical jump power, 30m maximal sprinting speed (30M), and muscle architecture were examined in 28 college-aged, recreationally-active men (n = 14; 24.3 ± 2.2y; 89.1 ± 9.3kg; 1.80 ± 0.07 m) and women (n = 14; 21.5 ± 1.7y; 65.2 ± 12.4kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m). Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness (MT), pennation angle (PNG), cross-sectional area (CSA), and echo intensity (ECHO) were collected from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of both legs; fascicle length (FL) was estimated from MT and PNG. Men possessed lower ECHO, greater muscle size (MT & CSA), were faster, and were more powerful (PVJP & MVJP) than women. Stepwise regression indicated that muscle size and quality influenced speed and power in men. In women, vastus lateralis asymmetry negatively affected PVJP (MT: r = -0.73; FL: r = -0.60) and MVJP (MT: r = -0.76; FL: r = -0.64), while asymmetrical ECHO (VL) and FL (RF) positively influenced MVJP (r = 0.55) and 30M (r = 0.57), respectively. Thigh muscle architecture appears to influence jumping power and sprinting speed, though the effect may vary by gender in recreationally-active adults. Appropriate assessment of these ultrasound variables in men and women prior to training may provide a more specific exercise prescription. Key pointsThe manner in which thigh muscle architecture affects jumping power and sprinting speed varies by gender.In men, performance is influenced by the magnitude of muscle size and architecture.In women, asymmetrical muscle size and architectural asymmetry significantly influence performance.To develop effective and precise exercise prescription for the improvement of jumping power and/or sprinting speed, muscle architecture assessment prior to the onset of a training program is advised.

  18. Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy increases muscle mass and function in healthy older adults1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I; Julliand, Sophie; Reeds, Dominic N; Sinacore, David R; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-associated declines in muscle mass and function are major risk factors for an impaired ability to carry out activities of daily living, falls, prolonged recovery time after hospitalization, and mortality in older adults. New strategies that can slow the age-related loss of muscle mass and function are needed to help older adults maintain adequate performance status to reduce these risks and maintain independence. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of fish oil–derived n–3 (ω-3) PUFA therapy to slow the age-associated loss of muscle mass and function. Design: Sixty healthy 60–85-y-old men and women were randomly assigned to receive n–3 PUFA (n = 40) or corn oil (n = 20) therapy for 6 mo. Thigh muscle volume, handgrip strength, one-repetition maximum (1-RM) lower- and upper-body strength, and average power during isokinetic leg exercises were evaluated before and after treatment. Results: Forty-four subjects completed the study [29 subjects (73%) in the n–3 PUFA group; 15 subjects (75%) in the control group]. Compared with the control group, 6 mo of n–3 PUFA therapy increased thigh muscle volume (3.6%; 95% CI: 0.2%, 7.0%), handgrip strength (2.3 kg; 95% CI: 0.8, 3.7 kg), and 1-RM muscle strength (4.0%; 95% CI: 0.8%, 7.3%) (all P < 0.05) and tended to increase average isokinetic power (5.6%; 95% CI: −0.6%, 11.7%; P = 0.075). Conclusion: Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy slows the normal decline in muscle mass and function in older adults and should be considered a therapeutic approach for preventing sarcopenia and maintaining physical independence in older adults. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01308957. PMID:25994567

  19. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Beeson, David; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable from controls. STIR images from CMS patients did not differ significantly from those of controls. Mean T1w score correlated with age in the CMS cohort. Conclusions MRI appearances ranged from normal to marked abnormality. T1w images seem to be especially abnormal in some CMS caused by mutations of proteins involved in the glycosylation pathway. A non‐selective pattern of fat infiltration or a normal‐appearing scan in the setting of significant clinical weakness should suggest CMS as a potential diagnosis. Muscle MRI could play a role in differentiating CMS subtypes. Muscle Nerve 54: 211–219, 2016 PMID:26789134

  20. Relationships between organochlorine concentrations in liver and muscle of otters

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, C.F. )

    1989-10-01

    The European otter (Lutra lutra) is now threatened or endangered over much of its European range. The decline, which has taken place mainly during the past three decades, has been attributed to the toxic effects of organochlorine residues, with emphasis being placed on dieldrin or PCBs. Few otters were analyzed for organochlorines during the main period of decline but there is not considerable interest in the species. Experiments with ranch mink (Mustela vison) have shown that reproductive failure occurs when PCB concentrations in thigh muscle approach 50 mg kg{sup {minus}1} lipid. Because otters are closely related and have similar habits this value is becoming widely used to interpret the potential significance of PCB concentrations determined in otters. Furthermore, although the mink data refer to concentrations in muscle, interpretations of concentrations in otters have frequently been based on analyses of livers. Because of the diverse sources of material in Europe, only limited tissues may be made available for analysis, while costs may also prohibit the analysis of several tissues from a single carcass. The relationship between concentrations of organochlorines in muscle and liver tissues in otters has not been determined. This is the purpose of the present communication.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and penetration of ceftazidime and avibactam into epithelial lining fluid in thigh- and lung-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Johanna; Melchers, Maria J; van Mil, Anita C; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Lagarde, Claudia M; Nichols, Wright W; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-04-01

    Ceftazidime and the β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam constitute a new, potentially highly active combination in the battle against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. To determine possible clinical use, it is important to know the pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds related to each other in plasma and the different compartments of infection in experimentally infected animals and in humans. We used a neutropenic murine thigh infection model and lung infection model to study pharmacokinetics in plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Mice were infected with ca. 10(6) CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intramuscularly into the thigh or intranasally to cause pneumonia and were given 8 different (single) subcutaneous doses of ceftazidime and avibactam in various combined concentrations, ranging from 1 to 128 mg/kg of body weight in 2-fold increases. Concomitant samples of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were taken at up to 12 time points until 6 h after administration. Pharmacokinetics of both compounds were linear and dose proportional in plasma and ELF and were independent of the infection type, with estimated half-lives (standard deviations [SD]) in plasma of ceftazidime of 0.28 (0.02) h and of avibactam of 0.24 (0.04) h and volumes of distribution of 0.80 (0.14) and 1.18 (0.34) liters/kg. The ELF-plasma (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) ratios (standard errors [SE]) were 0.24 (0.03) for total ceftazidime and 0.27 (0.03) for unbound ceftazidime; for avibactam, the ratios were 0.20 (0.02) and 0.22 (0.02), respectively. No pharmacokinetic interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam was observed. Ceftazidime and avibactam showed linear plasma pharmacokinetics that were independent of the dose combinations used or the infection site in mice. Assuming pharmacokinetic similarity in humans, this indicates that similar dose ratios of ceftazidime and avibactam could be used for different types and sites of infection. PMID

  2. Non-Instrumental Movement Inhibition (NIMI) Differentially Suppresses Head and Thigh Movements during Screenic Engagement: Dependence on Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Harry J.; Santos, Carlos P.; Ackah, James K.; Westling, Carina E. I.; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Estimating engagement levels from postural micromovements has been summarized by some researchers as: increased proximity to the screen is a marker for engagement, while increased postural movement is a signal for disengagement or negative affect. However, these findings are inconclusive: the movement hypothesis challenges other findings of dyadic interaction in humans, and experiments on the positional hypothesis diverge from it. Hypotheses: (1) Under controlled conditions, adding a relevant visual stimulus to an auditory stimulus will preferentially result in Non-Instrumental Movement Inhibition (NIMI) of the head. (2) When instrumental movements are eliminated and computer-interaction rate is held constant, for two identically-structured stimuli, cognitive engagement (i.e., interest) will result in measurable NIMI of the body generally. Methods: Twenty-seven healthy participants were seated in front of a computer monitor and speakers. Discrete 3-min stimuli were presented with interactions mediated via a handheld trackball without any keyboard, to minimize instrumental movements of the participant's body. Music videos and audio-only music were used to test hypothesis (1). Time-sensitive, highly interactive stimuli were used to test hypothesis (2). Subjective responses were assessed via visual analog scales. The computer users' movements were quantified using video motion tracking from the lateral aspect. Repeated measures ANOVAs with Tukey post hoc comparisons were performed. Results: For two equivalently-engaging music videos, eliminating the visual content elicited significantly increased non-instrumental movements of the head (while also decreasing subjective engagement); a highly engaging user-selected piece of favorite music led to further increased non-instrumental movement. For two comparable reading tasks, the more engaging reading significantly inhibited (42%) movement of the head and thigh; however, when a highly engaging video game was

  3. Multi-scale complexity analysis of muscle coactivation during gait in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wen; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Xiang; Wu, De; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize complexity of lower-extremity muscle coactivation and coordination during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP), children with typical development (TD) and healthy adults, by applying recently developed multivariate multi-scale entropy (MMSE) analysis to surface electromyographic (EMG) signals. Eleven CP children (CP group), eight TD children and seven healthy adults (considered as an entire control group) were asked to walk while surface EMG signals were collected from five thigh muscles and three lower leg muscles on each leg (16 EMG channels in total). The 16-channel surface EMG data, recorded during a series of consecutive gait cycles, were simultaneously processed by multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD), to generate fully aligned data scales for subsequent MMSE analysis. In order to conduct extensive examination of muscle coactivation complexity using the MEMD-enhanced MMSE, 14 data analysis schemes were designed by varying partial muscle combinations and time durations of data segments. Both TD children and healthy adults showed almost consistent MMSE curves over multiple scales for all the 14 schemes, without any significant difference (p > 0.09). However, distinct diversity in MMSE curve was observed in the CP group when compared with the control group. There appears to be diverse neuropathological processes in CP that may affect dynamical complexity of muscle coactivation and coordination during gait. The abnormal complexity patterns emerging in the CP group can be attributed to different factors such as motor control impairments, loss of muscle couplings, and spasticity or paralysis in individual muscles. This study expands our knowledge of neuropathology of CP from a novel point of view of muscle co-activation complexity, which might be useful to derive a quantitative index for assessing muscle activation characteristics as well as motor function in CP. PMID:26257622

  4. Localization and quantification of intramuscular damage using statistical parametric mapping and skeletal muscle parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre; Le Troter, Arnaud; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we proposed an original and robust methodology which combines the spatial normalization of skeletal muscle images, the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis and the use of a specific parcellation in order to accurately localize and quantify the extent of skeletal muscle damage within the four heads of the quadriceps femoris. T2 maps of thigh muscles were characterized before, two (D2) and four (D4) days after 40 maximal isometric electrically-evoked contractions in 25 healthy young males. On the basis of SPM analysis of coregistrated T2 maps, the alterations were similarly detected at D2 and D4 in the superficial and distal regions of the vastus medialis (VM) whereas the proportion of altered muscle was higher in deep muscle regions of the vastus lateralis at D4 (deep: 35 ± 25%, superficial: 23 ± 15%) as compared to D2 (deep: 18 ± 13%, superficial: 17 ± 13%). The present methodology used for the first time on skeletal muscle would be of utmost interest to detect subtle intramuscular alterations not only for the diagnosis of muscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions and clinical treatment strategies. PMID:26689827

  5. Using broadband spatially resolved NIRS to assess muscle oxygenation during altered running protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Georg; Vafiadou, Maria; Steimers, André; Geraskin, Dmitri; Neary, Patrick; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    We used spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) to assess calf and thigh muscle oxygenation during running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two protocols were used: An incremental speed protocol (velocity = 6 - 12 km/h, ▵v = 2 km/h) was performed in 3 minute stages, while a pacing paradigm modulated step frequency alternatively (2.3 Hz [SLow]; 3.3 Hz [SHigh]) during a constant velocity for 2 minutes each. A SRS-NIRS broadband system (600 - 1000 nm) was used to measure total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (SO2). An accelerometer was placed on the hip joints to measure limb acceleration through the experiment. The data showed that the calf (SO2 58 to 42%) desaturated to a significantly lower level than the thigh (61 to 54%). During the pacing protocol, SO2 was significantly different between the SLow vs. SHigh trials. Additionally, physiological data as measured by spirometry were different between the SLow vs. SHigh pacing trials (VO2 (2563+/- 586 vs. 2503 +/- 605 mL/min). Significant differences in VO2 at the same workload (speed) indicate alterations in mechanical efficiency. These data suggest that SRS broadband NIRS can be used to discern small changes in muscle oxygenation, making this device useful for metabolic exercise studies in addition to spirometry and movement monitoring by accelerometers.

  6. Unusual fibularis (peroneus) muscle.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2015-10-01

    Routine dissection has identified a previously unrecorded fibularis (peroneus) muscle in a 74-year-old male cadaver. The anomalous fibularis muscle was found lying immediately antero-medial to the fibularis longus (FL) muscle of the left leg. The anomalous muscle arose from the muscle belly of the FL in the proximal 1/2 of the leg. The muscle belly gave way to a long slender tendon that continued distally behind the lateral malleolus and inserted onto the superficial aspect of the inferior fibular retinaculum. The current finding and clinical significance are discussed.

  7. The influence of extracellular matrix derived from skeletal muscle tissue on the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Stern, Matthew M; Myers, Regina L; Hammam, Nevin; Stern, Kathryn A; Eberli, Daniel; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Soker, Shay; Van Dyke, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Skeletal muscle relies upon regeneration to maintain homeostasis and repair injury. This process involves the recruitment of the tissue's resident stem cell, the muscle progenitor cell, and a subsequent proliferative response by newly generated myoblasts, which must then align and fuse to generate new muscle fibers. During regeneration, cells rely on environmental input for direction. Extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a crucial component of a cell's microenvironment that aids in guiding muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that ECM extracted from skeletal muscle would provide muscle progenitor cells and myoblasts with an ideal substrate for growth and differentiation ex vivo. To test this hypothesis, we developed a method to extract ECM from the large thigh muscles of adult rats and present it to cells as a surface coating. Myogenic cells cultured on ECM extract experienced enhanced proliferation and differentiation relative to standard growth surfaces. As the methodology can be applied to any size muscle, these results demonstrate that bioactive ECM can be readily obtained from skeletal muscle and used to develop biomaterials that enhance muscle regeneration. Furthermore, the model system demonstrated here can be applied to the study of interactions between the ECM of a particular tissue and a cell population of interest.

  8. In vivo observation of quadrupolar splitting in (39)K magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Rösler, M B; Nagel, A M; Umathum, R; Bachert, P; Benkhedah, N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the origin of oscillations of the T(*)2 decay curve of (39)K observed in studies of (39)K magnetic resonance imaging of the human thigh. In addition to their magnetic dipole moment, spin-3/2 nuclei possess an electric quadrupole moment. Its interaction with non-vanishing electrical field gradients leads to oscillations in the free induction decay and to splitting of the resonance. All measurements were performed on a 7T whole-body MRI scanner (MAGNETOM 7T, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with customer-built coils. According to the theory of quadrupolar splitting, a model with three Lorentzian-shaped peaks is appropriate for (39)K NMR spectra of the thigh and calf. The frequency shifts of the satellites depend on the angle between the calf and the static magnetic field. When the leg is oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, the satellites are shifted by about 200 Hz. In the thigh, rank-2 double quantum coherences arising from anisotropic quadrupolar interaction are observed by double-quantum filtration with magic-angle excitation. In addition to the spectra, an image of the thigh with a nominal resolution of (16 × 16 × 32) mm(3) was acquired with this filtering technique in 1:17 h. From the line width of the resonances, (39)K transverse relaxation time constants T(*)2, fast  = (0.51 ± 0.01) ms and T(*)2, slow  = (6.21 ± 0.05) ms for the head were determined. In the thigh, the left and right satellite, both corresponding to the short component of the transverse relaxation time constant, take the following values: T(*)2, fast  = (1.56 ± 0.03) ms and T(*)2, fast  = (1.42 ± 0.03) ms. The centre line, which corresponds to the slow component, is T(*)2, slow  = (9.67 ± 0.04) ms. The acquisition time of the spectra was approximately 10 min. Our results agree well with a non-vanishing electrical field gradient interacting with (39)K nuclei in the intracellular space of

  9. Three-layered architecture of the popliteal fascia that acts as a kinetic retinaculum for the hamstring muscles.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masahiro; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Akira; Hitomi, Jiro; Isogai, Sumio

    2016-09-01

    When patients report pain in the popliteal fossa upon knee extension, the pain is usually localized in the lower region of the popliteal fossa. However, some patients complain of pain in the upper region of the popliteal fossa as the knee is flexed, which motivated us to examine the role of the popliteal fascia as the retinaculum of the hamstring muscles. Thirty-four thighs from 19 Japanese cadavers were dissected. The popliteal fascia was defined as the single aponeurotic sheet covering the popliteal fossa. We found that the fascia acted as a three-layered retinaculum for the flexor muscles of the thigh and provided a secure route for neurovascular structures to the lower leg in any kinetic position of the knee joint. The superficial layer of the popliteal fascia covering the thigh was strongly interwoven with the epimysium of biceps femoris along its lateral aspect and with that of the semimembranosus along its medial aspect, ensuring that the flexor muscles remained in their correct positions. The intermediate layer arose from the medial side of biceps femoris and merged medially with the superficial layer. The profound layer stretched transversely between the biceps femoris and the semimembranosus. Moreover, we investigated the nerve distribution in the popliteal fascia using Sihler's staining and whole-mount immunostaining for neurofilaments. The three-layered fascia was constantly innervated by branches from the posterior femoral cutaneous or saphenous nerve. The nerves were closely related and distributed to densely packed collagen fibers in the superficial layer as free or encapsulated nerve endings, suggesting that the fascia is involved in pain in the upper region of the popliteal fossa.

  10. Munchausen syndrome by proxy presented as recurrent respiratory arrest and thigh abscess: a case study and overview.

    PubMed

    Foto Özdemir, Dilşad; Yalçın, Sıdıka Songül; Zeki, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Kadriye; Özusta, Şeniz; Köse, Aslıhan; Karadağ, Ferda; Yıldız, Irem; Balseven Odabaşı, Aysun; Kale, Gülsev

    2013-01-01

    While many physicians are familiar with the sexual or physical abuse of children, there is little awareness about Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP). As case reports of MSBP increase, awareness among physicians is thought to increase as well. We thus present herein a 16-month-old girl who admitted to Hacettepe University İhsan Doğramacı Children's Hospital with the complaint of seizure, recurrent apnea and thigh abscess, who was later diagnosed as MSBP. The case was being followed by the Child Protection Team of the hospital (Haceteppe University Child Protection Unit [HU-CPU]). HU-CPU contributed to the early detection of this case and protected the child from a possible fatal outcome. The mother was confronted for MSBP and refused to take responsibility for her child's symptoms. As seen in this case, when MSBP is suspected, psychiatric evaluation of the mother, evaluation of the mother-child interaction and collection of a detailed family and social history can have a positive impact on the prognosis in these cases. This case report underlines the importance of multidisciplinary team work to share the responsibility and reduce the burden during the treatment process of these difficult and complicated cases. PMID:24217085

  11. Simulating Non-Specific Influences of Body Posture and Temperature on Thigh-Bioimpedance Spectroscopy during Continuous Monitoring Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. H.; Leonhardt, S.

    2013-04-01

    Application of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) for continuous monitoring of body fluid volumes is gaining considerable importance in personal health care. Unless laboratory conditions are applied, both whole-body or segmental BIS configurations are subject to nonspecific influences (e.g. temperature and change in body position) reducing the method's accuracy and reproducibility. In this work, a two-compartment mathematical model, which describes the thigh segment, has been adapted to simulate fluid and solute kinetics during change in body position or variation in skin temperature. The model is an improved version of our previous one offering a good tradeoff between accuracy and simplicity. It represents the kinetics of fluid redistribution, sodium-, potassium-, and protein-concentrations based on simple equations to predict the time course of BIS variations. Validity of the model was verified in five subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, and 40 min supine). The output of the model may reduce possible influences on BIS by up to 80%.

  12. Migration of the Anterior Spinal Rod to the Right Thigh, a Rare Complication of Anterior Spinal Instrumentations: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Camino Willhuber; Danilo, Taype Zamboni; Guido, Carabelli; Jorge, Barla; Carlos, Sancineto

    2015-01-01

    Posterior and anterior fusion procedures with instrumentation are well-known surgical treatments for scoliosis. Rod migration has been described as unusual complication in anterior spinal instrumentations; migration beyond pelvis is a rare complication. A 32-year-old female presented to the consultant with right thigh pain, rod migration was diagnosed, rod extraction by minimal approach was performed, and spinal instrumentation after nonunion diagnosis was underwent. A rod migration case to the right thigh is presented; this uncommon complication of spinal instrumentation should be ruled out as unusual cause of sudden pain without any other suspicions, and long-term follow-up is important to prevent and diagnose this problem. PMID:26613058

  13. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  14. [An Adult Case of Transperineal Repair of Congenital Rectourethral Fistula Using Gracilis Muscle Flap Interposition].

    PubMed

    Yo, Toeki; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Hanasaki, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Yukako; Togo, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshihide; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2015-07-01

    A man in his 50s was referred to our hospital after recurrent severe urinary tract infection. He had undergone anoplasty for anorectal malformation during early infancy. He noticed urinary leakage from the anus for a long time. Under diagnosis of congenital rectourethral fistula, we performed fistula closure. The fistula was transsected via transperineal incision and each stump was closed. A gracilis muscle flap approximately 30 cm long was harvested from the left thigh, brought into the deepest part between the separated rectum and urethra through a subcutaneous tunnel and fixed there. The urinary leakage from the anus disappeared, and the infection resolved. Application of gracilis muscle flap for congenital diseases is rare, but was useful in the present case. PMID:26278215

  15. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  16. Spatial genetic structure of bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis): breeding area differentiation not reflected on the non-breeding grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Gill, Robert E.; Williams, Ian S.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds occupy geographically and ecologically disparate areas during their annual cycle with conditions on breeding and non-breeding grounds playing separate and important roles in population dynamics. We used data from nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA control region loci to assess the breeding and non-breeding spatial genetic structure of a transoceanic migrant shorebird, the bristle-thighed curlew. We found spatial variance in the distribution of allelic and haplotypic frequencies between the curlew's two breeding areas in Alaska but did not observe this spatial structure throughout its non-breeding range on low-lying tropical and subtropical islands in the Central Pacific (Oceania). This suggests that the two breeding populations do not spatially segregate during the non-breeding season. Lack of migratory connectivity is likely attributable to the species' behavior, as bristle-thighed curlews exhibit differential timing of migration and some individuals move among islands during non-breeding months. Given the detrimental impact of many past and current human activities on island ecosystems, admixture of breeding populations in Oceania may render the bristle-thighed curlew less vulnerable to perturbations there, as neither breeding population will be disproportionally affected by local habitat losses or by stochastic events. Furthermore, lack of migratory connectivity may enable bristle-thighed curlews to respond to changing island ecosystems by altering their non-breeding distribution. However, availability of suitable non-breeding habitat for curlews in Oceania is increasingly limited on both low-lying and high islands by habitat loss, sea level rise, and invasive mammalian predators that pose a threat to flightless and flight-compromised curlews during the molting period.

  17. Impact response and biomechanical analysis of the knee-thigh-hip complex in frontal impacts with a full human body finite element model.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Rouhana, Stephen W; Prasad, Priya

    2008-11-01

    Changes in vehicle safety design technology and the increasing use of seat-belts and airbag restraint systems have gradually changed the relative proportion of lower extremity injuries. These changes in real world injuries have renewed interest and the need of further investigation into occupant injury mechanisms and biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex during frontal impacts. This study uses a detailed finite element model of the human body to simulate occupant knee impacts experienced in frontal crashes. The human body model includes detailed anatomical features of the head, neck, shoulder, chest, thoracic and lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower and upper extremities. The material properties used in the model for each anatomic part of the human body were obtained from test data reported in the literature. The human body model used in the current study has been previously validated in frontal and side impacts. It was further validated with cadaver knee-thigh-hip impact tests in the current study. The effects of impactor configuration and flexion angle of the knee on biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex were studied using the validated human body finite element model. This study showed that the knee flexion angle and the impact direction and shape of the impactors affected the injury outcomes of the knee-thigh-hip complex significantly. The 60 degrees flexed knee impact showed the least impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress but largest relative displacements of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The 90 degrees flexed knee impact resulted in a higher impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress; but smaller PCL and ACL displacements. Stress distributions of the patella, femur, and pelvis were also given for all the simulated conditions.

  18. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  19. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  20. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of exercised muscles • dark urine that looks like cola, following exercise (seek ...

  1. Muscle adaptations to plyometric vs. resistance training in untrained young men.

    PubMed

    Vissing, Kristian; Brink, Mads; Lønbro, Simon; Sørensen, Henrik; Overgaard, Kristian; Danborg, Kasper; Mortensen, Jesper; Elstrøm, Ole; Rosenhøj, Nikolaj; Ringgaard, Steffen; Andersen, Jesper L; Aagaard, Per

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle strength, power, and morphology induced by conventional strength training vs. plyometric training of equal time and effort requirements. Young, untrained men performed 12 weeks of progressive conventional resistance training (CRT, n = 8) or plyometric training (PT, n = 7). Tests before and after training included one-repetition maximum (1 RM) incline leg press, 3 RM knee extension, and 1 RM knee flexion, countermovement jumping (CMJ), and ballistic incline leg press. Also, before and after training, magnetic resonance imaging scanning was performed for the thigh, and a muscle biopsy was sampled from the vastus lateralis muscle. Muscle strength increased by approximately 20-30% (1-3 RM tests) (p < 0.001), with CRT showing 50% greater improvement in hamstring strength than PT (p < 0.01). Plyometric training increased maximum CMJ height (10%) and maximal power (Pmax; 9%) during CMJ (p < 0.01) and Pmax in ballistic leg press (17%) (p < 0.001). This was far greater than for CRT (p < 0.01), which only increased Pmax during the ballistic leg press (4%) (p < 0.05). Quadriceps, hamstring, and adductor whole-muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) increased equally (7-10%) with CRT and PT (p < 0.001). For fiber CSA analysis, some of the biopsies had to be omitted. Type I and IIa fiber CSA increased in CRT (n = 4) by 32 and 49%, respectively (p < 0.05), whereas no significant changes occurred for PT (n = 5). Myosin heavy-chain IIX content decreased from 11 to 6%, with no difference between CRT and PT. In conclusion, gross muscle size increased both by PT and CRT, whereas only CRT seemed to increase muscle fiber CSA. Gains in maximal muscle strength were essentially similar between groups, whereas muscle power increased almost exclusively with PT training. PMID:18978625

  2. Clinical and Muscle Imaging Findings in 14 Mainland Chinese Patients with Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Jiangxi; Du, Jing; Que, Chengli; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Sun, Weiping; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngodistal myopathy (OPDM) is an extremely rare, adult-onset hereditary muscular disease characterized by progressive external ocular, pharyngeal, and distal muscle weakness and myopathological rimmed vacuole changes. The causative gene is currently unknown; therefore, diagnosis of OPDM is based on clinical and histopathological features and genetic exclusion of similar conditions. Moreover, variable manifestations of this disorder are reported in terms of muscle involvement and severity. We present the clinical profile and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes of lower limb muscles in 14 mainland Chinese patients with OPDM, emphasizing the role of muscle MRI in disease identification and differential diagnosis. The patients came from 10 unrelated families and presented with progressive external ocular, laryngopharyngeal, facial, distal limb muscle weakness that had been present since early adulthood. Serum creatine kinase was mildly to moderately elevated. Electromyography revealed myogenic changes with inconsistent myotonic discharge. The respiratory function test revealed subclinical respiratory muscle involvement. Myopathological findings showed rimmed vacuoles with varying degrees of muscular dystrophic changes. All known genes responsible for distal and myofibrillar myopathies, vacuolar myopathies, and muscular dystrophies were excluded by PCR or targeted next-generation sequencing. Muscle MRI revealed that the distal lower legs had more severe fatty replacement than the thigh muscles. Serious involvement of the soleus and long head of the biceps femoris was observed in all patients, whereas the popliteus, gracilis and short head of biceps femoris were almost completely spared, even in advanced stages. Not only does our study widen the spectrum of OPDM in China, but it also demonstrates that OPDM has a specific pattern of muscle involvement that may provide valuable information for its differential diagnosis and show further evidence supporting

  3. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, P<0.001), but were similar to preoperative level at six months (18.4 N∙m, 7.4 N∙m P<0.001) and were maintained for up to one year (15.9 N∙m, 4.1 N∙m P<0.001). The pooled mean differences in changes in quadriceps and hamstring strengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041), but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength.

  4. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  5. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord; Ott, Peter; Buhl, Mads; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby; Schousboe, Arne; Møller, Niels; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in 14 patients with cirrhosis and in 7 healthy subjects by combining [(13)N]ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) of the thigh muscle with measurements of blood flow and arteriovenous (A-V) concentrations of ammonia and amino acids. PET was used to measure the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia and the A-V measurements were used to measure the total ammonia metabolism across the thigh muscle. After intake of BCAA, blood ammonia increased more than 30% in both groups of subjects (both P < 0.05). Muscle clearance of blood-supplied ammonia (PET) was unaffected (P = 0.75), but the metabolic removal rate (PET) increased significantly because of increased blood ammonia in both groups (all P < 0.05). The total ammonia clearance across the leg muscle (A-V) increased by more than 50% in both groups, and the flux (A-V) of ammonia increased by more than 45% (all P < 0.05). BCAA intake led to a massive glutamine release from the muscle (cirrhotic patients, P < 0.05; healthy subjects, P = 0.12). In conclusion, BCAA enhanced the intrinsic muscle metabolism of ammonia but not the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia in both the patients with cirrhosis and in the healthy subjects.

  6. Analysis of skeletal muscle has potential value in the assessment of cocaine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Rees, Kelly A; Seulin, Saskia; Yonamine, Mauricio; Leyton, Vilma; Munoz, Daniel R; Gianvecchio, Victor A P; Pounder, Derrick J; Osselton, M David

    2013-03-10

    This study assesses the interpretive value of cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BZE) and cocaethylene (COET) in skeletal muscle (rectus femoris) in cocaine-using decedents. The distribution of these analytes in cardiac muscle (CM), vitreous humour (VH), femoral blood (FB) and cardiac blood (CB) is also reported. In rectus femoris muscle, the spatial distribution of the analytes was examined across the whole rectus femoris muscle collected from seven fatalities in which cocaine was detected. In six of these cases, death was attributed to trauma and in one case the cause of death was undetermined but suspected to be drug related. In two additional cases analytes were detected in the blood and/or VH but not in the muscle. The muscle was sectioned into 12-15 approximately equal segments, each of which was analysed after homogenisation. Tissue and bio-fluid samples were extracted by solid phase extraction with confirmation and quantification by GC-ion trap-MS/MS. No significant variation was observed in the concentration of any analyte throughout the muscle in the 7 cases analysed. The results reported here are in contrast to a previous study in which great variation in the concentration of some basic drugs (mainly tricyclic antidepressants and benzodiazepines) was observed throughout the thigh muscle bulk (Williams and Pounder, 1997). Analyte concentrations in skeletal muscle (SM) correlated well with those in FB (p<0.01). In general, the concentration of cocaine and COET followed the order VH > CM > SM > FB ≥ CB. Cocaine concentrations measured in VH were significantly higher than in blood and muscle. Inter-matrix variations in the concentrations of BZE and COET were less marked. The concentration of BZE exceeded that of cocaine in all matrices and in all cases except one where the time between death and drug intake was suspected to be short. In this case, the cocaine to BZE ratio measured in SM (2.66), CM (2.91) and VH (2.19) was higher than that measured in FB (0

  7. Inoculum Effects of Ceftobiprole, Daptomycin, Linezolid, and Vancomycin with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae at Inocula of 105 and 107 CFU Injected into Opposite Thighs of Neutropenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gun; Murakami, Yoichi; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced bactericidal efficacy at a high inoculum is known as the inoculum effect (IE). We used neutropenic mice to compare the IEs of ceftobiprole (CFB), daptomycin (DAP), linezolid (LZD), and vancomycin (VAN) against 6 to 9 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 4 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae at 2 inocula in opposite thighs of the same mice. Neutropenic mice had 104.5 to 105.7 CFU/thigh (low inoculum [LI]) in one thigh and 106.4 to 107.2 CFU/thigh (high inoculum [HI]) in the opposite thigh when treated for 24 h with subcutaneous (s.c.) doses every 12 h of DAP at 0.024 to 100 mg/kg of body weight and LZD at 0.313 to 320 mg/kg and s.c. doses every 6 h of CFB at 0.003 to 160 mg/kg and VAN at 0.049 to 800 mg/kg. Dose-response data were analyzed by a maximum effect (Emax) model using nonlinear regression. Static doses for each drug and at each inoculum were calculated, and the difference between HI and LI (IE index) gave the magnitude of IE for each drug-organism combination. Mean (range) IE indexes of S. aureus were 2.9 (1.7 to 4.6) for CFB, 4.1 (2.6 to 9.3) for DAP, 4.6 (1.7 to 7.1) for LZD, and 10.1 (6.3 to 20.3) for VAN. In S. pneumoniae, the IE indexes were 2.5 (1.3 to 3.3) for CFB, 2.0 (1.6 to 2.8) for DAP, 1.9 (1.7 to 2.2) for LZD, and 1.5 (0.8 to 3.2) for VAN; these values were similar for all drugs. In S. aureus, the IE was much larger with VAN than with CFB, DAM, and LZD (P < 0.05). An in vivo time course of vancomycin activity showed initiation of killing at 4- to 16-fold-higher doses at HI than at LI despite similar initial growth of controls. PMID:23295932

  8. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002thigh (0.0008muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity. PMID:27451322

  9. Glucocorticoids and Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Furlow, J David

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle, producing a catabolic effect that is opposite that of insulin. In many catabolic diseases, such as sepsis, starvation, and cancer cachexia, endogenous glucocorticoids are elevated contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function. Further, exogenous glucocorticoids are often given acutely and chronically to treat inflammatory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in muscle atrophy. This chapter will detail the nature of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and discuss the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids on muscle. PMID:26215994

  10. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  11. Early rehabilitation with weight-bearing standing-shaking-board exercise in combination with electrical muscle stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kingo; Hayashi, Masamichi; Fujii, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Kenji; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to increase the muscle strength of the lower extremities. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise induces co-contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative muscle strength/mass of subjects who performed our new CKC exercise (new rehabilitation group:group N) from week 4, and subjects who received traditional rehabilitation alone (traditional rehabilitation group:group T). The subjects stood on the device and maintained balance. Then, low-frequency stimulation waves were applied to 2 points each in the anterior and posterior region of the injured thigh 3 times a week for 3 months. Measurement of muscle strength was performed 4 times (before the start, and then once a month). Muscle mass was evaluated in CT images of the extensor and flexor muscles of 10 knees (10 subjects) in each group. The injured legs of group N showed significant improvement after one month compared to group T. The cross-sectional area of the extensor muscles of the injured legs tended to a show a greater increase at 3 months in group N. This rehabilitation method makes it possible to contract fast-twitch muscles, which may be a useful for improving extensor muscle strength after ACL reconstruction.

  12. Local architecture of the vastus intermedius is a better predictor of knee extension force than that of the other quadriceps femoris muscle heads.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Saito, Akira; Umemura, Yoshihisa; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the muscle architecture of each head of the quadriceps femoris (QF) at multiple regions can be used to predict knee extension force. Muscle thickness and pennation angle were measured using sonographic images from multiple regions on each muscle of the QF with the knee flexed to 90°. The fascicle lengths of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were estimated based on sonographic images taken along the length of the thigh. The muscle architecture of the vastus intermedius was determined in two separate locations using sonographic images of the anterior (ant-VI) and lateral portions (lat-VI). The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured during isometric knee extension at a knee joint angle of 90°. The relationship between MVC force and muscle architecture was examined using a stepwise linear regression analysis with MVC force as the dependent variable. The muscle thickness of the ant-VI was selected as an independent variable in the first step of the linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.66, P<0.01). In the second step, pennation angle of the lat-VI was added to the model (R(2) = 0.91, P<0.01). These results suggest that among the four muscles that make up the QF, the muscle architecture of the VI is the best predictor of knee extension force.

  13. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial muscle cross-sectional area as predictors of tibial bone strength in middle-aged and older men.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Nikander, R; Kukuljan, S; Daly, R M

    2013-09-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that bones adapt to the site-specific prevalent loading environment, reasonable ways to estimate skeletal loads are not necessarily available. For long bone shafts, muscles acting to bend the bone may provide a more appropriate surrogate of the loading than muscles expected to cause compressive loads. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was a better predictor of tibial mid-shaft bone strength than mid-tibia muscle CSA in middle aged and older men. 181 Caucasian men aged 50-79 years (mean±SD; 61±7 years) participated in this study. Mid-femoral and mid-tibial bone traits cortical area, density weighted polar moment of area and muscle CSA [cm(2)] were assessed with computed tomography. Tibial bone traits were positively associated with both the mid-femur (r=0.44 to 0.46, P<0.001) and the mid-tibia muscle CSA (r=0.35 to 0.37, P<0.001). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age, weight, physical activity and femoral length, indicated that mid-femur muscle CSA predicted tibial mid-shaft bone strength indices better than mid-tibia muscle CSA. In conclusion, the association between a given skeletal site and functionally adjacent muscles may provide a meaningful probe of the site-specific effect of loading on bone. PMID:23989248

  14. Intramuscular pressure varies with depth. The tibialis anterior muscle studied in 12 volunteers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakhostine, M.; Styf, J. R.; van Leuven, S.; Hargens, A. R.; Gershuni, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    Pressures in the tibialis anterior muscle were recorded at rest and during exercise with transducer-tipped catheters in 12 volunteers while they were supine or standing. The recordings were repeated with venous stasis created by an inflated tourniquet cuff on the thigh. Catheters were placed at 3 different sites in the muscle: catheter I adjacent to the deep surface of the fascia over the anterior compartment; catheter II between the fascia and the central tendon; and catheter III deep in the muscle close to the interosseous membrane. In both the supine and standing positions the intramuscular pressure at rest and the muscle relaxation pressure during exercise, obtained by catheter II, were greater than the corresponding pressures measured by the superficially located catheter I in the normal as well as in the volume loaded limb. The same conditions for pressure measurement consistently revealed lower pressures recorded by catheter III compared to II, but the difference was not significant. Our results indicate that intramuscular pressure increases centripetally, as the centrally lying tendon is approached. We conclude that pressure measurements for diagnosis of acute and chronic compartment syndromes and in ergonomic studies should be based on recordings from a standard location of the catheter within the muscle and a standard posture of the subject.

  15. Functional Capacity, Muscle Fat Infiltration, Power Output, and Cognitive Impairment in Institutionalized Frail Oldest Old

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Millor, Nora; Martínez-Ramirez, Alicia; Gómez, Marisol; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Marcellán, Teresa; de Gordoa, Ana Ruiz; Marques, Mário C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the neuromuscular and functional performance differences between frail oldest old with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, the associations between functional capacities, muscle mass, strength, and power output of the leg muscles were also examined. Forty-three elderly men and women (91.9±4.1 years) were classified into three groups—the frail group, the frail with MCI group (frail+MCI), and the non-frail group. Strength tests were performed for upper and lower limbs. Functional tests included 5-meter habitual gait, timed up-and-go (TUG), dual task performance, balance, and rise from a chair ability. Incidence of falls was assessed using questionnaires. The thigh muscle mass and attenuation were assessed using computed tomography. There were no differences between the frail and frail+MCI groups for all the functional variables analyzed, except in the cognitive score of the TUG with verbal task, which frail showed greater performance than the frail+MCI group. Significant associations were observed between the functional performance, incidence of falls, muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail and frail+MCI groups (r=−0.73 to r=0.83, p<0.01 to p<0.05). These results suggest that the frail oldest old with and without MCI have similar functional and neuromuscular outcomes. Furthermore, the functional outcomes and incidences of falls are associated with muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail elderly population. PMID:23822577

  16. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  17. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  18. Functional capacity, muscle fat infiltration, power output, and cognitive impairment in institutionalized frail oldest old.

    PubMed

    Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Cadore, Eduardo L; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Millor, Nora; Martínez-Ramirez, Alicia; Gómez, Marisol; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Marcellán, Teresa; de Gordoa, Ana Ruiz; Marques, Mário C; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the neuromuscular and functional performance differences between frail oldest old with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, the associations between functional capacities, muscle mass, strength, and power output of the leg muscles were also examined. Forty-three elderly men and women (91.9±4.1 years) were classified into three groups--the frail group, the frail with MCI group (frail+MCI), and the non-frail group. Strength tests were performed for upper and lower limbs. Functional tests included 5-meter habitual gait, timed up-and-go (TUG), dual task performance, balance, and rise from a chair ability. Incidence of falls was assessed using questionnaires. The thigh muscle mass and attenuation were assessed using computed tomography. There were no differences between the frail and frail+MCI groups for all the functional variables analyzed, except in the cognitive score of the TUG with verbal task, which frail showed greater performance than the frail+MCI group. Significant associations were observed between the functional performance, incidence of falls, muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail and frail+MCI groups (r=-0.73 to r=0.83, p<0.01 to p<0.05). These results suggest that the frail oldest old with and without MCI have similar functional and neuromuscular outcomes. Furthermore, the functional outcomes and incidences of falls are associated with muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail elderly population.

  19. Chronic effects of low-frequency low-intensity electrical stimulation of stretched human muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Lyubaeva, Ekaterina V.; Popov, Daniil V.; Netreba, Aleksey I.; Bravy, Yan R.; Tarakin, Pavel P.; Lemesheva, Yulia S.; Vinogradova, Olga L.

    2007-02-01

    Effects of low-frequency electrical stimulation, which is currently considered to be a possible countermeasure for long-duration spaceflights, with and without stretch were evaluated. Twelve young male volunteers were randomly distributed into two groups. In one group anterior thigh muscles—knee extensors of both legs were stimulated with frequency of 15 Hz for 4.5 wks, six times a week; each session was 6-h long. In the other group, electrical stimulation with the same parameters was applied to stretched knee extensors. Following stimulation the subjects exhibited an increase in fatigue resistance, and in the succinate dehydrogenase activity and a 10% gain in the percentage of muscle fibers with slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. In a stimulated group the peak voluntary strength went down significantly, the CSA of fast muscle fibers in m. quadriceps femoris became slightly less in size (10%). Electrical stimulation of the stretched muscles induced an insignificant decline in their strength and an increase of cross-sectional area of muscle fibers of both types. Thus chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation may be proposed as a candidate countermeasure against muscle strength and mass loss if it is combined with stretch.

  20. Erythropoietin administration alone or in combination with endurance training affects neither skeletal muscle morphology nor angiogenesis in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mads S; Vissing, Kristian; Thams, Line; Sieljacks, Peter; Dalgas, Ulrik; Nellemann, Birgitte; Christensen, Britt

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the ability of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), alone or in combination with endurance training, to induce changes in human skeletal muscle fibre and vascular morphology. In a comparative study, 36 healthy untrained men were randomly dispersed into the following four groups: sedentary-placebo (SP, n = 9); sedentary-ESA (SE, n = 9); training-placebo (TP, n = 10); or training-ESA (TE, n = 8). The ESA or placebo was injected once weekly. Training consisted of progressive bicycling three times per week for 10 weeks. Before and after the intervention period, muscle biopsies and magnetic resonance images were collected from the thigh muscles, blood was collected, body composition measured and endurance exercise performance evaluated. The ESA treatment (SE and TE) led to elevated haematocrit, and both ESA treatment and training (SE, TP and TE) increased maximal O2 uptake. With regard to skeletal muscle morphology, TP alone exhibited increases in whole-muscle cross-sectional area and fibre diameter of all fibre types. Also exclusively for TP was an increase in type IIa fibres and a corresponding decrease in type IIx fibres. Furthermore, an overall training effect (TP and TE) was statistically demonstrated in whole-muscle cross-sectional area, muscle fibre diameter and type IIa and type IIx fibre distribution. With regard to muscle vascular morphology, TP and TE both promoted a rise in capillary to muscle fibre ratio, with no differences between the two groups. There were no effects of ESA treatment on any of the muscle morphological parameters. Despite the haematopoietic effects of ESA, we provide novel evidence that endurance training rather than ESA treatment induces adaptational changes in angiogenesis and muscle morphology.

  1. Quadriceps function relates to muscle size following ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuenze, Christopher M; Blemker, Silvia S; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-09-01

    It remains unclear what role reduced volume and cross-section area (CSA) of individual quadriceps muscles may play in persistent quadriceps weakness and more global dysfunction following ACL reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this investigation was to establish the relationship between cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle group and measures of knee related and quadriceps function following ACLR. Thirty participants with a history of primary, unilateral ACLR experiencing persistent quadriceps activation failure participated in this cohort study. Clinical factors including International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, normalized knee extension MVIC torque (Nm/kg) and quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR, %) were assessed in addition to CSA. Quadriceps CSA was measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; Siemens Avanto 1.5T). Quadriceps CSA (cm(2) ) and quadriceps volume (cm(3) ) as well as individual muscle estimates were identified within a 10 cm mid-thigh capture area. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (r) established relationships between CSA and all other variables. Stepwise linear regression established which CSA factors were able to successfully predict clinical factors. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly correlated with Vastus Intermedius (VI; r =  0.857, p < 0.001) CSA as well as partial VI (r = 0.849, p < 0.001) and quadriceps (r = 0.830, p < 0.001) volume. Partial VI (r = 0.365, p = 0.047) volume was weakly correlated with IKDC score. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly predicted using VI CSA alone (R(2)  = 0.725) or in combination with Vastus Medialis CSA (VM; R(2)  = 0.756). Statement of Clinical Significance: Atrophy of the VI and VM muscles negatively impacts knee extension strength following ACLR. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1656-1662, 2016.

  2. Muscle metastases: comparison of features in different primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle metastases (MM) from solid tumours are rare. The aim of this study was to describe radiological features of MM, and to compare their patterns in different malignancies. Methods A retrospective search in the statistical database of our institution revealed 61 cases of MM. Additionally, a retrospective search in Pubmed database was performed. Together with our cases the present analysis comprises 461 patients (682 MM). Results MM derived from the following malignancies: lung cancer (25.1%), gastrointestinal tumours (21.0%), and urological tumours (13.2%). Other neoplasias with MM were rare. MM were localised most frequently in the thigh muscles, the extraocular musculature, and the gluteal and paravertebral muscles. The localisation of MM was different in several primary malignancies. On computed tomography (CT), five different patterns of MM occurred: masses with homogeneous contrast enhancement (type I, 46.5%), abscess-like lesions (type II, 27.7%), diffuse infiltration with muscle swelling (type III, 18.1%), intramuscular calcifications (type IV, 6.5%), or MM presented as intramuscular bleeding (type V, 1.2%). MM from several primary tumours manifested with different CT patterns. On MRI, most MM were hyperintense in comparison to unaffected musculature in T2 weighted images and hypo- to isointense on T1 weighted images with a heterogeneous enhancement. There were no differences in MRI features of MM in different primary tumours. On ultrasound, most MM were hypoechoic. On positron emission tomography, MM presented as focally abnormal intramuscular uptake. Conclusion MM present with a broad spectrum of radiological features. Different CT imaging findings of MM were observed in different primary tumours. The localisation of MM also varies with different primary malignancies. PMID:25608474

  3. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  4. Noninvasive Sensor for Measuring Muscle Metabolism During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, B. R.; Yang, Y.; Lee, S. M. C.; Soyemi, O. O.; Wilson, C.; Hagan, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) and lactate threshold (LT) are utilized to assess changes in aerobic capacity and the efficacy of exercise countermeasures in astronauts. During extravehicular activity (EVA), real-time knowledge of VO2 and relative work intensity can be used to monitor crew activity levels and organize tasks to reduce the cumulative effects of fatigue. Currently VO2 and LT are determined with complicated measurement techniques that require sampling of expired ventilatory gases, which may not be accurate in enclosed, oxygen-rich environments such as the EVA suit. The UMMS team has developed a novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) system which noninvasively, simultaneously and continuously measures muscle oxygen tension, oxygen saturation, pH (pHm), and hematocrit from a small sensor placed on the leg. This system is unique in that it allows accurate, absolute measurement of these parameters in the thigh muscle by correcting spectra for the interference from skin pigment and fat. These parameters can be used to estimate VO2 and LT. A preliminary evaluation of the system s capabilities was performed in the NASA JSC Exercise Physiology Lab.

  5. PubMed Central

    Pellini, R.; Mercante, G.; Pichi, B.; Manciocco, V.; Marchesi, P.; Ferreli, F.; Spriano, G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In the last decade, the antero-lateral thigh free flap (ALT) has become the most popular free flap for tongue reconstruction because of less donor site morbidity and better cosmetic outcomes. However, fascio-cutaneous ALT may be insufficient to reconstruct major tongue defects, while its muscular-cutaneous variant (using the vastus lateralis muscle) may be too bulky. The present study describes our preliminary experience of tongue reconstruction with vastus lateralis myofascial flap, which could potentially offer unique advantages in head and neck reconstruction including adequate bulk when needed, optimal functional results and obliteration of dead space thus preventing fistulas and infections with minimal morbidity. PMID:27734986

  6. Muscle development and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of skeletal muscle from the epithelial somites involves a series of events triggered by temporally and spatially discrete signals resulting in the generation of muscle fibers which vary in their contractile and metabolic nature. The fiber type composition of muscles varies between individuals and it has now been found that there are differences in fiber type proportions between lean and obese animals and humans. Amongst the possible causes of obesity, it has been suggested that inappropriate prenatal environments may ‘program’ the fetus and may lead to increased risks for disease in adult life. The characteristics of muscle are both heritable and plastic, giving the tissue some ability to adapt to signals and stimuli both pre and postnatally. Given that muscle is a site of fatty acid oxidation and carbohydrate metabolism and that its development can be changed by prenatal events, it is interesting to examine the possible relationship between muscle development and the risk of obesity. PMID:19279728

  7. Effects of intermittent pneumatic compression of the thigh on blood flow velocity in the femoral and popliteal veins: developing a new physical prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the leg.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Takahira, Naonobu; Sakamoto, Miki; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Katagiri, Masato; Kitagawa, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower limb have an estimated venous thromboembolism rate of 2.5 % without prophylaxis, which includes many fatal cases. However, there is no practical physical prophylaxis for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in these patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intermittent pneumatic compression on the thigh alone (IPC to the thigh) on peak blood velocity (PBV) in the legs and to consider the possibility that IPC of the thigh could be used as physical prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg. Nine healthy male volunteers and eighteen elderly males were recruited. We immobilized each subject's right lower leg and ankle with a plaster splint, and applied the ActiveCare+S.F.T.(®) (Medical Compression Systems, Inc.) device to each subject's right thigh. The PBV in the superficial femoral vein (PBVFV) and the popliteal vein (PBVPV) were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasonography. IPC to the thigh resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in PBVFV and a 3.0-fold increase in PBVPV compared with resting at supine in the elderly group. Although IPC to the thigh also increased PBVFV and PBVPV significantly in the sitting position, the change ratios of PBV in the supine and sitting positions were equal (2.6-fold increase in PBVFV and 2.9-fold increase in PBVPV). IPC to the thigh in supine and sitting positions significantly increased PBVFV and PBVPV, and could be a useful prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg.

  8. Accurate, in vivo NIR measurement of skeletal muscle oxygenation through fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chunguang; Zou, Fengmei; Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Scott, Peter; Peshlov, Boyan; Soller, Babs R.

    2010-02-01

    Noninvasive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurement of muscle oxygenation requires the penetration of light through overlying skin and fat layers. We have previously demonstrated a dual-light source design and orthogonalization algorithm that corrects for inference from skin absorption and fat scattering. To achieve accurate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) measurement, one must select the appropriate source-detector distance (SD) to completely penetrate the fat layer. Methods: Six healthy subjects were supine for 15min to normalize tissue oxygenation across the body. NIR spectra were collected from the calf, shoulder, lower and upper thigh muscles with long SD distances of 30mm, 35mm, 40mm and 45mm. Spectral preprocessing with the short SD (3mm) spectrum preceded SmO2 calculation with a Taylor series expansion method. Three-way ANOVA was used to compare SmO2 values over varying fat thickness, subjects and SD distances. Results: Overlying fat layers varied in thickness from 4.9mm to 19.6mm across all subjects. SmO2 measured at the four locations were comparable for each subject (p=0.133), regardless of fat thickness and SD distance. SmO2 (mean+/-std dev) measured at calf, shoulder, low and high thigh were 62+/-3%, 59+/-8%, 61+/-2%, 61+/-4% respectively for SD distance of 30mm. In these subjects no significant influence of SD was observed (p=0.948). Conclusions: The results indicate that for our sensor design a 30mm SD is sufficient to penetrate through a 19mm fat layer and that orthogonalization with short SD effectively removed spectral interference from fat to result in a reproducible determination of SmO2.

  9. Muscle Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Siparsky, Patrick N.; Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle physiology in the aging athlete is complex. Sarcopenia, the age-related decrease in lean muscle mass, can alter activity level and affect quality of life. This review addresses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in muscle with age, recognizes contributing factors including nutrition and changes in hormone levels, and identifies potential pharmacologic agents in clinical trial that may aid in the battle of this complex, costly, and disabling problem. Level of Evidence: Level 5. PMID:24427440

  10. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  11. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  12. In Vivo Pharmacodynamics of Cefquinome in a Neutropenic Mouse Thigh Model of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 at Varied Initial Inoculum Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunna; Liao, Xiaoping; Wang, Mingru; Wang, Feng; Yan, Chaoqun; Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen and causes severe disease in both pigs and human beings. Cefquinome (CEQ), a fourth-generation cephalosporin, exhibits broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as S. suis. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities of CEQ against four strains of S. suis serotype 2 in a murine neutropenic thigh infection model. We investigated the effect of varied inoculum sizes (106 to 108 CFU/thigh) on the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) indices and magnitudes of a particular PK/PD index or dose required for efficacy. Dose fractionation studies included total CEQ doses ranging from 0.625 to 640 mg/kg/24 h. Data were analyzed via a maximum effect (Emax) model using nonlinear regression. The PK/PD studies demonstrated that the percentage of time that serum drug levels were above the MIC of free drug (%ƒT>MIC) in a 24-h dosing interval was the primary index driving the efficacy of both inoculum sizes (R2 = 91% and R2 = 63%). CEQ doses of 2.5 and 40 mg/kg body weight produced prolonged postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of 2.45 to 8.55 h. Inoculum sizes had a significant influence on CEQ efficacy. Compared to the CEQ exposure and dosages in tests using standard inocula, a 4-fold dose (P = 0.006) and a 2-fold exposure time (P = 0.01) were required for a 1-log kill using large inocula of 108 CFU/thigh. PMID:26666923

  13. The effect of thermal preslaughter stress on the susceptibility of broiler chickens differing with respect to growth rate, age at slaughter, blood parameters, and ascites mortality, to hemorrhages in muscles.

    PubMed

    Kranen, R W; Veerkamp, C H; Lambooy, E; Van Kuppevelt, T H; Veerkamp, J H

    1998-05-01

    In this study we investigated the occurrence of hemorrhages in four groups of electrically stunned broilers, differing with respect to growth rate, age at slaughter, hemodynamic parameters, and ascites mortality. In addition, the effect of three thermal preslaughter conditions on hemorrhage occurrence in thigh and breast muscles was studied. Broilers were either reared at a thermoneutral or low temperature regimen, and were either restricted in their feed consumption or consumed feed ad libitum. Prior to slaughter the broilers were exposed for 2 +/- 0.5 h to either cold (4 +/- 2 C, RH 100%), moderate (19 +/- 2 C, RH: 70 to 80%), or warm (30 +/- 2 C, RH: 60 to 70%) conditions. There was no effect of rearing group, nor was there an interaction between rearing group and preslaughter condition on hemorrhage scores in the thighs or breasts. Preslaughter conditions only affected hemorrhage scores in the left thigh. Scores were highest in broilers exposed to moderate preslaughter conditions. These data indicate that the cause of hemorrhages in muscles is multifactorial. Hemorrhage severity was not diminished in broilers retarded in growth. Pathological hemodynamic adaptations to low rearing temperatures, leading to ascites, did not increase hemorrhage severity, neither upon exposure to moderate nor to cold or warm preslaughter conditions. PMID:9603363

  14. Neural Network Model for Survival and Growth of Salmonella enterica Serotype 8,20:-:z6 in Ground Chicken Thigh Meat during Cold Storage: Extrapolation to Other Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Oscar, T P

    2015-10-01

    Mathematical models that predict the behavior of human bacterial pathogens in food are valuable tools for assessing and managing this risk to public health. A study was undertaken to develop a model for predicting the behavior of Salmonella enterica serotype 8,20:-:z6 in chicken meat during cold storage and to determine how well the model would predict the behavior of other serotypes of Salmonella stored under the same conditions. To develop the model, ground chicken thigh meat (0.75 cm(3)) was inoculated with 1.7 log Salmonella 8,20:-:z6 and then stored for 0 to 8 -8 to 16°C. An automated miniaturized most-probable-number (MPN) method was developed and used for the enumeration of Salmonella. Commercial software (Excel and the add-in program NeuralTools) was used to develop a multilayer feedforward neural network model with one hidden layer of two nodes. The performance of the model was evaluated using the acceptable prediction zone (APZ) method. The number of Salmonella in ground chicken thigh meat stayed the same (P > 0.05) during 8 days of storage at -8 to 8°C but increased (P < 0.05) during storage at 9°C (+0.6 log) to 16°C (+5.1 log). The proportion of residual values (observed minus predicted values) in an APZ (pAPZ) from -1 log (fail-safe) to 0.5 log (fail-dangerous) was 0.939 for the data (n = 426 log MPN values) used in the development of the model. The model had a pAPZ of 0.944 or 0.954 when it was extrapolated to test data (n = 108 log MPN per serotype) for other serotypes (S. enterica serotype Typhimurium var 5-, Kentucky, Typhimurium, and Thompson) of Salmonella in ground chicken thigh meat stored for 0 to 8 days at -4, 4, 12, or 16°C under the same experimental conditions. A pAPZ of ≥0.7 indicates that a model provides predictions with acceptable bias and accuracy. Thus, the results indicated that the model provided valid predictions of the survival and growth of Salmonella 8,20:-:z6 in ground chicken thigh meat stored for 0 to 8 days at -8 to

  15. Effectiveness of thigh-length graduated compression stockings to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis after stroke (CLOTS trial 1): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism are common after stroke. In small trials of patients undergoing surgery, graduated compression stockings (GCS) reduce the risk of DVT. National stroke guidelines extrapolating from these trials recommend their use in patients with stroke despite insufficient evidence. We assessed the effectiveness of thigh-length GCS to reduce DVT after stroke. Methods In this outcome-blinded, randomised controlled trial, 2518 patients who were admitted to hospital within 1 week of an acute stroke and who were immobile were enrolled from 64 centres in the UK, Italy, and Australia. Patients were allocated via a central randomisation system to routine care plus thigh-length GCS (n=1256) or to routine care plus avoidance of GCS (n=1262). A technician who was blinded to treatment allocation undertook compression Doppler ultrasound of both legs at about 7–10 days and, when practical, again at 25–30 days after enrolment. The primary outcome was the occurrence of symptomatic or asymptomatic DVT in the popliteal or femoral veins. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN28163533. Findings All patients were included in the analyses. The primary outcome occurred in 126 (10·0%) patients allocated to thigh-length GCS and in 133 (10·5%) allocated to avoid GCS, resulting in a non-significant absolute reduction in risk of 0·5% (95% CI −1·9% to 2·9%). Skin breaks, ulcers, blisters, and skin necrosis were significantly more common in patients allocated to GCS than in those allocated to avoid their use (64 [5%] vs 16 [1%]; odds ratio 4·18, 95% CI 2·40–7·27). Interpretation These data do not lend support to the use of thigh-length GCS in patients admitted to hospital with acute stroke. National guidelines for stroke might need to be revised on the basis of these results. Funding Medical Research Council (UK), Chief Scientist Office of Scottish Government, Chest Heart and Stroke

  16. Hemodynamic Instability after Low-Energy Thigh Contusion Caused by Injury to the Femoral Artery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Roiz, Juan Miguel; Ballesteros-Betancourt, José; García-Tarriño, Raquel; Rodríguez-Roiz, Victor Antonio; Llusa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries have been described in relation to high-energy trauma accidents or in patients undergoing surgery in the femoral area. We describe a healthy patient who sustained a direct, low-energy contusion in the thigh and presented haemodynamic instability. Arteriography was used to locate the point of bleeding, and embolisation and vessel occlusion were carried out to stop the haemorrhage. The genetic study identified the COL3A1 gene mutation; accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (vascular type). PMID:27293936

  17. Hemodynamic Instability after Low-Energy Thigh Contusion Caused by Injury to the Femoral Artery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Roiz, Juan Miguel; Ballesteros-Betancourt, José; García-Tarriño, Raquel; Rodríguez-Roiz, Victor Antonio; Llusa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries have been described in relation to high-energy trauma accidents or in patients undergoing surgery in the femoral area. We describe a healthy patient who sustained a direct, low-energy contusion in the thigh and presented haemodynamic instability. Arteriography was used to locate the point of bleeding, and embolisation and vessel occlusion were carried out to stop the haemorrhage. The genetic study identified the COL3A1 gene mutation; accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (vascular type). PMID:27293936

  18. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Target Investigation of Two Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors, ACT-387042 and ACT-292706, in the Neutropenic Murine Thigh Model against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lepak, A J; Seiler, P; Surivet, J P; Ritz, D; Kohl, C; Andes, D R

    2016-06-01

    ACT-387042 and ACT-292706 are two novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae We used the neutropenic murine thigh infection model to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of these investigational compounds against a group of 10 S. aureus and S. pneumoniae isolates with phenotypic resistance to beta-lactams and fluoroquinolones. The in vitro activities of the two compounds were very similar (MIC range, 0.03 to 0.125 mg/liter). Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined for each compound by using four escalating doses administered by the subcutaneous route. In treatment studies, mice had 10(7.4) to 10(8) CFU/thigh at the start of therapy with ACT-387042 and 10(6.7) to 10(8.3) CFU/thigh at the start of therapy with ACT-292706. A dose-response relationship was observed with all isolates over the dose range. Maximal kill approached 3 to 4 log10 CFU/thigh compared to the burden at the start of therapy for the highest doses examined. There was a strong relationship between the PK/PD index AUC/MIC ratio (area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC) and therapeutic efficacy in the model (R(2), 0.63 to 0.82). The 24-h free-drug AUC/MIC ratios associated with net stasis for ACT-387042 against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae were 43 and 10, respectively. The 24-h free-drug AUC/MIC ratios associated with net stasis for ACT-292706 against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae were 69 and 25, respectively. The stasis PD targets were significantly lower for S. pneumoniae (P < 0.05) for both compounds. The 1-log-kill AUC/MIC ratio targets were ∼2- to 4-fold higher than stasis targets. Methicillin, penicillin, or ciprofloxacin resistance did not alter the magnitude of the AUC/MIC ratio required for efficacy. These results should be

  19. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  20. Ultrasound-Derived Abdominal Muscle Thickness Better Detects Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Obese Patients than Skeletal Muscle Index Measured by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yuki; Ishii, Kojiro; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Sato, Koji; Fujimoto, Masahiro; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Sanada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia has never been diagnosed based on site-specific muscle loss, and little is known about the relationship between site-specific muscle loss and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. To this end, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between site-specific muscle size and MetS risk factors. Subjects were 38 obese men and women aged 40-82 years. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Muscle thickness (MTH) was measured using B-mode ultrasound scanning in six body regions. Subjects were classified into general obesity (GO) and sarcopenic obesity (SO) groups using the threshold values of one standard deviation below the sex-specific means of either MTH or skeletal muscle index (SMI) measured by DXA. MetS risk score was acquired by standardizing and summing the following continuously distributed variables: visceral fat area, mean blood pressure, HbA1c, and serum triglyceride / high density lipoprotein cholesterol, to obtain the Z-score. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the MetS risk score was independently associated with abdominal MTH in all subjects, but not with MTH in other muscle regions, including the thigh. Although HbA1c and the number of MetS risk factors in the SO group were significantly higher than those in the GO group, there were no significant differences between GO and SO groups as defined by SMI. Ultrasound-derived abdominal MTH would allow a better assessment of sarcopenia in obese patients and can be used as an alternative to the conventionally-used SMI measured by DXA. PMID:26700167

  1. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle of pigs with acute monensin myotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Large doses of monensin, a Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produce polyfocal, monophasic necrosis of skeletal muscle, with Type I fiber selectivity, in swine. For a study of the sequential ultrastructural alterations in affected skeletal muscles, 14 weanling pigs were given 40 mg monensin/kg body weight and were euthanatized 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days later. Myotoxicosis and myoglobinuria were apparent clinically. At necropsy, white, dry areas of necrosis were present in the muscle masses of the anterior and posterior thigh, shoulder, and loin. Two patterns of skeletal muscle necrosis were observed on Day 1, especially in Type I fibers. In fibers exhibiting the first of these patterns, the contractile material was disrupted, forming dense amorphous and filamentous clumps scattered within the persistent sheaths of external lamina (sarcolemmal tubes); the mitochondria were swollen and contained flocculent matrix densities, and the nuclei were pyknotic. Fibers showing the second pattern were uniformly dense, but their sarcoplasm was not disrupted. Sublethally injured fibers were also observed and showed focal myofibrillar lysis. On Days 2 and 4, the necrotic muscle had marked infiltration of macrophages in the interstitium and within sarcolemmal tubes. Rapid resolution of the fiber necrosis occurred by phagocytosis of the sarcoplasmic debris. Regeneration of affected muscles developed early following injury and progressed rapidly to complete restoration of the necrotic muscles without residual fibrosis. Regeneration was initiated on Day 1 by activation of satellite cells to form presumptive myoblasts; on Days 4 and 8 these cells showed evidence of fusion, forming myotubes to restore the necrotic fibers. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6696050

  2. Longer Interset Rest Periods Enhance Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Pope, Zachary K; Benik, Franklin M; Hester, Garrett M; Sellers, John; Nooner, Josh L; Schnaiter, Jessica A; Bond-Williams, Katherine E; Carter, Adrian S; Ross, Corbin L; Just, Brandon L; Henselmans, Menno; Krieger, James W

    2016-07-01

    Schoenfeld, BJ, Pope, ZK, Benik, FM, Hester, GM, Sellers, J, Nooner, JL, Schnaiter, JA, Bond-Williams, KE, Carter, AS, Ross, CL, Just, BL, Henselmans, M, and Krieger, JW. Longer interset rest periods enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained men. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1805-1812, 2016-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short rest intervals normally associated with hypertrophy-type training versus long rest intervals traditionally used in strength-type training on muscular adaptations in a cohort of young, experienced lifters. Twenty-one young resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a group that performed a resistance training (RT) program with 1-minute rest intervals (SHORT) or a group that employed 3-minute rest intervals (LONG). All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 8 weeks with subjects performing 3 total body workouts a week comprised 3 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM) of 7 different exercises per session. Testing was performed prestudy and poststudy for muscle strength (1RM bench press and back squat), muscle endurance (50% 1RM bench press to failure), and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, triceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris by ultrasound imaging. Maximal strength was significantly greater for both 1RM squat and bench press for LONG compared to SHORT. Muscle thickness was significantly greater for LONG compared to SHORT in the anterior thigh, and a trend for greater increases was noted in the triceps brachii (p = 0.06) as well. Both groups saw significant increases in local upper body muscle endurance with no significant differences noted between groups. This study provides evidence that longer rest periods promote greater increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in young resistance-trained men.

  3. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  4. Symmetric corticospinal excitability and representation of vastus lateralis muscle in right-handed healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Al Sawah, Mohomad; Rimawi, Mohammad; Concerto, Carmen; Amer, Bahaa; Cao, Yisheng; D'Antoni, Anthony V; Chusid, Eileen; Battaglia, Fortunato

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the size and location of the representations of the anterior thigh muscles on the human motor cortex in the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the right and left vastus lateralis (rVL, lVL) muscles. A total of ten right-handed healthy volunteers participated in the study. In a single session experiment, we investigated VL muscle corticospinal excitability (motor threshold, MEP size, short interval intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation) and cortical representation (map area, volume, and location) in the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. The motor threshold, MEPs, and intracortical excitability did not differ significantly between the hemispheres (P > 0.05). Furthermore, no difference between sides was found in the location of VL motor representation (mediolateral and anteroposterior axis) or in map area and volume (P > 0.05). Vastus lateralis muscle corticospinal excitability and cortical map were symmetrical in right-handed subjects. Future studies on patients with unilateral lower extremity injuries could examine side-to-side plastic reorganization in corticomotor output and map location in both hemispheres.

  5. Dietary mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal improves growth and increases muscle weights in growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Masahisa; Yoshimoto, Yu; Inui, Mariko; Fukui, Kensuke; Yonemoto, Hiroko; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The utilization of copra meal as a feed ingredient is limited because it contains a high level of mannan. However, recent findings indicate that the effect of copra meal on growth performance in broiler chickens can be improved by the supplementation of mannanase in the diet. In the present study, we examined the effect of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal (MCM) on growth performance and muscle protein metabolism in growing broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). Forty 8-day-old male broiler chicks were assigned to two groups (four birds in each pen, five replicates) and fed either a commercial diet (as a control diet) or a diet containing MCM at 0.2% until 22 days of age. Dietary MCM significantly increased the weights of body, breast muscle, and thighs in chickens, whereas the weights of abdominal adipose tissue and liver were not affected. Cumulative feed intake was significantly increased by MCM. Dietary MCM significantly decreased plasma 3-methylhistidine level. The messenger RNA and protein levels of muscle protein metabolism-related factors were not altered by MCM. These findings suggest that the growth-promoting effect of MCM is related to the suppression of muscle proteolysis in growing broiler chickens.

  6. Structure of Skeletal Muscle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... nerves. This is directly related to the primary function of skeletal muscle, ... an impulse from a nerve cell. Generally, an artery and at least one vein ...

  7. Autoimmune muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) present with the subacute onset of symmetric proximal muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, myopathic findings on electromyography, and autoantibodies. DM patients are distinguished by their cutaneous manifestations. Characteristic features on muscle biopsy include the invasion of nonnecrotic muscle fibers by T cells in PM, perifascicular atrophy in DM, and myofiber necrosis without prominent inflammation in IMNM. Importantly, these are regarded as autoimmune diseases and most patients respond partially, if not completely, to immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) usually present with the insidious onset of asymmetric weakness in distal muscles (e.g., wrist flexors, and distal finger flexors), often when more proximal muscle groups are relatively preserved. Although IBM muscle biopsies usually have focal invasion of myofibers by lymphocytes, the majority of IBM biopsies also include rimmed vacuoles. While most IBM patients do have autoantibodies, treatment with immunosuppressive agents does not improve their clinical course. Along with the presence of abnormally aggregated proteins on muscle biopsy, the refractory nature and relentless course of IBM suggest that the underlying pathophysiology may include a dominant myodegenerative component. This chapter will focus on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of the autoimmune myopathies and IBM. An emphasis will be placed on recent advances, indicating that these are a diverse family of diseases and that each of more than a dozen myositis autoantibodies is associated with a distinct clinical phenotype. PMID:27112692

  8. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  9. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in ... heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  10. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  11. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  12. Development of an inverse approach for the characterization of in vivo mechanical properties of the lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Bensamoun, Sabine F; Feissel, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an inverse method, coupling imaging techniques with numerical methods, to identify the muscle mechanical behavior. A finite element model updating (FEMU) was developed in three main interdependent steps. First, a 2D FE modeling, parameterized by a Neo-Hookean behavior (C10 and D), was developed from a segmented thigh muscle 1.5T MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Thus, a displacement field was simulated for different static loadings (contention, compression, and indentation). Subsequently, the optimal mechanical test was determined from a sensitivity analysis. Second, ultrasound parameters (gain, dynamic, and frequency) were optimized on the thigh muscles in order to apply the digital image correlation (DIC), allowing the measurement of an experimental displacement field. Third, an inverse method was developed to identify the Neo-Hookean parameters (C10 and D) by performing a minimization of the distance between the simulated and measured displacement fields. To replace the experimental data and to quantify the identification error, a numerical example was developed. The result of the sensitivity analysis showed that the compression test was more adapted to identify the Neo-Hookean parameters. Ultrasound images were recorded with a frequency, gain, and dynamic of 9 MHz, 34 dB, 42 dB, respectively. In addition, the experimental noise on displacement field measurement was estimated to be 0.2 mm. The identification performed on the numerical example revealed a low error for the C10 (<3%) and D (<7%) parameters with the experimental noise. This methodology could have an impact in the scientific and medical fields. A better knowledge of the muscle behavior will help to follow treatment and to ensure accurate medical procedures during the use of robotic devices. PMID:25188787

  13. Development of an inverse approach for the characterization of in vivo mechanical properties of the lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Bensamoun, Sabine F; Feissel, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an inverse method, coupling imaging techniques with numerical methods, to identify the muscle mechanical behavior. A finite element model updating (FEMU) was developed in three main interdependent steps. First, a 2D FE modeling, parameterized by a Neo-Hookean behavior (C10 and D), was developed from a segmented thigh muscle 1.5T MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Thus, a displacement field was simulated for different static loadings (contention, compression, and indentation). Subsequently, the optimal mechanical test was determined from a sensitivity analysis. Second, ultrasound parameters (gain, dynamic, and frequency) were optimized on the thigh muscles in order to apply the digital image correlation (DIC), allowing the measurement of an experimental displacement field. Third, an inverse method was developed to identify the Neo-Hookean parameters (C10 and D) by performing a minimization of the distance between the simulated and measured displacement fields. To replace the experimental data and to quantify the identification error, a numerical example was developed. The result of the sensitivity analysis showed that the compression test was more adapted to identify the Neo-Hookean parameters. Ultrasound images were recorded with a frequency, gain, and dynamic of 9 MHz, 34 dB, 42 dB, respectively. In addition, the experimental noise on displacement field measurement was estimated to be 0.2 mm. The identification performed on the numerical example revealed a low error for the C10 (<3%) and D (<7%) parameters with the experimental noise. This methodology could have an impact in the scientific and medical fields. A better knowledge of the muscle behavior will help to follow treatment and to ensure accurate medical procedures during the use of robotic devices.

  14. A Six-week Low-level Laser Therapy Protocol is Effective for Reducing Waist, Hip, Thigh, and Upper Abdomen Circumference

    PubMed Central

    Thaxton, Paul M.; Hornfeldt, Carl S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The efficacy of low-level laser therapy for noninvasive body contouring has been previously demonstrated in clinical trials leading to its market clearance. Subjects achieved these beneficial effects following three weekly low-level laser therapy treatments for two weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if the same aesthetic benefit can be achieved following one weekly low-level laser therapy treatment for six weeks. Setting: Two private dermatology practices. Participants: Healthy adults with a body mass index of 25 to 40kg/m2 (N=54). Measurements: Subjects underwent one weekly low-level laser therapy procedure for six consecutive weeks using a device consisting of six 17mW, 635nm red diodes. Waist, hip, thigh, and upper abdomen circumference were measured weekly. Study success criteria was a 4.5-inch mean decrease in combined body circumference. Results: The mean decrease in combined circumference reduction at six weeks was 5.4 inches (p<0.001), and most subjects (72.2%) achieved a ≥4.5-inch decrease. Most subjects (81.0%) were Satisfied (27%) or Very Satisfied (54%) with the aesthetic results they achieved. There were no adverse events. Conclusion: One weekly low-level laser therapy treatment for six weeks is clinically effective for reducing waist, hip, thigh, and upper abdomen circumference and may be more effective than the previous two-week treatment protocol. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02109107. PMID:27386049

  15. Monitoring Murine Skeletal Muscle Function for Muscle Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The primary function of skeletal muscle is to generate force. Muscle force production is compromised in various forms of acquired and/or inherited muscle diseases. An important goal of muscle gene therapy is to recover muscle strength. Genetically engineered mice and spontaneous mouse mutants are readily available for preclinical muscle gene therapy studies. In this chapter, we outlined the methods commonly used for measuring murine skeletal muscle function. These include ex vivo and in situ analysis of the contractile profile of a single intact limb muscle (the extensor digitorium longus for ex vivo assay and the tibialis anterior muscle for in situ assay), grip force analysis, and downhill treadmill exercise. Force measurement in a single muscle is extremely useful for pilot testing of new gene therapy protocols by local gene transfer. Grip force and treadmill assessments offer body-wide evaluation following systemic muscle gene therapy. PMID:21194022

  16. Strength Training Induces Muscle Hypertrophy and Functional Gains in Black Prostate Cancer Patients Despite Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Ben F.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with weakness, fatigue, sarcopenia, and reduced quality of life (QoL). Black men have a higher incidence and mortality from PCa than Caucasians. We hypothesized that despite ADT, strength training (ST) would increase muscle power and size, thereby improving body composition, physical function, fatigue levels, and QoL in older black men with PCa. Methods. Muscle mass, power, strength, endurance, physical function, fatigue perception, and QoL were measured in 17 black men with PCa on ADT before and after 12 weeks of ST. Within-group differences were determined using t tests and regression models. Results. ST significantly increased total body muscle mass (2.7%), thigh muscle volume (6.4%), power (17%), and strength (28%). There were significant increases in functional performance (20%), muscle endurance (110%), and QoL scores (7%) and decreases in fatigue perception (38%). Improved muscle function was associated with higher functional performance (R 2 = 0.54) and lower fatigue perception (R 2 = 0.37), and both were associated with improved QoL (R 2 = 0.45), whereas fatigue perception tended to be associated with muscle endurance (R 2 = 0.37). Conclusions. ST elicits muscle hypertrophy even in the absence of testosterone and is effective in counteracting the adverse functional consequences of ADT in older black men with PCa. These improvements are associated with reduced fatigue perception, enhanced physical performance, and improved QoL. Thus, ST may be a safe and well-tolerated therapy to prevent the loss of muscle mass, strength, and power commonly observed during ADT. PMID:23089339

  17. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  18. Relationship Between Sprint Performance of Front Crawl Swimming and Muscle Fascicle Length in Young Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Nasirzade, Alireza; Ehsanbakhsh, Alireza; Ilbeygi, Saeed; Sobhkhiz, Azadeh; Argavani, Hamed; Aliakbari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between 25-m sprint front crawl swimming performance and muscle fascicle length in young male swimmers. 23 swimmers were selected and divided into two groups according to their best records of 25-m sprint performance: 14.6-15.7 sec (S1, n = 11) and 15.8-17 sec (S2, n = 12). Muscle thickness and pennation angle of Biceps Brachii (BB; only muscle thickness), Triceps Brachii (TB), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM) and Lateralis (GL) muscles were measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and fascicle length was estimated. Although, there was no significant differences between groups in anthropometrical parameter as standing height, body mass, arm length, thigh length and leg length (p < 0.001), however, S1 significantly had a greater muscle thickness in VL, GL, and TB muscles (p < 0.05). Pennation angle only in TB was significantly smaller in S1 (p < 0.05). S1 in VL, GL, and TB muscles significantly had greater absolute fascicle length and in VL and TB muscles had relatively (relative to limb length) greater fascicle length (p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant relationship between sprint swimming time and absolute and relative fascicle length in VL (absolute: r = -0.49 and relative: r = -0.43, both p < 0.05) and GL (absolute: r = -0.47 and relative: r = -0.42, both p < 0.05). Potentially, it seems that fascicle geometry developed in muscles of faster young swimmers to help them to perform their high speed movement. Key Points This study investigated the relationship between muscle fascicle length and sprint front crawl performance in young male swimmers. It seems that young swimmers with faster front crawl sprint swimming performance trend to have smaller pennation angle and greater absolute and relative fascicle length (relative to limb length) in their locomotor muscles. Potentially, fascicle geometry developed in faster swimmers to help them to perform higher speed movement via higher

  19. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space

    PubMed Central

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  20. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space.

    PubMed

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  1. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  2. Contributory factors to the results of gravity-assisted pivot-shift test for anterior cruciate ligament injury: the significance of muscle torque around the knee.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Hisatada; Yashiki, Motohisa; Sakai, Hiroya

    2008-03-01

    Gravity-assisted pivot-shift (GAPS) test is a newly advocated test for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. It induces anterolateral rotatory instability with valgus stress to the knee applied by gravitational force during patient's active knee motion. We investigated prospectively the relationships between the results of the GAPS test and the possible contributory factors and sought to clarify the determinant factors of the GAPS test. A total of 54 knee joints of 54 patients with unilateral ACL injury (29 males, 25 females, average 23.4 +/- 9.0 years old) were enrolled in this study and were divided into two groups, i.e., positive GAPS test group and negative GAPS test group. Muscle torque around the knee joints measured before surgery, configuration of the femoral condyle and tibial posterior slope angle measured on lateral radiograph, and other clinical factors were compared between the two groups using Mann-Whitney U test or chi-square test. According to the results of these analyses, factors having a statistically significant difference were additionally evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis to reveal items with strong relevance to a positive GAPS test. The results of the multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the flexor/extensor peak torque ratio of contralateral uninjured knees and sex had a significant correlation with the results of the GAPS test. The relatively less flexor muscle torque compared with extensor muscle torque, and being a female patient were considered to be the determinant factors of a positive GAPS test.

  3. Increasing blood flow to exercising muscle attenuates systemic cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-11-15

    Reducing blood flow to working muscles during dynamic exercise causes metabolites to accumulate within the active muscles and evokes systemic pressor responses. Whether a similar cardiovascular response is elicited with normal blood flow to exercising muscles during dynamic exercise remains unknown, however. To address that issue, we tested whether cardiovascular responses are affected by increases in blood flow to active muscles. Thirteen healthy subjects performed dynamic plantarflexion exercise for 12 min at 20%, 40%, and 60% of peak workload (EX20, EX40, and EX60) with their lower thigh enclosed in a negative pressure box. Under control conditions, the box pressure was the same as the ambient air pressure. Under negative pressure conditions, beginning 3 min after the start of the exercise, the box pressure was decreased by 20, 45, and then 70 mmHg in stepwise fashion with 3-min step durations. During EX20, the negative pressure had no effect on blood flow or the cardiovascular responses measured. However, application of negative pressure increased blood flow to the exercising leg during EX40 and EX60. This increase in blood flow had no significant effect on systemic cardiovascular responses during EX40, but it markedly attenuated the pressor responses otherwise seen during EX60. These results demonstrate that during mild exercise, normal blood flow to exercising muscle is not a factor eliciting cardiovascular responses, whereas it elicits an important pressor effect during moderate exercise. This suggests blood flow to exercising muscle is a major determinant of cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise at higher than moderate intensity.

  4. Increasing blood flow to exercising muscle attenuates systemic cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-11-15

    Reducing blood flow to working muscles during dynamic exercise causes metabolites to accumulate within the active muscles and evokes systemic pressor responses. Whether a similar cardiovascular response is elicited with normal blood flow to exercising muscles during dynamic exercise remains unknown, however. To address that issue, we tested whether cardiovascular responses are affected by increases in blood flow to active muscles. Thirteen healthy subjects performed dynamic plantarflexion exercise for 12 min at 20%, 40%, and 60% of peak workload (EX20, EX40, and EX60) with their lower thigh enclosed in a negative pressure box. Under control conditions, the box pressure was the same as the ambient air pressure. Under negative pressure conditions, beginning 3 min after the start of the exercise, the box pressure was decreased by 20, 45, and then 70 mmHg in stepwise fashion with 3-min step durations. During EX20, the negative pressure had no effect on blood flow or the cardiovascular responses measured. However, application of negative pressure increased blood flow to the exercising leg during EX40 and EX60. This increase in blood flow had no significant effect on systemic cardiovascular responses during EX40, but it markedly attenuated the pressor responses otherwise seen during EX60. These results demonstrate that during mild exercise, normal blood flow to exercising muscle is not a factor eliciting cardiovascular responses, whereas it elicits an important pressor effect during moderate exercise. This suggests blood flow to exercising muscle is a major determinant of cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise at higher than moderate intensity. PMID:26377556

  5. The effect of passive movement training on angiogenic factors and capillary growth in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Høier, B; Rufener, N; Bojsen-Møller, J; Bangsbo, J; Hellsten, Y

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a period of passive movement training on angiogenic factors and capillarization in skeletal muscle was examined. Seven young males were subjected to passive training for 90 min, four times per week in a motor-driven knee extensor device that extended one knee passively at 80 cycles min−1. The other leg was used as control. Muscle biopsies were obtained from m. v. lateralis of both legs before as well as after 2 and 4 weeks of training. After the training period, passive movement and active exercise were performed with both legs, and muscle interstitial fluid was sampled from microdialysis probes in the thigh. After 2 weeks of training there was a 2-fold higher level of Ki-67 positive cells, co-localized with endothelial cells, in the passively trained leg which was paralleled by an increase in the number of capillaries around a fibre (P < 0.05). Capillary density was higher than pre-training at 4 weeks of training (P < 0.05). The training induced an increase in the mRNA level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in the passively trained leg and MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1 mRNA were elevated in both legs. Acute passive movement increased (P < 0.05) muscle interstitial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels 4- to 6-fold above rest and the proliferative effect, determined in vitro, of the muscle interstitial fluid ∼16-fold compared to perfusate. The magnitude of increase was similar for active exercise. The results demonstrate that a period of passive movement promotes endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenic factors and initiates capillarization in skeletal muscle. PMID:20693292

  6. Effect of muscle metaboreflex activation on spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Dear, William E; Waterfall, Jessica L; Fisher, James P

    2011-12-15

    We sought to determine whether the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) is a potential mechanism for the decrease in spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) during exercise in humans. In protocol 1, 15 male subjects (22 ± 1 years) performed steady-state leg cycling at low (26 ± 4 W) and moderate workloads (105 ± 7 W), under free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to evoke muscle metaboreflex activation during exercise. In protocol 2, rhythmic handgrip exercise at 35% maximum voluntary contraction was performed with progressive upper arm cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) to isolate the muscle metaboreflex. Leg cycling-induced increases in HR and mean BP were augmented by partial flow restriction (P < 0.05 vs. free flow), while HR and mean BP both remained elevated during PEI (P < 0.05 vs. rest). Leg cycling evoked an intensity-dependent decrease in cBRS (16 ± 2, 7 ± 1 and 2 ± 0.2 ms mmHg(-1) at rest, low and moderate workloads, respectively; P < 0.05), which was further reduced with partial flow restriction (by -2.6 ± 0.8 and -0.4 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) at low and moderate workloads). cBRS remained suppressed during PEI following leg cycling with partial flow restriction (4 ± 1 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 vs. rest). cBRS was unchanged during handgrip under free-flow conditions, handgrip with partial flow restriction and PEI following handgrip (P > 0.05 vs. rest). These data indicate that the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) decreases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness during leg cycling exercise in humans.

  7. Muscles of the Trunk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Trunk Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  8. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  9. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  10. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  11. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  12. Skeletal muscle ¹H MRSI before and after prolonged exercise. II. visibility of free carnitine.

    PubMed

    Boss, Andreas; Kreis, Roland; Saillen, Pierre; Zehnder, Monica; Boesch, Chris; Vermathen, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Carnitine (Car) buffers excess acetyl-CoA through the formation of acetylCar (AcCar). AcCar's acetyl group (AG-AcCar) gives rise to a peak at 2.13 ppm in ¹H MR spectra of skeletal muscle, whereas the trimethylammonium (TMA) groups of both, AcCar and Car, are thought to contribute to the TMA peak at 3.23 ppm. Surprisingly, in previous studies both resonances, AG-AcCar and TMA, increased after exercise. The aim of this study was to assess if the exercise-related TMA increase correlated with AcCar production. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (pulse repetition time/echo time = 1200/35 ms) was performed before and after prolonged exercise in the lower leg and thigh of eight runners and eight cyclists, respectively. TMA and AG-AcCar increased after exercise (P < 0.001). TMA's increase correlated with the AG-AcCar increase (R² = 0.73, P < 0.001, lower leg; R² = 0.28, P < 0.001, thigh). The correlation of ΔTMA with ΔAG-AcCar suggests that the TMA increase is due to AcCar formation. As total Car (Car + AcCar) remains unchanged with exercise, these findings suggest that the contribution of free Car to the TMA peak is limited and, therefore, is partly invisible in muscle ¹H MR spectra. This indicates that the biochemically relevant cytosolic content of free Car is considerably lower than the overall concentration determined by radioisotopic assays, a potentially important result with respect to regulation of substrate oxidation.

  13. Skeletal muscle ¹H MRSI before and after prolonged exercise. II. visibility of free carnitine.

    PubMed

    Boss, Andreas; Kreis, Roland; Saillen, Pierre; Zehnder, Monica; Boesch, Chris; Vermathen, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Carnitine (Car) buffers excess acetyl-CoA through the formation of acetylCar (AcCar). AcCar's acetyl group (AG-AcCar) gives rise to a peak at 2.13 ppm in ¹H MR spectra of skeletal muscle, whereas the trimethylammonium (TMA) groups of both, AcCar and Car, are thought to contribute to the TMA peak at 3.23 ppm. Surprisingly, in previous studies both resonances, AG-AcCar and TMA, increased after exercise. The aim of this study was to assess if the exercise-related TMA increase correlated with AcCar production. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (pulse repetition time/echo time = 1200/35 ms) was performed before and after prolonged exercise in the lower leg and thigh of eight runners and eight cyclists, respectively. TMA and AG-AcCar increased after exercise (P < 0.001). TMA's increase correlated with the AG-AcCar increase (R² = 0.73, P < 0.001, lower leg; R² = 0.28, P < 0.001, thigh). The correlation of ΔTMA with ΔAG-AcCar suggests that the TMA increase is due to AcCar formation. As total Car (Car + AcCar) remains unchanged with exercise, these findings suggest that the contribution of free Car to the TMA peak is limited and, therefore, is partly invisible in muscle ¹H MR spectra. This indicates that the biochemically relevant cytosolic content of free Car is considerably lower than the overall concentration determined by radioisotopic assays, a potentially important result with respect to regulation of substrate oxidation. PMID:22287218

  14. Case Report: Meralgia Paresthetica in a Baseball Pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yoshiyasu; Tsujino, Akihito; Kikuchi, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of meralgia paresthetica occurring in an amateur baseball pitcher who experienced inguinal pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh during pitching practice. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was pushed up by the iliac muscle to the inguinal ligament at the sharp ridge of its fascia and ensheathed in the tendinous origin of the sartorius muscle. Neurolysis of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and partial dissection of the inguinal ligament and sartorius muscle promptly relieved the symptoms and the patient resumed pitching 1 month later. These anatomic variations of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in the inguinal region might render the nerve susceptible to compression and irritation, and repetitive contraction of inguinal muscles during throwing motion might induce and exacerbate the neuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. PMID:18509710

  15. Case report: meralgia paresthetica in a baseball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Otoshi, Kenichi; Itoh, Yoshiyasu; Tsujino, Akihito; Kikuchi, Shinichi

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of meralgia paresthetica occurring in an amateur baseball pitcher who experienced inguinal pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh during pitching practice. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was pushed up by the iliac muscle to the inguinal ligament at the sharp ridge of its fascia and ensheathed in the tendinous origin of the sartorius muscle. Neurolysis of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and partial dissection of the inguinal ligament and sartorius muscle promptly relieved the symptoms and the patient resumed pitching 1 month later. These anatomic variations of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in the inguinal region might render the nerve susceptible to compression and irritation, and repetitive contraction of inguinal muscles during throwing motion might induce and exacerbate the neuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve.

  16. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  17. Posterior Thigh Flap Pedicled on the Cutaneous Vessels Arising From the Popliteo-posterior Intermediate Artery: A Report of 5 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Guang; Gong, Xu; Song, Liang-Song; Cui, Jian-Li; Yu, Xin; Liu, Bin; Lu, Lai-Jin

    2016-08-01

    Surgical repair of soft tissue defects of the knee and leg remains challenging. Using a case study approach, the anatomy of the popliteo-posterior intermediate cutaneous artery was examined, and a reverse island flap method was developed and implemented. After obtaining informed consent, 5 patients (1 woman, 4 men, age range 31 to 57 years) underwent the experimental use of a reverse island flap with a posterior thigh flap pedicled on the cutaneous vessels arising from the popliteo-posterior intermediate artery to repair soft-tissue defects of the knee and leg. The defects were caused by burned skin below the knee (n = 1), progressive skin necrosis in the knee after fracture surgery (n = 2), and skin infections associated with diabetes mellitus (n = 2). Skin defect sizes ranged from 15 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 12 cm. These large defects did not heal spontaneously; wound duration ranged from 1 week to 1 year, and all patients had refused defect repair with free flaps. Patients received posterior thigh flaps pedicled on the popliteo-posterior intermediate artery with areas ranging from 17 cm x 6 cm to 25 cm x 12 cm. All patients were treated with antibiotics and local dressings (iodoform and alcohol) changed daily post surgery, and blood supply was monitored by assessing the texture and color of the flap and venous regurgitation (ie, vein drainage disturbance). Four (4) of the five flaps survived completely. In 1 patient, partial survival of the flap, which had a good blood supply despite a venous circulation disorder, occurred: in this case, complete survival was achieved after treatment with a retrograde fascial flap and skin grafting. The appearance and texture of all flaps were satisfactory (ie, patients underwent only 1 operation, healing time was approximately 2 weeks, flap quality was close to normal skin, the donor site closed directly, and the shape and function of the knee and leg recovered well). No donor site abnormality was observed, and no postsurgical

  18. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  19. OBLIQUELY STRIATED MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack

    1967-01-01

    Segments of the obliquely striated body muscle of Ascaris were fixed at minimum body length after treatment with acetylcholine and at maximum body length after treatment with piperazine citrate and then studied by light and electron microscopy. Evidence was found for two mechanisms of length change: sliding of thin filaments with respect to thick filaments such as occurs in cross-striated muscle, and shearing of thick filaments with respect to each other such that the degree of their stagger increases with extension and decreases with shortening. The shearing mechanism could account for great extensibility in this muscle and in nonstriated muscles in general and could underlie other manifestations of "plasticity" as well. In addition, it is suggested that the contractile apparatus is attached to the endomysium in such a way that the sarcomeres can act either in series, as in cross-striated muscle, or individually. Since the sarcomeres are virtually longitudinal in orientation and are almost coextensive with the muscle fiber, it would, therefore, be possible for a single sarcomere contracting independently to develop tension effectively between widely separated points on the fiber surface, thus permitting very efficient maintenance of isometric tension. PMID:6040534

  20. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  1. Comparison between several muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure in obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bellefeuille, P; Robillard, M-E; Ringuet, M-E; Aubertin-Leheudre, M; Karelis, A D

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship of several muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure in obese postmenopausal women. This was a cross-sectional study involving 72 obese postmenopausal women (age: 60.0±4.8 years; body mass index: 34.1±3.5 kg/m²). Muscle strength was determined by hand dynamometer and cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by indirect calorimetry. Muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness were expressed in absolute (kg and L/min, respectively) and in relative values (kg/body weight (BW) and kg/lean body mass (LBM) for muscle strength and ml/min/kg BW and ml/min kg LBM for cardiorespiratory fitness). Body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Anthropometric (waist and thigh circumference), physical activity energy expenditure and daily number of steps (SenseWear armband) as well as blood pressure were also assessed. Correlations of muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure showed several similarities, however, several variations were also observed. Furthermore, our results showed that age and waist circumference were the primary independent predictors for the muscle strength indices, explaining 22-37% of the variance and % body fat and age were the primary predictors for the cardiorespiratory fitness indices, explaining 18-40% of the variance. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the different methods of expressing muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness may display several variations and similarities with body composition and energy expenditure associations. Therefore, interpretations of relationships between muscle strength and cardiorespiratory indices with body composition and energy expenditure factors should take in account the method used to express them.

  2. Individual variation and intraclass correlation in arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in chicken muscle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chicken meat with reduced concentration of arachidonic acid (AA) and reduced ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids has potential health benefits because a reduction in AA intake dampens prostanoid signaling, and the proportion between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids is too high in our diet. Analyses for fatty acid determination are expensive, and finding the optimal number of analyses to give reliable results is a challenge. The objective of the present study was i) to analyse the intraclass correlation of different fatty acids in five meat samples, of one gram each, within the same chicken thigh, and ii) to study individual variations in the concentrations of a range of fatty acids and the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations among fifteen chickens. Fifteen newly hatched broilers were fed a wheat-based diet containing 4% rapeseed oil and 1% linseed oil for three weeks. Five muscle samples from the mid location of the thigh of each chicken were analysed for fatty acid composition. The intraclass correlation (sample correlation within the same animal) was 0.85-0.98 for the ratios of total omega-6 to total omega-3 fatty acids and of AA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). This indicates that when studying these fatty acid ratios, one sample of one gram per animal is sufficient. However, due to the high individual variation between chicken for these ratios, a relatively high number of animals (minimum 15) are required to obtain a sufficiently high power to reveal significant effects of experimental factors (e.g. feeding regimes). The present experiment resulted in meat with a favorable concentration ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. The AA concentration varied from 1.5 to 2.8 g/100 g total fatty acids in thigh muscle in the fifteen broilers, and the ratio between AA and EPA concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 3.9. These differences among the birds may be due to genetic variance that can be exploited by breeding for lower AA

  3. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  4. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Herpesvirus Exposure in Mediterranean Tortoises (Spur-Thighed Tortoise [Testudo graeca] and Hermann's Tortoise [Testudo hermanni])†

    PubMed Central

    Origgi, F. C.; Klein, P. A.; Mathes, K.; Blahak, S.; Marschang, R. E.; Tucker, S. J.; Jacobson, E. R.

    2001-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of antibodies to a herpesvirus associated with an upper respiratory tract disease in Mediterranean tortoises [spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) and Hermann's tortoise (Testudo hermanni)]. This serodiagnostic test was validated through a hyperimmunization study. The mean of the A405 readings of the plasma samples collected at time zero of the hyperimmunization study plus three times the standard deviation was used as the cutoff for seropositivity in tortoises. ELISA results were compared to serum neutralization (SN) values for the same samples by using the McNemar test. The results obtained by SN and ELISA were not significantly different (P > 0.05). This new ELISA could be used as an important diagnostic tool for screening wild populations and private and zoo collections of Mediterranean tortoises. PMID:11526144

  5. A child with a long-standing, intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on a thigh: an uncommon (?) reaction to commonly used vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bergfors, Elisabet; Lundmark, Katarzyna; Nyström Kronander, Ulla

    2013-01-24

    A 2-year-old girl presented with an intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on the front of a thigh. The nodule persisted for 10 months until it was excised. Subsequent investigation for malignancy and systemic disease showed no pathological findings. The diagnosis, persistent itching vaccination granuloma, was revealed by hazard almost 2 years after the onset of symptoms. Persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium containing vaccines (mostly diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis combination vaccines for primary immunisation of infants) may appear with a long delay after the vaccination (months), cause prolonged itching (years) and are often associated with contact allergy to aluminium. The condition is poorly recognised in Health Care which may lead to prolonged symptoms and unnecessary investigations.

  6. [Fasciocutaneous flap of the posterior surface of the thigh with distal pedicle. Anatomical study and surgical value. A propos of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Lambert, F; Cariou, J L; Couturaud, B; Bellavoir, A

    1996-04-01

    In the light of previous studies, the authors conducted an anatomical study on 21 cadaveric dissections with injection in order to define the characteristics of the distally based fasciocutaneous flap of the posterior surface of the thigh, described for the first time in 1988 by Maruyama. This leaf-shaped flap extends from the popliteal region to the gluteal sulcus. It possesses an axial arterial network derived from the popliteal artery, reinforced by the perforating arteries derived from the vessel or the profunda femoris artery. The venous return is ensured by venae comitantes and the communicating saphenous vein. The flap raising technique is described. From 1991 to 1994, 3 patients were operated in order to cover a defect of the knee (1 case) and amputation stumps (2 cases). The postoperative course was uneventful and the results were considered to be stable and of excellent quality with a follow-up of 2 to 4 years.

  7. Illicit Transport via Dipeptide Transporter Dpp is Irrelevant to the Efficacy of Negamycin in Mouse Thigh Models of Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Bezdenejnih-Snyder, Natascha; Farrington, Krista; Guo, Jian; McLaughlin, Robert E; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Singh, Renu; Basarab, Gregory S; Narayan, Sridhar; Buurman, Ed T

    2015-05-01

    Negamycin is a hydrophilic antimicrobial translation inhibitor that crosses the lipophilic inner membrane of Escherichia coli via at least two transport routes to reach its intracellular target. In a minimal salts medium, negamycin's peptidic nature allows illicit entry via a high-affinity route by hijacking the Dpp dipeptide transporter. Transport via a second, low-affinity route is energetically driven by the membrane potential, seemingly without the direct involvement of a transport protein. In mouse thigh models of E. coli infection, no evidence for Dpp-mediated transport of negamycin was found. The implication is that for the design of new negamycin-based analogs, the physicochemical properties required for cell entry via the low-affinity route need to be retained to achieve clinical success in the treatment of infectious diseases. Furthermore, clinical resistance to such analogs due to mutations affecting their ribosomal target or transport is expected to be rare and similar to that of aminoglycosides. PMID:27622650

  8. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol.

  9. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  10. Activity of Colistin in Combination with Meropenem, Tigecycline, Fosfomycin, Fusidic Acid, Rifampin or Sulbactam against Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a Murine Thigh-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiumei; Cong, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Few effective therapeutic options are available for treating severe infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB). Using a murine thigh-infection model, we examined the in vivo efficacy of colistin in combination with meropenem, tigecycline, fosfomycin, fusidic acid, rifampin, or sulbactam against 12 XDR-AB strains. Colistin, tigecycline, rifampin, and sulbactam monotherapy significantly decreased bacterial counts in murine thigh infections compared with those observed in control mice receiving no treatment. Colistin was the most effective agent tested, displaying bactericidal activity against 91.7% of strains at 48 h post-treatment. With strains showing a relatively low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for meropenem (MIC ≤ 32 mg/L), combination therapy with colistin plus meropenem caused synergistic inhibition at both 24 h and 48 h post-treatment. However, when the meropenem MIC was ≥64 mg/L, meropenem did not significantly alter the efficacy of colistin. The addition of rifampin and fusidic acid significantly improved the efficacy of colistin, showing a synergistic effect in 100% and 58.3% of strains after 24 h of treatment, respectively, while the addition of tigecycline, fosfomycin, or sulbactam did not show obvious synergistic activity. No clear differences in activities were observed between colistin-rifampin and colistin-fusidic acid combination therapy with most strains. Overall, our in vivo study showed that administering colistin in combination with rifampin or fusidic acid is more efficacious in treating XDR-AB infections than other combinations. The colistin-meropenem combination may be another appropriate option if the MIC is ≤32 mg/L. Further clinical studies are urgently needed to confirm the relevance of these findings. PMID:27315107

  11. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  12. Non-surgically-induced disuse muscle atrophy and neuromuscular dysfunction upregulates alpha7 acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammed A. S.; Sahani, Nita; Neville, Kevin A.; Nagashima, Michio; Lee, Sangseok; Tomoki Sasakawa Masao, Kaneki; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra

    2014-01-01

    Previous models of disuse have invariably used surgical methods require repetitive plaster casts applications. A method of disuse atrophy that does not require repetitive application is described. A modified plastic pipette tubing was applied to one hindlimb from thigh to foot resulting in immobilization of knee in extension and ankle in plantar flexion position. This method resulted in loss of soleus muscle mass to 11, 22, 39, and 45% at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively, in association with a significant decrease of tibialis twitch (25%) and tetanic tensions (26%) at 21 days, compared to contralateral side and/or sham immobilized controls. Immunohistochemical analysis of soleus using fluorescent α-bungarotoxin revealed a significant increase in the number of synapses per unit area (818+31 vs 433+16/mm2) and increase in muscle fibers per unit area (117 vs 83/mm2) most likely related to atrophy of muscle fibers bringing synapses closer. A three fold increase in alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (α7AChR) protein expression along with increased expression of α1AChR subunit on immobilized vs contralateral side was observed. The physiology and pharmacology of the novel finding of upregulation of α7AChRs with disuse requires further study. PMID:24383867

  13. Muscle wasting in cancer.

    PubMed

    Johns, N; Stephens, N A; Fearon, K C H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle loss appears to be the most significant clinical event in cancer cachexia and is associated with a poor outcome. With regard to such muscle loss, despite extensive study in a range of models, there is ongoing debate as to whether a reduction in protein synthesis, an increase in degradation or a combination of both is the more relevant. Each model differs in terms of key mediators and the pathways activated in skeletal muscle. Certain models do suggest that decreased synthesis accompanied by enhanced protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) is important. Murine models tend to involve rapid development of cachexia and may represent more acute muscle atrophy rather than the chronic wasting observed in humans. There is a paucity of human data both at a basic descriptive level and at a molecular/mechanism level. Progress in treating the human form of cancer cachexia can only move forwards through carefully designed large randomised controlled clinical trials of specific therapies with validated biomarkers of relevance to underlying mechanisms. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  14. Muscle Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delos, Demetris; Maak, Travis G.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Muscle injuries are extremely common in athletes and often produce pain, dysfunction, and the inability to return to practice or competition. Appropriate diagnosis and management can optimize recovery and minimize time to return to play. Evidence Acquisition: Contemporary papers, both basic science and clinical medicine, that investigate muscle healing were reviewed. A Medline/PubMed search inclusive of years 1948 to 2012 was performed. Results: Diagnosis can usually be made according to history and physical examination for most injuries. Although data are limited, initial conservative management emphasizing the RICE principles and immobilization of the extremity for several days for higher grade injuries are typically all that is required. Injection of corticosteroids may clinically enhance function after an acute muscle strain. Additional adjunctive treatments (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, platelet-rich plasma, and others) to enhance muscle healing and limit scar formation show promise but need additional data to better define their roles. Conclusion: Conservative treatment recommendations will typically lead to successful outcomes after a muscle injury. There is limited evidence to support most adjunctive treatments. PMID:24459552

  15. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  16. Muscle morphological and strength adaptations to endurance vs. resistance training.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Kjølhede, Tue; Sørensen, Henrik; Dalgas, Ulrik; Møller, Andreas B; Vestergaard, Poul F; Ringgaard, Steffen; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Vissing, Kristian

    2012-02-01

    Fascicle angle (FA) is suggested to increase as a result of fiber hypertrophy and furthermore to serve as the explanatory link in the discrepancy in the relative adaptations in the anatomical cross-sectional area (CSA) and fiber CSA after resistance training (RT). In contrast to RT, the effects of endurance training on FA are unclear. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate and compare the longitudinal effects of either progressive endurance training (END, n = 7) or RT (n = 7) in young untrained men on FA, anatomical CSA, and fiber CSA. Muscle morphological measures included the assessment of vastus lateralis FA obtained by ultrasonography and anatomical CSA by magnetic resonance imaging of the thigh and fiber CSA deduced from histochemical analyses of biopsy samples from m. vastus lateralis. Functional performance measures included VO2max and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The RT produced increases in FA by 23 ± 8% (p < 0.01), anatomical CSA of the knee extensor muscles by 9 ± 3% (p = 0.001), and fiber CSA by 19 ± 7% (p < 0.05). RT increased knee extensor MVC by 20 ± 5% (p < 0.001). END increased VO2max by 10 ± 2% but did not evoke changes in FA, anatomical CSA, or in fiber CSA. In conclusion, the morphological changes induced by 10 weeks of RT support that FA does indeed serve as the explanatory link in the observed discrepancy between the changes in anatomical and fiber CSA. Contrarily, 10 weeks of endurance training did not induce changes in FA, but the lack of morphological changes from END indirectly support the fact that fiber hypertrophy and FA are interrelated.

  17. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume. PMID:27653488

  18. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume.

  19. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  20. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on muscle oxygenation responses to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Kraemer, William J; Hatfield, Disa L; Vingren, Jakob L; Fragala, Maren S; Ho, Jen-Yu; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Häkkinen, Keijo; Volek, Jeff S

    2008-07-01

    Previous research has shown that L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation beneficially affects markers of hypoxic stress following resistance exercise. However, the mechanism of this response is unclear. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to determine the effects of LCLT supplementation on muscle tissue oxygenation during and after multiple sets of squat exercise. Nine healthy, previously resistance-trained men (25.2 +/- 6.years, 91.2 +/- 10.2 kg, 180.2 +/- 6.3 cm) ingested 2 g.d of LCLT or an identical placebo for 23 days in a randomized, balanced, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures study design. On day 21, forearm muscle oxygenation was measured during and after an upper arm occlusion protocol using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which measures the balance of oxygen delivery in relation to oxygen consumption. On day 22, subjects performed 5 sets of 15 to 20 repetitions of squat exercise with corresponding measures of thigh muscle oxygenation, via NIRS, and serial blood draws. Compared to the placebo trial, muscle oxygenation was reduced in the LCLT trial during upper arm occlusion and following each set of resistance exercise. Despite reduced oxygenation, plasma malondealdehyde, a marker of membrane damage, was attenuated during the LCLT trial. There were no differences between trials in the vasoactive substance prostacyclin. In conclusion, because oxygen delivery was occluded during the forearm protocol, it is proposed that enhanced oxygen consumption mediated the reduced muscle oxygenation during the LCLT trial. Enhanced oxygen consumption would explain why hypoxic stress was attenuated with LCLT supplementation.

  2. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Anna; Eich-Greatorex, Susanne; Bernhoft, Aksel; Wold, Jens P; Hetland, Harald; Christophersen, Olav A; Sogn, Trine

    2007-01-01

    Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form) per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle). The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5), DPA (22:5) and DHA (22:6), thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form) may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle. PMID:17967172

  3. Reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness by a novel curcumin delivery system (Meriva®): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) due to eccentric muscle activity is associated with inflammatory responses and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that sustain both inflammation and oxidative stress. Curcumin, a powerful promoter of anti-oxidant response, is one of the best-investigated natural products, and is now commercially available as a lecithin delivery system (Meriva®, Indena SpA, Milan) with improved bio-availability. The aim of this study was to test whether curcumin could attenuate damage from oxidative stress and inflammation related to acute muscle injury induced by eccentric continuous exercise Methods This was a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind pilot trial. Twenty male healthy, moderately active volunteers were randomised to curcumin given as the Phytosome® delivery system 1 g twice daily (200 mg curcumin b.i.d.) or matching placebo. Supplementation was initiated 48 hours prior to a downhill running test and was continued for 24 hours after the test (4 days in total). Muscle damage was quantified by magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory tests and histological analyses on muscle samples obtained 48 hours after the test. Patient-reported pain intensity was also recorded. Results Subjects in the curcumin group reported less pain in the lower limb as compared with subjects in the placebo group, although significant differences were observed only for the right and left anterior thighs. Significantly fewer subjects in the curcumin group had MRI evidence of muscle injury in the posterior or medial compartment of both thighs. Increases in markers of muscle damage and inflammation tended to be lower in the curcumin group, but significant differences were only observed for interleukin-8 at 2 h after exercise. No differences in markers of oxidative stress and muscle histology were observed Conclusions Curcumin has the potential for preventing DOMS, as suggested by its effects on pain intensity and muscle injury

  4. Decreased muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) expression in regenerating muscle after muscle-damaging exercise.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Ono, Yusuke; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Itoi, Eiji

    2008-10-01

    A muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase, Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFbx), is known to mediate the degradation of muscle-specific transcription factor MyoD in vitro. Its regulation in regenerating skeletal muscle, however, has not been clarified. We looked for evidence of MAFbx downregulation in the course of regeneration after muscle damaging exercise. The soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of mice were subjected to forced eccentric contraction by electrical stimulation to induce muscle damage. The expression of developmental myosin heavy chain (MHCd) suggested that muscle regeneration took place from Day 3 after exercise. mRNA and protein expression of MAFbx decreased on Days 3, 5, and 7, while MyoD protein increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Although further study is required to establish the causal relationships, downregulation of MAFbx may have reduced MyoD degradation in favor of muscle regeneration.

  5. Effects of caffeine on muscle glycogen utilization and the neuroendocrine axis during exercise.

    PubMed

    Laurent, D; Schneider, K E; Prusaczyk, W K; Franklin, C; Vogel, S M; Krssak, M; Petersen, K F; Goforth, H W; Shulman, G I

    2000-06-01

    To examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle glycogen utilization and the neuroendocrine axis during exercise, we studied 20 muscle glycogen-loaded subjects who were given placebo or caffeine (6 mg/kg) in a double blinded fashion 90 min before cycling for 2 h at 65% of their maximal oxygen consumption. Exercise-induced glycogen depletion in the thigh muscle was noninvasively measured by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) spectroscopy, and plasma concentrations of substrates and neuroendocrine hormones, including beta-endorphins, were also assessed. Muscle glycogen content was increased 140% above normal values on the caffeine trial day (P < 0.001). After cycling for 2 h, caffeine ingestion was associated with a greater increase in plasma lactate (caffeine: +1.0 +/- 0.2 mmol/L; placebo, +0.1 +/- 0.2 mmol/L; P < 0.005), epinephrine (caffeine, +223 +/- 82 pg/mL; placebo, +56 +/- 26 pg/mL; P < 0.05), and cortisol (caffeine, +12 +/- 3 mg/mL; placebo, +2 +/- 2 mg/mL; P < 0.001) levels. However, plasma free fatty acid concentrations increased (caffeine, +814 +/- 133 mmol/L; placebo, +78