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Sample records for anthracnose disease caused

  1. Chilli anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species.

    PubMed

    Than, Po Po; Prihastuti, Haryudian; Phoulivong, Sitthisack; Taylor, Paul W J; Hyde, Kevin D

    2008-10-01

    Anthracnose disease is one of the major economic constraints to chilli production worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Accurate taxonomic information is necessary for effective disease control management. In the Colletotrichum patho-system, different Colletotrichum species can be associated with anthracnose of the same host. Little information is known concerning the interactions of the species associated with the chilli anthracnose although several Colletotrichum species have been reported as causal agents of chilli anthracnose disease worldwide. The ambiguous taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species has resulted in inaccurate identification which may cause practical problems in plant breeding and disease management. Although the management and control of anthracnose disease are still being extensively researched, commercial cultivars of Capsicum annuum that are resistant to the pathogens that cause chilli anthracnose have not yet been developed. This paper reviews the causal agents of chilli anthracnose, the disease cycle, conventional methods in identification of the pathogen and molecular approaches that have been used for the identification of Colletotrichum species. Pathogenetic variation and population structure of the causal agents of chilli anthracnose along with the current taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species are discussed. Future developments leading to the disease management strategies are suggested.

  2. Chilli anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species§

    PubMed Central

    Than, Po Po; Prihastuti, Haryudian; Phoulivong, Sitthisack; Taylor, Paul W.J.; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Anthracnose disease is one of the major economic constraints to chilli production worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Accurate taxonomic information is necessary for effective disease control management. In the Colletotrichum patho-system, different Colletotrichum species can be associated with anthracnose of the same host. Little information is known concerning the interactions of the species associated with the chilli anthracnose although several Colletotrichum species have been reported as causal agents of chilli anthracnose disease worldwide. The ambiguous taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species has resulted in inaccurate identification which may cause practical problems in plant breeding and disease management. Although the management and control of anthracnose disease are still being extensively researched, commercial cultivars of Capsicum annuum that are resistant to the pathogens that cause chilli anthracnose have not yet been developed. This paper reviews the causal agents of chilli anthracnose, the disease cycle, conventional methods in identification of the pathogen and molecular approaches that have been used for the identification of Colletotrichum species. Pathogenetic variation and population structure of the causal agents of chilli anthracnose along with the current taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species are discussed. Future developments leading to the disease management strategies are suggested. PMID:18837103

  3. Spot Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on Tulip Tree in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okryun; Choi, Okhee; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Kim, Jinwoo; Kwon, Jin-Hyeuk

    2012-03-01

    The tulip tree (Liriodendron chinense) has been widely cultivated in Korea as a street or garden tree for its large flowers, which have a superficial resemblance to tulips. Occurrence of anthracnose disease on the leaves of tulip trees growing on the campus of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Korea, has been observed. Based on mycological characteristics, pathogenicity, and internal transcribed spacer sequence, the causal fungus was identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. This is the first report on anthracnose disease caused by C. gloeosporioides on tulip trees in Korea.

  4. Anthracnose disease of switchgrass caused by the novel fungal species Colletotrichum navitas.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Jo Anne; Beirn, Lisa A; Cortese, Laura M; Bonos, Stacy A; Clarke, Bruce B

    2009-12-01

    In recent years perennial grasses such as the native tallgrass prairie plant Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) have taken on a new role in the North American landscape as a plant-based source of renewable energy. Because switchgrass is a native plant, it has been suggested that disease problems will be minimal, but little research in this area has been conducted. Recently, outbreaks of switchgrass anthracnose disease have been reported from the northeastern United States. Incidences of switchgrass anthracnose are known in North America since 1886 through herbarium specimens and disease reports, but the causal agent of this disease has never been experimentally determined or taxonomically evaluated. In the present work, we evaluate the causal agent of switchgrass anthracnose, a new species we describe as Colletotrichum navitas (navitas=Latin for energy). Multilocus molecular phylogenetics and morphological characters show C. navitas is a novel species in the falcate-spored graminicolous group of the genus Colletotrichum; it is most closely related to the corn anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola. We present a formal description and illustrations for C. navitas and provide experimental confirmation that this organism is responsible for switchgrass anthracnose disease.

  5. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Chinese Mallow Caused by Colletotrichum malvarum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-06-01

    Anthracnose symptoms were frequently observed on leaves, petioles, and stems of Chinese mallow grown in Namyangju, Korea, during a disease survey performed in November, 2007. The disease incidence was as high as 30% in the 12 greenhouses investigated. A total of 38 isolates of the Colletotrichum species were obtained from the anthracnose symptoms, and all the isolates were identified as Colletotrichum malvarum based on their morphological and culture characteristics. Three isolates of the fungus caused anthracnose symptoms on leaves and stems following artificial inoculation, which were similar to those observed during the greenhouse survey. In this study, mycological and pathological characteristics of C. malvarum identified as causing anthracnose of Chinese mallow were clarified.

  6. First report of Colletotrichum nigrum causing anthracnose disease on tomato fruit in New Jersey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose fruit rot is one of the most serious diseases affecting the production of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in the United States and is typically incited by Colletotrichum coccodes, C. gloeosporioides or C. dematium (Farr and Rossman 2016). During the summer of 2013, symptoms characteris...

  7. Characterization of a Colletotrichum population causing anthracnose disease on Olive in northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chattaoui, M; Raya, M C; Bouri, M; Moral, J; Perez-Rodriguez, M; Trapero, A; Msallem, M; Rhouma, A

    2016-05-01

    To phenotypically, physiologically and molecularly characterize the causal agent of olive anthracnose in the northern Tunisia and to study its genetic variability and pathogenicity. A total of 43 isolates were obtained from symptomatic olives collected from four regions in northern Tunisia. A range of morphological and physiological characteristics was recorded; and a phylogenetic study, based on the sequence analysis of both internal transcribed spacers and TUB2 gene regions, was performed. Of the 43 isolates, 41 were identified as Colletotrichum acutatum s.s, and only two were affiliated to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides s.s. Two more representative Spanish isolates, included for comparison, were identified as Colletotrichum godetiae. Using six inter-simple-sequence-repeat markers, homogeneity between isolates from different locations and within the same species was recorded. In pathogenicity and virulence studies, C. gloeosporioides s.s was found to be less virulent, while the Spanish C. godetiae isolate was significantly more virulent than the Tunisian C. acutatum s.s. Olive anthracnose in the North of Tunisia is mainly caused by C. acutatum s.s species. This is the first study of olive anthracnose in Tunisia, which combines both phenotypic and molecular approaches. Colletotrichum acutatum s.s group was recorded for the first time in the country as the causal agent of olive anthracnose. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Unraveling evolutionary relationships among the divergent lineages of colletotrichum causing anthracnose disease in turfgrass and corn.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Jo Anne; Clarke, Bruce B; Hillman, Bradley I

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colletotrichum species cause anthracnose diseases on a number of grass hosts and are common inhabitants of many others. They are divided into four species: C. sublineolum is pathogenic to Sorghum spp.; C. caudatum is found on C4 grasses such as indiangrass and big bluestem; C. falcatum causes red rot of sugarcane; and C. graminicola sensu lato is a broadly defined species including isolates that attack maize, wheat, oats, and many forage, turf, and amenity grasses of the subfamily Pooideae. In this paper, a combination of hierarchal- and nonhierarchal-based analyses were employed to examine evolutionary relationships among the grass-infecting Colletotrichum species, with special emphasis on isolates from turf and other grasses in the subfamily Pooideae. Reconstructions performed with data sets from over 100 Colletotrichum isolates at three variable loci using phylogenetic and network-based methodologies unambiguously supported the taxonomic separation of maize-infecting isolates of C. graminicola from the pooid-infecting strains of Colletotrichum. To reflect the evolutionary relationships that exist between these distinct lineages, we propose the resurrection of the species name C. cereale to describe the pooid-infecting isolates. There was also support for further subdivision of C. cereale, but the current data are insufficient to confidently subdivide the species, as there was some evidence of recombination between lineages of this species.

  9. Anthracnose disease of centipedegrass turf caused by Colletotrichum eremochloae, a new fungal species closely related to Colletotrichum sublineola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Colletotrichum is a cosmopolitan anamorphic fungal genus responsible for anthracnose disease in hundreds of plant species worldwide, including members of the grass family Poaceae. Anthracnose disease of the widely planted, non-native, warm-season lawn grass, Eremochloa ophiuroides (centipedegrass),...

  10. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Welsh Onion Caused by Colletotrichum circinans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-12-01

    Anthracnose occurred frequently on leaf sheaths of Welsh onions grown in Gangwha island, Korea in November, 2007. The disease incidence was as high as 30% in five fields investigated. A total of 20 single spore isolates of Colletotrichum species were obtained from the affected plants, and all the isolates were identified as Colletotrichum circinans based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Three isolates of the fungus caused anthracnose symptoms on the leaf sheaths of Welsh onions by artificial inoculation, which were similar to those observed during the field survey. In this study, the mycological and pathological characteristics of C. circinans identified as causing anthracnose of Welsh onions are clarified.

  11. Anthracnose Diseases of Eastern Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Frederick H. Berry

    1985-01-01

    Anthracnose diseases of hardwood trees are widespread throughout the Eastern United States. The most common symptom of these diseases is dead areas or blotches on the leaves. Because of the brown and black, scorched appearance of the leaves, the diseases are sometimes called leaf blight.

  12. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Chinese Mallow Caused by Colletotrichum malvarum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-01-01

    Anthracnose symptoms were frequently observed on leaves, petioles, and stems of Chinese mallow grown in Namyangju, Korea, during a disease survey performed in November, 2007. The disease incidence was as high as 30% in the 12 greenhouses investigated. A total of 38 isolates of the Colletotrichum species were obtained from the anthracnose symptoms, and all the isolates were identified as Colletotrichum malvarum based on their morphological and culture characteristics. Three isolates of the fungus caused anthracnose symptoms on leaves and stems following artificial inoculation, which were similar to those observed during the greenhouse survey. In this study, mycological and pathological characteristics of C. malvarum identified as causing anthracnose of Chinese mallow were clarified. PMID:23990748

  13. Mummified fruit as a source of inoculum and disease dynamics of olive anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum spp.

    PubMed

    Moral, Juan; Trapero, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is a destructive disease of olive fruit worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of agronomical and weather factors on inoculum production using detached olive fruit and on the development of epidemics in the field. The pathogen produced very large numbers of conidia on rotted (>1.87 × 10(8) conidia/fruit) or mummified (>2.16 × 10(4) conidia/fruit) fruit under optimal conditions. On mummified fruit, conidial production was highest on mummies incubated at 20 to 25°C and 96 h of wetness. Repeated washings of mummies reduced conidial production until it was very low after five washings. When mummies were placed in the tree canopy, conidial production was not reduced after 6 months (May to October); but, when they were held on the soil or buried in the soil, conidial production comparatively decreased up to 10,000 times. Anthracnose epidemics on susceptible 'Hojiblanca' and 'Picudo' during three seasons (2005-08) were influenced by rainfall, temperature, and fruit ripening, and had three main phases: the latent period (May to October); the onset of the epidemic, which coincided with the beginning of fruit ripening (early November); and disease development, which was predicted by the Weibull model (November to March). No epidemics developed on the susceptible cultivars during the driest season (2007-08) or on the resistant 'Picual' olive during any of the three seasons. These results provide the basis for a forecasting system of olive anthracnose which could greatly improve the management of this disease.

  14. First report of Colletotrichum chlorophyti causing soybean anthracnose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose of soybean is caused by several Colletotrichum species. Petiole samples were collected from Alabama, Illinois, and Mississippi. Diseased tissues suspected of being caused by Colletotrichum species were cut into 1-2 cm in lengths, surface-disinfested, and placed on water agar. Pure cultur...

  15. Phyllosticta musarum Infection-Induced Defences Suppress Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum musae in Banana Fruits cv ‘Embul’

    PubMed Central

    Abayasekara, C. L.; Adikaram, N. K. B.; Wanigasekara, U. W. N. P.; Bandara, B. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracnose development by Colletotrichum musae was observed to be significantly less in the fruits of the banana cultivar ‘Embul’ (Mysore, AAB) infected with Phyllosticta musarum than in fruits without such infections. Anthracnose disease originates from quiescent C. musae infections in the immature fruit. P. musarum incites minute, scattered spots, referred to as freckles, in the superficial tissues of immature banana peel which do not expand during maturation or ripening. P. musarum does not appear to have a direct suppressive effect on C. musae as conidia of C. musae germinate on both freckled and non-freckled fruit forming quiescent infections. Our investigations have shown that P. musarum infection induced several defence responses in fruit including the accumulation of five phytoalexins, upregulation of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity and cell wall lignification. 1H and 13C NMR spectral data of one purified phytoalexin compared closely with 4′-hydroxyanigorufone. Some of the P. musarum-induced defences that retained during ripening, restrict C. musae development at the ripe stage. This paper examines the potential of P. musarum-induced defences, in the control of anthracnose, the most destructive postharvest disease in banana. PMID:25288931

  16. Phyllosticta musarum Infection-Induced Defences Suppress Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum musae in Banana Fruits cv 'Embul'.

    PubMed

    Abayasekara, C L; Adikaram, N K B; Wanigasekara, U W N P; Bandara, B M R

    2013-03-01

    Anthracnose development by Colletotrichum musae was observed to be significantly less in the fruits of the banana cultivar 'Embul' (Mysore, AAB) infected with Phyllosticta musarum than in fruits without such infections. Anthracnose disease originates from quiescent C. musae infections in the immature fruit. P. musarum incites minute, scattered spots, referred to as freckles, in the superficial tissues of immature banana peel which do not expand during maturation or ripening. P. musarum does not appear to have a direct suppressive effect on C. musae as conidia of C. musae germinate on both freckled and non-freckled fruit forming quiescent infections. Our investigations have shown that P. musarum infection induced several defence responses in fruit including the accumulation of five phytoalexins, upregulation of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity and cell wall lignification. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data of one purified phytoalexin compared closely with 4'-hydroxyanigorufone. Some of the P. musarum-induced defences that retained during ripening, restrict C. musae development at the ripe stage. This paper examines the potential of P. musarum-induced defences, in the control of anthracnose, the most destructive postharvest disease in banana.

  17. Colletotrichum incanum sp. nov., a curved-conidial species causing soybean anthracnose in USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean anthracnose is caused by a number of species of Colletotrichum that as a group represent an important disease that results in significant economic losses. In the present study, Colletotrichum species were isolated from soybean petioles and stems with anthracnose symptoms from soybean fields ...

  18. Anthracnose disease of centipedegrass turf caused by Colletotrichum eremochloae, a new fungal species closely related to Colletotrichum sublineola.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Jo Anne; Tomaso-Peterson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Colletotrichum is a cosmopolitan, anamorphic fungal genus responsible for anthracnose disease in hundreds of plant species worldwide, including members of the Poaceae. Anthracnose disease of the widely planted, non-native, warm-season lawn grass, Eremochloae ophiuroides (centipedegrass), is commonly encountered in the southern United States, but the causal agent has never been identified. We use DNA sequence data from modern cultures and archival fungarium specimens in this study to determine the identity of the fungus responsible for centipedegrass anthracnose disease and provide experimental confirmation of pathogenicity. C. eremochloae sp. nov., a pathogen of centipedegrass, is proposed based on phylogenetic evidence from four sequence markers (Apn2, Apn2/ Mat1, Sod2, ITS). C. eremochloae isolates from centipedegrass shared common morphology and phenotype with C. sublineola, a destructive pathogen of cultivated sorghum and Johnsongrass weeds (Sorghum halepense, S. vulgaris). Molecular phylogenetic analysis identified C. eremochloae and C. sublineola as closely related sister taxa, but genealogical concordance supported their distinction as unique phylogenetic species. Fixed nucleotide differences between C. eremochloae and C. sublineola were observed from collections of these fungi spanning 105 y, including the 1904 lectotype specimen of C. sublineola. C. eremochloae was identified from a fungarium specimen of centipedegrass intercepted at a USA port from a 1923 Chinese shipment; the multilocus sequence from this specimen was identical to modern samples of the fungus. Thus, it appears that the fungus might have migrated to the USA around the same time that centipedegrass first was introduced to the USA in 1916 from China, where the grass is indigenous. The new species C. eremochloae is described and illustrated, along with a description and discussion of C. sublineola based on the lectotype and newly designated epitype.

  19. Apple anthracnose canker life cycle and disease cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple anthracnose [caused by Neofabraea malicorticis (H.S. Jacks) anamorph Cryptosporiopsis curvispora (Peck)] is a fungal disease that impacts apple production. The pathogen produces cankers on trees as well as a rot on the fruit known as ‘Bull’s-eye rot’. The cankers cause severe damage to trees...

  20. Screening strawberry plants for anthracnose disease resistance using traditional and molecular techniques

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose is one of the most destructive diseases of strawberry which may cause fruit rot, leaf and petiole lesions, crown rot, wilt, and death. Crop loss due to anthracnose diseases can reach into the millions of dollars. Three species of Colletotrichum are considered causative agents of anthr...

  1. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Highbush Blueberry Caused by Colletotrichum Species in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Kee; Choi, Hyo Won; Lee, Young Kee

    2009-01-01

    A total of 82 isolates of Colletotrichum species were obtained from anthracnose symptoms of highbush blueberry trees grown in the Gochang area of Korea during a disease survey in 2008. Out of the isolates, 75 were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and the others as C. acutatum based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Twenty six of C. gloeosporioides isolates produced their teleomorph Glomerella cingulata in PDA culture. Three isolates of each C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum caused anthracnose symptoms on the leaves by artificial inoculation, which were similar to what was observed in the orchards. Previously in Korea, only C. gloeosporioides has been reported as causing anthracnose in blueberries. This is the first report that C. acutatum causes anthracnose in the highbush blueberry in Korea. PMID:23983555

  2. Occurrence of anthracnose on highbush blueberry caused by colletotrichum species in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Hong, Sung Kee; Choi, Hyo Won; Lee, Young Kee

    2009-12-01

    A total of 82 isolates of Colletotrichum species were obtained from anthracnose symptoms of highbush blueberry trees grown in the Gochang area of Korea during a disease survey in 2008. Out of the isolates, 75 were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and the others as C. acutatum based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Twenty six of C. gloeosporioides isolates produced their teleomorph Glomerella cingulata in PDA culture. Three isolates of each C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum caused anthracnose symptoms on the leaves by artificial inoculation, which were similar to what was observed in the orchards. Previously in Korea, only C. gloeosporioides has been reported as causing anthracnose in blueberries. This is the first report that C. acutatum causes anthracnose in the highbush blueberry in Korea.

  3. Walnut Anthracnose

    Treesearch

    Frederick H. Berry

    1981-01-01

    Walnut anthracnose, or leaf blotch as it is sometimes called, is a wide-spread and destructive disease of walnut (Juglans) species, particularly the eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.). It is caused by a fungus, Gnomonia leptostyla (Fr.) Ces. and de N., the imperfect stage of which is Marssonia juglandis (Lib.) Magn. The disease may quickly become epidemic during...

  4. Sorghum pathology and biotechnology - A fungal disease perspective: Part II. Anthracnose, stalk rot, and downy mildew

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foliar diseases and stalk rots are among the most damaging diseases of sorghum in terms of lost production potential, thus commanding considerable research time and expenditure. This review will focus on anthracnose, a fungal disease that causes both foliar symptoms and stalk rots along with the st...

  5. The effects of rust and anthracnose on the photosynthetic competence of diseased bean leaves.

    PubMed

    Lopes, D B; Berger, R D

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of rust (caused by Uromyces appendiculatus) and anthracnose (caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and their interaction on the photosynthetic rates of healthy and diseased bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) leaves were determined by gas-exchange analysis, in plants with each disease, grown under controlled conditions. The equation P(x)/P(0) = (1 - x)() was used to relate relative photosynthetic rate (P(x)/P(0)) to proportional disease severity (x), where beta represents the ratio between virtual and visual lesion. The beta values obtained for rust were near one, indicating that the effect of the pathogen on the remaining green leaf area was minimal. The high values of beta obtained for anthracnose (8.46 and 12.18) indicated that the photosynthesis in the green area beyond the necrotic symptoms of anthracnose was severely impaired. The impact of anthracnose on bean leaf photosynthesis should be considered in assessments of the proportion of healthy tissue in diseased leaves. The accurate assessment of the healthy portion of the leaf could improve the use of concepts such as healthy leaf area duration and healthy leaf area absorption, which are valuable predictors of crop yield. The equation used to analyze the interaction between rust and anthracnose on the same leaf was P(z) = P(0) (1 - x)(x) x (1 - y)(y), where P(z) is the relative photosynthetic rate of any given leaf, P(0) is the maximum relative photosynthetic rate, x is anthracnose severity, y is rust severity, betax is the beta value for anthracnose in the presence of rust, and betay is the beta value for rust in the presence of anthracnose. From the resulting response surface, no interaction of the two diseases was observed. Dark respiration rate increased on diseased leaves compared with control leaves. The remaining green leaf area of leaves with both diseases was not a good source to estimate net photosynthetic rate because the effect of anthracnose extended far beyond the visual lesions

  6. Genome Sequence and Annotation of Colletotrichum higginsianum, a Causal Agent of Crucifer Anthracnose Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zampounis, Antonios; Pigné, Sandrine; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Wittenberg, Alexander H. J.; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an ascomycete fungus causing anthracnose disease on numerous cultivated plants in the family Brassicaceae, as well as the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We report an assembly of the nuclear genome and gene annotation of this pathogen, which was obtained using a combination of PacBio long-read sequencing and optical mapping. PMID:27540062

  7. Genome Sequence and Annotation of Colletotrichum higginsianum, a Causal Agent of Crucifer Anthracnose Disease.

    PubMed

    Zampounis, Antonios; Pigné, Sandrine; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Wittenberg, Alexander H J; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David C; Thon, Michael R; O'Connell, Richard J

    2016-08-18

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an ascomycete fungus causing anthracnose disease on numerous cultivated plants in the family Brassicaceae, as well as the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana We report an assembly of the nuclear genome and gene annotation of this pathogen, which was obtained using a combination of PacBio long-read sequencing and optical mapping. Copyright © 2016 Zampounis et al.

  8. Management of apple anthracnose canker

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple anthracnose (caused by Neofabraea malicorticis anamorph Cryptosporiopsis curvispora) is a fungal disease that causes cankers on trees and ‘Bull’s-eye rot’ on fruit. In western Washington, it is the canker phase of apple anthracnose that is considered most serious as it can result in death of ...

  9. Occurrence of Anthracnose on Fruits of Asian Pear Tree Caused by Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Hong, Sung Kee; Park, Yeong Seob

    2007-12-01

    Anthracnose symptoms often occurred on fruits of Asian pear trees grown in Anseong, Naju, Seonghwan and Pyeongtaek in Korea during the harvesting period from 2000 to 2005. A total of 28 isolates of Colletotrichum sp. were obtained from the anthracnose symptoms. All the isolates were identified as Colletotrichum acutatum based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Four isolates of the fungus were tested for pathogenicity to fruits of Asian pear tree by artificial inoculation. All the isolates induced anthracnose symptoms on the fruits by wound inoculation but not by unwound inoculation. The anthracnose symptoms induced by artificial inoculation were similar to those observed in the orchard. This is the first report of anthracnose of Asian pear tree caused by Colletotrichum acutatum.

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity in protein hydrolysates from normal and anthracnose disease-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris seeds.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Álvarez, Alan Javier; Carrasco-Castilla, Janet; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque-Peña, Javier; Jacinto-Hernández, Carmen; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian

    2013-03-15

    Bean seeds are an inexpensive source of protein. Anthracnose disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum results in serious losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crops worldwide, affecting any above-ground plant part, and protein dysfunction, inducing the synthesis of proteins that allow plants to improve their stress tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of beans damaged by anthracnose disease as a source of peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-inhibitory activity. Protein concentrates from beans spoiled by anthracnose disease and from regular beans as controls were prepared by alkaline extraction and precipitation at isolelectric pH and hydrolysed using Alcalase 2.4 L. The hydrolysates from spoiled beans had ACE-I-inhibitory activity (IC(50) 0.0191 mg protein mL(-1)) and were very similar to those from control beans in terms of ACE-I inhibition, peptide electrophoretic profile and kinetics of hydrolysis. Thus preparation of hydrolysates using beans affected by anthracnose disease would allow for revalorisation of this otherwise wasted product. The present results suggest the use of spoiled bean seeds, e.g. anthracnose-damaged beans, as an alternative for the isolation of ACE-I-inhibitory peptides to be further introduced as active ingredients in functional foods. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Foliar Application of Extract from an Azalomycin-Producing Streptomyces malaysiensis Strain MJM1968 Suppresses Yam Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam Palaniyandi, Sasikumar; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Woh

    2016-06-28

    Yam anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C.g) is the most devastating disease of yam (Dioscorea sp.). In the present study, we evaluated the culture filtrate extract (CFE) of azalomycin-producing Streptomyces malaysiensis strain MJM1968 for the control of yam anthracnose. MJM1968 showed strong antagonistic activity against C.g in vitro. Furthermore, the MJM1968 CFE was tested for inhibition of spore germination in C.g, where it completely inhibited spore germination at a concentration of 50 μg/ml. To assess the in planta efficacy of the CFE and spores of MJM1968 against C.g, a detached leaf bioassay was conducted, which showed both the treatments suppressed anthracnose development on detached yam leaves. Furthermore, a greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the CFE from MJM1968 as a fungicide for the control of yam anthracnose. The CFE non-treated plants showed a disease severity of >92% after 90 days of artificial inoculation with C.g, whereas the disease severity of CFE-treated and benomyl-treated yam plants was reduced to 26% and 15%, respectively, after 90 days. Analysis of the yam tubers from the CFE-treated and non-treated groups showed that tubers from the CFE-treated plants were larger than that of non-treated plants, which produced abnormal smaller tubers typical of anthracnose. This study demonstrated the utility of the CFE from S. malaysiensis strain MJM1968 as a biofungicide for the control of yam anthracnose.

  12. Dogwood anthracnose: how collaboration was used in the Southern United States to effectively deal with a new tree disease

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Anderson

    1998-01-01

    Dogwood anthracnose, caused by the fungus Discula destructiva was found in the Southern United States in 1987. Since that time millions of flowering dogwoods have been killed and disfigured by this disease. As soon as the disease was discovered a group of state and federal personnel formed a working group to develop an action plan for dealing with...

  13. Diverse Colletotrichum species cause anthracnose of tea plants (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Hao, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Lu; Bin Xiao; Wang, Xin-Chao; Yang, Ya-Jun

    2016-10-26

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum is one of the most severe diseases that can afflict Camellia sinensis. However, research on the diversity and geographical distribution of Colletotrichum in China remain limited. In this study, 106 Colletotrichum isolates were collected from diseased leaves of Ca. sinensis cultivated in the 15 main tea production provinces in China. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis coupled with morphological identification showed that the collected isolates belonged to 11 species, including 6 known species (C. camelliae, C. cliviae, C. fioriniae, C. fructicola, C. karstii, and C. siamense), 3 new record species (C. aenigma, C. endophytica, and C. truncatum), 1 novel species (C. wuxiense), and 1 indistinguishable strain, herein described as Colletotrichum sp. Of these species, C. camelliae and C. fructicola were the dominant species causing anthracnose in Ca. sinensis. In addition, our study provided further evidence that phylogenetic analysis using a combination of ApMat and GS sequences can be used to effectively resolve the taxonomic relationships within the C. gloeosporioides species complex. Finally, pathogenicity tests suggested that C. camelliae, C. aenigma, and C. endophytica are more invasive than other species after the inoculation of the leaves of Ca. sinensis.

  14. Diverse Colletotrichum species cause anthracnose of tea plants (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Hao, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Lu; Bin Xiao; Wang, Xin-Chao; Yang, Ya-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum is one of the most severe diseases that can afflict Camellia sinensis. However, research on the diversity and geographical distribution of Colletotrichum in China remain limited. In this study, 106 Colletotrichum isolates were collected from diseased leaves of Ca. sinensis cultivated in the 15 main tea production provinces in China. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis coupled with morphological identification showed that the collected isolates belonged to 11 species, including 6 known species (C. camelliae, C. cliviae, C. fioriniae, C. fructicola, C. karstii, and C. siamense), 3 new record species (C. aenigma, C. endophytica, and C. truncatum), 1 novel species (C. wuxiense), and 1 indistinguishable strain, herein described as Colletotrichum sp. Of these species, C. camelliae and C. fructicola were the dominant species causing anthracnose in Ca. sinensis. In addition, our study provided further evidence that phylogenetic analysis using a combination of ApMat and GS sequences can be used to effectively resolve the taxonomic relationships within the C. gloeosporioides species complex. Finally, pathogenicity tests suggested that C. camelliae, C. aenigma, and C. endophytica are more invasive than other species after the inoculation of the leaves of Ca. sinensis. PMID:27782129

  15. Effect of temperature, wetness duration, and planting density on olive anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum spp.

    PubMed

    Moral, Juan; Jurado-Bello, José; Sánchez, M Isabel; de Oliveira, Rodrígues; Trapero, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    The influence of temperature, wetness duration, and planting density on infection of olive fruit by Colletotrichum acutatum and C. simmondsii was examined in laboratory and field experiments. Detached olive fruit of 'Arbequina', 'Hojiblanca', and 'Picual' were inoculated with conidia of several isolates of the pathogen and kept at constant temperatures of 5 to 35°C in humid chambers. Similarly, potted plants and stem cuttings with fruit were inoculated and subjected to wetness periods of 0 to 48 h. Infection occurred at 10 to 25°C, and disease severity was greater and the mean latent period was shorter at 17 to 20°C. Overall, C. acutatum was more virulent than C. simmondsii at temperatures <25°C. When temperature was not a limiting factor, disease severity increased with the wetness period from 0 to 48 h. Disease severity was modeled as a function of temperature and wetness duration; two critical fruit incidence thresholds were defined as 5 and 20%, with wetness durations of 1.0 and 12.2 h at the optimum temperature. In the field, anthracnose epidemics progressed faster in a super-high-density planting (1,904 olive trees/ha) than in the high-density plantings (204 to 816 olive trees/ha) and caused severe epidemics in the super-high-density planting even with the moderately resistant Arbequina. Data in this study will be useful for the development of a forecasting system for olive anthracnose epidemics.

  16. Colletotrichum incanum sp. nov., a curved-conidial species causing soybean anthracnose in USA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ching; Haudenshield, James S; Hartman, Glen L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean anthracnose is caused by a number of species of Colletotrichum that as a group represent an important disease that results in significant economic losses. In the current study, Colletotrichum species were isolated from soybean petioles and stems with anthracnose symptoms from soybean fields in Illinois. Multigene sequence phylogenic analysis, combining rDNA internal transcribed spacer, actin, β-tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and histone H3 gene regions, revealed a group of isolates collected in this study to be distinct from other established Colletotrichum species. This new group was phylogenetically closer to C. liriopes, C. tofieldiae and C. verruculosum than to C. truncatum, another species with curved conidia commonly found on soybean. A representative isolate from this new group was used to examine its morphology, cultural characteristics and pathogenicity to soybean; it was found to differ from C. truncatum in colony culture characteristics and sizes of conidia and appressoria. As a result of the molecular phylogenetic, morphological and pathogenicity analyses, we named this species Colletotrichum incanum. Of the 84 Colletotrichum isolates collected from soybean petioles, 40 were C. incanum, indicating that this species may commonly occur.

  17. The potential of a fluorescent-based approach for bioassay of antifungal agents against chili anthracnose disease in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chutrakul, Chanikul; Khaokhajorn, Pratoomporn; Auncharoen, Patchanee; Boonruengprapa, Tanapong; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-01-01

    Severe chili anthracnose disease in Thailand is caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. capsici. To discover anti-anthracnose substances we developed an efficient dual-fluorescent labeling bioassay based on a microdilution approach. Indicator strains used in the assay were constructed by integrating synthetic green fluorescent protein (sGFP) and Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRedExp) genes into the genomes of C. gloeosporioides or C. capsici respectively. Survival of co-spore cultures in the presence of inhibitors was determined by the expression levels of these fluorescent proteins. This developed assay has high potential for utilization in the investigation of selective inhibition activity to either one of the pathogens as well as the broad-range inhibitory effect against both pathogens. The value of using the dual-fluorescent assay is rapid, reliable, and consistent identification of anti-anthracnose agents. Most of all, the assay enables the identification of specific inhibitors under the co-cultivation condition.

  18. Screening for anthracnose disease resistance in strawberry using a detached leaf assay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide a rapid, non-destructive method of identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. The reliability and validity of assessing disease severity is critical to disease management decisions. We inoculated detached strawberr...

  19. Effect of Fungicides and Plant Extracts on the Conidial Germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Causing Mango Anthracnose

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaj, Ahmed; Rahman, Syed Ajijur; Alam, Shahidul; Parvin, Rehana; Farhana, Khandaker Mursheda; Kim, Sang-Beom

    2005-01-01

    In Northern Bangladesh, generally mango trees are planted as agroforest that gives higher Net Present Value (NPV) than traditional agriculture. Mango anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. is seen as a very destructive and widely distributed disease, which results in poor market value. Five fungicides such as Cupravit, Bavistin, Dithane M-45, Thiovit and Redomil were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Dithane M-45 and Redomil were the most effective when the conidia were immersed for 10~20 minutes at 500~1000 ppm concentrations. Antifungal activities of 13 plant extracts were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides was completely inhibited in Curcuma longa (leaf and rhizome), Tagetes erecta (leaf) and Zingiber officinales (rhizome) after 15 minutes of incubation respectively. PMID:24049501

  20. First report of race 2 of Colletotrichum trifolii causing anthracnose on alfalfa (Medicago sativa) in Wisconsin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), caused by Colletotrichum trifolii, is widespread in the United States. Three physiological races have been described. Race 1 is reported to be the dominant race that is present wherever alfalfa is grown, while race 2 was reported in a limited area in the Mid...

  1. First Report of Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum fioriniae on Chinese Matrimony Vine in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Oo, May Moe; Tweneboah, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    A fungus, Colletotrichum fioriniae, was isolated for the first time from fruits of Chinese matrimony vine (Lycium chinense Mill.) in Korea. It was classified as C. fioriniae based on the morphological characteristics and nucleotide sequence of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and β-tubulin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. fioriniae causing anthracnose of Chinese matrimony vine in Korea. PMID:28154492

  2. First Report of Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum fioriniae on Chinese Matrimony Vine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oo, May Moe; Tweneboah, Solomon; Oh, Sang-Keun

    2016-12-01

    A fungus, Colletotrichum fioriniae, was isolated for the first time from fruits of Chinese matrimony vine (Lycium chinense Mill.) in Korea. It was classified as C. fioriniae based on the morphological characteristics and nucleotide sequence of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and β-tubulin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. fioriniae causing anthracnose of Chinese matrimony vine in Korea.

  3. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Colletotrichum species associated with anthracnose disease in peppers from Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangling; Tang, Guiting; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Li, Ying; Sun, Xiaofang; Qi, Xiaobo; Zhou, You; Xu, Jing; Chen, Huabao; Chang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Sirong; Gong, Guoshu

    2016-09-09

    The anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species is an important disease that primarily causes fruit rot in pepper. Eighty-eight strains representing seven species of Colletotrichum were obtained from rotten pepper fruits in Sichuan Province, China, and characterized according to morphology and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) sequence. Fifty-two strains were chosen for identification by phylogenetic analyses of multi-locus sequences, including the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the β-tubulin (TUB2), actin (ACT), calmodulin (CAL) and GAPDH genes. Based on the combined datasets, the 88 strains were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, C. siamense, C. fructicola, C. truncatum, C. scovillei, and C. brevisporum, and one new species was detected, described as Colletotrichum sichuanensis. Notably, C. siamense and C. scovillei were recorded for the first time as the causes of anthracnose in peppers in China. In addition, with the exception of C. truncatum, this is the first report of all of the other Colletotrichum species studied in pepper from Sichuan. The fungal species were all non-host-specific, as the isolates were able to infect not only Capsicum spp. but also Pyrus pyrifolia in pathogenicity tests. These findings suggest that the fungal species associated with anthracnose in pepper may inoculate other hosts as initial inoculum.

  4. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Colletotrichum species associated with anthracnose disease in peppers from Sichuan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangling; Tang, Guiting; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Li, Ying; Sun, Xiaofang; Qi, Xiaobo; Zhou, You; Xu, Jing; Chen, Huabao; Chang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Sirong; Gong, Guoshu

    2016-01-01

    The anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species is an important disease that primarily causes fruit rot in pepper. Eighty-eight strains representing seven species of Colletotrichum were obtained from rotten pepper fruits in Sichuan Province, China, and characterized according to morphology and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) sequence. Fifty-two strains were chosen for identification by phylogenetic analyses of multi-locus sequences, including the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the β-tubulin (TUB2), actin (ACT), calmodulin (CAL) and GAPDH genes. Based on the combined datasets, the 88 strains were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, C. siamense, C. fructicola, C. truncatum, C. scovillei, and C. brevisporum, and one new species was detected, described as Colletotrichum sichuanensis. Notably, C. siamense and C. scovillei were recorded for the first time as the causes of anthracnose in peppers in China. In addition, with the exception of C. truncatum, this is the first report of all of the other Colletotrichum species studied in pepper from Sichuan. The fungal species were all non-host-specific, as the isolates were able to infect not only Capsicum spp. but also Pyrus pyrifolia in pathogenicity tests. These findings suggest that the fungal species associated with anthracnose in pepper may inoculate other hosts as initial inoculum. PMID:27609555

  5. Screening strawberry (Fragria x ananassa) germplasm for anthracnose disease resistance using traditional techniques and molecular makers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose of strawberry may be caused by any of three Colletotrichum species: C. acutatum, C. gloeosporioides or C. fragariae. These destructive pathogens may infect the fruit, leaves, petioles, crowns or roots and may cause plant death. Traditional and molecular approaches were used to identify a...

  6. Identification of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soils with inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum spp., the causative agent of anthracnose disease.

    PubMed

    Intra, Bungonsiri; Mungsuntisuk, Isada; Nihira, Takuya; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2011-04-01

    Colletotrichum is one of the most widespread and important genus of plant pathogenic fungi worldwide. Various species of Colletotrichum are the causative agents of anthracnose disease in plants, which is a severe problem to agricultural crops particularly in Thailand. These phytopathogens are usually controlled using chemicals; however, the use of these agents can lead to environmental pollution. Potential non-chemical control strategies for anthracnose disease include the use of bacteria capable of producing anti-fungal compounds such as actinomycetes spp., that comprise a large group of filamentous, Gram positive bacteria from soil. The aim of this study was to isolate actinomycetes capable of inhibiting the growth of Colletotrichum spp, and to analyze the diversity of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soil. A total of 304 actinomycetes were isolated and tested for their inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides strains DoA d0762 and DoA c1060 and Colletotrichum capsici strain DoA c1511 which cause anthracnose disease as well as the non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain IFO 10217. Most isolates (222 out of 304, 73.0%) were active against at least one indicator fungus or yeast. Fifty four (17.8%) were active against three anthracnose fungi and 17 (5.6%) could inhibit the growth of all three fungi and S. cerevisiae used in the test. Detailed analysis on 30 selected isolates from an orchard at Chanthaburi using the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that most of the isolates (87%) belong to the genus Streptomyces sp., while one each belongs to Saccharopolyspora (strain SB-2) and Nocardiopsis (strain CM-2) and two to Nocardia (strains BP-3 and LK-1). Strains LC-1, LC-4, JF-1, SC-1 and MG-1 exerted high inhibitory activity against all three anthracnose fungi and yeast. In addition, the organic solvent extracts prepared from these five strains inhibited conidial growth of the three indicator fungi. Preliminary analysis of crude

  7. Diagnosis of centipedegrass anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum eremochloae sp. nov.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides) is a medium-textured, stoloniferous warm-season turfgrass used as home lawn and utility turf. It is well-adapted to a wide range of soil conditions but grows best in sandy, acidic soils of low fertility and can withstand some shade. Diseases arise when centip...

  8. Identification of the Fungal Pathogen that Causes Strawberry Anthracnose in Bangladesh and Evaluation of In Vitro Fungicide Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Md. Shamim; Alam, Shahidul; Islam, Md. Shafiqul

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose disease of strawberry in Balgladesh and to evaluate in vitro activity of commercial fungicides it. Based on morphological and cultural characteristics, all 22 isolates were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. They developed white or glittery colonies with grey to dark grey reverse colony colors and they produced cylindrical conidia. The efficacy of five commercial fungicides, Bavistin DF, Dithane M-45, Sulcox 50 WP, Corzim 50 WP and Rovral 50 WP, were tested against the fungus. Bavistin inhibited radial growth completely and was followed in efficacy by Dithane M-45. In Bavistin DF treated media, the fungus did not produce conidia. The percent inhibition of radial growth of the fungus was increased with the increasing concentrations of fungicide. PMID:23983513

  9. Anthracnose of lucky bamboo Dracaena sanderiana caused by the fungus Colletotrichum dracaenophilum in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Elshahawy, Ibrahim E

    2016-05-01

    Dracaena sanderiana, of the family Liliaceae, is among the ornamental plants most frequently imported into Egypt. Typical anthracnose symptoms were observed on the stems of imported D. sanderiana samples. The pathogen was isolated, demonstrated to be pathogenic based on Koch's rule and identified as Colletotrichum dracaenophilum. The optimum temperature for its growth ranges from 25 to 30 °C, maintained for 8 days. Kemazed 50% wettable powder (WP) was the most effective fungicide against the pathogen, as no fungal growth was observed over 100 ppm. The biocontrol agents Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride followed by Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus caused the highest reduction in fungal growth. To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first time that this pathogen was observed on D. sanderiana in Egypt.

  10. Anthracnose of lucky bamboo Dracaena sanderiana caused by the fungus Colletotrichum dracaenophilum in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Ahmed A.; Elshahawy, Ibrahim E.

    2016-01-01

    Dracaena sanderiana, of the family Liliaceae, is among the ornamental plants most frequently imported into Egypt. Typical anthracnose symptoms were observed on the stems of imported D. sanderiana samples. The pathogen was isolated, demonstrated to be pathogenic based on Koch’s rule and identified as Colletotrichum dracaenophilum. The optimum temperature for its growth ranges from 25 to 30 °C, maintained for 8 days. Kemazed 50% wettable powder (WP) was the most effective fungicide against the pathogen, as no fungal growth was observed over 100 ppm. The biocontrol agents Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride followed by Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus caused the highest reduction in fungal growth. To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first time that this pathogen was observed on D. sanderiana in Egypt. PMID:27222738

  11. Sequencing of an Anthracnose-resistant sorghum genotype and mapping of a major QTL reveal strong candidate genes for Anthracnose resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum Henn. ex. Sacc. and Trotter 1913, is an economically damaging disease of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] in hot and humid production regions of the world. Control of anthracnose is almost exclusively through the use of genet...

  12. Control of anthracnose disease via increased activity of defence related enzymes in 'Hass' avocado fruit treated with methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Marcin; Roets, Nico; Sivakumar, Dharini

    2017-11-01

    Development of anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. is one of the major issues within the avocado supply chain. Exposure to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and methyl salicylate (MeSA) vapours at 10 and 100µmoll(-1) was investigated as an alternative solution to commercial fungicide - prochloraz® that is currently being used by the industry. The incidence of anthracnose disease was found to be significantly reduced in 'Hass' avocado fruit treated with MeJA or MeSA vapours, especially at 100μmoll(-1). The mechanism involved enhanced activity of defence related enzymes, i.e. chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase and PAL, and higher content of epicatechin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Involvement of miR160/miR393 and their targets in cassava responses to anthracnose disease.

    PubMed

    Pinweha, Nattaya; Asvarak, Thipa; Viboonjun, Unchera; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2015-02-01

    Cassava is a starchy root crop for food and industrial applications in many countries around the world. Among the factors that affect cassava production, diseases remain the major cause of yield loss. Cassava anthracnose disease is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Severe anthracnose attacks can cause tip die-backs and stem cankers, which can affect the availability of planting materials especially in large-scale production systems. Recent studies indicate that plants over- or under-express certain microRNAs (miRNAs) to cope with various stresses. Understanding how a disease-resistant plant protects itself from pathogens should help to uncover the role of miRNAs in the plant immune system. In this study, the disease severity assay revealed different response to C. gloeosporioides infection in two cassava cultivars. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis uncovered the differential expression of the two miRNAs and their target genes in the two cassava cultivars that were subjected to fungal infection. The more resistant cultivar revealed the up-regulation of miR160 and miR393, and consequently led to low transcript levels in their targets, ARF10 and TIR1, respectively. The more susceptible cultivar exhibited the opposite pattern. The cis-regulatory elements relevant to defense and stress responsiveness, fungal elicitor responsiveness and hormonal responses were the most prevalent present in the miRNAs gene promoter regions. The possible dual role of these specific miRNAs and their target genes associated with cassava responses to C. gloeosporioides is discussed. This is the first study to address the molecular events by which miRNAs which might play a role in fungal-infected cassava. A better understanding of the functions of miRNAs target genes should greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanism underlying susceptibility and lead to new strategies to enhance disease tolerance in this economically important crop. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All

  14. Genome-wide association study of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans ...

  15. Postbloom fruit drop of citrus and key lime anthracnose are caused by distinct phylogenetic lineages of Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Peres, N A; Mackenzie, S J; Peever, T L; Timmer, L W

    2008-03-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum causes two diseases of citrus, postbloom fruit drop (PFD) and Key lime anthracnose (KLA). PFD is a disease restricted to flowers of sweet orange and most other citrus, and symptoms include petal necrosis, abscission of developing fruit, and the formation of persistent calyces. KLA is a disease of foliage, flowers, and fruits of Key lime only, and symptoms include necrotic lesions on leaves, fruits, twigs, flowers, and blight of entire shoots. The internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 and the gene encoding the 5.8S ribosomal RNA subunit within the nuclear ribosomal cluster (ITS) and intron 2 of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (G3PD) were sequenced for isolates from PFD-affected sweet orange and KLA-affected Key limes collected in the United States (Florida), Brazil (São Paulo), Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic to determine if there are consistent genetic differences between PFD and KLA isolates over the geographic area where these diseases occur. Based on the sequence data, isolates clustered into two well-supported clades with little or no sequence variation among isolates within clades. One clade (PFD clade) contained PFD isolates from all countries sampled plus a few isolates from flowers of Key lime in Brazil. The other clade (KLA clade) contained KLA isolates from Key lime foliage from all countries sampled and one isolate from flowers of sweet orange in Mexico. In greenhouse inoculations with PFD and KLA isolates from Florida, isolates from both clades produced PFD symptoms on Orlando tangelo flowers, but KLA-clade isolates produced significantly less severe symptoms. PFD-clade isolates were not pathogenic to Key lime foliage, confirming previous studies. The differentiation of PFD and KLA isolates into two well-supported clades and the pathogenicity data indicate that PFD and KLA are caused by distinct phylogenetic lineages of C. acutatum that are also biologically distinct. PFD is a recently

  16. PCR-based detection and characterization of the fungal pathogens Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum capsici causing anthracnose in papaya (Carica papaya l.) in the Yucatan peninsula.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Tussell, Raul; Quijano-Ramayo, Andres; Cortes-Velazquez, Alberto; Lappe, Patricia; Larque-Saavedra, Alfonso; Perez-Brito, Daisy

    2008-11-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is the common causal agent of anthracnose in papaya (Carica papaya L.) fruits, and infection by this fungal pathogen results in severe post-harvest losses. In the Yucatán peninsula (Mexico) a different Colletotrichum species was isolated from papaya fruits with atypical anthracnose lesions. The DNAs from a variety of Colletotrichum isolates producing typical and atypical lesions, respectively, were amplified by PCR with C.gloeosporioides-specific primers. All isolates from typical anthracnose lesions yielded a 450 bp PCR product, but DNAs from isolates with atypical lesions failed to produce an amplification product. For further characterization, the rDNA 5.8S-ITS region was amplified by PCR and processed for sequencing and RFLP analysis, respectively, to verify the identity of the papaya anthracnose pathogens. The results revealed unequivocally the existence of two Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose lesions on papaya fruits: C. gloeosporioides and C. capsici. PCR-RFLP using the restriction endonuclease MspI reliably reproduced restriction patterns specific for C. capsici or C. gloeosporioides. The generation of RFLP patterns by MspI (or AluI or RsaI) is a rapid, accurate, and unequivocal method for the detection and differentiation of these two Colletotrichum species.

  17. Anthracnose of centipedegrass turf

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose is a destructive fungal disease of centipedegrass (Eremochloae ophiuroides) turf that occurs throughout the southern United States and China. In this diagnostic guide, we provide an overview of the causal pathogen, Colletotrichum eremochloae, along with disease symptoms and signs, host ...

  18. Application of Rhizobacteria for Plant Growth Promotion Effect and Biocontrol of Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum acutatum on Pepper.

    PubMed

    Lamsal, Kabir; Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Yun Seok; Lee, Youn Su

    2012-12-01

    In vitro and greenhouse screening of seven rhizobacterial isolates, AB05, AB10, AB11, AB12, AB14, AB15 and AB17, was conducted to investigate the plant growth promoting activities and inhibition against anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum in pepper. According to identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing, the majority of the isolates are members of Bacillus and a single isolate belongs to the genus Paenibacillus. All seven bacterial isolates were capable of inhibiting C. acutatum to various degrees. The results primarily showed that antibiotic substances produced by the selected bacteria were effective and resulted in strong antifungal activity against the fungi. However, isolate AB15 was the most effective bacterial strain, with the potential to suppress more than 50% mycelial growth of C. acutatumin vitro. Moreover, antibiotics from Paenibacillus polymyxa (AB15) and volatile compounds from Bacillus subtilis (AB14) exerted efficient antagonistic activity against the pathogens in a dual culture assay. In vivo suppression activity of selected bacteria was also analyzed in a greenhouse with the reference to their prominent in vitro antagonism efficacy. Induced systemic resistance in pepper against C. acutatum was also observed under greenhouse conditions. Where, isolate AB15 was found to be the most effective bacterial strain at suppressing pepper anthracnose under greenhouse conditions. Moreover, four isolates, AB10, AB12, AB15, and AB17, were identified as the most effective growth promoting bacteria under greenhouse conditions, with AB17 inducing the greatest enhancement of pepper growth.

  19. Application of Rhizobacteria for Plant Growth Promotion Effect and Biocontrol of Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum acutatum on Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Lamsal, Kabir; Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    In vitro and greenhouse screening of seven rhizobacterial isolates, AB05, AB10, AB11, AB12, AB14, AB15 and AB17, was conducted to investigate the plant growth promoting activities and inhibition against anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum in pepper. According to identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing, the majority of the isolates are members of Bacillus and a single isolate belongs to the genus Paenibacillus. All seven bacterial isolates were capable of inhibiting C. acutatum to various degrees. The results primarily showed that antibiotic substances produced by the selected bacteria were effective and resulted in strong antifungal activity against the fungi. However, isolate AB15 was the most effective bacterial strain, with the potential to suppress more than 50% mycelial growth of C. acutatum in vitro. Moreover, antibiotics from Paenibacillus polymyxa (AB15) and volatile compounds from Bacillus subtilis (AB14) exerted efficient antagonistic activity against the pathogens in a dual culture assay. In vivo suppression activity of selected bacteria was also analyzed in a greenhouse with the reference to their prominent in vitro antagonism efficacy. Induced systemic resistance in pepper against C. acutatum was also observed under greenhouse conditions. Where, isolate AB15 was found to be the most effective bacterial strain at suppressing pepper anthracnose under greenhouse conditions. Moreover, four isolates, AB10, AB12, AB15, and AB17, were identified as the most effective growth promoting bacteria under greenhouse conditions, with AB17 inducing the greatest enhancement of pepper growth. PMID:23323049

  20. Soil Effects Mediate Interaction of Dogwood Anthracnose and Acidic Precipitation

    Treesearch

    Kerry O. Britton; Paul C. Berrang; Erika Mavity

    1998-01-01

    Dogwood anthracnose is a fungal disease caused by Discula destructiva Redlin. It was first reported in 1976 (Byther et al., 1979), and spread rapidly throughout the range of the Pacific dogwood(Cornus nuttallii Audubon) on the west coast. The disease was found in 1978 in New York, and swept through the eastern flowering dogwood (...

  1. Colletotrichum species associated with jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) anthracnose in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoping; Gao, Hong; Qi, Jianmin; Chen, Miancai; Tao, Aifen; Xu, Jiantang; Dai, Zhigang; Su, Jianguang

    2016-04-28

    Anthracnose, caused by the Colletotrichum species of fungi, is one of the most serious diseases affecting jute in China. The disease causes chlorotic regions with black brown sunken necrotic pits on the surfaces of stems. In late stages of disease, plants undergo defoliation, dieback and blight, which make anthracnose a major threat to jute fiber production and quality in China. In this study, 7 strains of Colletotrichum fungi were isolated from diseased jute stems from Zhejiang, Fujian, Guangxi, and Henan plantations in China. Multi-locus sequence (ACT, TUB2, CAL, GS, GAPDH and ITS) analysis coupled with morphological assessment revealed that C. fructicola, C. siamense and C. corchorum-capsularis sp. nov. were associated with jute anthracnose in southeastern China. C. fructicola and C. siamense were previously not associated with jute anthracnose. C. corchorum-capsularis is a new species formally described here. Pathogenicity tests confirmed that all species can infect jute, causing anthracnose, however the virulence of the 3 species differed. This report is the first associating these three species with jute disease worldwide and is the first description of the pathogens responsible for jute anthracnose in China.

  2. Colletotrichum species associated with jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) anthracnose in southeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoping; Gao, Hong; Qi, Jianmin; Chen, Miancai; Tao, Aifen; Xu, Jiantang; Dai, Zhigang; Su, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the Colletotrichum species of fungi, is one of the most serious diseases affecting jute in China. The disease causes chlorotic regions with black brown sunken necrotic pits on the surfaces of stems. In late stages of disease, plants undergo defoliation, dieback and blight, which make anthracnose a major threat to jute fiber production and quality in China. In this study, 7 strains of Colletotrichum fungi were isolated from diseased jute stems from Zhejiang, Fujian, Guangxi, and Henan plantations in China. Multi-locus sequence (ACT, TUB2, CAL, GS, GAPDH and ITS) analysis coupled with morphological assessment revealed that C. fructicola, C. siamense and C. corchorum-capsularis sp. nov. were associated with jute anthracnose in southeastern China. C. fructicola and C. siamense were previously not associated with jute anthracnose. C. corchorum-capsularis is a new species formally described here. Pathogenicity tests confirmed that all species can infect jute, causing anthracnose, however the virulence of the 3 species differed. This report is the first associating these three species with jute disease worldwide and is the first description of the pathogens responsible for jute anthracnose in China. PMID:27121760

  3. A gene with domains related to transcription regulation is required for pathogenicity in Colletotrichum acutatum causing Key lime anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Qin; Cao, Lihua; Dekkers, Katherine L; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Ko, Nan J; Timmer, L W; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2005-09-01

    SUMMARY Colletotrichum acutatum causes Key lime anthracnose (KLA) and postbloom fruit drop (PFD) of citrus. We utilized restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) mutagenesis to produce six non-pathogenic mutants from a KLA isolate after screening 1064 transformants on detached Key lime leaves. Subsequently, a gene designated KLAP1 (Key Lime Anthracnose Pathogenicity) was identified from one of the mutants and was demonstrated genetically to be required for pathogenicity to Key lime leaves. The predicted polypeptide encoded by KLAP1 contains a cAMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, and two RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) cell attachment sequences, a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence, a fungal G-protein alpha subunit signature, a putative metal-binding zinc finger (Cys(2)His(2)) and a putative HMG-I/Y ('high mobility group' non-histone chromatin protein encoding genes) DNA-binding domain (A+T hook), suggesting that KLAP1 may function as a transcription activator in C. acutatum. Sequences homologous to KLAP1 were detected in most C. acutatum isolates examined, and similarity was found in several classes of fungi, animals, plants and bacteria, indicating that KLAP1 is a putative, uncharacterized, conserved transcription activator in fungi. Targeted gene disruption of KLAP1 yielded mutants that were blocked in the penetration stage and were completely defective in pathogenicity on Key lime leaves, but remained pathogenic to flower petals. Complementation of a klap1-null mutant with a full-length KLAP1 gene clone restored complete ability to incite lesions on Key lime. The results indicate that KLAP1 is an important pathogenicity factor in C. acutatum.

  4. Species of the Colletotrichum acutatum complex associated with anthracnose diseases of fruit in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Carlos A D; Damm, Ulrike; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Massola Júnior, Nelson S; Crous, Pedro W

    2016-04-01

    Although Colletotrichum acutatum was recently investigated and shown to be a species complex comprising about 30 species, the name is still used in its broad sense for anthracnose pathogens of fruits in Brazil. In this study, a multilocus molecular analysis was carried out based on a dataset of ITS, HIS3, GAPDH, CHS-1, TUB2 and ACT sequences of Colletotrichum strains belonging to the C. acutatum species complex from fruits collected in different regions in Brazil combined with sequences of ex-type and other reference strains of species belonging to this complex. The strains were revealed to belong to Colletotrichum nymphaeae, Colletotrichum melonis, Colletotrichum abscissum and one new species, namely Colletotrichum paranaense, from apple and peach. Morphological descriptions of the new species and a strain closely related to but diverging from C. melonis are provided. From the data presently available, the most common species on apple fruits in Brazil is C. nymphaeae. In a pathogenicity test, strains of all four species caused lesions on detached apple, peach and guava fruits, except for strain CBS 134730 that did not infect guava fruits. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Colletotrichum graminicola mutant deficient in the establishment of biotrophy reveals early transcriptional events in the maize anthracnose disease interaction.

    PubMed

    Torres, Maria F; Ghaffari, Noushin; Buiate, Ester A S; Moore, Neil; Schwartz, Scott; Johnson, Charles D; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2016-03-08

    Colletotrichum graminicola is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes maize anthracnose disease. It progresses through three recognizable phases of pathogenic development in planta: melanized appressoria on the host surface prior to penetration; biotrophy, characterized by intracellular colonization of living host cells; and necrotrophy, characterized by host cell death and symptom development. A "Mixed Effects" Generalized Linear Model (GLM) was developed and applied to an existing Illumina transcriptome dataset, substantially increasing the statistical power of the analysis of C. graminicola gene expression during infection and colonization. Additionally, the in planta transcriptome of the wild-type was compared with that of a mutant strain impaired in the establishment of biotrophy, allowing detailed dissection of events occurring specifically during penetration, and during early versus late biotrophy. More than 2000 fungal genes were differentially transcribed during appressorial maturation, penetration, and colonization. Secreted proteins, secondary metabolism genes, and membrane receptors were over-represented among the differentially expressed genes, suggesting that the fungus engages in an intimate and dynamic conversation with the host, beginning prior to penetration. This communication process probably involves reception of plant signals triggering subsequent developmental progress in the fungus, as well as production of signals that induce responses in the host. Later phases of biotrophy were more similar to necrotrophy, with increased production of secreted proteases, inducers of plant cell death, hydrolases, and membrane bound transporters for the uptake and egress of potential toxins, signals, and nutrients. This approach revealed, in unprecedented detail, fungal genes specifically expressed during critical phases of host penetration and biotrophic establishment. Many encoded secreted proteins, secondary metabolism enzymes, and receptors that may

  6. Indole derivatives produced by the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum causing lime anthracnose and postbloom fruit drop of citrus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang Ren; Shilts, Turksen; Ertürk, Umran; Timmer, L W; Ueng, Peter P

    2003-09-12

    Postbloom fruit drop (PFD) of citrus and Key lime anthracnose (KLA) are caused by Colletotrichum acutatum. Both fungal isolates can infect flower petals, induce young fruit abscission and result in severe yield loss on many citrus cultivars. Previous studies revealed that infection of citrus flowers by C. acutatum caused higher levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which could be synthesized from the host plant and/or the fungal pathogen. The ability for IAA production by C. acutatum isolates was investigated. Similar to many microorganisms, the production of indole compounds in the medium by C. acutatum was dependent solely on the presence of tryptophan (Trp). In total, 14 PFD and KLA fungal isolates were tested, and revealed that they all were capable of utilizing Trp as a precursor to synthesize IAA and other indole derivatives. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis and chromogenic stains after a fluorescence thin-layer chromatography separation unambiguously identified IAA, tryptophol (TOL), indole-acetaldehyde, indole-acetamide (IAM), indole-pyruvic acid, and indole-lactic acid (ILA) from cultures supplemented with Trp. The data suggest that C. acutatum may synthesize IAA using various pathways. Interestingly, increasing Trp concentrations drastically increased the levels of TOL and ILA, but not IAA and IAM. The ability of C. acutatum to produce IAA and related indole compounds may in part contribute to the increased IAA levels in citrus flowers after infection.

  7. Differential resistances to anthracnose in Capsicum baccatum as responding to two Colletotrichum pathotypes and inoculation methods

    PubMed Central

    Mahasuk, Pitchayapa; Chinthaisong, Jittima; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-01-01

    Chili anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is one of the major diseases to chili production in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Breeding for durable anthracnose resistance requires a good understanding of the resistance mechanisms to different pathotypes and inoculation methods. This study aimed to investigate the inheritances of differential resistances as responding to two different Colletotrichum pathotypes, PCa2 and PCa3 and as by two different inoculation methods, microinjection (MI) and high pressure spray (HP). Detached ripe fruit of Capsicum baccatum ‘PBC80’ derived F2 and BC1s populations was assessed for anthracnose resistance. Two dominant genes were identified responsible for the differential resistance to anthracnose. One was responsible for the resistance to PCa2 and PCa3 by MI and the other was responsible for the resistance to PCa3 by HP. The two genes were linked with 16.7 cM distance. PMID:24273429

  8. Differential resistances to anthracnose in Capsicum baccatum as responding to two Colletotrichum pathotypes and inoculation methods.

    PubMed

    Mahasuk, Pitchayapa; Chinthaisong, Jittima; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-09-01

    Chili anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is one of the major diseases to chili production in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Breeding for durable anthracnose resistance requires a good understanding of the resistance mechanisms to different pathotypes and inoculation methods. This study aimed to investigate the inheritances of differential resistances as responding to two different Colletotrichum pathotypes, PCa2 and PCa3 and as by two different inoculation methods, microinjection (MI) and high pressure spray (HP). Detached ripe fruit of Capsicum baccatum 'PBC80' derived F2 and BC1s populations was assessed for anthracnose resistance. Two dominant genes were identified responsible for the differential resistance to anthracnose. One was responsible for the resistance to PCa2 and PCa3 by MI and the other was responsible for the resistance to PCa3 by HP. The two genes were linked with 16.7 cM distance.

  9. High-resolution mapping reveals linkage between genes in common bean cultivar Ouro Negro conferring resistance to the rust, anthracnose, and angular leaf spot diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rust, Anthracnose, and angular leaf spot are major diseases of common bean in the world and most particularly in the Americas and Africa, which are the largest common bean production regions of the world. The Mesoamerican black-seeded cultivar Ouro Negro is unusual in that it has resistance to all t...

  10. Co-segregation analysis and mapping of the anthracnose Co-10 and angular leaf spot Phg-ON disease resistance genes in common bean cultivar Ouro Negro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose (ANT) and angular leaf spot (ALS) are devastating diseases of common bean. Ouro Negro is a highly productive Mesoamerican black-seeded common bean cultivar possessing the dominant Co-10 and Phg-ON genes that confer resistance to ANT and ALS, respectively. In this study we elucidate the ...

  11. Mechanisms governing the responses to anthracnose pathogen in Juglans spp.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, P; Van der Linden, G; Belisario, A; Gras, M; Anselmi, N; Olimpieri, I; Luongo, L; Santini, A; Turco, E; Scarascia Mugnozza, G; Malvolti, M E

    2012-06-30

    Juglans nigra and Juglans regia are two highly economically important species for wood and fruit production that are susceptible to anthracnose caused by Gnomonia leptostyla. The identification of genotypes resistant to anthracnose could represent a valid alternative to agronomic and chemical management. In this study, we analyzed 72 walnut genotypes that showed a variety of resistance phenotypes in response to natural infection. According to the disease severity rating and microsatellite fingerprinting analysis, these genotypes were divided into three main groups: (40) J. nigra resistant, (1) J. nigra susceptible, and (31) J. regia susceptible. Data on leaf emergence rates and analysis of in vivo pathogenicity indicated that the incidence of anthracnose disease in the field might be partially conditioned by two key factors: the age and/or availability of susceptible leaves during the primary infection of fungus (avoidance by late flushing) and partial host resistance. NBS profiling approach, based on PCR amplification with an adapter primer for an adapter matching a restriction enzyme site and a degenerate primer targeting the conserved motifs present in the NBS domain of NBS-LRR genes, was applied. The results revealed the presence of a candidate marker that correlated to a reduction in anthracnose incidence in 72 walnut genotypes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic transformation of Colletotrichum truncatum associated with anthracnose disease of chili by random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Auyong, Adelene Shu Mei; Ford, Rebecca; Taylor, Paul William James

    2012-08-01

    An Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT) system was successfully developed for Colletotrichum truncatum, the causal agent of chili anthracnose. A. tumefaciens carrying a hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph) and a green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene was used to transform the conidiospores of two C. truncatum pathotypes F8-3B and BRIP26974. Optimum transformation efficiency was obtained when equal volumes of A. tumefaciens strain AGL1 carrying either pJF1 or pPK2 binary vector was used to transform C. truncatum conidiospores at 10(6) /ml and co-cultivated at 24 °C for three days. Southern blot analysis indicated that 87.5% of the transformants contained randomly inserted, single copies of the T-DNA. Infection and colonisation of chili fruit at the mature red stage with F8-3B-GFP and BRIP26974-GFP confirmed the maintenance of virulence within these transformed pathotypes. In situ studies of infection and colonisation of the susceptible genotype fruit using fluorescent microscopy and transformed isolates of C. truncatum expressing GFP revealed that the pathogen was able to colonise healthy fruit tissue intercellularly in an endophytic manner without producing secondary biotrophic infection structures. The developed transformation system will be used to study the function of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum using both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  13. Molecular mapping of Cg1, a gene for resistance to anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineolum) in sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum sublineolum is one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum and has been reported in most areas where the crop is grown. Several control strategies have been developed but host plant resistance has been regarded as the most effective strategy for ...

  14. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance Locus in Andean common bean Paloma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease of common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races ...

  15. Bio-photonic detection method for morphological analysis of anthracnose disease and physiological disorders of Diospyros kaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Moon, Byungin; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    The pathological and physiological defects in various types of fruits lead to large amounts of economical waste. It is well recognized that internal fruit defects due to pathological infections and physiological disorders can be effectively visualized at an initial stage of the disease using a well-known bio-photonic detection method called optical coherence tomography (OCT). This work investigates the use of OCT for identifying the morphological variations of anthracnose (bitter rot) disease infected and physiologically disordered Diospyros kaki (Asian Persimmon) fruits. An experiment was conducted using fruit samples that were carefully selected from persimmon orchards. Depth-resolved images with a high axial resolution were acquired using 850-nm-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. The obtained exemplary high-resolution two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional images revealed complementary morphological differences between healthy and defected samples. Moreover, the obtained depth-profile analysis results confirmed the disappearance of the healthy cell layers among the healthy-infected boundary regions. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the OCT technique used in agricultural plantations.

  16. Bio-photonic detection method for morphological analysis of anthracnose disease and physiological disorders of Diospyros kaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Moon, Byungin; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-10-01

    The pathological and physiological defects in various types of fruits lead to large amounts of economical waste. It is well recognized that internal fruit defects due to pathological infections and physiological disorders can be effectively visualized at an initial stage of the disease using a well-known bio-photonic detection method called optical coherence tomography (OCT). This work investigates the use of OCT for identifying the morphological variations of anthracnose (bitter rot) disease infected and physiologically disordered Diospyros kaki (Asian Persimmon) fruits. An experiment was conducted using fruit samples that were carefully selected from persimmon orchards. Depth-resolved images with a high axial resolution were acquired using 850-nm-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. The obtained exemplary high-resolution two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional images revealed complementary morphological differences between healthy and defected samples. Moreover, the obtained depth-profile analysis results confirmed the disappearance of the healthy cell layers among the healthy-infected boundary regions. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the OCT technique used in agricultural plantations.

  17. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Colletotrichum species associated with anthracnose of banana (Musa spp) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Intan Sakinah, M A; Suzianti, I V; Latiffah, Z

    2014-05-09

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species is a common postharvest disease of banana fruit. We investigated and identified Colletotrichum species associated with anthracnose in several local banana cultivars based on morphological characteristics and sequencing of ITS regions and of the β-tubulin gene. Thirty-eight Colletotrichum isolates were encountered in anthracnose lesions of five local banana cultivars, 'berangan', 'mas', 'awak', 'rastali', and 'nangka'. Based on morphological characteristics, 32 isolates were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and 6 isolates as C. musae. C. gloeosporioides isolates were divided into two morphotypes, with differences in colony color, shape of the conidia and growth rate. Based on ITS regions and β-tubulin sequences, 35 of the isolates were identified as C. gloeosporioides and only 3 isolates as C. musae; the percentage of similarity from BLAST ranged from 95-100% for ITS regions and 97-100% for β-tubulin. C. gloeosporioides isolates were more prevalent compared to C. musae. This is the first record of C. gloeosporioides associated with banana anthracnose in Malaysia. In a phylogenetic analysis of the combined dataset of ITS regions and β-tubulin using a maximum likelihood method, C. gloeosporioides and C. musae isolates were clearly separated into two groups. We concluded that C. gloeosporioides and C. musae isolates are associated with anthracnose in the local banana cultivars and that C. gloeosporioides is more prevalent than C. musae.

  18. High-resolution mapping reveals linkage between genes in common bean cultivar Ouro Negro conferring resistance to the rust, anthracnose, and angular leaf spot diseases.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Giseli; Gonçalves-Vidigal, Maria Celeste; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; de Lima Castro, Sandra Aparecida; Cregan, Perry B; Song, Qijian; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A

    2017-08-01

    Co-segregation analysis and high-throughput genotyping using SNP, SSR, and KASP markers demonstrated genetic linkage between Ur-14 and Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 loci conferring resistance to the rust, anthracnose and angular leaf spot diseases of common bean. Rust, anthracnose, and angular leaf spot are major diseases of common bean in the Americas and Africa. The cultivar Ouro Negro has the Ur-14 gene that confers broad spectrum resistance to rust and the gene cluster Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 containing two tightly linked genes conferring resistance to anthracnose and angular leaf spot, respectively. We used co-segregation analysis and high-throughput genotyping of 179 F2:3 families from the Rudá (susceptible) × Ouro Negro (resistant) cross-phenotyped separately with races of the rust and anthracnose pathogens. The results confirmed that Ur-14 and Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 cluster in Ouro Negro conferred resistance to rust and anthracnose, respectively, and that Ur-14 and the Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 cluster were closely linked. Genotyping the F2:3 families, first with 5398 SNPs on the Illumina BeadChip BARCBEAN6K_3 and with 15 SSR, and eight KASP markers, specifically designed for the candidate region containing Ur-14 and Co-3 (4) /Phg-3, permitted the creation of a high-resolution genetic linkage map which revealed that Ur-14 was positioned at 2.2 cM from Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 on the short arm of chromosome Pv04 of the common bean genome. Five flanking SSR markers were tightly linked at 0.1 and 0.2 cM from Ur-14, and two flanking KASP markers were tightly linked at 0.1 and 0.3 cM from Co-3 (4) /Phg-3. Many other SSR, SNP, and KASP markers were also linked to these genes. These markers will be useful for the development of common bean cultivars combining the important Ur-14 and Co-3 (4) /Phg-3 genes conferring resistance to three of the most destructive diseases of common bean.

  19. Quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance in sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With an aim to develop a durable resistance to the fungal disease anthracnose, two unique genetic sources of resistance were selected to create genetic mapping populations to identify regions of the sorghum genome that encode anthracnose resistance. A series of quantitative trait loci were identifi...

  20. Characterization of Glomerella strains recovered from anthracnose lesions on common bean plants in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Quélen L; Pinto, Joyce M A; Vaillancourt, Lisa J; Souza, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is an important disease of common bean, resulting in major economic losses worldwide. Genetic diversity of the C. lindemuthianum population contributes to its ability to adapt rapidly to new sources of host resistance. The origin of this diversity is unknown, but sexual recombination, via the Glomerella teleomorph, is one possibility. This study tested the hypothesis that Glomerella strains that are frequently recovered from bean anthracnose lesions represent the teleomorph of C. lindemuthianum. A large collection of Glomerella isolates could be separated into two groups based on phylogenetic analysis, morphology, and pathogenicity to beans. Both groups were unrelated to C. lindemuthianum. One group clustered with the C. gloeosporioides species complex and produced mild symptoms on bean tissues. The other group, which belonged to a clade that included the cucurbit anthracnose pathogen C. magna, caused no symptoms. Individual ascospores recovered from Glomerella perithecia gave rise to either fertile (perithecial) or infertile (conidial) colonies. Some pairings of perithecial and conidial strains resulted in induced homothallism in the conidial partner, while others led to apparent heterothallic matings. Pairings involving two perithecial, or two conidial, colonies produced neither outcome. Conidia efficiently formed conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs), but ascospores never formed CATs. The Glomerella strains formed appressoria and hyphae on the plant surface, but did not penetrate or form infection structures within the tissues. Their behavior was similar whether the beans were susceptible or resistant to anthracnose. These same Glomerella strains produced thick intracellular hyphae, and eventually acervuli, if host cell death was induced. When Glomerella was co-inoculated with C. lindemuthianum, it readily invaded anthracnose lesions. Thus, the hypothesis was not supported: Glomerella strains from anthracnose

  1. Characterization of Glomerella Strains Recovered from Anthracnose Lesions on Common Bean Plants in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos, Quélen L.; Pinto, Joyce M. A.; Vaillancourt, Lisa J.; Souza, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is an important disease of common bean, resulting in major economic losses worldwide. Genetic diversity of the C. lindemuthianum population contributes to its ability to adapt rapidly to new sources of host resistance. The origin of this diversity is unknown, but sexual recombination, via the Glomerella teleomorph, is one possibility. This study tested the hypothesis that Glomerella strains that are frequently recovered from bean anthracnose lesions represent the teleomorph of C. lindemuthianum. A large collection of Glomerella isolates could be separated into two groups based on phylogenetic analysis, morphology, and pathogenicity to beans. Both groups were unrelated to C. lindemuthianum. One group clustered with the C. gloeosporioides species complex and produced mild symptoms on bean tissues. The other group, which belonged to a clade that included the cucurbit anthracnose pathogen C. magna, caused no symptoms. Individual ascospores recovered from Glomerella perithecia gave rise to either fertile (perithecial) or infertile (conidial) colonies. Some pairings of perithecial and conidial strains resulted in induced homothallism in the conidial partner, while others led to apparent heterothallic matings. Pairings involving two perithecial, or two conidial, colonies produced neither outcome. Conidia efficiently formed conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs), but ascospores never formed CATs. The Glomerella strains formed appressoria and hyphae on the plant surface, but did not penetrate or form infection structures within the tissues. Their behavior was similar whether the beans were susceptible or resistant to anthracnose. These same Glomerella strains produced thick intracellular hyphae, and eventually acervuli, if host cell death was induced. When Glomerella was co-inoculated with C. lindemuthianum, it readily invaded anthracnose lesions. Thus, the hypothesis was not supported: Glomerella strains from anthracnose

  2. Biological Control of Apple Anthracnose by Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128, an Antagonistic Rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Soo; Balaraju, Kotnala; Jeon, Yongho

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the suppression of the disease development of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. acutatum in harvested apples using an antagonistic rhizobacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128 (APEC128). Out of 30 bacterial isolates from apple rhizosphere screened for antagonistic activity, the most effective strain was APEC128 as inferred from the size of the inhibition zone. This strain showed a greater growth in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth compared to other growth media. There was a reduction in anthracnose symptoms caused by the two fungal pathogens in harvested apples after their treatment with APEC128 in comparison with non-treated control. This effect is explained by the increased production of protease and amylase by APEC128, which might have inhibited mycelial growth. In apples treated with different APEC128 suspensions, the disease caused by C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum was greatly suppressed (by 83.6% and 79%, respectively) in treatments with the concentration of 1 × 108 colony forming units (cfu)/ml compared to other lower dosages, suggesting that the suppression of anthracnose development on harvested apples is dose-dependent. These results indicated that APEC128 is one of the promising agents in the biocontrol of apple anthracnose, which might help to increase the shelf-life of apple fruit during the post-harvest period. PMID:27298600

  3. Biological Control of Apple Anthracnose by Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128, an Antagonistic Rhizobacterium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soo; Balaraju, Kotnala; Jeon, Yongho

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated the suppression of the disease development of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. acutatum in harvested apples using an antagonistic rhizobacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128 (APEC128). Out of 30 bacterial isolates from apple rhizosphere screened for antagonistic activity, the most effective strain was APEC128 as inferred from the size of the inhibition zone. This strain showed a greater growth in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth compared to other growth media. There was a reduction in anthracnose symptoms caused by the two fungal pathogens in harvested apples after their treatment with APEC128 in comparison with non-treated control. This effect is explained by the increased production of protease and amylase by APEC128, which might have inhibited mycelial growth. In apples treated with different APEC128 suspensions, the disease caused by C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum was greatly suppressed (by 83.6% and 79%, respectively) in treatments with the concentration of 1 × 10(8) colony forming units (cfu)/ml compared to other lower dosages, suggesting that the suppression of anthracnose development on harvested apples is dose-dependent. These results indicated that APEC128 is one of the promising agents in the biocontrol of apple anthracnose, which might help to increase the shelf-life of apple fruit during the post-harvest period.

  4. Identification of genetic markers linked to anthracnose resistance in sorghum using association analysis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Hari D; Wang, Yi-Hong; Sharma, Rajan; Sharma, Shivali

    2013-06-01

    Anthracnose in sorghum caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum is one of the most destructive diseases affecting sorghum production under warm and humid conditions. Markers and genes linked to resistance to the disease are important for plant breeding. Using 14,739 SNP markers, we have mapped eight loci linked to resistance in sorghum through association analysis of a sorghum mini-core collection consisting of 242 diverse accessions evaluated for anthracnose resistance for 2 years in the field. The mini-core was representative of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics' world-wide sorghum landrace collection. Eight marker loci were associated with anthracnose resistance in both years. Except locus 8, disease resistance-related genes were found in all loci based on their physical distance from linked SNP markers. These include two NB-ARC class of R genes on chromosome 10 that were partially homologous to the rice blast resistance gene Pib, two hypersensitive response-related genes: autophagy-related protein 3 on chromosome 1 and 4 harpin-induced 1 (Hin1) homologs on chromosome 8, a RAV transcription factor that is also part of R gene pathway, an oxysterol-binding protein that functions in the non-specific host resistance, and homologs of menthone:neomenthol reductase (MNR) that catalyzes a menthone reduction to produce the antimicrobial neomenthol. These genes and markers may be developed into molecular tools for genetic improvement of anthracnose resistance in sorghum.

  5. HOW to Identify and Control Dogwood Anthracnose

    Treesearch

    Manfred E. Mielke; Margery L. Daughtrey

    Dogwood anthracnose is a disease of flowering and Pacific dogwood (Cornus florida and C. nuttallii). Infection of Pacific dogwood has been reported from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and British Columbia. In the East, infections have been reported on flowering dogwood in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Recently, the disease...

  6. [Characterization of a bacterial biocontrol strain 1404 and its efficacy in controlling postharvest citrus anthracnose].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hu, Chunjin; Ke, Fanggang; Huang, Siliang; Li, Qiqin

    2010-09-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Sacc. is a main disease in citrus production. To develop an effective biocontrol measure against citrus postharvest anthracnose, we screened antagonistic microbes and obtained a bacterial strain 1404 from the rhizospheric soil of chili plants in Nanning city, Guangxi, China. The objectives of the present study were to: (1) identify and characterize the antagonistic bacterium; and (2) to evaluate the efficacy of the antagonistic strain in controlling citrus postharvest anthracnose disease. Strain 1404 was identified by comparing its 16S rDNA sequence with related bacteria from GenBank database, as well as analyzing its morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. The antagonistic stability of the strain 1404 was determined by continuously transferring it on artificial media. The effect of the strain on suppressing citrus anthracnose at postharvest stage was tested by stab inoculation method. The 16S rDNA of strain 1404 was amplified with primers PF1 (5'-AGAGTTTGATCATGGCTCAG-3') and PR1 (5'-TACGGTTACCTTGTTACGACTT-3') and its sequence submitted to GenBank (accession number: GU361113). Strain 1404 clustered with the GenBank-derived Brevibacillus brevis strains in the 16S-rDNA-sequence-based phylogenetic tree at 100% bootstrap level. The morphological traits, physiological and biochemical characters of strain 1404 agreed with that of Brevibacillus brevis. Less change in the suppressive ability of antagonist against growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was observed during four continuous transfers on artificial media. The average control efficacy of the strain was 64. 9 % against the disease 20 days after the antagonist application. Strain 1404 was identified as Brevibacillus brevis based on its morphological traits, phyiological and biochemical characters as well as 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The antagonist was approved to be a promising biocontrol agent. This is the first report of

  7. Antifungal activity of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) in postharvest mango fruit and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbin; Lei, Huanhuan; Ma, Xiuyan; Lai, Tongfei; Song, Hongmiao; Shi, Xuequn; Li, Jiangkuo

    2017-01-16

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is one of the most important postharvest diseases in mango fruit, often causing huge economic losses. In this study, the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose in postharvest mango fruit and the mechanisms involved were investigated. 1-MCP induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, damaged the mitochondria and destroyed the integrity of plasma membrane of spores of C. gloeosporioides, significantly suppressing spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. 1-MCP also decreased the decay incidence and lesion expansion of mango fruit caused by C. gloeosporioides. For the first time this study demonstrated that 1-MCP suppressed anthracnose of postharvest mango fruit by directly inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides, thus providing a promising strategy for disease control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of unique and differentially expressed proteins in anthracnose-tolerant Florida hybrid bunch grapes.

    PubMed

    Vasanthaiah, Hemanth K N; Katam, Ramesh; Basha, Sheikh M

    2009-06-01

    Anthracnose is a major disease in Florida hybrid bunch grapes, caused by a fungus viz. Elsinoe ampelina. Florida hybrid bunch grapes are grown in southeastern USA for their superior wine characteristics. However, the effect of anthracnose on grape productivity and wine quality is a major concern to grape growers. Our research is aimed at determining biochemical basis of anthracnose tolerance in Florida hybrid bunch grape. Leaf samples were collected from the plants infected with E. ampelina at different periods and analyzed for differential protein expression using high throughput two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among the 32 differentially expressed leaf proteins, two were uniquely expressed in tolerant genotypes in response to E. ampelina infection. These proteins were identified as mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase and glutamine synthetase, which are known to play a major role in carbohydrate metabolism and defense. Several proteins including ribulose 1-5 bisphosphate-carboxylase involved in photosynthesis were found to be suppressed in susceptible genotypes compared to tolerant genotypes following E. ampelina infection. The results indicate that the anthracnose-tolerant genotypes have the ability to up-regulate and induce new proteins upon infection to defend the invasion of the pathogen as well as maintain the normal regulatory processes.

  9. An efficient method for evaluating black walnut for resistance to walnut anthracnose in filed plots and the identification of resistant genotypes

    Treesearch

    K.E. Woeste; W.F. Beineke

    2001-01-01

    Black walnut is native to the eastern USA and prized for its high-quality timber. Walnut anthracnose, the most important foliar disease of black walnut, is caused by Gnomonia leptostyla. There is no germplasm available that is resistant to the disease. Ramets of 42 black walnut clones, comprising about one-third of the Midwestern USA black walnut...

  10. Linkage mapping of the Phg-1 and Co-14 genes for resistance to angular leaf spot and anthracnose in the common bean cultivar AND 277

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Andean common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar AND 277 is an important source of disease resistance to angular leaf spot (ALS, caused by Pseudocercospora griseola) and anthracnose (caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum). AND 277 has the Phg-1 gene that confers resistance to eight races of...

  11. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents.

  12. Endophytic bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of Amazon Paullinia cupana associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Ferreira, Almir José; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes colonize an ecological niche similar to that of phytopathogens, which make them candidate for disease suppression. Anthracnose is a disease caused by Colletotrichum spp., a phytopathogen that can infect guarana (Paullinia cupana), an important commercial crop in the Brazilian Amazon. We investigated the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose guarana plants. The PCR-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed differences in the structure of the evaluated communities. Detailed analysis of endophytic bacteria composition using culture-dependent and 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria phyla. Firmicutes comprised the majority of isolates in asymptomatic plants (2.40E(-4)). However, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed differences at the genus level for Neisseria (1.4E(-4)), Haemophilus (2.1E(-3)) and Arsenophonus (3.6E(-5)) in asymptomatic plants, Aquicella (3.5E(-3)) in symptomatic anthracnose plants, and Pseudomonas (1.1E(-3)), which was mainly identified in asymptomatic plants. In cross-comparisons of the endophytic bacterial communities as a whole, symptomatic anthracnose plants contained higher diversity, as reflected in the Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices estimation (P < 0.05). Similarly, comparisons using LIBSHUFF and heatmap analysis for the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed differences between endophytic bacterial communities. These data are in agreement with the NMSD and ANOSIM analysis of DGGE profiles. Our results suggest that anthracnose can restructure endophytic bacterial communities by selecting certain strains in the phyllosphere of P. cupana. The understanding of these interactions is important for the development of strategies of biocontrol for Colletotrichum.

  13. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-07-07

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Felderhoff et al.

  14. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    J. Felderhoff, Terry; M. McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  15. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGES

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; ...

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  16. Real-Time PCR Detection of Dogwood Anthracnose Fungus in Historical Herbarium Specimens from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephen; Masuya, Hayato; Zhang, Jian; Walsh, Emily; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Cornus species (dogwoods) are popular ornamental trees and important understory plants in natural forests of northern hemisphere. Dogwood anthracnose, one of the major diseases affecting the native North American Cornus species, such as C. florida, is caused by the fungal pathogen Discula destructiva. The origin of this fungus is not known, but it is hypothesized that it was imported to North America with its host plants from Asia. In this study, a TaqMan real-time PCR assay was used to detect D. destructiva in dried herbarium and fresh Cornus samples. Several herbarium specimens from Japan and China were detected positive for D. destructiva, some of which were collected before the first report of the dogwood anthracnose in North America. Our findings further support that D. destructiva was introduced to North America from Asia where the fungus likely does not cause severe disease. PMID:27096929

  17. Real-Time PCR Detection of Dogwood Anthracnose Fungus in Historical Herbarium Specimens from Asia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephen; Masuya, Hayato; Zhang, Jian; Walsh, Emily; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Cornus species (dogwoods) are popular ornamental trees and important understory plants in natural forests of northern hemisphere. Dogwood anthracnose, one of the major diseases affecting the native North American Cornus species, such as C. florida, is caused by the fungal pathogen Discula destructiva. The origin of this fungus is not known, but it is hypothesized that it was imported to North America with its host plants from Asia. In this study, a TaqMan real-time PCR assay was used to detect D. destructiva in dried herbarium and fresh Cornus samples. Several herbarium specimens from Japan and China were detected positive for D. destructiva, some of which were collected before the first report of the dogwood anthracnose in North America. Our findings further support that D. destructiva was introduced to North America from Asia where the fungus likely does not cause severe disease.

  18. Microsatellite isolation and characterization for Colletotrichum spp, causal agent of anthracnose in Andean blackberry.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, M L; López, A M; Isaza, L; López, P

    2014-09-26

    The genus Colletotrichum, comprised of pathogenic fungi that affect plants grown worldwide, causes the disease known as anthracnose in several fruit and vegetable species. Several studies conducted on plants have shown that the disease is characterized by the presence of one or several species of the fungus attacking the fruit or other organs of the same host. To develop and implement effective control strategies, it is vital to understand the genetic structure of the fungus in agricultural systems, identify associated Colletotrichum species, and define the subpopulations responsible for the disease. Molecular tools were accordingly developed to characterize genotypic populations of Colletotrichum spp, causal agent of anthracnose in commercial crops of Andean blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.). A microsatellite-enriched library for Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was developed to identify and characterize microsatellite loci among isolates collected in R. glaucus plantations. Thirty microsatellites were developed and tested in 36 isolates gathered from eight different blackberry-production areas of Colombia. Ten pairs of microsatellites were polymorphic.

  19. Chilli Anthracnose: The Epidemiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amrita; Raghuwanshi, Richa; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Singh, Harikesh B

    2016-01-01

    Indian cuisine is renowned and celebrated throughout the world for its spicy treat to the tongue. The flavor and aroma of the food generated due to the use of spices creates an indelible experience. Among the commonly utilized spices to stimulate the taste buds in Indian food, whole or powdered chilli constitutes an inevitable position. Besides being a vital ingredient of of Indian food, chilli occupy an important position as an economic commodity, a major share in Indian economy. Chilli also has uncountable benefits to human health. Fresh green chilli fruits contain more Vitamin C than found in citrus fruits, while red chilli fruits have more Vitamin A content than as found in carrots. The active component of the spice, Capsaicin possesses the antioxidant, anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic and immunosuppressive activities having ability to inhibit bacterial growth and platelet aggregation. Though introduced by the Portuguese in the Seventeenth century, India has been one of the major producers and exporters of this crop. During 2010-2011, India was the leading exporter and producer of chilli in the world, but recently due to a decline in chilli production, it stands at third position in terms of its production. The decline in chilli production has been attributed to the diseases linked with crop like anthracnose or fruit rot causing the major share of crop loss. The disease causes severe damage to both mature fruits in the field as well as during their storage under favorable conditions, which amplifies the loss in yield and overall production of the crop. This review gives an account of the loss in production and yield procured in chili cultivation due to anthracnose disease in Indian sub-continent, with emphasis given to the sustainable management strategies against the conventionally recommended control for the disease. Also, the review highlights the various pathogenic species of Colletotrichum spp, the causal agent of the disease, associated with the host

  20. Chilli Anthracnose: The Epidemiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amrita; Raghuwanshi, Richa; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2016-01-01

    Indian cuisine is renowned and celebrated throughout the world for its spicy treat to the tongue. The flavor and aroma of the food generated due to the use of spices creates an indelible experience. Among the commonly utilized spices to stimulate the taste buds in Indian food, whole or powdered chilli constitutes an inevitable position. Besides being a vital ingredient of of Indian food, chilli occupy an important position as an economic commodity, a major share in Indian economy. Chilli also has uncountable benefits to human health. Fresh green chilli fruits contain more Vitamin C than found in citrus fruits, while red chilli fruits have more Vitamin A content than as found in carrots. The active component of the spice, Capsaicin possesses the antioxidant, anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic and immunosuppressive activities having ability to inhibit bacterial growth and platelet aggregation. Though introduced by the Portuguese in the Seventeenth century, India has been one of the major producers and exporters of this crop. During 2010–2011, India was the leading exporter and producer of chilli in the world, but recently due to a decline in chilli production, it stands at third position in terms of its production. The decline in chilli production has been attributed to the diseases linked with crop like anthracnose or fruit rot causing the major share of crop loss. The disease causes severe damage to both mature fruits in the field as well as during their storage under favorable conditions, which amplifies the loss in yield and overall production of the crop. This review gives an account of the loss in production and yield procured in chili cultivation due to anthracnose disease in Indian sub-continent, with emphasis given to the sustainable management strategies against the conventionally recommended control for the disease. Also, the review highlights the various pathogenic species of Colletotrichum spp, the causal agent of the disease, associated with the host

  1. Biocontrol activity and primed systemic resistance by compost water extracts against anthracnoses of pepper and cucumber.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Kim, Ki Deok

    2011-06-01

    We investigated direct and indirect effects of compost water extracts (CWEs) from Iljuk-3, Iljuk-7, Shinong-8, and Shinong-9 for the control of anthracnoses caused by Colletotrichum coccodes on pepper and C. orbiculare on cucumber. All tested CWEs significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited in vitro conidial germination and appressorium formation of the fungal pathogens; however, DL-β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA) failed to inhibit the conidial development of the pathogens. Direct treatments of the CWEs and BABA on pepper and cucumber leaves at 1 and 3 days before or after inoculation significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose severities; Iljuk-3, Shinong-9, and BABA for pepper and Iljuk-7 for cucumber had more protective activities than curative activities. In addition, root treatment of CWEs suppressed anthracnoses on the plants by the pathogens; however, CWE treatment on lower leaves failed to reduce the diseases on the upper leaves of the plants. The CWE root treatments enhanced not only the expression of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes CABPR1, CABGLU, CAChi2, CaPR-4, CAPO1, and CaPR-10 in pepper and PR1-1a, PR-2, PR-3, and APOX in cucumber but also the activity of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and peroxidase and the generation of hydrogen peroxide in pepper and cucumber under pathogen-inoculated conditions. However, the CWE treatments failed to induce the plant responses under pathogen-free conditions. These results indicated that the CWEs had direct effects, reducing anthracnoses by C. coccodes on pepper leaves and C. orbiculare on cucumber leaves through protective and curative effects. In addition, CWE root treatments could induce systemic resistance in the primed state against pathogens on plant leaves that enhanced PR gene expression, defense-related enzyme production, and hydrogen peroxide generation rapidly and effectively immediately after pathogen infection. Thus, the CWEs might suppress anthracnoses on leaves of both pepper and cucumber through primed

  2. First report of anthracnose of mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata) caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross; family Polygonaceae) is an exotic annual barbed vine that is now invasive in the northeastern USA, Mississippi, and Oregon and is a target of biological control efforts. In July, 2010, diseased P. perfoliata plants were found along the Firtina Rive...

  3. Meningococcal Disease: Causes and Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Causes and Spread to Others Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Causes Bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis cause meningococcal disease. About ...

  4. What causes alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R A

    2013-01-01

    Since the earliest descriptions of Alzheimer's disease (AD), many theories have been advanced as to its cause. These include: (1) exacerbation of aging, (2) degeneration of anatomical pathways, including the cholinergic and cortico-cortical pathways, (3) an environmental factor such as exposure to aluminium, head injury, or malnutrition, (4) genetic factors including mutations of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin (PSEN) genes and allelic variation in apolipoprotein E (Apo E), (5) mitochondrial dysfunction, (6) a compromised blood brain barrier, (7) immune system dysfunction, and (8) infectious agents. This review discusses the evidence for and against each of these theories and concludes that AD is a multifactorial disorder in which genetic and environmental risk factors interact to increase the rate of normal aging ('allostatic load'). The consequent degeneration of neurons and blood vessels results in the formation of abnormally aggregated 'reactive' proteins such as β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. Gene mutations influence the outcome of age-related neuronal degeneration to cause early onset familial AD (EO-FAD). Where gene mutations are absent and a combination of risk factors present, Aβ and tau only slowly accumulate not overwhelming cellular protection systems until later in life causing late-onset sporadic AD (LO-SAD). Aβ and tau spread through the brain via cell to cell transfer along anatomical pathways, variation in the pathways of spread leading to the disease heterogeneity characteristic of AD.

  5. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  6. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper.

  7. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Inheritance and molecular mapping of anthracnose resistance genes present in sorghum line SC112-14

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineolum) is one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) affecting all aerial tissues of the plant. The most effective strategy for its control is the incorporation of resistance genes. Therefore, the anthracnose resistance response pr...

  9. A New Anthracnose Resistance Gene in Andean Common Bean Cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose is one of the most widespread and economically important diseases of common bean worldwide. Most anthracnose resistance genes in common bean are from beans of the Mesoamerican gene pool. The resistant reaction of the Andean common bean cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas to races 9, 64, 65 and ...

  10. A pictorial technique for mass screening of sorghum germplasm for anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineolum) resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Globally, the foliar phase of anthracnose is one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum. In most cases, anthracnose resistance screening relies on the use of a spore suspension. This method is usually conducted after sundown and when there is the possibility of dew formation the following morn...

  11. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.

  12. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance locus in Andean common bean Paloma.

    PubMed

    de Lima Castro, Sandra Aparecida; Gonçalves-Vidigal, Maria Celeste; Gilio, Thiago Alexandre Santana; Lacanallo, Giselly Figueiredo; Valentini, Giseli; da Silva Ramos Martins, Vanusa; Song, Qijian; Galván, Marta Zulema; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial Antonio

    2017-04-18

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease in common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races of the anthracnose pathogen. Most genes conferring anthracnose resistance in common bean are overcome by these races. The genetic mapping and the relationship between the resistant Co-Pa gene of Paloma and previously characterized anthracnose resistance genes can be a great contribution for breeding programs. The inheritance of resistance studies for Paloma was performed in F2 population from the cross Paloma (resistant) × Cornell 49-242 (susceptible) inoculated with race 2047, and in F2 and F2:3 generations from the cross Paloma (resistant) × PI 207262 (susceptible) inoculated with race 3481. The results of these studies demonstrated that a single dominant gene confers the resistance in Paloma. Allelism tests performed with multiple races of C. lindemuthianum showed that the resistance gene in Paloma, provisionally named Co-Pa, is independent from the anthracnose resistance genes Co-1, Co-2, Co-3, Co-4, Co-5, Co-6, Co-12, Co-13, Co-14, Co-15 and Co-16. Bulk segregant analysis using the SNP chip BARCBean6K_3 positioned the approximate location of Co-Pa in the lower arm of chromosome Pv01. Further mapping analysis located the Co-Pa gene at a 390 kb region of Pv01 flanked by SNP markers SS82 and SS83 at a distance of 1.3 and 2.1 cM, respectively. The results presented here showed that Paloma cultivar has a new dominant gene conferring resistance to anthracnose, which is independent from those genes previously described. The linkage between the Co-Pa gene and the SS82 and SS83 SNP markers will be extremely important for marker-assisted introgression of the gene into elite cultivars in order to enhance resistance.

  13. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, rheumatic fever, or infections can cause acquired heart valve disease. These factors change the ...

  14. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S , causes sickle cell ... that hemoglobin works. ( See Overview. ) How Is Sickle Cell Disease Inherited? When the hemoglobin S gene is inherited ...

  15. Addison's Disease: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Addison's disease Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Addison's disease symptoms usually develop slowly, often over several months, ... crisis) Sometimes, however, the signs and symptoms of Addison's disease may appear suddenly. In acute adrenal failure (addisonian ...

  16. Dogwood Anthracnose and its Spread in the South

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Anderson; John L. Knighten; Mark Windham; Keith Langdon; Floyd Hedrix; Ron Roncadori

    In the 15 years since it was first reported in the United States, dogwood anthracnose (caused by Discula destructive sp. nov.) has spread rapidly and caused serious losses among flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida L.), particularly in the South. Infection begins in leaves and spreads to twigs and branches, which dieback. Main-stem infections cause cankers, which kill...

  17. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-09-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production.

  18. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production. PMID:26361475

  19. Diseases caused by viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn viruses are important disease agents worldwide that can be difficult to identify and diagnose. Previously undescribed viruses of corn also emerge periodically and their distributions and importance changes over time. The Compendium of Corn Diseases is a valuable tool for pre-diagnosis of diseas...

  20. Anthracnose field evaluation of sorghum germplasm from Botswana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum anthracnose is a disease of worldwide importance and host-plant resistance is the most practical method of disease management. In this study, 154 sorghum accessions from the Botswana collection maintained by the United States National Plant Germplasm System were inoculated with Colletotrich...

  1. Causes of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, D G; Feldman, H

    2000-01-01

    It is now understood that genetic factors play a crucial role in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare mutations in at least 3 genes are responsible for early-onset familial AD. A common polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene is the major determinant of risk in families with late-onset AD, as well as in the general population. Advanced age, however, remains the major established risk factor for AD, although environmental variables may also have some role in disease expression. Some pathogenic factors directly associated with aging include oxidative damage and mutations in messenger RNA. Other factors unrelated to the aging process may, in the future, be amenable to therapeutic intervention by way of estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, anti-inflammatory drug therapy and reducing vascular risk factors. Older theories, such as aluminum playing a role in the pathogenesis of AD, have been mostly discarded as our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of AD has advanced. PMID:11216203

  2. Antagonistic Activities of Bacillus spp. Strains Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment Towards Anthracnose Pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Joon-Hee; Shim, Hongsik; Shin, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2015-06-01

    Anthracnose is a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum species that is detrimental to numerous plant species. Anthracnose control with fungicides has both human health and environmental safety implications. Despite increasing public concerns, fungicide use will continue in the absence of viable alternatives. There have been relatively less efforts to search antagonistic bacteria from mudflats harboring microbial diversity. A total of 420 bacterial strains were isolated from mudflats near the western sea of South Korea. Five bacterial strains, LB01, LB14, HM03, HM17, and LB15, were characterized as having antifungal properties in the presence of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The three Bacillus atrophaeus strains, LB14, HM03, and HM17, produced large quantities of chitinase and protease enzymes, whereas the B. amyloliquefaciens strain LB01 produced protease and cellulase enzymes. Two important antagonistic traits, siderophore production and solubilization of insoluble phosphate, were observed in the three B. atrophaeus strains. Analyses of disease suppression revealed that LB14 was most effective for suppressing the incidence of anthracnose symptoms on pepper fruits. LB14 produced antagonistic compounds and suppressed conidial germination of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The results from the present study will provide a basis for developing a reliable alternative to fungicides for anthracnose control.

  3. Antagonistic Activities of Bacillus spp. Strains Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment Towards Anthracnose Pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joon-Hee; Shim, Hongsik; Shin, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose is a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum species that is detrimental to numerous plant species. Anthracnose control with fungicides has both human health and environmental safety implications. Despite increasing public concerns, fungicide use will continue in the absence of viable alternatives. There have been relatively less efforts to search antagonistic bacteria from mudflats harboring microbial diversity. A total of 420 bacterial strains were isolated from mudflats near the western sea of South Korea. Five bacterial strains, LB01, LB14, HM03, HM17, and LB15, were characterized as having antifungal properties in the presence of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The three Bacillus atrophaeus strains, LB14, HM03, and HM17, produced large quantities of chitinase and protease enzymes, whereas the B. amyloliquefaciens strain LB01 produced protease and cellulase enzymes. Two important antagonistic traits, siderophore production and solubilization of insoluble phosphate, were observed in the three B. atrophaeus strains. Analyses of disease suppression revealed that LB14 was most effective for suppressing the incidence of anthracnose symptoms on pepper fruits. LB14 produced antagonistic compounds and suppressed conidial germination of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The results from the present study will provide a basis for developing a reliable alternative to fungicides for anthracnose control. PMID:26060435

  4. Biological control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) in yam by Streptomyces sp.MJM5763.

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, S A; Yang, S H; Cheng, J H; Meng, L; Suh, J-W

    2011-08-01

    To find a suitable biocontrol agent for yam anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. An actinobacterial strain, MJM5763, showing strong antifungal activity, multiple biocontrol and plant growth-promoting traits was isolated from a yam cultivation field in Yeoju, South Korea. Based on morphological and physiological characteristics and analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence, strain MJM5763 was identified as a novel strain of Streptomyces and was designated as Streptomyces sp. MJM5763. Treatment with MJM5763 and the crude culture filtrate extract (CCFE) was effective in suppressing anthracnose in detached yam leaves in vitro and reduced incidence and severity of anthracnose in yam plants under greenhouse conditions. The CCFE treatment was the most effective of all the treatments and reduced the anthracnose severity by 85-88% and the incidence by 79-81%, 90 days after inoculation with the pathogen. CCFE treatment was also effective under field conditions and showed a reduction of 86 and 75% of anthracnose severity and incidence, respectively. Streptomyces sp. strain MJM5763 was effective in biocontrolling anthracnose in yam caused by C. gloeosporioides. Streptomyces sp. MJM5763 is a potential alternative to chemical fungicides for reducing yield losses to anthracnose in yam. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Evaluation of a Pomegranate Peel Extract (PGE) as Alternative Mean to Control Olive Anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Sonia; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Agosteo, Giovanni Enrico; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Romeo, Flora Valeria; Cacciola, Santa O; Rapisarda, Paolo; Schena, Leonardo

    2017-08-02

    Olive anthracnose is caused by different species of Colletotrichum spp. and may be regarded as the most damaging disease of olive fruits worldwide, greatly affecting quality and quantity of the productions. A pomegranate peel extract (PGE) proved very effective in controlling the disease. The extract had a strong in vitro fungicidal activity against Colletotrichum acutatum sensu stricto, was very effective in both preventive and curative trials with artificially inoculated fruit, and induced resistance in treated olive tissues. In field trials, PGE was significantly more effective than copper, which is traditionally used to control the disease. The highest level of protection was achieved by applying the extract in the early ascending phase of the disease outbreaks since natural rots were completely inhibited with PGE at 12 g/l and were reduced by 98.6 and by 93.0% on plants treated with PGE at 6 and 3 g/l, respectively. Two treatments carried out 30 and 15 days before the expected epidemic outbreak reduced the incidence of the disease by 77.6, 57.0, and 51.8%, depending on the PGE concentration. The analysis of epiphytic populations showed a strong antimicrobial activity of PGE, which sharply reduced both fungal and bacterial populations. Since PGE was obtained from a natural matrix using safe chemicals and did not have any apparent phytotoxic effect on treated olives it may be regarded as a safe and effective natural antifungal preparation to control olive anthracnose and improve olive productions.

  6. Optimal control of anthracnose using mixed strategies.

    PubMed

    Fotsa Mbogne, David Jaures; Thron, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose and study a spatial diffusion model for the control of anthracnose disease in a bounded domain. The model is a generalization of the one previously developed in [15]. We use the model to simulate two different types of control strategies against anthracnose disease. Strategies that employ chemical fungicides are modeled using a continuous control function; while strategies that rely on cultivational practices (such as pruning and removal of mummified fruits) are modeled with a control function which is discrete in time (though not in space). For comparative purposes, we perform our analyses for a spatially-averaged model as well as the space-dependent diffusion model. Under weak smoothness conditions on parameters we demonstrate the well-posedness of both models by verifying existence and uniqueness of the solution for the growth inhibition rate for given initial conditions. We also show that the set [0, 1] is positively invariant. We first study control by impulsive strategies, then analyze the simultaneous use of mixed continuous and pulse strategies. In each case we specify a cost functional to be minimized, and we demonstrate the existence of optimal control strategies. In the case of pulse-only strategies, we provide explicit algorithms for finding the optimal control strategies for both the spatially-averaged model and the space-dependent model. We verify the algorithms for both models via simulation, and discuss properties of the optimal solutions.

  7. Disease Outbreaks Caused by Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craun, Gunther F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the disease outbreaks caused by drinking polluted water, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the waterborn outbreaks included are: (1) cholera; (2) gastroenteritis; (3) giardiasis; and (4) typhoid fever and salmonellosis. A list of 66 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Disease Outbreaks Caused by Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craun, Gunther F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the disease outbreaks caused by drinking polluted water, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the waterborn outbreaks included are: (1) cholera; (2) gastroenteritis; (3) giardiasis; and (4) typhoid fever and salmonellosis. A list of 66 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Inheritance of downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) and anthracnose (Sphaceloma ampelinum) resistance in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Poolsawat, O; Mahanil, S; Laosuwan, P; Wongkaew, S; Tharapreuksapong, A; Reisch, B I; Tantasawat, P A

    2013-12-13

    Downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) and anthracnose (Sphaceloma ampelinum) are two of the major diseases of most grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) cultivars grown in Thailand. Therefore, breeding grapevines for improved downy mildew and anthracnose resistance is crucial. Factorial crosses were made between three downy mildew and/or anthracnose resistant lines ('NY88.0517.01', 'NY65.0550.04', and 'NY65.0551.05'; male parents) and two or three susceptible cultivars of V. vinifera ('Black Queen', 'Carolina Black Rose', and/or 'Italia'; female parents). F1 hybrid seedlings were evaluated for downy mildew and anthracnose resistance using a detached/excised leaf assay. For both diseases, the general combining ability (GCA) variance among male parents was significant, while the variance of GCA among females and the specific combining ability (SCA) variance were not significant, indicating the prevalence of additive over non-additive gene actions. The estimated narrow sense heritabilities of downy mildew and anthracnose resistance were 55.6 and 79.2%, respectively, suggesting that downy mildew/anthracnose resistance gene(s) were highly heritable. The 'Carolina Black Rose x NY65.0550.04' cross combination is recommended for future use.

  10. Trypanosomatid parasites causing neglected diseases.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, K; Honek, J; Cadmus, C M C v C; Efferth, T

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic diseases such as Kala azar (visceral leishmaniasis), Chagas disease human (American trypanosomiasis) and African sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis) are affecting more than 27 million people worldwide. They are categorized amongst the most important neglected diseases causing approximately 150,000 deaths annually. As no vaccination is available, treatment is solely dependent on chemotherapeutic drugs. This review provides a comprehensive insight into the treatment of Kala azar, Chagas disease and African sleeping sickness. In addition to established drugs, novel small molecule- based therapeutic approaches are discussed. Drugs currently used for the treatment of Kala azar include pentavalent antimonials, Amphotericin B, Miltefosine, and Paromomycin. Liposomal formulations such as AmBisome provide promising alternatives. Furthermore, antiproliferative compounds might open new avenues in Kala azar treatment. Regarding Chagas disease, chemotherapy is based on two drugs, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole. However, sequencing of T. cruzi genome in the year 2005 raises a hope for new drug targets. Proteases, sterols and sialic acids are potential promising drug targets. Suramin, Pentamidine, Melarsporol and Eflornithine are well-established drugs to treat African sleeping sickness. New treatment options include combination therapy of Eflornithine and Nifurtimox, a Chagas disease therapeutic.. However, all approved chemotherapeutic compounds for trypanosomatid diseases suffer from high toxicity. Further, increasing resistance limits their efficacy and compliance.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Zuiderveen, Grady H; Padder, Bilal A; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Song, Qijian; Kelly, James D

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS). Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481) included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219) tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Zuiderveen, Grady H.; Padder, Bilal A.; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Song, Qijian; Kelly, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS). Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481) included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219) tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans. PMID:27270627

  13. Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2010-05-01

    Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious agents may result from disruption of normal host barriers or dysregulation of cellular immunity, the latter serving to promote survival of the infectious agent through immune evasion. Such infections may be followed by opportunistic infections with a variety of other microorganisms. Classic infectious causes of immunodeficiency in companion animals are the immunodeficiency retroviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus. Other important causes include canine distemper virus; canine parvovirus 2; feline infectious peritonitis virus; rickettsial organisms that infect leukocytes; Leishmania; and fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus. Considerable research effort has been invested in understanding the mechanisms of pathogen-induced immunosuppression, with the hope that effective therapies may be developed that reverse the immunodeficiencies developed and in turn assist the host to clear persistent or life-threatening infectious diseases.

  14. Alfalfa benefits from Medicago truncatula: The RCT1 gene from M. truncatula confers broad-spectrum resistance to anthracnose in alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengming; Gao, Muqiang; Xu, Chenwu; Gao, Jianchang; Deshpande, Shweta; Lin, Shaoping; Roe, Bruce A.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2008-01-01

    Alfalfa is economically the most important forage legume worldwide. A recurrent challenge to alfalfa production is the significant yield loss caused by disease. Although knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying host resistance should facilitate the genetic improvement of alfalfa, the acquisition of such knowledge is hampered by alfalfa's tetrasomic inheritance and outcrossing nature. However, alfalfa is congeneric with the reference legume Medicago truncatula, providing an opportunity to use M. truncatula as a surrogate to clone the counterparts of many agronomically important genes in alfalfa. In particular, the high degree of sequence identity and remarkably conserved genome structure and function between the two species enables M. truncatula genes to be used directly in alfalfa improvement. Here we report the map-based cloning of RCT1, a host resistance (R) gene in M. truncatula that confers resistance to multiple races of Colletotrichum trifolii, a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease of alfalfa. RCT1 is a member of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor/nucleotide-binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class of plant R genes and confers broad-spectrum anthracnose resistance when transferred into susceptible alfalfa plants. Thus, RCT1 provides a novel resource to develop anthracnose-resistant alfalfa cultivars and contributes to our understanding of host resistance against the fungal genus Colletotrichum. This work demonstrates the potential of using M. truncatula genes for genetic improvement of alfalfa. PMID:18719113

  15. Thailandins A and B, New Polyene Macrolactone Compounds Isolated from Actinokineospora bangkokensis Strain 44EHW(T), Possessing Antifungal Activity against Anthracnose Fungi and Pathogenic Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Intra, Bungonsiri; Greule, Anja; Bechthold, Andreas; Euanorasetr, Jirayut; Paululat, Thomas; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2016-06-29

    Two new polyene macrolactone antibiotics, thailandins A, 1, and B, 2, were isolated from the fermentation broth of rhizosphere soil-associated Actinokineospora bangkokensis strain 44EHW(T). The new compounds from this strain were purified using semipreparative HPLC and Sephadex LH-20 gel filtration while following an antifungal activity guided fractionation. Their structures were elucidated through spectroscopic techniques including UV, HR-ESI-MS, and NMR. These compounds demonstrated broad spectrum antifungal activity against fungi causing anthracnose disease (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides DoA d0762, Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes DoA c1060, and Colletotrichum capsici DoA c1511) as well as pathogenic yeasts (Candida albicans MT 2013/1, Candida parasilopsis DKMU 434, and Cryptococcus neoformans MT 2013/2) with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging between 16 and 32 μg/mL. This is the first report of polyene antibiotics produced by Actinokineospora species as bioactive compounds against anthracnose fungi and pathogenic yeast strains.

  16. Pediatric genetic diseases causing glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichhpujani, Parul; Singh, Rohan B.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathy may be considered as an endpoint of multiple systemic factors. Genetic conditions commonly causing glaucoma in children and adolescents include Axenfeld-Reiger syndrome, aniridia, Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchessani syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, nevus of Ota, congenital rubella and neurofibromatosis type 1. In the recent years, with the advancements in genetic research our understanding of the fundamental causes of glaucoma associated with inherited disorders has improved. In addition to intraocular pressure reduction, it is important for the clinician to be familiar with the multiple systemic associations with glaucoma, to re-evaluate treatment frequently, and to target the underlying disease process, if present. PMID:27625878

  17. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, causing anthracnose of mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata) in Turkey, is a potential biological control agent of this weed in the U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross; family Polygonaceae) is an exotic annual barbed vine that has invaded the northeastern USA, Mississippi, and Oregon. In July of 2010, in a search for potential biological control pathogens, diseased P. perfoliata plants were found along the Firtina...

  18. Inheritance and molecular mapping of anthracnose resistance gene present in the differential line PI533918

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose (Collectrotichum sublineolum) is considered one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) because it infects all aerial tissues of the plant. The best strategy to control the disease is the incorporation of resistance genes. At present, eighteen sorghum line...

  19. Reaction of sorghum hybrids to anthracnose, grain mold and grain weathering in Burleson County, Texas, 2007

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty commercial hybrids were evaluated for resistance against anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum and grain mold or grain weathering caused by a number of fungal species at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Experiment Station in College Station (Burleson County). Six hybrids wer...

  20. Polygalacturonase inhibitor protein from fruits of anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of Chilli (Capsicum annuum L).

    PubMed

    Shivashankar, S; Thimmareddy, C; Roy, Tapas K

    2010-08-01

    Chilli fruit is highly susceptible to anthracnose infection at the stage of harvest maturity, due to which the fruit yield in the leading commercial variety Byadgi is severely affected. Field studies on screening of several varieties for resistance to anthracnose have shown that a variety of chilli AR-4/99K is resistant to anthracnose infection. In many crops, resistance to fungal attack has been correlated with PGIP activity in developing fruits based on which transgenic varieties have been developed with resistance to fungi. The present study was carried out to determine whether anthracnose resistance in AR-4/99K was due to the increased levels of PGIP alone and/ or due to differences, if any, in the properties of PGIP. Hence, a comparative study of the properties of polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP) isolated from fruits of anthracnose resistant chilli var AR-4/99K and a susceptible variety Byadgi was conducted with the objective of utilizing the information in genetic transformation studies. Both the PGIPs from anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of chilli exhibited similarities in the elution pattern on Sephadex gel, DEAE cellulose, PAGE and SDS-PAGE. The two PGIPs were active over a wide range of pH and temperature. Both PGIPs showed differential inhibitory activity against polygalacturonase (PG) secreted by Colletotrichum gleosporoides, C. capsici, C. lindemuthianum, Fusarium moniliforme and Sclerotium rolfsii. The inhibitory activity of PGIP from both resistant and susceptible varieties was the highest (82% and 76%, respectively) against the PG from Colletotrichum capsici, a pathogen causing anthracnose rot of chilli, while the activity was lower (1.27 to 12.3%) on the other fungal PGs. Although PGIP activity decreased with fruit maturation in both the varieties, the resistant variety maintained a higher activity at 45 days after flowering (DAF) as compared to the susceptible variety which helped it to overcome the infection by

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity in flowering dogwood natural stands using microsatellites: the effects of dogwood anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Hadziabdic, D; Fitzpatrick, B M; Wang, X; Wadl, P A; Rinehart, T A; Ownley, B H; Windham, M T; Trigiano, R N

    2010-10-01

    Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) populations recently have experienced severe declines caused by dogwood anthracnose. Mortality has ranged from 48 to 98%, raising the concern that genetic diversity has been reduced significantly. Microsatellite data were used to evaluate the level and distribution of genetic variation throughout much of the native range of the tree. Genetic variation in areas affected by anthracnose was as high as or higher than areas without die-offs. We found evidence of four widespread, spatially contiguous genetic clusters. However, there was little relationship between geographic distance and genetic difference. These observations suggest that high dispersal rates and large effective population sizes have so far prevented rapid loss of genetic diversity. The effects of anthracnose on demography and community structure are likely to be far more consequential than short-term genetic effects.

  2. Determination of the variations in levels of phenolic compounds in soybean (Glycine max Merr.) sprouts infected by anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Han; Jeong, Sung Woo; Cho, Young Ah; Park, Semin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Bae, Dong Won; Chung, Jong Il; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Park, Soo-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han; Jin, Jong Sung; Shin, Sung Chul

    2013-09-01

    Soybean sprouts (Kongnamool) are one of the most popular and nutritive traditional vegetables in East Asia. Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is one of the most serious diseases of soybean sprouts. In order to obtain basic information for breeding and/or selecting soybean genotypes with increased natural defense against anthracnose, phenolic compounds were profiled for healthy and infected soybean (Glycine max Merr.) sprouts by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Tryptophan and eight phenolic compounds (daidzin, genistin, malonyldaidzin, malonylgenistin, daidzein, glycitein, genistein and coumestrol) were determined from healthy and inoculated sprouts. Total identified phenolic content was 40.02 ± 0.03 mg kg⁻¹, 99.4% of which was isoflavones. The monitoring suggested that de novo induced glycitein appeared to act as a phytoalexin in the defence mechanism of the soybean sprouts against C. gloeosporioides, and constitutively formed seven phenolic components that functioned as phytoanticipins in the diseased soybean sprouts. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... as aspirin and ibuprofen an infection with the bacteria Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) rare cancerous and noncancerous ... peptic ulcer disease? H. pylori are spiral-shaped bacteria that can cause peptic ulcer disease by damaging ...

  4. Population structure of dogwood anthracnose fungus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Blackwell, Meredith

    2002-12-01

    ABSTRACT Dogwood anthracnose, caused by Discula destructiva, affects several native dogwood species in North America, especially flowering dogwood in the east and Pacific dogwood in the west. The fungus behaves as a recently introduced plant pathogen under episodic selection. Two distinct disjunct groups of fungal isolates corresponding to eastern and western groups were detected by amplified fragment length polymorphisms and sequences of the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, translation elongation factor-1alpha, and beta-tubulin genes. Of 20 genotypes identified among 72 isolates, 17 genotypes were from the eastern United States (n = 50), but only three were present among the western isolates (n = 22), indicating that the eastern population may be more diverse. Most eastern and western isolates belonged to a few widespread clones, and the genetic variability of this apparently asexual fungus was remarkably low compared with that of many other asexual fungi. We conclude that D. destructiva is still under intense selection pressure and that episodic selection may still be in effect. The New York City area, a possible epidemic center in the east, had relatively higher genetic variability than samples from other areas.

  5. Preliminary research on the identification system for anthracnose and powdery mildew of sandalwood leaf based on image processing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a survey on a system that uses digital image processing techniques to identify anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of sandalwood from digital images. Our main objective is researching the most suitable identification technology for the anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of the sandalwood leaf, which provides algorithmic support for the real-time machine judgment of the health status and disease level of sandalwood. We conducted real-time monitoring of Hainan sandalwood leaves with varying severity levels of anthracnose and powdery mildew beginning in March 2014. We used image segmentation, feature extraction and digital image classification and recognition technology to carry out a comparative experimental study for the image analysis of powdery mildew, anthracnose disease and healthy leaves in the field. Performing the actual test for a large number of diseased leaves pointed to three conclusions: (1) Distinguishing effects of BP (Back Propagation) neural network method, in all kinds of classical methods, for sandalwood leaf anthracnose and powdery mildew disease are relatively good; the size of the lesion areas were closest to the actual. (2) The differences between two diseases can be shown well by the shape feature, color feature and texture feature of the disease image. (3) Identifying and diagnosing the diseased leaves have ideal results by SVM, which is based on radial basis kernel function. The identification rate of the anthracnose and healthy leaves was 92% respectively, and that of powdery mildew was 84%. Disease identification technology lays the foundation for remote monitoring disease diagnosis, preparing for remote transmission of the disease images, which is a very good guide and reference for further research of the disease identification and diagnosis system in sandalwood and other species of trees.

  6. Preliminary research on the identification system for anthracnose and powdery mildew of sandalwood leaf based on image processing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a survey on a system that uses digital image processing techniques to identify anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of sandalwood from digital images. Our main objective is researching the most suitable identification technology for the anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of the sandalwood leaf, which provides algorithmic support for the real-time machine judgment of the health status and disease level of sandalwood. We conducted real-time monitoring of Hainan sandalwood leaves with varying severity levels of anthracnose and powdery mildew beginning in March 2014. We used image segmentation, feature extraction and digital image classification and recognition technology to carry out a comparative experimental study for the image analysis of powdery mildew, anthracnose disease and healthy leaves in the field. Performing the actual test for a large number of diseased leaves pointed to three conclusions: (1) Distinguishing effects of BP (Back Propagation) neural network method, in all kinds of classical methods, for sandalwood leaf anthracnose and powdery mildew disease are relatively good; the size of the lesion areas were closest to the actual. (2) The differences between two diseases can be shown well by the shape feature, color feature and texture feature of the disease image. (3) Identifying and diagnosing the diseased leaves have ideal results by SVM, which is based on radial basis kernel function. The identification rate of the anthracnose and healthy leaves was 92% respectively, and that of powdery mildew was 84%. Disease identification technology lays the foundation for remote monitoring disease diagnosis, preparing for remote transmission of the disease images, which is a very good guide and reference for further research of the disease identification and diagnosis system in sandalwood and other species of trees. PMID:28749977

  7. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the scab and spot anthracnose fungus Elsinoë (Myriangiales, Dothideomycetes).

    PubMed

    Fan, X L; Barreto, R W; Groenewald, J Z; Bezerra, J D P; Pereira, O L; Cheewangkoon, R; Mostert, L; Tian, C M; Crous, P W

    2017-06-01

    Species of Elsinoë are phytopathogens causing scab and spot anthracnose on many plants, including some economically important crops such as avocado, citrus, grapevines, and ornamentals such as poinsettias, field crops and woody hosts. Disease symptoms are often easily recognisable, and referred to as signature-bearing diseases, for the cork-like appearance of older infected tissues with scab-like appearance. In some Elsinoë-host associations the resulting symptoms are better described as spot anthracnose. Additionally the infected plants may also show mild to severe distortions of infected organs. Isolation of Elsinoë in pure culture can be very challenging and examination of specimens collected in the field is often frustrating because of the lack of fertile structures. Current criteria for species recognition and host specificity in Elsinoë are unclear due to overlapping morphological characteristics, and the lack of molecular and pathogenicity data. In the present study we revised the taxonomy of Elsinoë based on DNA sequence and morphological data derived from 119 isolates, representing 67 host genera from 17 countries, including 64 ex-type cultures. Combined analyses of ITS, LSU, rpb2 and TEF1-α DNA sequence data were used to reconstruct the backbone phylogeny of the genus Elsinoë. Based on the single nomenclature for fungi, 26 new combinations are proposed in Elsinoë for species that were originally described in Sphaceloma. A total of 13 species are epitypified with notes on their taxonomy and phylogeny. A further eight new species are introduced, leading to a total of 75 Elsinoë species supported by molecular data in the present study. For the most part species of Elsinoë appear to be host specific, although the majority of the species treated are known only from a few isolates, and further collections and pathogenicity studies will be required to reconfirm this conclusion.

  8. Assessing the vulnerability of sorghum converted lines to anthracnose and downy mildew infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A total of 59 converted sorghum lines and six checks were evaluated for resistance to two foliar fungal diseases, anthracnose and downy mildew (SDM) in 2008 and 2009 growing seasons at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, College Station, Texas. In 2008, 23 lines exhibited resistance (35%), 29 sus...

  9. Evaluation of Pseudomonas syringae Strain ESC11 for Biocontrol of Crown Rot and Anthracnose of Banana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae strain ESC11, and 250 'g/ml each of thiabendazole (TBZ) and imazalil reduced crown rot of banana caused by a Fusarium sp. by 0-88% and 73-88%, respectively, in laboratory experiments. ESC11 alone did not significantly reduce rot, mold, or anthracnose in most field trials. TBZ an...

  10. Introgression and pyramiding into common bean market class fabada of genes conferring resistance to anthracnose and potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juan José; Campa, Ana; Pérez-Vega, Elena; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Giraldez, Ramón

    2012-03-01

    Anthracnose and bean common mosaic (BCM) are considered major diseases in common bean crop causing severe yield losses worldwide. This work describes the introgression and pyramiding of genes conferring genetic resistance to BCM and anthracnose local races into line A25, a bean genotype classified as market class fabada. Resistant plants were selected using resistance tests or combining resistance tests and marker-assisted selection. Lines A252, A321, A493, Sanilac BC6-Are, and BRB130 were used as resistance sources. Resistance genes to anthracnose (Co-2 ( C ), Co-2 ( A252 ) and Co-3/9) and/or BCM (I and bc-3) were introgressed in line A25 through six parallel backcrossing programs, and six breeding lines showing a fabada seed phenotype were obtained after six backcross generations: line A1258 from A252; A1231 from A321; A1220 from A493; A1183 and A1878 from Sanilac BC6-Are; and line A2418 from BRB130. Pyramiding of different genes were developed using the pedigree method from a single cross between lines obtained in the introgression step: line A1699 (derived from cross A1258 × A1220), A2438 (A1220 × A1183), A2806 (A1878 × A2418), and A3308 (A1699 × A2806). A characterization based on eight morpho-agronomic traits revealed a limited differentiation among the obtained breeding lines and the recurrent line A25. However, using a set of seven molecular markers linked to the loci used in the breeding programs it was possible to differentiate the 11 fabada lines. Considering the genetic control of the resistance in resistant donor lines, the observed segregations in the last backcrossing generation, the reaction against the pathogens, and the expression of the molecular markers it was also possible to infer the genotype conferring resistance in the ten fabada breeding lines obtained. As a result of these breeding programs, genetic resistance to three anthracnose races controlled by genes included in clusters Co-2 and Co-3/9, and genetic resistance to BCM controlled

  11. Waterfowl diseases: causes, prevention, and control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.; Cross, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Preventing and controlling disease in waterfowl is a difficult job. Few tools are available to deal with disease in highly mobile, unconfined animal populations, and few managers are trained and experienced in the prevention and control of avian diseases. Furthermore, the geographic distribution, frequency of occurrence, magnitude of losses, and causes of diseases in waterfowl, as in other life forms, change over time. Waterfowl mortality from infectious diseases, for example, has increased in the past 20 years (Friend 1992).

  12. Association of RGA-SSCP markers with resistance to downy mildew and anthracnose in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Tantasawat, P A; Poolsawat, O; Prajongjai, T; Chaowiset, W; Tharapreuksapong, A

    2012-07-02

    Downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) and anthracnose (Sphaceloma ampelinum) are two major diseases that severely affect most grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars grown commercially in Thailand. Progress of conventional breeding programs of grapevine for improved resistance to these diseases can be speeded up by selection of molecular markers associated with resistance traits. We evaluated the association between 13 resistance gene analog (RGA)-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) markers with resistance to downy mildew and anthracnose in 71 segregating progenies of seven cross combinations between susceptible cultivars and resistant lines. F(1) hybrids from each cross were assessed for resistance to downy mildew and anthracnose (isolates Nk4-1 and Rc2-1) under laboratory conditions. Association of resistance traits with RGA-SSCP markers was evaluated using simple linear regression analysis. Three RGA-SSCP markers were found to be significantly correlated with anthracnose resistance, whereas significant correlation with downy mildew resistance was observed for only one RGA-SSCP marker. These results demonstrate the usefulness of RGA-SSCP markers. Four candidate markers with significant associations to resistance to these two major diseases of grapevine were identified. However, these putative associations between markers and resistance need to be verified with larger segregating populations before they can be used for marker-assisted selection.

  13. Genetic differentiation of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. truncatum associated with Anthracnose disease of papaya (Carica papaya L.) and bell pepper (Capsium annuum L.) based on ITS PCR-RFLP fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Ariana; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2012-03-01

    Members of the genus Colletotrichum include some of the most economically important fungal pathogens in the world. Accurate diagnosis is critical to devising disease management strategies. Two species, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. truncatum, are responsible for anthracnose disease in papaya (Carica papaya L.) and bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in Trinidad. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of 48 Colletotrichum isolates was sequenced, and the ITS PCR products were analyzed by PCR-RFLP analysis. Restriction site polymorphisms generated from 11 restriction enzymes enabled the identification of specific enzymes that were successful in distinguishing between C. gloeosporioides and C. truncatum isolates. Species-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms generated by the enzymes AluI, HaeIII, PvuII, RsaI, and Sau3A were used to consistently resolve C. gloeosporioides and C. truncatum isolates from papaya. AluI, ApaI, PvuII, RsaI, and SmaI reliably separated isolates of C. gloeosporioides and C. truncatum from bell pepper. PvuII, RsaI, and Sau3A were also capable of distinguishing among the C. gloeosporioides isolates from papaya based on the different restriction patterns that were obtained as a result of intra-specific variation in restriction enzyme recognition sites in the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA region. Of all the isolates tested, C. gloeosporioides from papaya also had the highest number of PCR-RFLP haplotypes. Cluster analysis of sequence and PCR-RFLP data demonstrated that all C. gloeosporioides and C. truncatum isolates clustered separately into species-specific clades regardless of host species. Phylograms also revealed consistent topologies which suggested that the genetic distances for PCR-RFLP-generated data were comparable to that of ITS sequence data. ITS PCR-RFLP fingerprinting is a rapid and reliable method to identify and differentiate between Colletotrichum species.

  14. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Burt, Andrew J; William, H Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K Peter; Kelly, James D; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co-4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co-4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co-4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK-4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co-4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases.

  15. Methyl and p-Bromobenzyl Esters of Hydrogenated Kaurenoic Acid for Controlling Anthracnose in Common Bean Plants.

    PubMed

    Mota, Suellen F; Oliveira, Denilson F; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Soares, Ana Carolina F; Midiwo, Jacob O; Souza, Elaine A

    2017-03-01

    Kaurenoic acid derivatives were prepared and submitted to in vitro assays with the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which causes anthracnose disease in the common bean. The most active substances were found to be methyl and p-bromobenzylesters, 7 and 9, respectively, of the hydrogenated kaurenoic acid, which presented a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.097 and 0.131 mM, respectively, while the commercial fungicide methyl thiophanate (MT) presented a MIC of 0.143 mM. Substances 7 (1.401 mM) and 9 (1.886 mM) reduced the severity of anthracnose in common bean to values statistically comparable to MT (2.044 mM). According to an in silico study, both compounds 7 and 9 are inhibitors of the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) enzyme produced by other organisms, the amino acid sequence of which could be detected in fungal genomes. These substances appeared to act against C. lindemuthianum by inhibiting its KSI. Therefore, substances 7 and 9 are promising for the development of new fungicides.

  16. Application of lemongrass oil in vapour phase for the effective control of anthracnose of 'Sekaki' papaya.

    PubMed

    Ali, A; Wee Pheng, T; Mustafa, M A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the potential use of lemongrass essential oil vapour as an alternative for synthetic fungicides in controlling anthracnose of papaya. Lemongrass oil used in the study was characterized using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) before it was tested against anthracnose of papaya in vitro and in vivo. The GC-FID analysis showed that geranial (45·6%) and neral (34·3%) were the major components in lemongrass oil. In vitro study revealed that lemongrass oil vapour at all concentrations tested (33, 66, 132, 264 and 528 μl l(-1) ) suppressed the mycelial growth and conidial germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. For the in vivo study, 'Sekaki' papaya were exposed to lemongrass oil fumigation (0, 7, 14, 28 μl l(-1) ) for 18 h and at room temperature for 9 days. Lemongrass oil vapour at the concentration of 28 μl l(-1) was most effective against anthracnose of artificially inoculated papaya fruit while quality parameters of papaya were not significantly altered. This suggests that lemongrass oil vapour can control anthracnose disease development on papaya without affecting its natural ripening process. The potential practical application of this technology can reduce reliance on synthetic fungicides for the control of postharvest diseases in papaya. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Neuro-Sweet Disease Causing Orbital Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Taravati, Parisa

    2015-02-01

    Neuro-Sweet disease is a rare condition causing encephalitis or meningitis in addition to the erythematous skin plaques of Sweet syndrome. Neuro-Sweet disease has been associated with several ocular manifestations, including ocular movement disorders, episcleritis, conjunctivitis, uveitis, and optic disc oedema. The author reports a patient with orbital inflammation, cranial neuropathies, and a skin rash in the setting of myelodysplastic syndrome. Biopsy of her skin lesion confirmed the diagnosis of neuro-Sweet disease. To the author's knowledge, this is the first reported case of neuro-Sweet disease causing orbital inflammation. Her ocular inflammation resolved with the use of systemic corticosteroid treatment.

  18. Respiratory Diseases Caused by Coal Mine Dust

    PubMed Central

    Laney, A. Scott; Weissman, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on respiratory diseases caused by coal mine dust. Methods This article presents the results of a literature review initially performed for an International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in summer 2013. Results Coal mine dust causes a spectrum of lung diseases collectively termed coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD). These include Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis, silicosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, dust-related diffuse fibrosis (which can be mistaken for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CMDLD continues to be a problem in the United States, particularly in the central Appalachian region. Treatment of CMDLD is symptomatic. Those with end-stage disease are candidates for lung transplantation. Because CMDLD cannot be cured, prevention is critical. Conclusions Coal mine dust remains a relevant occupational hazard and miners remain at risk for CMDLD. PMID:25285970

  19. Interstitial lung disease probably caused by imipramine.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Prasanna R; Ravi, Ranjani; Gouda, Sinddalingana; Stanley, Weena; Hande, Manjunath H

    2014-01-01

    Drugs are rarely associated with causing interstitial lung disease (ILD). We report a case of a 75-year-old woman who developed ILD after exposure to imipramine. To our knowledge, this is one of the rare cases of ILD probably caused due to imipramine. There is need to report such rare adverse effects related to ILD and drugs for better management of ILD.

  20. [Does periodontal disease cause cardiovascular disease? Analysis of epidemiological evidences].

    PubMed

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Nadanovsky, Paulo

    2003-01-01

    This article reports a critical analysis of epidemiologic studies that evaluated periodontal disease as a cause of cardiovascular disease. Thirty-five studies were identified through a manual search of the special abstracts volumes of the Journal of Dental Research, as well as an electronic search on MEDLINE, LILACS, and ISI and inspection of the articles' bibliographies. Inclusion criteria were: articles in any language published between 1989 and 2000 reporting the presence or absence of an association between periodontal and cardiovascular diseases. Available studies are scarce, and interpretations are limited by potential bias and confounding. The studies analyzed (whether separately or jointly) fail to provide convincing epidemiologic evidence for a causal association between periodontal and cardiovascular diseases. Although the possibility that oral diseases can cause cardiovascular diseases cannot be discarded, until better data are available, periodontal disease should not be incriminated as a cause of cardiovascular disease.

  1. [Fever of unknown cause and autoinflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiro

    2011-09-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are often associated with various kinds of febrile episodes such as fever of unknown origin, periodic fever and recurrent fever. Therefore, in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown cause, autoinflammatory diseases should be considered after exclusion of infections, malignancy and autoimmune diseases. As autoinflammatory diseases now include TRAPS (TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome), CAPS (cryopyrin -associated periodic syndromes), FMF(familial Mediterranean fever), MAPS (mevalonate kinase-associated periodic fever syndrome, hyper-IgD syndrome) and many others, and show symptoms and signs of wide variations, we need to make an accurate diagnosis of them to prevent possible complications such as amyloidosis.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gomes, Kleber Alves; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2016-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the world’s most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola) are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL) controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will contribute to more

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gomes, Kleber Alves; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2016-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the world's most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola) are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL) controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will contribute to more

  4. SCAR, RAPD and RFLP markers linked to a dominant gene (Are) conferring resistance to anthracnose in common bean.

    PubMed

    Adam-Blondon, A F; Sévignac, M; Bannerot, H; Dron, M

    1994-08-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungusColletotrichum lindemuthianum, is a severe disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) controlled, in Europe, by a single dominant gene,Are. Four pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were constructed, in which theAre gene was introgressed into different genetic backgrounds. These pairs of NILs were used to search for DNA markers linked to the resistance gene. Nine molecular markers, five RAPDs and four RFLPs, were found to discriminate between the resistant and the susceptible members of these NILs. A backcross progeny of 120 individuals was analysed to map these markers in relation to theAre locus. Five out of the nine markers were shown to be linked to theAre gene within a distance of 12.0 cM. The most tightly linked, a RAPD marker, was used to generate a pair of primers that specifically amplify this RAPD (sequence characterized amplified region, SCAR).

  5. Biocontrol of Postharvest Anthracnose of Mango Fruit with Debaryomyces Nepalensis and Effects on Storage Quality and Postharvest Physiology.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shanshan; Wan, Bin; Feng, Shuhan; Shao, Yuanzhi

    2015-11-01

    Anthracnose is presently recognized as one of the most important postharvest disease of mango worldwide. To control the disease, chemical fungicides for a long time was widely used among fruit farmers, but recently found that pathogen had developed increasingly resistance to it. With people's growing desire of healthy and green food, finding new and environmentally friendly biological control approach was very necessary. In this paper, we provided a kind of new antagonistic yeast which enriched the strain resources and the efficacy of Debaryomyces nepalensis against postharvest anthracnose of mango fruit and the influence on quality parameters were investigated. The results showed that the decay incidence and lesion diameter of postharvest anthracnose of mango treated by D. nepalensis were significantly reduced compared with the control fruit stored at 25 °C for 30 d or at 15 °C for 40 d, and the higher concentration of D. nepalensis was, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol was. Study also found that 1 h was the best treatment duration and antagonistic yeast inoculated earlier had good biocontrol effect on anthracnose. Meanwhile, treatment by D. nepalensis could significantly reduce postharvest anthracnose of mango, delay the decrease in firmness, TSS, TA, and ascorbic acid value, and do not impair surface color during postharvest storage. Moreover, the increase in MDA (malondialdehyde) content and increase in cell membrane permeability of fruit treated by D. nepalensis was highly inhibited. The results suggested D. nepalensis treatment could not only maintain storage quality of mango fruit, but also decrease the decay incidence to anthracnose disease. All these results indicated that D. nepalensis has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens of mango fruit.

  6. Massive Hemoptysis Caused by Atypical Behcet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young; Hoon, Choi Se

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary and/or bronchial aneurysm with systemic thrombophlebitis can be seen in the case of both Behcet's disease and Hughes-Stovin syndrome. These two diseases may be indistinguishable since the clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings are similar in both cases. In particular, from the perspective of pulmonary involvement, hemoptysis is the leading cause of death in both conditions and is followed by aneurysmal rupture. Here, we report a case in which surgical resection was performed for a patient presenting recurrent hemoptysis as an atypical presentation of Behcet's disease. PMID:24782975

  7. Celiac Disease and Other Causes of Duodenitis.

    PubMed

    Owen, Daniel R; Owen, David A

    2017-07-31

    - Patients who receive an upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination frequently have biopsies taken from the duodenum. Accurate interpretation of duodenal biopsies is essential for patient care. Celiac disease is a common clinical concern, but pathologists need to be aware of other conditions of the duodenum that mimic celiac disease. - To review the normal histologic features of duodenal mucosa and describe the clinical and histologic findings in celiac disease and its mimics, listing the differentiating features of biopsies with villous atrophy and epithelial lymphocytosis. - The study comprises a literature review of pertinent publications as of November 30, 2016. - Celiac disease is a common cause of abnormal duodenal histology. However, many of the histologic features found in the duodenal biopsy of patients with celiac disease are also present in other conditions that affect the small bowel. Diagnostic precision may be enhanced by obtaining a careful patient history and by ancillary laboratory testing, particularly for the presence of antitissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  8. Legionnaires' Disease Caused by Legionella londiniensis

    PubMed Central

    Stallworth, Christina; Steed, Lisa; Fisher, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Legionella londiniensis has been isolated from aqueous environments. However, to our knowledge, this organism has never been isolated from clinical specimens. A case of Legionnaires' disease in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient caused by this organism is described, which confirms that L. londiniensis can be an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:23052303

  9. Human disease causing viruses vectored by mosquitoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are a number of disease-causing viruses transmitted to people primarily through the bite of infected mosquitoes. Female mosquitoes take blood meals to produce eggs (Fig. 1). A mosquito that bites an infected animal may pick up a virus within the blood meal. If the mosquito is the appropriate s...

  10. Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella londiniensis.

    PubMed

    Stallworth, Christina; Steed, Lisa; Fisher, Mark A; Nolte, Frederick S

    2012-12-01

    Legionella londiniensis has been isolated from aqueous environments. However, to our knowledge, this organism has never been isolated from clinical specimens. A case of Legionnaires' disease in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient caused by this organism is described, which confirms that L. londiniensis can be an opportunistic pathogen.

  11. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  12. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  13. [Epidemiology and causes of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Lill, C M; Klein, C

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and has a growing socioeconomic impact due to demographic changes in the industrial nations. There are several forms of PD, a fraction of which (<5%) are monogenic, i. e. caused by mutations in single genes. At present, six genes have been established for the clinically classical form of parkinsonism including three autosomal dominantly (SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35) and three autosomal recessively inherited ones (Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1). In addition, there are a plethora of genes causing atypical forms of parkinsonism. In contrast, idiopathic PD is of a multifactorial nature. Genome-wide association studies have established a total of 26 genetic loci for this form of the disease; however, for most of these loci the underlying functional genetic variants have not yet been identified and the respective disease mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, there are a number of environmental and life style factors that are associated with idiopathic PD. Exposure to pesticides and possibly a history of head trauma represent genuine risk factors. Other PD-associated factors, such as smoking and intake of coffee and alcohol may not represent risk factors per se and the cause-effect relationship has not yet been elucidated for most of these factors. A patient with a positive family history and/or an early age of disease onset should undergo counseling with respect to a possible monogenic form of the disease. Disease prediction based on genetic, environmental and life style factors is not yet possible for idiopathic PD and potential gene-specific therapies are currently in the development or early testing phase.

  14. Overexpression of a defensin enhances resistance to a fruit-specific anthracnose fungus in pepper.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyo-Hyoun; Park, Sangkyu; Park, Soomin; Oh, Byung-Jun; Back, Kyoungwhan; Han, Oksoo; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kim, Young Soon

    2014-01-01

    Functional characterization of a defensin, J1-1, was conducted to evaluate its biotechnological potentiality in transgenic pepper plants against the causal agent of anthracnose disease, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. To determine antifungal activity, J1-1 recombinant protein was generated and tested for the activity against C. gloeosporioides, resulting in 50% inhibition of fungal growth at a protein concentration of 0.1 mg·mL-1. To develop transgenic pepper plants resistant to anthracnose disease, J1-1 cDNA under the control of 35S promoter was introduced into pepper via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. Southern and Northern blot analyses confirmed that a single copy of the transgene in selected transgenic plants was normally expressed and also stably transmitted to subsequent generations. The insertion of T-DNA was further analyzed in three independent homozygous lines using inverse PCR, and confirmed the integration of transgene in non-coding region of genomic DNA. Immunoblot results showed that the level of J1-1 proteins, which was not normally accumulated in unripe fruits, accumulated high in transgenic plants but appeared to differ among transgenic lines. Moreover, the expression of jasmonic acid-biosynthetic genes and pathogenesis-related genes were up-regulated in the transgenic lines, which is co-related with the resistance of J1-1 transgenic plants to anthracnose disease. Consequently, the constitutive expression of J1-1 in transgenic pepper plants provided strong resistance to the anthracnose fungus that was associated with highly reduced lesion formation and fungal colonization. These results implied the significance of the antifungal protein, J1-1, as a useful agronomic trait to control fungal disease.

  15. Overexpression of a Defensin Enhances Resistance to a Fruit-Specific Anthracnose Fungus in Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo-Hyoun; Park, Sangkyu; Park, Soomin; Oh, Byung-Jun; Back, Kyoungwhan; Han, Oksoo; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kim, Young Soon

    2014-01-01

    Functional characterization of a defensin, J1-1, was conducted to evaluate its biotechnological potentiality in transgenic pepper plants against the causal agent of anthracnose disease, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. To determine antifungal activity, J1-1 recombinant protein was generated and tested for the activity against C. gloeosporioides, resulting in 50% inhibition of fungal growth at a protein concentration of 0.1 mg·mL−1. To develop transgenic pepper plants resistant to anthracnose disease, J1-1 cDNA under the control of 35S promoter was introduced into pepper via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. Southern and Northern blot analyses confirmed that a single copy of the transgene in selected transgenic plants was normally expressed and also stably transmitted to subsequent generations. The insertion of T-DNA was further analyzed in three independent homozygous lines using inverse PCR, and confirmed the integration of transgene in non-coding region of genomic DNA. Immunoblot results showed that the level of J1-1 proteins, which was not normally accumulated in unripe fruits, accumulated high in transgenic plants but appeared to differ among transgenic lines. Moreover, the expression of jasmonic acid-biosynthetic genes and pathogenesis-related genes were up-regulated in the transgenic lines, which is co-related with the resistance of J1-1 transgenic plants to anthracnose disease. Consequently, the constitutive expression of J1-1 in transgenic pepper plants provided strong resistance to the anthracnose fungus that was associated with highly reduced lesion formation and fungal colonization. These results implied the significance of the antifungal protein, J1-1, as a useful agronomic trait to control fungal disease. PMID:24848280

  16. Uncommon causes of occupational interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Gong, H

    1996-09-01

    Uncommon causes of occupational interstitial lung disease, or pneumoconiosis, are being increasingly recognized and diagnosed. The fibrogenic potential of numerous types of respirable inorganic particles remains poorly understood but is significantly determined by lung deposition and clearance, the agent's size and solubility, host susceptibility, and other factors. Microanalytic techniques have improved the identification of uncommon or unusual biopersistent particles or elements in fibrotic lung tissue. Recent findings in workers exposed to manmade vitreous fibers, silicon carbide, talc, titanium, cerium, and polyvinyl chloride provide new clinical insights into not only their specific fibrogenic capabilities but also in the broader appreciation that many cases of unexplained interstitial lung disease may be caused by occupational exposures to one or more uncommon airborne substances.

  17. Application of next-generation sequencing for rapid marker development in molecular plant breeding: a case study on anthracnose disease resistance in Lupinus angustifolius L.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaan; Tao, Ye; Zheng, Zequn; Li, Chengdao; Sweetingham, Mark W; Howieson, John G

    2012-07-17

    In the last 30 years, a number of DNA fingerprinting methods such as RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, DArT, have been extensively used in marker development for molecular plant breeding. However, it remains a daunting task to identify highly polymorphic and closely linked molecular markers for a target trait for molecular marker-assisted selection. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is far more powerful than any existing generic DNA fingerprinting methods in generating DNA markers. In this study, we employed a grain legume crop Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) as a test case, and examined the utility of an NGS-based method of RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) sequencing as DNA fingerprinting for rapid, cost-effective marker development tagging a disease resistance gene for molecular breeding. Twenty informative plants from a cross of RxS (disease resistant x susceptible) in lupin were subjected to RAD single-end sequencing by multiplex identifiers. The entire RAD sequencing products were resolved in two lanes of the 16-lanes per run sequencing platform Solexa HiSeq2000. A total of 185 million raw reads, approximately 17 Gb of sequencing data, were collected. Sequence comparison among the 20 test plants discovered 8207 SNP markers. Filtration of DNA sequencing data with marker identification parameters resulted in the discovery of 38 molecular markers linked to the disease resistance gene Lanr1. Five randomly selected markers were converted into cost-effective, simple PCR-based markers. Linkage analysis using marker genotyping data and disease resistance phenotyping data on a F8 population consisting of 186 individual plants confirmed that all these five markers were linked to the R gene. Two of these newly developed sequence-specific PCR markers, AnSeq3 and AnSeq4, flanked the target R gene at a genetic distance of 0.9 centiMorgan (cM), and are now replacing the markers previously developed by a traditional DNA fingerprinting method for marker

  18. Application of next-generation sequencing for rapid marker development in molecular plant breeding: a case study on anthracnose disease resistance in Lupinus angustifolius L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the last 30 years, a number of DNA fingerprinting methods such as RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, DArT, have been extensively used in marker development for molecular plant breeding. However, it remains a daunting task to identify highly polymorphic and closely linked molecular markers for a target trait for molecular marker-assisted selection. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is far more powerful than any existing generic DNA fingerprinting methods in generating DNA markers. In this study, we employed a grain legume crop Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) as a test case, and examined the utility of an NGS-based method of RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) sequencing as DNA fingerprinting for rapid, cost-effective marker development tagging a disease resistance gene for molecular breeding. Results Twenty informative plants from a cross of RxS (disease resistant x susceptible) in lupin were subjected to RAD single-end sequencing by multiplex identifiers. The entire RAD sequencing products were resolved in two lanes of the 16-lanes per run sequencing platform Solexa HiSeq2000. A total of 185 million raw reads, approximately 17 Gb of sequencing data, were collected. Sequence comparison among the 20 test plants discovered 8207 SNP markers. Filtration of DNA sequencing data with marker identification parameters resulted in the discovery of 38 molecular markers linked to the disease resistance gene Lanr1. Five randomly selected markers were converted into cost-effective, simple PCR-based markers. Linkage analysis using marker genotyping data and disease resistance phenotyping data on a F8 population consisting of 186 individual plants confirmed that all these five markers were linked to the R gene. Two of these newly developed sequence-specific PCR markers, AnSeq3 and AnSeq4, flanked the target R gene at a genetic distance of 0.9 centiMorgan (cM), and are now replacing the markers previously developed by a traditional DNA fingerprinting method for

  19. Emerging infectious diseases: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Berns, D S; Rager, B

    2000-12-01

    As the twenty-first century begins it becomes increasingly apparent that the twentieth century, which opened with the promise of the eradication of most infectious diseases, closed with the specter of the reemergence of many deadly infectious diseases that have a rapidly increasing incidence and geographic range. Equally if not more alarming is the appearance of new infectious diseases that have become major sources of morbidity and mortality. Among recent examples are HIV/AIDS, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Lyme disease, hemolytic uremic syndrome (caused by a strain of Escherichia coli), Rift Valley fever, Dengue hemorrhagic fever, malaria, cryptosporidiosis, and schistosomiasis. The reasons for this situation are easily identified in some cases as associated with treatment modalities (permissive use of antibiotics), the industrial use of antibiotics, demographic changes, societal behavior patterns, changes in ecology, global warming, the inability to deliver minimal health care and the neglect of well-established public health priorities. In addition is the emergence of diseases of another type. We have begun to characterize the potential microbial etiology of what has historically been referred to as chronic diseases.

  20. Immunogenetics and the cause of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Baxter, A G

    1997-01-01

    Autoimmune disease results from the action of environmental factors on a predisposed genotype. In this review, the role of genetic susceptibility in the aetiology of autoimmune disease is examined. As the genetics of autoimmune diabetes has been studied more intensively than that of other autoimmune diseases, supporting evidence is drawn principally from that example. Autoimmune diseases are not inherited as entities but as constitutions which confer an increased probability of developing disease. It is proposed that there are two components to autoimmune disease susceptibility. One confers susceptibility to autoimmunity per se, while the other determines tissue specificity. In this review, the concept of liability is introduced as a tool used in quantitative genetics and is applied to the analysis of autoimmune diabetes by considering a threshold model. In this example, empirically derived incidence figures are used to calculate heritability which is a relative measure of the influence of genetics and environmental factors. The validity of applying the concept of liability to diabetes is confirmed by examining the values of heritability calculated from empirical data obtained from different kindred relationships, and by confirming that the assumptions on which liability is based are supported by recent gene mapping data. Finally, the physiological significance of liability is considered and its significance to the cause of autoimmunity discussed.

  1. Plague pneumonia disease caused by Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Cleri, D J; Vernaleo, J R; Lombardi, L J; Rabbat, M S; Mathew, A; Marton, R; Reyelt, M C

    1997-03-01

    Plague is a zoonotic infection caused by Yersina pesits, a pleomorphic, gram-negative non-spore-forming coccobacillus that is more accurately classified as a subspecies of Y pseudotuberculosis. Animal reservoirs include rodents, rabbits, and occasionally larger animals. Cats become ill and have spread pneumonic disease to man. Dogs may be a significant sentinel animal as well as a reservoir, although do not usually become ill. Flea bites commonly spread disease to man. Person to person spread has not been a recent feature until the purported outbreak of plague and plague pneumonia in India in 1994. Other factors that increase risk of infection in endemic areas are occupation-veterinarians and assistants, pet ownership, direct animal-reservoir contact especially during the hunting season, living in households with an index case, and, mild winters, cool moist springs, and early summers. Clinical presentations include subclinical plague (positive serology without disease); plague pharyngitis; pestis minor (abortive bubonic plague); bubonic plague; septicemic plague; pneumonic plague; and plague meningitis. Most prominent of plague's differential diagnosis are Reye's syndrome, other causes of lymphadenitis, bacterial pneumonias, tularemia, and acute surgical abdomen. Treatment has reduced mortality from 40-90% to 5-18%. The drug of choice (except for plague meningitis) is streptomycin, with tetracyclines being alternatives. Parenteral cholamphenicol is the treatment of choice for plague meningitis. A tetracycline should be administered as chemoprophylaxis to all contacts over the age of 8 years. Plague vaccine is available, but is only partially protective.

  2. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  3. A Fungal Effector With Host Nuclear Localization and DNA-Binding Properties Is Required for Maize Anthracnose Development.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Walter A; Sanz-Martín, José M; Rech, Gabriel E; Armijos-Jaramillo, Vinicio D; Rivera, Lina P; Echeverria, María Mercedes; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-02-01

    Plant pathogens have the capacity to manipulate the host immune system through the secretion of effectors. We identified 27 putative effector proteins encoded in the genome of the maize anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola that are likely to target the host's nucleus, as they simultaneously contain sequence signatures for secretion and nuclear localization. We functionally characterized one protein, identified as CgEP1. This protein is synthesized during the early stages of disease development and is necessary for anthracnose development in maize leaves, stems, and roots. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies confirmed that this effector targets the host's nucleus and defines a novel class of double-stranded DNA-binding protein. We show that CgEP1 arose from a gene duplication in an ancestor of a lineage of monocot-infecting Colletotrichum spp. and has undergone an intense evolution process, with evidence for episodes of positive selection. We detected CgEP1 homologs in several species of a grass-infecting lineage of Colletotrichum spp., suggesting that its function may be conserved across a large number of anthracnose pathogens. Our results demonstrate that effectors targeted to the host nucleus may be key elements for disease development and aid in the understanding of the genetic basis of anthracnose development in maize plants.

  4. A highly conserved metalloprotease effector enhances virulence in the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Martín, José M; Pacheco-Arjona, José Ramón; Bello-Rico, Víctor; Vargas, Walter A; Monod, Michel; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-09-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola causes maize anthracnose, an agronomically important disease with a worldwide distribution. We have identified a fungalysin metalloprotease (Cgfl) with a role in virulence. Transcriptional profiling experiments and live cell imaging show that Cgfl is specifically expressed during the biotrophic stage of infection. To determine whether Cgfl has a role in virulence, we obtained null mutants lacking Cgfl and performed pathogenicity and live microscopy assays. The appressorium morphology of the null mutants is normal, but they exhibit delayed development during the infection process on maize leaves and roots, showing that Cgfl has a role in virulence. In vitro chitinase activity assays of leaves infected with wild-type and null mutant strains show that, in the absence of Cgfl, maize leaves exhibit increased chitinase activity. Phylogenetic analyses show that Cgfl is highly conserved in fungi. Similarity searches, phylogenetic analysis and transcriptional profiling show that C. graminicola encodes two LysM domain-containing homologues of Ecp6, suggesting that this fungus employs both Cgfl-mediated and LysM protein-mediated strategies to control chitin signalling. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Corals diseases are a major cause of coral death

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corals, like humans, are susceptible to diseases. Some coral diseases are associated with pathogenic bacteria; however, the causes of most remain unknown. Some diseases trigger rapid and extensive mortality, while others slowly cause localized color changes or injure coral tiss...

  6. Corals diseases are a major cause of coral death

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corals, like humans, are susceptible to diseases. Some coral diseases are associated with pathogenic bacteria; however, the causes of most remain unknown. Some diseases trigger rapid and extensive mortality, while others slowly cause localized color changes or injure coral tiss...

  7. Glomerular diseases: genetic causes and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Inagi, Reiko

    2010-09-01

    The glomerulus consists of capillary tufts, a mesangial cell component and the Bowman capsule. The glomerular filtration barrier is composed of glomerular endothelial cells, a basement membrane, and podocytes. Particular components of the slit diaphragm and the glomerular basement membrane strictly orchestrate the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. The basement membrane is made of a highly crosslinked macromolecular meshwork of type IV collagen, proteoglycans, and laminin. Genetic forms of glomerular disease are predominantly caused by genetic defects in these molecular structures or in factors that regulate the glomerular filtration barrier. In addition, abnormal IgA1 glycosylation can increase susceptibility to IgA nephropathy. Dysregulation of the complement system or of platelet activation can lead to the development of endocapillary lesions, which manifest as thrombotic microangiopathy. Glomerular dysfunction is also encountered in several genetic metabolic and mitochondrial disorders. Discoveries of mutations in a range of genes have provided new insights into the mechanisms of glomerular disease. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the genetics and therapeutics of a number of glomerular diseases.

  8. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-06-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit.

  9. Chemical analysis and toxicity of seaweed extracts with inhibitory activity against tropical fruit anthracnose fungi.

    PubMed

    Machado, Levi Pompermayer; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Jamal, Claudia Masrouah; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Centeno, Danilo da Cruz; Colepicolo Neto, Pio; de Carvalho, Luciana Retz; Yokoya, Nair S

    2014-07-01

    Banana and papaya are among the most important crops in the tropics, with a value amounting to millions of dollars per year. However, these fruits suffer significant losses due to anthracnose, a fungal disease. It is well known that certain seaweed extracts possess antifungal activity, but no published data appear to exist on the practical application of this property. In the present study, five organic Brazilian seaweed extracts were screened for their activity against banana and papaya anthracnose fungi. Furthermore, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of the extracts were evaluated by the brine shrimp lethality assay and the Allium cepa root-tip mutagenicity test respectively, while their major components were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Strong fungus-inhibitory effects of Ochtodes secundiramea and Laurencia dendroidea extracts were observed on both papaya (100 and 98% respectively) and banana (89 and 78% respectively). This impressive activity could be associated with halogenated terpenes, the major components of both extracts. Only Hypnea musciformis extract showed cytotoxic and mutagenic effects. The results of this study suggest the potential use of seaweed extracts as a source of antifungal agents with low toxicity to control anthracnose in papaya and banana during storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit. PMID:25288942

  11. [Revealing the chemical changes of tea cell wall induced by anthracnose with confocal Raman microscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Hu, Xiao-qian; Lou, Bing-gan; He, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Healthy tea and tea infected by anthracnose were first studied by confocal Raman microscopy to illustrate chemical changes of cell wall in the present paper. Firstly, Raman spectra of both healthy and infected sample tissues were collected with spatial resolution at micron-level, and ultrastructure of healthy and infected tea cells was got from scanning electron microscope. These results showed that there were significant changes in Raman shift and Raman intensity between healthy and infected cell walls, indicating that great differences occurred in chemical compositions of cell walls between healthy and infected samples. In details, intensities at many Raman bands which were closely associated with cellulose, pectin, esters were reduced after infection, revealing that the content of chemical compounds such as cellulose, pectin, esters was decreased after infection. Subsequently, chemical imaging of both healthy and infected tea cell walls were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of cellulose and microscopic spatial structure. It was found that not only the content of cellulose was reduced greatly after infection, but also the ordered structure of cellulose was destroyed by anthracnose infection. Thus, confocal Raman microscopy was shown to be a powerful tool to detect the chemical changes in cell wall of tea caused by anthracnose without any chemical treatment or staining. This research firstly applied confocal Raman microscopy in phytopathology for the study of interactive relationship between host and pathogen, and it will also open a new way for intensive study of host-pathogen at cellular level.

  12. Engineering a genetic transformation system for Colletotrichum acutatum, the causal fungus of lime anthracnose and postbloom fruit drop of citrus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang Ren; Shilts, Turksen; Li, Wei; Timmer, L W

    2002-07-16

    Postbloom fruit drop (PFD) of citrus is caused by Colletotrichum acutatum. PFD isolates infect flower petals, induce abscission of small fruit and can cause severe yield loss on most citrus cultivars. Isolates from Key lime anthracnose (KLA) cause that disease on the Mexican lime, but also cause PFD on sweet orange. Both PFD and KLA isolates exhibited resistance to the common selection agents including hygromycin, bialaphos, benomyl and geneticin/G418. A genetic transformation system was developed for C. acutatum to confer resistance to sulfonylurea (chlorimuron ethyl) by expressing an acetolactate synthase gene (sur) cassette from Magnaporthe grisea. The protocol was tested on 11 different KLA and PFD isolates. The transformation frequencies were highly variable among isolates and among experiments (0-17.9 per microg circular DNA using 10(7) protoplasts). Southern blot analysis of transformants indicated that the plasmid vector was randomly integrated in multiple copies into the genome of C. acutatum. Addition of restriction enzymes or use of a vector with homologous sequences did not change the transformation frequencies, but tended to reduce the number integrated. Over 97% of the transformants retained the sulfonylurea resistance phenotype under non-selective conditions. Of 300 transformants tested, three were unable to cause necrotic lesions on detached Key lime leaves. The transformation method opens up opportunities for the genetic manipulation of C. acutatum.

  13. Assessment of sorghum germplasm from Burkina Faso and South Africa to identify new sources of resistance to grain mold and anthracnose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum is an important worldwide crop whose yield can be significantly reduced by anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineola) and grain mold diseases (multiple fungi). The identification of new genetic sources of resistance to both diseases is imperative for the development of new sorghum varieties. T...

  14. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines. PMID:28076395

  15. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingli; Wu, Jing; Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines.

  16. Pheromones cause disease: pheromone/odourant transduction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B

    2001-09-01

    This paper compares two models of the sense of smell and demonstrates that the new model has advantages over the accepted model with implications for medical research. The accepted transduction model had an odourant or pheromone contacting an aqueous sensory lymph then movement through it to a receptor membrane beneath. If the odourant or pheromone were non-soluble, the odourant/pheromone supposedly would be bound to a soluble protein in the lymph to be carried across. Thus, an odourant/carrier protein complex physically moved through the receptor lymph/mucus to interact with a membrane bound receptor. After the membranous receptor interaction, the molecule would be deactivated and any odourant/pheromone-binding protein recycled. This new electrical chemosensory model being proposed here has the pheromone or other odourant generating an electrical event in the extra-cellular mucus. Before the pheromone arrives, proteins of the 'carrier class' dissolved in the receptor mucus slowly and continuously sequester ions. A sensed pheromonal chemical species sorbs to the mucus and immediately binds to the now ion-holding dissolved protein. The binding of the pheromone to the protein causes a measurable conformational change in the pheromone/odourant-binding protein, desequestering ions. Releasing the bound ions changes the potential differences across a nearby super-sensitive dendritic membrane resulting in dendrite excitation. Pheromones will be implicated in the aetiology of the infectious, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases. This is the third article in a series of twelve to systematically explore this contention (see references 1-9). Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  17. [Aluminum, hypothetic cause of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Pailler, F M; Bequet, D; Corbé, H; Giudicelli, C P

    1995-03-11

    A great deal of research has focused on aluminium as a putative causative factor in Alzheimer's disease. We measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry aluminium levels in blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid from 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease, compared with 20 control individuals. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. This suggests that aluminium is not a causative factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Phylogeny and variability of Colletotrichum truncatum associated with soybean anthracnose in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rogério, F; Ciampi-Guillardi, M; Barbieri, M C G; Bragança, C A D; Seixas, C D S; Almeida, A M R; Massola, N S

    2017-02-01

    Fungal diseases are among the main factors limiting high yields of soybean crop. Colletotrichum isolates from soybean plants with anthracnose symptoms were studied from different regions and time periods in Brazil using molecular, morphological and pathogenic analyses. Bayesian phylogenetic inference of GAPDH, HIS3 and ITS-5.8S rDNA sequences, the morphologies of colony and conidia, and inoculation tests on seeds and seedlings were performed. All isolates clustered only with Colletotrichum truncatum species in three well-separated clusters. Intraspecific genetic diversity revealed 27 distinct haplotypes in 51 fungal isolates; some of which were identical to C. truncatum sequences from other regions around the world, while others were related to alternative hosts. Conidia were falcate, hyaline, unicellular and aseptate, formed in acervuli, with variable dimensions. Despite being pathogenic to seedlings by both inoculation methods, variation was observed in the aggressiveness of the tested isolates, which was not correlated with genetic variation. The identification of C. truncatum in the sampled isolates was evidenced as being the only causal agent of soybean anthracnose in Brazil until 2007, with relevant genetic, morphological and pathogenic variability as well as a broad geographical origin. The wide distribution of the predominant C. truncatum haplotype indicated the existence of a highly efficient mechanism of pathogen dispersal over long distances, reinforcing the role of seeds as the primary source of disease inoculum. The characterization and distribution of Colletotrichum species in soybean-producing regions in Brazil is fundamental for understanding the disease epidemiology and for ensuring effective control strategies against anthracnose. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension caused by left heart disease].

    PubMed

    Erer, Betül; Eren, Mehmet

    2010-09-01

    Increased resistance to pulmonary venous drainage is the main mechanism in pulmonary hypertension (PH) developing due to left heart disease. This condition may occur as a result of various diseases affecting left ventricle, left atrium, mitral or aortic valves. Pulmonary hypertension is the common and well-recognized complication of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension accompanying chronic heart failure is related to increased mortality. Treatment should be tailored according to the underlying disease.

  20. DISEASE OUTBREAKS CAUSED BY DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty-two waterborne disease outbreaks were reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1981. The outbreaks occurred in 17 states and involved 4430 cases. This was only 64% of the number of outbreaks that were reported in 1980 and...

  1. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast ... Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast ...

  2. Animal Diseases Caused by Orbiviruses, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Hafsa; Casal, Jordi; Alba, Anna; Allepuz, Alberto; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Hafsi, Leila; Kount-Chareb, Houria; Bouayed-Chaouach, Nadera; Saadaoui, Hassiba

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies against bluetongue virus were detected in cattle, sheep, goats, and camels in Algeria in 2008. Antibodies against epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus were detected in cattle, but antibodies against African horse sickness virus were not detected in horses and mules. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in northern Africa poses a major risk for the European Union. PMID:22172371

  3. Invasive disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; van Ingen, Jakko; Morrissey, Anne B; Boeree, Martin J; Mavura, Daudi R; Swai, Britta; Thielman, Nathan M; Bartlett, John A; Grossman, Henning; Maro, Venance P; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Data on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. During 2006-2008, we identified 3 HIV-infected patients in northern Tanzania who had invasive NTM; 2 were infected with "Mycobacterium sherrisii" and 1 with M. avium complex sequevar MAC-D. Invasive NTM disease is present in HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. DISEASE OUTBREAKS CAUSED BY DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty-two waterborne disease outbreaks were reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1981. The outbreaks occurred in 17 states and involved 4430 cases. This was only 64% of the number of outbreaks that were reported in 1980 and...

  5. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of an Anthracnose-Resistant Tea Plant Cultivar Reveals Genes Associated with Resistance to Colletotrichum camelliae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yuchun; Cao, Hongli; Hao, Xinyuan; Zeng, Jianming; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xinchao

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant breeding is a topic of great economic importance. However, disease remains a major cause of yield and quality losses. In this study, an anthracnose-resistant cultivar, ZC108, was developed. An infection assay revealed different responses to Colletotrichum sp. infection between ZC108 and its parent cultivar LJ43. ZC108 had greater resistance than LJ43 to Colletotrichum camelliae. Additionally, ZC108 exhibited earlier sprouting in the spring, as well as different leaf shape and plant architecture. Microarray data revealed that the genes that are differentially expressed between LJ43 and ZC108 mapped to secondary metabolism-related pathways, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways. In addition, genes involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling as well as plant-pathogen interaction pathways were also changed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of 27 selected genes in infected and uninfected tea plant leaves. Genes encoding a MADS-box transcription factor, NBS-LRR disease-resistance protein, and phenylpropanoid metabolism pathway components (CAD, CCR, POD, beta-glucosidase, ALDH and PAL) were among those differentially expressed in ZC108. PMID:26849553

  7. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    PubMed

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of an Anthracnose-Resistant Tea Plant Cultivar Reveals Genes Associated with Resistance to Colletotrichum camelliae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yuchun; Cao, Hongli; Hao, Xinyuan; Zeng, Jianming; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xinchao

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant breeding is a topic of great economic importance. However, disease remains a major cause of yield and quality losses. In this study, an anthracnose-resistant cultivar, ZC108, was developed. An infection assay revealed different responses to Colletotrichum sp. infection between ZC108 and its parent cultivar LJ43. ZC108 had greater resistance than LJ43 to Colletotrichum camelliae. Additionally, ZC108 exhibited earlier sprouting in the spring, as well as different leaf shape and plant architecture. Microarray data revealed that the genes that are differentially expressed between LJ43 and ZC108 mapped to secondary metabolism-related pathways, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways. In addition, genes involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling as well as plant-pathogen interaction pathways were also changed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of 27 selected genes in infected and uninfected tea plant leaves. Genes encoding a MADS-box transcription factor, NBS-LRR disease-resistance protein, and phenylpropanoid metabolism pathway components (CAD, CCR, POD, beta-glucosidase, ALDH and PAL) were among those differentially expressed in ZC108.

  9. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens. PMID:28846714

  10. Penetration and colonization of unwounded maize tissues by the maize anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola and the related nonpathogen C. sublineolum.

    PubMed

    Venard, C; Vaillancourt, L

    2007-01-01

    The maize anthracnose stalk-rot fungus Colletotrichum graminicola infects its host primarily through wounds in the stalks that are caused by insects. However it also can cause stalk-rot disease without wounding. It is not known how the pathogen enters stalks in the absence of wounds. Studies have suggested that direct invasion through the highly lignified rind tissues is not a viable means of entry. A cytological approach was used to investigate the ability of C. graminicola to penetrate and colonize intact maize stalks. The pathogen had a significant capacity for direct penetration, but this mechanism of infection was much slower and less efficient than penetration through wounds. The fungus breached the lignified rind fibers by passing through small openings in the cell walls via narrow hyphal connections. Epidermal cells and rind fiber cells did not appear to become rotted. Rotting only occurred once the pathogen had penetrated into the pith parenchyma cells. To our surprise the closely related fungus C. sublineolum, which is not normally a pathogen of maize, also was capable of infecting intact maize stalks, although to a lesser degree than C. graminicola. The two species also were observed on intact roots and leaves, and C. sublineolum was incapable of infecting those tissues whereas C. graminicola efficiently colonized both. This suggests the interesting possibility that nonhost resistance to C. sublineolum is conditional and perhaps also tissue-specific.

  11. Diseases and Their Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Important diseases and their management practices of lentil were reviewed. The diseases reveiwed include Ascochyta blight (Ascochyta lentis), Anthracnose (Colletotrichum truncatum), White mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), rust (Uromyces viciae-fabae), Botrytis gray mold (Botrytis cinerea and B. faba...

  12. Characterisation of Colletotrichum Species Associated with Anthracnose of Banana

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Latiffah; Sahak, Shamsiah; Zakaria, Maziah; Salleh, Baharuddin

    2009-01-01

    A total of 13 Colletotrichum isolates were obtained from different banana cultivars (Musa spp.) with symptoms of anthracnose. Colletotrichum isolates from anthracnose of guava (Psidium guajava) and water apple (Syzygium aqueum) were also included in this study. Based on cultural and morphological characteristics, isolates from banana and guava were identified as Colletotrichum musae and from water apple as Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes. Isolates of C. musae from banana and guava had similar banding patterns in a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with four random primers, and they clustered together in a UPGMA analysis. C. gloeosporiodes from water apple was clustered in a separate cluster. Based on the present study, C. musae was frequently isolated from anthracnose of different banana cultivars and the RAPD banding patterns of C. musae isolates were highly similar but showed intraspecific variations. PMID:24575184

  13. Characterisation of colletotrichum species associated with anthracnose of banana.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Latiffah; Sahak, Shamsiah; Zakaria, Maziah; Salleh, Baharuddin

    2009-12-01

    A total of 13 Colletotrichum isolates were obtained from different banana cultivars (Musa spp.) with symptoms of anthracnose. Colletotrichum isolates from anthracnose of guava (Psidium guajava) and water apple (Syzygium aqueum) were also included in this study. Based on cultural and morphological characteristics, isolates from banana and guava were identified as Colletotrichum musae and from water apple as Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes. Isolates of C. musae from banana and guava had similar banding patterns in a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with four random primers, and they clustered together in a UPGMA analysis. C. gloeosporiodes from water apple was clustered in a separate cluster. Based on the present study, C. musae was frequently isolated from anthracnose of different banana cultivars and the RAPD banding patterns of C. musae isolates were highly similar but showed intraspecific variations.

  14. For Seniors, Treatment for One Eye Disease May Cause Another

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164127.html For Seniors, Treatment for One Eye Disease May Cause Another Risk of glaucoma tied ... Drugs that preserve vision in people with the eye disease called age-related macular degeneration might increase ...

  15. Haemophilus haemolyticus Isolates Causing Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Briere, Elizabeth C.; Katz, Lee S.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Clark, Thomas A.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    We report seven cases of Haemophilus haemolyticus invasive disease detected in the United States, which were previously misidentified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. All cases had different symptoms and presentations. Our study suggests that a testing scheme that includes reliable PCR assays and standard microbiological methods should be used in order to improve H. haemolyticus identification. PMID:22573587

  16. Effect of calcium chloride treatments on calcium content, anthracnose severity and antioxidant activity in papaya fruit during ambient storage.

    PubMed

    Madani, Babak; Mirshekari, Amin; Yahia, Elhadi

    2016-07-01

    There have been no reports on the effects of preharvest calcium application on anthracnose disease severity, antioxidant activity and cellular changes during ambient storage of papaya, and therefore the objective of this study was to investigate these effects. Higher calcium concentrations (1.5 and 2% w/v) increased calcium concentration in the peel and pulp tissues, maintained firmness, and reduced anthracnose incidence and severity. While leakage of calcium-treated fruit was lower for 1.5 and 2% calcium treatments compared to the control, microscopic results confirmed that pulp cell wall thickness was higher after 6 days in storage, for the 2% calcium treatment compared to the control. Calcium-treated fruit also had higher total antioxidant activity and total phenolic compounds during storage. Calcium chloride, especially at higher concentrations, is effective in maintaining papaya fruit quality during ambient storage. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazokopakis, Elias E; Papadakis, John A; Kofteridis, Diamantis P

    2007-01-01

    We report five cases with unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestasis, including consumption of Teucrium polium (family Lamiaceae) in the form of tea, Stauffer’s syndrome, treatment with tamoxifen citrate for breast cancer, infection with Coxiella Burnetii (acute Q fever), and infection with Brucella melitensis (acute brucellosis). PMID:17465487

  18. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Thyme oil vapour and modified atmosphere packaging reduce anthracnose incidence and maintain fruit quality in avocado.

    PubMed

    Sellamuthu, Periyar Selvam; Mafune, Mpho; Sivakumar, Dharini; Soundy, Puffy

    2013-09-01

    Postharvest application of prochloraz fungicide is commercially practiced to control anthracnose, a postharvest disease in avocado. Increasing consumer concern regarding food safety and demand for organically produced fruits make it necessary to search for natural environmentally friendly alternative products and processes for the fruit industry. A combination of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; ∼8% CO₂, 2% O₂) plus thyme oil (TO) was evaluated on the incidence and severity of anthracnose, physiological disorders (grey pulp, vascular browning), fruit quality parameters (L*, h°, firmness, weight loss) and sensory parameters (taste, texture, flavour and overall acceptance), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) enzyme activity, total phenolic compounds, flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity in avocados ('Fuerte' and 'Hass' cultivars) held at 10 °C cold storage for 18 days and thereafter, ripened at 25 °C for 5-10 days. Stand-alone MAP, commercial treatment (prochloraz 0.05%) and untreated (control) fruit were included for comparison. MAP + TO treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the incidence and severity of anthracnose, grey pulp, vascular browning, weight loss and loss of fruit firmness, and showed acceptable taste, flavour, texture and higher overall acceptance, increased PAL activity, total phenolic compounds, flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity, after ripening at 25 °C followed by cold storage at 10 °C. This investigation recommends MAP + TO combination treatment as a suitable alternative to the currently adopted prochloraz application. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Characterization by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization of Transcripts That Are Differentially Expressed in Leaves of Anthracnose-Resistant Ramie Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Xuxia, Wang; Jie, Chen; Bo, Wang; Lijun, Liu; Hui, Jiang; Diluo, Tang; Dingxiang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of screening putative anthracnose resistance-related genes of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaud), a cDNA library was constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization using anthracnose-resistant cultivar Huazhu no. 4. The cDNAs from Huazhu no. 4, which were infected with Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, were used as the tester and cDNAs from uninfected Huazhu no. 4 as the driver. Sequencing analysis and homology searching showed that these clones represented 132 single genes, which were assigned to functional categories, including 14 putative cellular functions, according to categories established for Arabidopsis. These 132 genes included 35 disease resistance and stress tolerance-related genes including putative heat-shock protein 90, metallothionein, PR-1.2 protein, catalase gene, WRKY family genes, and proteinase inhibitor-like protein. Partial disease-related genes were further analyzed by reverse transcription PCR and RNA gel blot. These expressed sequence tags are the first anthracnose resistance-related expressed sequence tags reported in ramie.

  1. Evaluation of the endophytic nature of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain GYL4 and its efficacy in the control of anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Do; Jeon, Byeong Jun; Han, Jae Woo; Park, Min Young; Kang, Sin Ae; Kim, Beom Seok

    2016-08-01

    Endophytic bacteria are viewed as a potential new source of biofungicides because they have beneficial characteristics as control agents for plant disease. This study was performed to examine the endophytic feature and disease control efficacy of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain GYL4 and to identify the antifungal compounds produced by this strain. B. amyloliquefaciens strain GYL4 was isolated from leaf tissue of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.). Anthracnose symptoms were markedly reduced in the leaves of pepper plants colonised by GYL4. An egfp-expressing strain of GYL4 (GYL4-egfp) was constructed and reintroduced into pepper plants, which confirmed its ability to colonise the internal tissues of pepper plants. GYL4-egfp was observed in the root and stem tissues 4 days after treatment and abundantly found in the internal leaf tissue 9 days after treatment. Bacillomycin derivatives purified from the culture extract of GYL4 displayed control efficacy on anthracnose development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Chunsim). The present study is the first report on evaluation of the endophytic and systemic nature of B. amyloliquefaciens strain GYL4 and its potential as a biocontrol agent for anthracnose management. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Fine mapping of Co-x, an anthracnose resistance gene to a highly virulent strain of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in common bean.

    PubMed

    Richard, Manon M S; Pflieger, Stéphanie; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Blanchet, Sophie; Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The Co - x anthracnose R gene of common bean was fine-mapped into a 58 kb region at one end of chromosome 1, where no canonical NB-LRR-encoding genes are present in G19833 genome sequence. Anthracnose, caused by the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is one of the most damaging diseases of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. Various resistance (R) genes, named Co-, conferring race-specific resistance to different strains of C. lindemuthianum have been identified. The Andean cultivar JaloEEP558 was reported to carry Co-x on chromosome 1, conferring resistance to the highly virulent strain 100. To fine map Co-x, 181 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross between JaloEEP558 and BAT93 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers developed using the genome sequence of the Andean genotype G19833. Analysis of RILs carrying key recombination events positioned Co-x at one end of chromosome 1 to a 58 kb region of the G19833 genome sequence. Annotation of this target region revealed eight genes: three phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PI-PLC), one zinc finger protein and four kinases, suggesting that Co-x is not a classical nucleotide-binding leucine-rich encoding gene. In addition, we identified and characterized the seven members of common bean PI-PLC gene family distributed into two clusters located at the ends of chromosomes 1 and 8. Co-x is not a member of Co-1 allelic series since these two genes are separated by at least 190 kb. Comparative analysis between soybean and common bean revealed that the Co-x syntenic region, located at one end of Glycine max chromosome 18, carries Rhg1, a major QTL contributing to soybean cyst nematode resistance. The PCR-based markers generated in this study should be useful in marker-assisted selection for pyramiding Co-x with other R genes.

  3. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    McNees, Adrienne L; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R; Graham, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50-100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis.

  4. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Adrienne L.; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R.; Graham, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50 to 100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis. PMID:26474349

  5. Diseases of fish and shellfish caused by marine fungi.

    PubMed

    Hatai, Kishio

    2012-01-01

    Fungal diseases are problematic in cultured fish and shellfish, their seeds, and sometimes wild marine animals. In this chapter fungal diseases found in marine animals, especially in Japan, are described. Pathogens in the fungal diseases are divided into two groups. One of them is marine Oomycetes, which cause fungal diseases in marine shellfish and abalones. The diseases caused by the fungi of this group and the fungal characteristics are introduced. The pathogens include members of the genera Lagenidium, Haliphthoros, Halocrusticida, Halioticida, Atkinsiella, and Pythium. On the other hand, some fungal diseases caused by mitosporic fungi are also known in marine fish and shellfish. The diseases caused by these fungi and the fungal characteristics are described. The pathogens include members of the genera Fusarium, Ochroconis, Exophiala, Scytalidium, Plectosporium, and Acremonium.

  6. Managing Pain Caused By Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tunks, Eldon

    1985-01-01

    Stabbing paroxysmal pain due to neurological disease can often be controlled by anticonvulsants, whereas steady burning pain is often responsive to tricyclic antidepressants, and to neuroleptics. Overuse of opiates may actually aggravate the pain, necessitating detoxification. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is helpful for conditions in which pain is localized, especially if there is a ‘trigger area’ or neuroma, or if paresthesias can be stimulated within the painful area. Local anesthetic injection, possibly with corticosteroid, relieves painful scars and neuromas, neuritis, and tender trigger points. Sympathetic blocks are used for post-herpetic neuralgia and sympathetic dystrophies. Relaxation therapy is a very useful psychological treatment. PMID:21274032

  7. Can sleep apnea cause Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Pan, Weihong; Kastin, Abba J

    2014-11-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasing health concerns. The objective of this study is to review systematically the effects of OSA on the development of AD. The search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL, and followed by a manual search of references of published studies. Cross-sectional, cohorts, and randomized clinical trials were reviewed. Besides clinical studies, we also discuss neuroimaging data, experimental animal evidence, and molecular mechanisms. Although a causal relationship between OSA and AD is not yet established, OSA induces neurodegenerative changes as a result of two major contributing processes: sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. As such, inflammation and cellular stress are sufficient to impair cell-cell interactions, synaptic function, and neural circuitry, leading to a decline of cognitive behavior. Sustained OSA could promote cognitive dysfunction, overlapping with that in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Early treatment by positive airway pressure and other current standards of care should have a positive impact to alleviate structural and functional deterioration. With better understanding of the cellular and neurophysiological mechanisms by which OSA contributes to AD, we may identify novel molecular targets for intervention.

  8. Acrolein Can Cause Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Johnson, Giffe T; Coyle, Jayme P; Harbison, Raymond D

    2017-07-01

    Acrolein is a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde that is formed during the burning of gasoline and diesel fuels, cigarettes, woods and plastics. In addition, acrolein is generated during the cooking or frying of food with fats or oils. Acrolein is also used in the synthesis of many organic chemicals and as a biocide in agricultural and industrial water supply systems. The total emissions of acrolein in the United States from all sources are estimated to be 62,660 tons/year. Acrolein is classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a high-priority air and water toxicant. Acrolein can exert toxic effects following inhalation, ingestion, and dermal exposures that are dose dependent. Cardiovascular tissues are particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of acrolein based primarily on in vitro and in vivo studies. Acrolein can generate free oxygen radical stress in the heart, decrease endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and nitric oxide formation, form cytoplasmic and nuclear protein adducts with myocyte and vascular endothelial cell proteins and cause vasospasm. In this manner, chronic exposure to acrolein can cause myocyte dysfunction, myocyte necrosis and apoptosis and ultimately lead to cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure. Epidemiological studies of acrolein exposure and toxicity should be developed and treatment strategies devised that prevent or significantly limit acrolein cardiovascular toxicity.

  9. Does bacterial vaginosis cause pelvic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brandie DePaoli; Darville, Toni; Haggerty, Catherine L

    2013-02-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), the infection and inflammation of the female genital tract, results in serious reproductive morbidity including infertility and ectopic pregnancy. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a complex alteration of the vaginal flora that has been implicated in PID. The role of BV in the etiology and pathogenesis of PID has not been studied extensively. Our objective was to extensively review data related to the relationship between BV and PID (n = 19 studies). Several studies found a link between BV and cervicitis, endometritis, and salpingitis. Furthermore, it seems that some BV-associated organisms are associated with PID, whereas others are not. However, studies demonstrating an independent association between BV-associated organisms and PID are sparse. In addition, a causal association between BV and PID has not been established. Prospective studies are needed to further delineate the role of BV in PID, with particular focus on individual BV-associated organisms.

  10. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field.

  11. Tenosynovitis caused by texting: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Ashurst, John V; Turco, Domenic A; Lieb, Brian E

    2010-05-01

    De Quervain tenosynovitis is characterized by pain that overlies the radial aspect of the wrist and that is aggravated by ulnar deviation of the hand. The most common cause of de Quervain tenosynovitis is overuse of the thumb musculature. The authors report a case of bilateral de Quervain tenosynovitis observed in a woman aged 48 years at a rural outpatient primary care office. The condition was induced by the patient's excessive use of the text messaging feature on her cellular telephone. Treatment, including naproxen, cock-up wrist splints, and limitation of texting, resulted in complete recovery of the patient. The authors urge physicians to be aware of the potential association between a patient's tenosynovitis symptoms and excessive texting.

  12. Molecular Diversity of Anthracnose Pathogen Populations Associated with UK Strawberry Production Suggests Multiple Introductions of Three Different Colletotrichum Species

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Sukno, Serenella A.; Lane, Charles R.; Thon, Michael R.; Vannacci, Giovanni; Holub, Eric; Sreenivasaprasad, Surapareddy

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria × ananassa (common name: strawberry) is a globally cultivated hybrid species belonging to Rosaceae family. Colletotrichum acutatum sensu lato (s.l.) is considered to be the second most economically important pathogen worldwide affecting strawberries. A collection of 148 Colletotrichum spp. isolates including 67 C. acutatum s.l. isolates associated with the phytosanitary history of UK strawberry production were used to characterize multi-locus genetic variation of this pathogen in the UK, relative to additional reference isolates that represent a worldwide sampling of the diversity of the fungus. The evidence indicates that three different species C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae are associated with strawberry production in the UK, which correspond to previously designated genetic groups A2, A4 and A3, respectively. Among these species, 12 distinct haplotypes were identified suggesting multiple introductions into the country. A subset of isolates was also used to compare aggressiveness in causing disease on strawberry plants and fruits. Isolates belonging to C. nymphaeae, C. godetiae and C. fioriniae representative of the UK anthracnose pathogen populations showed variation in their aggressiveness. Among the three species, C. nymphaeae and C. fioriniae appeared to be more aggressive compared to C. godetiae. This study highlights the genetic and pathogenic heterogeneity of the C. acutatum s.l. populations introduced into the UK linked to strawberry production. PMID:26086351

  13. Effects of pretreatment with simulated acid rain on the severity of dogwood anthracnose

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, K.O.; Berrang, P.; Mavity, E.

    1996-06-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain on dogwood anthracnose severity were evaluated in a series of greenhouse and field experiments over a 4-year period. In 1990 and 1991, Cornus florida seedlings received 10 weekly foliar applications of simulated rain adjusted to pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5. They were then placed under mature dogwoods naturally infected with Discula destructive. In both years, the percent leaf area infected increased significantly as the pH of the simulated rain solution decreased. In 1992 and 1993, seedlings were wrapped in plastic bags below the root collar to permit separate application of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5) or normal rain (pH 5.5) to the foliage or the growing medium or both. Application of pH 2.5 rain to the growing medium increased disease severity. Foliar applications alone did not increase disease. These results suggest that changes in nutrient availability, rather than foliar damage, are responsible for the increase in anthracnose severity in dogwoods pretreated with simulated acid rain. 41 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. [A brief history of the natural causes of human disease].

    PubMed

    Lips-Castro, Walter

    2015-01-01

    In the study of the causes of disease that have arisen during the development of humankind, one can distinguish three major perspectives: the natural, the supernatural, and the artificial. In this paper we distinguish the rational natural causes of disease from the irrational natural causes. Within the natural and rational causal approaches of disease, we can highlight the Egyptian theory of putrid intestinal materials called "wechdu", the humoral theory, the atomistic theory, the contagious theory, the cellular theory, the molecular (genetic) theory, and the ecogenetic theory. Regarding the irrational, esoteric, and mystic causal approaches to disease, we highlight the astrological, the alchemical, the iatrochemical, the iatromechanical, and others (irritability, solidism, brownism, and mesmerism).

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease: cause and immunobiology.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Daniel C; Carding, Simon R

    2007-05-12

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are idiopathic inflammatory bowel disorders. In this paper, we discuss how environmental factors (eg, geography, cigarette smoking, sanitation and hygiene), infectious microbes, ethnic origin, genetic susceptibility, and a dysregulated immune system can result in mucosal inflammation. After describing the symbiotic interaction of the commensal microbiota with the host, oral tolerance, epithelial barrier function, antigen recognition, and immunoregulation by the innate and adaptive immune system, we examine the initiating and perpetuating events of mucosal inflammation. We pay special attention to pattern-recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding-oligomerisation-domains (NOD), NOD-like receptors and their mutual interaction on epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells. We also discuss the important role of dendritic cells in directing tolerance and immunity by modulation of subpopulations of effector T cells, regulatory T cells, Th17 cells, natural killer T cells, natural killer cells, and monocyte-macrophages in mucosal inflammation. Implications for novel therapies, which are discussed in detail in the second paper in this Series, are covered briefly.

  16. Study in vitro of the impact of endophytic bacteria isolated from Centella asiatica on the disease incidence caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum.

    PubMed

    Rakotoniriana, Erick Francisco; Rafamantanana, Mamy; Randriamampionona, Denis; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Urveg-Ratsimamanga, Suzanne; El Jaziri, Mondher; Munaut, Françoise; Corbisier, Anne-Marie; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle; Declerck, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one endophytic bacteria isolated from healthy leaves of Centella asiatica were screened in vitro for their ability to reduce the growth rate and disease incidence of Colletotrichum higginsianum, a causal agent of anthracnose. Isolates of Cohnella sp., Paenibacillus sp. and Pantoea sp. significantly stimulated the growth rate of C. higginsianum MUCL 44942, while isolates of Achromobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., Microbacterium sp., Klebsiella sp. and Pseudomonas putida had no influence on this plant pathogen. By contrast, Bacillus subtilis BCA31 and Pseudomonas fluorescens BCA08 caused a marked inhibition of C. higginsianum MUCL 44942 growth by 46 and 82 %, respectively. Cell-free culture filtrates of B. subtilis BCA31 and P. fluorescens BCA08 were found to contain antifungal compounds against C. higginsianum MUCL 44942. Inoculation assays on in vitro-cultured plants of C. asiatica showed that foliar application of B. subtilis BCA31, three days before inoculation with C. higginsianum MUCL 44942, significantly reduced incidence and severity of the disease. The role of endophytic bacteria in maintaining the apparent inactivity of C. higginsianum MUCL 44942 in C. asiatica grown in the wild is discussed.

  17. Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in avocados fumigated with thyme oil vapours and control of anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bill, Malick; Sivakumar, Dharini; Beukes, Mervyn; Korsten, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Thyme oil (TO) fumigation (96μll(-1)) to cv. Hass and Ryan avocados significantly reduced anthracnose incidence compared to prochloraz and the untreated control. Also, enhanced activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase were noted in both cultivars. TO fumigation induced the expression of both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase genes in naturally infected fruit of both cultivars, during storage at 7 or 7.5°C for up to 21d and during subsequent simulated market shelf conditions at 20°C for 5d. However, the impact of TO fumigation on the β-1,3-glucanase gene expression was higher in both cultivars. Higher gene regulation and β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase activities were observed in cv. Ryan compared to Hass. Although TO fumigation significantly reduced anthracnose incidence in both naturally infected cultivars, the inhibitory effect was slightly higher in cv. Ryan than Hass. Thus, postharvest TO fumigation had positive effects on enhancing anthracnose disease resistance during storage and also gave a residual effect during the simulated shelf life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Causes of death in Minamata disease: analysis of death certificates.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, H; Akagi, H; Arakaki, M; Futatsuka, M; Roht, L H

    1984-01-01

    The causes of death in Minamata disease were analyzed and compared with those of control subjects. Of the 1422 Minamata disease patients in the Kumamoto Prefecture, 378 had died by the end of 1980. Of these 378, the first death occurred in 1954 with a peak incidence in 1956 when Minamata disease was officially reported for the first time. The number of deaths increased rapidly after 1972 with a second peak in 1976. The male:female ratio was 1.8:1 and the mean age-at-death was 67.2 years (SD = +/- 18.65). The mean age-at-death was younger in the cases of the initial outbreak than in those recently. There were, on the average, 2.8 causes of death per person. Of these cases, 157 (41.5%) had Minamata disease indicated on the death certificate, though 64 (16.9%) had Minamata disease coded as the underlying cause. Minamata disease and the noninflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) were the main underlying causes of death between 1954 and 1969, while, in the multiple cause data, pneumonia and non-ischemic heart disease were the most prevalent. Cerebrovascular diseases (18.0%) were the main underlying causes of death followed by malignant neoplasms (14.7%), cardiovascular diseases (14.1%) and Minamata disease (14.1%) in 1970 or later, while cardiovascular diseases (18.6%), Minamata disease (14.5%), cerebrovascular diseases (10.4%) and malignant neoplasms (7.1%) were the major multiple causes of death. As compared with the control, the proportions of deaths due to noninflammatory diseases of CNS and pneumonia were higher in the initial outbreak. Although the difference in the causes of death was less apparent recently, malignant neoplasms and hypertensive diseases tended to be lower. These results suggest that there is a need for a long-term follow-up of Minamata disease patients. The data also show the potential value of multiple causes of death coding in analyses of mortality.

  19. RAPD-based SCAR marker SCA 12 linked to recessive gene conferring resistance to anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench].

    PubMed

    Singh, Monika; Chaudhary, K; Boora, K S

    2006-12-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum graminicola, infects all aerial parts of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, plants and causes loss of as much as 70%. F(1) and F(2) plants inoculated with local isolates of C. graminicola indicated that resistance to anthracnose in sorghum accession G 73 segregated as a recessive trait in a cross with susceptible cultivar HC 136. To facilitate the use of marker-assisted selection in sorghum breeding programs, a PCR-based specific sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker was developed. A total of 29 resistant and 20 susceptible recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a HC 136 x G 73 cross was used for bulked segregant analysis to identify a RAPD marker closely linked to a gene for resistance to anthracnose. The polymorphism between the parents HC 136 and G 73 was evaluated using 84 random sequence decamer primers. Among these, only 24 primers generated polymorphism. On bulked segregant analysis, primer OPA 12 amplified a unique band of 383 bp only in the resistant parent G 73 and resistant bulk. Segregation analysis of individual RILs showed the marker OPA 12(383) was 6.03 cM from the locus governing resistance to anthracnose. The marker OPA 12(383) was cloned and sequenced. Based on the sequence of cloned RAPD product, a pair of SCAR markers SCA 12-1 and SCA 12-2 was designed using the MacVector program, which specifically amplified this RAPD fragment in resistant parent G 73, resistant bulk and respective RILs. Therefore, it was confirmed that SCAR marker SCA 12 is at the same locus as RAPD marker OPA 12(383) and hence, is linked to the gene for resistance to anthracnose.

  20. Respiratory disease caused by synthetic fibres: a new occupational disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, J C; Avila, R; Lourenço, A G

    1975-01-01

    Seven patients exposed to the inhalation of synthetic fibres presented with various bronchopulmonary diseases, such as asthma, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, chronic bronchitis with bronchiectasis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and chronic pneumonia. The histological features are described and an attempt has been made to set up immunological techniques for the diagnosis. A series of histochemical techniques, based on textile chemistry, are proposed for the identification of the inclusions found in bronchopulmonary lesions. The results of the experimental production of the disease in guinea-pigs by the inhalation of synthetic fibre dusts are presented. The prognosis of these cases is good in the acute or recently established cases but is poor when widespread and irreversible fibrosis has set in. The authors consider that pulmonary disease due to inhaled particles is probably set off by an individual factor, possibly immunological. Images PMID:1179318

  1. Peptic ulcer disease: clinically relevant causes and treatments.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Ryan P; Davis, George A; Romanelli, Frank

    2009-02-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a significant cause of morbidity and in certain cases mortality among affected individuals. Proper identification and treatment of peptic ulcer disease is imperative to decreasing its associated sequellae. The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease are the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and infection with Helicobacter pylori. Initial assessment of the patient with dyspepsia is paramount, as the presence of symptoms will dictate further management. With currently available treatment regimens and the ability to reduce gastrointestinal bleeding it is important for all clinicians to have knowledge of this disease, its diagnosis, and pharmacotherapy.

  2. Causes of Death in Adults with Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Barends, Marlieke; Verschuren, Lotte; Morava, Eva; Nesbitt, Victoria; Turnbull, Doug; McFarland, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with a variable age of onset and rate of disease progression. It might therefore be expected that this variation be reflected in the age and cause of death. However, to date, little has been reported regarding the 'end-of-life' period and causes of death in mitochondrial disease patients. For some specific syndromes, the associated clinical problems might predict the cause of death, but for many patients, it remains difficult to provide an accurate prognosis. To describe a retrospective cohort of adult mitochondrial disease patients who had attended the NHS Highly Specialised Services for Rare Mitochondrial Diseases in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK), evaluate life expectancy and causes of death and assess the consequences for daily patient care. All deceased adult patients cared for at this centre over a period of 10 years were included in the study. Patient history, data on laboratory findings, biochemical investigations and genetic studies were analysed retrospectively. A total of 30 adult mitochondrial patients died within the time period of the study. The main mitochondrial disease-related causes of death in this patient cohort were respiratory failure, cardiac failure and acute cerebral incidents such as seizures and strokes. In almost half of the patients, the cause of death remained unknown. Based on our study, we present recommendations regarding the care of patients with mitochondrial disease.

  3. Do We Know What Causes Gestational Trophoblastic Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know What Causes Gestational Trophoblastic Disease? Normally, the sperm and egg cells each provide a set of ... hydatidiform (HY-duh-TIH-dih-form) moles , a sperm cell fertilizes an abnormal egg cell that has ...

  4. Losses Caused by Annosus Root Disease in Pacific Northwest Forests

    Treesearch

    Ellen Michaels Goheen; Donald J. Goheen

    1989-01-01

    Annosus root disease affects three tree species groups in the Pacific Northwest-the hemlocks, the pines, and the true firs. The disease causes significant decay and stem breakage in old growth western hemlock stands but little damage in young managed stands. Losses in ponderosa pine are minor over most of the region but can be substantial in selectively harvested...

  5. Shuni virus as cause of neurologic disease in horses.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Charmaine; Williams, June H; Gerdes, Truuske G H; van Wilpe, Erna; Viljoen, Adrianne; Swanepoel, Robert; Venter, Marietjie

    2012-02-01

    To determine which agents cause neurologic disease in horses, we conducted reverse transcription PCR on isolates from of a horse with encephalitis and 111 other horses with acute disease. Shuni virus was found in 7 horses, 5 of which had neurologic signs. Testing for lesser known viruses should be considered for horses with unexplained illness.

  6. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  7. Coronary heart disease: causes and drug treatment--spouses' conceptions.

    PubMed

    Kärner, Anita; Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt; Bergdahl, Björn

    2004-02-01

    Spouses are important in the rehabilitation process of their partner after coronary heart disease event. Their knowledge and attitudes have an impact on their support to the partner concerning lifestyle changes and drug treatment after an event. To explore spouses' conceptions concerning causes of coronary heart disease and drug treatment 1 year after the partner's cardiac event. Qualitative with an empirical and inductive approach. Semi-structured interviews with strategically selected spouses (17 women and eight men) were taped. The transcripts were analysed within the phenomenographic framework. Spouses' conceptions about causes of coronary heart disease and its treatment consisted of correct facts, as judged on a lay level, less elaborated conceptions and misconceptions. Among causes of coronary heart disease, the spouses were most knowledgeable about fat intake. They knew less about contributions from inactivity, stress and smoking. Ambivalent feelings were expressed about benefits vs. side effects of drugs. The treatment was conceived as necessary for the heart, but harmful for other organs. Men and women were evenly distributed in most of the derived categories. More women than men considered stress as a cause of coronary heart disease and also misconceived physical exercise to cause the disease. A variation of spouses' conceptions was revealed about causes of coronary heart disease and drug treatment. There was a lack of understanding concerning important parts of cardiac rehabilitation activities. These misconceptions may have implications by influencing their partner's co-operative behaviour. Spouses' pre-existing conceptions of coronary heart disease and its treatment should be considered in the rehabilitation process of their partner. Couples with misconceptions should be given the opportunity to increase qualitatively their knowledge starting from their point of view rather than from that of the professional perspective.

  8. Plant growth-promoting fungus Penicillium spp. GP15-1 enhances growth and confers protection against damping-off and anthracnose in the cucumber.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Motaher; Sultana, Farjana; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) have the potential to confer several benefits to plants in terms of growth and protection against pests and pathogens. In the present study, we tested whether a PGPF isolate, Penicillium spp. GP15-1 (derived from zoysiagrass rhizospheres), stimulates growth and disease resistance in the cucumber plant. The use of the barley grain inoculum GP15-1 significantly enhanced root and shoot growth and biomass of cucumber plants. A root colonization study revealed that GP15-1 was a very rapid and efficient root colonizer and was isolated in significantly higher frequencies from the upper root parts than from the middle and lower root parts during the first 14 d of seedling growth. Inoculating the cucumber seedlings with GP15-1 significantly reduced the damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and the disease suppression effects of GP15-1 were considerably influenced by the inoculum potential of both GP15-1 and the pathogen. Treatment with the barley grain inoculum or a cell-free filtrate of GP15-1 increased systemic resistance against leaf infection by the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum orbiculare, resulting in a significant decrease in lesion number and size. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer sequences of the genomic DNA of GP15-1 revealed that the fungal isolate is a strain of either Penicillium neoechinulatum or Penicillium viridicatum.

  9. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing tubulointerstitial kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mallett, Andrew; Posse, Viktor; Moreno, Pablo; Sciacovelli, Marco; Duff, Jennifer; Wiesener, Michael S.; Hudson, Gavin; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2017-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial kidney disease is an important cause of progressive renal failure whose aetiology is incompletely understood. We analysed a large pedigree with maternally inherited tubulointerstitial kidney disease and identified a homoplasmic substitution in the control region of the mitochondrial genome (m.547A>T). While mutations in mtDNA coding sequence are a well recognised cause of disease affecting multiple organs, mutations in the control region have never been shown to cause disease. Strikingly, our patients did not have classical features of mitochondrial disease. Patient fibroblasts showed reduced levels of mitochondrial tRNAPhe, tRNALeu1 and reduced mitochondrial protein translation and respiration. Mitochondrial transfer demonstrated mitochondrial transmission of the defect and in vitro assays showed reduced activity of the heavy strand promoter. We also identified further kindreds with the same phenotype carrying a homoplasmic mutation in mitochondrial tRNAPhe (m.616T>C). Thus mutations in mitochondrial DNA can cause maternally inherited renal disease, likely mediated through reduced function of mitochondrial tRNAPhe. PMID:28267784

  10. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature. PMID:28296933

  11. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  12. Genotype analysis identifies the cause of the "royal disease".

    PubMed

    Rogaev, Evgeny I; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Faskhutdinova, Gulnaz; Kittler, Ellen L W; Moliaka, Yuri K

    2009-11-06

    The "royal disease," a blood disorder transmitted from Queen Victoria to European royal families, is a striking example of X-linked recessive inheritance. Although the disease is widely recognized to be a form of the blood clotting disorder hemophilia, its molecular basis has never been identified, and the royal disease is now likely extinct. We identified the likely disease-causing mutation by applying genomic methodologies (multiplex target amplification and massively parallel sequencing) to historical specimens from the Romanov branch of the royal family. The mutation occurs in F9, a gene on the X chromosome that encodes blood coagulation factor IX, and is predicted to alter RNA splicing and to lead to production of a truncated form of factor IX. Thus, the royal disease is the severe form of hemophilia, also known as hemophilia B or Christmas disease.

  13. How do mutations in lamins A and C cause disease?

    PubMed Central

    Worman, Howard J.; Courvalin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in lamins A and C, nuclear intermediate-filament proteins in nearly all somatic cells, cause a variety of diseases that primarily affect striated muscle, adipocytes, or peripheral nerves or cause features of premature aging. Two new studies use lamin A/C–deficient mice, which develop striated muscle disease, as a model to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. These reports provide evidence for a stepwise process in which mechanically stressed cells first develop chromatin and nuclear envelope damage and then develop secondary alterations in the transcriptional activation of genes in adaptive and protective pathways. PMID:14755330

  14. Mutations in TJP2 cause progressive cholestatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sambrotta, Melissa; Strautnieks, Sandra; Papouli, Efterpi; Rushton, Peter; Clark, Barnaby E.; Parry, David A.; Logan, Clare V.; Newbury, Lucy J.; Kamath, Binita M.; Ling, Simon; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos; Wagner, Bart E.; Magee, John C.; Sokol, Ronald J.; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Smith, Joshua D.; Johnson, Colin A.; McClean, Patricia; Simpson, Michael A.; Knisely, A.S.; Bull, Laura N.; Thompson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The elucidation of genetic causes of cholestasis has proved to be important in understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Protein-truncating mutations in the tight junction protein 2 gene (TJP2) are shown to cause failure of protein localisation, with disruption of tight-junction structure leading to severe cholestatic liver disease. This contrasts with the embryonic-lethal knockout mouse, highlighting differences in redundancy in junctional complexes between organs and species. PMID:24614073

  15. The impact of weather conditions on response of sorghum genotypes to anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineola) infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainfall is a major climatic factor influencing anthracnose development and in this study, 68 sorghum accessions were evaluated for anthracnose resistance under dry and wet growing conditions at the Texas A&M Agricultural Experiment Station, near College Station, Texas. Accessions, planted in a ran...

  16. Effect of MeJA treatment on polyamine, energy status and anthracnose rot of loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Cai, Yuting; Yang, Zhenfeng; Joyce, Daryl C; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-02-15

    The effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on changes in polyamines content and energy status and their relation to disease resistance was investigated. Freshly harvested loquat fruit were treated with 10 μmol l(-1) MeJA and wound inoculated with Colletotrichum acutatum spore suspension (1.0 × 10(5) spores ml(-1)) after 24h, and then stored at 20 °C for 6 days. MeJA treatment significantly reduced decay incidence. MeJA treated fruit manifested higher contents of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) compared with the control fruit, during storage. MeJA treatment also maintained higher levels of adenosine triphosphate, and suppressed an increase in adenosine monophosphate content in loquat fruit. These results suggest that MeJA treatment may inhibit anthracnose rot by increasing polyamine content and maintaining the energy status. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  18. [Bone diseases caused by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-11-01

    The number of patients with lifestyle-related diseases is rapidly increasing in Japan. Metabolic syndrome caused by abdominal fat accumulation induces diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that the lifestyle-related diseases are risk factors of osteoporotic fractures. Although it remains still unclear how metabolic disorders affect bone tissue, oxidative stress and/or glycation stress might directly have negative impacts on bone tissue and increase the risk of fractures. In this review, we describe the association of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia with the fracture risk through oxidative stress and glycation stress.

  19. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Dysphagia Caused by Wilson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Yang, Hee Seung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Jeung, Hae Won; Park, Young Ok

    2012-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism. Although dysphagia is a common complaint of patients with Wilson's disease and pneumonia is an important cause of death in these patients, management of swallowing function has rarely been reported in the context of Wilson's disease. Hence, we report a case of Wilson's disease presenting with dysphagia. A 33-year-old man visited our hospital with a complaint of difficulty in swallowing, since about last 7 years and which had worsened since the last 2-3 months. He was diagnosed with Wilson's disease about 13 years ago. On the initial VFSS, reduced hyoid bone movement, impaired epiglottic movement and moderate amount of residue in the valleculae during the pharyngeal phase were noted. After 10 sessions of neuromuscular electrical stimulation for 1 hour per day, decreased amount of residue was observed in the valleculae during the pharyngeal phase on the follow-up VFSS. PMID:22837979

  20. Genetic Factors Are Not the Major Causes of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The risk of acquiring a chronic disease is influenced by a person's genetics (G) and exposures received during life (the 'exposome', E) plus their interactions (G×E). Yet, investigators use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to characterize G while relying on self-reported information to classify E. If E and G×E dominate disease risks, this imbalance obscures important causal factors. To estimate proportions of disease risk attributable to G (plus shared exposures), published data from Western European monozygotic (MZ) twins were used to estimate population attributable fractions (PAFs) for 28 chronic diseases. Genetic PAFs ranged from 3.4% for leukemia to 48.6% for asthma with a median value of 18.5%. Cancers had the lowest PAFs (median = 8.26%) while neurological (median = 26.1%) and lung (median = 33.6%) diseases had the highest PAFs. These PAFs were then linked with Western European mortality statistics to estimate deaths attributable to G for heart disease and nine cancer types. Of 1.53 million Western European deaths in 2000, 0.25 million (16.4%) could be attributed to genetics plus shared exposures. Given the modest influences of G-related factors on the risks of chronic diseases in MZ twins, the disparity in coverage of G and E in etiological research is problematic. To discover causes of disease, GWAS should be complemented with exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) that profile chemicals in biospecimens from incident disease cases and matched controls.

  1. Diseases of pines caused by the pitch canker fungus

    Treesearch

    L. David Dwinell; Stephen W. Fraedrich; D. Adams

    2001-01-01

    Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. pini, the pitch canker fungus, causes a number of serious diseases of Pinus species. The pathogen infects a variety of vegetative and reproductive pine structures at different stages of maturity and produces a diversity of symptoms. When the pathogen infects the woody vegetative...

  2. Patterns of evolution in Discula fungi and the origin of dogwood anthracnose in North America, studied using arbitrarily amplified and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, G; Trigiano, R N; Windham, M T

    2001-07-01

    The anthracnose epidemic caused by exotic filamentous fungi of the genus Discula threatens the future of the prized flowering (Cornus florida L.) and Pacific (C. nuttalli Aud.) dogwoods in North America. A cross-section of fungi that cause anthracnose in broadleaf temperate trees was characterized using DNA amplification fingerprinting, sequence and secondary structure analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), and compatibility of hyphal anastomosis. ITS-inferred phylogenies rejected the null hypothesis of only one fungal lineage, by defining four monophyletic and well differentiated groups, corresponding to Discula sp., D. quercina, D. umbrinella and D. destructiva, with the last two species sharing a common and recent ancestor. In turn, they showed that the dogwood pathogen, D. destructiva, did not evolve directly from an indigenous population related to Discula sp. In this study, rDNA spacers that are generally considered important for protein synthesis but are selectively neutral, appeared functionally constrained and subject to selective sequence diversification. Results confirmed the high variability of D. umbrinella and the remarkable homogeneity and exotic nature of D. destructiva at the genetic level, clarified the taxonomy and phylogeny of Discula, and provided clues as to the origin and diversification of dogwood anthracnose-causing fungi.

  3. Pellagra: A clue as to why energy failure causes diseases?

    PubMed

    Williams, Adrian C; Ramsden, David B

    2007-01-01

    Pellagra is a curable dietary illness that unchecked leads to dementia, diarrhoea, dermatitis and death due to lack of the precursors for NAD(H). In addition it caused a wide range of monosyndromic degenerative and functional neurological disorders as well as profound developmental, premature aging and metabolic syndromes. Pellagrins harbour many chronic infections including tuberculosis, yeasts and malaria, that may be symbionts supplying nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide {NAD(H)} when the diet is poor. Many common diseases and aging may be caused by electrogenic energy mismatches from lack of a timely supply of NAD(H) creating disturbed metabolic fields and "protonopathies". Initially these may present in compartments fronted by homeostatic corrections from chronic symbiotic infections to inflammatory disease, cancer and degenerative/autophagic diseases that can all release NAD(H).

  4. Noroviruses: The Principal Cause of Foodborne Disease Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Ajami, Nadim; Atmar, Robert L.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide, and may soon eclipse rotaviruses as the most common cause of severe pediatric gastroenteritis, as the use of rotavirus vaccines becomes more widespread. Genetic mutations and recombinations contribute to the broad heterogeneity of noroviruses and the emergence of new epidemic strains. Although typically a self-limited disease, norovirus gastroenteritis can cause significant morbidity and mortality among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. The lack of a cell culture or small animal model has hindered norovirus research and the development of novel therapeutic and preventative interventions. However, vaccines based on norovirus capsid protein virus-like particles are promising and may one day become widely available through transgenic expression in plants. PMID:20670600

  5. Infectious causes of equine respiratory disease on Ontario standardbred racetracks.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Thorsen, J; Barnum, D A; Mitchell, W R; Ingram, D G

    1977-01-01

    Upper respiratory disease has been a serious problem in Standardbred horses on racetracks in Ontario, with outbreaks occurring once or twice annually in late winter and early spring seasons. To determine the causes of these epidemics, a 3-year investigation was carried out in which nasal swabs and serum samples were obtained at intervals from apparently healthy horses and from horses suffering from upper respiratory disease. The nasal swabs were used to isolate bacteria and viruses. The serum samples were examined for the presence and level of antibodies to equine influenza viruses and equine herpesvirus 1. None of the bacteria isolated were associated with the outbreaks of disease. Equine herpesvirus 2 was isolated 72 times from both diseased and apparently healthy horses. Equine herpesvirus 1 was isolated 10 times from horses with respiratory disease, both during and between epidemics. Influenza equine/1 virus was isolated seven times and influenza equine/2 was isolated once during severe outbreaks of upper respiratory disease. Serological evidence confirmed that influenza viruses were the causes of the major epidemics, with the equine/1 strain being involved most often. PMID:192757

  6. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  7. Chemicals and environmentally caused diseases in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Jamall, I.S.; Davis, B. )

    1991-06-01

    This chapter discusses international aspects of diseases resulting from exposure to chemical pollutants in the environment, with an emphasis on developing countries. These countries share many of the same problems of air, water, and pesticide pollution that face the more industrialized countries. In developing countries, however, the problems are compounded by a number of unique situations, viz., economic priorities, high burden of infectious diseases, impoverishment, and absence of a regulatory framework for the disposal of toxic chemicals. This discussion emphasizes the importance of interactions among toxicants, malnutrition, and infectious diseases for both urban and rural populations insofar as these interactions contribute to disease. Toxicants not only produce disease directly but also exacerbate diseases with other causes. Specific examples from developing countries demonstrate how human health effects from exposures to environmental chemicals can be assessed. While they do not strictly fall under the rubric of developing countries, the public health consequences of inadequate control of environmental pollution in the East European countries should demonstrate the magnitude of the problem, except that in developing countries the public health consequence of environmental chemicals will be aggravated by the widespread malnutrition and high prevalence of infectious diseases. Much needs to be done before we can adequately quantify the contribution of environmental chemicals to morbidity and mortality in developing countries with the level of sophistication now evident in the charting of infectious diseases in these countries. 52 references.

  8. Pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease causing epilepsy and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shamima

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is part of the clinical phenotype in nearly 40% of children with mitochondrial disease, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Energy depletion has been postulated as the cause of mitochondrial epilepsy, but if this were the case, then 100% of patients with mitochondrial disease would be expected to present with seizures. This review explores other potential disease mechanisms underlying mitochondrial epilepsy, including oxidative stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, immune dysfunction, and deficiency of vitamins, cofactors, reducing equivalents, and other metabolites. Different mechanisms are likely to predominate in different mitochondrial disorders, since mitochondrial function varies between neurons and astrocytes, between different types of neurons, and in different brain regions. Systematic studies in cell and animal models of mitochondrial disease are needed in order to develop effective therapies for mitochondrial epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rheumatologic diseases as the cause of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Mulders-Manders, C M; Simon, A; Bleeker-Rovers, C P

    2016-10-01

    In 30% of patients with fever or inflammation of unknown origin (FUO/IUO), the cause is eventually found to be a rheumatologic disease such as autoimmune or granulomatous disease or vasculitis. Most of these patients suffer from an uncommon presentation of a common disease, instead of an uncommon disease. We demonstrate the diagnostic challenge with several cases. The workup of FUO is based on the identification of potential diagnostic clues (PDCs). In the absence of PDCs, a standardized diagnostic protocol should be followed, including early FDG-PET/CT. Other imaging techniques or invasive diagnostic techniques should be reserved for those in whom PDCs are present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Occupational diseases caused by chromium and its compounds].

    PubMed

    Hassmanová, V; Vanĕcková, J; Bousová, K

    2000-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates by documentary evidence occupational diseases caused by chromium and its compounds. Perforations of the nasal septum were diagnosed in 20 males and 9 females, the last one in 1980. Most of them worked in chromium-plating shops. Other diseases, including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, and contact allergic eczemas, were examined in 1985-1999. Bronchial asthma was reported in a textile dyer who was in contact with chromium dyes for 32 years and two allergic rhinitides (a welder and an electroplater) were reported in 1987 as "other damage to health resulting from work." Out of 103 contact allergic eczemas, only 24 diseases, i.e. less than one quarter, were healed in 1999. Improvements were observed in 59 of them and 20 diseases persist. There was an exceptional finding of a chromium ulcer (pigeonneaux) on the lower extremity of a builder.

  11. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate; Nordahl, Helene; Schernhammer, Eva; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-03-01

    Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. Among men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1.05-3.42]) and death from undefined symptoms/abnormal findings (1.25 [1.07-1.47]). Censoring at the time of death of the patient attenuated the findings for all-cause mortality in husbands (1.02 [0.95-1.09]), indicating that part of the association is with bereavement. Still, living with a person with Parkinson disease 5 years after first Parkinson hospitalization was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality for both husbands (1.15 [1.07-1.23]) and wives (1.11 [1.04-1.17]). Caring for a spouse with a serious chronic illness is associated with a slight but consistent elevation in mortality risk.

  12. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  13. [Effects of silicon on flowering Chinese cabbage's anthracnose occurence, flower stalk formation, and silicon uptake and accumulation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xian; Feng, Hong-Xian; Yang, Yue-Sheng

    2008-05-01

    Different concentrations of silicon (Si) were applied to flowering Chinese cabbbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis var. utilis Tsen et Lee) to study their effects on the flowering Chinese cabbage's anthracnose occurrence, flower stalk formation, and Si uptake and accumulation. The results indicated that Si could obviously control the occurrence of anthracnose, and the effect was genotype-dependant. The plants of susceptible cultivar applied with 2.5 mmol L(-1) Si and those of resistant cultivar applied with 0.5 mmol L(-1) Si exhibited the highest resistance to Colletotrichum higginsianum, with the lowest disease index and the higheist flower stalk yield. Si application also obviously affected the quality of flower stalk. For susceptible cultivar, Si application promoted the synthesis of chlorophyll, crude fiber and vitamin C, and induced the formation of soluble sugars. The contents of chlorophyll and crude fiber increased with increasing Si level. For resistant cultivar, the chlorophyll content increased while vitamin C content decreased with increasing Si level, but Si application had less effect on the contents of crude fiber and soluble sugars. For both cultivars, Si application did not have significant effect on the contents of crude protein and soluble protein but remarkably increased the Si accumulation in plant leaves, and the leaf Si content was significantly increased with increasing Si level. The Si granules deposited in leaf tissues were not equal in size, and distributed unevenly in epidermis tissues. It was concluded that the accumulation of Si in leaves could increase the resistance of plant to anthracnose, but there was no linear correlation between the accumulated amount of Si and the resistance.

  14. Guttural pouch diseases causing neurologic dysfunction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandre S; Watanabe, Marcos J

    2011-12-01

    The close relationship between guttural pouches, cranial nerves, and sympathetic structures make neurologic abnormalities due to diseases of the guttural pouches (especially mycosis) possible. Recognition of epistaxis or mucopurulent nasal discharge, together with signs of dysfunction of the cranial nerves in contact with the guttural pouches, are important key points in order to consider a comprehensive evaluation of these structures and further definitive diagnosis. Diseases of the guttural pouches can also cause signs such as dysphagia, abnormal soft palate positioning, laryngeal paralysis, and Horner syndrome due to lesions in one or more of the cranial nerves or sympathetic structures involved with these functions. Therefore, an accurate diagnosis is essential for treatment.

  15. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  16. Mutations in the deubiquitinase gene USP8 cause Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Reincke, Martin; Sbiera, Silviu; Hayakawa, Akira; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Meitinger, Thomas; Mizuno-Yamasaki, Emi; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ronchi, Cristina L; Allolio, Bruno; Buchfelder, Michael; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Komada, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by corticotroph adenomas of the pituitary. To explore the molecular mechanisms of endocrine autonomy in these tumors, we performed exome sequencing of 10 corticotroph adenomas. We found somatic mutations in the USP8 deubiquitinase gene in 4 of 10 adenomas. The mutations clustered in the 14-3-3 protein binding motif and enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity of USP8. Cleavage of USP8 led to increased deubiqutination of the EGF receptor, impairing its downregulation and sustaining EGF signaling. USP8 mutants enhanced promoter activity of the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin. In summary, our data show that dominant mutations in USP8 cause Cushing's disease via activation of EGF receptor signaling.

  17. Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella dumoffii in distilled water.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; Déry, P; Gauvreau, L; Coté, L; Trépanier, C

    1986-01-01

    Five cases of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella dumoffii were identified within an 11-month period in a hospital in the Quebec City area. In four cases bacterial isolates were obtained from clinical specimens, and in one case seroconversion was demonstrated. All the patients had been admitted to hospital within 10 days before diagnosis. Two of the patients were immunosuppressed children. Only 1 of the 40 hot water samples from the hospital yielded L. dumoffii; however, 6 of 11 distilled water samples contained the bacterium. All the patients had been exposed to distilled water, four through respiratory therapy equipment and one through a room humidifier. Following the use of sterile distilled water in the apparatus, no further cases were identified. This is the first reported outbreak of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. dumoffii, and it is the first time that nosocomial legionellosis has been linked to contaminated distilled water in Canada. PMID:3536052

  18. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    PubMed

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients.

  19. Viral Agents Causing Brown Cap Mushroom Disease of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Daniel; Green, Julian; Grogan, Helen; Burton, Kerry

    2015-10-01

    The symptoms of viral infections of fungi range from cryptic to severe, but there is little knowledge of the factors involved in this transition of fungal/viral interactions. Brown cap mushroom disease of the cultivated Agaricus bisporus is economically important and represents a model system to describe this transition. Differentially expressed transcript fragments between mushrooms showing the symptoms of brown cap mushroom disease and control white noninfected mushrooms have been identified and sequenced. Ten of these RNA fragments have been found to be upregulated over 1,000-fold between diseased and nondiseased tissue but are absent from the Agaricus bisporus genome sequence and hybridize to double-stranded RNAs extracted from diseased tissue. We hypothesize that these transcript fragments are viral and represent components of the disease-causing agent, a bipartite virus with similarities to the family Partitiviridae. The virus fragments were found at two distinct levels within infected mushrooms, at raised levels in infected, nonsymptomatic, white mushrooms and at much greater levels (3,500 to 87,000 times greater) in infected mushrooms exhibiting brown coloration. In addition, differential screening revealed 9 upregulated and 32 downregulated host Agaricus bisporus transcripts. Chromametric analysis was able to distinguish color differences between noninfected white mushrooms and white infected mushrooms at an early stage of mushroom growth. This method may be the basis for an "on-farm" disease detection assay.

  20. [Autoinflammatory diseases as cause of wound healing defects].

    PubMed

    Löhrer, R; Eming, R; Wolfrum, N; Krieg, T; Eming, S A

    2011-07-01

    Ulcerations of the skin and mucosal membranes are a common feature of autoinflammatory diseases. They can give raise to chronic wound healing defects and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic skin ulcers. The increased activation of the innate immune system in the absence of an apparent provocation for inflammation is a hallmark of autoinflammatory diseases. Mutations and alterations of signaling pathways regulating the innate immune response to physical trauma/tissue damage result into an unrestrained activation of the inflammasome, which leads to increased activation of Interleukin-1. Uncontrolled recruitment and activation of myeloid effector cells within the wound site lead to the release of potent proteases that cause the degradation of structural components of the skin. The majority of these diseases respond well to immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatment regimes. Therapeutic resistance converts the acute inflammatory response into a chronic and non-resolving inflammatory process that leads to tissue degeneration. In this article we will focus on the review of those autoinflammatory diseases that often display ulcerative cutaneous and aphthous lesions including pyoderma gangrenosum, Behçet disease, PAPA syndrome and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS). Furthermore, the article will be complemented by an overview of those inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-ulcerative cutaneous manifestations.

  1. Cat-scratch disease causing status epilepticus in children.

    PubMed

    Easley, R B; Cooperstock, M S; Tobias, J D

    1999-01-01

    Status epilepticus from cat-scratch encephalopathy is often recalcitrant to usual therapies, causing treatment to focus on critical care management of the patient that may require aggressive interventions, such as continuous pentobarbital administration. We describe two children whose initial clinical presentation of cat-scratch disease was status epilepticus with normal cerebrospinal fluid studies. A history of cat exposure (specifically, kitten and/or fleas), regional lymphadenopathy, and a papule or inoculation site should be sought, but are not essential for diagnosis. The presumptive diagnosis of cat-scratch disease can be made by serology alone even in the absence of classic diagnostic criteria. Our two cases and other reports in the literature show a favorable prognosis in most cases, despite the occurrence of status epilepticus. The diagnosis of cat-scratch disease should be strongly considered in all children with unexplained status epilepticus or encephalopathy and serologic testing for Bartonella henselae should be done.

  2. [Fungal diseases of vulva and vagina caused by Candida species].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2010-09-01

    Fungal diseases of vulva and vagina attributed to Candida species (vulvovaginal candidosis) are the most frequent mycoses of women. They show acute or chronic courses and different disease patterns which can strongly affect the quality of life of the women who are concerned. In general, the most common cause of acute vulvovaginal candidosis is Candida albicans, followed by C. glabrata. In chronic recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis, C. albicans and C. glabrata are often equally distributed. In several cases, treatment requires an antimycotic therapy which refers to the severity and main form of disease as well as to the aetiological agent. Most vulvovaginal candidoses are accessible to the treatment with local and systemic antimycotic agents. Generally, in Germany azoles such as clotrimazole, fluconazole and itraconazole, the polyens nystatin and Amphotericin B and the hydroxypyridone derivative ciclopirox are available for antimycotic therapy of vulvovaginal candidoses. Significance of non-conventional and adjuvant therapeutic approaches is considered to be generally low.

  3. Vascular pathology: Cause or effect in Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Rius-Pérez, S; Tormos, A M; Pérez, S; Taléns-Visconti, R

    2015-09-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the main cortical neurodegenerative disease. The incidence of this disease increases with age, causing significant medical, social and economic problems, especially in countries with ageing populations. This review aims to highlight existing evidence of how vascular dysfunction may contribute to cognitive impairment in AD, as well as the therapeutic possibilities that might arise from this evidence. The vascular hypothesis emerged as an alternative to the amyloid cascade hypothesis as an explanation for the pathophysiology of AD. This hypothesis locates blood vessels as the origin for a variety of pathogenic pathways that lead to neuronal damage and dementia. Destruction of the organisation of the blood brain barrier, decreased cerebral blood flow, and the establishment of an inflammatory context would thus be responsible for any subsequent neuronal damage since these factors promote aggregation of β-amyloid peptide in the brain. The link between neurodegeneration and vascular dysfunction pathways has provided new drug targets and therapeutic approaches that will add to the treatments for AD. It is difficult to determine whether the vascular component in AD is the cause or the effect of the disease, but there is no doubt that vascular pathology has an important relationship with AD. Vascular dysfunction is likely to act synergistically with neurodegenerative changes in a cycle that exacerbates the cognitive impairment found in AD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Do Insomnia Complaints Cause Hypertension or Cardiovascular Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Barbara; Mannino, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We prospectively investigated odds ratios (ORs) for development of hypertension or cardiovascular disease by endorsement of sleep complaints. Methods: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is a prospective, population-based study of cardiovascular disease. Our study sample was 8757 ARIC participants without hypertension and 11,863 ARIC participants without cardiovascular disease at baseline. We applied multivariate regression analysis to predict the ORs of development of hypertension or cardiovascular disease over 6 years of follow-up by endorsement of symptoms of difficulty falling asleep (DFA), waking up repeatedly (SCD), awakening tired and fatigued (NRS), or combinations of these symptoms. We controlled for age, sex, alcohol intake, income, smoking, diabetes, heart disease, menopausal status, depression, educational level, Body Mass Index, respiratory symptoms, and pulmonary function. Results: Endorsement of all 3 sleep complaints predicted a slightly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (OR 1.5, 1.1–2.0) but not of hypertension. Endorsement of either DFA or SCA predicted slightly increased risk of hypertension (OR 1.2, 1.03–1.3) Conclusions: The definition of insomnia affects its impact. A combination of 3 sleep complaints (DFA, SCD, NRS) predicted a slightly increased risk of cardiovascular disease but not hypertension, and a complaint of either DFA or SCD predicted increased hypertensive risk. It is not clear whether these modest and inconsistent effects are of clinical significance. Citation: Phillips B; Mannino DM. Do insomnia complaints cause hypertension or cardiovascular disease? J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(5):489-494. PMID:17803012

  5. Is Crohn's disease caused by a mycobacterium? Comparisons with leprosy, tuberculosis, and Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Robert J

    2003-08-01

    Although Crohn's disease is considered to be autoimmune in origin, there is increasing evidence that it may have an infectious cause. The most plausible candidate is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Intriguingly, Koch's postulates may have been fulfilled for MAP and Crohn's disease, even though they still have not been met for Mycobacterium leprae and leprosy. In animals MAP causes Johne's disease, a chronic wasting intestinal diarrhoeal disease evocative of Crohn's disease. Johne's disease occurs in wild and domesticated animals, including dairy herds. Viable MAP is found in human and cow milk, and is not reliably killed by standard pasteurisation. MAP is ubiquitous in the environment including in potable water. Since cell-wall-deficient MAP usually cannot be identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, identification of MAP in human beings requires culture or detection of MAP DNA or RNA. If infectious in origin, Crohn's disease should be curable with appropriate antibiotics. Many studies that argue against a causative role for MAP in Crohn's disease have used antibiotics that are inactive against MAP. However, trials that include macrolide antibiotics indicate that a cure for Crohn's disease is possible. The necessary length of therapy remains to be determined. Mycobacterial diseases have protean clinical manifestations, as does Crohn's disease. The necessity of stratifying Crohn's disease into two clinical manifestations (perforating and non-perforating) when interpreting the results of antibiotic therapy is discussed. Rational studies to evaluate appropriate therapies to cure Crohn's disease are proposed.

  6. Antifungal activity of rimocidin and a new rimocidin derivative BU16 produced by Streptomyces mauvecolor BU16 and their effects on pepper anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Jeon, B J; Kim, J D; Han, J W; Kim, B S

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore antifungal metabolites targeting fungal cell envelope and to evaluate the control efficacy against anthracnose development in pepper plants. A natural product library comprising 3000 microbial culture extracts was screened via an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cell lysis assay to detect antifungal metabolites targeting the cell envelope of plant-pathogenic fungi. The culture extract of Streptomyces mauvecolor strain BU16 displayed potent AK-releasing activity. Rimocidin and a new rimocidin derivative, BU16, were identified from the extract as active constituents. BU16 is a tetraene macrolide containing a six-membered hemiketal ring with an ethyl group side chain instead of the propyl group in rimocidin. Rimocidin and BU16 showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against various plant-pathogenic fungi and demonstrated potent control efficacy against anthracnose development in pepper plants. Antifungal metabolites produced by S. mauvecolor strain BU16 were identified to be rimocidin and BU16. The compounds displayed potent control efficacy against pepper anthracnose. Rimocidin and BU16 would be active ingredients of disease control agents disrupting cell envelope of plant-pathogenic fungi. The structure and antifungal activity of rimocidin derivative BU16 is first described in this study. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Atopic disease and breast-feeding--cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Adrian J; Carlin, John B; Bennett, Catherine M; Abramson, Michael J; Hosking, Clifford S; Hill, David J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2006-03-01

    A number of studies have observed an association between breast-feeding and increased risk of development of asthma and eczema. It has been proposed that these results might be due to early signs of atopic disease in the infant causing mothers to prolong breast-feeding. We sought to determine whether early symptoms of atopic disease (eczema, food reaction, or asthma) or positive skin prick test responses reduce the likelihood of ceasing breast-feeding. A prospective birth cohort of 620 infants from Melbourne, Australia, was used. Telephone interviews every 4 weeks were conducted until 64 weeks and then again at 78 and 104 weeks to determine duration of breast-feeding (both exclusive and total) and evidence of atopic disease. Because of the varying time of onset of atopic symptoms, they were modeled as time-varying covariates in Cox models. Only 52 (8.4%) infants did not establish breast-feeding, whereas an additional 103 (25.0%) did not establish exclusive breast-feeding. Early signs of atopic disease or sensitization were independently associated with an approximately 28% reduction in risk of ceasing exclusive breast-feeding (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.53-0.97); P=.029), but there was no evidence for a relationship with risk of ceasing breast-feeding completely (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.92-1.37; P=.262). Early signs of atopic disease might prolong the duration of exclusive breast-feeding. This could mask a protective effect of breast-feeding or even result in breast-feeding appearing to be a risk factor for the development of atopic diseases. Future investigation of the relationship between breast-feeding and atopic diseases should consider this possibility.

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Expanding the cause of hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Pekic, Sandra; Popovic, Vera

    2017-03-03

    Hypopituitarism is defined as one or more pituitary hormone deficits due to a lesion in the hypothalamic-pituitary region. By far, the most common cause of hypopituitarism associated with a sellar mass is a pituitary adenoma. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosing hypopituitarism in several other conditions such as: other massess in the sellar and parasellar region, brain damage caused by radiation and by traumatic brain injury, vascular lesions, infiltrative/immunological/inflammatory diseases (lymphocytic hypophysitis, sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis), infectious diseases and genetic disorders. Hypopituitarism may be permanent and progressive with sequential pattern of hormone deficiencies (radiation-induced hypopituitarism) or transient after traumatic brain injury with possible recovery occuring years from the initial event. In recent years there is increased reporting of less common and less reported causes of hypopituitarism with its delayed diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the published data and to allow earlier identification of populations at risk of hypopituitarism since optimal hormonal replacement may significantly improve their quality of life and life expectancy.

  9. Circumscription of the anthracnose pathogens Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and C. nigrum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cai, Lei; Crous, Pedro W; Damm, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    The anthracnose pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is usually identified as Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, while anthracnose of potato (Solanum tuberosum), peppers (Capsicum annuum), tomato (S. lycopersicum) and several other crop plants is often attributed to C. coccodes. In order to study the phylogenetic relationships of these important pathogens, we conducted a multigene analysis (ITS, ACT, TUB2, CHS-1, GAPDH) of strains previously identified as C. lindemuthianum, C. coccodes and other related species, as well as representative species of the major Colletotrichum species complexes. Strains of C. lindemuthianum belonged to a single clade; we selected an authentic specimen as lectotype, and an appropriate specimen and culture from the CBS collection to serve as epitype. Two clades were resolved within C. coccodes s. lat. One clade included the ex-neotype strain of C. coccodes on Solanum, while an epitype was selected for C. nigrum, which represents the oldest name of the second clade, which occurs on Capsicum, Solanum, as well as several other host plants. Furthermore, we recognized C. lycopersici as a synonym of C. nigrum, and C. biologicum as a synonym of C. coccodes.

  10. Seeking environmental causes of neurodegenerative disease and envisioning primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Peter S; Palmer, Valerie S; Kisby, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Pathological changes of the aging brain are expressed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders that will impact increasing numbers of people across the globe. Research on the causes of these disorders has focused heavily on genetics, and strategies for prevention envision drug-induced slowing or arresting disease advance before its clinical appearance. We discuss a strategic shift that seeks to identify the environmental causes or contributions to neurodegeneration, and the vision of primary disease prevention by removing or controlling exposure to culpable agents. The plausibility of this approach is illustrated by the prototypical neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). This often-familial long-latency disease, once thought to be an inherited genetic disorder but now known to have a predominant or exclusive environmental origin, is in the process of disappearing from the three heavily affected populations, namely Chamorros of Guam and Rota, Japanese residents of Kii Peninsula, Honshu, and Auyu and Jaqai linguistic groups on the island of New Guinea in West Papua, Indonesia. Exposure via traditional food and/or medicine (the only common exposure in all three geographic isolates) to one or more neurotoxins in seed of cycad plants is the most plausible if yet unproven etiology. Neurotoxin dosage and/or subject age at exposure might explain the stratified epidemic of neurodegenerative disease on Guam in which high-incidence ALS peaked and declined before that of PD, only to be replaced today by a dementing disorder comparable to Alzheimer's disease. Exposure to the Guam environment is also linked to the delayed development of ALS among a subset of Chamorro and non-Chamorro Gulf War/Era veterans, a summary of which is reported here for the first time. Lessons learned from this study and from 65 years of research on ALS-PDC include the exceptional value of initial, field-based informal investigation of

  11. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    PubMed

    Rowell, Temperance R; Tarran, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    PubMed Central

    Rowell, Temperance R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. PMID:26408554

  13. Autosomal recessive causes likely in early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Thomas S; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Cutler, David J

    2012-01-01

    To determine the genetic contribution to non-autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) (onset age ≤60 years) cases and identify the likely mechanism of inheritance in those cases. A liability threshold model of disease was used to estimate heritability of EOAD and late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) using concordance for AD among parent-offspring pairs. The Uniform Data Set, whose participants were collected from 32 US Alzheimer's Disease Centers, maintained by the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Individuals with probable AD and detailed parental history (n = 5370). The concordance among relatives and heritability of EOAD and late-onset AD. For late-onset AD (n = 4302), we found sex-specific parent-offspring concordance that ranged from approximately 10% to 30%, resulting in a heritability of 69.8% (95% confidence interval, 64.6%-75.0%), and equal heritability for both sexes regardless of parental sex. For EOAD (n = 702), we found that the parent-offspring concordance was 10% or less and concordance among siblings was 21.6%. Early-onset AD heritability was 92% to 100% for all likely values of EOAD prevalence. We confirm late-onset AD is a highly polygenic disease. By contrast, the data for EOAD suggest it is an almost entirely genetically based disease, and the patterns of observed concordance for parent-offspring pairs and among siblings lead us to reject the hypotheses that EOAD is a purely dominant, mitochondrial, X-linked, or polygenic disorder. The most likely explanation of the data is that approximately 90% of EOAD cases are due to autosomal recessive causes.

  14. New insights into the cause of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jenner, P.; Schapira, A.H.; Marsden, C.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Current concepts as to the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggest an inherited predisposition to environmental or endogenous toxic agents. Study of the substantia nigra after death in PD has highlighted three major changes: (1) evidence of oxidative stress and depletion of reduced glutathione; (2) high levels of total iron, with reduced ferritin buffering; and (3) mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Which of these is the primary event, generating a secondary cascade of changes culminating in nigral cell death, is unknown. In presymptomatic Lewy body-positive control brains, the nigra shows depletion of reduced glutathione content and, possibly, a reduction of complex I activity. Whatever the significance of these various abnormalities, be they causal or secondary, they provide novel targets for the development of new strategies to treat the cause of PD.104 references.

  15. Legal strategies to reduce tobacco-caused disease.

    PubMed

    Sweanor, David

    2003-12-01

    In efforts to control diseases it is common to look at ways to control the vectors of disease. When dealing with tobacco-caused disease this requires an understanding of the companies that manufacture and market tobacco products, and an examination of how to shape the behaviour of these companies. Since these corporations are created by law, and seek to maximize value for their owners within the constraints that laws place on the marketplace, it is only natural that a very significant part of tobacco control activities will consist of legal strategies. This paper identifies the underlying public health goal of tobacco control activities as being the reduction of death and disease. It then considers the roles that prevention, cessation, protection from environmental tobacco smoke and toxicity reduction can play as overall strategies for achieving this goal. This is followed by the identification of a broad range of legal strategies, primarily emphasizing governmental regulation, that can be used as part of these overall strategies. The paper looks specifically at a range of measures that impact on the accessibility of tobacco products, the provision of information for consumers, protection of the health and rights of non-users and the significant potential health gains from regulation of tobacco products.

  16. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer

    PubMed Central

    de Groof, Ad; Guelen, Lars; Deijs, Martin; van der Wal, Yorick; Miyata, Masato; Ng, Kah Sing; van Grinsven, Lotte; Simmelink, Bartjan; Biermann, Yvonne; Grisez, Luc; van Lent, Jan; de Ronde, Anthony; Chang, Siow Foong; Schrier, Carla; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-01-01

    From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch’s postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease. PMID:26252390

  17. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer.

    PubMed

    de Groof, Ad; Guelen, Lars; Deijs, Martin; van der Wal, Yorick; Miyata, Masato; Ng, Kah Sing; van Grinsven, Lotte; Simmelink, Bartjan; Biermann, Yvonne; Grisez, Luc; van Lent, Jan; de Ronde, Anthony; Chang, Siow Foong; Schrier, Carla; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-08-01

    From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch's postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease.

  18. Systemic Mastocytosis Causing Refractory Pruritus in a Liver Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Addepally, Naga S.; Klair, Jagpal S.; Jones, Johnny; Aduli, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) results from clonal, neoplastic proliferation of abnormal mast cells. Patients become susceptible to itching, urticaria, and anaphylactic shock, which occurs due to histamine release from mast cells. SM may coexist alongside other systemic diseases, thus confounding the overall clinical presentation. We discuss a 23-year-old woman with refractory pruritus, which was initially attributed to primary sclerosing cholangitis but had a nonresponse to antihistaminics, ursodiol, and cholestyramine. Concurrent evaluation for polyarthritis revealed increased uptake in the proximal femur on a bone scan, and subsequent bone marrow biopsy revealed indolent SM, and this was understood to be the cause of her intractable pruritus. PMID:27921051

  19. The automated system for prevention of industrial-caused diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnavsky, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the automated system intended to prevent industrial-caused diseases of workers, the basis of which is represented by algorithms of preventing several negative functional conditions (stress, monotony). The emergence of such state shall be determined based on an analysis of bioelectric signals, in particular, skin-galvanic reactions. Proceeding from the dynamics of the functional state, the automated system offers to perform an optimized set of measures to restore the health of the worker. Implementation of an automated system is presented in Visual Programming system LabVIEW.

  20. Burden of disease caused by local transport in Warsaw, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Tainio, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Transport is a major source of air pollution, noise, injuries and physical activity in the urban environment. The quantification of the health risks and benefits arising from these factors would provide useful information for the planning of cost-effective mitigation actions. In this study we quantified the burden of disease caused by local transport in the city of Warsaw, Poland. The disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were estimated for transport related air pollution (particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), cadmium, lead and nickel), noise, injuries and physical activity. Exposure to these factors was based on local and international data, and the exposure-response functions (ERFs) were based on published reviews and recommendations. The uncertainties were quantified and propagated with the Monte Carlo method. Local transport generated air pollution, noise and injuries were estimated to cause approximately 58,000 DALYs in the study area. From this burden 44% was due to air pollution and 46% due to noise. Transport related physical activity was estimated to cause a health benefit of 17,000 DALYs. Main quantified uncertainties were related to disability weight for the annoyance (due to noise) and to the ERFs for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution and walking. The results indicate that the health burden of transport could be mitigated by reducing motorized transport, which causes air pollution and noise, and by encouraging walking and cycling in the study area. PMID:26516622

  1. Diseases caused by mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels mediate a specific form of Ca2+ influx called store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) that contributes to the function of many cell types. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins located in the plasma membrane, which form its ion-conducting pore. ORAI1 channels are activated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Loss- and gain-of-function gene mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 in human patients cause distinct disease syndromes. CRAC channelopathy is caused by loss-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 that abolish CRAC channel function and SOCE; it is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-like disease, autoimmunity, muscular hypotonia, and ectodermal dysplasia, with defects in dental enamel. The latter defect emphasizes an important role of CRAC channels in tooth development. By contrast, autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in these genes result in constitutive CRAC channel activation, SOCE, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with an overlapping spectrum of diseases, including non-syndromic tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and York platelet and Stormorken syndromes, two syndromes defined, besides myopathy, by thrombocytopenia, thrombopathy, and bleeding diathesis. The fact that myopathy results from loss- and gain-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 highlights the importance of CRAC channels for Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle function. The cellular dysfunction and clinical disease spectrum observed in mutant patients provide important information about the molecular regulation of ORAI1 and STIM1 proteins and the role of CRAC channels in human physiology. PMID:26469693

  2. The wheat Lr34 multi-pathogen resistance gene confers resistance to anthracnose and rust in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Schnippenkoetter, Wendelin; Lo, Clive; Liu, Guoquan; Dibley, Katherine; Chan, Wai Lung; White, Jodie; Milne, Ricky; Zwart, Alexander; Kwong, Eunjung; Keller, Beat; Godwin, Ian; Krattinger, Simon G; Lagudah, Evans

    2017-03-16

    The ability of the wheat Lr34 multi-pathogen resistance gene (Lr34res) to function across a wide taxonomic boundary was investigated in transgenic Sorghum bicolor. Increased resistance to sorghum rust and anthracnose disease symptoms following infection with the biotrophic pathogen Puccinia purpurea and the hemibiotroph Colletotrichum sublineolum respectively occurred in transgenic plants expressing the Lr34res ABC transporter. Transgenic sorghum lines that highly expressed the wheat Lr34res gene exhibited immunity to sorghum rust compared to the low expressing single copy Lr34res genotype that conferred partial resistance. Pathogen induced pigmentation mediated by flavonoid phytoalexins was evident on transgenic sorghum leaves following P. purpurea infection within 24-72 hours, which paralleled Lr34res gene expression. Elevated expression of flavone synthase II, flavanone 4-reductase and dihydroflavonol reductase genes which control the biosynthesis of flavonoid phytoalexins characterised the highly expressing Lr34res transgenic lines 24 h post inoculation with P. purpurea. Metabolite analysis of mesocotyls infected with C. sublineolum showed increased levels of 3-deoxyanthocyanidin metabolites was associated with Lr34res expression, concomitant with reduced symptoms of anthracnose. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Compensation for occupational disease with multiple causes: the case of coal miners respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.L.; Wagner, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    Many diseases associated with occupational exposures are clinically indistinguishable from diseases with non-occupational causes. Given this, how are fair decisions made about eligibility for compensation. This problem is discussed in relation to the federal black lung program. Conflicting definitions of terms--coal workers pneumoconiosis as defined by the medical profession, pneumoconiosis as defined by the United States Congress, and the popular term, black lung--are important considerations in this discussion. Each is embedded in different logical interpretations of the causes of occupational disease and of disability. Alternative views are presented and critically discussed.

  4. [Environmental causes of the distal airways disease. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis and rare causes].

    PubMed

    Dalphin, J-C; Didier, A

    2013-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is one of the most frequent causes of distal airways disease. It is associated with inflammation of the bronchioles, predominantly by lymphocytic infiltrates, and with granuloma formation causing bronchial obstruction. This inflammation explains the clinical manifestations and the airways obstruction seen on pulmonary function tests, most often in the distal airways but proximal in almost 20%. CT scan abnormalities reflect the lymphocytic infiltrates and air trapping and, in some cases, the presence of emphysema. Bronchiolitis induced by chronic inhalation of mineral particles or acute inhalation of toxic gases (such as NO2) are other examples of small airways damage due to environmental exposure. The pathophysiological mechanisms are different and bronchiolar damage is either exclusive or predominant. Bronchiolitis induced by tobacco smoke exposure, usually classified as interstitial pneumonitis, is easily diagnosed thanks to broncho-alveolar lavage. Its prognosis is linked to the other consequences of tobacco smoke exposure including respiratory insufficiency. Finally, the complex lung exposure observed in some rare cases (such as the World Trade Center fire or during wars) may lead to a less characteristic pattern of small airways disease.

  5. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  6. Group C Streptococcus Causing Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Child.

    PubMed

    Chandnani, Harsha K; Jain, Renu; Patamasucon, Pisespong

    2015-07-01

    Human infection with group C Streptococcus is extremely rare and a select number of cases have been reported to cause acute pharyngitis, acute glomerulonephritis, skin and soft tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, pneumonitis, and bacteremia. In pediatrics, this bacteria is known to cause epidemic food-borne pharyngitis, pneumonia, endocarditis, and meningitis, and has reportedly been isolated in the blood, meninges, sinuses, fingernail, peritonsillar abscess, and thyroglossal duct cyst, among others. Our patient was a 7-year-old previously healthy female who presented with abnormal movements of her upper body and grimaces of her face that progressively worsened over time. Initial laboratory resulted revealed 3+ protein on urinalysis and elevated antistreptolysin-O and anti-DNAse antibody levels, and echocardiogram showed mild-to-moderate mitral regurgitation. We describe a rare case of group C Streptococcus resulting in rheumatic heart disease in a child, with a detailed review of the literature pertaining to the diagnosis and management of this infection. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Early recognition of rheumatic heart disease is crucial in the overall outcome of the condition and therefore knowledge of the symptoms associated with condition is also imperative. Group C Streptococcus is rarely associated with rheumatic heart disease and most children exhibiting acute onset of common symptoms, such as chorea, fever, carditis, and rash (erythema marginatum) will present to the emergency department first. Increased awareness and prompt recognition, as done with this child, will result in proper follow-up and adequate management of this condition in all patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Proventricular dilatation disease and Avian Bornavirus as a possible cause].

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Herden, C; Herzog, S; Piepenbring, A

    2010-01-01

    Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD) is a very important letal disease in parrots. It affects several psittacine species and is a high risk factor for the health of breeding collections, but is rarely observed in other avian families. To date, the etiology of the disease remained unclear, though a virus infection was always assumed. Recently, a novel virus (Avian Bornavirus [ABV]) was discovered in parrots suffering from PDD so that ABV is now considered as the most likely cause. Despite the fact that clinically healthy birds may be infected with ABV, several studies demonstrate a correlation between ABV-infection and clinically present PDD. Apart from direct virus detection, serological methods allow the demonstration of an infection. Currently, Avian Bornavirus is the leading candidate as the aetiologic agent of PDD. Breeding collections and birds planned to be introduced into collections should therefore be investigated by molecular biological and serological methods for the presence of an ABV-infection. The diagnostic value of the demonstration of an ABV-infection for the diagnosis of a clinically present PDD has to be investigated further.

  8. [Diarrheal disease caused by rotavirus in epidemic outbreaks].

    PubMed

    Reyna-Figueroa, Jesús; Sánchez-Uribe, Edgar; Esteves-Jaramillo, Alejandra; Hernández-Hernández, Luz del Carmen; Richardson, Vesta

    2012-02-01

    Determine the epidemiological profile of outbreaks of acute diarrheal disease caused by rotavirus (RV) occurring in pediatric patients, based on a critical review of the literature published between 2000 and 2010. A search was carried out for articles published from January 2000 to April 2010, collected by the Artemisa, EBSCO, Embase, Imbiomed, Lilacs, Ovid, PubMed, and Science Direct databases. In the studies that met the inclusion criteria, possible confounding factors were identified and risks of bias were attributed based on the number of items considered inadequate in each case. The epidemiological and microbiological characteristics of the outbreaks were described. The sample was comprised of only 14 (10.8%) of the 129 titles identified, which accounted for 91 092 reported cases of acute diarrhea. In 5 250 of these cases, a search for rotavirus was conducted, yielding 1 711 (32.5%) positive isolations. It was observed that the RV from Group A was the causative agent in 100% of the outbreaks, while genotype G9 was documented in 50% of the articles. Rotavirus, mainly serotype G9, was one of the principal agents responsible for outbreaks of acute diarrheal disease over the past decade. A careful outbreak study can contribute valuable information for RV disease control and prevention.

  9. Role of Sphingomyelinase in Infectious Diseases Caused by Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Masataka; Hashimoto, Manabu; Takahashi, Masaya; Ohmae, Yuka; Seike, Soshi; Kato, Ryoko; Fujita, Aoi; Tsuge, Hideaki; Nagahama, Masahiro; Ochi, Sadayuki; Sasahara, Teppei; Hayashi, Shunji; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Sakurai, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) is a pathogen in opportunistic infections. Here we show that Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (Bc-SMase) is a virulence factor for septicemia. Clinical isolates produced large amounts of Bc-SMase, grew in vivo, and caused death among mice, but ATCC strains isolated from soil did not. A transformant of the ATCC strain carrying a recombinant plasmid containing the Bc-SMase gene grew in vivo, but that with the gene for E53A, which has little enzymatic activity, did not. Administration of an anti-Bc-SMase antibody and immunization against Bc-SMase prevented death caused by the clinical isolates, showing that Bc-SMase plays an important role in the diseases caused by B. cereus. Treatment of mouse macrophages with Bc-SMase resulted in a reduction in the generation of H2O2 and phagocytosis of macrophages induced by peptidoglycan (PGN), but no effect on the release of TNF-α and little release of LDH under our experimental conditions. Confocal laser microscopy showed that the treatment of mouse macrophages with Bc-SMase resulted in the formation of ceramide-rich domains. A photobleaching analysis suggested that the cells treated with Bc-SMase exhibited a reduction in membrane fluidity. The results suggest that Bc-SMase is essential for the hydrolysis of SM in membranes, leading to a reduction in phagocytosis. PMID:22701599

  10. Disability Weights Measurement for 228 Causes of Disease in the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Disability weight for each disease plays a key role in combining years lived with disability and years of life lost in disability adjusted life year. For the Korean Burden of Disease 2012 study, we have conducted a re-estimation of disability weights for causes of disease by adapting the methodology of a recent Global Burden of Disease study. Our study was conducted through a self-administered web-based survey using a paired comparison (PC) as the main valuation method. A total of 496 physicians and medical college students who were attending in third or fourth grade of a regular course conducted the survey. We applied a probit regression on the PC data and computed the predicted probabilities of each cause of disease from the coefficient estimates of the probit regression. We used 'being dead (1)' and 'full health (0)' as anchor points to rescale the predicted probability of each cause of disease on a scale of 0 to 1. By this method, disability weights for a total of 228 causes of disease were estimated. There was a fairly high correlation between the disability weights of overlapping causes of disease from this study and a previous South Korean study despite the differences in valuation methods and time periods. In conclusion, we have shown that disability weights can be estimated based on a PC by including 'full health' and 'being dead' as anchor points without resorting to a person trade-off. Through developments in the methodology of disability weights estimation from this study, disability weights can be easily estimated and continuously revised. PMID:27775250

  11. Disability Weights Measurement for 228 Causes of Disease in the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012.

    PubMed

    Ock, Minsu; Lee, Jin Yong; Oh, In Hwan; Park, Hyesook; Yoon, Seok Jun; Jo, Min Woo

    2016-11-01

    Disability weight for each disease plays a key role in combining years lived with disability and years of life lost in disability adjusted life year. For the Korean Burden of Disease 2012 study, we have conducted a re-estimation of disability weights for causes of disease by adapting the methodology of a recent Global Burden of Disease study. Our study was conducted through a self-administered web-based survey using a paired comparison (PC) as the main valuation method. A total of 496 physicians and medical college students who were attending in third or fourth grade of a regular course conducted the survey. We applied a probit regression on the PC data and computed the predicted probabilities of each cause of disease from the coefficient estimates of the probit regression. We used 'being dead (1)' and 'full health (0)' as anchor points to rescale the predicted probability of each cause of disease on a scale of 0 to 1. By this method, disability weights for a total of 228 causes of disease were estimated. There was a fairly high correlation between the disability weights of overlapping causes of disease from this study and a previous South Korean study despite the differences in valuation methods and time periods. In conclusion, we have shown that disability weights can be estimated based on a PC by including 'full health' and 'being dead' as anchor points without resorting to a person trade-off. Through developments in the methodology of disability weights estimation from this study, disability weights can be easily estimated and continuously revised.

  12. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to

  13. Synergistic mixtures of chitosan and Mentha piperita L. essential oil to inhibit Colletotrichum species and anthracnose development in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Kataryne Árabe Rimá; Berger, Lúcia Raquel Ramos; de Araújo, Samara Amorim; Câmara, Marcos Paz Saraiva; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2017-09-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of chitosan (CHI) and Mentha piperita L. essential oil (MPEO) alone or in combination to control the mycelial growth of five different Colletotrichum species, C. asianum, C. dianesei, C. fructicola, C. tropicale and C. karstii, identified as potential anthracnose-causing agents in mango (Mangifera indica L.). The efficacy of coatings of CHI and MPEO mixtures in controlling the development of anthracnose in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins was evaluated. CHI (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 mg/mL) and MPEO (0.3, 0.6, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μL/mL) alone effectively inhibited mycelial growth of all tested Colletotrichum strains in synthetic media. Mixtures of CHI (5 or 7.5 mg/mL) and MPEO (0.3, 0.6 or 1.25 μL/mL) strongly inhibited mycelial growth and showed additive or synergistic inhibitory effects on the tested Colletotrichum strains based on the Abbott index. The application of coatings of CHI (5 or 7.5 mg/mL) and MPEO (0.6 or 1.25 μL/mL) mixtures that presented synergistic interactions decreased anthracnose lesion severity in mango artificially contaminated with either of the tested Colletotrichum strains over 15 days of storage at 25 °C. The anthracnose lesion severity in mango coated with the mixtures of CHI and MPEO was similar or lower than those observed in mango treated with the synthetic fungicides thiophanate-methyl (10 μg a.i./mL) and difenoconazole (0.5 μg a.i./mL). The application of coatings containing low doses of CHI and MPEO may be an effective alternative for controlling the postharvest development of anthracnose in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain in chronic kidney disease: prevalence, cause and management.

    PubMed

    Kafkia, Theodora; Chamney, Melissa; Drinkwater, Anna; Pegoraro, Marisa; Sedgewick, John

    2011-06-01

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience and is the most common symptom experienced by renal patients. It can be caused by primary co-morbid diseases, renal replacement therapies, medication or treatment side effects, and its intensity varies from moderate to severe. Pain management in renal patients is difficult, since the distance between pain relief and toxicity is very small. This paper will provide an algorithm for pain management proposed using paracetamol, nonsteroid anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs), mild and stronger opioids as well as complementary techniques. Quality of Life (QoL) and overall enhancement of the patient experience through better pain management are also discussed. To improve pain management it is essential that nurses recognise that they have direct responsibilities related to pain assessment and tailoring of opioid analgesics and better and more detailed education. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Splicing in action: assessing disease causing sequence changes

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, D; Baralle, M

    2005-01-01

    Variations in new splicing regulatory elements are difficult to identify exclusively by sequence inspection and may result in deleterious effects on precursor (pre) mRNA splicing. These mutations can result in either complete skipping of the exon, retention of the intron, or the introduction of a new splice site within an exon or intron. Sometimes mutations that do not disrupt or create a splice site activate pre-existing pseudo splice sites, consistent with the proposal that introns contain splicing inhibitory sequences. These variants can also affect the fine balance of isoforms produced by alternatively spliced exons and in consequence cause disease. Available genomic pathology data reveal that we are still partly ignorant of the basic mechanisms that underlie the pre-mRNA splicing process. The fact that human pathology can provide pointers to new modulatory elements of splicing should be exploited. PMID:16199547

  16. Oral disease in children with Down syndrome: causes and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shore, Sarah; Lightfoot, Tracy; Ansell, Pat

    2010-02-01

    While healthcare professionals may be familiar with the social and medical management of Down syndrome, dental issues have traditionally been somewhat neglected and are important causes of morbidity. The aims of this review are two-fold. Firstly, to draw attention to the environmental and host factors associated with periodontal disease and dental caries (tooth decay) in children with Down syndrome. Secondly, to highlight key yet largely modifiable risk factors in the causation and progression of these chronic oral conditions, many of which also apply to other children with learning disabilities. The review focuses on the role of community and school-based healthcare professionals in promoting good oral health using evidence-based preventative strategies, and in encouraging early, regular contact with dental services.

  17. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and the majority of reflux episodes remains asymptomatic. This review aims to address the question how reflux causes symptoms, focussing on factors leading to enhanced reflux perception. We will highlight esophageal sensitivity variance between subtypes of GERD, which is influenced by peripheral sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons, impaired mucosal barrier function and genetic factors. We will also discuss the contribution of specific refluxate characteristics to reflux perception, including acidity, and the role of bile, pepsin and gas and proximal extent. Further understanding of reflux perception might improve GERD treatment, especially in current partial responders to therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxemia in patients with COPD: cause, effects, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Kent, Brian D; Mitchell, Patrick D; McNicholas, Walter T

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. Alveolar hypoxia and consequent hypoxemia increase in prevalence as disease severity increases. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch resulting from progressive airflow limitation and emphysema is the key driver of this hypoxia, which may be exacerbated by sleep and exercise. Uncorrected chronic hypoxemia is associated with the development of adverse sequelae of COPD, including pulmonary hypertension, secondary polycythemia, systemic inflammation, and skeletal muscle dysfunction. A combination of these factors leads to diminished quality of life, reduced exercise tolerance, increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity, and greater risk of death. Concomitant sleep-disordered breathing may place a small but significant subset of COPD patients at increased risk of these complications. Long-term oxygen therapy has been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, reduce erythrocytosis, and improve survival in selected patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, the optimal treatment for patients with exertional oxyhemoglobin desaturation, isolated nocturnal hypoxemia, or mild-to-moderate resting daytime hypoxemia remains uncertain.

  19. Detection and Heterogeneity of Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease in Parrots

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth; Wilson, Van G.; Wigle, William L.; Phalen, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Pacheco's disease (PD) is a common, often fatal, disease of parrots. We cloned a virus isolate from a parrot that had characteristic lesions of PD. Three viral clones were partially sequenced, demonstrating that this virus was an alphaherpesvirus most closely related to the gallid herpesvirus 1. Five primer sets were developed from these sequences. The primer sets were used with PCR to screen tissues or tissue culture media suspected to contain viruses from 54 outbreaks of PD. The primer sets amplified DNA from all but one sample. Ten amplification patterns were detected, indicating that PD is caused by a genetically heterogeneous population of viruses. A single genetic variant (psittacid herpesvirus variant 1) amplified with all primer sets and was the most common virus variant (62.7%). A single primer set (23F) amplified DNA from all of the positive samples, suggesting that PCR could be used as a rapid postmortem assay for these viruses. PCR was found to be significantly more sensitive than tissue culture for the detection of psittacid herpesviruses. PMID:11158102

  20. [DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY AS A CAUSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Kos, Ivan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease in most developed countries. Hyperglycemia, hypertension and genetic predisposition are the main risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount and origin of dietary protein also seem to play a role as risk factors. Clinical picture includes a progressive increase in albuminuria, decline in glomerular filtration, hypertension, and a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening for albuminuria should be performed yearly, starting 5 years after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes or earlier in the presence of adolescence or poor metabolic control. In patients with type 2 diabetes, screening should be performed at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Patients with albuminuria should undergo evaluation regarding the presence of associated comorbidities, especially retinopathy and macrovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control (HbA1c < 7%), treating hypertension (target blood pressure < 140/85 mm Hg), using drugs with blockade effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, treating dyslipidemia and anemia are effective strategies for preventing the development of albuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Anthracnose disease evaluation of sorghum germplasm from Honduras

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Germplasm collections are important resources for sorghum improvement and 17 accessions from Honduras were inoculated with Colletotrichum sublineolum and evaluated at the Tropical Agriculture Research Station in Isabela, Puerto Rico during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons to identify sources of ant...

  2. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Campbell, Ian M; Baggett, Brett C; Soens, Zachry T; Rao, Mitchell M; Hixson, Patricia M; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R

    2013-09-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles.

  3. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  4. Identification of Lens culinaris defense genes responsive to the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum truncatum.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Bett, Kirstin E; Zhou, Tengsheng; Vandenberg, Albert; Wei, Yangdou; Banniza, Sabine

    2013-04-30

    Anthracnose of lentil, caused by the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum truncatum is a serious threat to lentil production in western Canada. Colletotrichum truncatum employs a bi-phasic infection strategy characterized by initial symptomless biotrophic and subsequent destructive necrotrophic colonization of its host. The transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy (known as the biotrophy-necrotrophy switch [BNS]) is critical in anthracnose development. Understanding plant responses during the BNS is the key to designing a strategy for incorporating resistance against hemibiotrophic pathogens either via introgression of resistance genes or quantitative trait loci contributing to host defense into elite cultivars, or via incorporation of resistance by biotechnological means. The in planta BNS of C. truncatum was determined by histochemical analysis of infected lentil leaf tissues in time-course experiments. A total of 2852 lentil expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from C. truncatum-infected leaf tissues were analyzed to catalogue defense related genes. These ESTs could be assembled into 1682 unigenes. Of these, 101 unigenes encoded membrane and transport associated proteins, 159 encoded proteins implicated in signal transduction and 387 were predicted to be stress and defense related proteins (GenBank accessions: JG293480 to JG293479). The most abundant class of defense related proteins contained pathogenesis related proteins (encoded by 125 ESTs) followed by heat shock proteins, glutathione S-transferase, protein kinases, protein phosphatase, zinc finger proteins, peroxidase, GTP binding proteins, resistance proteins and syringolide-induced proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to compare the expression of two resistance genes of the NBS-LRR class in susceptible and partially resistant genotypes. One (contig186) was induced 6 days post-inoculation (dpi) in a susceptible host genotype (Eston) whereas the mRNA level of another ( LT21-1990) peaked 4

  5. Identification of Lens culinaris defense genes responsive to the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum truncatum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthracnose of lentil, caused by the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum truncatum is a serious threat to lentil production in western Canada. Colletotrichum truncatum employs a bi-phasic infection strategy characterized by initial symptomless biotrophic and subsequent destructive necrotrophic colonization of its host. The transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy (known as the biotrophy-necrotrophy switch [BNS]) is critical in anthracnose development. Understanding plant responses during the BNS is the key to designing a strategy for incorporating resistance against hemibiotrophic pathogens either via introgression of resistance genes or quantitative trait loci contributing to host defense into elite cultivars, or via incorporation of resistance by biotechnological means. Results The in planta BNS of C. truncatum was determined by histochemical analysis of infected lentil leaf tissues in time-course experiments. A total of 2852 lentil expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from C. truncatum-infected leaf tissues were analyzed to catalogue defense related genes. These ESTs could be assembled into 1682 unigenes. Of these, 101 unigenes encoded membrane and transport associated proteins, 159 encoded proteins implicated in signal transduction and 387 were predicted to be stress and defense related proteins (GenBank accessions: JG293480 to JG293479). The most abundant class of defense related proteins contained pathogenesis related proteins (encoded by 125 ESTs) followed by heat shock proteins, glutathione S-transferase, protein kinases, protein phosphatase, zinc finger proteins, peroxidase, GTP binding proteins, resistance proteins and syringolide-induced proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to compare the expression of two resistance genes of the NBS-LRR class in susceptible and partially resistant genotypes. One (contig186) was induced 6 days post-inoculation (dpi) in a susceptible host genotype (Eston) whereas the mRNA level of another

  6. Causes of alternative pathway dysregulation in dense deposit disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Meyer, Nicole C; Wang, Kai; Nishimura, Carla; Frees, Kathy; Jones, Michael; Katz, Louis M; Sethi, Sanjeev; Smith, Richard J H

    2012-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the causes of alternative pathway dysregulation in a cohort of patients with dense deposit disease (DDD). Thirty-two patients with biopsy-proven DDD underwent screening for C3 nephritic factors (C3Nefs), factor H autoantibodies (FHAAs), factor B autoantibodies (FBAAs), and genetic variants in CFH. C3Nefs were detected by: ELISA, C3 convertase surface assay (C3CSA), C3CSA with properdin (C3CSAP), two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis (2DIEP), and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE). FHAAs and FBAAs were detected by ELISA, and CFH variants were identified by Sanger sequencing. Twenty-five patients (78%) were positive for C3Nefs. Three C3Nef-positive patients were also positive for FBAAs and one of these patients additionally carried two novel missense variants in CFH. Of the seven C3Nef-negative patients, one patient was positive for FHAAs and two patients carried CFH variants that may be causally related to their DDD phenotype. C3CASP was the most sensitive C3Nef-detection assay. C3CASP and IFE are complementary because C3CSAP measures the stabilizing properties of C3Nefs, whereas IFE measures their expected consequence-breakdown of C3b. A test panel that includes C3CSAP, IFE, FHAAs, FBAAs, and genetic testing for CFH variants will identify a probable cause for alternative pathway dysregulation in approximately 90% of DDD patients. Dysregulation is most frequently due to C3Nefs, although some patients test positive for FHAAs, FBAAs, and CFH mutations. Defining the pathophysiology of DDD should facilitate the development of mechanism-directed therapies.

  7. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Ellard, Colin G; Almeida, Quincy J

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001) and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001). Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013) and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005) when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD.

  8. Attention! Cardiac tamponade may be caused by underlying Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Atay, Hilmi; Kelkitli, Engin; Okuyucu, Muhammed; Yildiz, Levent; Turgut, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    Castleman's disease is a rarely observed lymphoproliferative disease. In the literature, various signs and symptoms of the disease have been reported; one of these is secondary cardiac tamponade. We describe the case of a 41-year-old man who developed cardiac tamponade during examination, and who was later diagnosed with Castleman's disease, based on his lymph node biopsies.

  9. Comparative Pathogenomics of Bacteria Causing Infectious Diseases in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S.; Al-Ghabshi, Aliya; Al-Mazrooei, Nashwa; Al-Habsi, Saoud

    2012-01-01

    Fish living in the wild as well as reared in the aquaculture facilities are susceptible to infectious diseases caused by a phylogenetically diverse collection of bacterial pathogens. Control and treatment options using vaccines and drugs are either inadequate, inefficient, or impracticable. The classical approach in studying fish bacterial pathogens has been looking at individual or few virulence factors. Recently, genome sequencing of a number of bacterial fish pathogens has tremendously increased our understanding of the biology, host adaptation, and virulence factors of these important pathogens. This paper attempts to compile the scattered literature on genome sequence information of fish pathogenic bacteria published and available to date. The genome sequencing has uncovered several complex adaptive evolutionary strategies mediated by horizontal gene transfer, insertion sequence elements, mutations and prophage sequences operating in fish pathogens, and how their genomes evolved from generalist environmental strains to highly virulent obligatory pathogens. In addition, the comparative genomics has allowed the identification of unique pathogen-specific gene clusters. The paper focuses on the comparative analysis of the virulogenomes of important fish bacterial pathogens, and the genes involved in their evolutionary adaptation to different ecological niches. The paper also proposes some new directions on finding novel vaccine and chemotherapeutic targets in the genomes of bacterial pathogens of fish. PMID:22675651

  10. Oral manifestations caused by the linear IgA disease.

    PubMed

    Eguia del Valle, Asier; Aguirre Urízar, José Manuel; Martínez Sahuquillo, Angel

    2004-01-01

    The Linear IgA deposit related disease or Linear IgA disease (LAD) is a chronic, uncommon and autoimmunological mucocutaneous disease, characterised by linear IgA deposits along the basement membrane zone. In mainly cases, moreover cutaneous lesions, there are oral mucosal and other mucosal lesions. There are also, some cases published of Linear IgA disease limited to oral mucosa. The known of this disease is important for the establishment of a correct differential diagnosis in cases of blistering mucocutaneous diseases. In this paper, we analyze the most important features of this disease, attending specially to the oral manifestations.

  11. Effect of host genotypes and weather variables on the severity and temporal dynamics of sorghum anthracnose in Ethiopia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The severity and temporal dynamics of anthracnose on susceptible (BTx623 and AL70) and resistant lines (2001PWColl#022 and 2001HararghieColl#12) were studied in field plots during the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons in southern Ethiopia. The initial, final, and mean anthracnose severities and area un...

  12. Differentiation of Colletotrichum species responsible for anthracnose of strawberry by arbitrarily primed PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of 39 isolates of Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides, which cause anthracnose on strawberry, was grouped into species based on the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (ap-PCR). All isolates used had previously been identified according to classical taxonomic morphology. Ap-PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of C. acutatum, C. fragariae and two genotypes of C. gloeosporioides. Fifteen of the 18 C. acutatum isolates were very similar, although three isolates which produced a red pigment had distinctly different banding patterns. Nearly identical banding patterns were observed for all nine isolates of C. fragariae. The 12 C. gloeosporioides isolates were more diverse and two separate genotypes, Cgl-1 (six isolates) and Cgl-2 (five isolates) were distinguished by ap-PCR. An additional isolate did not conform to either the Cgl-1 or Cgl-2 genotypes. The utility of ap-PCR compared with other molecular techniques for reliable identification of Colletotrichum isolates pathogenic on strawberry is discussed.

  13. Whole genome sequence and genome annotation of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of anthracnose in pepper plants in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Joon-Hee; Chon, Jae-Kyung; Ahn, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Ik-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2016-06-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is a destructive fungal pathogen which causes anthracnose in a wide range of crops. Here we report the whole genome sequence and annotation of C. acutatum strain KC05, isolated from an infected pepper in Kangwon, South Korea. Genomic DNA from the KC05 strain was used for the whole genome sequencing using a PacBio sequencer and the MiSeq system. The KC05 genome was determined to be 52,190,760 bp in size with a G + C content of 51.73% in 27 scaffolds and to contain 13,559 genes with an average length of 1516 bp. Gene prediction and annotation were performed by incorporating RNA-Seq data. The genome sequence of the KC05 was deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number LUXP00000000.

  14. Estimation of cumulative cadmium intake causing Itai-itai disease.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Takeya; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Suwazono, Yasushi; Uetani, Mirei; Oishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nogawa, Koji

    2005-11-15

    This study was undertaken to estimate the amount of cadmium (Cd) exposure needed for the development of Itai-itai disease. The investigated subjects comprised 82 Itai-itai disease patients and 11 persons requiring observation who were admitted in 1977 and 1978 for medical testing. With the period when the Itai-itai disease patients started to perceive leg/back pain defined as the 'mild disease onset', and the period when they experienced the most severe manifestations such as ambulatory disturbance and bone fractures defined as 'severe disease onset'. Relative cumulative person number distribution according to life time cadmium intake (LCD) at mild disease onset, severe disease onset, and time of death was depicted as an sigmoid curve and the establishment of probit regression lines was demonstrated between them. LCD at the time when mild disease onset and severe disease onset were recognized in half of the Itai-itai disease patients was 3.1 and 3.8 g, respectively. Furthermore, LCD at the time when mild disease onset and severe disease onset were recognized in 5% of the Itai-itai disease patients was calculated to be 2.6 and 3.3 g, respectively. The present results clarify that Itai-itai disease, the most severe stage of chronic Cd poisoning, occurs at levels of Cd consumption amounting to approximately three-fold of those currently seen in Japan.

  15. Genetic analysis of the resistance to eight anthracnose races in the common bean differential cultivar Kaboon.

    PubMed

    Campa, Ana; Giraldez, Ramón; Ferreira, Juan José

    2011-06-01

    Resistance to the eight races (3, 7, 19, 31, 81, 449, 453, and 1545) of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (anthracnose) was evaluated in F(3) families derived from the cross between the anthracnose differential bean cultivars Kaboon and Michelite. Molecular marker analyses were carried out in the F(2) individuals in order to map and characterize the anthracnose resistance genes or gene clusters present in Kaboon. The analysis of the combined segregations indicates that the resistance present in Kaboon against these eight anthracnose races is determined by 13 different race-specific genes grouped in three clusters. One of these clusters, corresponding to locus Co-1 in linkage group (LG) 1, carries two dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 81 and 1545, respectively, and a gene necessary (dominant complementary gene) for the specific resistance to race 31. A second cluster, corresponding to locus Co-3/9 in LG 4, carries six dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 3, 7, 19, 449, 453, and 1545, respectively, and the second dominant complementary gene for the specific resistance to race 31. A third cluster of unknown location carries three dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 449, 453, and 1545, respectively. This is the first time that two anthracnose resistance genes with a complementary mode of action have been mapped in common bean and their relationship with previously known Co- resistance genes established.

  16. Historical perspectives on music as a cause of disease.

    PubMed

    Kennaway, James

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between music and medicine is generally understood in the benign context of music therapy, but, as this chapter shows, there is a long parallel history of medical theories that suggest that music can cause real physical and mental illness. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the idea of music as an expression of universal harmony was challenged by a more mechanistic model of nervous stimulation. By the 1790s, there was a substantial discourse on the dangers of musical overstimulation to health in medicine, literature, and etiquette books. During the nineteenth century, the sense of music as a pathogenic stimulant gained in influence. It was often linked to fears about sexuality, female gynecological health, and theories of hypnosis and degeneration. In the twentieth century, the debate on the medical perils of the wrong kinds of music became overtly politicized in Germany and the Soviet Union. Likewise, the opponents of jazz, particularly in the United States, often turned to medicine to fend off its supposed social, moral, and physical consequences. The Cold War saw an extensive discourse on the idea of musical "brainwashing," that rumbled on into the 1990s. Today, regular media panics about pathological music are mirrored by alarming evidence of the deliberate use of music to harm listeners in the context of the so-called War on Terror. Can music make you ill? Music therapy is a common if perhaps rather neglected part of medicine, but its diametric opposite, the notion that music might lead to real mental and physical illness, may seem improbable. In fact, over the last two hundred years, there have been many times when as much was written about the medical dangers of music as about its potential benefits. Since the eighteenth century, fears about music's effects on the nerves and the mind have created a remarkably extensive discourse on pathological music based on a view of both music and the causation of disease as matters of

  17. Cholesteryl ester storage disease: a rare and possibly treatable cause of premature vascular disease and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a variety of mutations of the LIPA gene. These cause reduced activity of lysosomal acid lipase, which results in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in lysosomes. If enzyme activity is very low/absent, presentation is in infancy with failure to thrive, malabsorption, hepatosplenomegaly and rapid early death (Wolman disease). With higher but still low enzyme activity, presentation is later in life with hepatic fibrosis, dyslipidaemia and early atherosclerosis.Identification of this rare disorder is difficult as it is essential to assay leucocyte acid phosphatase activity. An assay using specific inhibitors has now been developed that facilitates measurement in dried blood spots. Treatment of CESD has until now been limited to management of the dyslipidaemia, but this does not influence the liver effects. A new enzyme replacement therapy (Sebelipase) has now been developed that could change treatment options for the future.

  18. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes Crohn's disease in some inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Naser, Saleh A; Sagramsingh, Sudesh R; Naser, Abed S; Thanigachalam, Saisathya

    2014-06-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition that plagues millions all over the world. This debilitating bowel disease can start in early childhood and continue into late adulthood. Signs and symptoms are usually many and multiple tests are often required for the diagnosis and confirmation of this disease. However, little is still understood about the cause(s) of CD. As a result, several theories have been proposed over the years. One theory in particular is that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is intimately linked to the etiology of CD. This fastidious bacterium also known to cause Johne's disease in cattle has infected the intestines of animals for years. It is believed that due to the thick, waxy cell wall of MAP it is able to survive the process of pasteurization as well as chemical processes seen in irrigation purification systems. Subsequently meat, dairy products and water serve as key vehicles in the transmission of MAP infection to humans (from farm to fork) who have a genetic predisposition, thus leading to the development of CD. The challenges faced in culturing this bacterium from CD are many. Examples include its extreme slow growth, lack of cell wall, low abundance, and its mycobactin dependency. In this review article, data from 60 studies showing the detection and isolation of MAP by PCR and culture techniques have been reviewed. Although this review may not be 100% comprehensive of all studies, clearly the majority of the studies overwhelmingly and definitively support the role of MAP in at least 30%-50% of CD patients. It is very possible that lack of detection of MAP from some CD patients may be due to the absence of MAP role in these patients. The latter statement is conditional on utilization of methodology appropriate for detection of human MAP strains. Ultimately, stratification of CD and inflammatory bowel disease patients for the presence or absence of MAP is necessary for appropriate and effective

  19. Epileptic activity in Alzheimer's disease: causes and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Zeman, Adam Z; Miller, Bruce L

    2017-04-01

    Epileptic activity is frequently associated with Alzheimer's disease; this association has therapeutic implications, because epileptic activity can occur at early disease stages and might contribute to pathogenesis. In clinical practice, seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease can easily go unrecognised because they usually present as non-motor seizures, and can overlap with other symptoms of the disease. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, seizures can hasten cognitive decline, highlighting the clinical relevance of early recognition and treatment. Some evidence indicates that subclinical epileptiform activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease, detected by extended neurophysiological monitoring, can also lead to accelerated cognitive decline. Treatment of clinical seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease with select antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), in low doses, is usually well tolerated and efficacious. Moreover, studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease suggest that certain classes of AEDs that reduce network hyperexcitability have disease-modifying properties. These AEDs target mechanisms of epileptogenesis involving amyloid β and tau. Clinical trials targeting network hyperexcitability in patients with Alzheimer's disease will identify whether AEDs or related strategies could improve their cognitive symptoms or slow decline.

  20. [Cœliac disease: a rare cause of recurrent miscarriages].

    PubMed

    Kehila, Mehdi; Hmid, Rim Ben; Godcha, Imene; Abouda, Hassine Saber; Boujomaa, Oueslati; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis

    2016-01-01

    Cœliac disease is an autoimmune disorder associated with Gluten intolerance resulting in progressive destruction of the villi of the small intestine. Symptoms are very diverse and can occur at any age. Abortive illness is a rare symptom leading to the detection of cœliac disease. We report the case of a patient with a history of 12 consecutive miscarriages whose etiology was finally related to cœliac disease.

  1. Living with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease: not letting the disease conquer life.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Eva; Persson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the findings of what it means to live with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease and how it influences daily life. Ten patients, 7 with an ostomy and 7 on home parenteral nutrition followed up at an outpatient clinic for patients with intestinal failure, were interviewed using a qualitative, phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The analysis of the transcribed data is described thematically and resulted in 3 main themes; (a) struggling to not be controlled by the disease, (b) walking on a thin thread, and (c) being seen as a person, not just as a patient. These themes led to the comprehensive understanding that living with intestinal failure was interpreted as the criticality of maintaining control over one's life and body while maintaining autonomy and not letting the disease conquer life. Life entails a constant struggle with much planning to live as normally as possible and get the most out of life. It was of great importance to be seen as a person and not just as a disease, affirm that life as it is has meaning, there is a state of suffering related to the disease, there are existential issues, and suffering is related to care.

  2. Diseases and Causes of Death in European Bats: Dynamics in Disease Susceptibility and Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Kurth, Andreas; Lesnik, René; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Background Bats receive increasing attention in infectious disease studies, because of their well recognized status as reservoir species for various infectious agents. This is even more important, as bats with their capability of long distance dispersal and complex social structures are unique in the way microbes could be spread by these mammalian species. Nevertheless, infection studies in bats are predominantly limited to the identification of specific pathogens presenting a potential health threat to humans. But the impact of infectious agents on the individual host and their importance on bat mortality is largely unknown and has been neglected in most studies published to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Between 2002 and 2009, 486 deceased bats of 19 European species (family Vespertilionidae) were collected in different geographic regions in Germany. Most animals represented individual cases that have been incidentally found close to roosting sites or near human habitation in urban and urban-like environments. The bat carcasses were subjected to a post-mortem examination and investigated histo-pathologically, bacteriologically and virologically. Trauma and disease represented the most important causes of death in these bats. Comparative analysis of pathological findings and microbiological results show that microbial agents indeed have an impact on bats succumbing to infectious diseases, with fatal bacterial, viral and parasitic infections found in at least 12% of the bats investigated. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the importance of diseases and infectious agents as cause of death in European bat species. The clear seasonal and individual variations in disease prevalence and infection rates indicate that maternity colonies are more susceptible to infectious agents, underlining the possible important role of host physiology, immunity and roosting behavior as risk factors for infection of bats. PMID:22216354

  3. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease is Caused by Multiple Virus Complexes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blackberry yellow vein disease, with symptoms of vein clearing, yellow mottling, ringspots and plant decline has been observed in blackberry in the southeastern United States since about 2000. At least six viruses have been identified by cloning and sequencing of double-stranded RNA from diseased p...

  4. Can Epiphytes reduce disease symptoms caused by Phytophthora ramorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf infection of ornamental species by Phytophthora ramorum has a significant impact on the spread of this disease. Fungicides have had limited effects on controlling this disease. With increasing concerns that repeated fungicide applications will exasperate the potential for fungicide resistance...

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the common bean anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Alzate, Juan; Yepes, Mauricio Salazar; Marín, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is the causal agent of anthracnose in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), one of the most limiting factors for this crop in South and Central America. In this work, the mitochondrial sequence of a Colombian isolate of C. lindemuthianum obtained from a common bean plant (var. Cargamanto) with anthracnose symptoms is presented. The mtDNA codes for 13 proteins of the respiratory chain, 1 ribosomal protein, 2 homing endonucleases, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 28 tRNAs. This is the first report of a complete mtDNA genome sequence from C. lindemuthianum.

  6. Co-morditities of environmental diseases: A common cause

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The global pandemic of non-vector borne environmental diseases may, in large part, be attributed to chronic exposures to ever increasing levels of exogenous lipophilic chemicals. These chemicals include persistent organic pollutants, semi-volatile compounds and low molecular weight hydrocarbons. Such chemicals facilitate the sequential absorption of otherwise not absorbed more toxic hydrophilic species that attack numerous body organs and systems, leading to environmental disease. Co-morbidities of non-communicable environmental diseases are alarmingly high, with as many as half of all individuals chronically ill with two or more diseases. Co-morbidity is to be anticipated, since all of the causative chemicals identified have independently been shown to trigger the individual diseases. PMID:26109888

  7. [Relationship of bilirubin to diseases caused by increased oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Vítek, L

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress contributes importantly to pathogenesis of numerous civilization diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, as well as autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions. Bilirubin is the major product of the heme catabolic pathway in the intravascular compartment. For long time, bilirubin was considered to be only a waste product, however, recent data from the last 2 decades have proved its important antioxidant properties, which contributes to defense against increased oxidative stress. Numerous experimental as well as clinical studies have demonstrated association between low bilirubin concentrations and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, certain cancers, autoimunne diseases, such as lupus erythematodes, or rheumatoid arthritis or neurological psychiatric disorders, such as schizofrenia. On the other hand, subjects with mildly elevated blood bilirubin levels, typical for Gilbert syndrome, have decreased risk of these diseases.

  8. A genetic linkage map of Phaseolus vulgaris L. and localization of genes for specific resistance to six races of anthracnose (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Pañeda, Astrid; Ferreira, Juan José; Giraldez, Ramón

    2007-02-01

    A genetic map of common bean was constructed using 197 markers including 152 RAPDs, 32 RFLPs, 12 SCARs, and 1 morphological marker. The map was established by using a F(2) population of 85 individuals from the cross between a line derived from the Spanish landrace Andecha (Andean origin) and the Mesoamerican genotype A252. The resulting map covers about 1,401.9 cM, with an average marker distance of 7.1 cM and includes molecular markers linked to disease resistance genes for anthracnose, bean common mosaic virus, bean golden yellow mosaic virus, common bacterial blight, and rust. Resistance to races 6, 31, 38, 39, 65, and 357 of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (anthracnose) was evaluated in F(3) families derived from the corresponding F(2) individuals. The intermediate resistance to race 65 proceeding from Andecha can be explained by a single dominant gene located on linkage group B1, corresponding to the Co-1 gene. The recombination between the resistance specificities proceeding from A252 agrees with the assumption that total resistance to races 6, 31, 38, 39, 65, and 357, is organized in two clusters. One cluster, located on B4 linkage group, includes individual genes for specific resistance to races 6, 38, 39, and 357. The second cluster is located on linkage group B11 and includes individual genes for specific resistance to races 6, 31, 38, 39, and 65. These two clusters correspond to genes Co-3/Co-9 and Co-2, respectively. It is concluded that most anthracnose resistance Co- genes, previously described as single major genes conferring resistance to several races, could be organized as clusters of different genes conferring race-specific resistance.

  9. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  10. Lipophilic chemical exposure as a cause of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-06-01

    Environmental chemical exposure has been linked to numerous diseases in humans. These diseases include cancers; neurological and neurodegenerative diseases; metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity; reproductive and developmental disorders; and endocrine disorders. Many studies have associated the link between exposures to environmental chemicals and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These chemicals include persistent organic pollutants (POPs); the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates; low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs); and poly nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Here it is reported that though the chemicals reported on differ widely in chemical properties and known points of attack in humans, a common link exists between them. All are lipophilic species that are found in serum. Environmentally induced CVD is related to total lipophilic chemical load in the blood. Lipophiles serve to promote the absorption of otherwise not absorbed toxic hydrophilic species that promote CVD.

  11. Bovine diseases causing neurological signs and death in Mexican feedlots.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Ramírez-Hernández, Cecilia; García-Márquez, Luis Jorge; Macedo-Barragán, Rafael Julio; Martínez-Burnes, Julio; López-Mayagoitia, Alfonso

    2014-06-01

    The number of large feedlot operations, similar to that of USA and Canada, has notably increased in Mexico in the last three decades. Clinical and laboratory diagnoses of neurological diseases in feedlot cattle are crucial in Mexico and Central America because of the high incidence of bovine paralytic rabies (BPR). Because of its zoonotic potential, BPR must be promptly diagnosed and differentiated from other bovine neurological diseases such as thrombotic meningoencephalitis (TME), polioencephalomalacia (PEM) and botulism. More recently, BPR and botulism have been diagnosed with increasing frequency in Mexican feedlots. Neither BPR nor botulism has relevant gross lesions, thus post-mortem diagnosis without laboratory support is impossible. Herein, we describe five outbreaks of neurological diseases in Mexican feedlots in which BPR, botulism and PEM were diagnosed either independently or in combination. A diagram illustrating the most conspicuous pathologic findings and ancillary laboratory test required to confirm the diagnoses of these neurological diseases in feedlot cattle is proposed.

  12. Lipophilic chemical exposure as a cause of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Environmental chemical exposure has been linked to numerous diseases in humans. These diseases include cancers; neurological and neurodegenerative diseases; metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity; reproductive and developmental disorders; and endocrine disorders. Many studies have associated the link between exposures to environmental chemicals and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These chemicals include persistent organic pollutants (POPs); the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates; low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs); and poly nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Here it is reported that though the chemicals reported on differ widely in chemical properties and known points of attack in humans, a common link exists between them. All are lipophilic species that are found in serum. Environmentally induced CVD is related to total lipophilic chemical load in the blood. Lipophiles serve to promote the absorption of otherwise not absorbed toxic hydrophilic species that promote CVD. PMID:24179429

  13. "Moya-moya' disease caused by cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Pineda, M; Royo, C; Manzanares, R

    1979-01-01

    A case of "moya-moya" disease of a 12-year-old boy is reported. The clinical history started at 3 years 2 months after cranial trauma. The patient developed mental retardation, hemiparesis and seizures.

  14. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... rare — and not all chemotherapy drugs carry the potential side effect of heart damage. Some anti-cancer treatments may cause temporary heart damage by weakening the heart muscle. These treatments include: A class of drugs known ...

  15. Pelvic hydatid disease: CT and MRI findings causing sciatica.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica (1, 2). We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings.

  16. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica (1, 2). We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. PMID:18071287

  17. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes Crohn's disease in some inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Saleh A; Sagramsingh, Sudesh R; Naser, Abed S; Thanigachalam, Saisathya

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition that plagues millions all over the world. This debilitating bowel disease can start in early childhood and continue into late adulthood. Signs and symptoms are usually many and multiple tests are often required for the diagnosis and confirmation of this disease. However, little is still understood about the cause(s) of CD. As a result, several theories have been proposed over the years. One theory in particular is that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is intimately linked to the etiology of CD. This fastidious bacterium also known to cause Johne’s disease in cattle has infected the intestines of animals for years. It is believed that due to the thick, waxy cell wall of MAP it is able to survive the process of pasteurization as well as chemical processes seen in irrigation purification systems. Subsequently meat, dairy products and water serve as key vehicles in the transmission of MAP infection to humans (from farm to fork) who have a genetic predisposition, thus leading to the development of CD. The challenges faced in culturing this bacterium from CD are many. Examples include its extreme slow growth, lack of cell wall, low abundance, and its mycobactin dependency. In this review article, data from 60 studies showing the detection and isolation of MAP by PCR and culture techniques have been reviewed. Although this review may not be 100% comprehensive of all studies, clearly the majority of the studies overwhelmingly and definitively support the role of MAP in at least 30%-50% of CD patients. It is very possible that lack of detection of MAP from some CD patients may be due to the absence of MAP role in these patients. The latter statement is conditional on utilization of methodology appropriate for detection of human MAP strains. Ultimately, stratification of CD and inflammatory bowel disease patients for the presence or absence of MAP is necessary for appropriate and effective

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: The cause and solution to Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuwei; Chadwick, Sarah R; Lajoie, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of many human diseases, including several incurable neurological disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD). In HD, expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Htt) leads to Htt misfolding, aberrant protein aggregation, and progressive appearance of disease symptoms. Several studies in various organisms (from yeast to humans) have identified the accumulation of misfolded secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) as a crucial determinant of cellular toxicity in HD. In this review, we highlight the recent research linking HD to ER stress. We also discuss how the modulation of signaling pathways responsible for coping with misfolded protein accumulation in the ER may constitute attractive methods to reduce toxicity and identify new therapeutic targets for treatment of HD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  19. Gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena: causes of death.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    The fact that Napoleon Ist died from gastric cancer seems to be well established. Arguments for the hypothesis of chronic arsenic poisoning have recently been developed in the literature. This study, focused on the gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena, is based on a confrontation between the clinical semiological anamnesis and the anatomical data in the autopsy report by F. Antommarchi. Napoleon presented several gastrointestinal diseases: gall-bladder lithiasis complicated with angiocholitis, chronic colitis and certainly a gastric cancer. Death was consecutive to perforation of the gastric lesion leading to haemorrhagic vomitis and multiorgan failure. The description of the gastric lesions during autopsy is consistent with the diagnosis of cancer. The course of the clinical events is closely correlated with the anatomic lesions. There is strong evidence that Napoleon died from an acute complication of his gastric disease.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease caused by periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ogrendik, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    A statistically significant association between periodontal disease (PD) and systemic diseases has been identified. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, exhibits similar characteristics and pathogenesis to PD. The association between RA and PD has been investigated, and numerous publications on this subject exist. Approximately 20 bacterial species have been identified as periodontal pathogens, and these organisms are linked to various types of PD. The most analyzed species of periodontopathic bacteria are Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Antibodies and DNA from these oral pathogens have been isolated from the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients. This rapid communication describes the role of periodontal pathogens in the etiopathogenesis of RA.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of disease-causing missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stefl, Shannon; Nishi, Hafumi; Petukh, Marharyta; Panchenko, Anna R.; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations resulting in a change of amino acid sequence can have a dramatic effect on stability, hydrogen bond network, conformational dynamics, activity and many other physiologically important properties of proteins. The substitutions of only one residue in a protein sequence, so-called missense mutations, can be related to many pathological conditions, and may influence susceptibility to disease and drug treatment. The plausible effects of missense mutations range from affecting the macromolecular stability to perturbing macromolecular interactions and cellular localization. Here we review the individual cases and genome-wide studies which illustrate the association between missense mutations and diseases. In addition we emphasize that the molecular mechanisms of effects of mutations should be revealed in order to understand the disease origin. Finally we report the current state-of-the-art methodologies which predict the effects of mutations on protein stability, the hydrogen bond network, pH-dependence, conformational dynamics and protein function. PMID:23871686

  2. Node of Ranvier disruption as a cause of neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Susuki, Keiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction and/or disruption of nodes of Ranvier are now recognized as key contributors to the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases. One reason is that the excitable nodal axolemma contains a high density of Nav (voltage-gated Na+ channels) that are required for the rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Nodal physiology is disturbed by altered function, localization, and expression of voltage-gated ion channels clustered at nodes and juxtaparanodes, and by disrupted axon–glial interactions at paranodes. This paper reviews recent discoveries in molecular/cellular neuroscience, genetics, immunology, and neurology that highlight the critical roles of nodes of Ranvier in health and disease. PMID:23834220

  3. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Causes and Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... ELITE Program for Laboratories For Media Water System Maintenance Water Management Toolkit Identify Buildings at Increased Risk Considerations ... people can get Legionnaires’ disease by aspiration of drinking water. This happens when water “goes down the ...

  4. Causes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... motor and sensory problems in the body’s extremities. Inheritance patterns in CMT Although CMT can look very similar ... from a parent will have the disease, as will the parent. When CMT is passed on in an autosomal dominant pattern, it can be easy to recognize in the ...

  5. [Analysis of the causes of vocal tract diseases in singers].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu S; Pavlikhin, O G; Izgarysheva, Z A

    2000-01-01

    The etiology of vocal apparatus diseases in opera singers is due to both specific features of their theatrical activity and conventions of opera genre in particular. A hundred and twenty seven vocalists (soloists and choristers) aged 23 to 70 years with service length of 3 to 40 years were examined. Both the status of the vocal apparatus itself and comorbidity were found to affect the occurrence of occupational diseases of the larynx. Of great importance are the quality of vocal background of a singer, his/her age, length of service, the even distribution of vocal load during a month and a season, the volume of additional work (concert and pedagogical activities), the correspondence of parts to his/her techniques and actor's capacities, and living and social conditions. The pattern of vocal apparatus diseases also depends on the type of a singer's voice and on the status of his/her nervous system. This study-based recommendations for singers and theater managers administrators reduced the incidence rates of laryngeal diseases in the followed-up professional opera singers by 15-20%.

  6. Osteoarthritis. What therapies for this disease of many causes?

    PubMed

    Morehead, Kerstin; Sack, Kenneth E

    2003-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and sometimes disabling disease. New directions in therapy include inhibitors of selective proteins and transplantation of cultured chondrocytes. At the present time, treatment continues to be in response to a patient's symptoms. Thus, the challenge to physicians is to devise individual treatment plans that safely maximize relief and preservation of joint function.

  7. Sooty Mould Disease Caused by Leptoxyphium kurandae on Kenaf

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In-Young; Kang, Chan-Ho; Lee, Geon-Hwi; Park, Ji-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In September 2013, we discovered sooty mould growing on kenaf with the extrafloral nectaries in Iksan, Korea and identified the causative fungus as Leptoxyphium kurandae based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses. This is the first report of sooty mould caused by L. kurandae on kenaf in Korea and globally. PMID:26539054

  8. Legume ground covers alter defoliation response of black walnut saplings to drought and anthracnose

    Treesearch

    J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Growth and premature defoliation of black walnut saplings underplanted 5 or 6 years earlier with six different ground covers were quantified in response to a summer drought or anthracnose. Walnut saplings growing with ground covers of hairy vetch, crownvetch, and to a lesser extent sericea lespedeza continued to have more rapid height and diameter growth than saplings...

  9. Effect of Fungicides on the Reaction of Sorghum Hybrids to Anthracnose in Burleson County, Texas, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of three fungicides to control grain mold/weathering and anthracnose on two sorghum hybrids NC+7R34 and Warner W851-DR was conducted during the 2012 growing season. Three fungicides Headline, Quilt Xcel, and Topguard were used. On May 26, plots were inoculated by putting 10 Colletotrichum ...

  10. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity assays of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent for lime anthracnose in Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several distorted Mexican lime [Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm). Swingle] fruit, leaf, and twig samples with lime anthracnose symptoms were collected from three trees in residential areas of Brownsville, Texas. The causal fungal organism, Colletotrichum acutatum J. H. Simmonds was isolated from leave...

  11. Response of sorghum accessions from four African countries against Colletotrichum sublineolum, causal agent of sorghum anthracnose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seventy-two sorghum accessions were randomly selected from the Ethiopia, Mali, Sudan, and Uganda germplasm collections maintained by the US National Plant Germplasm System to evaluate variation in anthracnose resistance. The accessions were planted in a randomized complete block design in College S...

  12. Evaluation of the Ugandan sorghum accessions for grain mold and anthracnose resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum accessions from Uganda were evaluated for grain mold and anthracnose resistance during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons at the Texas A&M University Research Farm, near College Station, TX. Accession PI534117 and SC719-11E exhibited the lowest grain mold severities of 2.4, whereas, accessio...

  13. "Kissing bugs": potential disease vectors and cause of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Klotz, John H; Dorn, Patricia L; Logan, Joy L; Stevens, Lori; Pinnas, Jacob L; Schmidt, Justin O; Klotz, Stephen A

    2010-06-15

    Physicians in the United States should familiarize themselves with "kissing bugs" endemic to their area of practice and appreciate the medical implications of their bites. Bite victims often seek advice from physicians about allergic reactions as well as the risk of contracting Chagas disease. Physicians are generally knowledgeable about the role of kissing bugs in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Latin America. However, they may be unaware of (1) severe allergic reactions to kissing bug salivary antigens, (2) the widespread occurrence of T. cruzi amongst vertebrate hosts of kissing bugs, and (3) the incidence of T. cruzi among kissing bugs (T. cruzi may infect >50% of sampled bugs). Despite the potential for Chagas disease transmission, the major concern regarding kissing bugs in the United States is anaphylactic reactions to their bites resulting in frequent emergency department visits, especially in areas of endemicity in the Southwest.

  14. Kikuchi's Disease: A Rare Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Jalal-ud-din, Mir; Noor, Muhammad Munir; Ali, Shadab; Ali, Rashid

    2015-04-01

    Kikuchi Fujimoto Disease (KFD) or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis can present with unexplained fever and lymphadenopathy. It is often mistaken for more serious conditions like malignant lymphoma or tuberculosis. First case was described by Kikuchi in Japan, very few cases have been reported in Pakistan. A middle aged female presented with fever and body aches for one month. She was investigated extensively for pyrexia of unknown origin, all of which came out to be normal except a raised ESR. Anti-tuberculous drugs were started on clinical suspicion, with no improvement after a month. Later, a detailed physical examination revealed cervical lymphadenopathy. One of the lymph nodes was excised and biopsied. The histopathology suggested Kikuchi's disease. Oral Prednisolone was started showing improvement. Her fever subsided and lymph nodes disappeared at the follow-up visit. No relapse was encountered in the subsequent visits.

  15. Attributions about Cause of Illness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, Karin F.; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Bowler, Russell; Make, Barry; Holm, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patients’ beliefs about the causes of their illness have been associated with emotional adjustment and behavioral outcomes in several medical conditions; however, few studies have examined illness attributions among patients with COPD. In the current study, patterns of patients’ causal attributions for COPD were identified and examined in relation to health behaviors and symptoms. Method Three-hundred and ninety-four patients with COPD and ≥10 pack year history of smoking completed a self-report questionnaire that included the Illness Perception Questionnaire- Revised (IPQ-R). Results A factor analysis of the IPQ-R cause items using principal axis factoring yielded four individual items (i.e., smoking, heredity, pollution, and personal behavior) and one large factor that was primarily driven by psychological attributions. Ninety-three percent of patients agreed or strongly agreed that smoking was a cause of their COPD. Higher scores on the large IPQ-R factor were associated with reduced quality of life (r=.25, p<.001) and symptoms of anxiety (r=.33, p<.001) and depression (r=.31, p<.001), indicating that patients who attributed their COPD to psychological factors were more likely to have poorer emotional adjustment and quality of life. Conclusions Our finding of one large factor with several stand-alone items is in contrast with previous research that has derived a multi-factor structure for the cause items of the IPQ-R in other chronic illness populations. This difference may be due to the importance of smoking, environmental exposures, and heredity in the development of COPD. Future research should expand upon these specific attributions in COPD‥ PMID:21511077

  16. Factors promoting acute and chronic diseases caused by yersiniae.

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, R R

    1991-01-01

    The experimental system constructed with the medically significant yersiniae provides a powerful basic model for comparative study of factors required for expression of acute versus chronic disease. The system exploits the close genetic similarity between Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of bubonic plague, and enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Y. pestis possesses three plasmids, of which one, shared by the enteropathogenic species, mediates a number of virulence factors that directly or indirectly promote survival within macrophages and immunosuppression. The two remaining plasmids are unique and encode functions that promote acute disease by enhancing bacterial dissemination in tissues and resistance to phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. These properties are replaced in the enteropathogenic yersiniae by host cell invasins and an adhesin which promote chronic disease; the latter are cryptic in Y. pestis. Additional distinctions include specific mutational losses in Y. pestis which result in loss of fitness in natural environments plus gain of properties that facilitate transmission and infection via fleabite. Images PMID:1889045

  17. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  18. [New infectious diseases in Finland--caused by climate change?].

    PubMed

    Vapalahti, Olli; Ruuhela, Reija; Henttonen, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Although the appearance and spreading of most new infectious diseases are likely to be due to globalization or socio-economic changes, the occurrence of tick-, insect- and rodent-borne infections is at least partially dependent on climate variability and change. Climate influences the distribution and life cycle of vectors of arthropod-borne viruses as well as viral evolution and efficacy of transmission. The natural circulation of many pathogens and the development of epidemics are dependent on complex ecological factors, such as biodiversity and predator-prey cycles that in turn are indirectly linked to climate.

  19. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  20. Unicentric Castleman’s disease associated with end stage renal disease caused by amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Eray; Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Akgun, Hulya; Kaynar, Leylagul; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay

    2017-01-01

    Castleman’s disease (CD), also known as angiofolicular lymph node hyperplasia, is a rare heterogenous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. Histologically, it can be classified as hyaline vascular type, plasma cell type, or mixed type. Clinically two different subtypes of the CD are present: Unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is generally asymptomatic and associated with hyaline vascular type, and its diagnoses depend on the localized lymphadenopathy on examination or imaging studies. However, multicentric CD presents with generalized lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms including malaise, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and it is associated with the plasma cell type and mix type. Herein, we report a patient with unicentric CD of the plasma cell type without systemic symptoms, who developed end stage renal failure caused by amyloidosis 6 years after onset of CD. PMID:28352636

  1. Causes and consequences of endoplasmic reticulum stress in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Navid, Fatemeh; Colbert, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory conditions, many of which involve chronic activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple genetic and environmental factors. These immune responses involve the secretion of excessive amounts of cytokines and other signalling mediators by activated immune cells. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the cellular organelle that directs the folding, processing and trafficking of membrane-bound and secreted proteins, including many key components of the immune response. Maintaining homeostasis in the ER is critical to cell function and survival. Consequently, elaborate mechanisms have evolved to sense and respond to ER stress through three main signalling pathways that together comprise the unfolded protein response (UPR). Activation of the UPR can rapidly resolve the accumulation of misfolded proteins, direct permanent changes in the size and function of cells during differentiation, and critically influence the immune response and inflammation. Recognition of the importance of ER stress and UPR signalling pathways in normal and dysregulated immune responses has greatly increased in the past few years. This Review discusses several settings in which ER stress contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases and considers some of the therapeutic opportunities that these discoveries provide.

  2. Mast cell activation disease: An underappreciated cause of neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and diseases.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Pöhlau, Dieter; Raithel, Martin; Haenisch, Britta; Dumoulin, Franz L; Homann, Juergen; Mauer, Uwe M; Harzer, Sabrina; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2015-11-01

    Neurologists and psychiatrists frequently encounter patients whose central and/or peripheral neurologic and/or psychiatric symptoms (NPS) are accompanied by other symptoms for which investigation finds no unifying cause and for which empiric therapy often provides little to no benefit. Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has rarely been considered in the differential diagnosis in such situations. Traditionally, MCAD has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, generally focusing on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, MC activation syndrome (MC), has been recognized, featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. There also has developed greater appreciation for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic themes--including very wide arrays of central and peripheral NPS. Significantly helpful treatment--including for neuropsychiatric issues--usually can be identified once MCAD is accurately diagnosed. We describe MCAD's pathogenesis, presentation (focusing on NPS), and therapy, especially vis-à-vis neuropsychotropes. Since MCAD patients often present NPS, neurologists and psychiatrists have the opportunity, in recognizing the diagnostic possibility of MCAD, to short-circuit the often decades-long delay in establishing the correct diagnosis required to identify optimal therapy.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurological diseases: cause(s), consequence(s), and implications of antioxidant therapy.

    PubMed

    Kasote, Deepak M; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Katyare, Surendra S

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is at the base of development and progression of several psychiatric and neurologic diseases with different etiologies. MtDNA/nDNA mutational damage, failure of endogenous antioxidant defenses, hormonal malfunction, altered membrane permeability, metabolic dysregulation, disruption of calcium buffering capacity and ageing have been found to be the root causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the overall consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are only limited to increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress and cellular energy crises. Thus far, extensive efforts have been made to improve mitochondrial function through specific cause-dependent antioxidant therapy. However, owing to complex genetic and interlinked causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, it has not been possible to achieve any common, unique supportive antioxidant therapeutic strategy for the treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases. Hence, we propose an antioxidant therapeutic strategy for management of consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurologic diseases. It is expected that this will not only reduces oxidative stress, but also promote anaerobic energy production.

  4. Mapping global potential risk of mango sudden decline disease caused by fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mango Sudden Decline (MSD), sometimes referred to as mango wilt, is an important disease of mango caused by one of the most significant fungal species causing disease in woody plants, Ceratocystis fimbriata. This species is mainly disseminated by the mango bark beetle, Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Steb...

  5. Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe: diseases caused by cestodes (tapeworms).

    PubMed

    Auer, Herbert; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    The second part of the overview "Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe" is dedicated to the cestodes (tapeworms) and the diseases caused by cestodes. The overview comprises the spectrum of the most relevant species, describes their incidence, geographic distribution and the most important clinical symptoms and highlights the possibilities of diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of cestode-caused diseases.

  6. Environmental chemicals and autoimmune disease: cause and effect.

    PubMed

    Hess, Evelyn V

    2002-12-27

    Many important clues have been provided by the relationship of certain medications to lupus and other autoimmune syndromes. These are temporary conditions that resolve when the medication is removed. There are now over 70 such medications which have been reported related to these autoimmune conditions. Interest continues to grow in the potential for environmental substances to cause these syndromes. Among those under suspicion are hydrazines, tartrazines, hair dyes, trichloroethylene, industrial emissions and hazardous wastes. Other possible associations include silica, mercury, cadmium, gold and L canavanine. Two recognised outbreaks include 'toxic oil syndrome' related to contaminated rape seed oil in Spain in 1981 and exposure to a contaminated environmental substance associated with an autoimmune attack on muscle tissue in 1989. Recently, there have been proposals made for the definition and identification of environmentally associated immune disorders. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has also provided recent publications for other environmentally related problems. All these aspects will be presented and reviewed in detail.

  7. Vibrio sp. causing Porites ulcerative white spot disease.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Mark D M; Reichardt, Wolfgang T

    2010-06-11

    The causative agent of the Indo-Pacific coral disease, Porites ulcerative white spot syndrome (PUWS), that affects Porites spp. and a few other coral genera has so far remained unidentified. Inoculation of thiosulphate citrate bile sucrose (TCBS) agar with tissue material from Porites cylindrica infected with white spot produced colonies of approximately 3 mm diameter consisting of Gram-negative, motile, non-sucrose-fermenting, slightly curved rods with a minimum NaCl requirement of 0.3%. Three of these putative Vibrio sp. isolates were used for infection trials that included different stages of cell growth. Four modes of inoculation and 3 stages of bacterial cell growth were considered for testing Koch's postulates. Stationary phase cells proved more consistently infectious than did exponentially growing or starved cells using a 1-step immersion technique at cell concentrations of 10(4) cells ml(-1). A 1-step immersion technique proved more reliable in producing signs of white spot than did other techniques, such as injection, smearing and 2-step immersion of the inoculum. At inoculum densities >10(4) cells ml(-1) further signs of disease, such as tissue degradation and bleaching, also became evident. At elevated temperatures (>29 degrees C) bleaching remained absent for at least 2 mo from non-inoculated corals serving as controls, but was observed in artificially infected coral fragments. Of the 9 seawater aquaria containing healthy specimens of P. cylindrica, 6 showed signs of white spot 15 d after infection with an isolate tentatively identified as Vibrio sp. Based on 99% similarity of its 16S rRNA gene sequence and selected phenotypical features, this isolate revealed a close relationship to V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus.

  8. Does gluten cause gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without coeliac disease?

    PubMed

    Newnham, Evan D

    2011-04-01

    To determine the evidence for the effect of gluten ingestion on gastrointestinal symptoms, intestinal permeability and other indices of small intestinal injury in non-coeliac, gluten intolerant individuals. A literature review was performed searching for interventional studies that addressed the issue. One unblinded study that identified symptomatic response to gluten did not effectively exclude patients with coeliac disease, since many had intraepithelial lymphocytosis. A double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled rechallenge trial was recently reported in patients in whom coeliac disease had been excluded by either normal duodenal histology on a gluten containing diet, or absence of the HLA DQ2 or DQ8 haplotype (56%). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 16 g/day carbohydrate-free gluten or placebo for six weeks. Participants were enrolled if they had gastrointestinal symptoms that had improved on a GFD and had been on a gluten free diet for at least 6 weeks prior to enrollment. 19 received gluten and 15 received placebo. Change between baseline and final weeks were greater for patients receiving gluten in overall symptom severity compared with those receiving placebo (p=0.047). and were worse with gluten within one week for pain (p=0.016), bloating (p=0.031), satisfaction with stool consistency (p=0.024), and tiredness (p=0.001). Mechanisms for symptom induction were not identified. Non-coeliac gluten intolerance does exist. Future studies need to identify issues of the dose of gluten needed and mechanisms of action. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Minamata disease: methylmercury poisoning in Japan caused by environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Harada, M

    1995-01-01

    Minamata disease (M. d.) is methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning that occurred in humans who ingested fish and shellfish contaminated by MeHg discharged in waste water from a chemical plant (Chisso Co. Ltd.). It was in May 1956, that M. d. was first officially "discovered" in Minamata City, south-west region of Japan's Kyushu Island. The marine products in Minamata Bay displayed high levels of Hg contamination (5.61 to 35.7 ppm). The Hg content in hair of patients, their family and inhabitants of the Shiranui Sea coastline were also detected at high levels of Hg (max. 705 ppm). Typical symptoms of M. d. are as follows: sensory disturbances (glove and stocking type), ataxia, dysarthria, constriction of the visual field, auditory disturbances and tremor were also seen. Further, the fetus was poisoned by MeHg when their mothers ingested contaminated marine life (named congenital M. d.). The symptom of patients were serious, and extensive lesions of the brain were observed. While the number of grave cases with acute M. d. in the initial stage was decreasing, the numbers of chronic M. d. patients who manifested symptoms gradually over an extended period of time was on the increase. For the past 36 years, of the 2252 patients who have been officially recognized as having M. d., 1043 have died. This paper also discusses the recent remaining problems.

  10. [Alteration of biological rhythms causes metabolic diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Saderi, Nadia; Escobar, Carolina; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto

    2013-07-16

    The incidence of obesity worldwide has become a serious, constantly growing public health issue that reaches alarming proportions in some countries. To date none of the strategies developed to combat obesity have proved to be decisive, and hence there is an urgent need to address the problem with new approaches. Today, studies in the field of chronobiology have shown that our physiology continually adapts itself to the cyclical changes in the environment, regard-less of whether they are daily or seasonal. This is possible thanks to the existence of a biological clock in our hypothalamus which regulates the expression and/or activity of enzymes and hormones involved in regulating our metabolism, as well as all the homeostatic functions. It has been observed that this clock can be upset as a result of today's modern lifestyle, which involves a drop in physical activity during the day and the abundant ingestion of food during the night, among other factors, which together promote metabolic syndrome and obesity. Hence, the aim of this review is to summarise the recent findings that show the effect that altering the circadian rhythms has on the metabolism and how this can play a part in the development of metabolic diseases.

  11. Patho-epigenetics of Infectious Diseases Caused by Intracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular eukaryotes including plants, animals and humans, epigenetic reprogramming may play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. Recent studies revealed that in addition to viruses, pathogenic bacteria are also capable to dysregulate the epigenetic machinery of their target cells. In this chapter we focus on epigenetic alterations induced by bacteria infecting humans. Most of them are obligate or facultative intracellular bacteria that produce either bacterial toxins and surface proteins targeting the host cell membrane, or synthesise effector proteins entering the host cell nucleus. These bacterial products typically elicit histone modifications, i.e. alter the "histone code". Bacterial pathogens are capable to induce alterations of host cell DNA methylation patterns, too. Such changes in the host cell epigenotype and gene expression pattern may hinder the antibacterial immune response and create favourable conditions for bacterial colonization, growth, or spread. Epigenetic dysregulation mediated by bacterial products may also facilitate the production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators affecting the epigenotype of their target cells. Such indirect epigenetic changes as well as direct interference with the epigenetic machinery of the host cells may contribute to the initiation and progression of malignant tumors associated with distinct bacterial infections.

  12. Indoxyl sulphate and kidney disease: Causes, consequences and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Small, David M; Vesey, David A; Johnson, David W; Francis, Ross; Vitetta, Luis; Gobe, Glenda C; Morais, Christudas

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) and/or evidence of kidney damage (typically manifested as albuminuria) for at least 3 months, has become one of the fastest-growing public health concerns worldwide. CKD is characterized by reduced clearance and increased serum accumulation of metabolic waste products (uremic retention solutes). At least 152 uremic retention solutes have been reported. This review focuses on indoxyl sulphate (IS), a protein-bound, tryptophan-derived metabolite that is generated by intestinal micro-organisms (microbiota). Animal studies have demonstrated an association between IS accumulation and increased fibrosis, and oxidative stress. This has been mirrored by in vitro studies, many of which report cytotoxic effects in kidney proximal tubular cells following IS exposure. Clinical studies have associated IS accumulation with deleterious effects, such as kidney functional decline and adverse cardiovascular events, although causality has not been conclusively established. The aims of this review are to: (i) establish factors associated with increased serum accumulation of IS; (ii) report effects of IS accumulation in clinical studies; (iii) critique the reported effects of IS in the kidney, when administered both in vivo and in vitro; and (iv) summarize both established and hypothetical therapeutic options for reducing serum IS or antagonizing its reported downstream effects in the kidney.

  13. Hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by coxsackievirus A6, Thailand, 2012.

    PubMed

    Puenpa, Jiratchaya; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Linsuwanon, Piyada; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongkomplew, Siwanat; Vichaiwattana, Preyaporn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-04-01

    In Thailand, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is usually caused by enterovirus 71 or coxsackievirus A16. To determine the cause of a large outbreak of HFMD in Thailand during June-August 2012, we examined patient specimens. Coxsackievirus A6 was the causative agent. To improve prevention and control, causes of HFMD should be monitored.

  14. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  15. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  16. [Kimura's disease: an unrecognized cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease].

    PubMed

    Shehwaro, N; Langlois, A-L; Gueutin, V; Debchi, L; Charlotte, F; Rouvier, P; Rottembourg, J; Izzedine, H

    2014-02-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is an angiolymphoid proliferative disorder of soft tissue with eosinophilia, with a predilection for head and neck regions in young Oriental men. Kidney disease is thought to be rare in KD. About a case of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease, we comment Kimura's disease and its associated kidney damage. Kimura disease should be suspected and included in the diagnosis of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease.

  17. Acquired mitochondrial impairment as a cause of optic nerve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blindness from an optic neuropathy recently occurred as an epidemic affecting 50,000 patients in Cuba (CEON) and had clinical features reminiscent of both tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA) and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Leber's; LHON). Selective damage to the papillomacular bundle was characteristic, and many patients also developed a peripheral neuropathy. Identified risk factors included vitamin deficiencies as well as exposure to methanol and cyanide. In all 3 syndromes, there is evidence that singular or combined insults to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are associated with a clinically characteristic optic neuropathy. PURPOSE: First, to test the hypothesis that a common pathophysiologic mechanism involving impairment of mitochondria function and, consequently, axonal transport underlies both genetic optic nerve diseases such as Leber's and acquired toxic and nutritional deficiency optic neuropathies. According to this hypothesis, ATP depletion below a certain threshold leads to a blockage of orthograde axonal transport of mitochondria, which, in turn, leads to total ATP depletion and subsequent cell death. Second, to address several related questions, including (1) How does impaired energy production lead to optic neuropathy, particularly since it seems to relatively spare other metabolically active tissues, such as liver and heart? (2) Within the nervous system, why is the optic nerve, and most particularly the papillomacular bundle, so highly sensitive? Although there have been previous publications on the clinical features of the Cuban epidemic of blindness, the present hypothesis and the subsequent questions have not been previously addressed. METHODS: Patients in Cuba with epidemic optic neuropathy were personally evaluated through a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic examination. In addition, serum, lymphocytes for DNA analysis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), sural nerves, and eyes with attached optic nerves were obtained from

  18. Enteric hyperoxaluria: an important cause of end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Lama; Puri, Sonika; Goldfarb, David S

    2016-03-01

    Hyperoxaluria is a frequent complication of inflammatory bowel diseases, ileal resection and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and is well-known to cause nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The associated prevalence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is less clear but may be more consequential than recognized. In this review, we highlight three cases of ESKD due to enteric hyperoxaluria following small bowel resections. We review current information on the pathophysiology, complications and treatment of this complex disease.

  19. NDRC: A Disease-Causing Genes Prioritized Method Based on Network Diffusion and Rank Concordance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minghong; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; He, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    Disease-causing genes prioritization is very important to understand disease mechanisms and biomedical applications, such as design of drugs. Previous studies have shown that promising candidate genes are mostly ranked according to their relatedness to known disease genes or closely related disease genes. Therefore, a dangling gene (isolated gene) with no edges in the network can not be effectively prioritized. These approaches tend to prioritize those genes that are highly connected in the PPI network while perform poorly when they are applied to loosely connected disease genes. To address these problems, we propose a new disease-causing genes prioritization method that based on network diffusion and rank concordance (NDRC). The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross validation on 1931 diseases in which at least one gene is known to be involved, and it is able to rank the true causal gene first in 849 of all 2542 cases. The experimental results suggest that NDRC significantly outperforms other existing methods such as RWR, VAVIEN, DADA and PRINCE on identifying loosely connected disease genes and successfully put dangling genes as potential candidate disease genes. Furthermore, we apply NDRC method to study three representative diseases, Meckel syndrome 1, Protein C deficiency and Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Our study has also found that certain complex disease-causing genes can be divided into several modules that are closely associated with different disease phenotype.

  20. Capitalizing on the autophagic response for treatment of liver disease caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and other genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew S; Perlmutter, David H; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) is one of the most common genetic causes of liver disease and is a prototype of liver diseases caused by the pathologic accumulation of aggregated mutant alpha-1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ) within liver cells. In the case of ATD-associated liver disease, the resulting "gain-of-function" toxicity can lead to serious clinical manifestations, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only definitive therapy for ATD-associated liver disease is liver transplantation, but recent efforts have demonstrated the exciting potential for novel therapies that target disposal of the mutant protein aggregates by harnessing a cellular homeostasis mechanism called autophagy. In this review, we will summarize research advances on autophagy and genetic liver diseases. We will discuss autophagy enhancer strategies for liver disease due to ATD and another genetic liver disease, inherited hypofibrinogenemia, caused by the proteotoxic effects of a misfolded protein. On the basis of recent evidence that autophagy plays a role in cellular lipid degradation, we also speculate about autophagy enhancer strategies for treatment of hepatic lipid storage diseases such as cholesterol ester storage disease.

  1. Fusarium avenaceum causes burn spot disease syndrome in noble crayfish (Astacus astacus).

    PubMed

    Makkonen, J; Jussila, J; Koistinen, L; Paaver, T; Hurt, M; Kokko, H

    2013-06-01

    Burn spot disease has been causing epidemics both in the Estonian mainland and in Saaremaa Island in the threatened noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) stocks. To study the cause of the disease, we isolated several Fusarium spp. from Estonian noble crayfish (A. astacus) populations suffering from burn spot disease syndrome. We first identified fungi directly from melanised cuticle by their ITS sequences. Then we isolated Fusarium spp. from melanised spots of crayfish showing burn spot disease symptoms, such as melanisation and shell erosion, from two different crayfish populations and watercourses in Estonia. The isolates were then identified based on ITS and EF1α-gene sequences. Isolates of Fusarium spp. taken from two separate Estonian noble crayfish populations were used in infection studies. Koch postulates confirmed that the studied agent was causing burn spot disease symptoms including shell erosion in the noble crayfish, which were significantly more severe after molts. After the infection period, an identical Fusarium spp. was re-isolated from carapace lesions and was thus shown to be the disease agent causing burn spot disease syndrome and shell erosion in noble crayfish. Based on GenBank database searches, the isolates causing burn spot disease symptoms were identified as Fusarium avenaceum in mainland Estonia and F. solani in Saaremaa crayfish.

  2. Osler-Weber-Rendu disease: A rare cause of recurrent hemoptysis

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Amir M; Jalan, Rahul K; Jain, Dheeraj L; Kajale, Omkar V

    2016-01-01

    Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing systemic fibrovascular dysplasia. It has an incidence of 1-2/100,000. Phenotypic variation is extreme ranging from asymptomatic to severely symptomatic, from cases with no or few mucocutaneous lesions to those with diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia. We discuss a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease causing diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia and hemoptysis. The patient presented with complaints of hemoptysis and was extensively examined and investigated before being diagnosed with Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. We successfully managed the patient's hemoptysis by bronchial artery embolization. This case emphasizes the need for careful examination and investigation and to consider such rare diseases when all the common causes of hemoptysis are ruled out. An early and proper diagnosis will lead to more effective management of such a rare disease with few treatment options available. PMID:27185997

  3. Osler-Weber-Rendu disease: A rare cause of recurrent hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Amir M; Jalan, Rahul K; Jain, Dheeraj L; Kajale, Omkar V

    2016-01-01

    Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing systemic fibrovascular dysplasia. It has an incidence of 1-2/100,000. Phenotypic variation is extreme ranging from asymptomatic to severely symptomatic, from cases with no or few mucocutaneous lesions to those with diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia. We discuss a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease causing diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia and hemoptysis. The patient presented with complaints of hemoptysis and was extensively examined and investigated before being diagnosed with Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. We successfully managed the patient's hemoptysis by bronchial artery embolization. This case emphasizes the need for careful examination and investigation and to consider such rare diseases when all the common causes of hemoptysis are ruled out. An early and proper diagnosis will lead to more effective management of such a rare disease with few treatment options available.

  4. Activating germline mutations in STAT3 cause early-onset multi-organ autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Richard; Allen, Hana Lango; De Franco, Elisa; McDonald, Timothy J.; Rajala, Hanna; Ramelius, Anita; Barton, John; Heiskanen, Kaarina; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Kajosaari, Merja; Murphy, Nuala P.; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Seppänen, Mikko; Lernmark, Åke; Mustjoki, Satu; Otonkoski, Timo; Kere, Juha; Morgan, Noel G.; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic causes of autoimmunity give key insights to the complex regulation of the immune system. We report a new monogenic cause of autoimmunity resulting from de novo germline activating STAT3 mutations in 5 individuals with a spectrum of early-onset autoimmune disease including type 1 diabetes. These findings emphasise the critical role of STAT3 in autoimmune disease and contrast with the germline inactivating STAT3 mutations that result in Hyper IgE syndrome. PMID:25038750

  5. Activating germline mutations in STAT3 cause early-onset multi-organ autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sarah E; Haapaniemi, Emma; Russell, Mark A; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; De Franco, Elisa; McDonald, Timothy J; Rajala, Hanna; Ramelius, Anita; Barton, John; Heiskanen, Kaarina; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Kajosaari, Merja; Murphy, Nuala P; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Seppänen, Mikko; Lernmark, Åke; Mustjoki, Satu; Otonkoski, Timo; Kere, Juha; Morgan, Noel G; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-08-01

    Monogenic causes of autoimmunity provide key insights into the complex regulation of the immune system. We report a new monogenic cause of autoimmunity resulting from de novo germline activating STAT3 mutations in five individuals with a spectrum of early-onset autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes. These findings emphasize the critical role of STAT3 in autoimmune disease and contrast with the germline inactivating STAT3 mutations that result in hyper IgE syndrome.

  6. First report of mango malformation disease caused by Fusarium pseudocircinatum in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) malformation disease (MMD) is one of the most important diseases affecting this crop worldwide, causing severe economic loss due to reduction of yield. Subsequent to the first report in India in 1891 (3), MMD has spread worldwide to most mango-growing regions. Several spe...

  7. First report of laurel wilt disease caused by Raffaelea lauricola on pondspice in Florida

    Treesearch

    M. Hughes; J.A. Smith; A.E. Mayfield III; M.C. Minno; K. Shin

    2011-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a fungal vascular disease of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng) and other plants in the family Lauraceae in the southeastern United States (1). The disease is caused by Raffaelea lauricola T. C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva, which is vectored by the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus...

  8. Apple Replant Disease: Role of microbial ecology in cause and control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Apple replant disease (ARD) has been reported from all major fruit-growing regions of the world, and is often caused by a consortium of biological agents. Development of non-fumigant alternatives for the control of this disease has been hindered by the absence of consensus concerning the etiology...

  9. Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe: diseases caused by nematodes (roundworms).

    PubMed

    Auer, Herbert; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    The third part of the overview "Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe" deals with the medically relevant nematodes (roundworms) and nematode-caused diseases occurring in Central Europe. The paper comprises data on the biology of the parasites and their ways of transmission, describes the symptomatology of the diseases, summarizes the possibilities of diagnosis and refers to the prophylactic means.

  10. Missed diagnosis of Behçet disease causing aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tham, Yi Chuan; Sin, Yoong Kong

    2016-02-01

    Aortic regurgitation is a rare and serious presentation of Behçet's disease. Here we describe a case of missed diagnosis of Behçet's disease in a 37-year-old man, causing symptomatic aortic regurgitation. Perioperative diagnosis of Behçet's aortitis is crucial because surgical intervention carries high reoperative morbidity and mortality.

  11. De Quervain disease caused by abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Ito, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tadayoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain disease is caused by a stenosing tenosynovitis in the first dorsal compartment, and the main aetiology is extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tenosynovitis. We encountered three cases in which EPB tenosynovitis was absent and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tenosynovitis was confirmed during operation. In the treatment of de Quervain disease, APL tenosynovitis should be paid as much attention as EPB tenosynovitis.

  12. Evaluation of virus resistant rootstocks to manage watermelon vine decline and diseases caused by other potyviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watermelon vine decline caused by Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is an emerging disease that has caused severe losses to Florida watermelon growers in recent years. Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W) is one of several watermelon-infecting potyviruses long present in the southeastern U.S. L...

  13. First case report of Neisseria lactamica causing cavitary lung disease in an adult organ transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Zavascki, Alexandre Prehn; Fritscher, Leandro; Superti, Silvana; Dias, Cícero; Kroth, Leonardo; Traesel, Moacir Alexandre; Antonello, Ivan Carlos Ferreira; Saitovitch, David

    2006-07-01

    We describe a case of an adult organ recipient patient with a pulmonary cavitary lesion due to Neisseria lactamica, a harmless commensal organism that rarely causes human infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pulmonary disease caused by this organism and the second case of N. lactamica infection in an adult patient.

  14. Phoma species on beet: more cause disease than just Phoma betae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phoma can cause damage to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) at multiple growth stages. It has historically been an important seedling disease, but this is largely managed by ensuring clean seed for planting. The pathogen also can cause a root rot, a leaf spot, and rotting of beets during storage. In the Un...

  15. [Diseases and causes of death of outstanding creative and scientific figures of XVII-XX centuries].

    PubMed

    Martsinkovs'kyĭ, I B

    2007-01-01

    The article reviewed the literature which analyzes clinical symptoms and causes of some creative and scientific figures of XVII-XX centuries. A conclusion has been made that there are not enough works with professional retrospective investigation of somatic diseases and causes of death of ukrainain outstanding cultural and scientific people in today's national medical literature.

  16. The Importance of Esophageal and Gastric Diseases as Causes of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Jung; Kim, Nam Su; Lee, Young Ho; Nam, Eun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric chest pain is considered to be idiopathic or caused by benign diseases. This study was to find out how much upper gastrointestinal (UGI) diseases are major causes of chest pain in pediatric patients. Methods The records of 75 children (42 boys and 33 girls, aged 3-17 years old) who have presented with mainly chest pain from January 1995 to March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Chest X-ray and electrocardiography (ECG) were performed in all aptients. Further cardiologic and gastrointestinal (GI) evaluations were performed in indicated patients. Results Chest pain was most common in the children of 6 and 9 to 14 years old. Esopha-gogastric diseases were unexpectedly the most common direct causes of the chest pain, the next are idiopathic, cardiac diseases, chest trauma, respiratory disease, and psychosomatic disease. Even though 21 showed abnormal ECG findings and 7 showed abnormalities on echocardiography, cardiac diseases were determined to be the direct causes only in 9. UGI endoscopy was performed in 57 cases, and esophago-gastric diseases which thereafter were thought to be causative diseases were 48 cases. The mean age of the children with esophago-gastric diseases were different with marginal significance from that of the other children with chest pain not related with esophago-gastric diseases. All the 48 children diagnosed with treated with GI medicines based on the diagnosis, and 37 cases (77.1%) subsequently showed clinical improvement. Conclusion Diagnostic approaches to find out esophageal and gastric diseases in children with chest pain are important as well as cardiac and respiratory investigations. PMID:26770901

  17. [Anaemia as a cause of haemodynamic angina in a patient with chronic ischaemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Miguéns Blanco, I; Bravo Amaro, M

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity and one of the primary causes of morbidity in Spain. The variability in the clinical presentation of this condition at both primary care and emergency services level requires a careful history and a thorough physical examination. In the case presented, the main symptoms of angina and dyspnea reported in the anamnesis, and the obvious pallor in the physical examination, were the key data to identify anaemia as a cause of angina.

  18. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia (Castleman's Disease) as a Rare Cause of Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon; Park, Jung-Yul

    2008-03-01

    Giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease) is a nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that usually occurs in the chest. Its morphological recognition is based on a composition of various histological features. The mass is often asymptomatic, but it can cause nonspecific thoracic symptoms, such as regional pain. This disease can be found wherever lymph nodes are present, but two-thirds of these tumors are found in the chest, along the tracheobronchial tree in the mediastinum or lung hilus. However, we experienced an unusual case of Castleman's disease as a cause of back pain that was localized in the posterior mediastinum bordering the chest wall.

  19. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia (Castleman's Disease) as a Rare Cause of Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Se-Hoon; Park, Jung-Yul

    2008-01-01

    Giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease) is a nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that usually occurs in the chest. Its morphological recognition is based on a composition of various histological features. The mass is often asymptomatic, but it can cause nonspecific thoracic symptoms, such as regional pain. This disease can be found wherever lymph nodes are present, but two-thirds of these tumors are found in the chest, along the tracheobronchial tree in the mediastinum or lung hilus. However, we experienced an unusual case of Castleman's disease as a cause of back pain that was localized in the posterior mediastinum bordering the chest wall. PMID:19096628

  20. Addison's Disease Caused by Tuberculosis with Atypical Hyperpigmentation and Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kainuma, Shigeto; Umeda, Sakurako; Makuuchi, Ayako; Fukumoto, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kinuhata, Shigeki; Isaka, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Kamata, Noriko; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hiura, Yoshikazu; Morimura, Mina; Shuto, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis characterized by atypical hyperpigmentation, noted as exacerbation of the pigmentation of freckles and the occurrence of new freckles, that was diagnosed in the presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The clinical condition of the patient was markedly ameliorated by the administration of hydrocortisone and anti-tuberculosis agents. When exacerbation of the pigmentation of the freckles and/or the occurrence of new freckles are noted, Addison's disease should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. In addition, the presence of active tuberculosis needs to be assumed whenever we treat patients with Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis, despite its rarity.

  1. Addison's Disease Caused by Tuberculosis with Atypical Hyperpigmentation and Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kainuma, Shigeto; Umeda, Sakurako; Makuuchi, Ayako; Fukumoto, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kinuhata, Shigeki; Isaka, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Kamata, Noriko; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hiura, Yoshikazu; Morimura, Mina; Shuto, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis characterized by atypical hyperpigmentation, noted as exacerbation of the pigmentation of freckles and the occurrence of new freckles, that was diagnosed in the presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The clinical condition of the patient was markedly ameliorated by the administration of hydrocortisone and anti-tuberculosis agents. When exacerbation of the pigmentation of the freckles and/or the occurrence of new freckles are noted, Addison's disease should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. In addition, the presence of active tuberculosis needs to be assumed whenever we treat patients with Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis, despite its rarity. PMID:28717080

  2. Construction of a System for the Strawberry Nursery Production towards Elimination of Latent Infection of Anthracnose Fungi by a Combination of PCR and Microtube Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagashima, Saki; Inukai, Tsuyoshi; Masuta, Chikara

    2017-02-01

    One of the major problems in strawberry production is difficulty in diagnosis of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum or Glomerella cingulata in latent infection stage. We here developed a diagnostic tool for the latent infection consisting of initial culturing of fungi, DNA extraction, synthesis of PCR-amplified probes and microtube hybridization (MTH) using a macroarray. The initial culturing step is convenient to lure the fungi out of the plant tissues, and to extract PCR-inhibitor-free DNA directly from fungal hyphae. For specific detection of the fungi, PCR primers were designed to amplify the fungal MAT1-2 gene. The subsequent MTH step using the PCR products as probes can replace the laborious electrophoresis step providing us sequence information and high-throughput screening. Using this method, we have conducted a survey for a few thousands nursery plants every year for three consecutive years, and finally succeeded in eliminating latent infection in the third year of challenge.

  3. Construction of a System for the Strawberry Nursery Production towards Elimination of Latent Infection of Anthracnose Fungi by a Combination of PCR and Microtube Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagashima, Saki; Inukai, Tsuyoshi; Masuta, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    One of the major problems in strawberry production is difficulty in diagnosis of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum or Glomerella cingulata in latent infection stage. We here developed a diagnostic tool for the latent infection consisting of initial culturing of fungi, DNA extraction, synthesis of PCR-amplified probes and microtube hybridization (MTH) using a macroarray. The initial culturing step is convenient to lure the fungi out of the plant tissues, and to extract PCR-inhibitor-free DNA directly from fungal hyphae. For specific detection of the fungi, PCR primers were designed to amplify the fungal MAT1-2 gene. The subsequent MTH step using the PCR products as probes can replace the laborious electrophoresis step providing us sequence information and high-throughput screening. Using this method, we have conducted a survey for a few thousands nursery plants every year for three consecutive years, and finally succeeded in eliminating latent infection in the third year of challenge. PMID:28167891

  4. Changes in the Leading Cause of Death: Recent Patterns in Heart Disease and Cancer Mortality.

    PubMed

    Heron, Melonie; Anderson, Robert N

    2016-08-01

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System •Heart disease has consistently been the leading cause of death in the United States and remained so in 2014. •The gap between the number of heart disease and cancer deaths generally widened from 1950 through 1968, narrowed from 1968 through 2012, and then slightly widened again from 2012 through 2014. •The mortality burden of cancer has surpassed that of heart disease in several states. In 2000, there were only 2 states where cancer was the leading cause of death; in 2014, there were 22. •Heart disease remained the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations in 2014. •Cancer is now the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic populations. The timing of the leading-cause crossover varied by group. For the total U.S. population, heart disease has been the leading cause of death for decades, with cancer the second leading cause (1). However, the ranking of these causes has varied across demographic group and geographic unit over time. Rankings are based on the number of deaths and reflect mortality burden rather than risk of death (2). This report highlights changes in the mortality burden of heart disease and cancer and presents findings by state, race, and Hispanic origin. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  5. Estimating the proportion of disease due to classes of sufficient causes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kurt; Heidemann, Christin; Weikert, Cornelia; Schulze, Matthias B; Boeing, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    Disease can be caused by different mechanisms. A possible causal model proposed by Rothman is a complete causal mechanism or a so-called "sufficient cause" consisting of a set of component causes that can be illustrated in a pie chart. However, this model does not allow finding out what sufficient causes produce the majority of cases. The authors' objective was to extend Rothman's work by quantifying the proportion of disease that can be attributed to a class of sufficient causes. The underlying idea was to consider all combinations of a given set of known risk factors and to assign each combination to a class of sufficient causes. This assignment makes it possible to evaluate a class of sufficient causes by the population attributable fraction of the corresponding combination of risk factors. The approach presented was applied to sufficient causes of myocardial infarction by use of data on participants recruited between 1994 and 1998 into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study. As a result, 51.8% of cases were attributed to only four different classes of sufficient causes. In conclusion, the statistical method described in the paper may be beneficial for quantifying the importance of different sufficient causes and for improving the efficiency of public health programs.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies NBS-LRR-Encoding Genes Related with Anthracnose and Common Bacterial Blight in the Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Zhu, Jifeng; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes represent the largest and most important disease resistance genes in plants. The genome sequence of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) provides valuable data for determining the genomic organization of NBS-LRR genes. However, data on the NBS-LRR genes in the common bean are limited. In total, 178 NBS-LRR-type genes and 145 partial genes (with or without a NBS) located on 11 common bean chromosomes were identified from genome sequences database. Furthermore, 30 NBS-LRR genes were classified into Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-NBS-LRR (TNL) types, and 148 NBS-LRR genes were classified into coiled-coil (CC)-NBS-LRR (CNL) types. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree supported the division of these PvNBS genes into two obvious groups, TNL types and CNL types. We also built expression profiles of NBS genes in response to anthracnose and common bacterial blight using qRT-PCR. Finally, we detected nine disease resistance loci for anthracnose (ANT) and seven for common bacterial blight (CBB) using the developed NBS-SSR markers. Among these loci, NSSR24, NSSR73, and NSSR265 may be located at new regions for ANT resistance, while NSSR65 and NSSR260 may be located at new regions for CBB resistance. Furthermore, we validated NSSR24, NSSR65, NSSR73, NSSR260, and NSSR265 using a new natural population. Our results provide useful information regarding the function of the NBS-LRR proteins and will accelerate the functional genomics and evolutionary studies of NBS-LRR genes in food legumes. NBS-SSR markers represent a wide-reaching resource for molecular breeding in the common bean and other food legumes. Collectively, our results should be of broad interest to bean scientists and breeders. PMID:28848595

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies NBS-LRR-Encoding Genes Related with Anthracnose and Common Bacterial Blight in the Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Zhu, Jifeng; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes represent the largest and most important disease resistance genes in plants. The genome sequence of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) provides valuable data for determining the genomic organization of NBS-LRR genes. However, data on the NBS-LRR genes in the common bean are limited. In total, 178 NBS-LRR-type genes and 145 partial genes (with or without a NBS) located on 11 common bean chromosomes were identified from genome sequences database. Furthermore, 30 NBS-LRR genes were classified into Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-NBS-LRR (TNL) types, and 148 NBS-LRR genes were classified into coiled-coil (CC)-NBS-LRR (CNL) types. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree supported the division of these PvNBS genes into two obvious groups, TNL types and CNL types. We also built expression profiles of NBS genes in response to anthracnose and common bacterial blight using qRT-PCR. Finally, we detected nine disease resistance loci for anthracnose (ANT) and seven for common bacterial blight (CBB) using the developed NBS-SSR markers. Among these loci, NSSR24, NSSR73, and NSSR265 may be located at new regions for ANT resistance, while NSSR65 and NSSR260 may be located at new regions for CBB resistance. Furthermore, we validated NSSR24, NSSR65, NSSR73, NSSR260, and NSSR265 using a new natural population. Our results provide useful information regarding the function of the NBS-LRR proteins and will accelerate the functional genomics and evolutionary studies of NBS-LRR genes in food legumes. NBS-SSR markers represent a wide-reaching resource for molecular breeding in the common bean and other food legumes. Collectively, our results should be of broad interest to bean scientists and breeders.

  8. Diseases of Landscape Ornamentals. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Charles C.; Sydnor, T. Davis

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with recognizing and controlling diseases found on ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 80 slides illustrating various foliar diseases (anthracnose, black spot, hawthorn leaf blight,…

  9. Fundamental Interventions: How Clinicians Can Address the Fundamental Causes of Disease.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam D; Hansen, Helena B; Link, Bruce G

    2016-06-01

    In order to enhance the "structural competency" of medicine-the capability of clinicians to address social and institutional determinants of their patients' health-physicians need a theoretical lens to see how social conditions influence health and how they might address them. We consider one such theoretical lens, fundamental cause theory, and propose how it might contribute to a more structurally competent medical profession. We first describe fundamental cause theory and how it makes the social causes of disease and health visible. We then outline the sorts of "fundamental interventions" that physicians might make in order to address the fundamental causes.

  10. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events inmore » NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.« less

  11. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.

  12. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O; Ory, Daniel S; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism's fitness. Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.Genet Med 18 10, 1029-1036.

  13. Rates and causes of end-stage renal disease in Navajo Indians, 1971-1985.

    PubMed

    Megill, D M; Hoy, W E; Woodruff, S D

    1988-08-01

    The rates of end-stage renal disease are much increased in American Indians, but no longitudinal study of its rates and causes has been undertaken in any tribe. This 15-year study of rates and causes of treated end-stage renal disease in the Navajo, the largest Indian tribe, supplies an important model on which to base projections and plan interventions. Treated end-stage renal disease in Navajos has increased to an age-adjusted incidence 4 times that in whites in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy accounted for 50% of all new cases in 1985, with an incidence 9.6 times that in US whites, and was due entirely to type II disease. Glomerulonephritis caused end-stage renal disease in Navajos at a rate at least 1.8 times that in US whites and afflicted a much younger population. The predominant form was mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with an immune complex deposition. Renal disease of unknown etiology, which probably includes much silent glomerulonephritis, accounted for 20% of all new cases. The aggregate Navajo population with end-stage renal disease was 9 years younger than its US counterpart. These observations reflect the genesis of the epidemic of diabetic nephropathy afflicting many tribes. Urgent measures are needed to contain this. In addition, the etiology and control of mesangiopathic, immune-complex glomerulonephritis of unusual severity, a previously unrecognized problem, need to be addressed.

  14. Aspergillus tanneri sp. nov., a New Pathogen That Causes Invasive Disease Refractory to Antifungal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sugui, Janyce A.; Peterson, Stephen W.; Clark, Lily P.; Nardone, Glenn; Folio, Les; Riedlinger, Gregory; Zerbe, Christa S.; Shea, Yvonne; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The most common cause of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is Aspergillus fumigatus followed by A. nidulans; other aspergilli rarely cause the disease. Here we review two clinical cases of fatal IA in CGD patients and describe a new etiologic agent of IA refractory to antifungal therapy. Unlike typical IA caused by A. fumigatus, the disease caused by the new species was chronic and spread from the lung to multiple adjacent organs. Mycological characteristics and the phylogenetic relationship with other aspergilli based on the sequence analysis of Mcm7, RPB2, and Tsr1 indicated that the new species, which we named as A. tanneri, belongs to Aspergillus section Circumdati. The species has a higher amphotericin B, voriconazole, and itraconazole MIC and causes more chronic infection in CGD mice than A. fumigatus. This is the first report documenting IA in CGD patients caused by a species belonging to the Aspergillus section Circumdati that is inherently resistant to azoles and amphotericin B. Unlike the results seen with many members of Aspergillus section Circumdati, ochratoxin was not detected in filtrates of cultures grown in various media. Our phenotypic and genetic characterization of the new species and the case reports will assist future diagnosis of infection caused by A. tanneri and lead to more appropriate patient management. PMID:22855513

  15. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  16. [Non-amyloidotic glomerular disease caused by light-chain deposits: a case report].

    PubMed

    Cantillo, Jorge de Jesús; López, Rocío del Pilar; Andrade, Rafael Enrique

    2009-12-01

    The nephropathy of monoclonal gammopathies is principally caused by light chain deposits of fragmented immunoglobins. Paraprotein-related renal diseases are associated with such deposits of intact (heavy chain) or fragmentary (light chain) immunoglobins. A condition of pathological light chain deposits is rare and characterized by deposits of fragments of monoclonal immunoglobulins in many organs. Renal deposits occur primarily in glomeruli and tubular basement membranes. This disease is frequently associated with lymphoproliferative disorders. The majority of cases are caused by deposits of kappa light chains. Whereas this disease is most frequently associated with hematologic malignancies, occasionally a case occurs without detectable hematological pathologies; these cases are called idiopathic or primary. They usually manifest themselves as severe renal insufficiencies with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No treatment regime has been clearly established and the prognosis is poor. Herein, the clinical and histological characteristics are described regarding the first case in Colombia of light chain deposit disease without symptoms of malignancy.

  17. Liver disease--a prominent cause of serum IgE elevation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Epps, E; Husby, G; Williams, R C; Strickland, R G

    1976-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations were elevated in thirty-seven out of sixty-seven patients (55%) with acute or chronic liver disease of widely differing aetiology. The mean IgE concentrations in these patients showed an eight-fold increase above that observed in control subjects. Increased IgE levels in patients with liver disease occurred in the absence of eosinophilia, clinical evidence of atopy or other known causes of IgE elevation. No IgE-containing plasma cells were detected in the liver biopsies from thirty-two of the sixty-seven patients tested. Peripheral blood T cells were significantly decreased from normal in the patients with liver disease, but no correlation emerged between serum IgE levels and absolute peripheral blood T-cell numbers. These findings emphasize the importance of liver disease as a significant cause of serum IgE elevation. PMID:1084811

  18. [EPIDEMIOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF OUTBREAKS OF DISEASES CAUSED BY AMERICAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS CAUSATIVE AGENTS IN ENDEMIC REGIONS].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Lebedev, V N; Kulish, V S; Pyshnaya, N S; Stovba, L F; Borisevich, S V

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic analysis of epidemic outbreaks caused by American equine encephalitis causative agents is carried out in the review. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE), Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and Venezuela equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) viruses are etiologic agents of dangerous transmissive diseases that are usually accompanied by fever and neurologic symptoms. Among the New World alphaviruses, VEE virus has the most potential danger for humans and domestic animals. Currently, enzootic strains of VEE play an increasing role as etiologic agents of human diseases. Most of the VEE cases in humans in endemic regions during inter-epidemic period are caused by infection with VEE subtype ID virus. A possibility of emergence of novel epidemic outbreaks of VEE is determined by mutations of ID subtype strains into IC subtype, and those currently pose a potential threat as an etiologic agent of the disease. Despite low morbidity, EEE and WEE are a problem for healthcare due to a relatively high frequency of lethal outcomes of the disease.

  19. Taxonomy of fungi causing mucormycosis and entomophthoramycosis (zygomycosis) and nomenclature of the disease: molecular mycologic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2012-02-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed the phylum Zygomycota to be polyphyletic, and the taxa conventionally classified in Zygomycota are now distributed among the new phylum Glomeromycota and 4 subphyla incertae sedis (uncertain placement). Because the nomenclature of the disease zygomycosis was based on the phylum Zygomycota (Zygomycetes) in which the etiologic agents had been classified, the new classification profoundly affects the name of the disease. Zygomycosis was originally described as a convenient and inclusive name for 2 clinicopathologically different diseases, mucormycosis caused by members of Mucorales and entomophthoramycosis caused by species in the order Entomophthorales of Zygomycota. Without revision of original definition, the name "zygomycosis," however, has more often been used as a synonym only for mucormycosis. This article reviews the progress and changes in taxonomy and nomenclature of Zygomycota and the disease zygomycosis. The article also reiterates the reasons why the classic names "mucormycosis" and "entomophthoramycosis" are more appropriate than "zygomycosis."

  20. Genetic dissection of the resistance to nine anthracnose races in the common bean differential cultivars MDRK and TU.

    PubMed

    Campa, Ana; Giraldez, Ramón; Ferreira, Juan José

    2009-06-01

    Resistance to nine races of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of anthracnose, was evaluated in F(3) families derived from the cross between the anthracnose differential bean cultivars TU (resistant to races, 3, 6, 7, 31, 38, 39, 102, and 449) and MDRK (resistant to races, 449, and 1545). Molecular marker analyses were carried out in the F(2) individuals in order to map and characterize the anthracnose resistance genes or gene clusters present in these two differential cultivars. The results of the combined segregation indicate that at least three independent loci conferring resistance to anthracnose are present in TU. One of them, corresponding to the previously described anthracnose resistance locus Co-5, is located in linkage group B7, and is formed by a cluster of different genes conferring specific resistance to races, 3, 6, 7, 31, 38, 39, 102, and 449. Evidence of intra-cluster recombination between these specific resistance genes was found. The second locus present in TU confers specific resistance to races 31 and 102, and the third locus confers specific resistance to race 102, the location of these two loci remains unknown. The resistance to race 1545 present in MDRK is due to two independent dominant genes. The results of the combined segregation of two F(4) families showing monogenic segregation for resistance to race 1545 indicates that one of these two genes is linked to marker OF10(530), located in linkage group B1, and corresponds to the previously described anthracnose resistance locus Co-1. The second gene conferring resistance to race 1545 in MDRK is linked to marker Pv-ctt001, located in linkage group B4, and corresponds to the Co-3/Co-9 cluster. The resistance to race 449 present in MDRK is conferred by a single gene, located in linkage group B4, probably included in the same Co-3/Co-9 cluster.

  1. An emerging disease causes regional population collapse of a common North American bat species.

    PubMed

    Frick, Winifred F; Pollock, Jacob F; Hicks, Alan C; Langwig, Kate E; Reynolds, D Scott; Turner, Gregory G; Butchkoski, Calvin M; Kunz, Thomas H

    2010-08-06

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging disease affecting hibernating bats in eastern North America that causes mass mortality and precipitous population declines in winter hibernacula. First discovered in 2006 in New York State, WNS is spreading rapidly across eastern North America and currently affects seven species. Mortality associated with WNS is causing a regional population collapse and is predicted to lead to regional extinction of the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), previously one of the most common bat species in North America. Novel diseases can have serious impacts on naïve wildlife populations, which in turn can have substantial impacts on ecosystem integrity.

  2. A chitin synthase with a myosin-like motor domain is essential for hyphal growth, appressorium differentiation, and pathogenicity of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stefan; Sugui, Janyce A; Steinberg, Gero; Deising, Holger B

    2007-12-01

    Chitin synthesis contributes to cell wall biogenesis and is essential for invasion of solid substrata and pathogenicity of filamentous fungi. In contrast to yeasts, filamentous fungi contain up to 10 chitin synthases (CHS), which might reflect overlapping functions and indicate their complex lifestyle. Previous studies have shown that a class VI CHS of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola is essential for cell wall synthesis of conidia and vegetative hyphae. Here, we report on cloning and characterization of three additional CHS genes, CgChsI, CgChsIII, and CgChsV, encoding class I, III, and V CHS, respectively. All CHS genes are expressed during vegetative and pathogenic development. DeltaCgChsI and DeltaCgChsIII mutants did not differ significantly from the wild-type isolate with respect to hyphal growth and pathogenicity. In contrast, null mutants in the CgChsV gene, which encodes a CHS with an N-terminal myosin-like motor domain, are strongly impaired in vegetative growth and pathogenicity. Even in osmotically stabilized media, vegetative hyphae of DeltaCgChsV mutants exhibited large balloon-like swellings, appressorial walls appeared to disintegrate during maturation, and infection cells were nonfunctional. Surprisingly, DeltaCgChsV mutants were able to form dome-shaped hyphopodia that exerted force and showed host cell wall penetration rates comparable with the wild type. However, infection hyphae that formed within the plant cells exhibited severe swellings and were not able to proceed with plant colonization efficiently. Consequently, DeltaCgChsV mutants did not develop macroscopically visible anthracnose disease symptoms and, thus, were nonpathogenic.

  3. Strength of Occipital Hair as an Explanation for Pilonidal Sinus Disease Caused by Intruding Hair.

    PubMed

    Doll, Dietrich; Bosche, Friederike D; Stauffer, Verena K; Sinicina, Inga; Hoffmann, Sebastian; van der Zypen, Dominic; Luedi, Markus M

    2017-09-01

    Pilonidal sinus disease is thought to be caused by intrusion of hair into healthy skin; loose hair in the intergluteal fold is thought to promote disease. However, compelling evidence to support these postulates is lacking; the cause of pilonidal sinus disease remains uncertain. To determine whether particular properties of hair are associated with susceptibility to pilonidal sinus disease, we compared physical properties of hairs of patients with pilonidal sinus disease with hairs from control subjects who were matched for sex, BMI, and age. This was an experimental study with establishment of a mechanical strength test for single hairs to quantify the maximum vertical force that a hair could exert, following tests of strength of occipital, lumbar, and intergluteal hair. Hair from patients with pilonidal sinus disease and matched control subjects were harvested from patients of the St. Marienhospital Vechta Department of Procto-Surgery. A total of 17 adult patients with pilonidal sinus disease and 217 control subjects were included. ANOVA and intraclass and interclass variations of data gained from mechanical strength tests of occipital, lumbar, and intergluteal hair were included. Vertical hair strength was significantly greater in patients with pilonidal sinus disease. Occipital hair exhibited 20% greater, glabella sacralis 1.1 times greater, and intergluteal hair 2 times greater strength in patients with pilonidal sinus disease than in matched control subjects (all p = 0.0001). In addition, patients with pilonidal sinus disease presented with significantly more hair at the glabella sacralis and in the intergluteal fold. The study was limited by its relatively small number of patients from a specific cohort of European patients. Occipital hair exhibited considerable vertical strength. Because occipital hair exerted the greatest force and cut hair fragments were found in the pilonidal nest in large quantities, these data suggest that pilonidal sinus disease is

  4. Disease expression of RP1 mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S G; Cideciyan, A V; Iannaccone, A; Weleber, R G; Fishman, G A; Maguire, A M; Affatigato, L M; Bennett, J; Pierce, E A; Danciger, M; Farber, D B; Stone, E M

    2000-06-01

    To determine the disease expression in heterozygotes for mutations in the RP1 gene, a newly identified cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Screening strategies were used to detect disease-causing mutations in the RP1 gene, and detailed studies of phenotype were performed in a subset of the detected RP1 heterozygotes using electroretinography (ERG), psychophysics, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Seventeen adRP families had heterozygous RP1 changes. Thirteen families had the Arg677ter mutation, whereas four others had one of the following: Pro658 (1-bp del), Ser747 (1-bp del), Leu762-763 (5-bp del), and Tyr1053 (1-bp del). In Arg677ter RP1 heterozygotes, there was regional retinal variation in disease, with the far peripheral inferonasal retina being most vulnerable; central and superior temporal retinal regions were better preserved. The earliest manifestation of disease was rod dysfunction, detectable as reduced rod ERG photoresponse maximum amplitude, even in heterozygotes with otherwise normal clinical, functional, and OCT cross-sectional retinal imaging results. At disease stages when cone abnormalities were present, there was greater rod than cone dysfunction. Patients with the RP1 frameshift mutations showed similarities in phenotype to those with the Arg677ter mutation. Earliest disease expression of RP1 gene mutations causing adRP involves primarily rod photoreceptors, and there is a gradient of vulnerability of retinopathy with more pronounced effects in the inferonasal peripheral retina. At other disease stages, cone function is also affected, and severe retina-wide degeneration can occur. The nonpenetrance or minimal disease expression in some Arg677ter mutation-positive heterozygotes suggests important roles for modifier genes or environmental factors in RP1-related disease.

  5. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  6. The spectrum of nephrocutaneous diseases and associations: Genetic causes of nephrocutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jay; Fenves, Andrew Z; Jackson, J Mark; Kimball, Alexa B; Menter, Alan

    2016-02-01

    There are a significant number of diseases and treatment considerations of considerable importance relating to the skin and renal systems. This emphasizes the need for dermatologists in practice or in clinical training to be aware of these associations. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews the genetic syndromes with both renal and cutaneous involvement that are most important for the dermatologist to be able to identify, manage, and appropriately refer to nephrology colleagues. Part II reviews the inflammatory syndromes with relevant renal manifestations and therapeutic agents commonly used by dermatologists that have drug-induced effects on or require close consideration of renal function. In addition, we will likewise review therapeutic agents commonly used by nephrologists that have drug-induced effects on the skin that dermatologists are likely to encounter in clinical practice. In both parts of this continuing medical education article, we discuss diagnosis, management, and appropriate referral to our nephrology colleagues in the context of each nephrocutaneous association. There are a significant number of dermatoses associated with renal abnormalities and disease, emphasizing the need for dermatologists to be keenly aware of their presence in order to avoid overlooking important skin conditions with potentially devastating renal complications. This review discusses important nephrocutaneous disease associations with recommendations for the appropriate urgency of referral to nephrology colleagues for diagnosis, surveillance, and early management of potential renal sequelae.

  7. Debating Diseases in Nineteenth-Century Colombia: Causes, Interests, and the Pasteurian Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the medical conceptualization of the causes of diseases in nineteenth-century Colombia. It traces the history of some of the pathologies that were of major concern among nineteenth-century doctors: periodic fevers (yellow fever and malaria), continuous fevers (typhoid fever), and leprosy (Greek elephantiasis). By comparing the transforming conceptualizations of these diseases, this article shows that their changing pattern, the idea of climatic determinism of diseases (neo-Hippocratism and medical geography), the weak standing of the medical community in Colombian society, as well as Pasteurian germ practices were all crucial in the uneven and varied reshaping of their understanding.

  8. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Frances K.; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Strydom, André

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP) — an Alzheimer disease risk factor — although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population. PMID:26243569

  9. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Frances K; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Strydom, André

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP)--an Alzheimer disease risk factor--although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population.

  10. Acute cryptosporidiosis as a cause of sudden recurrence of digestive symptoms in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Orianne; Rouen, Alexandre; Seksik, Philippe; Cosnes, Jacques; Beaugerie, Laurent; Sokol, Harry

    2010-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms occurring in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can be related to disease activity or to intercurrent infection. Absence of appropriate stool work-up can lead to misdiagnosis and wrong treatment. We report here two cases of acute cryptosporidiosis in patients with CD. This microorganism can trigger IBD flare or cause severe infections in immunocompromised host. Adding specific search for oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum using the Ziehl-Neelsen technique to the microbiologic work-up from stools in patients with Crohn's disease seeking medical intervention for sudden exacerbation of digestive symptoms seems to be recommended. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Hemifacial Spasm From Lyme Disease: Antibiotic Treatment Points to the Cause.

    PubMed

    LeWitt, Tessa M

    A wide range of etiologies can cause hemifacial spasm (HFS), including infection. In this case report, a 44-year-old woman developed HFS and was explored surgically 7 years later. No abnormalities were found. Afterward, treatment of a surgical wound infection with an oral cephalosporin resulted in a temporary HFS remission that had never occurred previously. This antibiotic experience prompted further workup for an underlying infection, which ultimately led to diagnosis of Lyme disease. Presentation of HFS due to Lyme disease has not been reported. Because its diagnosis can be occult and antibiotic therapy can be both diagnostic and therapeutic, Lyme disease should be a consideration for cases of HFS.

  12. Serum Resistin, Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Menzaghi, Claudia; Bacci, Simonetta; Salvemini, Lucia; Mendonca, Christine; Palladino, Giuseppe; Fontana, Andrea; De Bonis, Concetta; Marucci, Antonella; Goheen, Elizabeth; Prudente, Sabrina; Morini, Eleonora; Rizza, Stefano; Kanagaki, Alyssa; Fini, Grazia; Mangiacotti, Davide; Federici, Massimo; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Pellegrini, Fabio; Doria, Alessandro; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background High serum resistin has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the general population, Only sparse and conflicting results, limited to Asian individuals, have been reported, so far, in type 2 diabetes. We studied the role of serum resistin on coronary artery disease, major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested the association of circulating resistin concentrations with coronary artery disease, major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke) and all-cause mortality in 2,313 diabetic patients of European ancestry from two cross-sectional and two prospective studies. In addition, the expression of resistin gene (RETN) was measured in blood cells of 68 diabetic patients and correlated with their serum resistin levels. Results In a model comprising age, sex, smoking habits, BMI, HbA1c, and insulin, antihypertensive and antidyslipidemic therapies, serum resistin was associated with coronary artery disease in both cross-sectional studies: OR (95%CI) per SD increment = 1.35 (1.10–1.64) and 1.99 (1.55–2.55). Additionally, serum resistin predicted incident major cardiovascular events (HR per SD increment = 1.31; 1.10–1.56) and all-cause mortality (HR per SD increment = 1.16; 1.06–1.26). Adjusting also for fibrinogen levels affected the association with coronary artery disease and incident cardiovascular events, but not that with all cause-mortality. Finally, serum resistin was positively correlated with RETN mRNA expression (rho = 0.343). Conclusions This is the first study showing that high serum resistin (a likely consequence, at least partly, of increased RETN expression) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in diabetic patients of European ancestry. PMID:23755138

  13. Kidney diseases caused by glomerular basement membrane type IV collagen defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2013-01-01

    To review the pathogenesis, as well as the clinical and pathologic features of canine glomerular diseases caused by genetic type IV collagen defects. Original studies and review articles from human and veterinary medical fields. Presence in glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of a network composed of α3.α4.α5 heterotrimers of type IV collagen is required to maintain structure and function of glomerular capillary walls. Hereditary nephropathy (HN) is the most commonly used name for kidney diseases that occur in dogs due to genetic type IV collagen abnormalities. To date, 4 different collagen IV gene mutations have been identified in dogs with HN; 2 are COL4A5 mutations that cause X-linked HN (XL-HN), and 2 are COL4A4 mutations that cause autosomal recessive HN (AR-HN). Affected males with XL-HN and affected males and females with AR-HN develop juvenile-onset kidney disease manifested by proteinuria typically starting at 3-6 months of age and followed by progressive kidney disease leading to terminal failure usually at 6-24 months of age. Carrier female dogs with XL-HN also develop proteinuria starting at 3-6 months of age, but progressive disease causing kidney failure is uncommon until they are >5 years old. The distinctive pathologic lesions of HN are extensive multilaminar splitting and thickening of the GBM, as demonstrated by electron microscopy, and abnormal type IV collagen α-chain content of basement membranes, as demonstrated by immunolabeling. Identification of the underlying gene mutations has permitted genetic testing and selective breeding practices that currently are minimizing HN in breeds known to be at risk. Canine HN is a rare disease that should be considered whenever a dog exhibits a juvenile-onset kidney disease characterized partly by proteinuria, but highly specialized methods are required to pursue a definitive diagnosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  14. A novel sponge disease caused by a consortium of micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Michael; Bulling, Mark; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In healthy sponges, microbes have been shown to account for up to 40 % of tissues. The majority of these are thought to originate from survivors evading digestion and immune responses of the sponge and growing and residing in the microenvironments of the mesophyll. Although a large percentage of these microbes are likely commensals, they may also include potentially pathogenic agents, which under specific conditions, such as temperature stress, may cause disease. Here we report a novel disease (sponge necrosis syndrome) that is severely affecting populations of the sponge Callyspongia ( Euplacella) aff biru. Both ITS fungal and 16S rDNA bacterial diversities were assessed in healthy and diseased individuals, highlighting six potential primary causal agents for this new disease: two bacteria, a Rhodobacteraceae sp. and a cyanobacterium, Hormoscilla spongeliae (formally identified as Oscillatoria spongeliae), and four fungi, a Ascomycota sp., a Pleosporales sp., a Rhabdocline sp., and a Clasosporium sp. Furthermore, histological analysis showed the dominance of fungal hyphae rather than bacteria throughout the disease lesion, which was absent or rare in healthy tissues. Inoculation trails showed that only a combination of one bacterium and one fungus could replicate the disease, fulfilling Henle-Koch's postulates and showing that this sponge disease is caused by a poly-microbial consortium.

  15. Spontaneous retrotransposon insertion into TNF 3'UTR causes heart valve disease and chronic polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Derek; Hickey, Peter; Arhatari, Benedicta D; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Rohrbeck, Leona; Kiriazis, Helen; Du, Xiao-Jun; Bouillet, Philippe

    2015-08-04

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic inflammatory diseases that together affect 2-3% of the population. RA and AS predominantly involve joints, but heart disease is also a common feature in RA and AS patients. Here we have studied a new spontaneous mutation that causes severe polyarthritis in bone phenotype spontaneous mutation 1 (BPSM1) mice. In addition to joint destruction, mutant mice also develop aortic root aneurism and aorto-mitral valve disease that can be fatal depending on the genetic background. The cause of the disease is the spontaneous insertion of a retrotransposon into the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which triggers its strong overexpression in myeloid cells. We found that several members of a family of RNA-binding, CCCH-containing zinc-finger proteins control TNF expression through its 3'UTR, and we identified a previously unidentified regulatory element in the UTR. The disease in BPSM1 mice is independent of the adaptive immune system and does not appear to involve inflammatory cytokines other than TNF. To our knowledge, this is the first animal model showing both polyarthritis and heart disease as a direct result of TNF deregulation. These results emphasize the therapeutic potential of anti-TNF drugs for the treatment of heart valve disease and identify potential therapeutic targets to control TNF expression and inflammation.

  16. Medical disease as a cause of maternal mortality: the pre-imminence of cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, A O; Sliwa, K; Soma-Pillay, P

    2016-01-01

    Maternal mortality ratio in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC) is 14 times higher than in high-income countries. This is partially due to lack of antenatal care, unmet needs for family planning and education, as well as low rates of birth managed by skilled attendants. While direct causes of maternal death such as complications of hypertension, obstetric haemorrhage and sepsis remain the largest cause of maternal death in LMICs, cardiovascular disease emerges as an important contributor to maternal mortality in both developing countries and the developed world, hampering the achievement of the millennium development goal 5, which aimed at reducing by three-quarters the maternal mortality ratio until the end of 2015. Systematic search for cardiac disease is usually not performed during pregnancy in LMICs despite hypertensive disease, rheumatic heart disease and cardiomyopathies being recognised as major health problems in these settings. New concern has been rising due to both the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Undetected or untreated congenital heart defects, undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension, uncontrolled heart failure and complications of sickle cell disease may also be important challenges. This article discusses issues related to the role of cardiovascular disease in determining a substantial portion of maternal morbidity and mortality. It also presents an algorhitm to be used for suspected and previously known cardiac disease in pregnancy in the context of LIMCs.

  17. Spontaneous retrotransposon insertion into TNF 3′UTR causes heart valve disease and chronic polyarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Derek; Hickey, Peter; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; O’Reilly, Lorraine A.; Rohrbeck, Leona; Kiriazis, Helen; Du, Xiao-Jun; Bouillet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic inflammatory diseases that together affect 2–3% of the population. RA and AS predominantly involve joints, but heart disease is also a common feature in RA and AS patients. Here we have studied a new spontaneous mutation that causes severe polyarthritis in bone phenotype spontaneous mutation 1 (BPSM1) mice. In addition to joint destruction, mutant mice also develop aortic root aneurism and aorto-mitral valve disease that can be fatal depending on the genetic background. The cause of the disease is the spontaneous insertion of a retrotransposon into the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which triggers its strong overexpression in myeloid cells. We found that several members of a family of RNA-binding, CCCH-containing zinc-finger proteins control TNF expression through its 3′UTR, and we identified a previously unidentified regulatory element in the UTR. The disease in BPSM1 mice is independent of the adaptive immune system and does not appear to involve inflammatory cytokines other than TNF. To our knowledge, this is the first animal model showing both polyarthritis and heart disease as a direct result of TNF deregulation. These results emphasize the therapeutic potential of anti-TNF drugs for the treatment of heart valve disease and identify potential therapeutic targets to control TNF expression and inflammation. PMID:26195802

  18. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Xu, Jing; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Mei, Changlin

    2013-08-01

    Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation.

  19. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. Case presentation We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. Conclusion UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation. PMID:24070202

  20. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutants (POPs), the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates, low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It is reported here that though these chemicals differ widely in their chemical properties, reactivities and known points of attack in humans, a common link does exist between them. All are lipophilic species found in serum and they promote the sequential absorption of otherwise non-absorbed toxic hydrophilic species causing these diseases.

  1. [Coeliac disease as a possible cause of some gynecological and obstetric abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Fiolková, K; Biringer, K; Hrtánková, M; Fiolka, R; Danko, J

    To bring a review of available literature sources on the prevalence of coeliac disease and its possible impact on gynecological and obstetric disorders. Review article. Gynecology and Obstetrics Clinic, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia. Analysis of literary sources. Coeliac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by abnormal immune system response to gluten. Over the last decade when the prevalence of the disease increases rapidly confirming the relationship between coeliac disease and a range of reproductive disorders. Problems in this area are mostly confirmed in untreated women. Among the atypical symptoms of coeliac disease also include infertility such as delayed onset of menstruation, early menopause, secondary amenorrhea, infertility and pregnancy complications, such as recurrent abortions, intrauterine fetal growth restriction, small fetus for gestational age, low birth weight and premature birth.

  2. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutants (POPs), the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates, low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It is reported here that though these chemicals differ widely in their chemical properties, reactivities and known points of attack in humans, a common link does exist between them. All are lipophilic species found in serum and they promote the sequential absorption of otherwise non-absorbed toxic hydrophilic species causing these diseases. PMID:24678247

  3. An emergent disease causes directional changes in forest species composition in coastal California

    Treesearch

    Margaret Metz; Kerri Frangioso; Allison Wickland; Ross Meentemeyer; David Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Non-native forest pathogens can cause dramatic and long-lasting changes to the composition of forests, and these changes may have cascading impacts on community interactions and ecosystem functioning. Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of the emergent forest disease sudden oak death (SOD), has a wide host range, but mortality is concentrated in...

  4. Resistance in wheat to Septoria diseases caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola (Septoria tritici) and Phaeosphaeria (Stagonospora) nodorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Septoria of wheat is a disease complex caused by three pathogens: Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph: Septoria tritici); Phaeosphaeria (anamorph: Stagonospora) nodorum; and P. avenaria f. sp. triticae (anamorph: Stagonospora avenae f. sp. triticae). These pathogens are all in the fungal class Dot...

  5. Epididymitis caused by coxsackievirus A6 in association with hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Tytti; Osterback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-12-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6.

  6. Multiple pulmonary artery aneurysms: a rare cause of massive hemoptysis as presentation of Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Al Amri, Salem Mohammad; Banjar, Ahmad Hassan; Cheema, Ahsan Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of an acute episode of massive hemoptysis in a diagnosed patient of Behcet's disease, managed conservatively, using angio-guided vascular plug and coils for occluding the multiple bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with thoracic surgery backup. The episode of massive hemoptysis was caused by ruptured Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms (PAA).

  7. Effect of Straining Caused by Sapstreak Disease on Sugar Maple Log and Lumber Values

    Treesearch

    John H. Ohman; A. Bruce Spike

    1966-01-01

    Sapstreak, a killing disease of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), caused by the fungus Ceratocystis coerulescens (Munch) Bakshi, was first described by hepting in 1944 in North Carolina. It was reported in the Lake States by Kessler and Anderson in 1960 and in the Northeast by Houston and Fisher in 1964. It has also been found on occasional yellow-poplars (...

  8. Epididymitis Caused by Coxsackievirus A6 in Association with Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6. PMID:25232161

  9. Outbreak of Legionnaire’s Disease Caused by Legionella pneumophila Serogroups 1 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Ohya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Ichiro; Suzuki, Miyuki; Masaoka, Tomoka; Aikawa, Kastuhiro; Hibi, Kazumi; Morita, Masatomo; Lee, Ken-ichi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kura, Fumiaki

    2017-01-01

    In Japan, hot springs and public baths are the major sources of legionellosis. In 2015, an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease occurred among 7 patients who had visited a spa house. Laboratory investigation indicated that L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and 13 strains caused the outbreak and that these strains were genetically related. PMID:28098535

  10. Hemoglobin M Disease as a Cause of Cyanosis in a Newborn.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ojembarrena, Almudena; Lubián-López, Simón P

    2016-04-01

    Methemoglobinemia, including the inherited or congenital form, is a known but infrequent cause of neonatal cyanosis. We present the case of a newborn patient with neonatal cyanosis, who was diagnosed with F-M-Osaka methemoglobinemia, and an up-to-date literature review of the disease.

  11. ANIMAL PATHOGENS THAT MAY CAUSE HUMAN DISEASE THAT ORIGINATE FROM FARM OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent increase in concentrated animal feeding operations in the United States has caused renewed concern regarding the infectious diseases that may be passed from farm animals to humans via the environment. It is also known that more than 20 recent epidemics among humans cou...

  12. Genome sequence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, a fungus causing wilt disease on melon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This manuscript reports the genome sequence of F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis, a fungal pathogen that causes Fusarium wilt disease on melon (Cucumis melo). The project is part of a large comparative study designed to explore the genetic composition and evolutionary origin of this group of horizontally ...

  13. Genome Sequence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, a fungus causing wilt disease on melon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This manuscript reports the genome sequence of F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis, a fungal pathogen that causes Fusarium wilt disease on melon (Cucumis melo). The project is part of a large comparative study designed to explore the genetic composition and evolutionary origin of this group of horizontally ...

  14. Infection and disease progress of motile Aeromonas septicemia caused by virulent Aeromonas hydrophila in channel catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS), caused by virulent clonal isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh), is emerging as a major disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture in the Southeastern United States. Predisposing conditions leading to vAh infection in catfish were however largely...

  15. Erdheim-Chester disease: a rare cause of recurrent fever of unknown origin mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mariampillai, Anusiyanthan; Sivapiragasam, Abirami; Kumar, Amit; Hindenburg, Alexander; Cunha, Burke A; Zhou, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with recurrent fever of unknown origin (FUO) with prominent back pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and abdominal/pelvic adenopathy suggesting lymphoma. A bone biopsy showed histiocytic infiltration. Studies for lymphoma were negative, but immunohistochemical stains were diagnostic of Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD). ECD should be included as a rare cause of recurrent FUO with bone involvement.

  16. ANIMAL PATHOGENS THAT MAY CAUSE HUMAN DISEASE THAT ORIGINATE FROM FARM OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent increase in concentrated animal feeding operations in the United States has caused renewed concern regarding the infectious diseases that may be passed from farm animals to humans via the environment. It is also known that more than 20 recent epidemics among humans cou...

  17. [Procedure for coding the causes of death in some circulatory system diseases].

    PubMed

    Kakorina, E P; Aleksandrova, G A; Frank, G A; Mal'kov, P G; Zaĭratians, O V; Vaĭsman, D Sh

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the unification of requirements for coding the causes of death in circulatory system diseases, by taking into account the recently updated ICD-10 and the Consensus of the Expert Council Task Force on Pathological Anatomy, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation (27 February 2014).

  18. Management of Annosus Root Disease Caused by Heterobasidion annosum in Coniferous Trees in Yosemite National Park

    Treesearch

    Lorne West

    1989-01-01

    Trees affected by the annosus root disease are easily windthrown or fall without visible symptoms that might warn forest recreation managers of impending failure. Some of the treeshave struck cabins or campsites, causing death or destroying vehicles and recreational facilities. To prevent loss of life or property, and to save as many trees as possible for landscaping...

  19. The Blood Exposome and Its Role in Discovering Causes of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barupal, Dinesh K.; Wishart, David; Vineis, Paolo; Scalbert, Augustin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 2001, researchers have examined the human genome (G) mainly to discover causes of disease, despite evidence that G explains relatively little risk. We posit that unexplained disease risks are caused by the exposome (E; representing all exposures) and G × E interactions. Thus, etiologic research has been hampered by scientists’ continuing reliance on low-tech methods to characterize E compared with high-tech omics for characterizing G. Objectives: Because exposures are inherently chemical in nature and arise from both endogenous and exogenous sources, blood specimens can be used to characterize exposomes. To explore the “blood exposome” and its connection to disease, we sought human blood concentrations of many chemicals, along with their sources, evidence of chronic-disease risks, and numbers of metabolic pathways. Methods: From the literature we obtained human blood concentrations of 1,561 small molecules and metals derived from foods, drugs, pollutants, and endogenous processes. We mapped chemical similarities after weighting by blood concentrations, disease-risk citations, and numbers of human metabolic pathways. Results: Blood concentrations spanned 11 orders of magnitude and were indistinguishable for endogenous and food chemicals and drugs, whereas those of pollutants were 1,000 times lower. Chemical similarities mapped by disease risks were equally distributed by source categories, but those mapped by metabolic pathways were dominated by endogenous molecules and essential nutrients. Conclusions: For studies of disease etiology, the complexity of human exposures motivates characterization of the blood exposome, which includes all biologically active chemicals. Because most small molecules in blood are not human metabolites, investigations of causal pathways should expand beyond the endogenous metabolome. Citation: Rappaport SM, Barupal DK, Wishart D, Vineis P, Scalbert A. 2014. The blood exposome and its role in discovering causes of

  20. Heart disease is common in humans and chimpanzees, but is caused by different pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Varki, Nissi; Anderson, Dan; Herndon, James G; Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Cheriyan, Monica; Murphy, James; Strobert, Elizabeth; Fritz, Jo; Else, James G; Varki, Ajit

    2009-02-01

    Heart disease is common in both humans and chimpanzees, manifesting typically as sudden cardiac arrest or progressive heart failure. Surprisingly, although chimpanzees are our closest evolutionary relatives, the major cause of heart disease is different in the two species. Histopathology data of affected chimpanzee hearts from two primate centers, and analysis of literature indicate that sudden death in chimpanzees (and in gorillas and orangutans) is commonly associated with diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis of unknown cause. In contrast, most human heart disease results from coronary artery atherosclerosis, which occludes myocardial blood supply, causing ischemic damage. The typical myocardial infarction of humans due to coronary artery thrombosis is rare in these apes, despite their human-like coronary-risk-prone blood lipid profiles. Instead, chimpanzee 'heart attacks' are likely due to arrythmias triggered by myocardial fibrosis. Why do humans not often suffer from the fibrotic heart disease so common in our closest evolutionary cousins? Conversely, why do chimpanzees not have the kind of heart disease so common in humans? The answers could be of value to medical care, as well as to understanding human evolution. A preliminary attempt is made to explore possibilities at the histological level, with a focus on glycosylation changes.

  1. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M.; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans, however the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homolog of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbors bpsX-H, Bacillus cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in B. anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-D-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease. PMID:21371137

  2. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-04-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans; however, the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homologue of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbours bpsX-H, B. cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in Bacillus anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-d-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease.

  3. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy Is Not Associated With Risk of All-Cause Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jacqueline; Jackson, John W.; Grodstein, Francine; Blacker, Deborah; Weuve, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of postmenopausal hormone therapy with all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia has been controversial. Given continued interest in the role of hormone therapy in chronic disease prevention and the emergence of more prospective studies, we conducted a systematic review to identify all epidemiologic studies meeting prespecified criteria reporting on postmenopausal hormone therapy use and risk of Alzheimer's disease or dementia. A systematic search of Medline and Embase through December 31, 2012, returned 15 articles meeting our criteria. Our meta-analysis of any versus never use did not support the hypothesis that hormone therapy reduces risk of Alzheimer's disease (summary estimate = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.66, 1.16). Exclusion of trial findings did not change this estimate. There were not enough all-cause dementia results for a separate meta-analysis, but when we combined all-cause dementia results (n = 3) with Alzheimer's disease results (n = 7), the summary estimate remained null (summary estimate = 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.26). The limited explorations of timing of use—both duration and early initiation—did not yield consistent findings. Our findings support current recommendations that hormone therapy should not be used for dementia prevention. We discuss trends in hormone therapy research that could explain our novel findings and highlight areas where additional data are needed. PMID:24042430

  4. Postmenopausal hormone therapy is not associated with risk of all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jacqueline; Jackson, John W; Grodstein, Francine; Blacker, Deborah; Weuve, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of postmenopausal hormone therapy with all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia has been controversial. Given continued interest in the role of hormone therapy in chronic disease prevention and the emergence of more prospective studies, we conducted a systematic review to identify all epidemiologic studies meeting prespecified criteria reporting on postmenopausal hormone therapy use and risk of Alzheimer's disease or dementia. A systematic search of Medline and Embase through December 31, 2012, returned 15 articles meeting our criteria. Our meta-analysis of any versus never use did not support the hypothesis that hormone therapy reduces risk of Alzheimer's disease (summary estimate = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.66, 1.16). Exclusion of trial findings did not change this estimate. There were not enough all-cause dementia results for a separate meta-analysis, but when we combined all-cause dementia results (n = 3) with Alzheimer's disease results (n = 7), the summary estimate remained null (summary estimate = 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.26). The limited explorations of timing of use-both duration and early initiation-did not yield consistent findings. Our findings support current recommendations that hormone therapy should not be used for dementia prevention. We discuss trends in hormone therapy research that could explain our novel findings and highlight areas where additional data are needed.

  5. Oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms of lung disease caused by asbestos fibres.

    PubMed

    Kinnula, V L

    1999-09-01

    The pathogenesis of asbestos-related lung diseases is complicated and still poorly understood. Studies on animal models and cell cultures have indicated that asbestos fibres generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and cause oxidation and/or nitrosylation of proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid as a marker of cell injury. These effects are potentiated by the inflammation caused by the fibres. Recent studies have shown that individual variability in the antioxidant and/or detoxifying mechanisms probably has an important role in the development of asbestos-related lung diseases. Asbestos fibres cause both cell proliferation and apoptosis by multiple mechanisms, one of them being activation of signal transduction pathways by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Asbestos activates transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, which has been shown to lead to the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes, most importantly manganese superoxide dismutase. This enzyme is also overexpressed in asbestos-related human malignant mesothelioma, whereas the induction of other antioxidant enzymes (copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) by asbestos fibres appears to be marginal. The significance of antioxidant enzymes in asbestos related diseases has, however, remained unclear. Furthermore, previous studies have not been able to offer successful therapies to the patients with asbestos-associated diseases. Only an improved understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms in the human lung provides a basis for future therapies for asbestos-related diseases.

  6. The spectrum of oculocutaneous disease: Part II. Neoplastic and drug-related causes of oculocutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Day, Antoinette; Abramson, Amanda K; Patel, Mahir; Warren, Richard B; Menter, M Alan

    2014-05-01

    There are a multitude of diseases that commonly affect both the skin and the eye. Part II of this 2-part series reviews the oculocutaneous manifestations of neoplasms, both benign and malignant, and adverse drug reactions affecting the skin and the eye. Though rare, a number of neoplasms that primarily involve the skin, such as melanoma and basal cell carcinoma, can metastasize to the eye, leading to permanent damage if not properly treated. In addition, periocular neoplasms can irritate the conjunctiva and lid, reducing a patient's ability to see clearly. Neoplastic diseases, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and multiple myeloma, can also lead to permanent changes in the eye if not discovered and managed promptly. Furthermore, there are a multitude of drugs, including those commonly used by dermatologists, which can result in permanent damage to the eye. With proper knowledge of the ocular manifestations and treatment recommendations described in this 2-part series, dermatologists with the assistance of their ophthalmology colleagues can help avoid the complications, including permanent blindness, associated with infectious, inflammatory, genetic, neoplastic, and drug-related conditions. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mediastinal mass and brachial plexopathy caused by subclavian arterial aneurysm in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, W H; Kim, H K; Park, J H; Park, T S; Baek, H S

    2000-01-01

    Vascular involvement in Behçet's disease is divided into venous and arterial thrombosis and arterial aneurysmal formation. Subclavian arterial aneurysm rarely occurs in Behçet's disease; however, when it does occur, it causes serious aneurysmal rupture and local complications such as nerve compression and arterial ischemia. We describe the case of a 39-year-old male who presented with neurologic symptoms and signs of brachial plexopathy and mediastinal mass caused by Behçet's subclavian arterial aneurysm. This case shows that the occurrence of brachial plexopathy should be considered a manifestation of Behçet's disease, and that Behçet's aneurysm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper mediastinal mass.

  8. White Band Disease (type I) of Endangered Caribbean Acroporid Corals is Caused by Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kline, David I.; Vollmer, Steven V.

    2011-01-01

    Diseases affecting coral reefs have increased exponentially over the last three decades and contributed to their decline, particularly in the Caribbean. In most cases, the responsible pathogens have not been isolated, often due to the difficulty in isolating and culturing marine bacteria. White Band Disease (WBD) has caused unprecedented declines in the Caribbean acroporid corals, resulting in their listings as threatened on the US Threatened and Endangered Species List and critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. Yet, despite the importance of WBD, the probable pathogen(s) have not yet been determined. Here we present in situ transmission data from a series of filtrate and antibiotic treatments of disease tissue that indicate that WBD is contagious and caused by bacterial pathogen(s). Additionally our data suggest that Ampicillin could be considered as a treatment for WBD (type I). PMID:22355526

  9. Identifying new diseases and their causes: the dilemma of illnesses in Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, John W; Gibbons, Robert V; Hooper, Tomoko I; Cunnion, Stephen O; Kroenke, Kurt; Gackstetter, Gary D

    2003-03-01

    Since the Gulf War, investigation continues of symptoms and illnesses among its veterans. Yet, identifying a specific "Gulf War Syndrome" remains elusive. With new disease entities, causal associations are relatively easily established when the condition is serious, verifiable, and has excess disease rates in specific groups. In common conditions, many excess cases are required to establish association with a specific exposure. Establishing causality in syndromes with variable symptoms is difficult because specific diagnostic algorithms must be established before causal factors can be properly investigated. Searching for an environmental cause is futile in the absence of an operational disease case definition. Common subjective symptoms (without objective physical or laboratory findings) account for over one-half of all medical outpatient visits, yet these symptoms lack an identified physical cause at least one-third of the time. Our medical care system has difficulty dealing with disorders where there is no identified anatomic abnormality or documented metabolic/physiological dysfunction.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of the psittacid herpesviruses causing Pacheco's disease: correlation of genotype with phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Kaleta, Erhard F; Phalen, David N

    2003-10-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species.

  11. Global inference of disease-causing single nucleotide variants from exome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengmeng; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Rui

    2016-12-23

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has recently emerged as an effective approach for identifying genetic variants underlying human diseases. However, considerable time and labour is needed for careful investigation of candidate variants. Although filtration based on population frequencies and functional prediction scores could effectively remove common and neutral variants, hundreds or even thousands of rare deleterious variants still remain. In addition, current WES platforms also provide variant information in flanking noncoding regions, such as promoters, introns and splice sites. Despite of being recognized to harbour causal variants, these regions are usually ignored by current analysis pipelines. We present a novel computational method, called Glints, to overcome the above limitations. Glints is capable of identifying disease-causing SNVs in both coding and flanking noncoding regions from exome sequencing data. The principle behind Glints is that disease-causing variants should manifest their effect at both variant and gene levels. Specifically, Glints integrates 14 types of functional scores, including predictions for both coding and noncoding variants, and 9 types of association scores, which help identifying disease relevant genes. We conducted a large-scale simulation studies based on 1000 Genomes Project data and demonstrated the effectiveness of our method in both coding and flanking noncoding regions. We also applied Glints in two real exome sequencing and demonstrated its effectiveness for uncovering disease-causing SNVs. Both standalone software and web server are available at our website http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/glints . Glints is effective for uncovering disease-causing SNVs in coding and flanking noncoding regions, which is supported by both simulation and real case studies. Glints is expected to be a useful tool for human genetics research based on exome sequencing data.

  12. Molecular Phylogeny of the Psittacid Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease: Correlation of Genotype with Phenotypic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Phalen, David N.

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species. PMID:14512573

  13. Disease Course of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection With a Bacterial Cause.

    PubMed

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Loens, Katherine; Lammens, Christine; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul; Butler, Christopher C; Coenen, Samuel; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Verheij, Theo

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens are assumed to cause an illness course different from that of nonbacterial causes of acute cough, but evidence is lacking. We evaluated the disease course of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) with a bacterial cause in adults with acute cough. We conducted a secondary analysis of a multicenter European trial in which 2,061 adults with acute cough (28 days' duration or less) were recruited from primary care and randomized to amoxicillin or placebo. For this analysis only patients in the placebo group (n = 1,021) were included, reflecting the natural course of disease. Standardized microbiological and serological analyses were performed at baseline to define a bacterial cause. All patients recorded symptoms in a diary for 4 weeks. The disease course between those with and without a bacterial cause was compared by symptom severity in days 2 to 4, duration of symptoms rated moderately bad or worse, and a return consultation. Of 1,021 eligible patients, 187 were excluded for missing diary records, leaving 834 patients, of whom 162 had bacterial LRTI. Patients with bacterial LRTI had worse symptoms at day 2 to 4 after the first office visit (P = .014) and returned more often for a second consultation, 27% vs 17%, than those without bacterial LRTI (P = .004). Resolution of symptoms rated moderately bad or worse did not differ (P = .375). Patients with acute bacterial LRTI have a slightly worse course of disease when compared with those without an identified bacterial cause, but the relevance of this difference is not meaningful. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  14. Construction of a high-density genetic map using specific length amplified fragment markers and identification of a quantitative trait locus for anthracnose resistance in walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yufeng; Yin, Yanfei; Yang, Keqiang; Li, Jihong; Sang, Yalin; Huang, Long; Fan, Shu

    2015-08-18

    Walnut (Juglans regia, 2n = 32, approximately 606 Mb per 1C genome) is an economically important tree crop. Resistance to anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is a major objective of walnut genetic improvement in China. The recently developed specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is an efficient strategy that can obtain large numbers of markers with sufficient sequence information to construct high-density genetic maps and permits detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for molecular breeding. SLAF-seq generated 161.64 M paired-end reads. 153,820 SLAF markers were obtained, of which 49,174 were polymorphic. 13,635 polymorphic markers were sorted into five segregation types and 2,577 markers of them were used to construct genetic linkage maps: 2,395 of these fell into 16 linkage groups (LGs) for the female map, 448 markers for the male map, and 2,577 markers for the integrated map. Taking into account the size of all LGs, the marker coverage was 2,664.36 cM for the female map, 1,305.58 cM for the male map, and 2,457.82 cM for the integrated map. The average intervals between two adjacent mapped markers were 1.11 cM, 2.91 cM and 0.95 cM for three maps, respectively. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 89.25% of the markers on the integrated map. Mapping markers contained 5,043 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) loci, which corresponded to two SNP loci per SLAF marker. According to the integrated map, we used interval mapping (Logarithm of odds, LOD > 3.0) to detect our quantitative trait. One QTL was detected for anthracnose resistance. The interval of this QTL ranged from 165.51 cM to 176.33 cM on LG14, and ten markers in this interval that were above the threshold value were considered to be linked markers to the anthracnose resistance trait. The phenotypic variance explained by each marker ranged from 16.2 to 19.9%, and their LOD scores varied from 3.22 to 4.04. High-density genetic maps for walnut containing 16

  15. Walking and running produce similar reductions in cause-specific disease mortality in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2013-09-01

    To test prospectively in hypertensives whether moderate and vigorous exercise produces equivalent reductions in mortality, Cox-proportional hazard analyses were applied to energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents hours/d [METh/d]) in 6973 walkers and 3907 runners who used hypertensive medications at baseline. A total of 1121 died during 10.2-year follow-up: 695 cardiovascular disease (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision [ICD10] I00-99; 465 underlying cause and 230 contributing cause), 124 cerebrovascular disease, 353 ischemic heart disease (ICD10 I20-25; 257 underlying and 96 contributing), 122 heart failure (ICD10 I50; 24 underlying and 98 contributing), and 260 dysrhythmias (ICD10 I46-49; 24 underlying and 236 contributing). Relative to <1.07 METh/d, running or walking 1.8 to 3.6 METh/d produced significantly lower all-cause (29% reduction; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17%-39%; P=0.0001), cardiovascular disease (34% reduction; 95% CI, 20%-46%; P=0.0001), cerebrovascular disease (55% reduction; 95% CI, 27%-73%; P=0.001), dysrhythmia (47% reduction; 95% CI, 27%-62%; P=0.0001), and heart failure mortality (51% reduction; 95% CI, 21%-70%; P=0.003), as did ≥ 3.6 METh/d with all-cause (22% reduction; 95% CI, 6%-35%; P=0.005), cardiovascular disease (36% reduction; 95% CI, 19%-50%; P=0.0002), cerebrovascular disease (47% reduction; 95% CI, 6%-71%; P=0.03), and dysrhythmia mortality (43% reduction; 95% CI, 16%-62%; P=0.004). Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease mortality also decreased significantly with METh/d. All results remained significant when body mass index adjusted. Merely meeting guideline levels (1.07-1.8 METh/d) did not significantly reduced mortality. The dose-response was significantly nonlinear for all end points except diabetes mellitus, and cerebrovascular and chronic kidney disease. Results did not differ between running and walking. Thus, walking and running produce similar reductions in mortality in hypertensives.

  16. Characterization of a Novel Virus Causing a Lethal Disease in Carp and Koi

    PubMed Central

    Ilouze, Maya; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Since 1998 a lethal disease of carp and ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio) has afflicted fisheries in North America, Europe, and Asia, causing severe economic losses to the fish farming industry. This review summarizes the isolation and identification of the disease-causing agent and describes the currently known molecular characteristics of this newly isolated virus, distinguishing it from other known large DNA viruses. In addition, we summarize the clinical and histopathological manifestations of the disease. Providing information on the immune response to this virus and evaluating the available means of diagnosis and protection should help to reduce the damage induced by this disease. This review does not discuss the economic aspects of the disease or the debate on whether the disease should be registered; both of these issues were recently reviewed in detail (O. L. M. Haenen, K. Way, S. M. Bergmann, and E. Ariel, Bull. Eur. Assoc. Fish Pathol. 24:293-307, 2004; D. Pokorova, T. Vesely, V. Piackova, S. Reschova, and J. Hulova, Vet. Med. Czech. 50:139-147, 2005). PMID:16524920

  17. Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella longbeachae and Legionella pneumophila: comparison of clinical features, host-related risk factors, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, M R; Murdoch, D R; Pithie, A D

    2010-09-01

    Legionnaires' disease remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Disease caused by Legionella pneumophila has been extensively studied, and its clinical characteristics have been well described. There is, however, little information on disease caused by Legionella longbeachae, despite its importance in some countries. We undertook a retrospective review of culture-positive cases of Legionnaires' disease in the Canterbury region of New Zealand over 10 years, in order to compare the clinical features and outcomes of Legionnaires' disease caused by these two species.

  18. Potential gains in life expectancy from reducing heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, kidney disease or HIV/AIDS as major causes of death in the USA.

    PubMed

    Wang, G D; Lai, D J; Burau, K D; Du, X L

    2013-04-01

    Potential gains in life expectancy (PGLEs) that give proper consideration to competing risks are an effective indicator for measuring the impact of multiple causes of death on a defined population. This study aimed to assess PGLE by hypothetically reducing the major causes of death in the USA from 2001 to 2008. PGLEs due to the reduction and elimination of heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, kidney disease or human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) were calculated by age, gender and race. Age-specific mortality rates for the above diseases from the National Center for Health Statistics were used, and multiple decremental life tables were constructed to compute the corresponding PGLEs. PGLEs due to the elimination of heart disease, cancer or HIV/AIDS decreased from 2001 to 2008, but PGLEs due to the elimination of Alzheimer's disease or kidney disease increased over time. For heart disease, PGLE in 2001-2008 for all races was 2.78-2.15 for females vs 2.41-2.06 for males. For cancer, PGLE in 2001-2008 for all races was 2.97-2.81 for females vs 3.02-2.85 for males. HIV/AIDS has a greater impact on people of working age, whereas Alzheimer's disease has a greater impact on the elderly population. To compare the impacts of these diseases on life expectancy, partial multiple decremental life tables were constructed, and PGLEs were computed by a partial reduction or complete elimination of various causes of death for the entire life span as well as for certain working ages. This study outlined a picture of how each category of diseases could affect life expectancy in the US population by age, race or sex. The findings may assist in evaluating current public health improvements, and also provide useful information for directing future research and disease control programmes. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypertension as cause and consequence of renal disease in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Harlos, J; Heidland, A

    1994-01-01

    The pioneering work of Richard Bright, who introduced the concept of the renal origin of cardiovascular disease, initiated the continuous unfolding of knowledge on renal disease and its close interrelationship with arterial hypertension in the 19th century. Hypertension as a clinically and pathologically defined entity, however, was not established. The partial elucidation of the problem that the diseased kidney was sometimes the cause and sometimes the consequence of elevated blood pressure is not only fascinating but also remarkable, given the crude techniques available to physicians at that time. Subsequent workers came to regard 'Bright's disease' as consisting of several conditions differing in clinical manifestation and pathology. In particular, Johnson and Gull and Sutton drew attention to the small blood vessels in renal disease. Only the invention of a clinically applicable method of measuring blood pressure indirectly allowed Mahomed and Allbutt to show that hypertension may occur in the absence of renal disease. They paved the way for a clear separation of hypertensive renal disease from other forms of 'Bright's disease', culminating in the classification introduced by Fahr and Volhard.

  20. A somatic mutation in erythro-myeloid progenitors causes neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Mass, Elvira; Jacome-Galarza, Christian E; Blank, Thomas; Lazarov, Tomi; Durham, Benjamin H; Ozkaya, Neval; Pastore, Alessandro; Schwabenland, Marius; Chung, Young Rock; Rosenblum, Marc K; Prinz, Marco; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Geissmann, Frederic

    2017-09-21

    The pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases is poorly understood and there are few therapeutic options. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and loss, and chronic glial activation. Whether microglial activation, which is generally viewed as a secondary process, is harmful or protective in neurodegeneration remains unclear. Late-onset neurodegenerative disease observed in patients with histiocytoses, which are clonal myeloid diseases associated with somatic mutations in the RAS-MEK-ERK pathway such as BRAF(V600E), suggests a possible role of somatic mutations in myeloid cells in neurodegeneration. Yet the expression of BRAF(V600E) in the haematopoietic stem cell lineage causes leukaemic and tumoural diseases but not neurodegenerative disease. Microglia belong to a lineage of adult tissue-resident myeloid cells that develop during organogenesis from yolk-sac erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) distinct from haematopoietic stem cells. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic BRAF(V600E) mutation in the EMP lineage may cause neurodegeneration. Here we show that mosaic expression of BRAF(V600E) in mouse EMPs results in clonal expansion of tissue-resident macrophages and a severe late-onset neurodegenerative disorder. This is associated with accumulation of ERK-activated amoeboid microglia in mice, and is also observed in human patients with histiocytoses. In the mouse model, neurobehavioural signs, astrogliosis, deposition of amyloid precursor protein, synaptic loss and neuronal death were driven by ERK-activated microglia and were preventable by BRAF inhibition. These results identify the fetal precursors of tissue-resident macrophages as a potential cell-of-origin for histiocytoses and demonstrate that a somatic mutation in the EMP lineage in mice can drive late-onset neurodegeneration. Moreover, these data identify activation of the MAP kinase pathway in microglia as a cause of neurodegeneration and this offers