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Sample records for anthrax disinfection procedures

  1. Anthrax

    MedlinePlus

    Woolsorter's disease; Ragpicker's disease; Cutaneous anthrax; Gastrointestinal anthrax ... Anthrax commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep, cattle, and goats. Humans who come into contact with ...

  2. Anthrax

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Anthrax KidsHealth > For Teens > Anthrax Print A A A ... a weapon on a large scale. Types of Anthrax The three main types of anthrax are: Cutaneous ...

  3. 9 CFR 309.7 - Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Livestock affected with anthrax... INSPECTION § 309.7 Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways. (a) Any livestock found on ante-mortem inspection to be affected with anthrax shall be identified...

  4. 9 CFR 309.7 - Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Livestock affected with anthrax... INSPECTION § 309.7 Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways. (a) Any livestock found on ante-mortem inspection to be affected with anthrax shall be identified...

  5. 9 CFR 309.7 - Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livestock affected with anthrax... INSPECTION § 309.7 Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways. (a) Any livestock found on ante-mortem inspection to be affected with anthrax shall be identified...

  6. 9 CFR 309.7 - Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Livestock affected with anthrax... INSPECTION § 309.7 Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways. (a) Any livestock found on ante-mortem inspection to be affected with anthrax shall be identified...

  7. 9 CFR 309.7 - Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Livestock affected with anthrax... INSPECTION § 309.7 Livestock affected with anthrax; cleaning and disinfection of infected livestock pens and driveways. (a) Any livestock found on ante-mortem inspection to be affected with anthrax shall be identified...

  8. Anthrax

    MedlinePlus

    ... those who were infected died. More recently, 54 heroin users in Europe contracted anthrax through injecting illegal drugs. Eighteen people died from injectable anthrax. Heroin sold in Europe likely comes from areas where ...

  9. Anthrax

    MedlinePlus

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, a germ that lives in soil. Many people know ... bioterror attacks. In the attacks, someone purposely spread anthrax through the U.S. mail. This killed five people ...

  10. Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    peptidoglycan from the cell wall of Gram -positive bacteria such as B. anthracis. Anthrax spores can trigger a strong inflammatory response by activating TLR4...present, CSF should be collected. B. Diagnostics Laboratory tests for anthrax can include Gram staining , differential plating, y-bacteriophage plaque...Simple tests to rule out anthrax infection are Gram staining of cultured bacteria, differential plating, and a y-bacterio- phage plaque assay. Gram

  11. Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Skin Cellulitis; Brown recluse spider bite; Cat- scratch disease; Rat bite fever; Rickettsial spotted fever; Carbuncle; Cowpox; Bullous erysipelas...with inhalational anthrax be treated? − A: 60 days. This recommendation is based on studies done in monkeys , where relapse after therapy was noted when medications were discontinued after 30 days.

  12. Anthrax: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Anthrax Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Anthrax Basic Information Types of Anthrax Cutaneous Anthrax Inhalation ...

  13. Disinfection of aircraft : Appropriate disinfectants and standard operating procedures for highly infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Joachim; Gnirs, Peter; Hölterhoff, Sabine; Wirtz, Angela; Jeglitza, Matthias; Gaber, Walter; Gottschalk, Rene

    2016-12-01

    For infectious diseases caused by highly pathogenic agents (e. g., Ebola/Lassa fever virus, SARS-/MERS-CoV, pandemic influenza virus) which have the potential to spread over several continents within only a few days, international Health Protection Authorities have taken appropriate measures to limit the consequences of a possible spread. A crucial point in this context is the disinfection of an aircraft that had a passenger on board who is suspected of being infected with one of the mentioned diseases. Although, basic advice on hygiene and sanitation on board an aircraft is given by the World Health Organization, these guidelines lack details on available and effective substances as well as standardized operating procedures (SOP). The purpose of this paper is to give guidance on the choice of substances that were tested by a laboratory of Lufthansa Technik and found compatible with aircraft components, as well as to describe procedures which ensure a safe and efficient disinfection of civil aircrafts. This guidance and the additional SOPs are made public and are available as mentioned in this paper.

  14. Anthrax Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is anthrax?Anthrax is a serious disease that can affect both animals and humans. It is caused by bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. People can get anthrax from contact with infected animals, wool, meat, or ...

  15. Anthrax (Lecture Aids) - USSR .

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-08-14

    external influences. Ord- inary disinfectant solutions ( corrosive sublimate, carbolic acid, lysol) are not used, since they have little effect on...anthrax spores. A 10-20% solution of chloride of lime, a 5-7% solution of chloramine and a .10-20% hot solution of caustic soda are considered

  16. The effect of immersion disinfection procedures on dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Cassaro, Angelo; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of immersion disinfection procedures on the dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials. Impressions of a stainless steel die were made with polyether (PE) and with addition-polymerized silicone rubber (PVS). The test specimens underwent disinfection treatment by immersion in two commercially available solutions containing quaternary ammonium compounds (Sterigum Powder, SP) and glutaraldehyde plus an amino derivative (MD520, MD), respectively. The impressions were measured at 4 different time points: before any disinfection treatment (T0); after the first disinfection (T1); 6 hours after the first disinfection (T2); after the second disinfection, carried out 6 hours after the first one (T3). Impressions which were not disinfected served as controls. When both impression materials were disinfected with SP, significant differences were detected among all measurements (P < 0.0001), with the exception of T2 vs T3 (P > 0.05). On the other hand, when MD was used, significant differences were found when T0 measurement was compared to T1, T2 and T3 measurements (P = 0.0043 for PE, and P = 0.0014 for PVS). The dimensional change of all material/disinfectant combinations was always disinfection on the dimension of elastomers in SP or MD are not clinically relevant.

  17. Surveillance and control of anthrax and rabies in wild herbivores and carnivores in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Berry, H H

    1993-03-01

    Anthrax has been studied intensively in Etosha National Park, Namibia since 1966; in addition, since 1975, mortality due to rabies and all other causes has been recorded, totalling 6,190 deaths. Standard diagnostic procedures demonstrated that at least 811 deaths (13%) were due to anthrax and 115 deaths (2%) were caused by rabies. Of the total number of deaths due to anthrax, 97% occurred in zebra (Equus burchelli), elephant (Loxodonta africana), wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) while 96% of rabies deaths occurred in kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), jackal (Canis mesomelas), bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis) and lion (Panthera leo). Anthrax deaths were highest in the rainy season for zebra, wildebeest and springbok, while elephant mortality peaked during dry seasons. No statistical relationship existed between seasonal rainfall and overall incidence of either anthrax or rabies. Control of anthrax is limited to prophylactic inoculation when rare or endangered species are threatened. Incineration of anthrax carcasses and chemical disinfection of drinking water are not feasible at Etosha. Rabies control consists of the destruction of rabid animals and incineration of their carcasses when possible.

  18. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cause severe illness and even death. Cutaneous anthrax symptoms can include: A group of small blisters ... on the face, neck, arms, or hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort ...

  19. Comparison of Disinfection Procedures on the Catheter Adapter-Transfer Set Junction.

    PubMed

    Firanek, Catherine; Szpara, Edward; Polanco, Patricia; Davis, Ira; Sloand, James

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a significant complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), contributing to mortality and technique failure. Suboptimal disinfection and/or a loose connection at the catheter adapter-transfer set junction are forms of touch contamination that can compromise the integrity of the sterile fluid path and lead to peritonitis. Proper use of the right disinfectants for connections at the PD catheter adapter-transfer set interface can help eliminate bacteria at surface interfaces, secure connections, and prevent bacteria from entering into the sterile fluid pathway. Three studies were conducted to assess the antibacterial effects of various disinfecting agents and procedures, and ensuing security of the catheter adapter-transfer set junction. An open-soak disinfection procedure with 10% povidone iodine improves disinfection and tightness/security of catheter adapter-transfer set connection. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  20. Investigations into the efficacy of different procedures for surgical hand disinfection between consecutive operations.

    PubMed

    Rehork, B; Rüden, H

    1991-10-01

    In order to examine whether thorough surgical hand disinfection (handwashing plus hand disinfection) between consecutive operations is necessary, tests were carried out simulating normal clinical conditions. The tests were performed according to the guidelines for the evaluation of disinfection procedures of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology. Surgical hand disinfection was as follows: handwashing with soap without antimicrobial additives and subsequent 5-min disinfection with 60% n-propanol. This was followed by simulated operations of 30 or 120 min duration with a 30-min break between operations, during which half of the test group kept on the surgical gloves, while the other half removed them. The second surgical hand disinfection was done without prior handwashing by 50% of the test group. The disinfection time was reduced from 5 to 1 min by 50% of the test group. The results were evaluated by means of explorative data analysis and inductive statistical methods. Removing the surgical gloves during the interoperative break did not result in significantly higher numbers of colony forming units (cfu) compared with retaining the gloves. This was also the case after a subsequent handwashing. At the second surgical hand disinfection, after a simulated operation of 60 min duration (including break), there was no significant difference in the numbers of cfus between the test group who had washed their hands and those who had not. Reducing the disinfection time from 5 min to 1 min was not associated with a significant increase in the number of cfus. However, after a simulated operating time of 150 min (including the break), the second surgical hand disinfection with handwashing resulted in a significantly lower number of microorganisms than disinfection alone. In half the tests, the numbers of cfu were significantly lower when the test group disinfected their hands for 5 min rather than 1 min.

  1. Efficacy of Cleaning and Disinfection Procedures in a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Facility

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rachel L; Sanders, George E

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate cleaning and disinfection procedures in zebrafish (Danio rerio) laboratories are crucial in preventing the spread of aquatic animal pathogens and minimizing the build-up of waste products and biologic matter. The procedures selected should accomplish these goals and incorporate the individual needs of various laboratories. In this study of a single zebrafish facility, we assessed the efficacy of 2 different cleaning and disinfection procedures for nets, tanks, and lids. ATP levels were used as a surrogate biomarker for microbial burden. We measured the number of relative light units (RLU), as an expression of the amount of ATP present, on items before and after disinfection and calculated the percentage reduction. We compared daily replacement of a commercial net disinfection product in J lab with weekly replacement in H lab and found a 96.6% reduction in RLU in H lab and a 91.2% reduction in J lab. These results indicate that either replacement schedule is effective. Evaluation of tanks and lids soaked in a bleach disinfection bath for 30 or 60 min revealed a 99.7% reduction in RLU at 30 min compared with 97.1% at 60 min. Therefore a 30-min soak in a bleach bath achieved a similar level of disinfection as did a 60-min soak. The current results demonstrate that these cleaning and disinfection methods are efficacious. PMID:22330783

  2. An Investigation of Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Disinfection Procedures in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assessed the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practice regarding disinfection procedures among nurses in Italian hospitals. Methods A face-to-face interview gathered the following information: demographic and practice characteristics; knowledge about the healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and the disinfection practices; attitudes towards the utility of guidelines/protocols and perception of the risks of acquiring/transmitting HAIs; compliance with antisepsis/disinfection procedures; and sources of information. Results Only 29% acknowledged that urinary and respiratory tract infections were the two most common HAIs and this knowledge was significantly higher in those with a higher level of education. Attitudes towards the utility of guidelines/protocols for disinfection procedures showed a mean score of 9.1. The results of the linear regression model indicated a more positive attitude in female nurses, in those with a lower number of years of activity, and in those needing additional information about disinfection procedures. Nurses with higher educational level and with a higher perception of risk of transmitting an infectious disease while working were more likely to perform appropriate antisepsis of the surgical wound and handwashing before and after medication. Conclusions Plan of successful prevention activities about HAIs and provide pointers to help optimize disinfection procedures and infection prophylaxis and management are needed. PMID:21612613

  3. Disinfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. Disinfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of the disinfection process in drinking water treatment is the inactivation of microbial pathogens. These pathogens comprise a diverse group of organisms which serve as the etiological agents of waterborne disease. Included in this group are bacterial, viral and ...

  6. Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  7. The effect of long-term disinfection procedures on hardness property of resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Campanha, Nara Hellen; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of long-term disinfection procedures on the Vickers hardness (VHN) of acrylic resin denture teeth. Five acrylic resin denture teeth (Vipi Dent Plus-V, Trilux-T, Biolux-B, Postaris-P and Artiplus-A) and one composite resin denture teeth (SR-Orthosit-O) were embedded in heat-polymerised acrylic resin within polyvinylchloride tubes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 h. Measurements of hardness were taken after the following disinfection procedures: immersion for 7 days in 4% chlorhexidine gluconate or in 1% sodium hypochlorite (CIm and HIm group, respectively) and seven daily cycles of microwave sterilisation at 650 W for 6 min (MwS group). In the WIm group, specimens were maintained in water during the time used to perform the disinfection procedures (7 days). Data were analysed with anova followed by the Bonferroni procedure (α = 0.01). Microwave disinfection decreased the hardness of all acrylic resin denture teeth (p < 0.001). Immersion for 7 days in 4% chlorhexidine gluconate or distilled water had significant effect on the hardness of the acrylic resin denture teeth A (p < 0.01), and 1% sodium hypochlorite on teeth T (p < 0.01). All disinfection procedures decrease the hardness of the composite resin denture teeth (p < 0.01). Teeth O exhibited the highest and teeth V the lowest hardness values in the control group (p < 0.01). Disinfection procedures changed the hardness of resin denture teeth. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Demonstration of disinfection procedure for the development of accurate blood glucose meters in accordance with ISO 15197:2013

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Ye; Chang, Jung-Tzu; Chu, Chun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Despite measures to reduce disease transmission, a risk can occur when blood glucose meters (BGMs) are used on multiple individuals or by caregivers assisting a patient. The laboratory and in-clinic performance of a BGM system before and after disinfection should be demonstrated to guarantee accurate readings and reliable control of blood glucose (BG) for patients. In this study, an effective disinfection procedure, conducting wiping 10 times to assure a one minute contact time of the disinfectant on contaminated surface, was first demonstrated using test samples of the meter housing materials, including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and polycarbonate (PC), in accordance with ISO 15197:2013. After bench studies comprising 10,000 disinfection cycles, the elemental compositions of the disinfected ABS, PMMA, and PC samples were almost the same as in the original samples, as indicated by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Subsequently, the validated disinfection procedure was then directly applied to disinfect 5 commercial BGM systems composed of ABS, PMMA, or PC to observe the effect of the validated disinfection procedure on meter accuracy. The results of HBsAg values after treatment with HBV sera and disinfectant wipes for each material were less than the LoD of each material of 0.020 IU/mL. Before and after the multiple disinfection cycles, 900 of 900 samples (100%) were within the system accuracy requirements of ISO 15197:2013. All of the systems showed high performance before and after the series of disinfection cycles and met the ISO 15197:2013 requirements. In addition, our results demonstrated multiple cleaning and disinfection cycles that represented normal use over the lifetime of a meter of 3–5 years. Our validated cleaning and disinfection procedure can be directly applied to other registered disinfectants for cleaning commercial BGM products in the future. PMID:28683148

  9. Demonstration of disinfection procedure for the development of accurate blood glucose meters in accordance with ISO 15197:2013.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Lin, Wen-Ye; Chang, Jung-Tzu; Chu, Chun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Despite measures to reduce disease transmission, a risk can occur when blood glucose meters (BGMs) are used on multiple individuals or by caregivers assisting a patient. The laboratory and in-clinic performance of a BGM system before and after disinfection should be demonstrated to guarantee accurate readings and reliable control of blood glucose (BG) for patients. In this study, an effective disinfection procedure, conducting wiping 10 times to assure a one minute contact time of the disinfectant on contaminated surface, was first demonstrated using test samples of the meter housing materials, including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and polycarbonate (PC), in accordance with ISO 15197:2013. After bench studies comprising 10,000 disinfection cycles, the elemental compositions of the disinfected ABS, PMMA, and PC samples were almost the same as in the original samples, as indicated by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Subsequently, the validated disinfection procedure was then directly applied to disinfect 5 commercial BGM systems composed of ABS, PMMA, or PC to observe the effect of the validated disinfection procedure on meter accuracy. The results of HBsAg values after treatment with HBV sera and disinfectant wipes for each material were less than the LoD of each material of 0.020 IU/mL. Before and after the multiple disinfection cycles, 900 of 900 samples (100%) were within the system accuracy requirements of ISO 15197:2013. All of the systems showed high performance before and after the series of disinfection cycles and met the ISO 15197:2013 requirements. In addition, our results demonstrated multiple cleaning and disinfection cycles that represented normal use over the lifetime of a meter of 3-5 years. Our validated cleaning and disinfection procedure can be directly applied to other registered disinfectants for cleaning commercial BGM products in the future.

  10. Effects of sterilization and disinfection procedures on the corrosion of orthodontic ligature cutters.

    PubMed

    Benyahia, Hicham; Merzouk, Nadia; Ebn Touhami, Mohamed; Zaoui, Fatima

    2012-03-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of orthodontic ligature cutters subjected separately to two different sterilization procedures, namely, autoclaving and chemical disinfection with main focus on the cutting section of each instrument. Twenty-four ligature cutters were obtained from three different manufacturers: Hu-Friedy, ETM, and Nadir & Co. The study included a control group (G0) and four experimental groups (G1-4). G1 was subjected to 50 autoclave sterilization cycles. G2, G3, and G4 were subjected to 50 chemical disinfection cycles using, respectively, Peridiol E, Hexanios G+R, and Steranios 2%. Manufacturer recommendations were followed. The instruments' blades were studied via SEM and X-ray microanalysis (EDX spectrum). These cutters have inserts made from various resistant alloys. SEM micrographs revealed different forms of corrosion depending on whether autoclaving or chemical disinfectant sterilization procedures were used, and depending on the alloys present. Chemical disinfection is more aggressive than autoclave sterilization, and is responsible for localized corrosion in the form of pitting. This is more detrimental to the lifespan of orthodontic cutters. Sterilization/disinfection procedures should be adapted to the chemical profile of the metal alloys present. Recommendations for use published by instrument manufacturers must be followed. Copyright © 2011 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Cutaneous anthrax (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Anthrax is caused by the bacteria Bacillus anthracis . While anthrax commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats, humans may get sick from anthrax, too. The most common type of anthrax infection ...

  12. Hardness and surface roughness of reline and denture base acrylic resins after repeated disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Lucia; Breeding, Larry C; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias

    2009-08-01

    Microwave irradiation and immersion in chemical solutions have been recommended for denture disinfection. However, the effect of these procedures on the surface characteristics of denture base and reline resins has not been completely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave and chemical disinfection on the Vickers hardness (VHN) and surface roughness (Ra, microm) of 2 hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, DuraLiner II), and 1 heat-polymerizing denture base resin (Lucitone 550). Specimens (12 x 12 x 3 mm) were divided into 2 control and 4 test groups (n=8). Hardness and roughness measurements were performed after: polymerization and immersion in water (37 degrees C) for 7 days (controls), or repeated exposure to disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (50 degrees C/10 min) or microwave irradiation (650 W/6 min). Measurements of surface roughness (Ra, microm) and hardness (kg/mm(2)) were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (alpha=.05). Microwave and chemical disinfection increased the mean (SD) hardness of Kooliner (from 4.1 to 7.5 kg/mm(2)) and DuraLiner II (from 2.6 to 5.6 kg/mm(2)), whereas Lucitone 550 (14.4 kg/mm(2)) remained unaffected. Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate increased the surface roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.13 to 0.26 microm) and Kooliner (from 0.16 to 0.26 microm), regardless of the number of cycles. For Lucitone 550, an increase in roughness was observed after 2 cycles of chemical disinfection (from 0.12 to 0.26 microm). Two cycles of microwave disinfection increased the roughness of both reline resins (DuraLiner II: from 0.13 to 0.22 microm; Kooliner: from 0.16 to 0.24 microm), whereas repeated microwave disinfection increased the roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.11 to 0.25 microm). Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate or microwave irradiation did not adversely affect the hardness of all materials evaluated. The effect of both

  13. Anthrax Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... be found naturally in soil and commonly affects domestic and wild animals around the world. Although it ... flu. How do animals get infected with anthrax? Domestic and wild animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, ...

  14. [Comparison of efficacy of 14 procedures for the hygienic disinfection of hands (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wewalka, G; Rotter, M; Koller, W; Stanek, G

    1977-10-01

    The efficacy of 14 procedures for the hygienic disinfection of hands mostly with commerical preparations was tested by a new experimental model developed at the Institute of Hygiene of the university Vienna (1,3). The disinfectant power was clearly dependent on the duration of treatment as well as on the kind of alcohol used in the preparation (n-Propanol better than iso-Propanol better than Ethanol). After one minute the efficacy of all preparations containing one of the three alcohols as active agent was well comparable to that of the standard procedure which according to our proposal (5) uses iso-Propanol 60% (ml/ml) for 1 minute. For preparations with n-Propanol as the main active agent (Satinazid and Sterillium) this was true even after treatment for a period as short as 0.5 min. In our opinion disinfecting detergents are out of place for hygienic disinfection of hands. One preparation representing this group (Versuchspräparat A) was far less effective than the standard procedure.

  15. Testing linen disinfection procedures in practice with phage-charged-bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Gerhardts, Anja; Mucha, Helmut; Höfer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Disinfecting laundry processes are essential to avoid contamination of laundering machines and linen during commercial laundry reprocessing in the health care sector. Recently a bacteriophage-charged bioindicator has been developed using MS2 as surrogate virus for testing of low-temperature disinfecting laundry processing on efficacy against viruses related to practice. This paper therefore aims to investigate application of MS2-bioindicators in chemothermal processes under practical conditions (phase 2/step 2) and in practice (phase 3). The experimental design was developed and modified according to the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) Standard Methods for Testing Chemical Disinfection Processes. Tests under practical conditions were performed at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. Additional tests in tunnel washers were carried out at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. In all experiments validated disinfecting laundry processes, recommended for bactericidal and virucidal performance (categories A and B), were applied. The results show a temperature-dependent gradual efficacy against the test virus MS2 up to reduction values of more than 8 log10-steps. Therefore MS2-bioindicators prove to be suitable as a tool to determine the performance of disinfection procedures against viruses in practice. Phage-charged bioindicators may be a tool to provide further insights into the reliability of antiviral laundry processes for health care quality management and for infection control.

  16. Evaluation of disinfecting procedures for aseptic transfer in hospital pharmacy departments.

    PubMed

    Mehmi, Manita; Marshall, Lindsay J; Lambert, Peter A; Smith, Julian C

    2009-01-01

    Current practice in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals employs 70% Industrial Methylated Spirit spray for surface disinfection of components required in Grade A pharmaceutical environments. This study seeks to investigate other agents and procedures that may provide more effective sanitisation. Several methods are available to test the efficacy of disinfectants against vegetative organisms. However, no methods currently available test the efficacy of disinfectants against spores on the hard surfaces encountered in the pharmacy aseptic processing environment. Therefore, a method has been developed to test the efficacy of disinfectants against spores, modified from British Standard 13697 and Association of Analytical Chemists standards. The testing procedure was used to evaluate alternative biocides and disinfection methods for transferring components into hospital pharmacy cleanrooms, and to determine which combinations of biocide and application method have the greatest efficacy against spores of Bacillus subtilis subspecies subtilis 168, Bacillus subtilis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 6633, and Bacillus pumilis ATCC 27142. Stainless steel carrier test plates were used to represent the hard surfaces in hospital pharmacy cleanrooms. Plates were inoculated with 10(7)-10(8) colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) and treated with the various biocide formulations, using different disinfection methods. Sporicidal activity was calculated as log reduction in CFU. Of the biocides tested, 6% hydrogen peroxide and a quaternary ammonium compound/chlorine dioxide combination were most effective compared to a Quat/biguanide, amphoteric surfactant, 70% v/v ethanol in deionised water and isopropyl alcohol in water for injection. Of the different application methods tested, spraying followed by wiping was the most effective, followed closely by wiping alone. Spraying alone was least effective.

  17. Effect of different disinfecting procedures on the hardness and color stability of two maxillofacial elastomers over time

    PubMed Central

    ELENI, Panagiota N.; KROKIDA, Magdalini K.; POLYZOIS, Gregory L.; GETTLEMAN, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disinfection procedures often cause deterioration in a maxillofacial prosthesis. Color and hardness alterations could lead to a replacement of the prosthesis. Material and Methods: An experimental chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and a commercial polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sample were treated with four different disinfection procedures for a period which simulates 1 year of clinical service. The applied disinfection procedures included microwave exposure and immersion in three solutions, sodium hypochlorite, neutral soap and a commercial disinfecting soap. Shore A hardness (ΔΗ) and color differences (ΔΕ) were determined before and after each procedure. All data were analyzed by Two Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests at a level of α=0.05. Results: The samples presented significant alterations in color and hardness after the different disinfection treatments. The color differences (ΔΕ) were at least eye detectable in all cases and clinically unacceptable in most of the cases, with values ranging from 1.51 to 4.15 and from 1.54 to 5.92 for the PDMS and CPE material, respectively. Hardness was decreased after all the disinfection procedures in the PDMS, while for the CPE, a decrement was observed after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite and neutral soap and an increment after microwave exposure and the disinfection with a commercial antimicrobial agent. The PDMS samples presented greater alterations in color and hardness after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite solution, while the microwave exposure caused negligible effects. The CPE samples were affected most after disinfection when treated with neutral soap, and more slightly when disinfected with sodium hypochlorite solution. Conclusions: The disinfection procedures caused alterations in color and hardness of the examined materials. The most suitable disinfection procedure for the PDMS material is microwave exposure, while disinfection with sodium hypochlorite

  18. Alcohol disinfection procedure for isolating giant viruses from contaminated samples.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Meriem; Pagnier, Isabelle; Boughalmi, Mondher; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have been neglected in the literature because they are removed from samples during viral purification for viral metagenomic studies. Isolation via amoeba coculture has low efficiency and is extremely time-consuming. Thus, our objective was to improve Megavirales detection and recovery by using a new protocol that will eliminate most bacteria present in environmental samples while preserving giant virus viability. In this study, we tested the ability of a number of disinfection protocols to kill contaminating bacteria. These treatments were ethanol, UV irradiation, desiccation, glutaraldehyde and thermal shock. Of all the treatments, a brief ethanol treatment did not significantly reduce the titer of viable viral particles of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus or Marseillevirus, whereas it efficiently killed Escherichia coli. This treatment was applied to environmental samples that previously tested positive for giant viruses and was shown to eliminate contaminating bacteria, whereas it allowed for the isolation of the giant viruses. Our results demonstrate that ethanol treatment can be used to evaluate large collections of environmental samples for the presence of giant viruses and to provide insight into understanding their ecology. This study should also facilitate the isolation of giant viruses using other species of protozoa in addition to Acanthamoeba spp.

  19. Surface disinfection procedure and in vitro regeneration of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) axillary buds.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Javalera, M F; Troncoso-Rojas, R; Tiznado-Hernández, M E; Martínez-Tellez, M A; Vargas-Arispuro, I; Islas-Osuna, M A; Rivera-Domínguez, M

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of an efficient explants surface disinfection protocol is essential for in vitro cell and tissue culture as well as germplasm conservation, such as the case of Grapevine (Vitis spp.) culture. In this research, different procedures for disinfection and regeneration of field-grown grapevine cv. 'Flame seedless' axillary buds were evaluated. The buds were disinfected using either NaOCl or allyl, benzyl, phenyl and 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanates. Two different media for shooting and four media for rooting were tested. Shoot and root development per buds were registered. The best disinfection procedure with 90 % of tissue survival involved shaking for 60 min in a solution containing 20 % Clorox with 50 drops/L Triton(®) X-100. These tissues showed the potential to regenerate a complete plant. Plant regeneration was conducted using full strength Murashigue and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 8 µM benzyl aminopurine for shoot induction and multiplication, whereas rooting was obtained on half strength MS supplemented with 2 mg L(-1) of indole-3-butyric acid and 200 mg L(-1) of activated charcoal. In this work, it was designed the protocols for obtaining sterile field-grown grapevine buds and in vitro plant development. This methodology showed potential to produce vigorous and healthy plants in 5 weeks for clonal grapevine propagation. Regenerated plants were successfully established in soil.

  20. Effectiveness of current disinfection procedures against biofilm on contaminated GI endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Neves, Marcelo S; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Ventura, Grasiella M; Côrtes, Patrícia Barbur; Duarte, Rafael Silva; de Souza, Heitor S

    2016-05-01

    Attention to patient safety has increased recently due to outbreaks of nosocomial infections associated with GI endoscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate current cleaning and disinfection procedures of endoscope channels with high bioburden and biofilm analysis, including the use of resistant mycobacteria associated with postsurgical infections in Brazil. Twenty-seven original endoscope channels were contaminated with organic soil containing 10(8) colony-forming units/mL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, or Mycobacterium abscessus subsp bolletii. Biofilms with the same microorganisms were developed on the inner surface of channels with the initial inoculum of 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Channels were reprocessed following current protocol, and samples from cleaning and disinfection steps were analyzed by bioluminescence for adenosine triphosphate, cultures for viable microorganisms, and confocal microscopy. After contamination, adenosine triphosphate levels increased dramatically, and high bacterial growth was observed in all cultures. After cleaning, adenosine triphosphate levels decreased to values comparable to precontamination levels, and bacterial growth was demonstrated in 5 of 27 catheters, 2 with P aeruginosa and 3 with M abscessus. With regard to induced biofilm, a remarkable reduction occurred after cleaning, but significant microbial growth inhibition occurred only after disinfection. Nevertheless, viable microorganisms within the biofilm were still detected by confocal microscopy, more so with glutaraldehyde than with peracetic acid or O-phataladehyde. After the complete disinfection procedure, viable microorganisms could still be detected within the biofilm on endoscope channels. Prevention of biofilm development within endoscope channels should be a priority in disinfection procedures, particularly for ERCP and EUS. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Control of Legionella Contamination and Risk of Corrosion in Hospital Water Networks following Various Disinfection Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ferranti, Greta; Mansi, Antonella; Marcelloni, Anna M.; Proietto, Anna R.; Saini, Navneet; Borella, Paola; Bargellini, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Physical and chemical disinfection methods have been proposed with the aim of controlling Legionella water contamination. To date, the most effective procedures for reducing bacterial contamination have not yet been defined. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effectiveness of various disinfection procedures in order to reduce both culturable and nonculturable (NC) legionellae in different hospital water networks treated with heat, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, and hydrogen peroxide. The temperature levels and biocide concentrations that proved to give reliable results were analyzed. In order to study the possible effects on the water pipes, we verified the extent of corrosion on experimental coupons after applying each method for 6 months. The percentage of positive points was at its lowest after treatment with monochloramine, followed by chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hyperthermia. Different selections of Legionella spp. were observed, as networks treated with chlorine-based disinfectants were contaminated mainly by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, hyperthermia was associated with serogroups 2 to 14, and hydrogen peroxide treatment was associated mainly with non-pneumophila species. NC cells were detected only in heat-treated waters, and also when the temperature was approximately 60°C. The corrosion rates of the coupons were within a satisfactory limit for water networks, but the morphologies differed. We confirm here that chemical disinfection controls Legionella colonization more effectively than hyperthermia does. Monochloramine was the most effective treatment, while hydrogen peroxide may be a promising alternative to chlorine-based disinfectants due to its ability to select for other, less virulent or nonpathogenic species. PMID:26969696

  2. Bacterial population kinetics on hands during 2 consecutive surgical hand disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Günter; Ostermeyer, Christiane; Kohlmann, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Although consecutive surgical hand disinfections is common clinical practice, the effect on the bacterial density on hands has not been studied for all commonly used hand rubs. We studied the effect of 2 consecutive applications of hand rubs on resident bacterial hand flora. A propanol-based hand rub (PBHR; Sterillium) and the reference alcohol (60% n-propanol) were tested in a Latin-square design according to EN 12791. The first application of the PBHR was always for 1.5 minutes; the second application was for 1.5, 1, or 0.5 minutes. The reference alcohol was always applied for 3 minutes. Pre-values and post-values were obtained in accordance with EN 12791. The first reference disinfection reduced the bacterial density by 2.87 log(10) (immediate efficacy) and 2.27 log(10) (after 3 hours). The PBHR yielded a similar reduction. Immediately after the second reference disinfection, bacterial density was reduced by 0.45 log(10). Application of the PBHR yielded greater reductions of 0.71 log(10) (after 0.5 minute), 0.79 log(10) (after 1 minute), and 1.12 log(10) (after 1.5 minutes). The difference between all treatments was not significant (P = .089; Friedman test). After 3 hours, bacterial density was further decreased by 1.11 log(10) (reference disinfection), 1.89 log(10) (PBHR, 1 minute), 1.67 log(10) (PBHR, 1.5 minutes), and 1.08 log(10) (PBHR, 0.5 minute). The difference between all treatments was significant (P = .005), but none of the short treatments with the PBHR was significantly less effective than the reference treatment (P > .05; Wilcoxon-Wilcox test). Overall, a simple 1.5-minute application of a well-formulated PBHR for surgical hand disinfection keeps the bacterial density as low as possible ("irreducible minimum") even in 2 consecutive surgical procedures of 3 hours.

  3. Persistence of Microbial Contamination on Transvaginal Ultrasound Probes despite Low-Level Disinfection Procedure

    PubMed Central

    M'Zali, Fatima; Bounizra, Carole; Leroy, Sandrine; Mekki, Yahia; Quentin-Noury, Claudine; Kann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study In many countries, Low Level Disinfection (LLD) of covered transvaginal ultrasound probes is recommended between patients' examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of LLD under routine conditions on a range of microorganisms. Materials and Methods Samples were taken over a six month period in a private French Radiology Center. 300 specimens derived from endovaginal ultrasound probes were analyzed after disinfection of the probe with wipes impregnated with a quaternary ammonium compound and chlorhexidine. Human papillomavirus (HPV) was sought in the first set of s100 samples, Chlamydia trachomatis and mycoplasmas were searched in the second set of 100 samples, bacteria and fungi in the third 100 set samples. HPV, C. trachomatis and mycoplasmas were detected by PCR amplification. PCR positive samples were subjected to a nuclease treatment before an additional PCR assay to assess the likely viable microorganisms. Bacteria and fungi were investigated by conventional methods. Results A substantial persistence of microorganisms was observed on the disinfected probes: HPV DNA was found on 13% of the samples and 7% in nuclease-resistant form. C. trachomatis DNA was detected on 20% of the probes by primary PCR but only 2% after nuclease treatment, while mycoplasma DNA was amplified in 8% and 4%, respectively. Commensal and/or environmental bacterial flora was present on 86% of the probes, occasionally in mixed culture, and at various levels (10->3000 CFU/probe); Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from 4% of the probes (10-560 CFU/probe). No fungi were isolated. Conclusion Our findings raise concerns about the efficacy of impregnated towels as a sole mean for disinfection of ultrasound probes. Although the ultrasound probes are used with disposable covers, our results highlight the potential risk of cross contamination between patients during ultrasound examination and emphasize the need for reviewing the disinfection

  4. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  5. Anthrax blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Anthrax serology test; Antibody test for anthrax; Serologic test for B anthracis ... A normal result means no antibodies to the anthrax bacteria were seen in your blood sample. However, during the early stages of infection, your body may only ...

  6. 9 CFR 310.9 - Anthrax; carcasses not to be eviscerated; disposition of affected carcasses; hides, hoofs, horns...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anthrax; carcasses not to be...-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.9 Anthrax; carcasses not to be eviscerated; disposition of affected carcasses...; general cleanup and disinfection. (a) Carcasses found before evisceration to be affected with anthrax...

  7. In vitro study on the disinfectability of two split-septum needle-free connection devices using different disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, Steffen; Exner, Martin; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the external disinfection of two needle-free connection devices (NFC) using Octeniderm(®) (spraying and wiping technique) vs. Descoderm(®) pads (wiping technique). The split-septum membrane of the NFC was contaminated with >10(5) CFU K. pneumoniae or S. epidermidis. The efficacy of the disinfection at 30 sec. exposure time was controlled by taking a swab sample and by flushing the NFC with sterile 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Disinfection with octenidine dihydrochloride 0.1 g, 1-Propanol 30.0 g, and 2-Propanol 45.0 g in 100 g solution was highly effective (CFU reduction ≥4 log) against both microorganisms, whereas the use of 63.1 g 2-Propanol in 100 ml solution led to residual contamination with S. epidermidis. Our investigation underlines that (i) in clinical practice disinfection of NFCs before use is mandatory, and that (ii) details of disinfection technique are of utmost importance regarding their efficacy. Our investigation revealed no significant differences between both split-septum NFC types. Clinical studies are needed to confirm a possible superiority of disinfectants with long-lasting residual antimicrobial activity.

  8. In vitro study on the disinfectability of two split-septum needle-free connection devices using different disinfection procedures

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Steffen; Exner, Martin; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the external disinfection of two needle-free connection devices (NFC) using Octeniderm® (spraying and wiping technique) vs. Descoderm® pads (wiping technique). The split-septum membrane of the NFC was contaminated with >105 CFU K. pneumoniae or S. epidermidis. The efficacy of the disinfection at 30 sec. exposure time was controlled by taking a swab sample and by flushing the NFC with sterile 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Disinfection with octenidine dihydrochloride 0.1 g, 1-Propanol 30.0 g, and 2-Propanol 45.0 g in 100 g solution was highly effective (CFU reduction ≥4 log) against both microorganisms, whereas the use of 63.1 g 2-Propanol in 100 ml solution led to residual contamination with S. epidermidis. Our investigation underlines that (i) in clinical practice disinfection of NFCs before use is mandatory, and that (ii) details of disinfection technique are of utmost importance regarding their efficacy. Our investigation revealed no significant differences between both split-septum NFC types. Clinical studies are needed to confirm a possible superiority of disinfectants with long-lasting residual antimicrobial activity. PMID:26693394

  9. [Efficient killing of anthrax spores using aqueous and alcoholic peracetic acid solutions].

    PubMed

    Nattermann, H; Becker, S; Jacob, D; Klee, S R; Schwebke, I; Appel, B

    2005-08-01

    We analysed the sporicidal effect of different concentrations of aqueous and alcoholic peracetic acid (PAA) solutions on anthrax spores in suspension and germ carrier tests. In activation of anthrax spores in suspension assays was achieved in less than 2 min using 1% PAA solution and in less than 3 min using 0.5% PAA solution, respectively. In contrast, in germ carrier as says, a test under practical conditions, spores on 38% of the germ carriers survived treatment with 1% PAA solution for 15 min. The use of PAA in 80% ethyl alcohol outclassed the sporicidal effect of aqueous PAA solutions in both suspension and germ carrier assays. Anthrax spores on 14% of germ carriers tested survived 30 min of treatment with a 1% aqueous PAA solution. In contrast anthrax spores were reliably inactivated under the same test procedure using a 1% alcoholic PAA solution for 30 min. The proven enhancement of the sporicidal effect of alcoholic PAA solutions should be kept in mind when using disinfectants in practice. In further surveys we will optimise the test conditions.

  10. Human anthrax as a re-emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Mehmet; Demiraslan, Hayati

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is primarily a disease of herbivores and the etiological agent is B. anthracis which is a gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming, and rod shaped bacterium. Bacillus anthracis spores are highly resistant to heat, pressure, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, chemical agents and disinfectants. For these reasons, B. anthracis spores are an attractive choice as biological agents for the use of bioweapon and/or bioterrorism. Soil is the main reservoir for the infectious agent. The disease most commonly affects wild and domestic mammals. Human are secondarily infected by contact with infected animals and contaminated animal products or directly expose to B. anthracis spores. Anthrax occurs worldwide. This infection is still endemic or hyperendemic in both animals and humans in some part of areas of the world; particularly in Middle East, West Africa, Central Asia, some part of India, South America. However, some countries are claiming free of anthrax, and anthrax has become a re-emerging disease in western countries with the intentional outbreak. Currently, anthrax is classified according to its setting as (1) naturally occurring anthrax, (2) bioterrorism-related anthrax. Vast majority of human anthrax are occurring as naturally occurring anthrax in the world. It is also a threaten disease for western countries. The aim of this paper is to review the relevant patents, short historical perspective, microbiological and epidemiological features, clinical presentations and treatment.

  11. Effects of disinfectant fogging procedure on dust, ammonia concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores in a farrowing-weaning room.

    PubMed

    Costa, Annamaria; Colosio, Claudio; Gusmara, Claudia; Sala, Vittorio; Guarino, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, large-scale swine production has led to intensive rearing systems in which air quality can be easily degraded by aerial contaminants that can pose a health risk to the pigs and farm workers. This study evaluated the effects of fogging disinfectant procedure on productive performance, ammonia and dust concentration, aerobic bacteria and fungal spores spreading in the farrowing-weaning room. This trial was conducted in 2 identical farrowing-weaning rooms of a piggery. In both rooms, 30 pregnant sows were lodged in individual cages. At 75 days of age, the piglets were moved to the fattening room. In the treated room, with the birth of the first suckling-pig, the fogging disinfection with diluted Virkon S was applied once a day in the experimental room per 15 minutes at 11:00. The fogging disinfectant treatment was switched between rooms at the end of the first trial period. Temperature, relative humidity, dust (TSP-RF fractions and number of particles), ammonia concentration and aerial contaminants (enterococci, Micrococcaeae and fungal spores) were monitored in both rooms. Ammonia concentration reduction induced by fogging disinfection was estimated 18%, total suspended particles and the respirable fraction were significantly lower in the experimental room. Fungal spores resulted in a significant reduction by the fogging procedure, together with dust respirable fraction and fine particulate matter abatement. The fogging disinfection procedure improved air quality in the piggery, thereby enhancing workers and animals health.

  12. Thermal contribution to the inactivation of Cryptosporidium in plastic bottles during solar water disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fontán-Sainz, María; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    To determine the thermal contribution, independent of ultraviolet radiation, on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum during solar water disinfection procedures (SODIS), oocysts were exposed for 4, 8, and 12 hours to temperatures recorded in polyethylene terephthalate bottles in previous SODIS studies carried out under field conditions. Inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide, spontaneous excystation, and infectivity studies were used to determine the inactivation of oocysts. There was a significant increase in the percentage of oocysts that took up propidium iodide and in the number of oocysts that excysted spontaneously. There was also a significant decrease in the intensity of infection elicited in suckling mice at the end of all exposure times. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of temperature in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts during application of SODIS under natural conditions.

  13. Thermal Contribution to the Inactivation of Cryptosporidium in Plastic Bottles during Solar Water Disinfection Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fontán-Sainz, María; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    To determine the thermal contribution, independent of ultraviolet radiation, on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum during solar water disinfection procedures (SODIS), oocysts were exposed for 4, 8, and 12 hours to temperatures recorded in polyethylene terephthalate bottles in previous SODIS studies carried out under field conditions. Inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide, spontaneous excystation, and infectivity studies were used to determine the inactivation of oocysts. There was a significant increase in the percentage of oocysts that took up propidium iodide and in the number of oocysts that excysted spontaneously. There was also a significant decrease in the intensity of infection elicited in suckling mice at the end of all exposure times. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of temperature in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts during application of SODIS under natural conditions. PMID:20064992

  14. Disinfection procedures: their efficacy and effect on dimensional accuracy and surface quality of an irreversible hydrocolloid impression material.

    PubMed

    Rentzia, A; Coleman, D C; O'Donnell, M J; Dowling, A H; O'Sullivan, M

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial efficacy and effect of 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde (Cidex OPA(®)) and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the dimensional accuracy and surface quality of gypsum casts retrieved from an irreversible hydrocolloid impression material. A simulated clinical cast and technique was developed to compare the dimensional accuracy and surface quality changes of the test gypsum casts with controls. Dimensional accuracy measurements were completed between fixed points using a travelling microscope under low angle illumination at a magnification of ×3. Surface quality changes of "smooth" and "rough" areas on the cast were evaluated by means of optical profilometry. The efficacy of the disinfection procedures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by determining the number of colony forming units (cfu) recovered after disinfection of alginate discs inoculated with 1×10⁶cfu for defined intervals. The dimensional accuracy of the gypsum casts was not significantly affected by the disinfection protocols. Neither disinfectant solution nor immersion time had an effect on the surface roughness of the "smooth" area on the cast, however, a significant increase in surface roughness was observed with increasing immersion time for the "rough" surface. Complete elimination of viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells from alginate discs was obtained after 30 and 120 s immersion in Cidex OPA(®) and NaOCl, respectively. Immersion of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions in Cidex OPA(®) for 30 s was proved to be the most effective disinfection procedure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithers, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The microbial ecology facility in the Analytical and Physical Chemistry Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is tasked with anticipation of potential microbial problems (and opportunities to exploit microorganisms) which may occur in partially closed systems such as space station/vehicles habitats and in water reclamation systems therein, with particular emphasis on the degradation of materials. Within this context, procedures for microbial biofilm research are being developed. Reported here is the development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species. Preliminary investigations have been completed. As procedures are refined, it will be possible to focus more closely on the elucidation of biofilm phenomena.

  16. [Evaluation of efficacy of selected antiseptics for hands disinfection before surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Leksowski, K; Jasiński, A; Marszałek, A

    2001-08-01

    The most important in surgical hands washing and disinfections is long-term and effective reduction of bacteria number. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of some antiseptic fluids used for surgical hands disinfection's (AHD 2000, Biotensid, Manopronto and Medi-Scrub PVP Iodine). 62 doctors and surgical nurses were examined. The material for the bacteriological examination was collected before and after hands disinfection's. The bacterial flora reduction have been presented as a percent and a logarithmic reduction ratio. All estimated antiseptic fluids were very potent and provided prolonged efficiency when the operation team complied with orders of hands washing.

  17. Elimination of volatile chemicals in disinfectant evaluation procedures by freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Quinn, P J; Scanlon, M P

    2000-09-01

    Standard methods for the removal or inactivation of disinfectants from reaction mixtures are often unsatisfactory when dealing with high concentrations of particulate organic matter. A method employing freeze drying was developed to eliminate residual disinfectant activity from reaction mixtures. Following the addition of volatile chemicals to sterilized cattle slurry, samples were removed from the mixture, freeze dried, and the dried material was reconstituted with diluent containing Escherichia coli as the test micro-organism to determine if the volatile chemicals had been removed. Twelve chemicals and one commercial disinfectant (Virkon S) were evaluated at different concentrations. The chemicals selected were acetone, ammonium hydroxide, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, dichloromethane, ethyl alcohol, formalin, hydrogen peroxide, isopropyl alcohol, peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite and xylene. Eight chemicals, acetone, ammonium hydroxide, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, dichloromethane, ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and xylene were removed by freeze drying. The remaining four chemicals and the commercial disinfectant, which were not removed by freeze drying, could not be evaluated by this method.

  18. Centers for disease control and prevention expert panel meetings on prevention and treatment of anthrax in adults.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Katherine A; Wright, Mary E; Shadomy, Sean V; Bradley, John S; Morrow, Meredith G; Pavia, Andy T; Rubinstein, Ethan; Holty, Jon-Erik C; Messonnier, Nancy E; Smith, Theresa L; Pesik, Nicki; Treadwell, Tracee A; Bower, William A

    2014-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened panels of anthrax experts to review and update guidelines for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis and treatment. The panels included civilian and military anthrax experts and clinicians with experience treating anthrax patients. Specialties represented included internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, infectious disease, emergency medicine, critical care, pulmonology, hematology, and nephrology. Panelists discussed recent patients with systemic anthrax; reviews of published, unpublished, and proprietary data regarding antimicrobial drugs and anthrax antitoxins; and critical care measures of potential benefit to patients with anthrax. This article updates antimicrobial postexposure prophylaxis and antimicrobial and antitoxin treatment options and describes potentially beneficial critical care measures for persons with anthrax, including clinical procedures for infected nonpregnant adults. Changes from previous guidelines include an expanded discussion of critical care and clinical procedures and additional antimicrobial choices, including preferred antimicrobial drug treatment for possible anthrax meningitis.

  19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Expert Panel Meetings on Prevention and Treatment of Anthrax in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Katherine A.; Wright, Mary E.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Bradley, John S.; Morrow, Meredith G.; Pavia, Andy T.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Holty, Jon-Erik C.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Smith, Theresa L.; Pesik, Nicki; Treadwell, Tracee A.

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened panels of anthrax experts to review and update guidelines for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis and treatment. The panels included civilian and military anthrax experts and clinicians with experience treating anthrax patients. Specialties represented included internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, infectious disease, emergency medicine, critical care, pulmonology, hematology, and nephrology. Panelists discussed recent patients with systemic anthrax; reviews of published, unpublished, and proprietary data regarding antimicrobial drugs and anthrax antitoxins; and critical care measures of potential benefit to patients with anthrax. This article updates antimicrobial postexposure prophylaxis and antimicrobial and antitoxin treatment options and describes potentially beneficial critical care measures for persons with anthrax, including clinical procedures for infected nonpregnant adults. Changes from previous guidelines include an expanded discussion of critical care and clinical procedures and additional antimicrobial choices, including preferred antimicrobial drug treatment for possible anthrax meningitis. PMID:24447897

  20. Anthrax: an update

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, SM; Rashid, AKM M; Bakar, MA; Ahad, MA

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. It is potentially fatal and highly contagious disease. Herbivores are the natural host. Human acquire the disease incidentally by contact with infected animal or animal products. In the 18th century an epidemic destroyed approximately half of the sheep in Europe. In 1900 human inhalational anthrax occured sporadically in the United States. In 1979 an outbreak of human anthrax occured in Sverdlovsk of Soviet Union. Anthrax continued to represent a world wide presence. The incidence of the disease has decreased in developed countries as a result of vaccination and improved industrial hygiene. Human anthrax clinically presents in three forms, i.e. cutaneous, gastrointestinal and inhalational. About 95% of human anthrax is cutaneous and 5% is inhalational. Gastrointestinal anthrax is very rare (less than 1%). Inhalational form is used as a biological warefare agent. Penicillin, ciprofloxacin (and other quinolones), doxicyclin, ampicillin, imipenem, clindamycin, clarithromycin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin are effective antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy for 60 days is recommended. Human anthrax vaccine is available. Administration of anti-protective antigen (PA) antibody in combination with ciprofloxacin produced 90%-100% survival. The combination of CPG-adjuvanted anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) plus dalbavancin significantly improved survival. PMID:23569822

  1. Anthrax control and research, with special reference to national programme development in Africa: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of anthrax in both animal and human populations has been increasing in Africa. It was therefore appropriate for this WHO meeting to be convened in an endemic area of the Western Province of Zambia in 1992. The participants reviewed anthrax epidemiology and control in some African countries, elaborated national anthrax control and research programmes in Africa, discussed international cooperation and work plans, and elaborated recommendations for anthrax control in Africa. The discussions centred on anthrax surveillance and reporting systems, diagnosis, vaccine production and immunization, disinfection and decontamination, carcass disposal, treatment of human cases, health systems, as well as intersectorial cooperation between public health services, veterinary services and other services such as wildlife conservation, so that national control programmes could take full account of the conditions prevailing in epidemic situations in Africa. The recommendations are applicable in other regions where anthrax poses similar problems in public, animal and environmental health.

  2. ANTHRAX REMEDIATION RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has initiated a research program to respond to the immediate needs arising from the recent Bacillus anthracis bioterrorism events. Although the program has a strong emphasis on anthrax, other pathogens and chemical agents, including toxic indu...

  3. ANTHRAX REMEDIATION RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has initiated a research program to respond to the immediate needs arising from the recent Bacillus anthracis bioterrorism events. Although the program has a strong emphasis on anthrax, other pathogens and chemical agents, including toxic indu...

  4. Anthrax and the inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Sastalla, Inka; Leppla, Stephen H

    2012-05-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), a major virulence determinant of anthrax disease, induces vascular collapse in mice and rats. LT activates the Nlrp1 inflammasome in macrophages and dendritic cells, resulting in caspase-1 activation, IL-1β and IL-18 maturation and a rapid cell death (pyroptosis). This review presents the current understanding of LT-induced activation of Nlrp1 in cells and its consequences for toxin-mediated effects in rodent toxin and spore challenge models.

  5. Targeted Silencing of Anthrax Toxin Receptors Protects against Anthrax Toxins*

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo, Maria T.; Navarro, Ashley; Arico, Chenoa D.; Li, Junwei; Alkhatib, Omar; Chen, Shan; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax spores can be aerosolized and dispersed as a bioweapon. Current postexposure treatments are inadequate at later stages of infection, when high levels of anthrax toxins are present. Anthrax toxins enter cells via two identified anthrax toxin receptors: tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2). We hypothesized that host cells would be protected from anthrax toxins if anthrax toxin receptor expression was effectively silenced using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Thus, anthrax toxin receptors in mouse and human macrophages were silenced using targeted siRNAs or blocked with specific antibody prior to challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Viability assays were used to assess protection in macrophages treated with specific siRNA or antibody as compared with untreated cells. Silencing CMG2 using targeted siRNAs provided almost complete protection against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cytotoxicity and death in murine and human macrophages. The same results were obtained by prebinding cells with specific antibody prior to treatment with anthrax lethal toxin. In addition, TEM8-targeted siRNAs also offered significant protection against lethal toxin in human macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, silencing CMG2, TEM8, or both receptors in combination was also protective against MEK2 cleavage by lethal toxin or adenylyl cyclase activity by edema toxin in human kidney cells. Thus, anthrax toxin receptor-targeted RNAi has the potential to be developed as a life-saving, postexposure therapy against anthrax. PMID:24742682

  6. Targeted silencing of anthrax toxin receptors protects against anthrax toxins.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Maria T; Navarro, Ashley; Arico, Chenoa D; Li, Junwei; Alkhatib, Omar; Chen, Shan; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-05-30

    Anthrax spores can be aerosolized and dispersed as a bioweapon. Current postexposure treatments are inadequate at later stages of infection, when high levels of anthrax toxins are present. Anthrax toxins enter cells via two identified anthrax toxin receptors: tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2). We hypothesized that host cells would be protected from anthrax toxins if anthrax toxin receptor expression was effectively silenced using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Thus, anthrax toxin receptors in mouse and human macrophages were silenced using targeted siRNAs or blocked with specific antibody prior to challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Viability assays were used to assess protection in macrophages treated with specific siRNA or antibody as compared with untreated cells. Silencing CMG2 using targeted siRNAs provided almost complete protection against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cytotoxicity and death in murine and human macrophages. The same results were obtained by prebinding cells with specific antibody prior to treatment with anthrax lethal toxin. In addition, TEM8-targeted siRNAs also offered significant protection against lethal toxin in human macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, silencing CMG2, TEM8, or both receptors in combination was also protective against MEK2 cleavage by lethal toxin or adenylyl cyclase activity by edema toxin in human kidney cells. Thus, anthrax toxin receptor-targeted RNAi has the potential to be developed as a life-saving, postexposure therapy against anthrax.

  7. Comparison of antimicrobial activities and compressive strength of alginate impression materials following disinfection procedure.

    PubMed

    Alwahab, Zahraa

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of disinfecting solution when incorporated into alginate powder instead of water against some microorganisms and on compressive strength of alginate. For measuring antimicrobial activity of alginate, 60 alginate specimens were prepared and divided into two groups: One with water incorporated in the mix (control) and the other with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate incorporated in the mix instead of water. The tested microorganisms were: gram +ve cocci, gram -ve bacilli and yeast (each group 10 samples). For measuring compressive strength, 20 specimens of alginate were divided into two groups: One with water incorporated in the mix (control) and the other with chlorhexidine incorporated in the mix. The statistical analysis of antimicrobial efficacy of alginate was performed with Mann-Whitney U-test, which revealed very high significant difference when comparing among groups (p < 0.000). Student t-test analyzed the compressive strength data which revealed nonsignificant difference between groups (p > 0.05). The incorporation of disinfecting agents into impression materials could serve an important role in dental laboratory infection control and it had no adverse effect on compressive strength of the hydrocolloid alginate. The risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms to dental laboratories via impression has been considered a topic of importance for a number of years.

  8. Disinfection of wastewater by hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid: development of procedures for measurement of residual disinfectant and application to a physicochemically treated municipal effluent.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Monika; Brumelis, Daina; Gehr, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    The Montreal Urban Community Wastewater Treatment Plant (MUCWTP) located in Montreal. Quebec, Canada, uses physicochemical treatment processes prior to discharging wastewater into the St. Lawrence River via an outfall tunnel of 2 hours retention time. Although chlorination facilities exist, they are not being used, and the MUCWTP is seeking alternative methods for disinfection to achieve a 2- to 3-log fecal coliform reduction. Liquid chemical disinfectants were attractive options because of their low capital costs. This led to an investigation of the feasibility of using hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid. A method for measuring peroxycompounds (hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid plus hydrogen peroxide) was developed using the peroxidase-based oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfuric acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide. The validity of the method was confirmed using effluent from the MUCWTP. Recovery was higher than 90% for peracetic acid levels as low as 1.0 mg/L. Quenching of hydrogen peroxide was achieved with 50-mg/L catalase; quenching of peracetic acid was achieved with 100 mg/L of sodium thiosulfate, followed by 50 mg/L of catalase. Batch disinfection tests were conducted on MUCWTP effluent. Hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in wastewater over time could be modeled as a second-order decay, with the decay "constant" being a function of the initial concentration of peroxycompounds. This function was the same for both hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, possibly indicating similar decomposition pathways in wastewater matrices. Disinfection was modeled using a modified Hom equation. Required doses of hydrogen peroxide to reach the target fecal coliform levels ranged from 106 to 285 mg/L, with the higher doses occurring when ferric chloride instead of alum was used as the coagulant. Hence, hydrogen peroxide was infeasible as a disinfectant for this application. On the other hand, the peracetic acid dose needed to

  9. A 1-minute hand wash does not impair the efficacy of a propanol-based hand rub in two consecutive surgical hand disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Ostermeyer, C

    2009-11-01

    We studied the effect of a 1-min hand wash on the bacterial hand flora in two consecutive surgical hand disinfection procedures. A propanol-based hand rub (PBHR; Sterillium) and n-propanol (60%, v/v) were tested in a Latin-square design according to EN 12791 in four variations. The reference alcohol was always applied for 3 min after a 1-min hand wash (variation 1). The PBHR was applied for 1.5 min (first application) or 0.5 min (second application). Variation 2 included a 1-min hand wash before both applications, variation 3 included the hand wash before application 1, in variation 4 hands were not washed at all before application. Pre- and post-values were obtained according to EN 12791. The reference disinfection reduced bacteria by 2.99 log(10) (immediate efficacy) and 2.22 log(10) after 3 h. The second reference disinfection reduced bacteria by 0.95 log(10) (immediate efficacy) and 0.68 log(10) after 3 h. The PBHR always yielded an equivalent reduction with and without a preceding hand wash (p > 0.05; Friedman test). A 1-min hand wash before application of the PBHR did not significantly change its efficacy for surgical hand disinfection in two consecutive surgical procedures of 3 h.

  10. Comparison of sampling procedures and microbiological and non-microbiological parameters to evaluate cleaning and disinfection in broiler houses.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, K; Dewulf, J; Van Weyenberg, S; Herman, L; Zoons, J; Vervaet, E; Heyndrickx, M; De Reu, K

    2015-04-01

    Cleaning and disinfection of the broiler stable environment is an essential part of farm hygiene management. Adequate cleaning and disinfection is essential for prevention and control of animal diseases and zoonoses. The goal of this study was to shed light on the dynamics of microbiological and non-microbiological parameters during the successive steps of cleaning and disinfection and to select the most suitable sampling methods and parameters to evaluate cleaning and disinfection in broiler houses. The effectiveness of cleaning and disinfection protocols was measured in six broiler houses on two farms through visual inspection, adenosine triphosphate hygiene monitoring and microbiological analyses. Samples were taken at three time points: 1) before cleaning, 2) after cleaning, and 3) after disinfection. Before cleaning and after disinfection, air samples were taken in addition to agar contact plates and swab samples taken from various sampling points for enumeration of total aerobic flora, Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia coli and the detection of E. coli and Salmonella. After cleaning, air samples, swab samples, and adenosine triphosphate swabs were taken and a visual score was also assigned for each sampling point. The mean total aerobic flora determined by swab samples decreased from 7.7±1.4 to 5.7±1.2 log CFU/625 cm2 after cleaning and to 4.2±1.6 log CFU/625 cm2 after disinfection. Agar contact plates were used as the standard for evaluating cleaning and disinfection, but in this study they were found to be less suitable than swabs for enumeration. In addition to measuring total aerobic flora, Enterococcus spp. seemed to be a better hygiene indicator to evaluate cleaning and disinfection protocols than E. coli. All stables were Salmonella negative, but the detection of its indicator organism E. coli provided additional information for evaluating cleaning and disinfection protocols. Adenosine triphosphate analyses gave additional information about the

  11. Heroin-associated anthrax with minimal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Black, Heather; Chapman, Ann; Inverarity, Donald; Sinha, Satyajit

    2017-03-08

    In 2010, during an outbreak of anthrax affecting people who inject drugs, a heroin user aged 37 years presented with soft tissue infection. He subsequently was found to have anthrax. We describe his management and the difficulty in distinguishing anthrax from non-anthrax lesions. His full recovery, despite an overall mortality of 30% for injectional anthrax, demonstrates that some heroin-related anthrax cases can be managed predominately with oral antibiotics and minimal surgical intervention. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Anthrax lethal and edema toxins in anthrax pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiological effects resulting from many bacterial diseases are caused by exotoxins released by the bacteria. Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming bacterium, is such a pathogen, causing anthrax through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. B. anthracis causes natural infection in humans and animals and has been a top bioterrorism concern since the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA. The exotoxins secreted by B. anthracis use CMG2 as the major toxin receptor and play essential roles in pathogenesis during the entire course of the disease. This review focuses on the activities of anthrax toxins and their roles in initial and late stages of anthrax infection. PMID:24684968

  13. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  14. Pediatric anthrax clinical management.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John S; Peacock, Georgina; Krug, Steven E; Bower, William A; Cohn, Amanda C; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Pavia, Andrew T

    2014-05-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which has multiple routes of infection in humans, manifesting in different initial presentations of disease. Because B anthracis has the potential to be used as a biological weapon and can rapidly progress to systemic anthrax with high mortality in those who are exposed and untreated, clinical guidance that can be quickly implemented must be in place before any intentional release of the agent. This document provides clinical guidance for the prophylaxis and treatment of neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21 (referred to as "children") in the event of a deliberate B anthracis release and offers guidance in areas where the unique characteristics of children dictate a different clinical recommendation from adults. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Pediatric Anthrax Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John S.; Peacock, Georgina; Krug, Steven E.; Bower, William A.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Pavia, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which has multiple routes of infection in humans, manifesting in different initial presentations of disease. Because B anthracis has the potential to be used as a biological weapon and can rapidly progress to systemic anthrax with high mortality in those who are exposed and untreated, clinical guidance that can be quickly implemented must be in place before any intentional release of the agent. This document provides clinical guidance for the prophylaxis and treatment of neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21 (referred to as “children”) in the event of a deliberate B anthracis release and offers guidance in areas where the unique characteristics of children dictate a different clinical recommendation from adults. PMID:24777226

  16. Possible overestimation of surface disinfection efficiency by assessment methods based on liquid sampling procedures as demonstrated by in situ quantification of spore viability.

    PubMed

    Grand, I; Bellon-Fontaine, M-N; Herry, J-M; Hilaire, D; Moriconi, F-X; Naïtali, M

    2011-09-01

    The standard test methods used to assess the efficiency of a disinfectant applied to surfaces are often based on counting the microbial survivors sampled in a liquid, but total cell removal from surfaces is seldom achieved. One might therefore wonder whether evaluations of microbial survivors in liquid-sampled cells are representative of the levels of survivors in whole populations. The present study was thus designed to determine the "damaged/undamaged" status induced by a peracetic acid disinfection for Bacillus atrophaeus spores deposited on glass coupons directly on this substrate and to compare it to the status of spores collected in liquid by a sampling procedure. The method utilized to assess the viability of both surface-associated and liquid-sampled spores included fluorescence labeling with a combination of Syto 61 and Chemchrome V6 dyes and quantifications by analyzing the images acquired by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The principal result of the study was that the viability of spores sampled in the liquid was found to be poorer than that of surface-associated spores. For example, after 2 min of peracetic acid disinfection, less than 17% ± 5% of viable cells were detected among liquid-sampled cells compared to 79% ± 5% or 47% ± 4%, respectively, when the viability was evaluated on the surface after or without the sampling procedure. Moreover, assessments of the survivors collected in the liquid phase, evaluated using the microscopic method and standard plate counts, were well correlated. Evaluations based on the determination of survivors among the liquid-sampled cells can thus overestimate the efficiency of surface disinfection procedures.

  17. Anthrax Spores under a microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax spores are inactive forms of Bacillus anthracis. They can survive for decades inside a spore's tough protective coating; they become active when inhaled by humans. A result of NASA- and industry-sponsored research to develop small greenhouses for space research is the unique AiroCide TiO2 system that kills anthrax spores and other pathogens.

  18. Anthrax Spores under a microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax spores are inactive forms of Bacillus anthracis. They can survive for decades inside a spore's tough protective coating; they become active when inhaled by humans. A result of NASA- and industry-sponsored research to develop small greenhouses for space research is the unique AiroCide TiO2 system that kills anthrax spores and other pathogens.

  19. Three eyelid localized cutaneous anthrax cases.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Oktay; Karadag, Remzi; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Gultepe, Bilge; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2014-12-01

    Anthrax is primarily seen in the developing countries, but it can be a worldwide medical concern due to bioterrorism threats. Palpebral anthrax is a rare form of cutaneous anthrax. Untreated cutaneous anthrax can be lethal. Patients with palpebral anthrax can develop complications including cicatrisation and ectropion. Thus, anthrax should be considered in differential diagnosis for patients presenting with preseptal cellulitis in high-risk regions. Herein, we report three anthrax cases (with different age) involving eyelids that were cured without any complications due to early diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Antimicrobial disinfection effect of a laundering procedure for hospital textiles against various indicator bacteria and fungi using different substrates for simulating human excrements.

    PubMed

    Fijan, S; Koren, S; Cencic, A; Sostar-Turk, S

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies confirm the increase of nosocomial infections and microbial resistance. One of the possible causes is infected textiles due to inappropriate laundering procedures. Most Slovenian laundries use thermal laundering procedures with high energy and water consumption to disinfect hospital textiles. In addition to this fact, there is an increasing number of hospital textiles composed of cotton/polyester blends that cannot endure high temperatures of thermal disinfection. On the other hand, decreasing the temperature of laundering procedures enhances the possibility of pathogenic microorganisms to survive the laundering procedure. In our research, we determined the antimicrobic laundering effect by simulating a common laundering procedure for hospital textiles in the laboratory washing machine at different temperatures by the use of bioindicators. Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium terrae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for determining the antibacterial laundering effect. Candida albicans was used for determining the antifungal laundering effect. Swine blood, artificial sweat, and swine fat were used as substrates for simulating human excrements and were inoculated together with the chosen microorganisms onto cotton pieces to simulate real laundering conditions. It was found that E. faecium, S. aureus, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa survived at 60 degrees C, but no microorganisms were found at 75 degrees C.

  1. Anthrax lethal and edema toxins in anthrax pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiological effects resulting from many bacterial diseases are caused by exotoxins released by the bacteria. Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming bacterium, is such a pathogen, causing anthrax through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. B. anthracis causes natural infection in humans and animals and has been a top bioterrorism concern since the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA. The exotoxins secreted by B. anthracis use capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) as the major toxin receptor and play essential roles in pathogenesis during the entire course of the disease. This review focuses on the activities of anthrax toxins and their roles in initial and late stages of anthrax infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. 9 CFR 310.9 - Anthrax; carcasses not to be eviscerated; disposition of affected carcasses; hides, hoofs, horns...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; handling of blood and scalding vat water; general cleanup and disinfection. 310.9 Section 310.9 Animals and...; hides, hoofs, horns, hair, viscera and contents, and fat; handling of blood and scalding vat water... scalding vat water through which hog carcasses affected with anthrax have passed shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 310.9 - Anthrax; carcasses not to be eviscerated; disposition of affected carcasses; hides, hoofs, horns...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; handling of blood and scalding vat water; general cleanup and disinfection. 310.9 Section 310.9 Animals and...; hides, hoofs, horns, hair, viscera and contents, and fat; handling of blood and scalding vat water... scalding vat water through which hog carcasses affected with anthrax have passed shall be...

  4. 9 CFR 310.9 - Anthrax; carcasses not to be eviscerated; disposition of affected carcasses; hides, hoofs, horns...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; handling of blood and scalding vat water; general cleanup and disinfection. 310.9 Section 310.9 Animals and...; hides, hoofs, horns, hair, viscera and contents, and fat; handling of blood and scalding vat water... scalding vat water through which hog carcasses affected with anthrax have passed shall be...

  5. Application of automated thermal disinfection instead of sterilisation procedures for treatment of rotating dental instruments: efficacy against viruses?

    PubMed

    Rabenau, H F; Nentwig, G H; Doerr, H W

    1997-08-01

    In dentistry it is of primary importance to take into consideration microbial transfer due to the nature of the construction of rotating dental instruments. This aspect was the starting point for our research with the question whether or not sterilisation is fundamentally necessary for slow and high speed hand pieces to make them "safe" out of a virological point of view, or whether a thermal disinfection could also possibly be adequate for this purpose. In this context, we tested the efficiency of the cleaning and disinfection capacity of an automated steam disinfection and sterilisation unit (Sirona Hygiene Center, Siemens, AG, Bensheim) intended to the hygienic treatment of dental instruments with respect to viruses. In model tests the corresponding instruments were experimentally infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) and simian vacuoling virus (SV40). As indicator systems we used for both cell cultures (measurement of the degree of infectiosity) and (for HSV) polymerase chain reactions (PCR; determination of viral nucleic acids). In the tests for (residual) infectiosity after thermal disinfection (as an isolated step of the Hygienic Centre) and also for a combination of cleaning and subsequent thermal disinfection (also after protein application), no infectious virus could be found in the interior of the slow handpieces and turbines tested. In opposite to this, infectious HSV and SV40 could be found after completion of every isolated cleaning program in the turbine (in all three ducts) and in the slow handpiece (only in the gearbox duct in the case of HSV, and in the case of SV40 also in the water and air ducts in very small amounts). The PCR analyses showed that no nucleic acids could be found in both instruments (in the air and water ducts) following a practice-relevant combination of cleaning and disinfection, but that PCR-positive signals were obtained for the larger-volume gearbox and drive and return air ducts in 1 or 2 of 3 test samples. The

  6. Anthrax receptors position the spindle.

    PubMed

    Minc, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Spindle orientation plays a pivotal role in tissue morphogenesis. An asymmetric anthrax receptor cap is revealed to promote activation of a formin to orient the spindle along the planar cell polarity (PCP) axis in zebrafish dorsal epiblast cells.

  7. Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Christine M; Hendricks, Kate; Bower, William A; Shadomy, Sean V; Hupert, Nathaniel

    2017-05-01

    During the First World War, anthrax cases in the United States and England increased greatly and seemed to be associated with use of new shaving brushes. Further investigation revealed that the source material and origin of shaving brushes had changed during the war. Cheap brushes of imported horsehair were being made to look like the preferred badger-hair brushes. Unfortunately, some of these brushes were not effectively disinfected and brought with them a nasty stowaway: Bacillus anthracis. A review of outbreak summaries, surveillance data, and case reports indicated that these cases originated from the use of ineffectively disinfected animal-hair shaving brushes. This historical information is relevant to current public health practice because renewed interest in vintage and animal-hair shaving brushes has been seen in popular culture. This information should help healthcare providers and public health officials answer questions on this topic.

  8. Anthrax lethal factor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shoop, W L; Xiong, Y; Wiltsie, J; Woods, A; Guo, J; Pivnichny, J V; Felcetto, T; Michael, B F; Bansal, A; Cummings, R T; Cunningham, B R; Friedlander, A M; Douglas, C M; Patel, S B; Wisniewski, D; Scapin, G; Salowe, S P; Zaller, D M; Chapman, K T; Scolnick, E M; Schmatz, D M; Bartizal, K; MacCoss, M; Hermes, J D

    2005-05-31

    The primary virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis is a secreted zinc-dependent metalloprotease toxin known as lethal factor (LF) that is lethal to the host through disruption of signaling pathways, cell destruction, and circulatory shock. Inhibition of this proteolytic-based LF toxemia could be expected to provide therapeutic value in combination with an antibiotic during and immediately after an active anthrax infection. Herein is shown the crystal structure of an intimate complex between a hydroxamate, (2R)-2-[(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)sulfonylamino]-N-hydroxy-2-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)acetamide, and LF at the LF-active site. Most importantly, this molecular interaction between the hydroxamate and the LF active site resulted in (i) inhibited LF protease activity in an enzyme assay and protected macrophages against recombinant LF and protective antigen in a cell-based assay, (ii) 100% protection in a lethal mouse toxemia model against recombinant LF and protective antigen, (iii) approximately 50% survival advantage to mice given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Sterne vegetative cells and to rabbits given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Ames spores and doubled the mean time to death in those that died in both species, and (iv) 100% protection against B. anthracis spore challenge when used in combination therapy with ciprofloxacin in a rabbit "point of no return" model for which ciprofloxacin alone provided 50% protection. These results indicate that a small molecule, hydroxamate LF inhibitor, as revealed herein, can ameliorate the toxemia characteristic of an active B. anthracis infection and could be a vital adjunct to our ability to combat anthrax.

  9. Anthrax Vaccine and Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Martin Meyer; Weiss, Peter D.; Weiss, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified Bacillus anthracis, the causative organism of anthrax, as a category A potential bioterrorism agent. There are critical shortcomings in the US anthrax vaccine program. Rather than depending on the private sector, the government must assume direct production of anthrax vaccine. The development of a capacity capable of preemptive immunization of the public against anthrax should be considered. PMID:17901434

  10. Anthrax: A Guide for Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents facts about anthrax so that biology teachers can communicate them to others. Defines anthrax and the nature of bacterial spores. Discusses transmission and clinical presentation as well as prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Explores the use of anthrax as a biological warfare agent. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  11. Anthrax: A Guide for Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents facts about anthrax so that biology teachers can communicate them to others. Defines anthrax and the nature of bacterial spores. Discusses transmission and clinical presentation as well as prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Explores the use of anthrax as a biological warfare agent. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  12. Investigation of inhalation anthrax case, United States.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Jayne; Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States.

  13. Investigation of Inhalation Anthrax Case, United States

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States. PMID:24447835

  14. Anthrax - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anthrax URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/anthrax.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Anthrax - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. Airing Out Anthrax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The AiroCide TiO2 is an air-purifier that kills 93.3 percent of airborne pathogens that pass through it, including Bacillus anthraci, more commonly known as anthrax. It is essentially a spinoff of KES Science & Technology, Inc.'s Bio-KES system, a highly effective device used by the produce industry for ethylene gas removal to aid in preserving the freshness of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. The TiO2-based ethylene removal technology that is incorporated into the company's AiroCide TiO2 and Bio-KES products was first integrated into a pair of plant-growth chambers known as ASTROCULTURE(TM) and ADVANCED ASTROCULTURE(TM). Both chambers have housed commercial plant growth experiments in space on either the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station. The AiroCide TiO2 also has a proven record of destroying 98 percent of other airborne pathogens, such as microscopic dust mites, molds, and fungi. Moreover, the device is a verified killer of Influenza A (flu), E. coli, Staphylococcus aureas, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, among many other harmful viruses.

  16. Anthrax of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    nized in two districts in Udon Thani Province in northeastern Thailand after an outbreak in cattle that killed 36 water buffa- los (Bubalus bubalus...1993;90:2291–4. 23. Phonboon K, Ratanasiri P, Peeraprakorn S, Choomkasien P, Chong- charoen P, Sritasoi S. Anthrax outbreak in Udon Thani . Communicable

  17. Anthrax - Pasteur to the Present

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    anthrax cultures by aging them, as he had done with chicken tholera cultures, but instead discovered that spores formed when cultures were grown at 371C...in diameter. Although B. anthracis is susceptible to virtually all routinely used antibiotics (14) except polymyxin B and neomycin (9), 0-lactam

  18. Risk Assessment of Anthrax Threat Letters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    feeling of a powdery substance. References: Approval of Cipro  for Use After Exposure to Inhalational Anthrax (http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ANSWERS...recommendation on administration of the drug: “The recommended adult dose of Cipro  for post- exposure inhalational anthrax is 500 milligrams given orally twice...a day. The recommended pediatric dose of Cipro  for post-exposure inhalational anthrax is 15mg/kg given orally twice a day. The adult intravenous

  19. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  20. [Effects of different procedures of disinfection on the bacteriologic quality of hemodialysis monitors of the Cobe CS3 and AK 100 type].

    PubMed

    Di Majo, P; Hartemann, P; Andre, J L

    1996-03-01

    ]n recent years, hemodialysis treatment for chronic renal failure has been increasing. Although the technical evolutions have improved the therapy, the problem of microbial, toxic and chemical contamination of the dialysis fluid is now re-emerging. Most of all, because of increasing use of high-flux dialysis and its potential for transmembrane transport of bacteria into patients, one should be aware that dialysis fluid pathways may be colonised with bacteria. On the bacterial point of view, the French legislation proposed 100 CFU/mL as a maximum for total count of aerobic bacteria in the bi-osmosed water used for dilution of the dialysis concentrate. This study took place during 8 weeks in the children-hospital dialysis unit in Nancy (France). Our laboratory have succeeded in validating an aseptic bacteriological sampling procedure within fluid pathways of haemodialysis monitors Cobe CS3 and AK 100. It has also be shown that 6 to 12 hours of dialysis monitoring doesn't affect the quantitative and qualitative bacterial contamination of the biosmosed water (mean: 5 CFU/100 mL) drained through the 5 years' old internal pipes of the 2 monitors. So it has whatever the 4 different disinfection procedures applied and on the monitors (Formol or Formol + Citric acid + Chlorine or Heat or Heat + dehydrated Citric acid).

  1. [Optimizing surgical hand disinfection].

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Kramer, A; Rotter, M; Widmer, A

    2006-08-01

    For more than 110 years hands of surgeons have been treated before a surgical procedure in order to reduce the bacterial density. The kind and duration of treatment, however, has changed significantly over time. Recent scientific evidence suggests a few changes with the aim to optimize both the efficacy and the dermal tolerance. Aim of this article is the presentation and discussion of new insights in surgical hand disinfection. A hand wash should be performed before the first disinfection of a day, ideally at least 10 min before the beginning of the disinfection as it has been shown that a 1 min hand wash significantly increases skin hydration for up to 10 min. The application time may be as short as 1.5 min depending on the type of hand rub. Hands and forearms should be kept wet with the hand rub for the recommended application time in any case. A specific rub-in procedure according to EN 12791 has been found to be suitable in order to avoid untreated skin areas. The alcohol-based hand rub should have a proven excellent dermal tolerance in order to ensure appropriate compliance. Considering these elements in clinical practice can have a significant impact to optimize the high quality of surgical hand disinfection for prevention of surgical site infections.

  2. Methods of Eradicating Anthrax - USSR -

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    case of other zoonoses ( brucellosis , rabies, foot- and-mouth disease). Such frequent cases of infection of persons from sick animals indicates an...the diagnosis of anthrax in man« As shown by an analysis of available data, the- overwhelming majority of cases in man have not been confirmed by...bacteriological examination and the diagnosis has been based on clinical and epidemiological or simply clinical data» If the measures indicated are

  3. Neutron-based sterilization of anthrax contamination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Qingfei

    2006-05-01

    With the anthrax threat becoming a reality, it is very important to have an effective way to sterilize areas contaminated by anthrax. Anthrax spores are the dormant form of the anthrax bacteria. They can germinate in tissues, producing new bacteria that release lethal toxins. Neutrons can be a powerful tool in our defense against anthrax contamination. Neutrons are elementary particles that have no charge, which allows them to be very penetrating, killing the anthrax spores on the surface and inside the containers. So neutrons have an advantage over other forms of radiation if deep penetration is required to kill biological organisms. A Cf neutron source allows for a low cost method of decontamination. It emits most neutrons in the 100 keV to 2 MeV energy regions, and a neutron in this energy region is 20 times more deadly than electrons or gamma rays in killing anthrax spores. If we just consider the first neutron collision with anthrax spores and that all the anthrax spores will not survive at the dose level above 2.0 x 10 Gy, our calculations show that a 0.5-g Cf neutron source within 20 min can generate 1.11 x 10 m fluence neutrons, which is good enough to kill the anthrax spores on the sample. An experimental confirmation of the above results may prove that to achieve 1.11 x 10 m fluence neutrons on the anthrax spore sample, the neutron irradiation time may be reduced dramatically or the Cf neutron source reduced to 0.1 g level or even less. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a feasible way to sterilize the anthrax contamination by using a Cf neutron source. Presently, we are mainly concentrating on the theoretical estimation of neutron fluence to see if the Cf neutron source can deliver enough neutron irradiation dose to kill the anthrax spores. Our future work will focus on experimental confirmation and Monte Carlo simulation by using Geant4 or MCNP codes. At that time, we will consider the effects of the real experimental setup, the shielding materials

  4. A poster of pustules: representations of early twentieth century industrial anthrax in Britain.

    PubMed

    Stark, James F

    2011-03-01

    In the decades around 1900, industrial anthrax attracted significant attention from medical practitioners, legislators and the general public in Britain. Attempts to reduce the incidence of the disease ranged from basic health measures - preventing workmen from eating inside factories and trialling the use of respirators - through to national legislation making disinfection of dangerous materials mandatory. Another effort involved the production of industrial warning posters (or cautionary notices) which were designed for use in the factory environment. In the case of anthrax, the context in which these notices appeared adds to our understanding of not only the disease itself, but also the relations between those producing such posters and those who encountered them in an industrial setting. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Thomas G; Honl, Beth A

    2002-01-01

    The Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program is a Department of Defense initiative to protect military personnel against the threat of anthrax. Surveillance for adverse events associated with anthrax vaccination has shown that mild local reactions are not uncommon while systemic reactions are extremely rare. We present a case of 26-year-old male with delayed-type hypersensitivity after two doses of anthrax vaccine.

  6. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  7. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  8. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  9. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  10. Anthrax in America 2001-2003.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shivang G.; Cymet, Holly Berkovits; Kerkvliet, Gary; Cymet, Tyler

    2004-01-01

    Anthrax caused by Bacillus anthracis in humans is rare. Two recent outbreaks that were intentionally caused occurred among postal employees, politicians, and journalists in the United States. This has caused tremendous fear, and our experience with these "anthrax incidents" has changed our views on the natural history of this disease in people. In this paper, we review the lifecycle and biology of this micro-organism. Anthrax that occurs from a weaponized form of this micro-organism has a specific clinical presentation that requires a suspicion of anthrax exposure to be diagnosed. New methods of testing for anthrax have been developed and may simplify diagnosis in the future. The range of illness caused by B. anthracis from the molecular level to the clinical symptoms is discussed. We also review the diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis as well as treatment of this condition. PMID:15040516

  11. Serum adenosine deaminase activity in cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Karadas, Sevdegul; Aslan, Mehmet; Ceylan, Mehmet Resat; Demir, Halit; Oncu, Mehmet Resit; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasım; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aypak, Cenk

    2014-07-06

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity has been discovered in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data associated with cutaneous anthrax. The aim of this study was to investigate serum ADA activity in patients with cutaneous anthrax. Sixteen patients with cutaneous anthrax and 17 healthy controls were enrolled. We measured ADA activity; peripheral blood leukocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts; erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and C reactive protein levels. Serum ADA activity was significantly higher in patients with cutaneous anthrax than in the controls (p<0.001). A positive correlation was observed between ADA activity and lymphocyte counts (r=0.589, p=0.021) in the patient group. This study suggests that serum ADA could be used as a biochemical marker in cutaneous anthrax.

  12. Anthrax Outbreaks in Bangladesh, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Apurba; Khan, Salah Uddin; Hasnat, Mohammed Abul; Parveen, Shahana; Islam, M. Saiful; Mikolon, Andrea; Chakraborty, Ranjit Kumar; Ahmed, Be-Nazir; Ara, Khorsed; Haider, Najmul; Zaki, Sherif R.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.; Hossain, M. Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    During August 2009–October 2010, a multidisciplinary team investigated 14 outbreaks of animal and human anthrax in Bangladesh to identify the etiology, pathway of transmission, and social, behavioral, and cultural factors that led to these outbreaks. The team identified 140 animal cases of anthrax and 273 human cases of cutaneous anthrax. Ninety one percent of persons in whom cutaneous anthrax developed had history of butchering sick animals, handling raw meat, contact with animal skin, or were present at slaughtering sites. Each year, Bacillus anthracis of identical genotypes were isolated from animal and human cases. Inadequate livestock vaccination coverage, lack of awareness of the risk of anthrax transmission from animal to humans, social norms and poverty contributed to these outbreaks. Addressing these challenges and adopting a joint animal and human health approach could contribute to detecting and preventing such outbreaks in the future. PMID:22492157

  13. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  14. In vitro adhesion of Acanthamoeba castellanii to soft contact lenses depends on water content and disinfection procedure.

    PubMed

    Reverey, Julia F; Fromme, Roland; Leippe, Matthias; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2014-08-01

    To compare the potential of different soft contact lenses to be contaminated with Acanthamoeba castellanii as a function of material parameters and cleaning procedures. Different unworn soft hydrogel and silicone hydrogel contact lenses were incubated with human pathogenic A. castellanii. The adhesion of the acanthamoebae was investigated on the contact lenses and put into relation to their material parameters. The efficacy of a recommended contact lens cleaning procedure in reducing A. castellanii adhesion was investigated. We found that material parameters such as elastic modulus, silicone content, ionic properties and swelling do not influence the adhesion of acanthamoebae to soft contact lenses. A material parameter that influenced adhesion significantly was the water content of the lens. With increasing water content, the adhesion of acanthamoebae increased. By following the cleaning instructions of the manufacturer the contamination of the lenses with A. castellanii could be reduced to a minimum, as shown both on contact lenses and in control experiments. With this study we show that for the tested lenses, the adhesion of A. castellanii to contact lenses is independent of the silicone content of the lens, but depends nonlinearly on the water content of the lens. Furthermore, we demonstrate that applying proper lens cleaning procedures minimizes the risk of acanthamoebae adhesion to contact lenses. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identifying Meningitis During an Anthrax Mass Casualty Incident: Systematic Review of Systemic Anthrax Since 1880

    PubMed Central

    Katharios-Lanwermeyer, Stefan; Holty, Jon-Erik; Person, Marissa; Sejvar, James; Haberling, Dana; Tubbs, Heather; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Pillai, Satish K.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Bower, William A.; Hendricks, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a potential bioterrorism agent. Anthrax meningitis may be a manifestation of B. anthracis infection, has high mortality, and requires more aggressive treatment than anthrax without meningitis. Rapid identification and treatment of anthrax meningitis are essential for successful management of an anthrax mass casualty incident. METHODS Three hundred six published reports from 1880 through 2013 met pre-defined inclusion criteria. We calculated descriptive statistics for abstracted cases and conducted multivariable regression on separate derivation and validation cohorts to identify clinical diagnostic and prognostic factors for anthrax meningitis. RESULTS One hundred thirty-two of 363 (36%) cases with systemic anthrax met anthrax meningitis criteria. Severe headache, altered mental status, meningeal signs, and other neurological signs at presentation independently predicted meningitis in the derivation cohort and are proposed as a four-item screening tool for use during mass casualty incidents. Presence of any one factor on admission had a sensitivity for finding anthrax meningitis of 89% (83%) in the adult (pediatric) validation cohorts. Anthrax meningitis was unlikely in the absence of any of these signs or symptoms ([LR−]=0.12 [0.19] for adult [pediatric] cohorts), while presence of two or more factors made meningitis very likely ([LR+]=26.5 [29.2]). Survival of anthrax meningitis was predicted by treatment with a bactericidal agent (P=0.005) and use of multiple antimicrobials (P=0.012). CONCLUSIONS We developed an evidence-based triage tool for screening patients for meningitis during an anthrax mass casualty incident; its use could improve both patient outcomes and resource allocation in such an event. PMID:27025833

  16. Identification of Anthrax Toxin Genes in a Bacillus cereus Associated With An Illness Resembling Inhalation Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Identification of anthrax toxin genes in a Bacillus cereus associated with an illness resembling inhalation anthrax Alex R. Hoffmaster*†, Jacques... Bacillus anthracis is the etiologic agent of anthrax, an acute fatal disease among mammals. It was thought to differ from Bacillus cereus , an...correlation of phenotypic characteristics and their genetic basis. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis are members of a closelyrelated phylogenetic

  17. [Molecular aspects of anthrax pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Noskov, A N

    2014-01-01

    A model of anthrax infection with the role determined for main pathogenicity factors of Bacillus anthracis exotoxin and capsule is presented. After spore phagocytosis by macrophages, synthesis of the main exotoxin component begins - a protective antigen that in oligomeric form disrupts phagosome membrane. This accelerates the transition of the pathogen from phagosome into the macrophage cytoplasm. Poly-D-glutamine capsule synthesized by the pathogen triggers the exit (exocytosis) of vegetative cells from macrophages and protects them from re-phagocytosis in lymphatic node lumen. The vegetative cells, that actively and freely replicate in lymphatic node, secret an exotoxin that disrupts endothelial septum between lymph and blood due to cytotoxic activity. As a result the vegetative cells get into blood and bacteremia develops. Pathogenetic pattern during anthrax (multiple hemorrhages in various organs etc.) is associated with local microcirculation disorders of various organs caused by the effect of bacterial exoproteases via activation of Willebrand factor. This results in a rapid local increase of microbial mass and consequent powerful cytotoxic effect of exotoxin on the tissue cells of the affected organ. Death of the infected organism takes place at the final stage of infec- tion due to toxic shock caused by the exotoxin. A reduction of body temperature takes place after death and the process of spore formation begins in the dead animal: capsule depolymerization, chain shortening, peptidoglycan cortex formation. Spores in this form are the prolonged source of infectious agent conservation and spread of infection in nature.

  18. The efficacy of different cleaning and disinfection procedures to reduce Salmonella and Enterobacteriaceae in the lairage environment of a pig abattoir.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Grant, Jim; Leonard, Finola C; Lawlor, Peadar G; Gardiner, Gillian E; Duffy, Geraldine

    2017-04-04

    This study investigated several cleaning and disinfection protocols for their ability to eliminate Salmonella and to reduce levels of Enterobacteriaceae, within the lairage pens of a commercial pig abattoir. Eight protocols were evaluated in each of 12 lairage pens at the end of the slaughtering day on 3 occasions (36 pens/protocol): (P1) high-pressure cold water wash (herein referred to as high-pressure wash); (P2) high-pressure wash followed by a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC)-based disinfectant without rinsing; (P3) high-pressure wash followed by a chlorocresol-based disinfectant without rinsing; (P4) high-pressure wash followed by a sodium hydroxide/sodium hypochlorite detergent with rinsing; (P5) P4 followed by P2; (P6) P4 followed by P3; (P7) P5 with drying for 24-48h; and (P8) P6 with drying for 24-48h. Two floor swabs and one wall swab were taken from each lairage pen before and after each protocol was applied, and examined for the presence of Salmonella and enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae. High-pressure washing alone (P1) did not reduce the prevalence of Salmonella in the lairage pens. When high-pressure washing, the probability of detecting Salmonella following application of the chlorocresol-based disinfectant (P3) was lower than with the QAC-based disinfectant, P2 (14.2% versus 34.0%, respectively; p<0.05). The probability of detecting Salmonella after the combined use of detergent and the chlorocresol-based disinfectant (P6) was also lower than application of detergent followed by the QAC-based disinfectant, P5 (2.2% versus 17.1%, respectively; p<0.05). Drying of pens (P7 and P8) greatly reduced the probability of detecting Salmonella. Only 3.8% of swabs were Salmonella-positive 48h after cleaning with detergent and the QAC-based disinfectant (P7); while an eradication of Salmonella was achieved 24h after cleaning with detergent and the chlorocresol-based disinfectant, P8. A reduction in Enterobacteriaceae counts to below the limit of detection

  19. Advances in Anthrax Detection: Overview of Bioprobes and Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Gedi, Vinayakumar; Lee, Sang-Choon; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Moon, Ji-Young; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2015-06-01

    Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Although anthrax commonly affects domestic and wild animals, it causes a rare but lethal infection in humans. A variety of techniques have been introduced and evaluated to detect anthrax using cultures, polymerase chain reaction, and immunoassays to address the potential threat of anthrax being used as a bioweapon. The high-potential harm of anthrax in bioterrorism requires sensitive and specific detection systems that are rapid, field-ready, and real-time monitoring. Here, we provide a systematic overview of anthrax detection probes with their potential applications in various ultra-sensitive diagnostic systems.

  20. List of Contractors to Support Anthrax Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2010-05-14

    This document responds to a need identified by private sector businesses for information on contractors that may be qualified to support building remediation efforts following a wide-area anthrax release.

  1. Cutaneous anthrax in Southeast Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Recep; Sula, Bilal; Devecı, Ozcan; Tekin, Alicem; Bozkurt, Fatma; Ucmak, Derya; Kaya, Şafak; Bekcibasi, Muhammed; Erkan, Mehmet Emin; Ayaz, Celal; Hosoglu, Salih

    2015-03-01

    Anthrax is a rare disease cause by Bacillus anthracis, a Gram-positive, rod-shaped endospore-forming capsuled bacterium. Anthrax is manifest in three primary forms: cutaneous, respiratory, and gastrointestinal. Cutaneous anthrax accounts for approximately 95% of all cases of anthrax in humans. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous anthrax, a rare disease that nonetheless remains a serious healthcare problem in developing countries. The complete medical records of patients diagnosed with cutaneous anthrax between January 2001 and December 2012 were examined in a retrospective manner. Cutaneous anthrax was diagnosed by the identification of typical anthrax lesions and/or the presence of Gram-positive-capsuled bacillus after staining with Gram stain and methylen blue in pathology samples obtained from these lesions and the presence of characteristic scarring with a history of severe swelling, black eschar, and positive response to treatment form the basis of diagnosis in cases where cultures were negative for the presence of bacillus. A total of 58 patients were admitted to the hospital with cutaneous anthrax between January 2001 and December 2012. This included 32 (55.2%) males and 26 (44.8%) females, with an age range of 15-82 years and a mean age of 38 ± 13.8 years. The incubation period for the infection ranged between 1 and 20 d (mean 3.7 ± 1.4 d). The most common symptoms at the time of hospital referral were swelling, redness, and black eschar of the skin. The most common lesion site was the hand and fingers (41.3%). Isolated of bacteria was used to diagnose the disease in six cases (23.8%), detection of Gram-positive bacillus in samples of characteristic lesion material was used in seven (28.5%) cases, and the presence of a characteristic lesion was the sole diagnostic criteria in 45 (77.6%) cases. Treatment consisted of penicillin G (12 cases), ampicillin-sulbactam (30 cases), Cefazolin (12 cases), or

  2. Cutaneous anthrax: evaluation of 28 cases in the Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Denk, Affan; Tartar, Ayse Sagmak; Ozden, Mehmet; Demir, Betul; Akbulut, Ayhan

    2016-09-01

    Anthrax is an endemic disease in developing countries. Human cases are usually associated with animal products. About 95% of naturally acquired cases are cutaneous anthrax. In this study, cutaneous anthrax cases from the Elazig province (the Eastern Anatolian region) of Turkey seen in our hospital within a 6-year period were evaluated with respect to epidemiological and clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome. Twenty-eight patients with cutaneous anthrax observed between January 2009 and December 2014 were investigated retrospectively. The diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax was based on detailed history, dermatologic findings, including painless, ulcers covered by a characteristic black eschar and/or microbiological procedures, including Gram stain and culture of materials obtained from the lesions. Of the 28 patients followed up with cutaneous anthrax diagnosis, 14 (50%) were female and 14 (50%) were male. The mean age of the cases was 39.6 years (age range 17-65 years). The patients have an incubation period in the range of 1-9 days (mean 4.6 ± 0.5 days). The cases were seen between April and November of each year during the study period. Twenty-three cases (82%) had a history of contact with animals or animal products. Twenty patients (71.4%) showed malignant pustules and eight (28.6%) malignant edema. Bacillus anthracis was isolated in three cases (10.7%) and Gram stain smear were positive in five cases (17.8%). All patients were treated successfully with penicillin or ciprofloxacin. Systemic corticosteroids were added to the antibiotic treatment in six patients with malignant edema. Sepsis no developed in patients, all the cases recovered. Anthrax is still a serious public health problem in Turkey. Cutaneous anthrax must always be kept in mind when characteristic lesions such as a painless ulcer with vesicles, edema, and a history of contact with animals or animal products are observed in an individual. Early and correct diagnosis significantly

  3. Anthrax: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The risk of anthrax can be reduced through international collaboration in health education and training, promotion of research, and provision of scientific and technical advice. These issues were discussed by a WHO Working Group on Anthrax in September 1995, and this Memorandum presents their priority concerns and recommendations in several areas: surveillance, epidemiology, diagnosis in humans and in animals, prevention and control, and international cooperation. PMID:9002326

  4. Anthrax: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The risk of anthrax can be reduced through international collaboration in health education and training, promotion of research, and provision of scientific and technical advice. These issues were discussed by a WHO Working Group on Anthrax in September 1995, and this Memorandum presents their priority concerns and recommendations in several areas: surveillance, epidemiology, diagnosis in humans and in animals, prevention and control, and international cooperation.

  5. Investigations on the efficacy of surface disinfection and surface cleaning procedures. 2. Laboratory testing of the efficacy under conditions simulating those of real-life.

    PubMed

    Werner, H P

    1975-08-01

    Using a standardised method (impression method by means of 'Rodac' plates and glass as well as ceramic surfaces as germ carriers) we tested for the efficacy of 3 surface disinfectants (aldehydes, aldehydes + detergent substances, phenol derivatives) and 3 disinfectant cleaning agents (aldehydes + detergent substances + wax) and 2 per cent soft soap solution on Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Sarcina lutea. The method enabled us to calculate the actual germ count reduction and also took account of the natural dying-rate of the test organisms. Their resistance to the different types of active substances varied greatly. Thus the 3 disinfectants had a better effect on Klebsiellae and Staphylococci than on Sarcinae. 2 of the 3 disinfectant cleaning agents, on the other hand, turned out to be less suitable for the elimination of Klebsiellae. It thus follows that Sarcina cannot be used as test organism for in-use tests (see Communication 1) unless the resistance of Staphylococci and Klebsiellae to the test preparation has first been established in laboratory experiments. The general question, namely whether in-use tests provide meaningful and accurate results remain to be elucidated. On the basis of our test results, the exclusive use of soap for cleaning floors, as a substitute of disinfection, should definitely be ruled out. Although soap reduces Gram-positive cocci well in actual practice, it is almost ineffective against problem germs such as Klebsiellae. What should be stipulated is the use of broad-spectrum disinfectants, i.e. they should, if possible, act equally well against different types of germs. From the commercially-available preparations that were tested, a phenol-base product gave the best results. On the basis of these results we venture to doubt that the use of aldehyde preparations which is customary at the moment, is the right approach to fight hospital infections.

  6. The Ins and Outs of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Sarah; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Bürgi, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a severe, although rather rare, infectious disease that is caused by the Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The infectious form is the spore and the major virulence factors of the bacterium are its poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule and the tripartite anthrax toxin. The discovery of the anthrax toxin receptors in the early 2000s has allowed in-depth studies on the mechanisms of anthrax toxin cellular entry and translocation from the endocytic compartment to the cytoplasm. The toxin generally hijacks the endocytic pathway of CMG2 and TEM8, the two anthrax toxin receptors, in order to reach the endosomes. From there, the pore-forming subunit of the toxin inserts into endosomal membranes and enables translocation of the two catalytic subunits. Insertion of the pore-forming unit preferentially occurs in intraluminal vesicles rather than the limiting membrane of the endosome, leading to the translocation of the enzymatic subunits in the lumen of these vesicles. This has important consequences that will be discussed. Ultimately, the toxins reach the cytosol where they act on their respective targets. Target modification has severe consequences on cell behavior, in particular on cells of the immune system, allowing the spread of the bacterium, in severe cases leading to host death. Here we will review the literature on anthrax disease with a focus on the structure of the toxin, how it enters cells and its immunological effects. PMID:26978402

  7. The Ins and Outs of Anthrax Toxin.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Sarah; van der Goot, F Gisou; Bürgi, Jérôme

    2016-03-10

    Anthrax is a severe, although rather rare, infectious disease that is caused by the Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The infectious form is the spore and the major virulence factors of the bacterium are its poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule and the tripartite anthrax toxin. The discovery of the anthrax toxin receptors in the early 2000s has allowed in-depth studies on the mechanisms of anthrax toxin cellular entry and translocation from the endocytic compartment to the cytoplasm. The toxin generally hijacks the endocytic pathway of CMG2 and TEM8, the two anthrax toxin receptors, in order to reach the endosomes. From there, the pore-forming subunit of the toxin inserts into endosomal membranes and enables translocation of the two catalytic subunits. Insertion of the pore-forming unit preferentially occurs in intraluminal vesicles rather than the limiting membrane of the endosome, leading to the translocation of the enzymatic subunits in the lumen of these vesicles. This has important consequences that will be discussed. Ultimately, the toxins reach the cytosol where they act on their respective targets. Target modification has severe consequences on cell behavior, in particular on cells of the immune system, allowing the spread of the bacterium, in severe cases leading to host death. Here we will review the literature on anthrax disease with a focus on the structure of the toxin, how it enters cells and its immunological effects.

  8. Laboratories Face Crackdown in Wake of Anthrax Scare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Explores the after-effects on college laboratories of the anthrax mail scare; scientists say the anthrax scare justifies tougher rules on biological agents, but some fear that Congress may go too far. (EV)

  9. Laboratories Face Crackdown in Wake of Anthrax Scare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Explores the after-effects on college laboratories of the anthrax mail scare; scientists say the anthrax scare justifies tougher rules on biological agents, but some fear that Congress may go too far. (EV)

  10. Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-21

    p) or vegetative (continued on back)L UO~ 173 EO9Iow or v ov asis omsOLETz UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASISFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Whn aa nerd % %* :%N...with pronounced splenomegaly a characteristic necropsy finding . Rapidly dividing organisms quickly overwhelm the mononu’clear phagocytic system however

  11. Anthrax refusers: a 2nd infantry division perspective.

    PubMed

    Staudenmeier, James J; Bacon, Bryan L; Ruiz, Robert T; Diebold, Carroll J

    2003-07-01

    The Department of Defense anthrax vaccination program has been in the news often recently. Concerns are cited over the safety and usefulness of the vaccine. This brief report describes some of the characteristics of anthrax vaccine refusers. This report examines the implementation of an anthrax vaccination program in a well-disciplined, forward-deployed Army unit facing a hostile enemy with access to anthrax biological warfare stocks.

  12. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, the East Anatolian Region of Turkey 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Emine; Parlak, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. While anthrax is rare in developed countries, it is endemic in Turkey. The names of the different forms of the disease refer to the manner of entry of the spores into the body-cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalation, and injection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, epidemiological history, treatment, and outcomes of patients with anthrax. Eighty-two cases of anthrax hospitalized at Atatürk University Faculty of Medicine Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology in 2008-2014 were examined retrospectively. Gender, age, occupation, year, history, clinical characteristics, character of lesions, length of hospitalization, and outcomes were recorded. Thirty (36.6%) patients were female and 52 (63.4%) patients were male; ages were 18-69 and mean age was 43.77 ± 13.05. The mean incubation period was 4.79 ± 3.76 days. Cases were largely identified in August (41.5%) and September (25.6%). Sixty-nine (84.1%) of the 82 patients had been given antibiotics before presentation. Lesions were most common on the fingers and arms. The most common occupational groups were housewives (36.6%) and people working in animal husbandry (31.7%). All patients had histories of contact with diseased animals and animal products. Penicillin-group antibiotics (78%) were most commonly used in treatment. One patient (1.2%) died from anthrax meningitis. The mean length of hospitalization was 8.30 ± 5.36 days. Anthrax is an endemic disease of economic and social significance for the region. Effective public health control measures, risk group education, vaccination of animals, and decontamination procedures will reduce the number of cases.

  13. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  14. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  15. 9 CFR 113.66 - Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated. 113.66 Section 113.66 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.66 Anthrax Spore Vaccine—Nonencapsulated. Anthrax Spore Vaccine...

  16. 9 CFR 113.66 - Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated. 113.66 Section 113.66 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.66 Anthrax Spore Vaccine—Nonencapsulated. Anthrax Spore Vaccine...

  17. 9 CFR 113.66 - Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated. 113.66 Section 113.66 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.66 Anthrax Spore Vaccine—Nonencapsulated. Anthrax Spore Vaccine...

  18. 9 CFR 113.66 - Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated. 113.66 Section 113.66 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.66 Anthrax Spore Vaccine—Nonencapsulated. Anthrax Spore Vaccine...

  19. 9 CFR 113.66 - Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anthrax Spore Vaccine-Nonencapsulated. 113.66 Section 113.66 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.66 Anthrax Spore Vaccine—Nonencapsulated. Anthrax Spore Vaccine...

  20. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  1. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  2. Review of water disinfection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the history of manned space flight the supply of potable water to the astronauts has presented unique problems. Of particular concern has been the microbiological quality of the potable water. This has required the development of both preflight water system servicing procedures to disinfect the systems and inflight disinfectant addition and monitoring devices to ensure continuing microbiological control. The disinfectants successfully used to date have been aqueous chlorine or iodine. Because of special system limitations the use of iodine has been the most successful for inflight use and promises to be the agent most likely to be used in the future. Future spacecraft potable, hygiene, and experiment water systems will utilize recycled water. This will present special problems for water quality control. NASA is currently conducting research and development to solve these problems.

  3. Review of water disinfection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the history of manned space flight the supply of potable water to the astronauts has presented unique problems. Of particular concern has been the microbiological quality of the potable water. This has required the development of both preflight water system servicing procedures to disinfect the systems and inflight disinfectant addition and monitoring devices to ensure continuing microbiological control. The disinfectants successfully used to date have been aqueous chlorine or iodine. Because of special system limitations the use of iodine has been the most successful for inflight use and promises to be the agent most likely to be used in the future. Future spacecraft potable, hygiene, and experiment water systems will utilize recycled water. This will present special problems for water quality control. NASA is currently conducting research and development to solve these problems.

  4. Effect of anthrax immune globulin on response to BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Malkevich, Nina V; Basu, Subhendu; Rudge, Thomas L; Clement, Kristin H; Chakrabarti, Ajoy C; Aimes, Ronald T; Nabors, Gary S; Skiadopoulos, Mario H; Ionin, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Development of anthrax countermeasures that may be used concomitantly in a postexposure setting requires an understanding of the interaction between these products. Anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIGIV) is a candidate immunotherapeutic that contains neutralizing antibodies against protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxins. We evaluated the interaction between AIGIV and BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in rabbits. While pharmacokinetics of AIGIV were not altered by vaccination, the vaccine-induced immune response was abrogated in AIGIV-treated animals.

  5. Effect of Anthrax Immune Globulin on Response to BioThrax (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) in New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Malkevich, Nina V.; Basu, Subhendu; Rudge, Thomas L.; Clement, Kristin H.; Chakrabarti, Ajoy C.; Aimes, Ronald T.; Nabors, Gary S.; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.

    2013-01-01

    Development of anthrax countermeasures that may be used concomitantly in a postexposure setting requires an understanding of the interaction between these products. Anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIGIV) is a candidate immunotherapeutic that contains neutralizing antibodies against protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxins. We evaluated the interaction between AIGIV and BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in rabbits. While pharmacokinetics of AIGIV were not altered by vaccination, the vaccine-induced immune response was abrogated in AIGIV-treated animals. PMID:23979740

  6. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian F

    2016-10-02

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like 'clean' surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost.

  7. Hazards with disinfecting agents in renal units!

    PubMed

    Stragier, A

    1992-02-01

    As already described in the April 1991 issue of EDTNA/ERCA Journal (Volume XVII, No. 2), the specific characteristics of various disinfecting agents delineate their respective application areas. Obviously, in a renal unit one needs a large range of disinfecting agents as they are being used for cleaning and disinfection of: water treatment devices; water tanks and distribution systems; single patient units; patient vascular access sites; dialysis connection procedure; dialyser reuse; instruments; floors, etc.... We have been taught never to mix different disinfecting agents as this might reduce their efficiency. However, it had never been hitherto reported that this might be dangerous or even cause an explosion! In this paper, we describe in detail how we were confronted with such an explosion. We further report that similar hazards occurred in other units and present an overview of possible hazards with the most common disinfecting agents. Finally, we emphasize some preventive guidelines to be put forth in renal units.

  8. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  9. Colonic mucosal pseudolipomatosis: disinfectant colitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Baek, Il Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Colonic pseudolipomatosis is rare and its pathogenesis is still unclear. A number of mechanisms, including mechanical injury during an endoscopic procedure or chemical injury by disinfectant, seem to contribute to its pathogenesis. In our endoscopy unit, pseudolipomatosis occurred in an epidemic pattern after changing the endoscopic disinfectant from 2% glutaraldehyde to peracetic acid compound to decrease the length of endoscope reprocessing time. We assumed that pseudolipomatosis could be a type of chemical colitis produced by the residual disinfectant solution that remained on the surface or in a channel of the endoscope after reprocessing. The aim of this report was to highlight a series of 12 cases of colonic pseudolipomatosis in order to describe the endoscopic and pathological features and discuss the harmful effect of disinfectants as a possible cause of pseudolipomatosis. To identify the cause of the lesions, we systematically reviewed each patient history and the endoscopic and histological features. From March 2004 to February 2005, 1276 colonoscopies were performed and 12 cases (0.94%) of colonic pseudolipomatosis were diagnosed at the Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital of Hallym University. The pathogenesis of colonic pseudolipomatosis is not well-known, but our experience indicates the endoscopic disinfectant as the probable cause of pseudolipomatosis rather than either mechanical traumatic injury or intraluminal air pressure-related injury.

  10. Recovery efficiencies of anthrax spores and ricin from nonporous or nonabsorbent and porous or absorbent surfaces by a variety of sampling methods*.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Dody A; Samaan, Marian N; Bull, Robert L; Robertson, James M; Mateczun, Alfred J; Turnbull, Peter C B

    2008-09-01

    The 2001 anthrax letter cases brought into focus the need to establish the most effective environmental sampling procedures. Results are presented from two studies aimed at establishing the best procedures for everyday surfaces likely to be contaminated after the release of environmentally stable bioaggressive agents, as exemplified by anthrax spores and ricin. With anthrax spores, contact plates, with mean retrieval rates of 28-54%, performed better than other methods by a wide margin for flat nonporous, nonabsorbent surfaces. They also proved best on flat porous, absorbent materials, although recoveries were low (<7%). For both agents, dry devices (swabs, wipes, Trace Evidence Collection Filters) had universally poor retrieval efficiencies with no significant differences between them. Among moistened devices (wipes, swabs, and Sample Collection and Recovery Devices), wipes were generally best, albeit with considerable cross-over among individual readings (highest mean recoveries for anthrax spores and ricin 5.5% and 2.5%, respectively, off plastic).

  11. [Vaccination strategies for anthrax prevention].

    PubMed

    Beyer, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Apart from live spore vaccines with a certain amount of residual virulence for various animal species, there are two acellular protein vaccines for immunoprophylaxis against anthrax in humans. For ethical reasons there are no experimental data available on the efficacy and duration of the immunity they induce in men. Their efficacy was evaluated in laboratory animals, mainly rabbits and rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, it is well known that these vaccines elicit only partial protection in guinea pigs and almost no protection in mice against a challenge with fully virulent spores of Bacillus (B.) anthracis. Other disadvantages are the high amount of boosters necessary to elicit and to maintain a protective immune response, the variability in the composition of bacterial culture supernatants used for production, and the appearance of clinically relevant side effects. Therefore, there is ongoing work worldwide to improve the existing vaccines by substitution with recombinant antigens and to develop new vaccines on the basis of recombinant bacterial or viral live vectors, DNA-vectors, and by addition of new adjuvants. Special attention is given to supplementing the existing toxoid-vaccines with an anti-bacterial component.

  12. Serological anthrax surveillance in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Bagamian, Karoun H; Skrypnyk, Artem; Rodina, Yana; Bezymennyi, Maksym; Nevolko, Oleg; Skrypnyk, Valeriy; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-08-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, is an acute disease affecting wildlife, livestock, and humans worldwide, although its impact on these populations is underappreciated. In Ukraine, surveillance is passive, and anthrax is often detected in livestock. However, wildlife is not subject to surveillance, although anthrax deaths (such as in wild boar, Sus scrofa) have been documented. The wild boar is a plentiful and widespread species in Ukraine and is frequently hunted. We initiated a screening study testing Ukrainian wild boar blood samples for antibodies to B. anthracis. We mapped results relative to known livestock anthrax hotspots. We discovered evidence of exposure in wild boar up to 35 km from livestock anthrax hotspots and over 400 km from previous anthrax reports in boars. We make recommendations about using wildlife species as biosentinels for anthrax in Ukraine.

  13. Crystallographic Studies of the Anthrax Lethal Toxin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Singh, K. R. Klimpel, C. P. Quinn, Y. K. Chaudhary, J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15493-97 (1991). The carboxyl- terminal end of protective antigen is required for...AD CONTRACT NUMBER DAMD17-94-C-4047 TITLE: Crystallographic Studies of the Anthrax Lethal Toxin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christin A. Frederick, Ph.D...FUNDING NUMBERS Anthrax Lethal Toxin DAMDI7-94-C-4047 6. AUTHOR(S) Christin A. Frederick, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  14. Roles of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 in Anthrax Toxin Membrane Insertion and Pore Formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Jacquez, Pedro

    2016-01-22

    Interaction between bacterial toxins and cellular surface receptors is an important component of the host-pathogen interaction. Anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA) binds to the cell surface receptor, enters the cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis, and forms a pore on the endosomal membrane that translocates toxin enzymes into the cytosol of the host cell. As the major receptor for anthrax toxin in vivo, anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) plays an essential role in anthrax toxin action by providing the toxin with a high-affinity binding anchor on the cell membrane and a path of entry into the host cell. ANTXR2 also acts as a molecular clamp by shifting the pH threshold of PA pore formation to a more acidic pH range, which prevents premature pore formation at neutral pH before the toxin reaches the designated intracellular location. Most recent studies have suggested that the disulfide bond in the immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain of ANTXR2 plays an essential role in anthrax toxin action. Here we will review the roles of ANTXR2 in anthrax toxin action, with an emphasis on newly updated knowledge.

  15. WATER DISINFECTION PRACTICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The current review of canteen water disinfection proceeded along three general lines. A summary has been prepared of the information available from...the literature on canteen water disinfection. The current opinions of two outstanding investigators in the field of disinfection have been solicited in

  16. Anthrax Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... products • some military personnel, as determined by the Department of Defense These people should get 5 doses of vaccine ( ... emergency. cdc. gov/ agent/ anthrax/ • Contact the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD): - Call 1-877-438-8222 - Visit the ...

  17. Periorbital cellulitis due to cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Grant; Starks, Victoria; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2015-12-01

    Virgil's plague of the ancient world, Bacillus anthracis, is rare in developed nations. Unfortunately rural communities across the globe continue to be exposed to this potentially lethal bacterium. Herein we report a case of periorbital cutaneous anthrax infection in a 3-year-old girl from the rural area surrounding Harare, Zimbabwe with a brief review of the literature.

  18. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Allison B.; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LF-inhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and high-throughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  19. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection.

  20. Molecular determinants for a cardiovascular collapse in anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Brojatsch, Jurgen; Casadevall, Arturo; Goldman, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis releases two bipartite proteins, lethal toxin and edema factor, that contribute significantly to the progression of anthrax-associated shock. As blocking the anthrax toxins prevents disease, the toxins are considered the main virulence factors of the bacterium. The anthrax bacterium and the anthrax toxins trigger multiorgan failure associated with enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage and cardiac dysfunction in animal challenge models. A recent study using mice that either lacked the anthrax toxin receptor in specific cells and corresponding mice expressing the receptor in specific cell types demonstrated that cardiovascular cells are critical for disease mediated by anthrax lethal toxin. These studies are consistent with involvement of the cardiovascular system, and with an increase of cardiac failure markers observed in human anthrax and in animal models using B. anthracis and anthrax toxins. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of anthrax and tries to provide a mechanistic model and molecular determinants for the circulatory shock in anthrax. PMID:24389148

  1. Molecular determinants for a cardiovascular collapse in anthrax.

    PubMed

    Brojatsch, Jurgen; Casadevall, Arturo; Goldman, David L

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis releases two bipartite proteins, lethal toxin and edema factor, that contribute significantly to the progression of anthrax-associated shock. As blocking the anthrax toxins prevents disease, the toxins are considered the main virulence factors of the bacterium. The anthrax bacterium and the anthrax toxins trigger multi-organ failure associated with enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage and cardiac dysfunction in animal challenge models. A recent study using mice that either lacked the anthrax toxin receptor in specific cells and corresponding mice expressing the receptor in specific cell types demonstrated that cardiovascular cells are critical for disease mediated by anthrax lethal toxin. These studies are consistent with involvement of the cardiovascular system, and with an increase of cardiac failure markers observed in human anthrax and in animal models using B. anthracis and anthrax toxins. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of anthrax and tries to provide a mechanistic model and molecular determinants for the circulatory shock in anthrax.

  2. Bioterrorism-related anthrax surveillance, Connecticut, September-December, 2001.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alcia A; Parashar, Umesh D; Stoica, Adrian; Ridzon, Renee; Kirschke, David L; Meyer, Richard F; McClellan, Jennifer; Fischer, Marc; Nelson, Randy; Cartter, Matt; Hadler, James L; Jernigan, John A; Mast, Eric E; Swerdlow, David L

    2002-10-01

    On November 19, 2001, a case of inhalational anthrax was identified in a 94-year-old Connecticut woman, who later died. We conducted intensive surveillance for additional anthrax cases, which included collecting data from hospitals, emergency departments, private practitioners, death certificates, postal facilities, veterinarians, and the state medical examiner. No additional cases of anthrax were identified. The absence of additional anthrax cases argued against an intentional environmental release of Bacillus anthracis in Connecticut and suggested that, if the source of anthrax had been cross-contaminated mail, the risk for anthrax in this setting was very low. This surveillance system provides a model that can be adapted for use in similar emergency settings.

  3. Disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2016-05-02

    All invasive procedures involve contact by a medical device or surgical instrument with a patient's sterile tissue or mucous membranes. The level of disinfection or sterilization is dependent on the intended use of the object: critical (items that contact sterile tissue such as surgical instruments), semicritical (items that contact mucous membrane such as endoscopes), and noncritical (devices that contact only intact skin such as stethoscopes) items require sterilization, high-level disinfection and low-level disinfection, respectively. Cleaning must always precede high-level disinfection and sterilization. Antiseptics are essential to infection prevention as part of a hand hygiene program as well as several other uses such as surgical hand antisepsis and pre-operative skin preparation.

  4. Disinfection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in potable water.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kay; Inglis, Timothy J J

    2005-03-01

    The effect of chlorine, monochloramine and UV disinfection on the water-borne pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei was assessed. Persistence of B. pseudomallei was verified by MPN involving a one-step recovery procedure. Chlorine proved the most effective disinfectant with a 99.99% reduction of a 10(6) CFU/mL pure bacterial culture followed by 99.9% reduction by monochloramine and 99% reduction by UV. Co-culture of B. pseudomallei with Acanthamoeba astronyxis was found to greatly enhance survival of B. pseudomallei in the presence of all disinfecting agents tested. For example, when amoebae were present 100 times more monochloramine was required to maintain the disinfectant efficacy. Given the results obtained from these co-culture experiments, more research is needed to investigate the role of amoeba and biofilms in survival of B. pseudomallei in potable water.

  5. Evidence-based spectrum of antimicrobial activity for disinfection of bronchoscopes.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Constanze; Kampf, Birgit

    2008-10-01

    Processing of bronchoscopes after a physical examination has to eliminate all micro-organisms that could have contaminated the endoscope and that may harm the following patient. The aim of this analysis is to define those micro-organisms that may contaminate the bronchoscope during the examination and that may cause disease in other patients. Research of literature and analysis of laboratory data. During the passage of the respiratory tract the bronchoscope will be contaminated by the physiological flora of oral cavity, nasopharynx, trachea, bronchi, and pulmonary tissues. Whilst the oral cavity, the nasopharynx and the pharynx are the habitat for a great variety of bacteria the lower respiratory tract is virtually free of micro-organisms. However, in ventilated patients trachea and bronchi can become colonized as the result of bypassing the cleansing effect of the ciliated epithelium. In addition all agents that can cause bronchitis or pneumonia in immunocompromised or otherwise healthy individuals are potential contaminants of bronchoscopes. These microorganisms include bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts and moulds, enveloped and non-enveloped viruses and rarely parasites. The bronchoscopic procedure can result in epithelial injury with subsequent bleeding. Therefore, all blood-borne pathogens, e.g. HIV or HBV are also potential contaminants of the bronchoscope. There are several reports of transmission of micro-organisms due to incomplete or faulty cleaning and disinfection procedures of bronchoscopes. These incidents include nearly all classes of micro-organisms but not parasites or viruses. However, the incubation period of viruses can be long and the association between bronchoscopy and infection may be obscure. Endospore forming micro-organisms and parasites are not part of the normal flora of the respiratory tract and may rarely cause disease, usually only in severely immunocompromised patients, but transmission of such organisms by bronchoscopy has never been

  6. Anthrax as an example of the One Health concept.

    PubMed

    Bengis, R G; Frean, J

    2014-08-01

    Anthrax is a peracute, acute or subacute multispecies bacterial infection that occurs on many continents. It is one of the oldest infectious diseases known; the biblical fifth and sixth plagues (Exodus chapters 7 to 9) that affected first livestock and then humans were probably anthrax. From the earliest historical records until development of an effective vaccine midway through the 20th Century, anthrax was one of the foremost causes of uncontrolled mortality in cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs, with 'spill over' into humans, worldwide. With the development of the Sterne spore vaccine, a sharp decline in anthrax outbreaks in livestock occurred during the 1930-1980 era. There were successful national vaccination programmes in many countries during this period, complemented by the liberal use of antibiotics and the implementation of quarantine regulations and carcass disposal. However, a resurgence of this disease in livestock has been reported recently in some regions, where complacency and a false sense of security have hindered vaccination programmes. The epidemiology of anthrax involves an environmental component, as well as livestock, wildlife and human components. This makes anthrax an ideal example for discussion in the One Health context. Many outbreaks of anthrax in wildlife are undetected or unreported, owing to surveillance inadequacies and difficulties. Human disease is generally acquired accidentally during outbreaks of anthrax in domestic livestock and wildlife. The exception is deliberate targeting of humans with anthrax in the course of biowarfare or bioterrorism.

  7. Anthrax: a continuing concern in the era of bioterrorism

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Anthrax, a potentially fatal infection, is a virulent and highly contagious disease. It is caused by a gram-positive, toxigenic, spore-forming bacillus: Bacillus anthracis. For centuries, anthrax has caused disease in animals and, although uncommonly, in humans throughout the world. Descriptions of this naturally occurring disease begin in antiquity. Anthrax is primarily a disease of herbivores, which are infected by ingestion of spores from the soil. With the advent of modern microbiology, Pasteur developed the first successful anthrax vaccine in 1881. The incidence of the disease has continually decreased since the late 19th century, and animal vaccination programs drastically reduced the animal mortality from the disease. However, anthrax spores continue to be documented in soil samples from throughout the world. Research on anthrax as a biological weapon began more than 80 years ago, and today at least 17 nations are believed to have offensive biological weapons programs that include anthrax. Recent events in the USA have shown how society is affected by both hoax and real threats of anthrax bioweapons. This fourth article in the series on weapons of biowarfare/bioterrorism summarizes the historical background of anthrax as well as clinical and laboratory information useful for bioterrorism preparedness. PMID:16200179

  8. Recent progress in the development of anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the etiological agent of anthrax. Although anthrax is primarily an epizootic disease; humans are at risk for contracting anthrax. The potential use of B. anthracis spores as biowarfare agent has led to immense attention. Prolonged vaccination schedule of current anthrax vaccine and variable protection conferred; often leading to failure of therapy. This highlights the need for alternative anthrax countermeasures. A number of approaches are being investigated to substitute or supplement the existing anthrax vaccines. These relied on expression of Protective antigen (PA), the key protective immunogen; in bacterial or plant systems; or utilization of attenuated strains of B. anthracis for immunization. Few studies have established potential of domain IV of PA for immunization. Other targets including the spore, capsule, S-layer and anthrax toxin components have been investigated for imparting protective immunity. It has been shown that co-immunization of PA with domain I of lethal factor that binds PA resulted in higher antibody responses. Of the epitope based vaccines, the loop neutralizing determinant, in particular; elicited robust neutralizing antibody response and conferred 97% protection upon challenge. DNA vaccination resulted in varying degree of protection and seems a promising approach. Additionally, the applicability of monoclonal and therapeutic antibodies in the treatment of anthrax has also been demonstrated. The recent progress in the direction of anthrax prophylaxis has been evaluated in this review.

  9. [Infection control in dentistry. II.: Disinfection od dental handpieces].

    PubMed

    Vályi, P; Gorzó, I; Mari, A

    1999-07-01

    The effectiveness of three different kind of sterilization or disinfection procedures was investigated in case of contaminated turbine handpieces. The results demonstrated that formaldehyde, isopropyl-alcohol and ethylenoxid are equally effective to disinfect or sterilize handpieces. The isopropyl-alcohol solving in pure ethyl-alcohol is one of the material which complies most of the requirements, as described by the authors.

  10. Challenges in Disposing of Anthrax Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Stein, Steven L.; Upton, Jaki F.; Toomey, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    Disasters often create large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate response and long-term recovery. While many federal, state, and local agencies have debris management plans, these plans often do not address chemical, biological, and radiological contamination. The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration’s (IBRD) purpose was to holistically assess all aspects of an anthrax incident and assist the development of a plan for long-term recovery. In the case of wide-area anthrax contamination and the follow-on response and recovery activities, a significant amount of material will require decontamination and disposal. Accordingly, IBRD facilitated the development of debris management plans to address contaminated waste through a series of interviews and workshops with local, state, and federal representatives. The outcome of these discussion was the identification of three primary topical areas that must be addressed: 1) Planning; 2) Unresolved research questions, and resolving regulatory issues.

  11. New Insights into Gastrointestinal Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the “archetype zoonotic” pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target establishment of infection. PMID:25577136

  12. New insights into gastrointestinal anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the 'archetype zoonotic' pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target the establishment of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cutaneous anthrax in a school teacher.

    PubMed

    Nandi, A K; Kamal, M M; Alam, M A; Rahman, F; Uddin, M J; Baidya, N R; Mostafa, S M

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous anthrax is an infection of the skin caused by Bacillus anthracis. This is a report of a case of cutaneous anthrax attending outpatients of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital in October, 2010. The infected person was a retired school teacher with a very good body build. He reported to handle cow flesh about 4-5 days ago, developed few painless papules over shin of right leg, which gradually became large bullae and blackish eschar developed over the lesion. Smears from the lesions were investigated which confirmed the causative agent B. anthracis. The patient was treated with oral Ciprofloxacin (500mg) twice daily for seven days which cured the infection as observed on his subsequent follow up visits on 7 and 14 days later. Oral Ciprofloxacin is found effective as recommended by the World Health Organization.

  14. Receptors of anthrax toxin and cell entry.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Gisou; Young, John A T

    2009-12-01

    Anthrax toxin-receptor interactions are critical for toxin delivery to the host cell cytoplasm. This review summarizes what is known about the molecular details of the protective antigen (PA) toxin subunit interaction with either the ANTXR1 and ANTXR2 cellular receptors, and how receptor-type can dictate the low pH threshold of PA pore formation. The roles played by cellular factors in regulating the endocytosis of toxin-receptor complexes is also discussed.

  15. Increased membrane turnover in the brain in cutaneous anthrax without central nervous system disorder: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Yasar; Firat, Ahmet K; Kayabas, Uner; Alkan, Alpay; Yetkin, Funda; Karakas, Hakki M; Yologlu, Saim

    2012-07-01

    Cutaneous anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis contacting the skin, is the most common form of human anthrax. Recent studies implicate the presence of additional, possibly toxin-related subtle changes, even in patients without neurological or radiological findings. In this study, the presence of subtle changes in cutaneous anthrax was investigated at the metabolite level using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Study subjects were consisted of 10 patients with cutaneous anthrax without co-morbid disease and/or neurological findings, and 13 healthy controls. There were no statistical differences in age and gender between two groups. The diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax was based on medical history, presence of a typical cutaneous lesion, large gram positive bacilli on gram staining and/or positive culture for B. anthracis from cutaneous samples. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination consisted of conventional imaging and single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed by using point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (TR: 2000ms, TE: 136ms, 128 averages). Voxels of 20mm×20mm×20mm were placed in normal-appearing parietal white matter to detect metabolite levels. Cerebral metabolite peaks were measured in normal appearing parietal white matter. N-acetyl aspartate/creatine and choline/creatine ratios were calculated using standard analytical procedures. Patients and controls were not statistically different regarding parietal white matter N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios (p=0.902), a finding that implicates the conservation of neuronal and axonal integrity and neuronal functions. However, choline/creatine ratios were significantly higher in patient groups (p=0.001), a finding implicating an increased membrane turnover. In conclusion, these two findings point to a possibly anthrax toxins-related subtle inflammatory reaction of the central nervous system at the cellular level.

  16. Producing, controlling, and stabilizing Pasteur's anthrax vaccine: creating a new industry and a health market.

    PubMed

    Cassier, Maurice

    2008-06-01

    When Pasteur and Chamberland hastily set up their small biological industry to meet the agricultural demand for the anthrax vaccine, their methods for preparation and production had not yet been stabilized. The process of learning how to standardize biological products was accelerated in 1882 when vaccination accidents required the revision of production norms as the first hypotheses on fixity, inalterability, and transportability of vaccines were invalidated and replaced by procedures for continuous monitoring of the calibration of vaccines and the renewal of vaccine strains. Initially, the incompleteness and ongoing development of production standards justified Pasteur's monopoly on the production of the anthrax vaccine under his immediate supervision. Later on, the Pasteur Institute maintained control of these standards in the framework of a commercial monopoly that it established on the veterinary vaccines first sent and then cultivated abroad by the Société de Vulgarisation du Vaccin Charbonneux Pasteur, founded in 1886.

  17. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin.

    PubMed

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-05-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  18. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  19. An outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa because of inadequate disinfection procedures in a urology unit: a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-based epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Kayabas, Uner; Bayraktar, Mehmet; Otlu, Baris; Ugras, Murat; Ersoy, Yasemin; Bayindir, Yasar; Durmaz, Riza

    2008-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections in many hospitals. We aimed to investigate the source of urinary tract infections by determining clonal relationship of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During a 2-month period, all postoperative infections because of P aeruginosa were investigated in the Urology Department. Patient data were collected from medical records. Surveillance samples were obtained from various places in urological operating rooms. PFGE typing was performed for all P aeruginosa isolates. A total of 14 P aeruginosa strains (12 from patients and 2 from environmental samples) were isolated. PFGE typing of these 14 strains yielded 2 possibly related clones, which differed from each other by 4 major bands. Ten of the patient isolates were clonally identical with the strains of 2 forceps. Typing results confirmed that inadequately disinfected surgical devices can be the source of outbreak. After institution of infection control measures and education, no further clusters of P aeruginosa infection were detected in the Urology Department.

  20. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Meghashri, K; Kumar, Prasanna; Prasad, D Krishna; Hegde, Rakshit

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare microwave disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. A total of 120 casts were prepared from a silicone mold using Type III dental stone. Of the 120 casts, 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Staphylococcus aureus and 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Then, the casts were disinfected with microwave irradiation and chemical disinfection using the microwave oven and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. Bacteriologic procedures were performed; the cfu/ml for each cast was calculated as a weighted mean. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. The untreated casts showed Brain heart infusion broth counts of 106 log cfu/ml compared to irradiated and chemically disinfected casts, in which 105 log reduction of cfu/ml was seen. These results satisfied the requirements of current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory. The results obtained for chemical disinfection were in equivalence with microwave disinfection. Within the limitation of this in vitro study, it was found that microwave disinfection of casts for 5 min at 900 W gives high-level disinfection that complies with the current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory and microwave disinfection method is an effective and validated method as chemical disinfection. How to cite the article: Meghashri K, Kumar P, Prasad DK, Hegde R. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):56-60 .

  1. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Level Microwave Oven Disinfection with Chemical Disinfection of Dental Gypsum Casts

    PubMed Central

    Meghashri, K; Kumar, Prasanna; Prasad, D Krishna; Hegde, Rakshit

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare microwave disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 casts were prepared from a silicone mold using Type III dental stone. Of the 120 casts, 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Staphylococcus aureus and 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Then, the casts were disinfected with microwave irradiation and chemical disinfection using the microwave oven and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. Bacteriologic procedures were performed; the cfu/ml for each cast was calculated as a weighted mean. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: The untreated casts showed Brain heart infusion broth counts of 106 log cfu/ml compared to irradiated and chemically disinfected casts, in which 105 log reduction of cfu/ml was seen. These results satisfied the requirements of current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory. The results obtained for chemical disinfection were in equivalence with microwave disinfection. Conclusions: Within the limitation of this in vitro study, it was found that microwave disinfection of casts for 5 min at 900 W gives high-level disinfection that complies with the current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory and microwave disinfection method is an effective and validated method as chemical disinfection. How to cite the article: Meghashri K, Kumar P, Prasad DK, Hegde R. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):56-60 . PMID:25083033

  2. Recent Developments in Anti-dotes Against Anthrax.

    PubMed

    Dhasmana, Neha; Singh, Lalit K; Bhaduri, Asani; Misra, Richa; Singh, Yogendra

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of disease anthrax, Bacillus anthracis, causes recurrent outbreaks among the livestock and intermittent infections in humans across the world. Controlling animal infections by vaccination can minimize the incidence of disease in humans. Prevention of anthrax in occupationally exposed personnel is achieved through vaccination with either live spores or precipitates of culture supernatants from attenuated strains of B. anthracis. However, anthrax vaccination of the large human population is impractical as well as inappropriate. Broad-range antibiotics like amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, streptomycin, and penicillin G are recommended for the treatment of human anthrax infections, but the threat of antibiotic resistant strains always remains. Moreover, in the absence of any specific symptom (s) during early infection, the diagnosis of anthrax is delayed causing elevated levels of anthrax toxin component which could be fatal. For these reasons, there is a need to develop new antimicrobial agents against virulent B. anthracis to effectively combat this fatal pathogen. Over the last two decades, extensive studies have been carried out to develop specific inhibitors against virulence factors of B. anthracis such as capsule, protective antigen, lethal factor and edema factor. Research has also been focused in developing inhibitors of anthrax toxin receptors (including the use of receptor decoys) and host furin endoproteases which are required for activation of toxin. This review highlights the recent progress made in developing the diverse countermeasures for anthrax infections targeting B. anthracis virulence factors and their counterparts in host.

  3. A Comparison of the Adaptive Immune Response between Recovered Anthrax Patients and Individuals Receiving Three Different Anthrax Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Thomas R.; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Chitadze, Nazibriola; Little, Stephen F.; Webster, Wendy M.; Debes, Amanda K.; Saginadze, Salome; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Chubinidze, Mariam; Rivard, Robert G.; Tsanava, Shota; Dyson, Edward H.; Simpson, Andrew J. H.; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Trapaidze, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Several different human vaccines are available to protect against anthrax. We compared the human adaptive immune responses generated by three different anthrax vaccines or by previous exposure to cutaneous anthrax. Adaptive immunity was measured by ELISPOT to count cells that produce interferon (IFN)-γ in response to restimulation ex vivo with the anthrax toxin components PA, LF and EF and by measuring circulating IgG specific to these antigens. Neutralising activity of antisera against anthrax toxin was also assayed. We found that the different exposures to anthrax antigens promoted varying immune responses. Cutaneous anthrax promoted strong IFN-γ responses to all three antigens and antibody responses to PA and LF. The American AVA and Russian LAAV vaccines induced antibody responses to PA only. The British AVP vaccine produced IFN-γ responses to EF and antibody responses to all three antigens. Anti-PA (in AVA and LAAV vaccinees) or anti-LF (in AVP vaccinees) antibody titres correlated with toxin neutralisation activities. Our study is the first to compare all three vaccines in humans and show the diversity of responses against anthrax antigens. PMID:27007118

  4. A Comparison of the Adaptive Immune Response between Recovered Anthrax Patients and Individuals Receiving Three Different Anthrax Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Laws, Thomas R; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Chitadze, Nazibriola; Little, Stephen F; Webster, Wendy M; Debes, Amanda K; Saginadze, Salome; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Chubinidze, Mariam; Rivard, Robert G; Tsanava, Shota; Dyson, Edward H; Simpson, Andrew J H; Hepburn, Matthew J; Trapaidze, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Several different human vaccines are available to protect against anthrax. We compared the human adaptive immune responses generated by three different anthrax vaccines or by previous exposure to cutaneous anthrax. Adaptive immunity was measured by ELISPOT to count cells that produce interferon (IFN)-γ in response to restimulation ex vivo with the anthrax toxin components PA, LF and EF and by measuring circulating IgG specific to these antigens. Neutralising activity of antisera against anthrax toxin was also assayed. We found that the different exposures to anthrax antigens promoted varying immune responses. Cutaneous anthrax promoted strong IFN-γ responses to all three antigens and antibody responses to PA and LF. The American AVA and Russian LAAV vaccines induced antibody responses to PA only. The British AVP vaccine produced IFN-γ responses to EF and antibody responses to all three antigens. Anti-PA (in AVA and LAAV vaccinees) or anti-LF (in AVP vaccinees) antibody titres correlated with toxin neutralisation activities. Our study is the first to compare all three vaccines in humans and show the diversity of responses against anthrax antigens.

  5. The Effect of Anthrax Bioterrorism on Emergency Department Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Robert M.; Reeves, Jabari; Houston, Sherard; McClung, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Study Objective: From September through December 2001, 22 Americans were diagnosed with anthrax, prompting widespread national media attention and public concern over bioterrorism. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the threat of anthrax bioterrorism on patient presentation to a West Coast emergency department (ED). Methods: This survey was conducted at an urban county ED in Oakland, CA between December 15, 2001 and February 15, 2002. During random 8-hour blocks, all adult patients presenting for flu or upper respiratory infection (URI) symptoms were surveyed using a structured survey instrument that included standard visual numerical and Likert scales. Results: Eighty-nine patients were interviewed. Eleven patients (12%) reported potential exposure risk factors. Eighty percent of patients watched television, read the newspaper, or listened to the radio daily, and 83% of patients had heard about anthrax bioterrorism. Fifty-five percent received a chest x-ray, 10% received either throat or blood cultures, and 28% received antibiotics. Twenty-one percent of patients surveyed were admitted to the hospital. Most patients were minimally concerned that they may have contracted anthrax (mean=3.3±3.3 where 0=no concern and 10=extremely concerned). Patient concern about anthrax had little influence on their decision to visit the ED (mean=2.8±3.0 where 0=no influence and 10=greatly influenced). Had they experienced their same flu or URI symptoms one year prior to the anthrax outbreak, 91% of patients stated they would have sought medical attention. Conclusions: After considerable exposure to media reports about anthrax, most patients in this urban West Coast ED population were not concerned about anthrax infection. Fear of anthrax had little effect on decisions to come to the ED, and most would have sought medical help prior to the anthrax outbreak. PMID:20847852

  6. Disinfection. [Wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.N.; McCreary, J.J.

    1982-06-01

    Methods of disinfection of wastewater including chlorination, ultraviolet radiation, ozone, and quaternary compounds are reviewed. Various analytical methods to detect residues of the disinfectants are described. The production of inorganic and nonvolatile organic compounds in conventional water treatment processes is reviewed. (KRM)

  7. Production and Purification of Anthrax Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-20

    11111 tl I I I,, I’ 1-11 ’If 0 I’ V*; c III) rI’ Tj I I!v DD 1473 EDITION OF C’ , I S NOVC XT 65 I:’. 01’,) -- - -- I ’~’A1I’:v -ir IN’S1 PA-. W?. n ...8217 10?- ’"!. Best Available Copy Anthrax toxin . a- n K . . . . . .. "Stephen H. Leppla i t * Bacteriology Division ./ U. S. Army Medical Research...Department of Defense. "*’ Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Clearance date - May 20, 1986 ’.* N

  8. The Seminal Literature of Anthrax Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    documents are combined to create a separate database, and all the references contained in these documents are ex- tracted. Identical references are combined...J Med 345 1607 27 ∗CDCP 2001 MMWR-Morbid Mortal W 50 941 27 Mayer TA 2001 JAMA-J Am Med Assoc 286 2549 24 Grinberg LM 2001 Modern Pathol 14 482 23...infrastructure and technology structure of the anthrax literature that text mining can provide. REFERENCES Abramova, F.A., Grinberg , L.M., Yampolskaya, O.V

  9. Studies on egg disinfection.

    PubMed

    Adler, H E; DaMassa, A J; Scott, W F

    1979-07-01

    Various concentrations of alkyldimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (QAC), Na2CO3, and ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) were tested for antimicrobial activity singly and in combination against Escherichia coli, Arizona hinshawii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity of the reagents were evaluated in embryonating eggs, trypticase soy broth, and a medium containing lecithin. Toxicity of the chemicals was assayed in embryonating eggs. An appraisal was made of an egg-washing solution composed of 250 ppm QAC, 100 ppm Na2CO3, and 10 and 100 ppm EDTA. The mixture was effective and nontoxic for this purpose. All egg treatments had an adverse effect on fertility and hatchability. Using the temperature differential procedure in egg dipping, the disinfectant mixture was relatively nontoxic if 10 ppm EDTA was used with 3000 ppm tylosin tartrate. One hundred parts per million of the chelator in the dip solution caused excessive embryo mortality due to synergistic toxicity with the antibiotic. The germicidal action of the QAC solution was markedly increased with Na2CO3. Ten parts per million EDTA did not improve the biocidal effect of QAC solutions in distilled water but increased bactericidal activity in tap water that contained 16 ppm Ca and 22 ppm Mg.

  10. Injectional anthrax - new presentation of an old disease.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Kassirer, M; Aran, A A

    2014-08-14

    Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) has three distinct clinical presentations depending on the route of exposure: cutaneous, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax. Each of these can lead to secondary bacteraemia and anthrax meningitis. Since 2009,anthrax has emerged among heroin users in Europe,presenting a novel clinical manifestation, 'injectional anthrax', which has been attributed to contaminated heroin distributed throughout Europe; before 2009 only one case was reported. During 2012 and 2013,new cases of injectional anthrax were diagnosed in Denmark, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.Here we present a comprehensive review of the literature and information derived from different reporting systems until 31 December 2013. Overall 70 confirmed cases were reported, with 26 fatalities (37% case fatality rate).The latest two confirmed cases occurred in March 2013. Thirteen case reports have been published,describing 18 confirmed cases. Sixteen of these presented as a severe soft tissue infection that differed clinically from cutaneous anthrax, lacked the characteristic epidemiological history of animal contact and ten cases required complimentary surgical debridement. These unfamiliar characteristics have led to delays of three to 12 days in diagnosis, inadequate treatment and a high fatality rate. Clinicians' awareness of this recently described clinical entity is key for early 'and successful management of patients.

  11. Inactivation of an enterovirus by airborne disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of airborne disinfectants on bacteria, fungi and spores has been reported. However, the issue of the virucidal effect of disinfectants spread by fogging has not been studied thoroughly. Methods A procedure has been developed to determine the virucidal activity of peracetic acid-based airborne disinfectants on a resistant non-enveloped virus poliovirus type 1. This virus was laid on a stainless carrier. The products were spread into the room by hot fogging at 55°C for 30 minutes at a concentration of 7.5 mL.m-3. Poliovirus inoculum, supplemented with 5%, heat inactivated non fat dry organic milk, were applied into the middle of the stainless steel disc and were dried under the air flow of a class II biological safety cabinet at room temperature. The Viral preparations were recovered by using flocked swabs and were titered on Vero cells using the classical Spearman-Kärber CPE reading method, the results were expressed as TCID50.ml-1. Results The infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula was kept at 105 TCID50.mL-1 up to 150 minutes at room temperature. Dried inocula exposed to airborne peracetic acid containing disinfectants were recovered at 60 and 120 minutes post-exposition and suspended in culture medium again. The cytotoxicity of disinfectant containing medium was eliminated through gel filtration columns. A 4 log reduction of infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula exposed to peracetic-based airborne disinfectant was obtained. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the virucidal activity of airborne disinfectants can be tested on dried poliovirus. PMID:23587047

  12. Inactivation of an enterovirus by airborne disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Thevenin, Thomas; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hober, Didier

    2013-04-15

    The activity of airborne disinfectants on bacteria, fungi and spores has been reported. However, the issue of the virucidal effect of disinfectants spread by fogging has not been studied thoroughly. A procedure has been developed to determine the virucidal activity of peracetic acid-based airborne disinfectants on a resistant non-enveloped virus poliovirus type 1. This virus was laid on a stainless carrier. The products were spread into the room by hot fogging at 55°C for 30 minutes at a concentration of 7.5 mL.m(-3). Poliovirus inoculum, supplemented with 5%, heat inactivated non fat dry organic milk, were applied into the middle of the stainless steel disc and were dried under the air flow of a class II biological safety cabinet at room temperature. The Viral preparations were recovered by using flocked swabs and were titered on Vero cells using the classical Spearman-Kärber CPE reading method, the results were expressed as TCID50.ml(-1). The infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula was kept at 10(5) TCID50.mL(-1) up to 150 minutes at room temperature. Dried inocula exposed to airborne peracetic acid containing disinfectants were recovered at 60 and 120 minutes post-exposition and suspended in culture medium again. The cytotoxicity of disinfectant containing medium was eliminated through gel filtration columns. A 4 log reduction of infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula exposed to peracetic-based airborne disinfectant was obtained. This study demonstrates that the virucidal activity of airborne disinfectants can be tested on dried poliovirus.

  13. Sterilization and disinfection in the physician's office.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, D C; Skidmore, A G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the principles and practice of sterilization and disinfection of medical instruments in the office setting. DATA SOURCES: Searches of MEDLINE for articles published from 1980 to 1990 on disinfection, sterilization, cross infection, surgical instruments and iatrogenic disease, bibliographies, standard texts and reference material located in a central processing department. STUDY SELECTION: We reviewed surveys of decontamination practices in physicians' offices, reviews of current recommendations for office decontamination procedures, case reports of cross infection in offices and much of the standard reference material on decontamination theory and practice. DATA SYNTHESIS: There have been few surveys of physicians' decontamination practices and few case reports of cross infection. Office practitioners have little access to practical information on sterilization and disinfection. CONCLUSION: The increasing threat of cross infection from medical instruments calls for greater knowledge about decontamination. We have adapted material from various sources and offer a primer on the subject. PMID:1913427

  14. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeyong; Paek, Domyung

    2016-01-01

    Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet.

  15. Epidemic Anthrax in the Eighteenth Century, the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Anthrax has been described as a veterinary disease of minor importance to clinical medicine, causing occasional occupational infections in single cases or clusters. Its potential for rapid and widespread epidemic transmission under natural circumstances has not been widely appreciated. A little-known 1770 epidemic that killed 15,000 people in Saint-Domingue (modern Haiti) was probably intestinal anthrax. The epidemic spread rapidly throughout the colony in association with consumption of uncooked beef. Large-scale, highly fatal epidemics of anthrax may occur under unusual but natural circumstances. Historical information may not only provide important clues about epidemic development but may also raise awareness about bioterrorism potential. PMID:12396933

  16. A Review of Current Disinfectants for Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Koo, Ja Seol; Park, Jeong Bae; Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is gaining popularity for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, concerns over endoscope-related nosocomial infections are increasing, together with interest by the general public in safe and efficient endoscopy. For this reason, reprocessing the gastrointestinal endoscope is an important step for effective performance of endoscopy. Disinfectants are essential to the endoscope reprocessing procedure. Before selecting an appropriate disinfectant, their characteristics, limitations and means of use must be fully understood. Herein, we review the characteristics of several currently available disinfectants, including their uses, potency, advantages, and disadvantages. Most disinfectants can be used to reprocess gastrointestinal endoscopes if the manufacturer's guidelines are followed. The selection and use of a suitable disinfectant depends on the individual circumstances of each endoscopy suite. PMID:23964330

  17. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Jürgen; Exner, Martin; French, Gary; Chartier, Yves; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gemein, Stefanie; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heudorf, Ursel; Kramer, Axel; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed “The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention”. The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper. Aim: Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges. Methods and findings: After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects. Conclusions: Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection. PMID:23967396

  18. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of anthrax and bioterrorism-related anthrax.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    The spore-forming Bacillus anthracis must be considered as one of the most serious potential biological weapons. The recent cases of anthrax caused by a deliberate release reported in 2001 in the United States point to the necessity of early recognition of this disease. Infection in humans most often involves the skin, and more rarely the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. Inhalational anthrax is of particular interest for possible deliberate release: it is a life-threatening disease and early diagnosis and treatment can significantly decrease the mortality rate. Treatment consists of massive doses of antibiotics and supportive care. Isolation is not necessary. Antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin are recommended for post-exposure prophylaxis during 60 days.

  19. Evaluation of intravenous anthrax immune globulin for treatment of inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Mytle, Nutan; Hopkins, Robert J; Malkevich, Nina V; Basu, Subhendu; Meister, Gabriel T; Sanford, Daniel C; Comer, Jason E; Van Zandt, Kristopher E; Al-Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kramer, William G; Howard, Cris; Daczkowski, Nancy; Chakrabarti, Ajoy C; Ionin, Boris; Nabors, Gary S; Skiadopoulos, Mario H

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis toxins can be neutralized by antibodies against protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxins. Anthrivig (human anthrax immunoglobulin), also known as AIGIV, derived from plasma of humans immunized with BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed), is under development for the treatment of toxemia following exposure to anthrax spores. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of AIGIV was assessed in naive animals and healthy human volunteers, and the efficacy of AIGIV was assessed in animals exposed via inhalation to aerosolized B. anthracis spores. In the clinical study, safety, tolerability, and PK were evaluated in three dose cohorts (3.5, 7.1, and 14.2 mg/kg of body weight of anti-PA IgG) with 30 volunteers per cohort. The elimination half-life of AIGIV in rabbits, nonhuman primates (NHPs), and humans following intravenous infusion was estimated to be approximately 4, 12, and 24 days, respectively, and dose proportionality was observed. In a time-based treatment study, AIGIV protected 89 to 100% of animals when administered 12 h postexposure; however, a lower survival rate of 39% was observed when animals were treated 24 h postexposure, underscoring the need for early intervention. In a separate set of studies, animals were treated on an individual basis upon detection of a clinical sign or biomarker of disease, namely, a significant increase in body temperature (SIBT) in rabbits and presence of PA in the serum of NHPs. In these trigger-based intervention studies, AIGIV induced up to 75% survival in rabbits depending on the dose and severity of toxemia at the time of treatment. In NHPs, up to 33% survival was observed in AIGIV-treated animals. (The clinical study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00845650.).

  20. Recombinant anthrax toxin receptor-Fc fusion proteins produced in plants protect rabbits against inhalational anthrax.

    PubMed

    Wycoff, Keith L; Belle, Archana; Deppe, Dorothée; Schaefer, Leah; Maclean, James M; Haase, Simone; Trilling, Anke K; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H; Geren, Isin N; Pawlik, Jennifer; Peterson, Johnny W

    2011-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax, a zoonotic disease caused by the inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores, has a ∼50% fatality rate even when treated with antibiotics. Pathogenesis is dependent on the activity of two toxic noncovalent complexes: edema toxin (EdTx) and lethal toxin (LeTx). Protective antigen (PA), an essential component of both complexes, binds with high affinity to the major receptor mediating the lethality of anthrax toxin in vivo, capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2). Certain antibodies against PA have been shown to protect against anthrax in vivo. As an alternative to anti-PA antibodies, we produced a fusion of the extracellular domain of human CMG2 and human IgG Fc, using both transient and stable tobacco plant expression systems. Optimized expression led to the CMG2-Fc fusion protein being produced at high levels: 730 mg/kg fresh leaf weight in Nicotiana benthamiana and 65 mg/kg in N. tabacum. CMG2-Fc, purified from tobacco plants, fully protected rabbits against a lethal challenge with B. anthracis spores at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight administered at the time of challenge. Treatment with CMG2-Fc did not interfere with the development of the animals' own immunity to anthrax, as treated animals that survived an initial challenge also survived a rechallenge 30 days later. The glycosylation of the Fc (or lack thereof) had no significant effect on the protective potency of CMG2-Fc in rabbits or on its serum half-life, which was about 5 days. Significantly, CMG2-Fc effectively neutralized, in vitro, LeTx-containing mutant forms of PA that were not neutralized by anti-PA monoclonal antibodies.

  1. [Delayed hypersensitivity after anthrax vaccination. I--Study of guinea pigs vaccinated against anthrax].

    PubMed

    Shlyakhov, E; Rubinstein, E

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate delayed hypersensitivity after anthrax vaccination, an Anthraxin skin test was performed in 682 guinea pigs at various times after immunization with veterinary unencapsulated active anthrax vaccine. Results were compared with those obtained in unimmunized control guinea pigs (n = 216), in guinea pigs that received a non-immunizing dose of live vaccine (n = 183) and in guinea pigs inoculated with inactivated vaccine (n = 120). Anthraxin skin tests were positive in the first postvaccination days. The incidence and intensity of positive tests peaked between two weeks and one month after vaccination and then gradually decreased during the first year. Study of resistance of guinea pigs to an inoculum at a lethal dose of a virulent strain of Bacillus anthracis showed a close correlation between positive tests and resistance. These findings demonstrate development of cell-mediated immunity after anthrax vaccination. The Anthraxin skin test should have practical applications for the production of vaccines and for evaluation of the immune status of vaccinated livestock [corrected].

  2. Exposure to anthrax toxin alters human leucocyte expression of anthrax toxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Harris, A; Ascough, S; Metan, G; Doganay, M; Ballie, L; Williamson, E D; Dyson, H; Robinson, J H; Sriskandan, S; Altmann, D M

    2013-07-01

    Anthrax is a toxin-mediated disease, the lethal effects of which are initiated by the binding of protective antigen (PA) with one of three reported cell surface toxin receptors (ANTXR). Receptor binding has been shown to influence host susceptibility to the toxins. Despite this crucial role for ANTXR in the outcome of disease, and the reported immunomodulatory consequence of the anthrax toxins during infection, little is known about ANTXR expression on human leucocytes. We characterized the expression levels of ANTXR1 (TEM8) on human leucocytes using flow cytometry. In order to assess the effect of prior toxin exposure on ANTXR1 expression levels, leucocytes from individuals with no known exposure, those exposed to toxin through vaccination and convalescent individuals were analysed. Donors could be defined as either 'low' or 'high' expressers based on the percentage of ANTXR1-positive monocytes detected. Previous exposure to toxins appears to modulate ANTXR1 expression, exposure through active infection being associated with lower receptor expression. A significant correlation between low receptor expression and high anthrax toxin-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed in previously infected individuals. We propose that there is an attenuation of ANTXR1 expression post-infection which may be a protective mechanism that has evolved to prevent reinfection.

  3. [Post anthrax vaccine delayed hypersensitivity. II--delayed hypersensitivity in humans vaccinated against anthrax].

    PubMed

    Shlyakhov, E; Rubinstein, E

    1994-01-01

    To detect cell immunity characterized by delayed postvaccination hypersensitivity to anthrax in man and assess its dynamics, vaccination using unencapsulated live anthrax vaccine was performed in 668 healthy volunteers. Vaccination was performed either by scarification (n = 172), subcutaneous injection (n = 202), or low-dose (n = 202) or high-dose (n = 83) inhalation. The anthraxin intradermal tests were performed in each patient at various times during the year following vaccination (D7, D15, D90, D180, D365). This study confirm that, regardless of the mode of administration, the vaccine induces cell-mediated immunity in man, as determined by positive anthraxine skin test. The incidence of positive tests decreases with time regardless of the mode of vaccination. After one year, the test remained positive in 34.8% of subjects vaccinated by subcutaneous injection, 37.5% vaccinated by low-dose inhalation, 34.2% vaccinated by high-dose inhalation, and 22.4% vaccinated by scarification. These findings are in agreement with those obtained in clinical epidemiological studies documenting the effectiveness of encapsulated live anthrax vaccine in man.

  4. Anthrax infection in bone meal from various countries of origin.

    PubMed

    Davies, D G; Harvey, R W

    1972-09-01

    Using animal inoculation, three out of six Lebanese and three out of nine Argentinian and two out of two Pakistan separate commercial consignments of bone meal imported during 1970 were found to be infected with anthrax.

  5. Anthrax infection in bone meal from various countries of origin

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. G.; Harvey, R. W. S.

    1972-01-01

    Using animal inoculation, three out of six Lebanese and three out of nine Argentinian and two out of two Pakistan separate commercial consignments of bone meal imported during 1970 were found to be infected with anthrax. PMID:4627264

  6. Cutaneous anthrax--the non-industrial hazard.

    PubMed

    Knight, A H; Wynne-Williams, C J; Willis, A T

    1969-02-15

    Two patients contracted cutaneous anthrax after contact with infected bone meal. Awareness of the risk of infection from this source may help in achieving early clinical diagnosis and a low fatality rate following effective antibiotic therapy.

  7. Human anthrax outbreak associated with livestock exposure: Georgia, 2012.

    PubMed

    Navdarashvili, A; Doker, T J; Geleishvili, M; Haberling, D L; Kharod, G A; Rush, T H; Maes, E; Zakhashvili, K; Imnadze, P; Bower, W A; Walke, H T; Shadomy, S V

    2016-01-01

    Human anthrax cases reported in the country of Georgia increased 75% from 2011 (n = 81) to 2012 (n = 142). This increase prompted a case-control investigation using 67 culture- or PCR-confirmed cases and 134 controls matched by residence and gender to investigate risk factor(s) for infection during the month before case onset. Independent predictors most strongly associated with disease in the multivariable modelling were slaughtering animals [odds ratio (OR) 7·3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·9-18·1, P 1 km; 15 (12%) of 125 had sick livestock; and 11 (9%) of 128 respondents reported finding dead livestock. We recommend joint public health and veterinary anthrax case investigations to identify areas of increased risk for livestock anthrax outbreaks, annual anthrax vaccination of livestock in those areas, and public awareness education.

  8. Cutaneous anthrax in an unusual location: case report.

    PubMed

    Sari, Tugba; Koruk, Suda Tekin

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous anthrax is well known, unlike anthrax of the lumbar region, which is not reported elsewhere. We present a case of anthrax of the lumbar region in a 50-year-old man. The infection was characterised by a wide, black eschar and oedema on an erythematous ground. After isolation of the Gram-positive bacilli from the skin lesions, prompt antibiotic treatment (intravenous sulbactam-ampicillin 1.5 g every six hours) was initiated. Following eradication of the bacilli after 14 days of antibiotic treatment, a split-thickness skin graft was applied. A diagnosis of anthrax depends on clinical suspicion. Early diagnosis, antibiotic and surgical treatment can facilitate the treatment and prevent development of complications.

  9. Anthrax lethal factor inhibitors as potential countermeasure of the infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V S Suneel; Malik, Siddharth; Grandhi, Pradeep; Dayam, Raveendra; Sarma, J A R P

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease, one of the virulence factor of anthrax infection. Three forms of the anthrax infection have been identified: cutaneous (through skin), gastrointestinal (through alimentary tract), and pulmonary (by inhalation of spores). Anthrax toxin is composed of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). Protective antigen mediates the entry of Lethal Factor/Edema Factor into the cytosol of host cells. Lethal factor (LF) inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inducing cell death, and EF is an adenylyl cyclase impairing host defenses. In the past few years, extensive studies are undertaken to design inhibitors targeting LF. The current review focuses on the small molecule inhibitors targeting LF activity and its structure activity relationships (SAR).

  10. Patent prospects toward therapeutics and diagnostics of anthrax.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Rashi; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Jain, Chakresh K

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is one of the deadly infectious disease as documented in the CDC website. In spite of the availability of appropriate antimicrobial agents, the mortality related with the anthrax remains high. The pathogenicity of B. anthracis is mainly accredited to the two foremost components: toxins and capsule. Virulence component of B. anthracis includes protective antigen (PA) which plays a vital role in pathogenesis, virulence protein edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). This search for novel therapeutic strategies that attack the proteins involved in the pathogenesis of anthrax and may potentially supplement antimicrobials being investigated. Currently, extensive attempts are in progress to develop novel helpful therapies to all of the virulence components: lethal factor, protective antigen, edema factor and the capsule of B. anthracis. This review discusses the potential anthrax therapeutic, prophylactic measures and diagnostic applications based on recent patents' prospects.

  11. Effect of Methodology on the Tuberculocidal Activity of a Glutaraldehyde-Based Disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Dauendorffer, J. N.; Laurain, C.; Weber, M.; Dailloux, M.

    1999-01-01

    Although official guidelines recommend a plate counting method for testing the susceptibility of mycobacteria to disinfectants, manufacturers usually prefer to employ the BACTEC procedure. Data showing that the BACTEC method overestimates the activity of a glutaraldehyde-based disinfectant against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in comparison with a conventional plate counting procedure are presented. PMID:10473443

  12. A case report of inhalation anthrax acquired naturally.

    PubMed

    Azarkar, Zohreh; Bidaki, Majid Zare

    2016-03-03

    Anthrax is a zoonotic occupational disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, a rod-shaped immobile aerobic gram-positive bacteria with spore. Anthrax occurs in humans randomly and with low frequency. Most cases of anthrax are acquired through contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products. This old disease became particularly important since 2001 that the biological spores were exploited in America. Depending on the transmission method of the disease, clinical manifestations occur in three classes: Cutaneous, respiratory, and gastrointestinal anthrax. The respiratory form is considered as the most fatal and a rare form of anthrax intending to show complicated and unusual manifestations. In this case report a rare case of inhalation anthrax acquired naturally in southeast of Iran is presented. A blind 65-year-old man, living in a rural area, was admitted with respiratory infection, fever, dyspnea, loss of appetite, and myalgia. The patient was treated with outpatient antibiotics a week ago. After admission, the patient was again treated for pneumonia, but there was no improvement despite treatment and the patient was suffering from septicemia symptoms. Radiographic images showed wide mediastinum. Bacillus anthracis was isolated from blood and sputum culture and the results were confirmed by colony morphology, biochemical reactions and PCR. The treatment was changed to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, and penicillin. On the second day of anthrax treatment, the patient was complicated with jaundice, elevation of liver enzymes, and a significant drop in hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet despite lack of obvious bleeding and was complicated with respiratory distress and sepsis and died a week after treatment. We could discover no specific exposure associated with anthrax infection for this patient. However, due to being located in an endemic and enzootic area, it is proposed that the exposure occurred through contact with infected airborne dust or an unknown

  13. America’s Food: Does Anthrax Pose A Threat?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    against United States livestock would sicken and kill the animals and contaminated meat could possibly arrive at the consumers’ table. Secondly, a direct...known, but normally confined to the Third World where meat is not inspected and perhaps not cooked thoroughly.8 The specific aim of this project is...contract gastrointestinal anthrax from consuming raw or undercooked contaminated meat . The known cases of gastrointestinal anthrax are the result of

  14. The Anthrax Vaccine Debate: A Medical Review for Commanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    anthrax infections and is caused when spores enter through the lungs , lodging in the alveoli, the microscopic air sacs where oxygen exchange with...the blood occurs. The anthrax spores may reside in the lung alveoli for several weeks before germinating.23 Macrophages, cells designed to consume...foreign bacteria as part of the body‘s immune system, engulf the spores and then migrate from the lungs to lymph nodes in the chest. Inside the

  15. Antitoxin Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eileen; Pillai, Satish K.; Bower, William A.; Hendricks, Katherine A.; Guarnizo, Julie T.; Hoyle, Jamechia D.; Gorman, Susan E.; Boyer, Anne E.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Concern about use of anthrax as a bioweapon prompted development of novel anthrax antitoxins for treatment. Clinical guidelines for the treatment of anthrax recommend antitoxin therapy in combination with intravenous antimicrobials; however, a large-scale or mass anthrax incident may exceed antitoxin availability and create a need for judicious antitoxin use. We conducted a systematic review of antitoxin treatment of inhalation anthrax in humans and experimental animals to inform antitoxin recommendations during a large-scale or mass anthrax incident. A comprehensive search of 11 databases and the FDA website was conducted to identify relevant animal studies and human reports: 28 animal studies and 3 human cases were identified. Antitoxin monotherapy at or shortly after symptom onset demonstrates increased survival compared to no treatment in animals. With early treatment, survival did not differ between antimicrobial monotherapy and antimicrobial-antitoxin therapy in nonhuman primates and rabbits. With delayed treatment, antitoxin-antimicrobial treatment increased rabbit survival. Among human cases, addition of antitoxin to combination antimicrobial treatment was associated with survival in 2 of the 3 cases treated. Despite the paucity of human data, limited animal data suggest that adjunctive antitoxin therapy may improve survival. Delayed treatment studies suggest improved survival with combined antitoxin-antimicrobial therapy, although a survival difference compared with antimicrobial therapy alone was not demonstrated statistically. In a mass anthrax incident with limited antitoxin supplies, antitoxin treatment of individuals who have not demonstrated a clinical benefit from antimicrobials, or those who present with more severe illness, may be warranted. Additional pathophysiology studies are needed, and a point-of-care assay correlating toxin levels with clinical status may provide important information to guide antitoxin use during a large-scale anthrax

  16. Antitoxin Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eileen; Pillai, Satish K; Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine A; Guarnizo, Julie T; Hoyle, Jamechia D; Gorman, Susan E; Boyer, Anne E; Quinn, Conrad P; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Concern about use of anthrax as a bioweapon prompted development of novel anthrax antitoxins for treatment. Clinical guidelines for the treatment of anthrax recommend antitoxin therapy in combination with intravenous antimicrobials; however, a large-scale or mass anthrax incident may exceed antitoxin availability and create a need for judicious antitoxin use. We conducted a systematic review of antitoxin treatment of inhalation anthrax in humans and experimental animals to inform antitoxin recommendations during a large-scale or mass anthrax incident. A comprehensive search of 11 databases and the FDA website was conducted to identify relevant animal studies and human reports: 28 animal studies and 3 human cases were identified. Antitoxin monotherapy at or shortly after symptom onset demonstrates increased survival compared to no treatment in animals. With early treatment, survival did not differ between antimicrobial monotherapy and antimicrobial-antitoxin therapy in nonhuman primates and rabbits. With delayed treatment, antitoxin-antimicrobial treatment increased rabbit survival. Among human cases, addition of antitoxin to combination antimicrobial treatment was associated with survival in 2 of the 3 cases treated. Despite the paucity of human data, limited animal data suggest that adjunctive antitoxin therapy may improve survival. Delayed treatment studies suggest improved survival with combined antitoxin-antimicrobial therapy, although a survival difference compared with antimicrobial therapy alone was not demonstrated statistically. In a mass anthrax incident with limited antitoxin supplies, antitoxin treatment of individuals who have not demonstrated a clinical benefit from antimicrobials, or those who present with more severe illness, may be warranted. Additional pathophysiology studies are needed, and a point-of-care assay correlating toxin levels with clinical status may provide important information to guide antitoxin use during a large-scale anthrax

  17. Treatment of Experimental Anthrax with Recombinant Capsule Depolymerase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    reports indicate that such an approach can be used to treat experimental infections with B. anthracis using phospholipase A2 (35) or Bacillus cereus using...Received 7 June 2007/Returned for modification 9 July 2007/Accepted 17 December 2007 Bacillus anthracis produces an antiphagocytic gamma-linked poly-D...target anthrax bacilli for neutrophil killing may lead to novel postexposure therapies. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, produces a

  18. Public health and bioterrorism: renewed threat of anthrax and smallpox.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Arūne; Luksiene, Zivile; Zagminas, Kestutis; Surkiene, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Bioterrorism is one of the main public health categorical domains. According to sociological analytics, in postmodern society terrorism is one of the real threats of the 21st century. While rare, the use of biological weapons has a long history. Recently, anthrax has been evaluated as one of the most dangerous biological weapons. Naturally occurring anthrax in humans is a disease acquired from contact with anthrax-infected animals or anthrax-contaminated animal products. Usually anthrax infection occurs in humans by three major routes: inhalational, cutaneous, and gastrointestinal. Inhalational anthrax is expected to account for most serious morbidity and most mortality. The clinical presentation of inhalation anthrax has been described as a two-stage illness. Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis. Antibiotics, anthrax globulin, corticosteroids, mechanical ventilation, vaccine are possible tools of therapy. Smallpox existed in two forms: variola major, which accounted for most morbidity and mortality, and a milder form, variola minor. Smallpox spreads from person to person primarily by droplet nuclei or aerosols expelled from the oropharynx of infected persons and by direct contact. In the event of limited outbreak with few cases, patients should be admitted to the hospital and confined to rooms that are under negative pressure and equipped with high-efficiency particulate air filtration. In larger outbreaks, home isolation and care should be the objective for most patients. Progress in detection, suitable vaccines, postexposure prophylaxis, infection control, and decontamination might be serious tools in fight against the most powerful biological weapon. To assure that the public health and healthcare system can respond to emergencies, the government should direct resources to strengthen the emergency-response system, create medication stockpiles, and improve the public health infrastructure.

  19. [Anthrax meningoencephalitis: a case report and review of Turkish literature].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Uysal, Burcu; Coşkun, Ramazan; Perçin, Duygu; Doğanay, Mehmet

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of anthrax is decreasing in Turkey, however, it is still endemic in some regions of the country. Although central nervous system involvement is rare in cases with anthrax, high mortality rates are significant. Here, we report a 46-years old woman who was anthrax meningoencephalitis. The patient was from Yozgat located in Central Anatolia, Turkey. Her history revealed that following peeling the skin of sheeps and consuming their meat a week ago, a lesion developed in her left forearm and she had been treated with penicilin G with the diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax in a local health center. The patient was admitted to the emergency room of our hospital due to increased headache and loss of conciousness and diagnosed as anthrax meningitis. Crytallized penicilin G (24 MU/day IV) and vancomycin (2 g/day IV) were initiated. The macroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample was haemorrhagic, white blood cell count was 40/mm3 (80% of neutrophil) and Gram staining of CSF yielded abundant gram-positive bacilli. The diagnosis was confirmed by the isolation of Bacillus anthracis from CSF culture. Although the isolate was susceptible to penicillin and dexamethasone was added to the treatment, the patient died. Review of the Turkish literature revealed seven cases of anthrax with central nervous system involvement between 1980-2008. One of the patients was an 11-years old boy and the others were adults aged between 19 and 64 years. The source of the infection was skin in four patients and inhalation in one patient. The most common findings in all of the patients were inhabitance in rural area, haemorrhagic CSF and loss of all patients despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, anthrax meningitis and meningoencephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic meningitis in areas where anthrax is endemic and high rate of mortality despite appropriate therapy should always be kept in mind.

  20. RAZOR EX anthrax air detection system.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Usha K; Christensen, Clarissa J; Crisp, Robert J; Vaughn, Michael B; Trauscht, Robert C; Gardner, Jordan R; Thatcher, Stephanie A; Clemens, Kristine M; Teng, David H F; Bird, Abigail; Ota, Irene M; Hadfield, Ted; Ryan, Valorie; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    The RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System, developed by Idaho Technology, Inc. (ITI), is a qualitative method for the detection of Bacillus anthracis spores collected by air collection devices. This system comprises a DNA extraction kit, a freeze-dried PCR reagent pouch, and the RAZOR EX real-time PCR instrument. Each pouch contains three assays, which distinguish potentially virulent B. anthracis from avirulent B. anthracis and other Bacillus species. These assays target the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids and chromosomal DNA. When all targets are detected, the instrument makes an "anthrax detected" call, meaning that virulence genes of the anthrax bacillus are present. This report describes results from AOAC Method Developer (MD) and Independent Laboratory Validation (ILV) studies, which include matrix, inclusivity/exclusivity, environmental interference, upper and lower LOD of DNA, robustness, product consistency and stability, and instrument variation testing. In the MD studies, the system met the acceptance criteria for sensitivity and specificity, and the performance was consistent, stable, and robust for all components of the system. For the matrix study, the acceptance criteria of 95/96 expected calls was met for three of four matrixes, clean dry filters being the exception. Ninety-four of the 96 clean dry filter samples tested gave the expected calls. The nucleic acid limit of detection was 5-fold lower than AOAC's acceptable minimum detection limit. The system demonstrated no tendency for false positives when tested with Bacillus cereus. Environmental substances did not inhibit accurate detection of B. anthracis. The ILV studies yielded similar results for the matrix and inclusivity/exclusivity studies. The ILV environmental interference study included environmental substances and environmental organisms. Subsoil at a high concentration was found to negatively interfere with the pXO1 reaction. No interference was observed from the environmental organisms. The

  1. Optimum Disinfection Properties and Commercially Available Disinfectants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    and its oyproducts have been negative (25). Sodium dichloro-s-triaztnetrione, also known as sodium dichloroisocyanurate , is the only promising...Candidates Criterion Chlorine dioxide Sodium dichloro-s- triazinetrione * Health effects : toxicity of chemical and byproducts less than HTH no more than...necesary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SU -GROUP :potable water, disinfectant; chlorine dioxide; sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione, 3-Chloro-4,4

  2. Anthrax: A disease of biowarfare and public health importance

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bioterrorism has received a lot of attention in the first decade of this century. Biological agents are considered attractive weapons for bioterrorism as these are easy to obtain, comparatively inexpensive to produce and exhibit widespread fear and panic than the actual potential of physical damage. Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), the etiologic agent of anthrax is a Gram positive, spore forming, non-motile bacterium. This is supposed to be one of the most potent BW agents because its spores are extremely resistant to natural conditions and can survive for several decades in the environment. B. anthracis spores enter the body through skin lesion (cutaneous anthrax), lungs (pulmonary anthrax), or gastrointestinal route (gastrointestinal anthrax) and germinate, giving rise to the vegetative form. Anthrax is a concern of public health also in many countries where agriculture is the main source of income including India. Anthrax has been associated with human history for a very long time and regained its popularity after Sept 2001 incidence in United States. The present review article describes the history, biology, life cycle, pathogenicity, virulence, epidemiology and potential of B. anthracis as biological weapon. PMID:25610847

  3. In-office microwave disinfection of soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.G.; Rechberger, J.; Grant, T.; Holden, B.A. )

    1990-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an in-office microwave disinfection procedure which allowed for the disinfection of up to 40 soft contact lenses at one time. Ciba AOSept cases filled with sterile unpreserved saline were contaminated with one of six FDA test challenge microorganisms at a concentration of approximately 10(3) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Twenty cases were placed on the rotating plate of a standard 2450 MHz 650 W microwave oven in a 10-cm diameter circle. The cases were exposed to high intensity microwave irradiation for periods of 0 to 15 min. None of the 6 microorganisms evaluated survived 2 min or longer of microwave exposure. Our findings indicated that microwave irradiation can be a convenient, rapid, and effective method of disinfecting a number of soft contact lenses at one time and thus adaptable as an in-office soft contact lens disinfection procedure.

  4. STUDIES ON IMMUNITY IN ANTHRAX X.

    PubMed Central

    Puziss, Milton; Wright, George G.

    1963-01-01

    Puziss, Milton (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and George G. Wright. Studies on immunity in anthrax. X. Gel-adsorbed protective antigen for immunization of man. J. Bacteriol. 85:230–236. 1963.—Protective antigen in filtrates of anaerobic cultures of Bacillus anthracis was not readily precipitable by alum or other aluminum salts, but was adsorbed onto a preformed aluminum hydroxide gel under specific conditions. The adsorbed product was highly effective in immunizing rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice against challenge with virulent B. anthracis spores. Gel-adsorbed anaerobic antigens preserved with 1:10,000 thimerosal were unstable on storage at 4 C; replacement of this preservative with 1:40,000 benzethonium chloride produced a more stable product. Addition of 0.0009% formalin further increased the stability during accelerated aging at 37 C. The final product had high protective activity in animals and was well tolerated in man. PMID:13972632

  5. Emergency response to an anthrax attack

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Lawrence M.; Craft, David L.; Kaplan, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare various emergency responses in the event of an airborne anthrax attack. The system consists of an atmospheric dispersion model, an age-dependent dose–response model, a disease progression model, and a set of spatially distributed two-stage queueing systems consisting of antibiotic distribution and hospital care. Our results underscore the need for the extremely aggressive and timely use of oral antibiotics by all asymptomatics in the exposure region, distributed either preattack or by nonprofessionals postattack, and the creation of surge capacity for supportive hospital care via expanded training of nonemergency care workers at the local level and the use of federal and military resources and nationwide medical volunteers. The use of prioritization (based on disease stage and/or age) at both queues, and the development and deployment of modestly rapid and sensitive biosensors, while helpful, produce only second-order improvements. PMID:12651951

  6. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures: MB-17-03

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about ATMP - SOP Neutralization Confirmation Procedures for the AOAC Use-dilution method (UDM), the AOAC Germicidal Spray Products as Disinfectants Test (GSPT) and the Disinfectant Towelette Test (DTT) - MB-17-03

  7. Anthrax edema toxin impairs clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Sastalla, Inka; Tang, Shixing; Crown, Devorah; Liu, Shihui; Eckhaus, Michael A; Hewlett, Indira K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2012-02-01

    The anthrax edema toxin (ET) of Bacillus anthracis is composed of the receptor-binding component protective antigen (PA) and of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic moiety, edema factor (EF). Uptake of ET into cells raises intracellular concentrations of the secondary messenger cyclic AMP, thereby impairing or activating host cell functions. We report here on a new consequence of ET action in vivo. We show that in mouse models of toxemia and infection, serum PA concentrations were significantly higher in the presence of enzymatically active EF. These higher concentrations were not caused by ET-induced inhibition of PA endocytosis; on the contrary, ET induced increased PA binding and uptake of the PA oligomer in vitro and in vivo through upregulation of the PA receptors TEM8 and CMG2 in both myeloid and nonmyeloid cells. ET effects on protein clearance from circulation appeared to be global and were not limited to PA. ET also impaired the clearance of ovalbumin, green fluorescent protein, and EF itself, as well as the small molecule biotin when these molecules were coinjected with the toxin. Effects on injected protein levels were not a result of general increase in protein concentrations due to fluid loss. Functional markers for liver and kidney were altered in response to ET. Concomitantly, ET caused phosphorylation and activation of the aquaporin-2 water channel present in the principal cells of the collecting ducts of the kidneys that are responsible for fluid homeostasis. Our data suggest that in vivo, ET alters circulatory protein and small molecule pharmacokinetics by an as-yet-undefined mechanism, thereby potentially allowing a prolonged circulation of anthrax virulence factors such as EF during infection.

  8. The higher disinfectant resistance of nosocomial isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca: how reliable are indicator organisms in disinfectant testing?

    PubMed

    Gebel, J; Sonntag, H-G; Werner, H-P; Vacata, V; Exner, M; Kistemann, T

    2002-04-01

    The Children's Clinic in Giessen, Germany recently reported several severe infections with Klebsiella oxytoca resulting in deaths of two neonates. The putative source of the infections was a contaminated infusion solution. The resistance to disinfectant of the K. oxytoca isolates was investigated in three independent laboratories and was indeed found to be significantly increased. Comparative tests with standard strains of K. oxytoca and other recommended bacterial surrogates showed the disinfection procedures used were fully effective. The higher resistance of the nosocomial isolates may have developed due to improper handling and storage of the cleaning utensils. This report describes the events and draws conclusions concerning the use of disinfectants, the treatment of cleaning utensils, the reliability of procedures for testing disinfectants, and suggests additional measures.

  9. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How to boil and disinfect water to kill most disease-causing microorganisms during emergency situations where regular water service has been interrupted and local authorities recommend using only bottled water, boiled water, or disinfected water.

  11. An Aggregate of Four Anthrax Cases during the Dry Summer of 2011 in Epirus, Greece.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, Georgios; Lolis, Christos J; Tsartsarakis, Antonios; Kalogeropoulos, Chris; Leveidiotou-Stefanou, Stamatina; Bartzokas, Aristidis; Bassukas, Ioannis D

    2016-01-01

    Human anthrax is currently a sporadic disease in Europe, without significant regional clustering. To report an unexpected aggregate of anthrax cases and correlate local climatic factors with yearly anthrax admissions. Clinical description of a geographical-temporal anthrax aggregate, correlation of disease admissions with local weather data in the period 2001-2014 and literature reports of anthrax clusters from Europe in the last 20 years. We identified 5 cases, all cutaneous: an unexpected aggregate of 4 cases in mid-summer 2011 (including a probable human-to-human transmission) and a sporadic case in August 2005, all in relatively dry periods (p < 0.05). Remarkably, 3/6 reports of human anthrax aggregates from Europe were observed in Balkan Peninsula countries in the year 2011. In the light of the predicted climatic change, unexpected anthrax aggregates during dry periods in southern Europe underscore the risk of future anthrax re-emergence on this continent. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. [Necrotic lesion of the lip and cough with fever: cutaneous and pulmonary anthrax].

    PubMed

    Bennaoui, F; Draiss, G; Bourrous, M; Bouskraoui, M

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax disease is an anthropozoonosis caused by Bacillus anthracis. It appears in three clinical forms: pulmonary, intestinal, and cutaneous. We report a case of pulmonary and cutaneous anthrax in a one-year-old Moroccan infant.

  13. Predictability of anthrax infection in the Serengeti, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Katie; Lembo, Tiziana; Bessell, Paul; Auty, Harriet; Packer, Craig; Halliday, Jo; Beesley, Cari A.; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Ernest, Eblate; Mentzel, Christine; Metzger, Kristine L.; Mlengeya, Titus; Stamey, Karen; Roberts, Keith; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Anthrax is endemic throughout Africa, causing considerable livestock and wildlife losses and severe, sometimes fatal, infection in humans. Predicting the risk of infection is therefore important for public health, wildlife conservation and livestock economies. However, because of the intermittent and variable nature of anthrax outbreaks, associated environmental and climatic conditions, and diversity of species affected, the ecology of this multihost pathogen is poorly understood. We explored records of anthrax from the Serengeti ecosystem in north-west Tanzania where the disease has been documented in humans, domestic animals and a range of wildlife. Using spatial and temporal case-detection and seroprevalence data from wild and domestic animals, we investigated spatial, environmental, climatic and species-specific associations in exposure and disease. Anthrax was detected annually in numerous species, but large outbreaks were spatially localized, mostly affecting a few focal herbivores. Soil alkalinity and cumulative weather extremes were identified as useful spatial and temporal predictors of exposure and infection risk, and for triggering the onset of large outbreaks. Interacting ecological and behavioural factors, specifically functional groups and spatiotemporal overlap, helped to explain the variable patterns of infection and exposure among species. Synthesis and applications. Our results shed light on ecological drivers of anthrax infection and suggest that soil alkalinity and prolonged droughts or rains are useful predictors of disease occurrence that could guide risk-based surveillance. These insights should inform strategies for managing anthrax including prophylactic livestock vaccination, timing of public health warnings and antibiotic provision in high-risk areas. However, this research highlights the need for greater surveillance (environmental, serological and case-detection-orientated) to determine the mechanisms underlying anthrax dynamics

  14. The receptors that mediate the direct lethality of anthrax toxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Hoover, Benjamin; Leppla, Stephen H

    2012-12-27

    Tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2) are the two well-characterized anthrax toxin receptors, each containing a von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain responsible for anthrax protective antigen (PA) binding. Recently, a cell-based analysis was used to implicate another vWA domain-containing protein, integrin β1 as a third anthrax toxin receptor. To explore whether proteins other than TEM8 and CMG2 function as anthrax toxin receptors in vivo, we challenged mice lacking TEM8 and/or CMG2. Specifically, we used as an effector protein the fusion protein FP59, a fusion between the PA-binding domain of anthrax lethal factor (LF) and the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. FP59 is at least 50-fold more potent than LF in the presence of PA, with 2 μg PA + 2 μg FP59 being sufficient to kill a mouse. While TEM8(-/-) and wild type control mice succumbed to a 5 μg PA + 5 μg FP59 challenge, CMG2(-/-) mice were completely resistant to this dose, confirming that CMG2 is the major anthrax toxin receptor in vivo. To detect whether any toxic effects are mediated by TEM8 or other putative receptors such as integrin β1, CMG2(-/-)/TEM8(-/-) mice were challenged with as many as five doses of 50 μg PA + 50 μg FP59. Strikingly, the CMG2(-/-)/TEM8(-/-) mice were completely resistant to the 5-dose challenge. These results strongly suggest that TEM8 is the only minor anthrax toxin receptor mediating direct lethality in vivo and that other proteins implicated as receptors do not play this role.

  15. Predictability of anthrax infection in the Serengeti, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Katie; Lembo, Tiziana; Bessell, Paul; Auty, Harriet; Packer, Craig; Halliday, Jo; Beesley, Cari A; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Ernest, Eblate; Mentzel, Christine; Metzger, Kristine L; Mlengeya, Titus; Stamey, Karen; Roberts, Keith; Wilkins, Patricia P; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2011-06-10

    Anthrax is endemic throughout Africa, causing considerable livestock and wildlife losses and severe, sometimes fatal, infection in humans. Predicting the risk of infection is therefore important for public health, wildlife conservation and livestock economies. However, because of the intermittent and variable nature of anthrax outbreaks, associated environmental and climatic conditions, and diversity of species affected, the ecology of this multihost pathogen is poorly understood.We explored records of anthrax from the Serengeti ecosystem in north-west Tanzania where the disease has been documented in humans, domestic animals and a range of wildlife. Using spatial and temporal case-detection and seroprevalence data from wild and domestic animals, we investigated spatial, environmental, climatic and species-specific associations in exposure and disease.Anthrax was detected annually in numerous species, but large outbreaks were spatially localized, mostly affecting a few focal herbivores.Soil alkalinity and cumulative weather extremes were identified as useful spatial and temporal predictors of exposure and infection risk, and for triggering the onset of large outbreaks.Interacting ecological and behavioural factors, specifically functional groups and spatiotemporal overlap, helped to explain the variable patterns of infection and exposure among species.Synthesis and applications. Our results shed light on ecological drivers of anthrax infection and suggest that soil alkalinity and prolonged droughts or rains are useful predictors of disease occurrence that could guide risk-based surveillance. These insights should inform strategies for managing anthrax including prophylactic livestock vaccination, timing of public health warnings and antibiotic provision in high-risk areas. However, this research highlights the need for greater surveillance (environmental, serological and case-detection-orientated) to determine the mechanisms underlying anthrax dynamics.

  16. 9 CFR 311.10 - Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis, bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle, blackleg, bluetongue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis... DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.10 Anaplasmosis, anthrax... condemned: (1) Anthrax. (2) Blackleg. (3) Unhealed vaccine lesions (vaccinia). (4) Strangles. (5) Purpura...

  17. 9 CFR 311.10 - Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis, bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle, blackleg, bluetongue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis... DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.10 Anaplasmosis, anthrax... condemned: (1) Anthrax. (2) Blackleg. (3) Unhealed vaccine lesions (vaccinia). (4) Strangles. (5) Purpura...

  18. An overview of anthrax infection including the recently identified form of disease in injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) can be highly lethal. Two recent outbreaks related to contaminated mail in the USA and heroin in the UK and Europe and its potential as a bioterrorist weapon have greatly increased concerns over anthrax in the developed world. Methods This review summarizes the microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anthrax. Results and conclusions Anthrax, a gram-positive bacterium, has typically been associated with three forms of infection: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and inhalational. However, the anthrax outbreak among injection drug users has emphasized the importance of what is now considered a fourth disease form (i.e., injectional anthrax) that is characterized by severe soft tissue infection. While cutaneous anthrax is most common, its early stages are distinct and prompt appropriate treatment commonly produces a good outcome. However, early symptoms with the other three disease forms can be nonspecific and mistaken for less lethal conditions. As a result, patients with gastrointestinal, inhalational, or injectional anthrax may have advanced infection at presentation that can be highly lethal. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with gram stain and culture from blood or tissue followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR). While antibiotics are the mainstay of anthrax treatment, use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists are a consideration. Prompt surgical therapy appears to be important for successful management of injectional anthrax. PMID:22527064

  19. 9 CFR 311.10 - Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis, bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle, blackleg, bluetongue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis... DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.10 Anaplasmosis, anthrax... condemned: (1) Anthrax. (2) Blackleg. (3) Unhealed vaccine lesions (vaccinia). (4) Strangles. (5) Purpura...

  20. 9 CFR 311.10 - Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis, bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle, blackleg, bluetongue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis... DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.10 Anaplasmosis, anthrax... condemned: (1) Anthrax. (2) Blackleg. (3) Unhealed vaccine lesions (vaccinia). (4) Strangles. (5) Purpura...

  1. 9 CFR 311.10 - Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis, bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle, blackleg, bluetongue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anaplasmosis, anthrax, babesiosis... DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.10 Anaplasmosis, anthrax... condemned: (1) Anthrax. (2) Blackleg. (3) Unhealed vaccine lesions (vaccinia). (4) Strangles. (5) Purpura...

  2. Investigation and control of anthrax outbreak at the human-animal interface, Bhutan, 2010.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Nirmal K; Tenzin; Wangdi, Karma; Dorji, Tshering; Migma; Dorjee, Jambay; Marston, Chung K; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-09-01

    In 2010, we investigated anthrax outbreak in Bhutan. A total of 43 domestic animals died, and cutaneous anthrax developed in 9 persons, and 1 died. All affected persons had contact with the carcasses of infected animals. Comprehensive preparedness and response guidelines are needed to increase public awareness of anthrax in Bhutan.

  3. 76 FR 34994 - Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax-Public Engagement Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax--Public Engagement Workshop AGENCY: Office of... workshop on July 7, 2011, to discuss vaccine to protect children from anthrax. This meeting is open to the... children from anthrax. The meeting will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. ADDRESSES: Washington Plaza Hotel,...

  4. Effects of different disinfectants on decontamination of laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    Tekin, I; Arican, I; Akcali, S; Sanlidag, T; Ozbakkaloglu, B

    2003-10-01

    Guidelines for controlling possible contamination of laryngoscopes should be formulated with the benefit of relevant experimental data. In this study, the effects of five different disinfectants commonly used for the disinfection of laryngoscopes are evaluated. We formed 14 groups, with 10 blades in each. The first 7 groups were contaminated with hospital related meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the remaining 7 groups with hospital related multiple resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). For the first group of blades, no disinfection procedure was carried out and, were assumed as a control group. Blades in remaining groups were rested for 10 minutes in containers containing 70% alcohol (II), 1/100 dilution of cetrimide (III), 1/100 dilution of chlorhexidine (IV), 1/10 dilution of chlorhexidine (V), 1/10 dilution of povidone iodine (VI), and 1/100 dilution of ammonium chloride (VII). Disinfectant used in a group was considered effective when growth was seen in 5 or less than 5 plates representing that group. All disenfectants tested were found effective on decontamination of laryngoscopes. Five different moderate level disinfectants, which are commonly used for the disinfection of laryngoscopes, have been found effective even on resistant hospital microorganisms like MRSA and P. aeruginosa. They may be the choices of the disinfectants, especially 1/10 dilution of chlorhexidine gluconate and 1/100 dilution of ammonium chloride.

  5. [Microbicidal efficacy of a new foam disinfectant].

    PubMed

    Votavá, M; Slitrová, J; Matusková, Z

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test efficacy of a newly developed foam disinfectant Hvĕzda S.C.H. using the standard procedures. The agent was initially intended for use as a detoxicant for the needs of the Army, Integrated Rescue System and Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech Republic and its active ingredient is hydrogen peroxide. Microbicidal efficacy of the agent was tested under the conditions required by the standards for the evaluation of bactericidal, fungicidal, sporicidal, mycobactericidal and virucidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics in health care settings, food, industrial, domestic and institutional areas and veterinary care facilities. In all of the efficacy tests used, the foam disinfectant Hvĕzda S.C.H. reduced density of test microorganisms under the prescribed conditions by at least eight orders of magnitude, even for much shorter exposure times (1, 5, 10 minutes) than usually prescribed by the standards. In conclusion, the foam disinfectant Hvĕzda S.C.H. easily met the requirements for the bactericidal, fungicidal, sporicidal, mycobactericidal and virucidal activity, with a reserve of several orders of magnitude, under the conditions prescribed by the standards for health care, community and veterinary settings.

  6. Role of disinfection in the Infection Prevention Multibarrier System.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Axel

    2007-09-13

    The role of disinfection in infection prevention has been analyzed over the past 50 years both in the form of benefit-risk evaluations as well as in an epidemiological sense. This has served as the basis for not only national and international guidelines and recommendations, but has also created the legal and normative framework for regulation of infection control (and hence of disinfection) in numerous and acts and ordinances. Likewise, today the efficacy of disinfection measures, user safety and environmental compatibility in line with the state of the art are assured. Compliance as regards the conductance of disinfection measures has increased accordingly. The user is able to select and correctly employ the disinfectant most suited to the intended disinfection procedure. The quality of the apparatus used has vastly improved since the coming into force of the German Medical Devices Act (MPG). And finally the preconditions for conductance of disinfection have become so matter of fact that it is easy to forget just what progress has been made here. This applies e.g. to the facilities now available for hand hygiene, for decontamination of instruments, laundry and bedpans with washer-disinfectors as well as for surface disinfection and drinking water disinfection. But it is the human being who continues to pose the greatest risk. Risk awareness does not always result in proper action being taken: it is hard to really grasp something that one cannot experience. As such, hand disinfection is often dispensed with, and without any sense of having done something wrong, the debate about the evidence of the usefulness of floor disinfection continues, and often medical practitioners fail to resort to exclusive automated decontamination of medical devices because of the costs incurred. Hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation establishments are obliged to set up a quality management system, and to continue developing this. This calls for a quality assurance system

  7. Effective reprocessing of reusable dispensers for surface disinfection tissues – the devil is in the details

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Degenhardt, Stina; Lackner, Sibylle; Ostermeyer, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has recently been reported that reusable dispensers for surface disinfection tissues may be contaminated, especially with adapted Achromobacter species 3, when products based on surface-active ingredients are used. Fresh solution may quickly become recontaminated if dispensers are not processed adequately. Methods: We evaluated the abilities of six manual and three automatic processes for processing contaminated dispensers to prevent recolonisation of a freshly-prepared disinfectant solution (Mikrobac forte 0.5%). Dispensers were left at room temperature for 28 days. Samples of the disinfectant solution were taken every 7 days and assessed quantitatively for bacterial contamination. Results: All automatic procedures prevented recolonisation of the disinfectant solution when a temperature of 60–70°C was ensured for at least 5 min, with or without the addition of chemical cleaning agents. Manual procedures prevented recontamination of the disinfectant solution when rinsing with hot water or a thorough cleaning step was performed before treating all surfaces with an alcohol-based disinfectant or an oxygen-releaser. Other cleaning and disinfection procedures, including the use of an alcohol-based disinfectant, did not prevent recolonisation. Conclusions: These results indicate that not all processes are effective for processing reusable dispensers for surface-disinfectant tissues, and that a high temperature during the cleaning step or use of a biofilm-active cleaning agent are essential. PMID:24653973

  8. Optic Atrophy Secondary to Preseptal Cutaneous Anthrax: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Metin; Çağatay, H. Hüseyin; Hüseyinoğlu, Nergiz; Ceylan, Erdinç; Gökçe, Gökçen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus anthracis, the agent of anthrax, is a nonmotile, aerobic gram-positive rod that can form very resistant spores in economically poor environments. Anthrax can manifest as cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational form. Cutaneous anthrax, caused by direct skin contact, presents with eschar, lymphadenopathy, and a febrile illness. The face and eyelids are most commonly involved in cutaneous anthrax. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with high fever and swelling of the right eyelid. One day later on re-examination, formation of ulcerous lesions in the right medial canthal region was observed, with general oedema in the upper and lower eyelids. The patient was evaluated as having cutaneous anthrax and medical treatment was continued until the 28th day; he was discharged from the hospital with no loss of vision. He returned for a follow-up examination after 2 months, with decreased visual acuity (

  9. A Mathematical Model of Anthrax Transmission in Animal Populations.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; van den Driessche, P; Yakubu, Abdul-Aziz

    2017-02-01

    A general mathematical model of anthrax (caused by Bacillus anthracis) transmission is formulated that includes live animals, infected carcasses and spores in the environment. The basic reproduction number [Formula: see text] is calculated, and existence of a unique endemic equilibrium is established for [Formula: see text] above the threshold value 1. Using data from the literature, elasticity indices for [Formula: see text] and type reproduction numbers are computed to quantify anthrax control measures. Including only herbivorous animals, anthrax is eradicated if [Formula: see text]. For these animals, oscillatory solutions arising from Hopf bifurcations are numerically shown to exist for certain parameter values with [Formula: see text] and to have periodicity as observed from anthrax data. Including carnivores and assuming no disease-related death, anthrax again goes extinct below the threshold. Local stability of the endemic equilibrium is established above the threshold; thus, periodic solutions are not possible for these populations. It is shown numerically that oscillations in spore growth may drive oscillations in animal populations; however, the total number of infected animals remains about the same as with constant spore growth.

  10. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  11. A MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO ANTHRAX INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rukmini; Chow, Carson C.; Bartels, John D.; Clermont, Gilles; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) can trigger an acute inflammatory response that results in multisystem organ failure and death. Previously, we developed a mathematical model of acute inflammation after gram-negative infection that had been matched qualitatively to literature data. We modified the properties of the invading bacteria in that model to those specific to B. anthracis and simulated the host response to anthrax infection. We simulated treatment strategies against anthrax in a genetically diverse population including the following: (1) antibiotic treatment initiated at various time points, (2) antiprotective antigen vaccine, and (3) a combination of antibiotics and vaccine. In agreement with studies in mice, our simulations showed that antibiotics only improve survival if administered early in the course of anthrax infection. Vaccination that leads to the formation of antibodies to protective antigen is anti-inflammatory and beneficial in averting shock and improving survival. However, antibodies to protective antigen alone are predicted not to be universally protective against anthrax infection. Rather, our simulations suggest that an optimal strategy would require both vaccination and antibiotic administration. PMID:18157069

  12. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  13. Why do UK military personnel refuse the anthrax vaccination?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dominic; Marteau, Theresa; Hotopf, Matthew; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the reasons why some UK military personnel refused the anthrax vaccination. Data were collected from 5,302 members of the UK Armed Forces who had been deployed to Iraq since 2003 and had been offered the anthrax vaccination. As part of a larger questionnaire, information was collected on acceptance or refusal of the vaccination. Twenty-eight percent of participants refused the anthrax vaccination; of these 51% indicated that they refused vaccination because of concern that it was being offered voluntarily. Reasons differed between those deployed during the war-fighting phase in Iraq, who were concerned about being supplied with insufficient or unclear information (75% vs. 66%), and those involved on subsequent deployments, who felt that there was no longer a risk that biological weapons would be used against them (61% vs. 43%). Thus, refusal rates were related to perception of the threat. In addition, our results indicated the importance of providing individuals with relevant information to aid them in making decisions to receive the anthrax vaccination or not. The findings provide evidence that for some people, the policy to increase confidence in the anthrax vaccination program may have led to a decrease in levels of trust.

  14. [Microbiological assesssment of efficiency chemothermal disinfection of blood contaminated hospital textiles].

    PubMed

    Röhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bozenna; Podgórska, Marta; Chojecka, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Thermal disinfection should be applied to laundering procedures of hospital textiles contaminated with blood. Currently, there is an increasing number of hospital textiles composed of cotton-polyester blends that cannot endure high temperatures of thermal disinfection. Besides, decreasing the temperature of chemothermal disinfection enhances the possibility of micro-organisms to survive the laundering procedure. The aim of this study was to prepare a new method for the microbiological evaluation of disinfecting laundering procedures for hospital textiles contaminated with blood. The bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants for chemothermal disinfection was determined by simulating a laundering procedure for hospital textiles in the laboratory according to procedure of National Institute of Hygiene - DF/05/03. Bioindicators cotton carriers inoculated with Enterococcus faecium were used for determinating the antibacterial effects for hospital textiles contaminated with blood. High concentrations of bovine albumin and/or sheep erythrocytes were used as substrate for simulating human blood. The results showed that the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants for chemothermal disinfection hospital textiles in the event of massive organic contamination--heavily soiled with blood, shall be evaluated using carrier test in following conditions: test organism- Enterococcus faecium, interfering substances--6 g/l bovine albumin solution added to preparation.

  15. CHLORINE DISINFECTION OF AEROMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial genus Aeromonas is currently listed on the USEPA's Candidate Contaminant List (CCL). Resistance to chemical disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. This study was designed to determine the inactivation kinetics of Aeromo...

  16. CHLORINE DISINFECTION OF AEROMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial genus Aeromonas is currently listed on the USEPA's Candidate Contaminant List (CCL). Resistance to chemical disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. This study was designed to determine the inactivation kinetics of Aeromo...

  17. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar.

    PubMed

    Marston, Chung K; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity.

  18. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Chung K.; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E.; Boyer, Anne E.; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R.; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity. PMID:27257909

  19. Dances with anthrax: wolves (Canis lupus) kill anthrax bacteremic plains bison (Bison bison bison) in southwestern Montana.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Asher, Valpa; Stokke, Stephen; Hunter, David L; Alexander, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the cause of anthrax, was recovered from two plains bison (Bison bison bison) cows killed by wolves (Canis lupus) in Montana, USA, without associated wolf mortality in July 2010. This bison herd experienced an epizootic in summer 2008, killing ∼ 8% of the herd, the first documented in the region in several decades. No wolf deaths were associated with the 2008 event. Surveillance has continued since 2008, with research, ranch, and wildlife personnel diligent during summer. As part of this, we tested wolf-killed bison and elk (Cervus elaphus) for anthrax during the 2010 summer using lateral flow immunochromatographic assays (LFIA). Two bison cows were positive for protective antigen, confirming active bacteremia. The LFIA results were confirmed with traditional bacteriology recovering viable B. anthracis. No wolf fatalities were associated with the bison deaths, despite consuming the meat. Low-level anthrax occurrence in large, rough terrain landscapes remains difficult to detect, particularly if mortality in the herbivore host is not a consequence of infection. In these instances, surveillance of predators with large home ranges may provide a more sensitive indicator of anthrax emergence or reemergence in such systems. Though speculative, it is also possible that anthrax infection in the bison increased predation risk. These results also suggest B. anthracis remains a threat to wildlife and associated livestock in southwestern Montana.

  20. Sverdlovsk Anthrax Outbreak: An Educational Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, S. J.; van der Vink, G.

    2002-05-01

    In April and May of 1979 an Anthrax epidemic broke out in the city of Sverdlovsk (now Ekaterinburg) in the former Soviet Union. Sixty-four people were reported to have died from the outbreak, although there is still debate concerning the actual number of victims. While Soviet officials initially attributed this outbreak to contaminated meat, the US Government maintained that the outbreak was due to a leakage from a biological weapons facility. We have created and implemented an undergraduate educational exercise based on the forensic analysis of this event. Students were provided case data of the victims, area satellite images and meteorological data. One goal of the exercise was for students to reconstruct the most probable scenario of events through valid inference based on the limited information and uncertainties associated with the data set. Another goal was to make students sensitive to issues of biological weapons and bioterrorism. The exercise was highly rated by students even before the events of September 11. There is a clear need to educate students, particularly in the sciences, to be aware of the signatures of terrorist activities. Evidence of terrorist activities is more likely to appear from unintended discoveries than from active intelligence gathering. We believe our national security can be enhanced by sensitizing those that monitor the natural environment to the signatures of terrorist activities through the types of educational exercises that we have developed.

  1. Wanted, an Anthrax vaccine: Dead or Alive?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A

    2005-01-01

    It has been more than 100 years since the realization that microbes are capable of causing disease. In that time, we have learned a great deal as to how each organism has adapted to the immune system so as to avoid elimination. As well, we have also learned an immense amount since Louis Pasteur first proposed that the solution to infectious diseases was to culture the microbes and attenuate their virulence, so as to use them as vaccines. From the optimism and promise of the 19th century and immunization as the ultimate answer to the invasion by the microbial world, to the scientific realities of the 21st century, it is of interest to retrace the steps of the earliest microbiologists cum immunologists, to realize how far we've come, as well as how far we yet have to go. This editorial focuses on the history of anthrax as a microbial disease, and the earliest efforts at producing a vaccine for its prevention. PMID:15836780

  2. Mechanisms of iron import in anthrax.

    PubMed

    Honsa, Erin Sarah; Maresso, Anthony William

    2011-06-01

    During an infection, bacterial pathogens must acquire iron from the host to survive. However, free iron is sequestered in host proteins, which presents a barrier to iron-dependent bacterial replication. In response, pathogens have developed mechanisms to acquire iron from the host during infection. Interestingly, a significant portion of the iron pool is sequestered within heme, which is further bound to host proteins such as hemoglobin. The copious amount of heme-iron makes hemoglobin an ideal molecule for targeted iron uptake during infection. While the study of heme acquisition is well represented in Gram-negative bacteria, the systems and mechanism of heme uptake in Gram-positive bacteria has only recently been investigated. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, represents an excellent model organism to study iron acquisition processes owing to a multifaceted lifecycle consisting of intra- and extracellular phases and a tremendous replicative potential upon infection. This review provides an in depth description of the current knowledge of B. anthracis iron acquisition and applies these findings to a general understanding of how pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria transport this critical nutrient during infection.

  3. Antimicrobial postexposure prophylaxis for anthrax: adverse events and adherence.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Colin W; Soriano-Gabarro, Montse; Zell, Elizabeth R; Hayslett, James; Lukacs, Susan; Goldstein, Susan; Factor, Stephanie; Jones, Joshua; Ridzon, Renee; Williams, Ian; Rosenstein, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    We collected data during postexposure antimicrobial prophylaxis campaigns and from a prophylaxis program evaluation 60 days after start of antimicrobial prophylaxis involving persons from six U.S. sites where Bacillus anthracis exposures occurred. Adverse events associated with antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent anthrax were commonly reported, but hospitalizations and serious adverse events as defined by Food and Drug Administration criteria were rare. Overall adherence during 60 days of antimicrobial prophylaxis was poor (44%), ranging from 21% of persons exposed in the Morgan postal facility in New York City to 64% of persons exposed at the Brentwood postal facility in Washington, D.C. Adherence was highest among participants in an investigational new drug protocol to receive additional antibiotics with or without anthrax vaccine--a likely surrogate for anthrax risk perception. Adherence of <60 days was not consistently associated with adverse events.

  4. Simulation modeling of anthrax spore dispersion in a bioterrorism incident.

    PubMed

    Reshetin, Vladimir P; Regens, James L

    2003-12-01

    Recent events have increased awareness of the risk posed by terrorist attacks. Bacillus anthracis has resurfaced in the 21st century as a deadly agent of bioterrorism because of its potential for causing massive civilian casualties. This analysis presents the results of a computer simulation of the dispersion of anthrax spores in a typical 50-story, high-rise building after an intentional release during a bioterrorist incident. The model simulates aerosol dispersion in the case of intensive, small-scale convection, which equalizes the concentration of anthrax spores over the building volume. The model can be used to predict the time interval required for spore dispersion throughout a building after a terrorist attack in a high-rise building. The analysis reveals that an aerosol release of even a relatively small volume of anthrax spores during a terrorist incident has the potential to quickly distribute concentrations that are infectious throughout the building.

  5. Experimental respiratory anthrax infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark S; Stagg, Anthony J; Nelson, Michelle; Pearce, Peter; Stevens, Daniel J; Scott, Elizabeth A M; Simpson, Andrew J H; Fulop, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is a rare but potentially fatal infection in man. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) was evaluated as a small non-human primate (NHP) model of inhalational anthrax infection, as an alternative to larger NHP species. The marmoset was found to be susceptible to inhalational exposure to Bacillus anthracis Ames strain. The pathophysiology of infection following inhalational exposure was similar to that previously reported in the rhesus and cynomolgus macaque and humans. The calculated LD50 for B. anthracis Ames strain in the marmoset was 1.47 × 103 colony-forming units, compared with a published LD50 of 5.5 × 104 spores in the rhesus macaque and 4.13 × 103 spores in the cynomolgus macaque. This suggests that the common marmoset is an appropriate alternative NHP and will be used for the evaluation of medical countermeasures against respiratory anthrax infection. PMID:18460069

  6. Effect of microwave disinfection on denture base adaptation and resin surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Evandro Afonso; Schmidt, Caroline Bom; Walber, Luiz Fernando; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of disinfection methods [chemical disinfection (immersion in 100 ppm chloride solution) or microwave disinfection (690 W for 6 min)] on the internal adaptation of denture bases and resin surface roughness. For the adaptation test, 18 maxillary denture bases were obtained from stone casts duplicated from a metallic master model and submitted to the following treatments: 1) control (no disinfection), 2) chemical disinfection or 3) microwave disinfection. Disinfection procedures were performed twice (T1, T2) with a 7-day interval between them. Internal adaptation was measured at baseline (T0) and after T1 and T2 by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between the resin base and the master model. For surface roughness measurement, 60 rectangular (5x10x40 mm) resin specimens were either mechanically or chemically polished and then submitted to the disinfection treatments. Surface roughness (Ra) was recorded after polishing (T0) and after T1 and T2. Data were analyzed by ANOVA GLM for repeated measures and Bonferroni correction at 5% significance level. Bases submitted to microwave disinfection had gradual increase of misfit, while bases immersed in chloride solution did not differ from the control group. Surface roughness increased in the mechanical polishing groups with microwave disinfection and decreased in the chemical polishing groups.

  7. In-Use Evaluation of Peracetic Acid for High-Level Disinfection of Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chenjiao, Wu; Hongyan, Zhang; Qing, Gu; Xiaoqi, Zhong; Liying, Gu; Ying, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Many high-level disinfectants have been used for disinfection of endoscopes such as 2% glutaraldehyde (GA), 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both GA and OPA are widely used in disinfection of endoscopes and have been previously discussed, but there is little research on the practical use of PAA as an endoscope disinfectant. An experimental model of a flexible gastrointestinal endoscope being contaminated with 9 strains of microorganism was designed. After the cleaning and disinfecting procedure was completed, we evaluated the biocidal activity (850 ppm PAA, 2% GA, and 0.55% OPA) on our flexible gastrointestinal endoscope model. We also evaluated sterilization effectiveness of PAA on other bacteria, including some antibiotic-resistant bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile). The residual bacterial colony count number of the PAA-disinfected endoscope was significantly lower than that of the GA- and OPA-disinfected endoscopes. The biocidal effect and efficiency of the endoscope disinfection by PAA appeared to be better than either the GA- or OPA-disinfected endoscope. PAA has demonstrated a good sterilization effect on other bacterial species; of particular note are common antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile. The results of this study demonstrate that PAA is a fast and effective high-level disinfectant for use in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes.

  8. Anthrax and the Geochemistry of Soils in the Contiguous ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Soil geochemical data from sample sites located in counties that reported cases or outbreaks of anthrax since 2000 were evaluated against counties within the same states (MN, MT, ND, NV, OR, SD and TX) that did not report cases or outbreaks. These data identified the elements Ca, Mn, P and Sr as having statistically significant differences in concentrations between county type (anthrax occurrence versus no occurrence) within the total data set or in a majority of the states. Preliminary elemental threshold values present prospective investigative tools that can be refined through future high-resolution studies and present a path forward for understanding the geochemical constraints of other pathogens.

  9. Reanalysis of the anthrax epidemic in Rhodesia, 1978-1984.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James M; Brediger, Walter; Albright, Thomas P; Smith-Gagen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, the largest epidemic of anthrax of the last 200 years was documented in a little known series of studies by Davies in The Central African Journal of Medicine. This epidemic involved thousands of cattle and 10,738 human cases with 200 fatalities in Rhodesia during the Counterinsurgency. Grossly unusual epidemiological features were noted that, to this day, have not been definitively explained. This study performed a historical reanalysis of the data to reveal an estimated geographic involvement of 245,750 km(2), with 171,990 cattle and 17,199 human cases. Here we present the first documented geotemporal visualization of the human anthrax epidemic.

  10. Thermal disinfection of hotels, hospitals, and athletic venues hot water distribution systems contaminated by Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Mouchtouri, Varvara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2007-11-01

    Legionella spp. (> or = 500 cfu liter(-1)) were detected in 92 of 497 water distribution systems (WDS) examined. Thermal disinfection was applied at 33 WDS. After the first and second application of the disinfection procedure, 15 (45.4%) and 3 (9%) positive for remedial actions WDS were found, respectively. Legionella pneumophila was more resistant to thermal disinfection than Legionella non-pneumophila spp. (relative risk [RR]=5.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1-35). WDS of hotels with oil heater were more easily disinfected than those with electrical or solar heater (RR=0.4 95% CI=0.2-0.8). Thermal disinfection seems not to be efficient enough to eliminate legionellae, unless repeatedly applied and in combination with extended heat flushing, and faucets chlorine disinfection.

  11. Determination of phenolic disinfectants in consumer products by capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lianmei; Wang, Jinyan; He, Yan; Ye, Jiannong; Chu, Qingcui

    2010-08-01

    Numerous disinfection products are widely used in daily life to kill pathogenic microorganisms. However, most disinfectants are organic compounds that might be hazardous to the environment and humans when used excessively. Phenolic disinfectants in disinfection products are investigated using a high-performance capillary electrophoresis-amperometric detection method. Under the optimum conditions, five commonly used disinfectants can be well-separated within 19 min at the separation voltage of 18 kV in a 80 mmol/L borax running buffer (pH 9.2), and adequate extraction was obtained with ethanol for the determination of the five compounds. Satisfactory recovery (93.5-106.0%), intra-day repeatability of the peak current (< 2.9%), and detection limits (1.6 x 10(-7) - 3.8 x 10(-8) g/mL) for the method are achieved. This proposed procedure is successfully used to analyze different samples of disinfection products.

  12. Commercial Disinfectants During Disinfection Process Validation: More Failures than Success

    PubMed Central

    Chumber, Sushil Kumar; Khanduri, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Disinfection process validation is mandatory before introduction of a new disinfectant in hospital services. Commercial disinfection brands often question existing hospital policy claiming greater efficacy and lack of toxicity of their products. Inadvertent inadequate disinfection leads to morbidity, patient’s economic burden, and the risk of mortality. Aim To evaluate commercial disinfectants for high, intermediate and low-level disinfection so as to identify utility for our routine situations. Materials and Methods This laboratory based experiment was conducted at St Stephen Hospital, Delhi during July-September 2013. Twelve commercial disinfectants: Sanidex®, Sanocid®, Cidex®, SekuSept Aktiv®, BIB Forte®, Alprojet W®, Desnet®, Sanihygiene®, Incidin®, D125®, Lonzagard®, and Glutishield® were tested. Time-kill assay (suspension test) was performed against six indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhi, Bacillus cereus, and Mycobacterium fortuitum). Low and high inoculum (final concentrations 1.5X106 and 9X106 cfu/ml) of the first five bacteria while only low level of M. fortuitum was tested. Results Cidex® (2.4% Glutaraldehyde) performed best as high level disinfectant while newer quarternary ammonium compounds (QACs) (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were good at low level disinfection. Sanidex® (0.55% Ortho-pthalaldehyde) though mycobactericidal took 10 minutes for sporicidal activity. Older QAC containing BIB Forte® and Desnet® took 20 minutes to fully inhibit P. aeruginosa. All disinfectants effectively reduced S. Typhi to zero counts within 5 minutes. Conclusion Cidex® is a good high-level disinfectant while newer QACs (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were capable low-level disinfectants. PMID:27656441

  13. Medical device disinfection by dense carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bertoloni, G; Bertucco, A; Rassu, M; Vezzù, K

    2011-01-01

    The employment of disinfection-sterilisation processes for the re-use of medical devices without negative effects such as the presence of toxic residues, material degradation or other modifications is an important consideration for reducing the costs of surgical and medical procedures. Ethylene oxide is the most commonly used low temperature sterilisation technique in healthcare facilities, but its associated toxicity has reduced interest in this technology for the reprocessing of medical equipment. The aim of this study was to examine the disinfection efficiency of a novel low temperature approach, based on dense carbon dioxide on artificially contaminated catheters. The results obtained demonstrated that this method provided a complete inactivation of all bacteria and yeast strains tested, and that no obvious modifications to the surfaces tested were observed with multiple treatments. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved contact lens disinfection by exposure to violet radiation.

    PubMed

    Hoenes, Katharina; Stangl, Felix; Gross, Andrej; Hessling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional procedures for contact lens disinfection, based on solutions with aggressive chemical ingredients, not only affect microorganisms but operate likewise damaging towards the epithelial eye surface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of an alternative or complementary disinfection procedure for contact lenses based on irradiation within the visible wavelength range. Suspensions of S. auricularis, B. subtilis and E. coli were exposed to 405 nm irradiation, for determining the disinfection efficacy. Surviving rates were analyzed by membrane filtration as well as a semi-quantitative analysis using DipSlides. A significant antibacterial effect of the 405 nm irradiation is verifiable for all probed bacteria. Using S. auricularis, there has been no colony forming after an irradiation exposure of 2 hours. The hitherto existing results give reason for the assumption that violet LEDs integrated in contact lens cases will provide a subsidiary disinfection activity and maybe even offer the reduction of chemical ingredients in lens cleaning solutions to become gentler to the eye. In addition the danger of a rerise of the germ concentration after the completion of the disinfection procedure will be reduced.

  15. [Decontamination of dental unit waterlines using disinfectants and filters].

    PubMed

    Monarca, S; Garusi, G; Gigola, P; Spampinato, L; Zani, C; Sapelli, P L

    2002-10-01

    Bacterial contamination of the dental unit water system can become a health problem for patients, particularly if they are immunodepressed. The present study has had the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of methods of chemical decontamination using different disinfectants (peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, silver salts, chloramine T, glutaraldehyde T4) and methods of physical decontamination using synthetic membranes for the filtration of water. A preliminary removal procedure of the biofilm present in the waterline has been followed in a dental unit prepared on purpose for the research; subsequently different 2-week long maintenance procedures were applied using disinfectants injected by a pump and finally the bacterial contamination of the water flowing from the waterline was evaluated. The physical decontamination was performed using 0.22 mm membrane filters, which have been installed also in another dental unit, and the filtered water was analyzed to detect bacterial contamination. The preliminary procedure of biofilm removal succeeded obtaining germ-free water. Among the disinfectants used for the maintenance of the water quality only glutaraldehyde T4 was able to reduce the bacterial contamination under the limit suggested by the ADA. The membrane filter system was not able to purify the water, but when a disinfectant (peracetic acid) was used in the last part of the waterline good results were obtained. At present no decontamination system of dental waterline is available, and glutaraldehyde T4 seems to be the best disinfectant only if integrated with periodic biofilm removal for the maintenance of the water quality.

  16. SAFER STERILE COMPOUNDING: Choosing and Using Disinfectants for the Cleanroom.

    PubMed

    Kastango, Eric S; Douglass, Kate; Patel, Kedar; Givehchi, Babak; Brister, Paul; Postlewaite, Jay; Taraban, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Compounders worldwide are responsible for ensuring that the sterile preparations they dispense are pure, potent, and safe. To achieve that result, proper cleaning and disinfection of International Organization for Standardization controlled environments must occur. Because those tasks must be performed according to established standards, the compounding pharmacist must research regulatory requirements and appropriate products for use. In this report, we focus on U.S. regulations, guiding entities, and effective products that enable compliance with the increasingly stringent procedures required for pharmaceutical compounding. We also review cleaning and disinfecting processes, discuss the importance of correctly choosing and using disinfectants and/ or sporicidal disinfectants with surface claims in the cleanroom, and provide answers to questions frequently asked by staff who use those agents. In addition, we profile specific disinfectants that are compliant with UnitedStates Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and current good manufacturing practice standards. Biological safety cabinets and compounding aseptic containment isolators must undergo an additional process that deactivates hazardous drug residues and removes them from the interior surfaces of those devices before they are cleaned and disinfected, but that discussion is beyond the scope of this article.

  17. Silver as a disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Silvestry-Rodriguez, Nadia; Sicairos-Ruelas, Enue E; Gerba, Charles P; Bright, Kelly R

    2007-01-01

    Silver has been used as an antimicrobial for thousands of years. Over the past several decades, it has been introduced into numerous new venues such as in the treatment of water, in dietary supplements, in medical applications, and to produce antimicrobial coatings and products. Silver is often used as an alternative disinfectant in applications in which the use of traditional disinfectants such as chlorine may result in the formation of toxic by-products or cause corrosion of surfaces. Silver has also been demonstrated to produce a synergistic effect in combination with several other disinfectants. Many mechanisms of the antibacterial effect of silver have been described, but its antiviral and antiprotozoal mechanisms are not well understood. Both microbial tolerance and resistance to silver have been reported; however, the effect of silver has been observed against a wide variety of microorganisms over a period of years. Further research is needed to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of silver in these new applications and the effects of its long-term usage.

  18. Methodology for HIV disinfectant testing.

    PubMed

    van Bueren, J

    1995-06-01

    Due to the variation in protocols from studies by different workers for the inactivation of HIV by chemical disinfectants, only limited comparisons of the results can be made. These variations include those which apply to disinfectant testing in general, such as the level of organic load and the form of neutralization of the disinfectant, and those which apply particularly to HIV inactivation, such as the method used to detect infectious virus. Our suspension and carrier tests to assess the efficacy of chemical disinfectants against HIV are described and problems with the interpretation and applicability of the results are discussed.

  19. Growth medium for the rapid isolation and identification of anthrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Grubbs, Teri R.; Alls, John L.

    2000-07-01

    Anthrax has been recognized as a highly likely biological warfare or terrorist agent. The purpose of this work was to design a culture technique to rapidly isolate and identify `live' anthrax. In liquid or solid media form, 3AT medium (3-amino-L-tyrosine, the main ingredient) accelerated germination and growth of anthrax spores in 5 to 6 hours to a point expected at 18 to 24 hours with ordinary medium. During accelerated growth, standard definitive diagnostic tests such as sensitivity to lysis by penicillin or bacteriophage can be run. During this time, the bacteria synthesized a fluorescent and thermochemiluminescent polymer. Bacteria captured by specific antibody are, therefore, already labeled. Because living bacteria are required to generate the polymer, the test converts immunoassays for anthrax into viability assays. Furthermore, the polymer formation leads to the death of the vegetative form and non-viability of the spores produced in the medium. By altering the formulation of the medium, other microbes and even animal and human cells can be grown in it and labeled (including viruses grown in the animal or human cells).

  20. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2014-10-24

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  1. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    ScienceCinema

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2016-07-12

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  2. Space Technology to Device that Destroys Pathogens Such As Anthrax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of a technician at KES Science and Technology Inc., in Kernesaw, Georgia, assembling the AiroCide Ti02, an anthrax-killing device about the size of a small coffee table. The anthrax-killing air scrubber, AiroCide Ti02, is a tabletop-size metal box that bolts to office ceilings or walls. Its fans draw in airborne spores and airflow forces them through a maze of tubes. Inside, hydroxyl radicals (OH-) attack and kill pathogens. Most remaining spores are destroyed by high-energy ultraviolet photons. Building miniature greenhouses for experiments on the International Space Station has led to the invention of this device that annihilates anthrax, a bacteria that can be deadly when inhaled. The research enabling the invention started at the University of Wisconsin's (Madison) Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), one of 17 NASA Commercial Space Centers. A special coating technology used in this anthrax-killing invention is also being used inside WCSAR-built plant growth units on the International Space Station. This commercial research is managed by the Space Product Development Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. Epidemiologic investigations of bioterrorism-related anthrax, New Jersey, 2001.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carolyn M; Reefhuis, Jennita; Tan, Christina; Fiore, Anthony E; Goldstein, Susan; Beach, Michael J; Redd, Stephen C; Valiante, David; Burr, Gregory; Buehler, James; Pinner, Robert W; Bresnitz, Eddy; Bell, Beth P

    2002-10-01

    At least four Bacillus anthracis-containing envelopes destined for New York City and Washington, D.C. were processed at the Trenton Processing and Distribution Center (PDC) on September 18 and October 9, 2001. When cutaneous anthrax was confirmed in a Trenton postal worker, the PDC was closed. Four cutaneous and two inhalational anthrax cases were identified. Five patients were hospitalized; none died. Four were PDC employees; the others handled or received mail processed there. Onset dates occurred in two clusters following envelope processing at the PDC. The attack rate among the 170 employees present when the B. anthracis-containing letters were sorted on October 9 was 1.2%. Of 137 PDC environmental samples, 57 (42%) were positive. Five (10%) of 50 local post offices each yielded one positive sample. Cutaneous or inhalational anthrax developed in four postal employees at a facility where B. anthracis-containing letters were processed. Cross-contaminated mail or equipment was the likely source of infection in two other case-patients with cutaneous anthrax.

  4. Discovery and development of anthrax lethal factor metalloproteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turk, Benjamin E

    2008-02-01

    Anthrax is caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, a spore forming, rod-shaped, encapsulated gram positive bacteria. The disease manifests itself in distinct ways depending on the route of entry of infective bacterial spores: cutaneous, inhalational, and gastrointestinal. Though rare in humans, inhalational anthrax has become a major concern due to the capacity for spores to be weaponized. The limited success of antibiotic therapy has motivated investigation of complementary therapeutic strategies that target the bacteria's secreted toxin. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of anthrax toxin and an important potential target for small molecule drugs. In the past few years, a number of approaches have been taken to identify LF inhibitors, from generating conventional metal chelating substrate analogs to random screening of diverse compound libraries. These efforts have produced several different classes of specific nanomolar range inhibitors. Some compounds have fared well in animal models for anthrax toxemia and infection, and these inhibitors and their derivatives may form the basis for future therapies to treat the disease in humans.

  5. Epidemiologic Investigations of Bioterrorism-Related Anthrax, New Jersey, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Reefhuis, Jennita; Tan, Christina; Fiore, Anthony E.; Goldstein, Susan; Beach, Michael J.; Redd, Stephen C.; Valiante, David; Burr, Gregory; Buehler, James; Pinner, Robert W.; Bresnitz, Eddy; Bell, Beth P.

    2002-01-01

    At least four Bacillus anthracis–containing envelopes destined for New York City and Washington, D.C., were processed at the Trenton Processing and Distribution Center (PDC) on September 18 and October 9, 2001. When cutaneous anthrax was confirmed in a Trenton postal worker, the PDC was closed. Four cutaneous and two inhalational anthrax cases were identified. Five patients were hospitalized; none died. Four were PDC employees; the others handled or received mail processed there. Onset dates occurred in two clusters following envelope processing at the PDC. The attack rate among the 170 employees present when the B. anthracis–containing letters were sorted on October 9 was 1.2%. Of 137 PDC environmental samples, 57 (42%) were positive. Five (10%) of 50 local post offices each yielded one positive sample. Cutaneous or inhalational anthrax developed in four postal employees at a facility where B. anthracis–containing letters were processed. Cross-contaminated mail or equipment was the likely source of infection in two other case-patients with cutaneous anthrax. PMID:12396914

  6. Space Technology to Device that Destroys Pathogens Such As Anthrax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of a technician at KES Science and Technology Inc., in Kernesaw, Georgia, assembling the AiroCide Ti02, an anthrax-killing device about the size of a small coffee table. The anthrax-killing air scrubber, AiroCide Ti02, is a tabletop-size metal box that bolts to office ceilings or walls. Its fans draw in airborne spores and airflow forces them through a maze of tubes. Inside, hydroxyl radicals (OH-) attack and kill pathogens. Most remaining spores are destroyed by high-energy ultraviolet photons. Building miniature greenhouses for experiments on the International Space Station has led to the invention of this device that annihilates anthrax, a bacteria that can be deadly when inhaled. The research enabling the invention started at the University of Wisconsin's (Madison) Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), one of 17 NASA Commercial Space Centers. A special coating technology used in this anthrax-killing invention is also being used inside WCSAR-built plant growth units on the International Space Station. This commercial research is managed by the Space Product Development Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Treatment of Anthrax in Man: Historical and Current Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-22

    been used in the treatment of cutaneous anthrax, but irr some cases this therapy.in not succe-.sful (9). Polymyxin and neomycin are not effective (35...Enhancement of Infection with Bacillus anthracis by chicken yolk.’Jap. J. Bact. 11:477- 480, 1956 75,. Rhian M, Riley JM, Wolfe VL, et al: Change in

  8. Anthrax meningitis. Report of two cases with autopsies.

    PubMed

    Pluot, M; Vital, C; Aubertin, J; Croix, J C; Pire, J C; Poisot, D

    1976-12-21

    The authors report two cases of occupation-related anthrax meningitis; one was direct contamination from a diseased animal; the second was due to handling of bone powder imported from India. The pathological pattern of involvement of the meninges and brain is described and discussed.

  9. [Aerosol disinfection of bacterial spores].

    PubMed

    Theilen, U; Wilsberg, F J; Böhm, R; Strauch, D

    1987-06-01

    The present investigations are divided into two parts. First it is tested which commercial disinfectants are efficient in aerosol disinfection of bacterial spores. This part is carried out in an aerosol chamber with airborne spores (laboratory experiments). The best results are obtained with peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde are effective with some restrictions. With these disinfectants it is tested in the second part if the aerosol disinfecting-method is capable for disinfecting rooms with electronic equipment. This part is carried out in a vessel under open air conditions (field experiments). Bacterial spores dried on germ carriers of limewood, aluminium and rusty iron are exposed to disinfectant aerosols under those temperature and relative humidity conditions which are representative for the four seasons in Germany. In these investigations there are also included germ carriers with spores, that have been lyophilized without any protective substances respectively with Bentonite, Mixtura desiccans and Silicagel + Serum as protective substances. To check the corrosive effect of disinfectant aerosols electronic pocket calculators and pocket transistor receivers have been exposed to the aerosols. The best results are obtained with formaldehyde at temperatures above 10 degrees C and relative humidities within 65% to 95%. At temperatures and relative humidity conditions outside of this optimal range the effectiveness of formaldehyde tends to zero. Hydrogen peroxide is capable for disinfecting spores on germ carriers of limewood and aluminium at all temperature and relative humidity conditions; on germ carriers of rusty iron the effectiveness is reduced strongly. Same results could be obtained with peracetic acid respectively a mixture of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. With these disinfectants a decontamination of rusty iron surfaces is impossible too except the germ concentration on the surface is below 10(4) CFU/cm2. As to the protective

  10. [Principles of antisepsis, disinfection and sterilization].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Navarrete, María-Jesús; Celorrio-Pascual, José-Miguel; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Solano Bernad, Victor-Manuel

    2014-12-01

    This article aims to provide a brief review of the main concepts on which the prevention and control of infection are based. Antisepsis comprises a set of techniques aimed at the total sterilization, or at most, disinfection, removing germs that contaminate an environment. Both procedures must be preceded by an environmental cleanup in the location in which they intend to be applied. The disinfection is carried out using biocides or germicides. Antimicrobial chemicals, that have mechanisms of action and resistances very similar to antibiotics, are generating concern due to the possibility of crossing genetic information that aggravates the problem of bacterial resistance. Most biocides can act as antiseptics, and applied to skin tissue, or disinfectants on inanimate materials. The spectrum of action of germicides depends on the product itself and external controllable factors: temperature, concentration, exposure time, etc. Sterilization techniques are primarily physical, by exposing the material to steam, or sterilizing gas, using autoclaves. Major advances are the use of low temperatures with shorter exposure times, in parallel with technological advances in instrumentation in order to avoid high temperatures and high use rotations due to workload. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. A population survey--would Australian general practice be the first point of contact during an anthrax bioterrorism event?

    PubMed

    Durrheim, David N; Muller, Reinhold; Saunders, Vicki L; Speare, Richard; Lowe, John B

    2006-03-01

    Anthrax bioterrorism is a new threat to Australians. How they would respond to an anthrax bioterrorism event is unknown. A national telephone survey of Australian adults. We successfully interviewed 1001 Australian adults (response rate 63%). The threat of anthrax bioterrorism was of medium to high concern to 57% of survey participants. In the event of an anthrax bioterrorism event, the first point of care would be GPs for 60% of survey participants, and 71% were confident in their doctor's ability to recognise anthrax. Most would accept vaccination if anthrax bioterrorism cases were reported locally, or even elsewhere in Australia. Australian GPs should be included in any bioterrorism planning to respond to such threats.

  12. Effectiveness of disinfection therapies and promotion of osteoblast growth on osseotite and nanotite implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Judith; Hernandez, Maria A; Drukteinis, Saulius E; Parker, William B; Murray, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of 4 procedures to disinfect implant surfaces intentionally inoculated with bacteria and afterward to evaluate osteoblast viability to the disinfected implant surfaces. Eighty-eight commercially pure Osseotite and Nanotite titanium implant discs were inoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis. The implant surfaces were disinfected with EDTA, tetracycline, citric acid, or neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The implant discs were then placed in cultures of osteoblast cells. Osseotite implant discs were easier to disinfect compared with the Nanotite implant discs. Citric acid and tetracycline were the most effective solutions for the disinfection of P. gingivalis from the Osseotite implant discs. The Nanotite implant discs were the most difficult to disinfect, likely because of their chemical and physical properties. Citric acid and tetracycline were most effective for disinfecting the Osseotite implant discs, and further clinical research is needed to verify these effects in vivo. The Nd:YAG laser was the weakest disinfection method, and it is not recommended for disinfecting implant surfaces until its effectiveness is improved.

  13. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS: THE NEXT GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water is rightly hailed as a major public health triumph of the 20th Century. Before widespread disinfection of drinking water in the U.S. and Europe, millions of people died from infectious waterborne diseases, such as typhoid and cholera. The microbia...

  14. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS: THE NEXT GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water is rightly hailed as a major public health triumph of the 20th Century. Before widespread disinfection of drinking water in the U.S. and Europe, millions of people died from infectious waterborne diseases, such as typhoid and cholera. The microbia...

  15. New Disinfection Agents for Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    with HTH being the better disinfectant. In similar experiments involving Entamoeba invadens and Giardia Lamblia Compound I was more effective than...different and dependent upon the nature of the organism. Keywords: Water disinfections; N-Chloramines; HTH; Bacteria; Viruses; Protozoa; Giardia lamblia ; Stability in water; 3-Chloro-4,4-dimethy1-2-oxazolidinone; Calcium hypochlorite.

  16. Sanitizers and Disinfectants Guide. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Sanitizers and disinfectants can play an important role in protecting public health. They are designed to kill "pests," including infectious germs and other microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Unfortunately, sanitizers and disinfectants also contain chemicals that are "pesticides." Exposure to persistent toxic…

  17. Hardness of heat-polymerized acrylic resins after disinfection and long-term water immersion.

    PubMed

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2005-02-01

    In selecting a disinfectant for dental prostheses, compatibility between the disinfectant and the type of denture base material must be considered to avoid adverse effects on the hardness of the acrylic resin. This study investigated the hardness of 2 denture base resins after disinfection and long-term water immersion. Thirty-two disk-shaped specimens (13 mm in diameter and 8 mm thick) were fabricated from each resin (Lucitone 550 and QC-20), polished, stored in water at 37 degrees C for 48 hours, and submitted to hardness tests (Vickers hardness number [VHN]) before disinfection. Disinfection methods included scrubbing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate for 1 minute, immersion for 10 minutes in 1 of the tested disinfectant solutions (n=8) (3.78% sodium perborate, 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, or 1% sodium hypochorite), and immersion in water for 3 minutes. The disinfection procedures were repeated 4 times, and 12 hardness measurements were made on each specimen. Control specimens (not disinfected) were stored in water for 56 minutes. Hardness tests (VHN) were also performed after 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days of storage in water. Statistical analyses of data were conducted with a repeated measures 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc test (alpha=.05). Mean values +/- SD for Lucitone 550 (16.52 +/- 0.94 VHN) and QC-20 (9.61 +/- 0.62 VHN) demonstrated a significant (P <.05) decrease in hardness after disinfection, regardless of material and disinfectant solutions used (Lucitone 550: 15.25 +/- 0.74; QC-20: 8.09 +/- 0.39). However, this effect was reversed after 15 days of storage in water. Both materials exhibited a continuous increase (P <.05) in hardness values for up to 60 days of water storage, after which no significant change was observed. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, QC-20 and Lucitone 550 specimens exhibited significantly lower hardness values after disinfection regardless of the disinfectant solution used.

  18. Polyvalent Recognition of Biopolymers:The Design of Potent Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Ravi

    2007-03-01

    Polyvalency -- the simultaneous binding of multiple ligands on one entity to multiple receptors on another -- is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in nature. We are using a biomimetic approach, inspired by polyvalency, to design potent inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Since the major symptoms and death from anthrax are due primarily to the action of anthrax toxin, the toxin is a prime target for therapeutic intervention. We describe the design of potent polyvalent anthrax toxin inhibitors, and will discuss the role of pattern matching in polyvalent recognition. Pattern-matched polyvalent inhibitors can neutralize anthrax toxin in vivo, and may enable the successful treatment of anthrax during the later stages of the disease, when antibiotic treatment is ineffective.

  19. Assessing the safety of anthrax immunization in US Army aircrew members via physical examination.

    PubMed

    Downing, Jill; Greig, Thomas W; Quattlebaum, Martin D; Valentin, Manuel; Heeren, Timothy C; Grabenstein, John D

    2007-10-01

    Anthrax in weaponized form is the bioterrorism agent of most concern. Questions raised about the safety of the anthrax vaccine can be addressed by comparing immunized and unimmunized people in population-based studies. A retrospective evaluation of data from periodic physical examinations collected on anthrax-immunized and -unimmunized US Army aircrew members between 1998 and 2005 was performed to evaluate the safety of anthrax immunization. Mean changes in variables found on physical examination and laboratory analysis were compared by use of t tests. Multiple linear regression predicted change in outcome from baseline characteristics. We compared 6,820 immunized subjects and 4,145 unimmunized controls based on US Army aircrew physical examination and screening laboratory tests. No association between anthrax immunization and a clinically relevant change in a tested physiologic parameter was detected. No attributable risk of anthrax immunization was observed in this group of Army aircrew members.

  20. Bioterrorism-Related Anthrax: International Response by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Jonathan T.; De La Cruz, Margarita Irizarry; Lai, James E.; McAuliffe, Jay F.; Popovic, Tanja; Pillai, Segaran P.; Mintz, Eric D.

    2002-01-01

    After reports of the intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States, epidemiologists, laboratorians, and clinicians around the world were called upon to respond to widespread political and public concerns. To respond to inquiries from other countries regarding anthrax and bioterrorism, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established an international team in its Emergency Operations Center. From October 12, 2001, to January 2, 2002, this team received 130 requests from 70 countries and 2 territories. Requests originated from ministries of health, international organizations, and physicians and included subjects ranging from laboratory procedures and clinical evaluations to assessments of environmental and occupational health risks. The information and technical support provided by the international team helped allay fears, prevent unnecessary antibiotic treatment, and enhance laboratory-based surveillance for bioterrorism events worldwide. PMID:12396915

  1. Disinfection of pumice.

    PubMed

    Setz, J; Heeg, P

    1996-10-01

    Pumice is a potential source of infection for the dental technician and of cross-contamination between different dentures and patients. In this study, the number of microorganisms in two different combinations of pumice and disinfectant was compared with a conventional mixture of pumice and water. The results revealed that under practical conditions the mix of Steribim (pumice containing benzoic acid added by the manufacturer) with water reduced the number of bacteria by 99% compared with a mix of a conventional pumice and water. The addition of an antiseptic product that contained octenidine as active agent to conventional pumice reduced the number of microorganisms by 99.999%.

  2. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity and dimensional alterations of alginate impression disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Semensato, Ana Paula Nocentini; Crosariol, Sonia Khouri; Marchini, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    This paper offers a quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of eight different disinfection procedures for irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and the dimensional changes induced by them. Samples were collected immediately after impressions, after the disinfection procedures and over casts and analyzed for bacterial growth. Control, enzyme solutions, acetic acid and ultraviolet irradiation samples showed bacterial growth. Chlorhexidine and 1% sodium hypochlorite presented adequate antimicrobial activity, while 2% sodium hypochlorite solution showed the best results. Dimensional changes were similar to those of the controls in all the tested agents. The results indicated 2% hypochlorite was the most appropriate disinfectant tested.

  3. Evaluation of 5 Cleaning and Disinfection Methods for Nets Used to Collect Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Collymore, Chereen; Porelli, Gina; Lieggi, Christine; Lipman, Neil S

    2014-01-01

    Few standardized methods of cleaning and disinfecting equipment in zebrafish facilities have been published, even though the effectiveness of these procedures is vital to preventing the transmission of pathogenic organisms. Four chemical disinfectants and rinsing with municipal tap water were evaluated for their ability to disinfect nets used to capture zebrafish. The disinfectants included benzalkonium chloride+methylene blue, sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and potassium peroxymonosulfate+sodium chloride for a soak time of 5 or 30 min. Disinfection effectiveness was evaluated by using an ATP-based system that measured the reduction in absolute number and percentage of relative light units. In addition, nets were cultured aerobically on blood and MacConkey agar plates to determine the number of bacteria remaining after disinfection procedures. Soaking nets in sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and in potassium peroxymonosulfate+sodium chloride for 5 or 30 min were effective means of disinfection, according to at least 90% reduction in the number of relative light units and no bacterial growth after cleaning. These results will aid facility managers, veterinarians and investigators in selecting net cleaning and disinfection protocols. PMID:25650972

  4. Health Risk Communication in the Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program: Lessons for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    HEALTH RISK COMMUNICATION IN THE ANTHRAX VACCINE IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM: Lessons for the Future Colonel Bradley D. Freeman April 2001 AEPI-IFP-0901...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Strategy Research Project 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Health Risk Communication in the Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program...Maximum 200 words) When Secretary of Defense William Cohen announced that all military service members would be vaccinated with the anthrax vaccine , few

  5. Enhancement of an Analytical Method for the Determination of Squalene in Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed Formulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-20

    Enhancement of an analytical method for the determination of squalene in anthrax vaccine adsorbed formulations Ronald J. Spanggord a,∗, Meg Sun a, Peter Lim...anthrax vaccine adsorbed administered to members of the U.S. Armed Forces have been alleged to contain squalene , a chemical urported to be associated with...illnesses of Gulf War veterans. A method of enhanced sensitivity for determining squalene in anthrax vaccine dsorbed using high-performance liquid

  6. Cellular and Systemic Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin and Edema Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) are the major virulence factors of anthrax and can replicate the lethality and symptoms associated with the disease. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of anthrax toxin effects in animal models and the cytotoxicity (necrosis and apoptosis) induced by LT in different cells. A brief reexamination of early historic findings on toxin in vivo effects in the context of our current knowledge is also presented. PMID:19638283

  7. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of new'' DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  8. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of ``new`` DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  9. Disability among US Army Veterans vaccinated against anthrax.

    PubMed

    Sulsky, Sandra I; Luippold, Rose; Garman, Patrick; Hughes, Hayley; Boyko, Edward J; Maynard, Charles; Amoroso, Paul J

    2012-09-21

    To protect troops against the use of anthrax as a biological weapon, the US Department of Defense began an anthrax vaccination program in 1998. 14 years after the inception of the vaccination program, there is no evidence suggesting vaccination against anthrax carries long-term health risks for Active Duty Soldiers. To investigate the association between Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) received while on Active Duty and subsequent disability determined by the Veterans Benefits Administration. Case-control study nested in the cohort of all Active Duty personnel known to have separated from the US Army between December 1, 1997 and December 31, 2005. Cases were ≥10% disabled, determined either by the Army prior to separation (N=5846) or by the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) after separation (N=148,934). Controls (N=937,705) separated from the Army without disability, and were not receiving pensions from the VBA as of April 2007. Data were from the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database and the VBA Compensation and Pension and Benefits database. Disability status (yes/no); for primary disability, percent disabled (≥10%, 20%, >20%) and type of disability. Vaccination against anthrax was four times more likely among disabled Veterans with hostile fire pay records (HFP, a surrogate for deployment). Vaccinated Soldiers with HFP had lower odds of disability separation from the Army 0.89 (0.80, 0.98); there was no association between vaccine and receiving Army disability benefits among those without HFP (OR=1.05, CI: 0.96, 1.14). Vaccination was negatively associated with receiving VA disability benefits for those with HFP (OR=0.66, CI: 0.65, 0.67), but there was little or no association between vaccine and receipt of VA disability benefits for those without HFP (OR=0.95, CI: 0.93, 0.97). Risk of disability separation from the Army and receipt of disability compensation from the VA were not increased in association with prior exposure to AVA. This study

  10. Clinical and epidemiological investigation of a fatal anthrax case in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Bao, Wanguo; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Kaiyu; Wang, Feng

    2015-02-19

    Anthrax is a recessive infectious disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, and is primarily a zoonotic disease. Until recently, Bacillus anthracis infections were relatively infrequent and confined to agrarian communities in underdeveloped countries. No anthrax cases were reported in Changchun City in the past few decades until a male patient from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region presented the anthrax disease manifestation. This paper describes an anthrax patient's diagnosis, isolation and treatment which involved institutions in two different Chinese provinces; the foci epidemiological investigation alongside with the outbreak management process, which is of great significance to control the spread of the recessive infection is also described.

  11. Confirmation of Bacillus anthracis from flesh-eating flies collected during a West Texas anthrax season.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Curtis, Andrew; Hadfield, Ted L; O'Shea, Bob; Mitchell, Mark A; Hugh-Jones, Martin E

    2010-07-01

    This case study confirms the interaction between necrophilic flies and white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, during an anthrax outbreak in West Texas (summer 2005). Bacillus anthracis was identified by culture and PCR from one of eight pooled fly collections from deer carcasses on a deer ranch with a well-documented history of anthrax. These results provide the first known isolation of B. anthracis from flesh-eating flies associated with a wildlife anthrax outbreak in North America and are discussed in the context of wildlife ecology and anthrax epizootics.

  12. Evaluation of the House Fly Musca domestica as a Mechanical Vector for an Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Fasanella, Antonio; Scasciamacchia, Silvia; Garofolo, Giuliano; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Tarsitano, Elvira; Adone, Rosanna

    2010-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease of human beings and animals caused by the encapsulated, spore-forming, Bacillus anthracis. The potential role of insects in the spread of B. anthracis to humans and domestic animals during an anthrax outbreak has been confirmed by many studies. Among insect vectors, the house fly Musca domestica is considered a potential agent for disease transmission. In this study, laboratory-bred specimens of Musca domestica were infected by feeding on anthrax-infected rabbit carcass or anthrax contaminated blood, and the presence of anthrax spores in their spots (faeces and vomitus) was microbiologically monitored. It was also evaluated if the anthrax spores were able to germinate and replicate in the gut content of insects. These results confirmed the role of insects in spreading anthrax infection. This role, although not major, given the huge size of fly populations often associated with anthrax epidemics in domestic animals, cannot be neglected from an epidemiological point of view and suggest that fly control should be considered as part of anthrax control programs. PMID:20808920

  13. Integrated MOSFET-Embedded-Cantilever-Based Biosensor Characteristic for Detection of Anthrax Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, Salwa; Lee, Ida; Islam, Syed K; Eliza, Sazia A.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Tulip, Fahmida S

    2011-01-01

    In this work, MOSFET-embedded cantilevers are configured as microbial sensors for detection of anthrax simulants, Bacillus thuringiensis. Anthrax simulants attached to the chemically treated gold-coated cantilever cause changes in the MOSFET drain current due to the bending of the cantilever which indicates the detection of anthrax simulant. Electrical properties of the anthrax simulant are also responsible for the change in the drain current. The test results suggest a detection range of 10 L of stimulant test solution (a suspension population of 1.3 107 colony-forming units/mL diluted in 40% ethanol and 60% deionized water) with a linear response of 31 A/ L.

  14. Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.

    PubMed

    Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

    2014-11-01

    A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Update: Investigation of bioterrorism-related anthrax and adverse events from antimicrobial prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    2001-11-09

    CDC and state and local public health authorities continue to investigate cases of bioterrorism-related anthrax. As of November 7, a total of 22 cases of anthrax have been identified according to the CDC surveillance case definition; 10 were confirmed inhalational anthrax cases and 12 cases (seven confirmed and five suspected) were cutaneous anthrax (Table 1). The majority of cases have occurred in persons working at postal facilities in New Jersey (NJ) and the District of Columbia (DC) in which letters contaminated with anthrax were handled or processed using high-speed sorting machines, or at media companies in New York City (NYC) or Florida (FL) where letters, either confirmed or presumed to be contaminated with anthrax, were opened or handled. The probable exposures for a case of cutaneous anthrax in NJ and a case of inhalational anthrax in NYC remain unknown. Epidemiologic investigations of these cases and surveillance to detect new cases of bioterrorism-associated anthrax continue. This report updates the investigation of these cases and describes adverse events associated with antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  16. Solar water disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Collier, R.

    1996-11-01

    Non-potable drinking water is a major problem for much of the world`s population. It has been estimated that from 15 to 20 million children under the age of 5 die from diarrheal conditions brought on by infected drinking water every year. This is equivalent to a fully-loaded DC-10 crashing every ten minutes of every day, 365 days a year. Heat is one of the most effective methods of disinfecting drinking water. Using conventional means of heating water (heating on an open-flamed stove) results in an extremely energy-intensive process. The main obstacle is that for areas of the world where potable water is a problem, fuel supplies are either too expensive, not available, or the source of devastating environmental problems (deforestation). The apparatus described is a solar-powered water disinfection device that can overcome most if not all of the barriers that presently limit technological solutions to drinking water problems. It uses a parabolic trough solar concentrator with a receiver tube that is also a counterflow heat exchanger. The system is totally self-contained utilizing a photovoltaic-powered water pump, and a standard automotive thermostat for water flow control. The system is designed for simplicity, reliability and the incorporation of technology readily accessible in most areas of the world. Experiments at the Florida Solar Energy Center have demonstrated up to 2,500 liters of safe drinking water per day with 28 square meters of solar concentrator.

  17. Demonstration of a hermetic airborne ozone disinfection system: studies on E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, W J; Bahnfleth, W P; Striebig, B A; Whittam, T S

    2003-01-01

    An enclosed flow-through system using airborne ozone for disinfection and which removes the ozone with a catalytic converter was tested with a strain of Escherichia coli. Petri dishes containing the microorganisms were inserted in a chamber and exposed for 10-480 min to ozone concentrations between 4 and 20 ppm. Death rates in excess of 99.99% were achieved. Survival data is fitted to a two-stage curve with a shoulder based on the multihit target model. Ozone was removed from the exhaust air to nondetectable levels using a metal oxide based catalyst. The possibility of using ozone as an airborne disinfectant for internal building surfaces and catalytically removing the ozone on exhaust is demonstrated to be feasible. A model for the decay of Bacillus cereus under ozone exposure is proposed as an example for predicting the sterilization of buildings contaminated with anthrax. The potential for disinfecting airstreams and removing ozone to create breathable air is also implied by the results of this experiment.

  18. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth A.; Mogridge, Jeremy; Mourez, Michael; Collier, R. John; Young, John A. T.

    2001-11-01

    The tripartite toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, helps the bacterium evade the immune system and can kill the host during a systemic infection. Two components of the toxin enzymatically modify substrates within the cytosol of mammalian cells: oedema factor (OF) is an adenylate cyclase that impairs host defences through a variety of mechanisms including inhibiting phagocytosis; lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent protease that cleaves mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and causes lysis of macrophages. Protective antigen (PA), the third component, binds to a cellular receptor and mediates delivery of the enzymatic components to the cytosol. Here we describe the cloning of the human PA receptor using a genetic complementation approach. The receptor, termed ATR (anthrax toxin receptor), is a type I membrane protein with an extracellular von Willebrand factor A domain that binds directly to PA. In addition, a soluble version of this domain can protect cells from the action of the toxin.

  19. Coordinated Response to Reports of Possible Anthrax Contamination, Idaho, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Richard; Barnes, Shana; Hahn, Christine

    2002-01-01

    In 2001, the intentional release of anthrax spores in the eastern United States increased concern about exposure to anthrax nationwide, and residents of Idaho sought assistance. Response from state and local agencies was required, increasing the strain on epidemiologists, laboratorians, and communications personnel. In late 2001, Idaho’s public health communications system handled 133 calls about suspicious powders. For each call, a multiagency bridge call was established, and participants (public health officials, epidemiologists, police, Federal Bureau of Investigation personnel, hazardous materials officials, and others) determined which samples would be tested by the state public health laboratory. A triage system for calls helped relieve the burden on public safety and health systems. PMID:12396922

  20. Reanalysis of the anthrax epidemic in Rhodesia, 1978–1984

    PubMed Central

    Brediger, Walter; Albright, Thomas P.; Smith-Gagen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, the largest epidemic of anthrax of the last 200 years was documented in a little known series of studies by Davies in The Central African Journal of Medicine. This epidemic involved thousands of cattle and 10,738 human cases with 200 fatalities in Rhodesia during the Counterinsurgency. Grossly unusual epidemiological features were noted that, to this day, have not been definitively explained. This study performed a historical reanalysis of the data to reveal an estimated geographic involvement of 245,750 km2, with 171,990 cattle and 17,199 human cases. Here we present the first documented geotemporal visualization of the human anthrax epidemic. PMID:27867766

  1. [Anthrax in Chad: a zoonosis that still exists today].

    PubMed

    Lamarque, D; Haessler, C; Champion, R; Granga, D; Bendina; Steinmetz, P; Guelina, A; Maurice, Y

    1989-01-01

    An epidemic of human and animal anthrax raged in Chad mainly in the Department of Chari Baguirmi from September to December 1988, infesting more than 50% of donkeys and horses. 716 human cases have been reported, with 88 deaths. Thanks to a geographical distribution of animal and human prevalence, one sees immediately the interdependency between sanitary state of live-stock and public health. An unusual means of transmission from donkey to donkey by insects as the vector is suggested to explain the intensity of animal epidemics. Two strains of B. anthracis were isolated and described. Systematic annual prophylactic inoculation of the live-stock is recommended, and also resumption of research to create a polyvalent vaccine for cattle plague/peripneumonia and anthrax.

  2. Evaluation of mucoadhesive carrier adjuvant: toward an oral anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Pawar, Dilip; Agrawal, Udita; Jain, Arvind K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2014-02-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the potential of mucoadhesive alginate-coated chitosan microparticles (A-CHMp) for oral vaccine against anthrax. The zeta potential of A-CHMp was -29.7 mV, and alginate coating could prevent the burst release of antigen in simulated gastric fluid. The results indicated that A-CHMp was mucoadhesive in nature and transported it to the peyer's patch upon oral delivery. The immunization studies indicated that A-CHMp resulted in the induction of potent systemic and mucosal immune responses, whereas alum-adjuvanted rPA could induce only systemic immune response. Thus, A-CHMp represents a promising acid carrier adjuvant for oral immunization against anthrax.

  3. Receptor palmitoylation and ubiquitination regulate anthrax toxin endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Abrami, Laurence; Leppla, Stephen H.; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2006-01-01

    The anthrax toxin is composed of three independent polypeptide chains. Successful intoxication only occurs when heptamerization of the receptor-binding polypeptide, the protective antigen (PA), allows binding of the two enzymatic subunits before endocytosis. We show that this tailored behavior is caused by two counteracting posttranslational modifications in the cytoplasmic tail of PA receptors. The receptor is palmitoylated, and this unexpectedly prevents its association with lipid rafts and, thus, its premature ubiquitination. This second modification, which is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl, only occurs in rafts and is required for rapid endocytosis of the receptor. As a consequence, cells expressing palmitoylation-defective mutant receptors are less sensitive to anthrax toxin because of a lower number of surface receptors as well as premature internalization of PA without a requirement for heptamerization. PMID:16401723

  4. Receptor palmitoylation and ubiquitination regulate anthrax toxin endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Leppla, Stephen H; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2006-01-16

    The anthrax toxin is composed of three independent polypeptide chains. Successful intoxication only occurs when heptamerization of the receptor-binding polypeptide, the protective antigen (PA), allows binding of the two enzymatic subunits before endocytosis. We show that this tailored behavior is caused by two counteracting posttranslational modifications in the cytoplasmic tail of PA receptors. The receptor is palmitoylated, and this unexpectedly prevents its association with lipid rafts and, thus, its premature ubiquitination. This second modification, which is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl, only occurs in rafts and is required for rapid endocytosis of the receptor. As a consequence, cells expressing palmitoylation-defective mutant receptors are less sensitive to anthrax toxin because of a lower number of surface receptors as well as premature internalization of PA without a requirement for heptamerization.

  5. Clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide for disinfection of dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to clinically evaluate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for used dental instruments. An imprint culture technique demonstrated that ultrasonic cleaning of intraorally applied dental mirrors in 0.02% ClO2 for 10 minutes resulted in compete removal of microorganisms for 10 subjects. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction on periodontal curettes after subgingival scaling in four HCV-infected patients and was completely removed by the same treatment procedure. Therefore, the combination of ultrasonic cleaning with ClO2 may provide an alternative to toxic disinfectants, such as glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochlorite, for disinfecting dental instruments.

  6. Efficacy testing of disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Tomasino, Stephen F

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) has the responsibility for regulating antimicrobial products, including sporicides, used to treat and decontaminate inanimate surfaces. In response to the anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) attacks of 2001 and the associated need for verifying the performance of chemicals for building decontamination, the EPA initiated research in late 2003 to evaluate and improve efficacy test methods for sporicides. The OPP Microbiology Laboratory located at the Environmental Science Center, Ft. Meade, MD is the lead laboratory. Through funding provided by EPA's Office of Research and Development (Safe Buildings Program), a collaborative research plan has been established to address several key issues. Research is currently being conducted on 2 fronts: (1) the evaluation of quantitative methodology for assessing the efficacy of sporicides, and (2) the development and comparative testing of selected modifications to improve the AOAC Sporicidal Activity Test (AOAC Method 966.04). Future studies will include the evaluation of candidate surrogates of B. anthracis using a quantitative method, and a multilaboratory validation study of a quantitative method-surrogate combination. The General Referee is serving as the Principal Investigator for all research described in this report, and has the overall responsibility for the technical conduct of the projects. In cases where the General Referee has oversight of projects that involve official collaborative studies and validation support from AOAC INTERNATIONAL, AOAC officials and the Committee Chair will determine the appropriate mechanism for formal study review. The 2003 General Referee report provides the background on the development and direction of the research projects. The preliminary data, general conclusions, next steps, and recommendations are provided in this report.

  7. Observations on a new disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. M.

    1969-01-01

    A disinfectant formula (Resiguard) containing picloxydine digluconate, benzalkonium chloride, and a detergent was examined for antibacterial activity. Studies in vitro with simulated organic contamination were followed by realistic in-use tests employing items of anaesthetic and urological equipment heavily infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contaminated with blood. These showed that a dilution of 1/80 was reliably bactericidal to this resistant organism. It is concluded that Resiguard is a valuable disinfectant which may reliably be employed in the cleaning and disinfection of items of delicate, non-autoclavable, hospital equipment. PMID:4978998

  8. Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2009-05-29

    This analysis explores economic impacts that might result from a wide-area release of anthrax. The intent is not to provide a quantitative analysis of such a disaster, but to: 1. Define the general categories of economic impacts that the region should be concerned about; and, 2. Explore what types of private sector businesses or industries, if any, may have the greatest impact on speeding the economic recovery of the region.

  9. Total decontamination cost of the anthrax letter attacks.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Ketra; Zacchia, Nicholas A

    2012-03-01

    All of the costs associated with decontamination following the 2001 anthrax letter attacks were summarized, estimated, and aggregated based on existing literature and news media reports. A comprehensive list of all affected structures was compiled. Costs were analyzed by building class and decontamination type. Sampling costs and costs of worker relocation were also included. Our analysis indicates that the total cost associated with decontamination was about $320 million.

  10. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    significance of coiling phagocy- tosis for disease pathogenesis has yet to be elucidated, it is a sub- ject that surely warrants further investigation. B...Schmaljohn. 2003. Ebola and marburg viruses replicate in monocyte-derived dendritic cells without inducing the pro- duction of cytokines and full maturation...Journal of Immunology, 2005, 174: 5545–5552. I nhalational anthrax, a disease that was exploited for bioter-rorism (1), is most often fatal and causes

  11. SNR analysis: molecular investigation of an anthrax epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Italy, anthrax is endemic but occurs sporadically. During the summer of 2004, in the Pollino National Park, Basilicata, Southern Italy, an anthrax epidemic consisting of 41 outbreaks occurred; it claimed the lives of 124 animals belonging to different mammal species. This study is a retrospective molecular epidemiological investigation carried out on 53 isolates collected during the epidemic. A 25-loci Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) MLVA was initially performed to define genetic relationships, followed by an investigation of genetic diversity between epidemic strains through Single Nucleotide Repeat (SNR) analysis. Results 53 Bacillus anthracis strains were isolated. The 25-loci MLVA analysis identified all of them as belonging to a single genotype, while the SNR analysis was able to detect the existence of five subgenotypes (SGTs), allowing a detailed epidemic investigation. SGT-1 was the most frequent (46/53); SGTs 2 (4/53), 3 (1/53) 4 (1/53) and 5 (1/53) were detected in the remaining seven isolates. Conclusions The analysis revealed the prevalent spread, during this epidemic, of a single anthrax clone. SGT-1 - widely distributed across the epidemic area and present throughout the period in question - may, thus, be the ancestral form. SGTs 2, 3 and 4 differed from SGT-1 at only one locus, suggesting that they could have evolved directly from the latter during the course of this epidemic. SGT-5 differed from the other SGTs at 2-3 loci. This isolate, thus, appears to be more distantly related to SGT-1 and may not be a direct descendant of the lineage responsible for the majority of cases in this epidemic. These data confirm the importance of molecular typing and subtyping methods for in-depth epidemiological analyses of anthrax epidemics. PMID:20187980

  12. [Anthrax meningoencephalitis: a case following a cutaneous lesion in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Ziadi, A; Hachimi, A; Soraa, N; Tassi, N; Nejmi, H; Elkhayari, M; Samkaoui, M A

    2014-05-01

    Anthrax meningoencephalitis is very rare especially following skin location. We report a case of meningoencephalitis secondary to skin lesion. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and confirmed by microbiological tests. Its evolution remains fatal despite aggressive resuscitation. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Public Response to an Anthrax Attack: A Multiethnic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    SteelFisher, Gillian K.; Blendon, Robert J.; Brulé, Amanda S.; Ben-Porath, Eran N.; Ross, Laura J.; Atkins, Bret M.

    2016-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax attacks emphasized the need to develop outreach that would more effectively support racial/ethnic minority populations during a bioterrorism incident. Given the importance of antibiotic prophylaxis in a future anthrax attack, it should be a priority to better support racial/ethnic minorities in mass dispensing programs. To examine the needs and perspectives of racial/ethnic minorities, this study used a nationally representative poll of 1,852 adults, including 1,240 whites, 261 African Americans, and 282 Hispanics. The poll examined public reactions to a “worst-case scenario” in which cases of inhalation anthrax are discovered without an identified source and the entire population of a city or town is asked to receive antibiotic prophylaxis within 48 hours. Findings suggest willingness across all racial/ethnic groups to comply with recommendations to seek prophylaxis at dispensing sites. However, findings also indicate possible barriers for racial/ethnic minorities, including greater concern about pill safety and multiple attacks as well as lesser knowledge about inhalation anthrax. Across all racial/ethnic groups, roughly half would prefer to receive antibiotics at mass dispensing sites rather than through the US Postal Service. People in racial/ethnic minority groups were more likely to say this preference stems from a desire to speak with staff or to exchange medication formulation or type. Findings suggest the need for tailored outreach to racial/ethnic minorities through, for example, emphasis on key messages and enhanced understandability in communications, increased staff for answering questions in relevant dispensing sites, and long-term trust building with racial/ethnic minority communities. PMID:23244501

  14. Pathology of Inhalational Anthrax Infection in the African Green Monkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of the immunogenicity and efficacy of a replication-defective vaccinia virus expressing antigens of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3...pathology in 12 African green monkeys (AGMs) that succumbed to inhalational anthrax after exposure to a low dose (presented dose 200–2 3 104colony...forming units [cfu]) or a high dose (presented dose 2 3 104–1 3 107 cfu) of Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) spores. Frequent gross lesions noted in the AGM

  15. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: a short history of anthrax.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maxime

    2009-12-01

    The anthrax letters crisis, following the discovery of a major bacterial warfare program in the USSR and the realization that Irak had been on the verge of using anthrax as a weapon during the first Gulf war, had the consequence of putting anthrax back on the agenda of scientists. Fortunately, although it was mostly unknown by the public before these events, it was far from unknown by microbiologists. Already mentioned in the bible as a disease of herbivores, it remained a major cause of death for animals all over the planet until the end of the 19th century, with occasional, sometimes extensive, contamination of human beings. The aetiological agent, Bacillus anthracis, was identified by French and German scientists in the 1860s and 1870s. This was the first time that a disease could be attributed to a specific microorganism. The discovery by Koch that this bacterium formed spores greatly contributed to the understanding of the disease epidemiology. Studies on the pathophysiology of anthrax led to the identification of two major virulence factors, the capsule, protecting the bacilli against phagocytosis, and a tripartite toxin. The latter consists of two toxins with a common component (protecting antigen, PA) that allows the binding to and penetration into cells of two enzymes, the oedema factor EF, a calmodulin dependent adenylate cyclase, and the lethal factor LF, a specific zinc metalloprotease. The primary targets of these toxins would seem to be cells of innate immunity that would otherwise impair multiplication of the bacilli. If detected early enough, B. anthracis infections can be stopped by using antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin. Infection of animals can be prevented by the administration of vaccines, the first of which was developed by Pasteur after an historical testing at Pouilly-le-Fort which marked the beginning of the science of vaccines.

  16. Human Anthrax Transmission at the Urban-Rural Interface, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Imnadze, Paata; Blackburn, Jason K

    2015-12-01

    Human anthrax has increased dramatically in Georgia and was recently linked to the sale of meat in an urban market. We assessed epidemiological trends and risk factors for human anthrax at the urban-rural interface. We reviewed epidemiologic records (2000-2012) that included the place of residence (classified as urban, peri-urban, or rural), age, gender, and self-reported source of infection (handling or processing animal by-products and slaughtering or butchering livestock). To estimate risk, we used a negative binomial regression. The average incidence per 1 million population in peri-urban areas (24.5 cases) was > 2-fold higher compared with rural areas and > 3-fold higher compared with urban area. Risk from handling or purchasing meat was nearly 2-fold higher in urban areas and > 4-fold higher in peri-urban areas compared with rural area. Our findings suggest a high risk of anthrax in urban and peri-urban areas likely as a result of spillover from contaminated meat and animal by-products. Consumers should be warned to purchase meat only from licensed merchants. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Human Anthrax Transmission at the Urban–Rural Interface, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Imnadze, Paata; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Human anthrax has increased dramatically in Georgia and was recently linked to the sale of meat in an urban market. We assessed epidemiological trends and risk factors for human anthrax at the urban–rural interface. We reviewed epidemiologic records (2000–2012) that included the place of residence (classified as urban, peri-urban, or rural), age, gender, and self-reported source of infection (handling or processing animal by-products and slaughtering or butchering livestock). To estimate risk, we used a negative binomial regression. The average incidence per 1 million population in peri-urban areas (24.5 cases) was > 2-fold higher compared with rural areas and > 3-fold higher compared with urban area. Risk from handling or purchasing meat was nearly 2-fold higher in urban areas and > 4-fold higher in peri-urban areas compared with rural area. Our findings suggest a high risk of anthrax in urban and peri-urban areas likely as a result of spillover from contaminated meat and animal by-products. Consumers should be warned to purchase meat only from licensed merchants. PMID:26438026

  18. Injectional anthrax at a Scottish district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Inverarity, D J; Forrester, V M; Cumming, J G R; Paterson, P J; Campbell, R J; Brooks, T J G; Carson, G L; Ruddy, J P

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective, descriptive case-series reviews the clinical presentations and significant laboratory findings of patients diagnosed with and treated for injectional anthrax (IA) since December 2009 at Monklands Hospital in Central Scotland and represents the largest series of IA cases to be described from a single location. Twenty-one patients who fulfilled National Anthrax Control Team standardized case definitions of confirmed, probable or possible IA are reported. All cases survived and none required limb amputation in contrast to an overall mortality of 28% being experienced for this condition in Scotland. We document the spectrum of presentations of soft tissue infection ranging from mild cases which were managed predominantly with oral antibiotics to severe cases with significant oedema, organ failure and coagulopathy. We describe the surgical management, intensive care management and antibiotic management including the first description of daptomycin being used to treat human anthrax. It is noted that some people who had injected heroin infected with Bacillus anthracis did not develop evidence of IA. Also highlighted are biochemical and haematological parameters which proved useful in identifying deteriorating patients who required greater levels of support and surgical debridement.

  19. Space Technology to Device That Destroys Pathogens Such as Anthrax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    AiroCide Ti02, an anthrax-killing air scrubber manufactured by KES Science and Technology Inc., in Kernesaw, Georgia, looks like a square metal box when it is installed on an office wall. Its fans draw in airborne spores and airflow forces them through a maze of tubes. Inside, hydroxyl radicals (OH-) attack and kill pathogens. Most remaining spores are destroyed by high-energy ultraviolet photons. Building miniature greenhouses for experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has led to the invention of this device that annihilates anthrax-a bacteria that can be deadly when inhaled. The research enabling the invention started at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), one of 17 NASA Commercial Space Centers. A special coating technology used in the anthrax-killing invention is also being used inside WCSAR-built plant growth units on the ISS. This commercial research is managed by the Space Product Development Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Improvement of a potential anthrax therapeutic by computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean J; Eiben, Christopher B; Carra, John H; Huang, Ivan; Zong, David; Liu, Peixian; Wu, Cindy T; Nivala, Jeff; Dunbar, Josef; Huber, Tomas; Senft, Jeffrey; Schokman, Rowena; Smith, Matthew D; Mills, Jeremy H; Friedlander, Arthur M; Baker, David; Siegel, Justin B

    2011-09-16

    Past anthrax attacks in the United States have highlighted the need for improved measures against bioweapons. The virulence of anthrax stems from the shielding properties of the Bacillus anthracis poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule. In the presence of excess CapD, a B. anthracis γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, the protective capsule is degraded, and the immune system can successfully combat infection. Although CapD shows promise as a next generation protein therapeutic against anthrax, improvements in production, stability, and therapeutic formulation are needed. In this study, we addressed several of these problems through computational protein engineering techniques. We show that circular permutation of CapD improved production properties and dramatically increased kinetic thermostability. At 45 °C, CapD was completely inactive after 5 min, but circularly permuted CapD remained almost entirely active after 30 min. In addition, we identify an amino acid substitution that dramatically decreased transpeptidation activity but not hydrolysis. Subsequently, we show that this mutant had a diminished capsule degradation activity, suggesting that CapD catalyzes capsule degradation through a transpeptidation reaction with endogenous amino acids and peptides in serum rather than hydrolysis.

  1. Key tissue targets responsible for anthrax-toxin-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Moayeri, Mahtab; Liu, Jie; Crown, Devorah; Fattah, Rasem J; Wein, Alexander N; Yu, Zu-Xi; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-05

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, is lethal owing to the actions of two exotoxins: anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and oedema toxin (ET). The key tissue targets responsible for the lethal effects of these toxins are unknown. Here we generated cell-type-specific anthrax toxin receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2)-null mice and cell-type-specific CMG2-expressing mice and challenged them with the toxins. Our results show that lethality induced by LT and ET occurs through damage to distinct cell types; whereas targeting cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells is required for LT-induced mortality, ET-induced lethality occurs mainly through its action in hepatocytes. Notably, and in contradiction to what has been previously postulated, targeting of endothelial cells by either toxin does not seem to contribute significantly to lethality. Our findings demonstrate that B. anthracis has evolved to use LT and ET to induce host lethality by coordinately damaging two distinct vital systems.

  2. Key tissue targets responsible for anthrax toxin-induced-lethality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Moayeri, Mahtab; Liu, Jie; Crown, Devorah; Fattah, Rasem; Wein, Alexander N.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, is lethal due to the actions of two exotoxins, anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET). The key tissue targets responsible for the lethal effects of these toxins are unknown. Here we generated cell-type specific anthrax toxin receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2)-null mice and cell-type specific CMG2-expressing mice and challenged them with the toxins. Our results show that lethality induced by LT and ET occur through damage to distinct cell-types; while targeting cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells is required for LT-induced mortality, ET-induced lethality occurs mainly through its action in hepatocytes. Surprisingly, and in contradiction to what has been previously postulated, targeting of endothelial cells by either toxin does not appear to contribute significantly to lethality. Our findings demonstrate that B. anthracis has evolved to use LT and ET to induce host lethality by coordinately damaging two distinct vital systems. PMID:23995686

  3. HEPA/Vaccine Plan for Indoor Anthrax Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  4. Interactions between Bacillus anthracis and Plants May Promote Anthrax Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Holly H.; Turner, Wendy C.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Kusters, Martina; Shi, Ying; Sibanda, Heniritha; Torok, Tamas; Getz, Wayne M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental reservoirs are essential in the maintenance and transmission of anthrax but are poorly characterized. The anthrax agent, Bacillus anthracis was long considered an obligate pathogen that is dormant and passively transmitted in the environment. However, a growing number of laboratory studies indicate that, like some of its close relatives, B. anthracis has some activity outside of its vertebrate hosts. Here we show in the field that B. anthracis has significant interactions with a grass that could promote anthrax spore transmission to grazing hosts. Using a local, virulent strain of B. anthracis, we performed a field experiment in an enclosure within a grassland savanna. We found that B. anthracis increased the rate of establishment of a native grass (Enneapogon desvauxii) by 50% and that grass seeds exposed to blood reached heights that were 45% taller than controls. Further we detected significant effects of E. desvauxii, B. anthracis, and their interaction on soil bacterial taxa richness and community composition. We did not find any evidence for multiplication or increased longevity of B. anthracis in bulk soil associated with grass compared to controls. Instead interactions between B. anthracis and plants may result in increased host grazing and subsequently increased transmission to hosts. PMID:24901846

  5. Pathology and Pathogenesis of Bioterrorism-Related Inhalational Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Guarner, Jeannette; Jernigan, John A.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Tatti, Kathleen; Flannagan, Lisa M.; Stephens, David S.; Popovic, Tanja; Ashford, David A.; Perkins, Bradley A.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2003-01-01

    During October and November 2001, public health authorities investigated 11 patients with inhalational anthrax related to a bioterrorism attack in the United States. Formalin-fixed samples from 8 patients were available for pathological and immunohistochemical (IHC) study using monoclonal antibodies against the Bacillus anthracis cell wall and capsule. Prominent serosanguinous pleural effusions and hemorrhagic mediastinitis were found in 5 patients who died. Pulmonary infiltrates seen on chest radiographs corresponded to intraalveolar edema and hyaline membranes. IHC assays demonstrated abundant intra- and extracellular bacilli, bacillary fragments, and granular antigen-staining in mediastinal lymph nodes, surrounding soft tissues, and pleura. IHC staining in lung, liver, spleen, and intestine was present primarily inside blood vessels and sinusoids. Gram’s staining of tissues was not consistently positive. In 3 surviving patients, IHC of pleural samples demonstrated abundant granular antigen-staining and rare bacilli while transbronchial biopsies showed granular antigen-staining in interstitial cells. In surviving patients, bacilli were not observed with gram’s stains. Pathological and IHC studies of patients who died of bioterrorism-related inhalational anthrax confirmed the route of infection. IHC was indispensable for diagnosis of surviving anthrax cases. The presence of B. anthracis antigens in the pleurae could explain the prominent and persistent hemorrhagic pleural effusions. PMID:12875989

  6. Space Technology to Device That Destroys Pathogens Such as Anthrax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    AiroCide Ti02, an anthrax-killing air scrubber manufactured by KES Science and Technology Inc., in Kernesaw, Georgia, looks like a square metal box when it is installed on an office wall. Its fans draw in airborne spores and airflow forces them through a maze of tubes. Inside, hydroxyl radicals (OH-) attack and kill pathogens. Most remaining spores are destroyed by high-energy ultraviolet photons. Building miniature greenhouses for experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has led to the invention of this device that annihilates anthrax-a bacteria that can be deadly when inhaled. The research enabling the invention started at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), one of 17 NASA Commercial Space Centers. A special coating technology used in the anthrax-killing invention is also being used inside WCSAR-built plant growth units on the ISS. This commercial research is managed by the Space Product Development Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Anthrax: Where Margins are Merging between Emerging Threats and Bioterrorism

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Dibyendu; Chakraborty, Baishali; Chakraborty, Banya

    2017-01-01

    National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has classified all the emerging infectious diseases agents under three categories. Among Category A priority pathogens comes Bacillus anthracis –the causative agent of Anthrax. It is a gram positive spore bearing bacteria, and the disease is typically associated with grazing animals, and affects the people as a zoonosis. The disease can be classically transmitted by three routes namely: cutaneous, gastrointestinal and pulmonary, with a fourth route recently identified as “injection anthrax”, seen in intravenous drug abusers. Cutaneous anthrax is the commonest form in humans, accounting for 95% of all the cases. There are two main virulence factors of this bacteria, a capsule and an exotoxin, each carried by a separate toxin. Two models have been used for explaining the pathogenesis of this infection. The earlier one or “Trojan horse” model is now replaced with “jail-break” model. Centers for disease control (CDC) has issued updated guidelines for diagnosis, post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment. For immunization, anthrax vaccine absorbed is available. PMID:28979006

  8. Effect of two microwave disinfection protocols on adaptation of poly (methyl methacrylate) denture bases.

    PubMed

    Fleck, G; Ferneda, F; Ferreira da Silva, D F; Mota, E G; Shinkai, R S

    2007-03-01

    A few protocols of microwave irradiation have been proposed for disinfection of dental prostheses, but their effect on dimensional alteration still is unknown. This study evaluated the effect of 2 protocols of microwave disinfection on adaptation of resin denture bases polymerised by conventional hot water bath or by microwave energy. Thirty-six resin bases were obtained from stone casts duplicated from a metallic master model of an edentulous maxilla and polymerised by either conventional hot water bath or microwave energy. Experimental disinfection treatments were: 1) control (no disinfection); 2) protocol 1 (690 W/6 min); 3) protocol 2 (345 W/6 min). Disinfection procedures were performed 3 times (T1, T2, T3) with a 7-day interval. Adaptation was measured by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between resin base and master model. Data were analysed by ANOVA for repeated measures and Bonferroni test (a=0.05). In T1 and T2, all groups polymerised by microwave energy had higher mean values than the groups polymerised by conventional technique. In T3, denture resin bases polymerised by microwave energy had increased poor adaptation when submitted to microwave disinfection at 690 W for 6 min. No significant changes were found for bases submitted to microwave disinfection at 345 W for 6 min (P>0.05). Adaptation of denture bases varied as a function of polymerisation technique and protocol of microwave disinfection (power and time) over time. Microwave disinfection at 690 W for 6 min proved harmful to denture bases after repeated disinfection procedures.

  9. Protective-antigen (PA) based anthrax vaccines confer protection against inhalation anthrax by precluding the establishment of a systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Tod J; Perera, Pin-Yu; Lee, Gloria M; Verma, Anita; Hiroi, Toyoko; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Waldmann, Thomas A; Perera, Liyanage P

    2013-09-01

    An intense effort has been launched to develop improved anthrax vaccines that confer rapid, long lasting protection preferably with an extended stability profile amenable for stockpiling. Protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines are most favored as immune responses directed against PA are singularly protective, although the actual protective mechanism remains to be unraveled. Herein we show that contrary to the prevailing view, an efficacious PA-based vaccine confers protection against inhalation anthrax by preventing the establishment of a toxin-releasing systemic infection. Equally importantly, antibodies measured by the in vitro lethal toxin neutralization activity assay (TNA) that is considered as a reliable correlate of protection, especially for PA protein-based vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts appear to be not absolutely essential for this protective immune response.

  10. Genotoxicity of the disinfection by-products resulting from peracetic acid- or hypochlorite-disinfected sewage wastewater.

    PubMed

    Crebelli, R; Conti, L; Monarca, S; Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Zani, C; Veschetti, E; Cutilli, D; Ottaviani, M

    2005-03-01

    Wastewater disinfection is routinely carried out to prevent the spread of human pathogens present in wastewater effluents. To this aim, chemical and physical treatments are applied to the effluents before their emission in water bodies. In this study, the influence of two widely used disinfectants, peracetic acid (PAA) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), on the formation of mutagenic by-products was investigated. Wastewater samples were collected before and after disinfection, in winter and in summer, at a pilot plant installed in a municipal wastewater-treatment plant. Samples were adsorbed using silica C18 cartridges and the concentrates were tested for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium reversion test with strains TA98 and TA100. Non-concentrated water samples were tested with two plant genotoxicity assays (the Allium cepa root anaphase aberration test and the Tradescantia/micronucleus test). Mutagenicity assays in bacteria and in Tradescantia showed borderline mutagenicity in some of the wastewater samples, independent of the disinfection procedure applied. Negative results were obtained in the A. cepa anaphase aberration test. These results indicate that, in the conditions applied, wastewater disinfection with PAA and NaClO does not lead to the formation of significant amounts of genotoxic by-products.

  11. A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...AND SUBTITLE A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective

  12. Translational science in disinfection for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Diogenes, Anibal R; Ruparel, Nikita B; Teixeira, Fabricio B; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The endodontic management of permanent immature teeth is fraught with challenges. Although treatment modalities for vital pulp therapy in these teeth provide long-term favorable outcome, the outcomes from the treatment of pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis are significantly less predictable. Immature teeth diagnosed with pulp necrosis have been traditionally treated with apexification or apexogenesis approaches. Unfortunately, these treatments provide little to no benefit in promoting continued root development. Regenerative endodontic procedures have emerged as an important alternative in treating teeth with otherwise questionable long-term prognosis because of thin, fragile dentinal walls and a lack of immunocompetency. These procedures rely heavily on root canal chemical disinfection of the root canal system. Traditionally, irrigants and medicaments have been chosen for their maximum antimicrobial effect without consideration for their effects on stem cells and the dentinal microenvironment. Translational research has been crucial to provide evidence for treatment modifications that aim to increase favorable outcome while steering away from common pitfalls in the currently used protocols. In this review, recent advances learned from translational research related to disinfection in regenerative endodontics are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of a high-level peracetic acid disinfection protocol to re-process antibiotic disinfected skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, R J; Huang, Q; Pegg, D E; Kearney, J N

    2004-01-01

    Skin allografts, derived from cadaveric donors, are widely used for the treatment of burns and ulcers. Prior to use in clinical situations, these allografts are disinfected using a cocktail of antibiotics and then cryopreserved. Unfortunately, this antibiotic disinfection procedure fails to decontaminate a significant proportion and these contaminated grafts can not be used clinically. We have investigated whether it is possible to apply a second, more potent disinfection procedure to these contaminated grafts and effectively to re-process them for clinical use. Cadaveric skin grafts, treated with antibiotics and cryopreserved, were thawed and a peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection protocol applied. The grafts were then preserved in a high concentration of glycerol or propylene glycol, and properties thought to be essential for successful clinical performance assessed. The cytotoxicity of the grafts was assessed using both extract and contact assays; damage to the skin collagen was assessed using a collagenase susceptibility assay and the capacity of the grafts to elicit an inflammatory response in vitro was assessed by quantifying the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha by human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes. PAA disinfection, in conjunction with either glycerol or propylene glycol preservation, did not render the grafts cytotoxic, pro-inflammatory, or increase their susceptibility to collagenase digestion. The rates of penetration of glycerol and propylene glycol into the re-processed skin were comparable to those of fresh skin. This study has demonstrated that PAA disinfection combined with immersion in high concentrations of either glycerol or propylene glycol was an effective method for re-processing contaminated skin allografts, and may justify their clinical use.

  14. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of molds: influence of disinfectant solutions and elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Berger, Sandrine B; Siqueira, Ronaldo Mt; Grandi, Victor H; Lopes, Murilo B; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Caixeta, Rodrigo V; de Carvalho, Rodrigo V; Sinhoreti, Mário Ac

    2017-04-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of molds after disinfection using 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to those of molds that were not disinfected, for four elastomeric impression materials: polysulfide (Light Bodied Permlastic), polyether (Impregum Soft), polydimethylsiloxane (Oranwash L) andpolyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil Ultra LV). The molds were prepared on a matrix by applying pressure, using a perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following polymerization and either disinfected (by soaking in one of the solutions for 15 minutes) or not disinfected. The samples were thus divided into 16 groups (n=5). Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy to assess the 20-μm line over its entire 25 mm length. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the means were compared by Tukey's test (a=5%). The 20-μm line was completely reproduced by all elastomeric impression materials, regardless of disinfection procedure. There was no significant difference between the control group and molds disinfected with peracetic acid for the elastomeric materials Impregum Soft (polyether) and Aquasil Ultra LV (polyvinylsiloxane). The high-level disinfectant peracetic acid would be the choice material for disinfection. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  15. [Quantitative bacteriological evaluation of a method for skin disinfection in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Folléa, G; Saint-Laurent, P; Bigey, F; Gayet, S; Bientz, M; Cazenave, J P

    1997-12-01

    Skin disinfection at the site of venipuncture is a critical point in every blood transfusion collection procedure, as it contributes to ensure the bacterial safety of transfusion. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria present in the antecubital fossae before and after skin disinfection may be one method of assessing the anti-bacterial efficiency of disinfection. Swab culture systems and contact plates are the two techniques usually employed for this purpose. A washing and swabbing technique was used to quantify bacteria before and skin disinfection of the antecubital fossae in blood donors. This contra-placebo study was carried out on 32 donors, each of whom served as his own control, with a random choice of test arm and opposing control arm. Bacterial counts were determined in the antecubital fossae without skin disinfection (control, n = 32) and after a 3 step skin preparation procedure (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) using placebo (distilled water, n = 16) or an antiseptic product (mixture of chlorexidine, benzalkonium chloride and benzylic alcohol, n = 16). The absence of a statistical difference in bacterial counts between the right and left antecubital fossae without disinfection was controlled in a preliminary study of 20 subjects. Mean bacterial counts were 25,000/cm2 and 27,400/cm2 respectively for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria before disinfection, with a wide variation in results between individuals. When using placebo, preparation of the venipuncture site by the 3 step method (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) resulted in a non significant mean reduction of 0.56 log in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Using the antiseptic product, the same method resulted in a significant mean reduction of 1.8 and 1.7 log respectively in aerobic (p = 0.015) and anaerobic flora (p = 0.005). On an average, 2,750 aerobic bacteria/cm2 and 2,910 anaerobic bacteria/cm2 remained after disinfection, while qualitative analysis showed that disinfection suppressed the

  16. Disinfecting capabilities of oxychlorine compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Noss, C I; Olivieri, V P

    1985-01-01

    The bacterial virus f2 was inactivated by chlorine dioxide at acidic, neutral, and alkaline pH values. The rate of inactivation increased with increasing pH. Chlorine dioxide disproportionation products, chlorite and chlorate, were not active disinfectants. As chlorine dioxide solutions were degraded under alkaline conditions, they displayed reduced viricidal effectiveness, thereby confirming the chlorine dioxide free radical as the active disinfecting species. PMID:3911893

  17. Comparative testing of disinfectant efficacy on planktonic bacteria and bacterial biofilms using a new assay based on kinetic analysis of metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Günther, F; Scherrer, M; Kaiser, S J; DeRosa, A; Mutters, N T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a new reproducible method for disinfectant efficacy testing on bacterial biofilms and to evaluate the efficacy of different disinfectants against biofilms. Clinical multidrug-resistant strains were chosen as test isolates to ensure practical relevance. We compared the standard qualitative suspension assay for disinfectant testing, which does not take into account biofilm formation, to the new biofilm viability assay that uses kinetic analysis of metabolic activity in biofilms after disinfectant exposure to evaluate disinfectant efficacy. In addition, the efficacy of four standard disinfectants to clinical isolates was tested using both methods. All tested disinfectants were effective against test isolates when in planktonic state using the standard qualitative suspension assay, while disinfectants were only weakly effective against bacteria in biofilms. Disinfectant efficacy testing on planktonic organisms ignores biofilms and overestimates disinfectant susceptibility of bacteria. However, biofilm forming, e.g. on medical devices or hospital surfaces, is the natural state of bacterial living and needs to be considered in disinfectant testing. Although bacterial biofilms are the predominant manner of bacterial colonization, most standard procedures for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and efficacy testing of disinfectants are adapted for application to planktonic bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use a newly developed microplate-based biofilm test system that uses kinetic analysis of the metabolic activity in biofilms, after disinfectant exposure, to evaluate disinfectant efficacy. Our study shows that findings obtained from disinfectant efficacy testing on planktonic bacteria cannot be extrapolated to predict disinfectant efficacy on bacterial biofilms of clinically relevant multidrug-resistant organisms. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. From structure to solutions: the role of basic research in developing anthrax countermeasures: Microbiology Graduate Program Seminar: Anthrax toxin.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Camille A

    2012-06-01

    Dr. John Collier traced the discoveries that elucidated the structure and function of the anthrax toxin in his talk "Anthrax Toxin," which was part of the Microbiology Graduate Program Seminar Series at Yale School of Medicine on February 23, 2012. Dr. Collier, Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology at Harvard University, began by noting the advantages to studying anthrax pathogenesis in a biosafety level-1 lab. This designation does not merely facilitate his research, but also reflects a larger trend of basic research being leveraged to develop translational applications. Basic research on toxin structure has led to the development of a vaccine by Dr. Collier's group. Next-generation prophylactics also may stem from recent discoveries uncovering a role for cellular cofactors that mediate toxin function. Finally, basic research into the toxin substructure has facilitated efforts to change the receptor tropism to target dysregulated cells for therapeutic purposes. The urgency around biodefense agents makes the choice of research priorities a salient issue. As such, this author submits that basic research occupies a unique and lucrative niche driving clinical applications.

  19. Estimating Retrospective Exposure of Household Humidifier Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Uk; Friesen, Melissa C; Roh, Hyun-Suk; Choi, Ye-Yong; Ahn, Jong-Ju; Lim, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Koh, Dong-Hee; Jung, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lim, Sin-Ye; Leem, Jong-Han; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Paek, Do-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive humidifier disinfectant exposure characterization for 374 subjects with lung disease who presumed their disease was related to humidifier disinfectant use (patient group) and for 303 of their family members (family group) for an ongoing epidemiological study. We visited the homes of the registered patients to investigate disinfectant use characteristics. Probability of exposure to disinfectants was determined from the questionnaire and supporting evidence from photographs demonstrating the use of humidifier disinfectant, disinfectant purchase receipts, any residual disinfectant and the consistency of their statements. Exposure duration was estimated as cumulative disinfectant use hours from the questionnaire. Airborne disinfectant exposure intensity (μg/m3) was estimated based on the disinfectant volume (mL) and frequency added to the humidifier per day, disinfectant bulk level (μg/mL), the volume of the room (m3) with humidifier disinfectant, and the degree of ventilation. Overall, the distribution patterns of the intensity, duration and cumulative exposure to humidifier disinfectants for the patient group were higher than those of the family group, especially for pregnant women and patients ≤ 6 years old. Further study is underway to evaluate the association between the disinfectant exposure estimated here with clinically diagnosed lung disease. PMID:25557769

  20. Modeling the Ecological Niche of Bacillus anthracis to Map Anthrax Risk in Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Matakarimov, Saitbek; Kozhokeeva, Sabira; Tagaeva, Zhyldyz; Bell, Lindsay K; Kracalik, Ian T; Zhunushov, Asankadyr

    2017-03-01

    AbstractAnthrax, caused by the environmental bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is an important zoonosis nearly worldwide. In Central Asia, anthrax represents a major veterinary and public health concern. In the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, ongoing anthrax outbreaks have been reported in humans associated with handling infected livestock and contaminated animal by-products such as meat or hides. The current anthrax situation has prompted calls for improved insights into the epidemiology, ecology, and spatial distribution of the disease in Kyrgyzstan to better inform control and surveillance. Disease control for both humans and livestock relies on annual livestock vaccination ahead of outbreaks. Toward this, we used a historic database of livestock anthrax reported from 1932 to 2006 mapped at high resolution to develop an ecological niche model-based prediction of B. anthracis across Kyrgyzstan and identified spatial clusters of livestock anthrax using a cluster morphology statistic. We also defined the seasonality of outbreaks in livestock. Cattle were the most frequently reported across the time period, with the greatest number of cases in late summer months. Our niche models defined four areas as suitable to support pathogen persistence, the plateaus near Talas and Bishkek, the valleys of western Kyrgyzstan along the Fergana Valley, and the low-lying areas along the shore of Lake Isyk-Kul. These areas should be considered "at risk" for livestock anthrax and subsequent human cases. Areas defined by the niche models can be used to prioritize anthrax surveillance and inform efforts to target livestock vaccination campaigns.

  1. Case Report of an Anthrax Presentation Relevant to Special Operations Medicine.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Stephen; Enzenauer, Robert W; Karesh, James W; Pasteur, Nshimyimana; Eisnor, Derek L; Painter, Rex B; Calvano, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical personnel function worldwide in environments where endemic anthrax (caused by Bacillus anthracis infection) may present in one of three forms: cutaneous, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal. This report presents a rare periocular anthrax case from Haiti to emphasize the need for heightened diagnostic suspicion of unusual lesions likely to be encountered in SOF theaters. 2016.

  2. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    germinate into vegetative bacteria (10, 23), which are capable of secreting anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin . In the lymph nodes, bacteria ...inability of AM to completely eradicate bacteria suggests that intracellularly secreted lethal FIG. 5. Lethal toxin impairs bactericidal activity but...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis

  3. Use of medical simulation to teach bioterrorism preparedness: the anthrax example.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Martin E

    2013-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax bioterrorism attacks demonstrated vulnerability for future similar attacks. This article describes mechanisms that can be used to prepare the medical community and healthcare facilities for the diagnosis and management of a subsequent bioterrorism attack should such an event occur and the fundamentals of medical simulation and its use in teaching learners about the diagnosis of management of anthrax exposure.

  4. Current GI endoscope disinfection and QA practices.

    PubMed

    Moses, Frank M; Lee, Jennifer S

    2004-01-01

    High-level disinfection (HLD) of GI endoscopes is readily achieved when published guidelines are observed. Contamination is linked to breakdowns in accepted procedure. However, there is no recognized method of verifying adequacy of endoscope reprocessing in routine practice and no data regarding current quality assurance (QA) practice. Prior reports have demonstrated a wide variation in routine clinical practice of GI endoscopy HLD. The goal of this study was to determine current practice at regional endoscopy centers with regard to endoscope cleaning and HLD, maintenance, and QA practice. An anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire was mailed to 367 SGNA members in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, and District of Columbia and completed by 230 (63%). The majority of responders were hospital-based and 59% of the units performed over 3000 procedures per year. After use the endoscope was hand-carried or transported in a dry container (97%) to a separate cleaning room (85%) for HLD by technicians (40%). Wide variations existed in manual step procedures including use of disposable (50%) brushes and number of times channel brushed: once (21%), twice (35%), or three to five times (37%). Soaking duration in disinfectant (70% gluteraldehyde) was for <10 min (8%), 10-20 min (35%), 20-30 min (38%), 30-40 min (7%), and >40 min (3%). Sixty-seven percent had an active unit infection control (IC) service and 98% had a QA program. Monitoring of cleaning effectiveness was by visual inspection (50%) and culturing endoscopes (17%). Culture was done weekly (1%) and procedure-related infection. Wide practice variations were noted in manual cleaning and in soaking time during automated HLD in this community

  5. Awareness and attitude toward zoonoses with particular reference to anthrax among cattle owners in selected rural communities of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chikerema, S M; Matope, G; Pfukenyi, D M

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess cattle owners' awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward zoonoses, with particular emphasis regarding anthrax. Data on awareness of zoonoses, clinical signs of anthrax in animals and human, its routes of transmission and methods of prevention, the families' consumption habits of anthrax-infected carcasses, and other family activities that increase exposure to anthrax were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 41.4% (135/326) of the farmers were from high-anthrax-risk districts, whereas 28.5% and 30.1% were from medium- and low-risk districts, respectively. Overall, the level of awareness amongst the farmers for the named zoonoses were rabies (88.7%), anthrax (71.5%), and brucellosis (20.9%). Except for anthrax, awareness of other zoonoses did not differ significantly (p>0.05) among the district categories. Farmers from anthrax high-risk districts were significantly more aware of anthrax compared to those from moderate- (p=0.000) and low- (p=0.000) risk districts. All of the farmers were aware that anthrax occurs in cattle, and 73% indicated the presence of unclotting blood oozing from natural orifices as a consistent finding in cattle that died of anthrax, whereas 86.7% of them indicated the presence of skin lesions as the most common sign of the disease in humans. The good efficacy of human anthrax treatment (58.3%), slaughter of moribund cattle and selling of meat from cattle found dead to unsuspecting consumers (59.8%), reluctance to lose animals (47.9%), and forgetting about anthrax (41.1%) were cited as the major reasons for consuming anthrax-infected carcasses. Given that 75.2% of cattle owners indicated that they would not consume meat from cattle found dead, because they were discouraged by veterinary authorities, introducing meat inspection services is likely to have a positive impact in preventing human anthrax outbreaks in Zimbabwe.

  6. Protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a Bacillus anthracis capsule conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Donald J; Ribot, Wilson J; Joyce, Joseph; Cook, James; Hepler, Robert; Nahas, Debbie; Chua, Jennifer; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2016-07-25

    The efficacy of currently licensed anthrax vaccines is largely attributable to a single Bacillus anthracis immunogen, protective antigen. To broaden protection against possible strains resistant to protective antigen-based vaccines, we previously developed a vaccine in which the anthrax polyglutamic acid capsule was covalently conjugated to the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B and demonstrated that two doses of 2.5μg of this vaccine conferred partial protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax . Here, we demonstrate complete protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a higher 50μg dose of the same capsule conjugate vaccine. These results indicate that B. anthracis capsule is a highly effective vaccine component that should be considered for incorporation in future generation anthrax vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Disinfection of the Peritoneal Dialysis Bag Medication Port: Comparison of Disinfectant Agent and Disinfection Time.

    PubMed

    Conti, Adriana; Katzap, Roberta Monteiro; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo; Pagnussatti, Vany; Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth

    2017-07-13

    To compare different disinfection techniques for the peritoneal dialysis bag medication port (MP). An experimental study was conducted testing different cleaning agents (70% alcohol vs 2% chlorhexidine) and time periods (5, 10 and 60 seconds) for disinfection of the MP. Five microorganisms (S. aureus, E.coli, A. baumannii and C. parapsilosis, CNS) were prepared for use as contaminants of the MP. MP were incubated in Tryptic soy broth at 36 °C for 24 h, after which, they were seeded on a Biomérieux® blood agar plate and incubated for 24 h at 36 °C. 300 peritoneal dialysis bags were analyzed regarding the time expose to the disinfectant showed a statistically significant difference in the number of culture positive (7/100) p = 0.001; Gram positive (6/100) p = 0.006 for five seconds, one positive culture and turbid bag with ten seconds, while friction for 60 seconds showed all negative results. The comparison between disinfectant, alcohol or chlorhexidine, 150 bag in each group, showed that the ones disinfected with alcohol had 5 turbid bags, 8 positive cultures and 7 germs identified, while all bags disinfected with chlorhexidine were negative for all parameters, with a difference statistically significant (p = 0.004). Our results suggest that the MP should be scrubbed with 2% chlorhexidine for at least 5 seconds; if alcohol 70% is used the length of friction should not be inferior to 10 seconds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid microbial quantification of disinfected contact lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Powers, Linda S; Snyder, Robert W; Wardell, Lois J

    2012-09-01

    The efficacy of disinfection of contact lenses is difficult to determine. We have monitored microbial contamination on surfaces and in fluids by intrinsic fluorescence of microbes and distinguished their metabolic states (viable cells, nonviable cells, and endospores). This approach is sensitive (10 cells), requires no added reagents or sample contact, and measurements can be made in near real time. The disinfection performance of AMO Easy Rub™ and Alcon No Rub™ contact lens solutions was compared with CVS-brand saline for contact lenses on contact lenses contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 10145). Our aim is to show that intrinsic fluorescence measurements can yield real-time, critical information about the efficacy of contact lens decontamination products and protocols. Intrinsic fluorescence of Acuvue™ contact lenses (samples and controls) was measured before and after incubation with P. aeruginosa. Inoculated lenses were then cleaned and disinfected, according to directions for AMO Easy Rub™ and Alcon No Rub™, rubbed and rinsed with saline for contact lenses (the brand made a difference in the experiment), followed by measurement of the effectiveness of the disinfection procedure with the intrinsic fluorescence instrument. Both the sample lenses after disinfection and the control lenses were immediately placed in LB broth for outgrowth and measured by standard cell-counting methods. The experiments were performed in triplicate. The concentration of P. aeruginosa formed on the lenses by the above methods varied from 10(6)-10(13) cells/mL. All lenses that were cultured following cleaning yielded no colonies. However, 10(5)-10(9) cells/mL of the bacteria on the treated lenses remained viable when analyzed by intrinsic fluorescence methodology. These results indicate that a medically significant amount of bacteria remained on the contact lenses after disinfection and/or cleaning, which were viable but nonculturable and are likely to go

  9. The effect of various disinfectants on dental shade guides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peterson Y; Masri, Radi; Romberg, Elaine; Driscoll, Carl F

    2014-09-01

    Dental shade guides are used to evaluate tooth color before prosthodontic procedures and are subjected to disinfection after use. The effect of disinfection on shade guides has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of disinfectants on the color of shade tabs. Changes in the color (ΔE) of VITA Classical Shade Guide tabs were measured with a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer in the CIELAB system and calculated after being subjected to Cavicide, Asepticare TB, Sporicidin, and distilled water (control) over a simulated period of 2 years. Statistical analysis was accomplished by a 2-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) test (α=.05). A significant difference was noted in the degree of shade tab color change, depending on the type of disinfectant used (F=153.2, P<.001). No significant difference was noted in the amount of shade tab color change that occurred after disinfection among the different shade tabs used (F=0.611, P=.865), nor was a significant interaction noted between the type of disinfectant and the different shade tabs used (F=0.7, P=.919). Asepticare TB showed the least significant amount of change (ΔE=0.401), and Sporicidin (ΔE=0.889) and the control (ΔE=0.969) showed significantly more color change than Asepticare TB but less than Cavicide (ΔE=1.198). The average total CIELAB color difference for 50% human perceptibility is approximately 1 unit (under standardized laboratory conditions). In the oral cavity, however, an average change of 3.7 ΔE units could still allow teeth to be perceived as having the same color. Therefore, although the results are statistically significant, they may not be clinically important. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Observations on Salmonella contamination of commercial duck farms before and after cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Callaby, Rebecca; Davies, Rob

    2017-04-01

    In the European Union, statutory control of Salmonella is in place in the chicken and turkey sectors, but not in the duck sector. In this study, 14 Salmonella-positive duck farms were sampled before and after cleaning and disinfection, and once the houses had been restocked with a new flock. The cleaning and disinfection programmes used were subdivided into two main categories: ones in which a final formaldehyde disinfection step was included (1) and ones in which it was not included (2). Several types of samples were collected during the study, and faecal samples were those more frequently positive (62% of faecal samples were positive for Salmonella in comparison to 2-23% of samples from all the other sample categories) (P < 0.001). Independently of the cleaning and disinfection programme used, there was a statistically significant (P < 0.001) reduction in the percentage of Salmonella-positive samples between before cleaning and disinfection (41.1%) and after cleaning and disinfection (3.1%). After restocking, the number of Salmonella-positive samples increased significantly (P < 0.001), with 65.3% of the samples tested being positive for Salmonella. Farms in which disinfection programme 1 was used were 5.34 times less likely to have samples positive for Salmonella after cleaning and disinfection than farms which implemented programme 2. Formaldehyde acts effectively against Salmonella even in the presence of some residual organic matter. Limited residual contamination on farms after cleaning and disinfection represents a risk of infection for young ducklings, and thorough cleaning and disinfection procedures should be implemented to reduce the carry-over of infection between flocks.

  11. Health effects of drinking water disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Condie, L.W.; Bercz, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes toxicological studies conducted with drinking water disinfectants. Toxicological effects, which are associated with the disinfectants themselves as well as with the by-products formed when disinfectants react with organic material present in water, are considered. The health impact of chemical reactions occurring between residual disinfectants and nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract is also discussed. 40 references, 5 tables.

  12. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level goals...

  13. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level goals...

  14. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level goals...

  15. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level goals...

  16. Analysis of a Panel of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria for Resistance to Aldehyde-based Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Gibbs, Sara; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Burgess, Winona; Richardson, Kris; Kasperbauer, Shannon; Madinger, Nancy; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Summary After several accounts across the globe of mycobacterial outbreaks associated with medical procedures and aldehyde disinfectants resistance, we undertook an analysis of mycobacteria isolated from patients seen in a hospital in the United States between 1994 and 2008 to determine prevalence of resistance to aldehyde-based disinfectants. Out of the 117 clinical isolates screened, six isolates belonging to the emerging Mycobacterium abscessus group were found to display significant levels of resistance to glutaraldehyde and ortho-phthalaldehyde. PMID:25087149

  17. Disinfection of the flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M gordonae.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D; Bonekat, H W; Andrews, D; Shigeoka, J W

    1984-01-01

    In view of recent reports of contamination of the fibreoptic bronchoscope by tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, we evaluated the disinfecting properties of aqueous glutaraldehyde (Cidex) and an iodophor (Prepodyne) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M gordonae. We found that a 15 minute disinfection procedure with either agent, coupled with initial vigorous mechanical cleaning of the bronchoscope and its accessories, is a quick and reliable method for preventing the contamination of the bronchoscope with mycobacteria. Images PMID:6437002

  18. Effectiveness of disinfectants used in hemodialysis against both Candida orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis sensu stricto biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pires, Regina Helena; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Gomes Martins, Carlos Henrique; Fusco Almeida, Ana Marisa; Pienna Soares, Christiane; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José

    2013-05-01

    Biofilms have been observed in the fluid pathways of hemodialysis machines. The impacts of four biocides used for the disinfection of hemodialysis systems were tested against Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto and Candida orthopsilosis biofilms generated by isolates obtained from a hydraulic circuit that were collected in a hemodialysis unit. Acetic acid was shown to be the most effective agent against Candida biofilms. Strategies for effective disinfection procedures used for hemodialysis systems should also seek to kill and inhibit biofilms.

  19. Antimicrobial Treatment for Systemic Anthrax: Analysis of Cases from 1945–2014 Identified through Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Satish K.; Huang, Eileen; Guarnizo, Julie; Hoyle, Jamechia; Katharios-Lanwermeyer, Stefan; Turski, Theresa; Bower, William; Hendricks, Katherine; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic anthrax is associated with high mortality. Current national guidelines, developed for the individualized treatment of systemic anthrax, outline the use of combination intravenous antimicrobials for a minimum of two weeks; bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor antimicrobials for all cases of systemic anthrax; and at least 3 antimicrobials with good blood-brain barrier penetration for anthrax meningitis. However, in an anthrax mass casualty incident, large numbers of anthrax cases may create challenges in meeting antimicrobial needs. Methods To further inform our understanding of the role of antimicrobials in treating systemic anthrax, a systematic review of the English language literature was conducted to identify cases of systemic anthrax treated with antimicrobials for which a clinical outcome was recorded. Results A total of 149 cases of systemic anthrax were identified (cutaneous [n=59], gastrointestinal [n=28], inhalation [n=26], primary anthrax meningitis [n=19], multiple routes [n=9], and injection [n=8]). Among the identified 59 cases of cutaneous anthrax, 33 were complicated by meningitis (76% mortality), while 26 simply had evidence of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (4% mortality); 21 of 26 (81%) of this latter group received monotherapy. Subsequent analysis regarding combination antimicrobial therapy was restricted to the remaining 123 cases of more severe anthrax (overall 67% mortality). Recipients of combination bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor therapy had a 45% survival versus 28% in the absence of combination therapy (p = 0.07). For meningitis cases (n=77), survival was greater for those receiving a total of ≥3 antimicrobials over the course of treatment (3 of 4; 75%), compared to receipt of 1 or 2 antimicrobials (12 of 73; 16%) (p = 0.02). Median parenteral antimicrobial duration was 14 days. Conclusion Combination bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor therapy may be appropriate in severe

  20. Estimating retrospective exposure of household humidifier disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Park, D U; Friesen, M C; Roh, H S; Choi, Y Y; Ahn, J J; Lim, H K; Kim, S K; Koh, D H; Jung, H J; Lee, J H; Cheong, H K; Lim, S Y; Leem, J H; Kim, Y H; Paek, D M

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a comprehensive humidifier disinfectant exposure characterization for 374 subjects with lung disease who presumed their disease was related to humidifier disinfectant use (patient group) and for 303 of their family members (family group) for an ongoing epidemiological study. We visited the homes of the registered patients to investigate disinfectant use characteristics. Probability of exposure to disinfectants was determined from the questionnaire and supporting evidence from photographs demonstrating the use of humidifier disinfectant, disinfectant purchase receipts, any residual disinfectant, and the consistency of their statements. Exposure duration was estimated as cumulative disinfectant use hours from the questionnaire. Airborne disinfectant exposure intensity (μg/m(3)) was estimated based on the disinfectant volume (ml) and frequency added to the humidifier per day, disinfectant bulk level (μg/ml), the volume of the room (m(3)) with humidifier disinfectant, and the degree of ventilation. Overall, the distribution patterns of the intensity, duration, and cumulative exposure to humidifier disinfectants for the patient group were higher than those of the family group, especially for pregnant women and patients ≤6 years old. Further study is underway to evaluate the association between the disinfectant exposures estimated here with clinically diagnosed lung disease. Retrospective exposure to household humidifier disinfectant as estimated here can be used to evaluate associations with clinically diagnosed lung disease due to the use of humidifier disinfectant in Korea. The framework, with modifications to account for dispersion and use patterns, can also be potentially adapted to assessment of other household chemical exposures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2–) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  2. Disinfection of gutta-percha cones using three reagents and their residual effects

    PubMed Central

    Chandrappa, Mahesh Martur; Mundathodu, Nofal; Srinivasan, Raghu; Nasreen, Farhat; Kavitha, Pamarthi; Shetty, Ashwija

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorehexidine and MTAD in disinfecting gutta-percha cones and to analyze the surface topography of gutta-percha cones after the rapid chemical disinfection procedure. Materials and Methods: Gutta-percha cones were immersed in suspensions of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus separately. The cones were then immersed in 5.25% NaOCl, 2% CHX and MTAD for 30 seconds, 1 minute and 5 minutes separately. The disinfected cones were then incubated in thioglycollate media for 7 days. The thioglycolate media was sub-cultured and colony forming units were counted. For topographical examination of gutta-percha cones, the cones were immersed in respective solutions for one minute and allowed to air dry for 30 minutes after rinsing or without rinsing the cones with distilled water. The topography of the cones were then analyzed under SEM. Data was statistically analyzed using one way anova. Results: MTAD was found to be the most effective disinfecting solution. The topographical examination of GP cones found some deposits after the disinfection procedure in every group. These deposits were removed when the GP cones were rinsed with distilled water. Conclusions: MTAD possesses superior bactericidal activity when compared with NaOCl and CHX and a final rinse with distilled water is essential after the disinfection procedure. PMID:25506147

  3. Effectiveness of chemical disinfection on biofilms of relined dentures: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moffa, Eduardo B; Izumida, Fernanda E; Jorge, Janaina H; Mussi, Maria C M; Siqueira, Walter L; Giampaolo, Eunice T

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of disinfection with sodium perborate or chlorhexidine (when combined with brushing) on the removal of biofilm in relined dentures. Swabs were collected 48 hours after the relining procedure and at the follow-up time intervals of 7, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days. The dentures' surface roughness was measured at the same times. 45 subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 15 subjects each. The control group brushed with coconut soap and a soft toothbrush. The sodium perborate group followed the same procedure and also disinfected with sodium perborate solution for 5 minutes per day. The chlorhexidine group followed the control group procedure and disinfected with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution for 5 minutes per day. The number of colony forming units and the surface roughness were evaluated statistically by 2-way repeated-measure ANOVA (α = 0.05). The control group dentures exhibited similar levels of microbial cells throughout the experiment. However, after 15 days, no microbial growth was observed on the dentures for which either disinfection agent was used. There were no statistically significant differences in superficial roughness between the groups (P = 0.298). The disinfection agents used, combined with brushing, were able to remove the relined dentures' biofilm after 15 days of disinfection. Roughness was not a predominant factor in CFU reduction.

  4. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA's Microbiology Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We develop antimicrobial testing methods and standard operating procedures to measure the effectiveness of hard surface disinfectants against a variety of microorganisms. Find methods and procedures for antimicrobial testing.

  5. Decontamination of Anthrax spores in critical infrastructure and critical assets.

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Raymond M.; Crown, Kevin K.; Tucker, Mark David; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2010-05-01

    Decontamination of anthrax spores in critical infrastructure (e.g., subway systems, major airports) and critical assets (e.g., the interior of aircraft) can be challenging because effective decontaminants can damage materials. Current decontamination methods require the use of highly toxic and/or highly corrosive chemical solutions because bacterial spores are very difficult to kill. Bacterial spores such as Bacillus anthracis, the infectious agent of anthrax, are one of the most resistant forms of life and are several orders of magnitude more difficult to kill than their associated vegetative cells. Remediation of facilities and other spaces (e.g., subways, airports, and the interior of aircraft) contaminated with anthrax spores currently requires highly toxic and corrosive chemicals such as chlorine dioxide gas, vapor- phase hydrogen peroxide, or high-strength bleach, typically requiring complex deployment methods. We have developed a non-toxic, non-corrosive decontamination method to kill highly resistant bacterial spores in critical infrastructure and critical assets. A chemical solution that triggers the germination process in bacterial spores and causes those spores to rapidly and completely change to much less-resistant vegetative cells that can be easily killed. Vegetative cells are then exposed to mild chemicals (e.g., low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, quaternary ammonium compounds, alcohols, aldehydes, etc.) or natural elements (e.g., heat, humidity, ultraviolet light, etc.) for complete and rapid kill. Our process employs a novel germination solution consisting of low-cost, non-toxic and non-corrosive chemicals. We are testing both direct surface application and aerosol delivery of the solutions. A key Homeland Security need is to develop the capability to rapidly recover from an attack utilizing biological warfare agents. This project will provide the capability to rapidly and safely decontaminate critical facilities and assets to return them to

  6. Keeping the Air Clean and Safe: An Anthrax Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at work in the Planetary Protection division at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) sterilize everything before blasting it to the Red Planet. They take great pains to ensure that all spacecraft are void of bacterial life, especially the microscopic bacteria that can live hundreds of years in their spore states. No one is quite sure what Earthly germs would do on Mars, but scientists agree that it is safest to keep the Martian terrain as undisturbed as possible. Errant Earth germs would also render useless the instruments placed on exploration rovers to look for signs of life, as the life that they registered would be life that came with them from Earth. A team at JPL, headed by Dr. Adrian Ponce, developed a bacterial spore-detection system that uses a simple and robust chemical reaction that visually alerts Planetary Protection crews. It is a simple air filter that traps micron-sized bacterial spores and then submits them to the chemical reaction. When the solution is then viewed under an ultraviolet light, the mixture will glow green if it is contaminated by bacteria. Scientists can then return to the scrubbing and cleaning stages of the sterilization process to remove these harmful bacteria. The detection system is the space-bound equivalent of having your hands checked for cleanliness before being allowed to the table; and although intended to keep terrestrial germs from space, this technology has awesome applications here on Mother Earth. The bacterial spore-detection unit can recognize anthrax and other harmful, spore-forming bacteria and alert people of the impending danger. As evidenced in the anthrax mailings of fall 2001 in the United States, the first sign of anthrax exposure was when people experienced flu-like symptoms, which unfortunately, can take as much as a week to develop after contamination. Anthrax cost 5 people their lives and infected 19 others; and the threat of bioterrorism became a routine concern, with new threats popping up

  7. Injectional anthrax in a heroin skin-popper.

    PubMed

    Ringertz, S H; Høiby, E A; Jensenius, M; Maehlen, J; Caugant, D A; Myklebust, A; Fossum, K

    2000-11-04

    Anthrax is rare in western Europe but may arise sporadically in people exposed to animal products from endemic areas. A heroin-injecting drug user presented with a severe soft-tissue infection at the injection site, septic shock, and meningitis. A gram-positive endospore-forming aerobic rod was isolated from the soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid; confirmation of Bacillus anthracis was made by PCR. Since contaminated heroin was the probable source of infection, this case is of concern and warrants surveillance.

  8. Can pulsed xenon ultraviolet light systems disinfect aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection?

    PubMed

    Jinadatha, Chetan; Villamaria, Frank C; Ganachari-Mallappa, Nagaraja; Brown, Donna S; Liao, I-Chia; Stock, Eileen M; Copeland, Laurel A; Zeber, John E

    2015-04-01

    Whereas pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light no-touch disinfection systems are being increasingly used for room disinfection after patient discharge with manual cleaning, their effectiveness in the absence of manual disinfection has not been previously evaluated. Our study indicates that pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light systems effectively reduce aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection. These data are important for hospitals planning to adopt this technology as adjunct to routine manual disinfection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Drinking water decontamination with isolative sorbent disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water can be decontaminated with the use of isolative sorbent disinfectants. Consideration of the effectiveness of water disinfectants and the sorptive power of porous materials against bacteria and viruses attested to the favour of iodine and silver-containing disinfectants and their compositions on porous aggressive carriers to be employed in extreme conditions such as on board crewed space vehicles.

  10. Disinfection of Human Teeth for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, William H.; White, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the efficacy of glutaraldehyde and several other disinfectants for disinfecting teeth to be used for teaching and research, as an alternative to autoclaving for teeth with amalgam restorations. Results indicate that formalin was the only disinfectant that penetrated tooth pulp chambers in effective antimicrobial…

  11. Disinfection of Human Teeth for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, William H.; White, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the efficacy of glutaraldehyde and several other disinfectants for disinfecting teeth to be used for teaching and research, as an alternative to autoclaving for teeth with amalgam restorations. Results indicate that formalin was the only disinfectant that penetrated tooth pulp chambers in effective antimicrobial…

  12. Recombinant HSA-CMG2 Is a Promising Anthrax Toxin Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Ju; Zhang, Jun; Yin, Ying; Dong, Dayong; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-20

    Anthrax toxin is the major virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis. Protective antigen (PA) is the key component of the toxin and has been confirmed as the main target for the development of toxin inhibitors. The inhibition of the binding of PA to its receptor, capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), can effectively block anthrax intoxication. The recombinant, soluble von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain of CMG2 (sCMG2) has demonstrated potency against anthrax toxin. However, the short half-life of sCMG2 in vivo is a disadvantage for its development as a new anthrax drug. In the present study, we report that HSA-CMG2, a protein combining human serum albumin (HSA) and sCMG2, produced in the Pichia pastoris expression system prolonged the half-life of sCMG2 while maintaining PA binding ability. The IC50 of HSA-CMG2 is similar to those of sCMG2 and CMG2-Fc in in vitro toxin neutralization assays, and HSA-CMG2 completely protects rats from lethal doses of anthrax toxin challenge; these same challenge doses exceed sCMG2 at a sub-equivalent dose ratio and overwhelm CMG2-Fc. Our results suggest that HSA-CMG2 is a promising inhibitor of anthrax toxin and may contribute to the development of novel anthrax drugs.

  13. Recombinant HSA-CMG2 Is a Promising Anthrax Toxin Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangliang; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Ju; Zhang, Jun; Yin, Ying; Dong, Dayong; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is the major virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis. Protective antigen (PA) is the key component of the toxin and has been confirmed as the main target for the development of toxin inhibitors. The inhibition of the binding of PA to its receptor, capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), can effectively block anthrax intoxication. The recombinant, soluble von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain of CMG2 (sCMG2) has demonstrated potency against anthrax toxin. However, the short half-life of sCMG2 in vivo is a disadvantage for its development as a new anthrax drug. In the present study, we report that HSA-CMG2, a protein combining human serum albumin (HSA) and sCMG2, produced in the Pichia pastoris expression system prolonged the half-life of sCMG2 while maintaining PA binding ability. The IC50 of HSA-CMG2 is similar to those of sCMG2 and CMG2-Fc in in vitro toxin neutralization assays, and HSA-CMG2 completely protects rats from lethal doses of anthrax toxin challenge; these same challenge doses exceed sCMG2 at a sub-equivalent dose ratio and overwhelm CMG2-Fc. Our results suggest that HSA-CMG2 is a promising inhibitor of anthrax toxin and may contribute to the development of novel anthrax drugs. PMID:26805881

  14. Serum paraoxonase activity and oxidative stress levels in patients with cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Karadas, S; Aslan, M; Ceylan, M R; Sunnetcioglu, M; Bozan, N; Kara, H; Demir, H

    2017-07-01

    Anthrax is a bacterial disease caused by the aerobic sporeforming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It has been suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B. anthracis. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity, catalase activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in patients with cutaneous anthrax. Fifteen patients with cutaneous anthrax and 15 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The serum MDA levels, SOD levels, paraoxonase, arylesterase, and catalase activities were measured using a spectrophotometer. The serum SOD levels, paraoxonase, arylesterase, and catalase activities were significantly lower in patients with cutaneous anthrax than in controls (for all, p < 0.001), whereas MDA levels were significantly higher ( p < 0.001). No significant correlation was found between serum paraoxonase activity, arylesterase activity, SOD levels, and MDA levels (all, p > 0.05) in patients with cutaneous anthrax. The current study was the first to show decreased antioxidant levels and increased oxidant levels in patients with cutaneous anthrax. Therefore, decreased PON1 activity may play a role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous anthrax.

  15. Military hospitalizations among deployed US service members following anthrax vaccination, 1998-2001.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy Steven; Sato, Paul A; Smith, Tyler Clain; Wang, Linda Zhenling; Reed, Robert John; Ryan, Margaret Angela Kappel

    2006-01-01

    Safety concerns have confronted the Department of Defense Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program since inception in 1998. To determine if anthrax vaccination was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization, a historical cohort study utilizing pre- and post-anthrax-vaccination hospitalizations was undertaken and analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models. The study population consisted of 170,723 active duty US service members who were anthrax-vaccinated and deployed during the time period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2001. Study outcomes included hospitalizations due to any-cause, 14 broad International Classification of Diseases diagnostic categories, autoimmune organ specific and organ non-specific hospitalizations, and asthma. After adjustment, anthrax vaccination was associated with significantly fewer hospitalizations for any-cause, diseases of the blood and blood forming organs, and diseases of the respiratory system. Comparing anthrax post-vaccination hospitalization experience with the pre-vaccination period resulted in no significant increased hazard for any of the hospitalization outcomes studied. Although there was no apparent increase in risk of morbidity in this study population, the relationship between anthrax vaccine and deployment on health outcomes among US service members needs further study.

  16. Predicting Disease Risk, Identifying Stakeholders, and Informing Control Strategies: A Case Study of Anthrax in Montana.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lillian R; Blackburn, Jason K

    2016-06-01

    Infectious diseases that affect wildlife and livestock are challenging to manage and can lead to large-scale die-offs, economic losses, and threats to human health. The management of infectious diseases in wildlife and livestock is made easier with knowledge of disease risk across space and identifying stakeholders associated with high-risk landscapes. This study focuses on anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, risk to wildlife and livestock in Montana. There is a history of anthrax in Montana, but the spatial extent of disease risk and subsequent wildlife species at risk are not known. Our objective was to predict the potential geographic distribution of anthrax risk across Montana, identify wildlife species at risk and their distributions, and define stakeholders. We used an ecological niche model to predict the potential distribution of anthrax risk. We overlaid susceptible wildlife species distributions and land ownership delineations on our risk map. We found that there was an extensive region across Montana predicted as potential anthrax risk. These potentially risky landscapes overlapped the ranges of all 6 ungulate species considered in the analysis and livestock grazing allotments, and this overlap was on public and private land for all species. Our findings suggest that there is the potential for a multi-species anthrax outbreak on multiple landscapes across Montana. Our potential anthrax risk map can be used to prioritize landscapes for surveillance and for implementing livestock vaccination programs.

  17. The sepsis model: an emerging hypothesis for the lethality of inhalation anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Lupu, Florea; Ballard, Jimmy; Metcalf, Jordan P; James, Judith A; Farris, Darise; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is often described as a toxin-mediated disease. However, the toxaemia model does not account for the high mortality of inhalation anthrax relative to other forms of the disease or for the pathology present in inhalation anthrax. Patients with inhalation anthrax consistently show extreme bacteraemia and, in contrast to animals challenged with toxin, signs of sepsis. Rather than toxaemia, we propose that death in inhalation anthrax results from an overwhelming bacteraemia that leads to severe sepsis. According to our model, the central role of anthrax toxin is to permit the vegetative bacteria to escape immune detection. Other forms of B. anthracis infection have lower mortality because their overt symptoms early in the course of disease cause patients to seek medical care at a time when the infection and its sequelae can still be reversed by antibiotics. Thus, the sepsis model explains key features of inhalation anthrax and may offer a more complete understanding of disease pathology for researchers as well as those involved in the care of patients. PMID:23742651

  18. Phylogenetic Characteristics of Anthrax Outbreaks in Liaoning Province, China, 2001-2015.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lingling; Zhang, Enmin; Wang, Zijiang; Li, Yan; Zhou, Hang; Liu, Xuesheng; Zhang, Huijuan; Cai, Hong; Liang, Xudong; Sun, Yingwei; Zhang, Zhikai; Li, Wei; Yao, Wenqing; Wei, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a continuous threat in China, especially in rural regions. In July 2015, an anthrax outbreak occurred in Xifeng County, Liaoning Province. A total of 10 cutaneous anthrax cases were reported, with 210 people under medical observation. In this study, the general characteristics of human anthrax outbreak occurred in Liaoning Province were described, and all cases were caused by butchering and contacting sick animal. Meanwhile, the phylogenetic relationship between outbreak-related isolates/samples of the year 2015 and previous Bacillus anthracis strains was analyzed by means of canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNP), multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) with 15 markers and single-nucleotide repeats (SNR) analysis. There are two canSNP subgroups found in Liaoning, A.Br.001/002 and A.Br.Ames, and a total of six MLVA 15 genotypes and five SNR genotypes were observed. The strain collected from anthrax outbreak in Xifeng County in 2015 was classified as A.Br.001/002 subgroup and identified as MLVA15-29 genotype, with same SNR profile (CL10: 17, CL12: 15, CL33: 29, and CL35: 13). So we conclude that the same clone of B.anthracis caused the anthrax outbreak in Xifeng County in 2015, and this clone is different to previous isolates. Strengthening public health education in China is one of the most important measures to prevent and control anthrax.

  19. Anthrax in a backyard domestic dog in Ukraine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Skrypnyk, Artem; Bagamian, Karoun H; Nikolich, Mikeljon P; Bezymennyi, Maksym; Skrypnyk, Valeriy

    2014-08-01

    Anthrax has been reported in domestic and wild dogs throughout much of the world. Generally, canids are considered resistant to anthrax, although there are several reports of anthrax deaths in both wild and domestic canid populations. Prior to 2012, anthrax had not been reported in dogs in Ukraine, despite a long history in livestock and wildlife. An outbreak involving at least one cow and one dog was reported from a backyard setting in southern Ukraine in August of 2012. Laboratory results and epizootic data were compiled from official investigation reports of regional and state veterinary services involved in the case response. A single dog died after being fed meat and bones from an illegally slaughtered heifer that died of anthrax 5 days earlier. On the evening of the dog's death, the dog refused food or water; however, there were no other clinical signs. Laboratory tests of dog tissue included traditional bacteriology for Bacillus anthracis, a small rodent bioassay for virulence, and immunoprecipitation tests (IPT). IPT was positive, viable B. anthracis colonies were cultured, and a bioassay confirmed virulence. This was the first confirmed case of canid anthrax in Ukraine. This case report serves to remind veterinary officials that anthrax can affect a wide number of species. We advise surveillance systems remain flexible and include animals that might not otherwise be tested.

  20. Phylogenetic Characteristics of Anthrax Outbreaks in Liaoning Province, China, 2001-2015

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zijiang; Li, Yan; Zhou, Hang; Liu, Xuesheng; Zhang, Huijuan; Cai, Hong; Liang, Xudong; Sun, Yingwei; Zhang, Zhikai; Li, Wei; Yao, Wenqing; Wei, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a continuous threat in China, especially in rural regions. In July 2015, an anthrax outbreak occurred in Xifeng County, Liaoning Province. A total of 10 cutaneous anthrax cases were reported, with 210 people under medical observation. In this study, the general characteristics of human anthrax outbreak occurred in Liaoning Province were described, and all cases were caused by butchering and contacting sick animal. Meanwhile, the phylogenetic relationship between outbreak-related isolates/samples of the year 2015 and previous Bacillus anthracis strains was analyzed by means of canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNP), multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) with 15 markers and single-nucleotide repeats (SNR) analysis. There are two canSNP subgroups found in Liaoning, A.Br.001/002 and A.Br.Ames, and a total of six MLVA 15 genotypes and five SNR genotypes were observed. The strain collected from anthrax outbreak in Xifeng County in 2015 was classified as A.Br.001/002 subgroup and identified as MLVA15-29 genotype, with same SNR profile (CL10: 17, CL12: 15, CL33: 29, and CL35: 13). So we conclude that the same clone of B.anthracis caused the anthrax outbreak in Xifeng County in 2015, and this clone is different to previous isolates. Strengthening public health education in China is one of the most important measures to prevent and control anthrax. PMID:27299730

  1. Capillary morphogenesis protein-2 is the major receptor mediating lethality of anthrax toxin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Crown, Devorah; Miller-Randolph, Sharmina; Moayeri, Mahtab; Wang, Hailun; Hu, Haijing; Morley, Thomas; Leppla, Stephen H

    2009-07-28

    Anthrax toxin, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, gains entry into target cells by binding to either of 2 von Willebrand factor A domain-containing proteins, tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2). The wide tissue expression of TEM8 and CMG2 suggest that both receptors could play a role in anthrax pathogenesis. To explore the roles of TEM8 and CMG2 in normal physiology, as well as in anthrax pathogenesis, we generated TEM8- and CMG2-null mice and TEM8/CMG2 double-null mice by deleting TEM8 and CMG2 transmembrane domains. TEM8 and CMG2 were found to be dispensable for mouse development and life, but both are essential in female reproduction in mice. We found that the lethality of anthrax toxin for mice is mostly mediated by CMG2 and that TEM8 plays only a minor role. This is likely because anthrax toxin has approximately 11-fold higher affinity for CMG2 than for TEM8. Finally, the CMG2-null mice are also shown to be highly resistant to B. anthracis spore infection, attesting to the importance of both anthrax toxin and CMG2 in anthrax infections.

  2. The sepsis model: an emerging hypothesis for the lethality of inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Lupu, Florea; Ballard, Jimmy; Metcalf, Jordan P; James, Judith A; Farris, Darise; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-07-01

    Inhalation anthrax is often described as a toxin-mediated disease. However, the toxaemia model does not account for the high mortality of inhalation anthrax relative to other forms of the disease or for the pathology present in inhalation anthrax. Patients with inhalation anthrax consistently show extreme bacteraemia and, in contrast to animals challenged with toxin, signs of sepsis. Rather than toxaemia, we propose that death in inhalation anthrax results from an overwhelming bacteraemia that leads to severe sepsis. According to our model, the central role of anthrax toxin is to permit the vegetative bacteria to escape immune detection. Other forms of B. anthracis infection have lower mortality because their overt symptoms early in the course of disease cause patients to seek medical care at a time when the infection and its sequelae can still be reversed by antibiotics. Thus, the sepsis model explains key features of inhalation anthrax and may offer a more complete understanding of disease pathology for researchers as well as those involved in the care of patients.

  3. Anthrax vaccination and joint related adverse reactions in light of biological warfare scenarios.

    PubMed

    Geier, D A; Geier, M R

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate anthrax vaccine (AVA) and joint related adverse reactions based upon analysis of the VAERS database in light of the current possibility of the use of anthrax as a biological warfare agent. A certified copy of the VAERS database was obtainedfrom the CDC. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis using Microsoft Access for all joint attributed adverse reactions reported following anthrax vaccination. The employment of chi-square analysis determined if the elevated incidence rates of associated adverse reactions in anthrax vaccine recipients were statistically significant. Our analysis shows a very large and statistically significant increase in joint symptoms following vaccination with AVA when compared to our control population consisting of adverse joint reactions reported following vaccination with hepatitis A vaccine and Td vaccine. We believe that civilian doctors need to become familiar with the adverse reactions that can be expected to follow the use of AVA. Both civilian and military doctors need to be vigilant in reporting all such reactions to VAERS, so that more information can be gathered about AVA. We also believe that an anthrax vaccine with an improved safety profile is needed if it is to be used in populations, either military or civilian, that are not under imminent threat of attack by biological warfare agents. It should also be kept in mind that the widespread use of anthrax vaccination may cause potential producers of biological weapons and terrorists to seek to produce anthrax strains that are not neutralized by the current vaccine.

  4. Computational modeling of ultraviolet disinfection.

    PubMed

    Younis, B A; Yang, T H

    2010-01-01

    The efficient design of ultraviolet light (UV) systems for water and wastewater treatment requires detailed knowledge of the patterns of fluid motion that occur in the disinfection channel. This knowledge is increasingly being obtained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software packages that solve the equations governing turbulent fluid-flow motion. In this work, we present predictions of the patterns of flow and the extent of disinfection in a conventional reactor consisting of an open channel with an array of UV lamps placed with their axes perpendicular to the direction of flow. It is shown that the resulting flow is inherently unsteady due to the regular shedding of vortices from the submerged lamps. It is also shown that the accurate prediction of the hydraulic residence time and, consequently, the extent of disinfection is strongly dependent on the ability of the CFD method to capture the occurrence and strength of the vortex shedding, and its effects on the turbulent mixing processes.

  5. Mapping the Distribution of Anthrax in Mainland China, 2005-2013.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Jun; Lai, Sheng-Jie; Yang, Yang; Liu, Kun; Li, Xin-Lou; Yao, Hong-Wu; Li, Yu; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Li-Ping; Mu, Di; Yin, Wen-Wu; Fang, Li-Qun; Yu, Hong-Jie; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-04-01

    Anthrax, a global re-emerging zoonotic disease in recent years is enzootic in mainland China. Despite its significance to the public health, spatiotemporal distributions of the disease in human and livestock and its potential driving factors remain poorly understood. Using the national surveillance data of human and livestock anthrax from 2005 to 2013, we conducted a retrospective epidemiological study and risk assessment of anthrax in mainland China. The potential determinants for the temporal and spatial distributions of human anthrax were also explored. We found that the majority of human anthrax cases were located in six provinces in western and northeastern China, and five clustering areas with higher incidences were identified. The disease mostly peaked in July or August, and males aged 30-49 years had higher incidence than other subgroups. Monthly incidence of human anthrax was positively correlated with monthly average temperature, relative humidity and monthly accumulative rainfall with lags of 0-2 months. A boosted regression trees (BRT) model at the county level reveals that densities of cattle, sheep and human, coverage of meadow, coverage of typical grassland, elevation, coverage of topsoil with pH > 6.1, concentration of organic carbon in topsoil, and the meteorological factors have contributed substantially to the spatial distribution of the disease. The model-predicted probability of occurrence of human cases in mainland China was mapped at the county level. Anthrax in China was characterized by significant seasonality and spatial clustering. The spatial distribution of human anthrax was largely driven by livestock husbandry, human density, land cover, elevation, topsoil features and climate. Enhanced surveillance and intervention for livestock and human anthrax in the high-risk regions, particularly on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is the key to the prevention of human infections.

  6. Risk practices for animal and human anthrax in Bangladesh: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Saiful; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Mikolon, Andrea; Parveen, Shahana; Khan, M. Salah Uddin; Haider, Najmul; Chakraborty, Apurba; Titu, Abu Mohammad Naser; Rahman, M. Waliur; Sazzad, Hossain M. S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Gurley, Emily S.; Luby, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction From August 2009 to October 2010, International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh and the Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research together investigated 14 outbreaks of anthrax which included 140 animal and 273 human cases in 14 anthrax-affected villages. Our investigation objectives were to explore the context in which these outbreaks occurred, including livestock rearing practices, human handling of sick and dead animals, and the anthrax vaccination program. Methods Field anthropologists used qualitative data-collection tools, including 15 hours of unstructured observations, 11 key informant interviews, 32 open-ended interviews, and 6 group discussions in 5 anthrax-affected villages. Results Each cattle owner in the affected communities raised a median of six ruminants on their household premises. The ruminants were often grazed in pastures and fed supplementary rice straw, green grass, water hyacinth, rice husk, wheat bran, and oil cake; lactating cows were given dicalcium phosphate. Cattle represented a major financial investment. Since Islamic law forbids eating animals that die from natural causes, when anthrax-infected cattle were moribund, farmers often slaughtered them on the household premises while they were still alive so that the meat could be eaten. Farmers ate the meat and sold it to neighbors. Skinners removed and sold the hides from discarded carcasses. Farmers discarded the carcasses and slaughtering waste into ditches, bodies of water, or open fields. Cattle in the affected communities did not receive routine anthrax vaccine due to low production, poor distribution, and limited staffing for vaccination. Conclusion Slaughtering anthrax-infected animals and disposing of butchering waste and carcasses in environments where ruminants live and graze, combined with limited vaccination, provided a context that permitted repeated anthrax outbreaks in animals and humans. Because of strong financial incentives

  7. Mapping the Distribution of Anthrax in Mainland China, 2005–2013

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Kun; Li, Xin-Lou; Yao, Hong-Wu; Li, Yu; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Li-Ping; Mu, Di; Yin, Wen-Wu; Fang, Li-Qun; Yu, Hong-Jie; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background Anthrax, a global re-emerging zoonotic disease in recent years is enzootic in mainland China. Despite its significance to the public health, spatiotemporal distributions of the disease in human and livestock and its potential driving factors remain poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the national surveillance data of human and livestock anthrax from 2005 to 2013, we conducted a retrospective epidemiological study and risk assessment of anthrax in mainland China. The potential determinants for the temporal and spatial distributions of human anthrax were also explored. We found that the majority of human anthrax cases were located in six provinces in western and northeastern China, and five clustering areas with higher incidences were identified. The disease mostly peaked in July or August, and males aged 30–49 years had higher incidence than other subgroups. Monthly incidence of human anthrax was positively correlated with monthly average temperature, relative humidity and monthly accumulative rainfall with lags of 0–2 months. A boosted regression trees (BRT) model at the county level reveals that densities of cattle, sheep and human, coverage of meadow, coverage of typical grassland, elevation, coverage of topsoil with pH > 6.1, concentration of organic carbon in topsoil, and the meteorological factors have contributed substantially to the spatial distribution of the disease. The model-predicted probability of occurrence of human cases in mainland China was mapped at the county level. Conclusions/Significance Anthrax in China was characterized by significant seasonality and spatial clustering. The spatial distribution of human anthrax was largely driven by livestock husbandry, human density, land cover, elevation, topsoil features and climate. Enhanced surveillance and intervention for livestock and human anthrax in the high-risk regions, particularly on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is the key to the prevention of human infections

  8. New disinfection and sterilization methods.

    PubMed Central

    Rutala, W. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    New disinfection methods include a persistent antimicrobial coating that can be applied to inanimate and animate objects (Surfacine), a high-level disinfectant with reduced exposure time (ortho-phthalaldehyde), and an antimicrobial agent that can be applied to animate and inanimate objects (superoxidized water). New sterilization methods include a chemical sterilization process for endoscopes that integrates cleaning (Endoclens), a rapid (4-hour) readout biological indicator for ethylene oxide sterilization (Attest), and a hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilizer that has a shorter cycle time and improved efficacy (Sterrad 50). PMID:11294738

  9. Bacteriologic testing of endoscopes after high-level disinfection.

    PubMed

    Rejchrt, Stanislav; Cermák, Pavel; Pavlatová, Ludmila; McKová, Eva; Bures, Jan

    2004-07-01

    There are no definitive data available concerning microbiologic safety of prolonged endoscope storage after reprocessing and disinfection. This study evaluated the durability of high-level disinfection of endoscopes stored in a dust-proof cabinet for 5 days. Three different types of endoscopes (upper endoscopes, duodenoscopes, colonoscopes) were tested. After completion of the endoscopic procedure, endoscopes were subjected to an initial decontamination, followed by manual cleaning with the endoscope immersed in detergent. The endoscopes then were placed in an automatic reprocessor that provides high-level disinfection. They then were stored by hanging in a dust-proof cabinet. Bacteriologic samples were obtained from the surface of the endoscopes, the openings for the piston valves, and the accessory channel daily for 5 days, and by flush-through (combined with brushing) from the accessory channels after 5 days of storage. Samples were cultured for all types of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including bacterial spores, and for Candida species. For all assays, all endoscopes were bacteria-free immediately after high-level disinfection. Only 4 assays (of 135) were positive during the subsequent 5-day assessment (skin bacteria cultured from endoscope surfaces). All flush-through samples were sterile. When endoscope reprocessing guidelines are strictly observed and endoscopes are stored in appropriate cabinets for up to 5 days, reprocessing before use may not be necessary.

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides a review of the epidemiologic evidence for human health effects that may be associated with the disinfection of drinking water. An epidemiologic study attempts to link human health effects with exposure to a specific agent (e.g., DBCM), agents (e.g., THMs or...

  11. A membrane filter technique for testing disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, J; Deverill, C E; Ayliffe, G A

    1975-01-01

    A membrane filter was used for assessing the surface disinfecting activity of phenolic disinfectants and a chloroxylenol disinfectant. The influence of the type of organism, inoculum size, and hardness of water was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen for the standardized test. Disinfectant solutions were prepared in water of 300 ppm hardness and applied for two and a half minutes and eight minutes to the bacteria deposited from filtration of 1 ml of a suspension containing 10-6 bacteria. The membrane filter test has certain advantages over many tests, eg, all organisms surviving after treatment can be counted and residual disinfectant is easily removed. PMID:804497

  12. A membrane filter technique for testing disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Prince, J; Deverill, C E; Ayliffe, G A

    1975-01-01

    A membrane filter was used for assessing the surface disinfecting activity of phenolic disinfectants and a chloroxylenol disinfectant. The influence of the type of organism, inoculum size, and hardness of water was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen for the standardized test. Disinfectant solutions were prepared in water of 300 ppm hardness and applied for two and a half minutes and eight minutes to the bacteria deposited from filtration of 1 ml of a suspension containing 10-6 bacteria. The membrane filter test has certain advantages over many tests, eg, all organisms surviving after treatment can be counted and residual disinfectant is easily removed.

  13. Pre-Columbian Origins for North American Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Okinaka, Richard T.; Schupp, James M.; Wagner, David M.; Ravel, Jacques; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Trim, Carla P.; Chung, Wai-Kwan; Beaudry, Jodi A.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Mead, James I.; Keim, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Disease introduction into the New World during colonial expansion is well documented and had a major impact on indigenous populations; however, few diseases have been associated with early human migrations into North America. During the late Pleistocene epoch, Asia and North America were joined by the Beringian Steppe ecosystem which allowed animals and humans to freely cross what would become a water barrier in the Holocene. Anthrax has clearly been shown to be dispersed by human commerce and trade in animal products contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. Humans appear to have brought B. anthracis to this area from Asia and then moved it further south as an ice-free corridor opened in central Canada ∼13,000 ybp. In this study, we have defined the evolutionary history of Western North American (WNA) anthrax using 2,850 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 285 geographically diverse B. anthracis isolates. Phylogeography of the major WNA B. anthracis clone reveals ancestral populations in northern Canada with progressively derived populations to the south; the most recent ancestor of this clonal lineage is in Eurasia. Our phylogeographic patterns are consistent with B. anthracis arriving with humans via the Bering Land Bridge. This northern-origin hypothesis is highly consistent with our phylogeographic patterns and rates of SNP accumulation observed in current day B. anthracis isolates. Continent-wide dispersal of WNA B. anthracis likely required movement by later European colonizers, but the continent's first inhabitants may have seeded the initial North American populations. PMID:19283072

  14. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  15. Deterministic Models of Inhalational Anthrax in New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Computational models describing bacterial kinetics were developed for inhalational anthrax in New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits following inhalation of Ames strain B. anthracis. The data used to parameterize the models included bacterial numbers in the airways, lung tissue, draining lymph nodes, and blood. Initial bacterial numbers were deposited spore dose. The first model was a single exponential ordinary differential equation (ODE) with 3 rate parameters that described mucociliated (physical) clearance, immune clearance (bacterial killing), and bacterial growth. At 36 hours postexposure, the ODE model predicted 1.7×107 bacteria in the rabbit, which agreed well with data from actual experiments (4.0×107 bacteria at 36 hours). Next, building on the single ODE model, a physiological-based biokinetic (PBBK) compartmentalized model was developed in which 1 physiological compartment was the lumen of the airways and the other was the rabbit body (lung tissue, lymph nodes, blood). The 2 compartments were connected with a parameter describing transport of bacteria from the airways into the body. The PBBK model predicted 4.9×107 bacteria in the body at 36 hours, and by 45 hours the model showed all clearance mechanisms were saturated, suggesting the rabbit would quickly succumb to the infection. As with the ODE model, the PBBK model results agreed well with laboratory observations. These data are discussed along with the need for and potential application of the models in risk assessment, drug development, and as a general aid to the experimentalist studying inhalational anthrax. PMID:24527843

  16. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  17. Deterministic models of inhalational anthrax in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gutting, Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Computational models describing bacterial kinetics were developed for inhalational anthrax in New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits following inhalation of Ames strain B. anthracis. The data used to parameterize the models included bacterial numbers in the airways, lung tissue, draining lymph nodes, and blood. Initial bacterial numbers were deposited spore dose. The first model was a single exponential ordinary differential equation (ODE) with 3 rate parameters that described mucociliated (physical) clearance, immune clearance (bacterial killing), and bacterial growth. At 36 hours postexposure, the ODE model predicted 1.7×10⁷ bacteria in the rabbit, which agreed well with data from actual experiments (4.0×10⁷ bacteria at 36 hours). Next, building on the single ODE model, a physiological-based biokinetic (PBBK) compartmentalized model was developed in which 1 physiological compartment was the lumen of the airways and the other was the rabbit body (lung tissue, lymph nodes, blood). The 2 compartments were connected with a parameter describing transport of bacteria from the airways into the body. The PBBK model predicted 4.9×10⁷ bacteria in the body at 36 hours, and by 45 hours the model showed all clearance mechanisms were saturated, suggesting the rabbit would quickly succumb to the infection. As with the ODE model, the PBBK model results agreed well with laboratory observations. These data are discussed along with the need for and potential application of the models in risk assessment, drug development, and as a general aid to the experimentalist studying inhalational anthrax.

  18. Epidemiology of Human Anthrax in China, 1955−2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Yin, Wenwu; Hugh-Jones, Martin; Wang, Liping; Mu, Di; Ren, Xiang; Zeng, Lingjia; Chen, Qiulan; Li, Wei; Wei, Jianchun; Lai, Shengjie; Zhou, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Using national surveillance data for 120,111 human anthrax cases recorded during 1955−2014, we analyzed the temporal, seasonal, geographic, and demographic distribution of this disease in China. After 1978, incidence decreased until 2013, when it reached a low of 0.014 cases/100,000 population. The case-fatality rate, cumulatively 3.6% during the study period, has also decreased since 1990. Cases occurred throughout the year, peaking in August. Geographic distribution decreased overall from west to east, but the cumulative number of affected counties increased during 2005−2014. The disease has shifted from industrial to agricultural workers; 86.7% of cases occurred in farmers and herdsmen. Most (97.7%) reported cases were the cutaneous form. Although progress has been made in reducing incidence, this study highlights areas that need improvement. Adequate laboratory diagnosis is lacking; only 7.6% of cases received laboratory confirmation. Geographic expansion of the disease indicates that livestock control programs will be essential in eradicating anthrax. PMID:27983489

  19. Probabilistic Anthrax Risk Assessment Tool v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, Robert; Hubbard, Josh

    2016-07-14

    PARAT is a human health risk assessment tool for quantifying the uncertainty associated with inhalational exposures to Bacillus anthracis (Ba), which is the causative agent for contracting anthrax. The tool has a unique set of aerosol transport algorithms to account for indoor-outdoor deposition, re-aerosolization, building infiltration/exfiltration, and ventilation system effects, all of which are coded to preserve mass. PARAT is currently implemented within a Microsoft Excel application along with the Crystal Ball third-party add-on software that provides a Monte Carlo simulation technique for quantifying uncertainty in model predictions. The tool predicts both air and surface concentrations, as well as the fraction of the population that would contract a lethal dose from exposure to Ba. The tool can be used by decision makers to support Preliminary Remediaiton Goals (PRGs) to guide sampling and decontamination decisions after a release of Ba. Currently the de facto standard for recovery from a Ba release is a sampling protocol whereby all of the surface samples sent to a laboratory have to meet the requirement of “no culturable growth” on the media. This could lead to some very costly cleanups, as was evidenced following the 2001 anthrax letter attack responses. So PARAT may provide decision makers and risk assessors the ability to negotiate risk-based endpoints for the recovery process.

  20. Stable Dry Powder Formulation for Nasal Delivery of Anthrax Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheena H.; Kirwan, Shaun M.; Abraham, Soman N.; Staats, Herman F.; Hickey, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a current biodefense interest in protection against Anthrax. Here we developed a new generation of stable and effective anthrax vaccine. We studied the immune response elicited by rPA delivered intranasally with a novel mucosal adjuvant, a mast cell activator Compound 48/80. The vaccine formulation was prepared in a powder form by spray-freeze-drying (SFD) under optimized conditions to produce particles with a target size of D50=25μm, suitable for delivery to the rabbit nasal cavity. Physicochemical properties of the powder vaccines were characterized to assess their delivery and storage potential. Structural stability of rPA was confirmed by CD and ATR-FTIR, while functional stability of rPA and C48/80 was monitored by cell-based assays. Animal study was performed using a unitdose powder device for direct nasal application. Results showed that C48/80 provided effective mucosal adjuvant activity in rabbits. Freshly prepared SFD powder vaccine formulations or powders stored for over two years at room temperature elicited significantly elevated serum PA-specific and lethal toxin neutralization antibody titers that were comparable to that induced by IM immunization with rPA. Nasal delivery of this vaccine formulation may be a viable alternative to the currently licensed vaccine, or an attractive vaccine platform for other mucosally transmitted diseases. PMID:21905034

  1. Private and public economic incentives for the control of animal diseases: the case of anthrax in livestock.

    PubMed

    Ndiva Mongoh, M; Hearne, R; Khaitsa, M L

    2008-10-01

    This study examined the roles of the public and private sectors as economic components of anthrax control with direct reference to the 2005 anthrax outbreak in livestock in North Dakota. Anthrax is an endemic disease in North Dakota, which often causes disease outbreaks in livestock, leading to economic losses to the livestock industry. The economic incentives and interests behind public and private control of an anthrax outbreak are investigated. Anthrax management is most effective with the participation of public and private firms. As anthrax is an infectious disease, its control also brings positive economic externalities, which are not accounted for in a producer's decision to protect animals. Therefore, public programs designed to control the disease must be implemented. The government can change producer response to anthrax by setting up policies and incentives that encourage their participation. However, these interventions must encourage compliance and not discourage producers from actively taking part in anthrax management. Producers have economy-based interests and personal reasons for controlling anthrax in their farms. The main reason behind government intervention is to provide assurance to the public who consume livestock products. Another reason is to assist producers and veterinarians, and to achieve biosecurity and biosafety objectives. The contribution of each animal healthcare partner in making anthrax management a success in North Dakota is discussed.

  2. Skin Bacteria and Skin Disinfection Reconsidered

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Sydney; Ellis, Harold

    1972-01-01

    Large discrepancies in the available data on skin microbiology stimulated investigations of the number, interactions, and location of commensals and the true efficiency of disinfection by using skin biopsy, culture of frozen sections, and other methods. Most current procedures were less than 0·5% as sensitive as the biopsy method described. This gave mean bacterial counts ranging from 4,400/cm2 on the breast to 400,000/cm2 in the axillae. An iodine preparation removed 95% of accessible organisms, but about 20% of bacteria were protected by follicles, crevices, and lipids. Commensals in over 20% of people produced antibiotics against a wide range of pathogens. Conversely, “satellitism” was demonstrable in 12% of people. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:5007838

  3. Antimicrobial Treatment for Systemic Anthrax: Analysis of Cases from 1945 to 2014 Identified Through a Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Satish K; Huang, Eileen; Guarnizo, Julie T; Hoyle, Jamechia D; Katharios-Lanwermeyer, Stefan; Turski, Theresa K; Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine A; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Systemic anthrax is associated with high mortality. Current national guidelines, developed for the individualized treatment of systemic anthrax, outline the use of combination intravenous antimicrobials for a minimum of 2 weeks, bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor antimicrobials for all cases of systemic anthrax, and at least 3 antimicrobials with good blood-brain barrier penetration for anthrax meningitis. However, in an anthrax mass casualty incident, large numbers of anthrax cases may create challenges in meeting antimicrobial needs. To further inform our understanding of the role of antimicrobials in treating systemic anthrax, a systematic review of the English-language literature was conducted to identify cases of systemic anthrax treated with antimicrobials for which a clinical outcome was recorded. A total of 149 cases of systemic anthrax were identified. Among the identified 59 cases of cutaneous anthrax, 33 were complicated by meningitis (76% mortality), while 26 simply had evidence of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (4% mortality); 21 of 26 (81%) of this latter group received monotherapy. Subsequent analysis regarding combination antimicrobial therapy was restricted to the remaining 123 cases of more severe anthrax (overall 67% mortality). Recipients of combination bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor therapy had a 45% survival versus 28% in the absence of combination therapy (p = 0.07). For meningitis cases (n = 77), survival was greater for those receiving 3 or more antimicrobials over the course of treatment (3 of 4; 75%), compared to receipt of 1 or 2 antimicrobials (12 of 73; 16%) (p = 0.02). Median parenteral antimicrobial duration was 14 days. Combination bactericidal and protein synthesis inhibitor therapy may be appropriate in severe anthrax disease, particularly anthrax meningitis, in a mass casualty incident.

  4. Disinfection, sterilization and operation theater guidelines for dermatosurgical practitioners in India.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Narendra; Kelkar, Uday

    2011-01-01

    Modern day dermatologists conduct different esthetic and surgical procedures, with risk of infective complications. Hence, infection control practices need to be established in dermatological practice to minimize the risk of exogenous infections. These practices include hand washing, cleaning, sterilization, disinfection, operation theater sterilization and specifications. Proper hand washing after examination of each patient and prior to any surgery with a formulation containing alcohol alone or as a combination with other agents reduces the chances of transferring infections to and from patients. Sterilization and disinfection constitute the most important aspect of infection control. Disinfectants and disinfecting procedures vary according to the environment and equipment. Proper knowledge of different processes/agents for sterilization and disinfection is essential. Disinfectants for use in hospitals should always be freshly prepared and should be of adequate strength. Sterilization is carried out most commonly using steam sterilizers or ethylene dioxide sterilizers. The waste generated during practice is a potential source of nosocomial infections and should be treated as per the proper protocol and guidelines. Trained staff to carry out these practices is essential.

  5. Antibacterial activity of a plant extract and its potential for disinfecting gutta-percha cones.

    PubMed

    Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Nobre, Sérgio A M; Freitas, Juliana C P; Camilo, Carla C; Faria-e-Silva, André L

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of Rosmarinus officinalis extract and its potential for disinfecting guttapercha (GP) cones. In the first experiment, a hydro-alcoholic extract of Rosmarinus officinalis (leaves) in a dilution ratio of 10% m/v was tested against Enterococcus faecalis by using the disk diffusion method. Positive and negative controls were 70% cereal alcohol and antibiotics, respectively. The procedures were performed in triplicate, and the diameters of the zones of growth inhibition were measured with a caliper after 24 h at 37 degrees C. In the second experiment, the disinfection procedures were evaluated on GP cones artificially contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. The R. officinalis extract was compared with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite, using a direct exposure test (5 min treatment). Sterilized and non-disinfected cones were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. After 24 h of incubation, bacterial counts were taken. For both experiments, the data were statistically analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Tukey's tests (p < 0.05). The plant extract produced zones of inhibition comparable to those of tested antibiotics. Significant GP cone disinfection was verified with all disinfectant solutions, with no significant difference between them. R. officinalis extract showed bactericidal effect on Enterococcus faecalis and capacity to disinfect GP cones contamined with it.

  6. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on colour stability of denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Dos Santos, Daniela M; Baptista, Gabriella T; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda M; Bannwart, Lisiane C; Dekon, Stefan F C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the colour change of denture base acrylic resin. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated (Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone). All brands were divided into four groups (n = 7) determined according to the disinfection procedure (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine or 1% hypochlorite). The treatments were conducted three times a week for 60 days. All specimens were thermal cycled between 5 and 55°C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles before and after disinfection. The specimens' colour was measured with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* system. The evaluations were conducted at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1 ), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2 ). Colour differences (ΔE) were calculated between T1 and B (T1 B), D and B (DB), and T2 and B (T2 B) time-points.   The samples submitted to disinfection by microwave and Efferdent exhibited the highest values of colour change. There were significant differences on colour change between the time-points, except for the Lucitone acrylic resin. The thermal cycling and disinfection procedures significantly affected the colour stability of the samples. However, all values obtained for the acrylic resins are within acceptable clinical parameters. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  8. Risk of wound and pelvic infection after laparoscopic tubal sterilization: instrument disinfection versus sterilization.

    PubMed

    Huezo, C M; DeStefano, F; Rubin, G L; Ory, H W

    1983-05-01

    To determine if disinfection, rather than sterilization, of laparoscopic equipment leads to an increase in the risk of postlaparoscopy infection, the authors analyzed data from a multicenter prospective study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control on the safety of sterilizing operations. From September 1978 through July 1981, 3903 women underwent laparoscopic tubal sterilization procedures in which the equipment was sterilized with ethylene oxide (58%) or disinfected with glutaraldehyde (42%). The overall risk of wound infection in each group was 1.5 per 100 women. The relative risk of wound infection for disinfection versus sterilization of the equipment was 0.5 when adjusted for differences in the two groups. The corresponding relative risk of pelvic infection was 1.2. These results suggest that laparoscopy equipment disinfected with glutaraldehyde is not associated with an increased risk of wound or pelvic infection compared with equipment sterilized with ethylene oxide.

  9. Postoutbreak disinfection of mobile equipment.

    PubMed

    Alphin, R L; Ciaverelli, C D; Hougentogler, D P; Johnson, K J; Rankin, M K; Benson, E R

    2010-03-01

    Current control strategies for avian influenza virus, exotic Newcastle disease, and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. Skid steer loaders and other mobile equipment are extensively used during depopulation and disposal. Movement of contaminated equipment has been implicated in the spread of disease in previous outbreaks. One approach to equipment decontamination is to power wash the equipment, treat with a liquid disinfectant, change any removable filters, and let it sit idle for several days. In this project, multiple disinfectant strategies were individually evaluated for their effectiveness at inactivating Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on mechanical equipment seeded with the virus. A small gasoline engine was used to simulate typical mechanical equipment. A high titer of LaSota strain, NDV was applied and dried onto a series of metal coupons. The coupons were then placed on both interior and exterior surfaces of the engine. Liquid disinfectants that had been effective in the laboratory were not as effective at disinfecting the engine under field conditions. Indirect thermal fog showed a decrease in overall virus titer or strength. Direct thermal fog was more effective than liquid spray application or indirect thermal fog application.

  10. Recycled Water Poses Disinfectant Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the possible health hazards resulting from released nucleic acid of inactivated viruses, chlorinated nonliving organic molecules, and overestimated reliability of waste treatment standards. Suggests the recycle system use a dual disinfectant such as chlorine and ozone in water treatment. (CC)

  11. Recycled Water Poses Disinfectant Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the possible health hazards resulting from released nucleic acid of inactivated viruses, chlorinated nonliving organic molecules, and overestimated reliability of waste treatment standards. Suggests the recycle system use a dual disinfectant such as chlorine and ozone in water treatment. (CC)

  12. Waterborne outbreak control: which disinfectant?

    PubMed

    Akin, E W; Hoff, J C; Lippy, E C

    1982-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection was shown to be an important public health measure around the turn of the century. In the United States, it was perhaps the single most important factor in controlling typhoid fever, a waterborne disease that was rampant throughout the world during the last century. It may also be assumed that disinfection was important in limiting the number of cases of other diseases known to be capable of waterborne transmission, i.e., cholera, amebiasis, shigellosis, salmonellosis, and hepatitis A. Even though modern treatment has eliminated water as a major vehicle of infectious disease transmission, outbreaks still occur. In fact, the annual number has been increasing since 1966. Interruption in chlorination or failure to achieve adequate levels of chlorine residual is the most often identified deficiency of the involved water supplies. This finding indicates that waterborne microbial pathogens remain as a potential health threat and underscores the importance of disinfection. From the outset, chlorination has been the drinking water disinfectant of choice in the country. Numerous studies have demonstrated its ability to inactivate bacterial, viral, and protozoal pathogens when applied under proper conditions. However, the finding that chlorinated organics that are potentially carcinogenic are formed has prompted an evaluation of alternative disinfectants. The viable alternatives to chlorine currently under consideration for widespread use are ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramines. In terms of biocidal efficiency, ozone is the most potent of the three. Chlorine dioxide is about the equivalent of free chlorine in the hypochlorous acid form but much more efficient than the hypochlorite form of free chlorine. The chloramines are weaker biocides than hypochlorite. Although this general order of ranking of efficiency holds for diverse types of microorganisms, quantitative comparisons vary with different microorganisms and experimental conditions.

  13. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-01-01

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  14. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself.

  15. Anthrax in injecting drug users: the need for increased vigilance in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Ascough, Stephanie; Altmann, Daniel Martin

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of a previously unrecognized route of Bacillus anthracis infection over the last few years has led to concern: sporadic anthrax outbreaks among heroin users in northern Europe have demonstrated the severe pathology associated with the newly described 'injectional anthrax'. With a high case fatality rate and non-specific early symptoms, this is a novel clinical manifestation of an old disease. Lack of awareness of this syndrome among emergency room clinicians can lead to a delayed diagnosis among heroin users; indeed, for many health workers in developed countries, where infection by B. anthracis is rare, this may be the first time they have encountered anthrax infections. As the putative route of contamination of the heroin supply is potentially ongoing, it is important that clinicians and public health workers remain vigilant for early signs of injectional anthrax.

  16. Persistent anthrax as a major driver of wildlife mortality in a tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Constanze; Zimmermann, Fee; Biek, Roman; Kuehl, Hjalmar; Nowak, Kathrin; Mundry, Roger; Agbor, Anthony; Angedakin, Samuel; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Blankenburg, Anja; Brazolla, Gregory; Corogenes, Katherine; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Deschner, Tobias; Dieguez, Paula; Dierks, Karsten; Düx, Ariane; Dupke, Susann; Eshuis, Henk; Formenty, Pierre; Yuh, Yisa Ginath; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Gogarten, Jan F.; Granjon, Anne-Céline; McGraw, Scott; Grunow, Roland; Hart, John; Jones, Sorrel; Junker, Jessica; Kiang, John; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leendertz, Siv Aina; Léguillon, Floraine; Leinert, Vera; Löhrich, Therese; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Meier, Amelia; Merkel, Kevin; Metzger, Sonja; Murai, Mizuki; Niedorf, Svenja; de Nys, Hélène; Sachse, Andreas; van Schijndel, Joost; Thiesen, Ulla; Ton, Els; Wu, Doris; Wieler, Lothar H.; Boesch, Christophe; Klee, Silke R.; Wittig, Roman M.; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H.

    2017-08-01

    Anthrax is a globally important animal disease and zoonosis. Despite this, our current knowledge of anthrax ecology is largely limited to arid ecosystems, where outbreaks are most commonly reported. Here we show that the dynamics of an anthrax-causing agent, Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis, in a tropical rainforest have severe consequences for local wildlife communities. Using data and samples collected over three decades, we show that rainforest anthrax is a persistent and widespread cause of death for a broad range of mammalian hosts. We predict that this pathogen will accelerate the decline and possibly result in the extirpation of local chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) populations. We present the epidemiology of a cryptic pathogen and show that its presence has important implications for conservation.

  17. Persistent anthrax as a major driver of wildlife mortality in a tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Constanze; Zimmermann, Fee; Biek, Roman; Kuehl, Hjalmar; Nowak, Kathrin; Mundry, Roger; Agbor, Anthony; Angedakin, Samuel; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Blankenburg, Anja; Brazolla, Gregory; Corogenes, Katherine; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Deschner, Tobias; Dieguez, Paula; Dierks, Karsten; Düx, Ariane; Dupke, Susann; Eshuis, Henk; Formenty, Pierre; Yuh, Yisa Ginath; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Gogarten, Jan F; Granjon, Anne-Céline; McGraw, Scott; Grunow, Roland; Hart, John; Jones, Sorrel; Junker, Jessica; Kiang, John; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leendertz, Siv Aina; Léguillon, Floraine; Leinert, Vera; Löhrich, Therese; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Meier, Amelia; Merkel, Kevin; Metzger, Sonja; Murai, Mizuki; Niedorf, Svenja; De Nys, Hélène; Sachse, Andreas; van Schijndel, Joost; Thiesen, Ulla; Ton, Els; Wu, Doris; Wieler, Lothar H; Boesch, Christophe; Klee, Silke R; Wittig, Roman M; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2017-08-02

    Anthrax is a globally important animal disease and zoonosis. Despite this, our current knowledge of anthrax ecology is largely limited to arid ecosystems, where outbreaks are most commonly reported. Here we show that the dynamics of an anthrax-causing agent, Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis, in a tropical rainforest have severe consequences for local wildlife communities. Using data and samples collected over three decades, we show that rainforest anthrax is a persistent and widespread cause of death for a broad range of mammalian hosts. We predict that this pathogen will accelerate the decline and possibly result in the extirpation of local chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) populations. We present the epidemiology of a cryptic pathogen and show that its presence has important implications for conservation.

  18. Characterizing a “New” Disease: Epizootic and Epidemic Anthrax, 1769–1780

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M.

    2003-01-01

    In 1876, Robert Koch established anthrax as the first disease linked to a microbial agent. But Koch’s efforts had followed more than 150 years of scientific progress in characterizing anthrax as a specific human and veterinary disease. Focusing on France and the period between 1769 and 1780, this brief review examines noteworthy early events in the characterization of anthrax. It suggests that some “new” diseases like anthrax might be “discovered” not only by luck, brilliance, or new technologies, but by clinical/epidemiological “puzzle-fitting,” which can assemble a cohesive picture of a seemingly specific disease entity. If such processes have operated over 2 or more centuries, studying them may yield clues about desirable interactions between epidemiology/public health and experimental science in the characterization of new diseases. PMID:12773345

  19. UV Disinfection System for Cabin Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soojung

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used for disinfection of water. As a result of advancements made in the last 10-15 years, the analysis and design of UV disinfection systems for water is well developed. UV disinfection is also used for disinfection of air; however, despite the fact the UV-air systems have a longer record of application than UV-water systems, the methods used to analyze and design UV-air disinfection systems remain quite empirical. It is well-established that the effectiveness of UV-air systems is strongly affected by the type of microorganisms, the irradiation level/type (lamp power and wavelength), duration of irradiation (exposure time), air movement pattern (mixing degree), and relative humidity. This paper will describe ongoing efforts to evaluate, design and test a UV-air system based on first principles. Specific issues to be addressed in this work will include laboratory measurements of relevant kinetics (i.e., UV dose-response behavior) and numerical simulations designed to represent fluid mechanics and the radiation intensity field. UV dose-response behavior of test microorganism was measured using a laboratory (bench-scale) system. Target microorganisms (e.g., bacterial spores) were first applied to membrane filters at sub-monolayer coverage. The filters were then transferred to an environmental chamber at fixed relative humidity (RH) and allowed to equilibrate with their surroundings. Microorganisms were then subjected to UV exposure under a collimated beam. The experiment was repeated at RH values ranging from 20% to 100%. UV dose-response behavior was observed to vary with RH. For example, at 100% RH, a UV dose of 20 mJ/cm2 accomplished 90% (1 log10 units) of the B. subtilis spore inactivation, whereas 99 % (2 log10 units) inactivation was accomplished at this same UV dose under 20% RH conditions. However, at higher doses, the result was opposite of that in low dose. Reactor behavior is simulated using an integrated application

  20. ANTHRAX IN WUERTTEMBERG. A STATISTICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    tanning and would decontaminate the resultant waste water cheaply and without harmful effects. At present, the main danger threatens from the textile ... industry which processes foreign animal hair. The entire import of foreign animal hairs should be disinfected centrally after unloading, as is being done

  1. Lessons for control of heroin-associated anthrax in Europe from 2009-2010 outbreak case studies, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Aula; Brooks, Tim; Taylor, Graham P; Nolan, Marianne; Donaldson, Hugo; Manikon, Maribel; Holmes, Alison

    2014-07-01

    Outbreaks of serious infections associated with heroin use in persons who inject drugs (PWIDs) occur intermittently and require vigilance and rapid reporting of individual cases. Here, we give a firsthand account of the cases in London during an outbreak of heroin-associated anthrax during 2009-2010 in the United Kingdom. This new manifestation of anthrax has resulted in a clinical manifestation distinct from already recognized forms. During 2012-13, additional cases of heroin-associated anthrax among PWIDs in England and other European countries were reported, suggesting that anthrax-contaminated heroin remains in circulation. Antibacterial drugs used for serious soft tissue infection are effective against anthrax, which may lead to substantial underrecognition of this novel illness. The outbreak in London provides a strong case for ongoing vigilance and the use of serologic testing in diagnosis and serologic surveillance schemes to determine and monitor the prevalence of anthrax exposure in the PWID community.

  2. Lessons for Control of Heroin-Associated Anthrax in Europe from 2009–2010 Outbreak Case Studies, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Abbara, Aula; Brooks, Tim; Taylor, Graham P.; Nolan, Marianne; Donaldson, Hugo; Manikon, Maribel

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of serious infections associated with heroin use in persons who inject drugs (PWIDs) occur intermittently and require vigilance and rapid reporting of individual cases. Here, we give a firsthand account of the cases in London during an outbreak of heroin-associated anthrax during 2009–2010 in the United Kingdom. This new manifestation of anthrax has resulted in a clinical manifestation distinct from already recognized forms. During 2012–13, additional cases of heroin-associated anthrax among PWIDs in England and other European countries were reported, suggesting that anthrax-contaminated heroin remains in circulation. Antibacterial drugs used for serious soft tissue infection are effective against anthrax, which may lead to substantial underrecognition of this novel illness. The outbreak in London provides a strong case for ongoing vigilance and the use of serologic testing in diagnosis and serologic surveillance schemes to determine and monitor the prevalence of anthrax exposure in the PWID community. PMID:24959910

  3. Anthrax and Other Vaccines: Use in the U.S. Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    DATSD(CBD) Disease Effects i Vaccine Adverse Effects i Ac tua l Risk Disease Effects i Vaccine Adverse Effects i Pot en ial • Hepatitis ...Anthrax Vaccine • Vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA), which binds to the Lethal Factor (LF) and Edema Factor (EF) of B . anthracis...DATSD(CBD) ANTHRAX AND OTHER VACCINES : USE IN THE U.S. MILITARY Anna Johnson-Winegar, Ph.D. Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for

  4. Efficacy of Oritavancin in a Murine Model of Bacillus anthracis Spore Inhalation Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-21

    standard of care for inhalational anthrax postexposure prophylaxis is ciprofloxacin therapy twice daily for 60 days. The potent in vitro activity of...postchallenge. Untreated animals died within 4 days of challenge, whereas 90% of control animals receiving ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg intraperitoneally...with ciprofloxacin 24 h or 24 and 12 h before challenge all died within 5 days. Efficacy in pre- and postexposure models of inhalation anthrax

  5. Pathology and Pathophysiology of Inhalational Anthrax in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Savransky, Vladimir; Sanford, Daniel C.; Syar, Emily; Austin, Jamie L.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Anderson, Michael S.; Stark, Gregory V.; Barnewall, Roy E.; Briscoe, Crystal M.; Lemiale-Biérinx, Laurence; Park, Sukjoon; Ionin, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) and rabbits are the animal models most commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of medical countermeasures against anthrax in support of licensure under the FDA's “Animal Rule.” However, a need for an alternative animal model may arise in certain cases. The development of such an alternative model requires a thorough understanding of the course and manifestation of experimental anthrax disease induced under controlled conditions in the proposed animal species. The guinea pig, which has been used extensively for anthrax pathogenesis studies and anthrax vaccine potency testing, is a good candidate for such an alternative model. This study was aimed at determining the median lethal dose (LD50) of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain in guinea pigs and investigating the natural history, pathophysiology, and pathology of inhalational anthrax in this animal model following nose-only aerosol exposure. The inhaled LD50 of aerosolized Ames strain spores in guinea pigs was determined to be 5.0 × 104 spores. Aerosol challenge of guinea pigs resulted in inhalational anthrax with death occurring between 46 and 71 h postchallenge. The first clinical signs appeared as early as 36 h postchallenge. Cardiovascular function declined starting at 20 h postexposure. Hematogenous dissemination of bacteria was observed microscopically in multiple organs and tissues as early as 24 h postchallenge. Other histopathologic findings typical of disseminated anthrax included suppurative (heterophilic) inflammation, edema, fibrin, necrosis, and/or hemorrhage in the spleen, lungs, and regional lymph nodes and lymphocyte depletion and/or lymphocytolysis in the spleen and lymph nodes. This study demonstrated that the course of inhalational anthrax disease and the resulting pathology in guinea pigs are similar to those seen in rabbits and NHPs, as well as in humans. PMID:23357384

  6. Anthrax Detection: Agencies Need to Validate Sampling Activities in Order to Increase Confidence in Negative Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    validate all activities related to other biothreat agents. In September and October 2001, letters laced with Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores were...2001, contaminated letters laced with Bacillus anthracis, or anthrax spores,1 were sent through the mail to two senators, Thomas Daschle and Patrick...report reflects commonly used terminology. Technically, the term refers only to the disease caused by the microorganism Bacillus anthracis, not the

  7. Relationship Between Prepregnancy Anthrax Vaccination and Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes Among US Army Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-27

    define low birth weights (764-765) and congeni- tal structural abnormalities (740-759). Low birth weight was defined as in- fants weighing less than 2500 g...come analysis. Eleven (3.3%) of the births were of low birth weight (2500 g). The OR for anthrax vaccination and low birth weight , after adjusting for...anthrax vaccination prior to pregnancy. Although the num- ber of adverse outcomes was small, the percentage of low- birth - weight in- fants was about

  8. Enhancement of the Anthrax AVA Vaccine with CpG ODN’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-28

    NUMBER OF PAGES 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UL - 28-Aug-2005 Final Report on ACCELERATE ANTHRAX: CpG 7909 Vaccine Adjuvant Program Report Title...Vaccine Adsorbed (BioThrax?) Combined with CPG 7909 in Normal Volunteers” was completed and presented at the 2005 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial...Agents and Chemotherapy in a poster entitled “Marked Enhancement Of Antibody Response To Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed With CPG 7909 In Healthy

  9. Immunomagnetic separation combined with RT-qPCR for determining the efficacy of disinfectants against human noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengbo; Kim, Myung; Schlesinger, David; Kranz, Christine; Ha, Sangdo; Ha, Jeehyoung; Slauch, James; Baek, Seungbum; Moe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of disinfectants against human noroviruses (NoV) partially because human NoV cannot be routinely cultured in laboratory. The objective of this study was to develop a NoV monoclonal antibody-conjugated immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure combined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays to study the in vitro efficacy of disinfectants against human NoV. Monoclonal antibodies against Norwalk virus (NV, GI.1) and NoV GII.4 were produced using unique NoV capsid proteins, and the antibodies were conjugated to magnetic Dynalbeads. The immunomagnetic beads were used to simultaneously capture intact NoV in samples and effectively remove PCR inhibitors. We examined the efficacy of ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, nine commercially available disinfectants, and one prototype disinfectant using the IMS/RT-qPCR. The sensitivity of this procedure was approximately 100 virus particles for both the NV and GII.4 viruses. The average log reductions in in vitro activities varied between disinfectants. The prototype disinfectant produced an average 3.19-log reduction in NV and a 1.38-log reduction in GII.4. The prototype disinfectant is promising of inactivating NoV. This method can be used to evaluate in vitro activity of disinfectants against human NoV. The IMS/RT-qPCR method is promising as an effective method to remove PCR inhibitors in disinfectants and enable the evaluation of the efficacy of disinfectants. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ecology and epidemiology of anthrax in cattle and humans in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Siamudaala, Victor M; Bwalya, John M; Munang'andu, Hetron M; Munag'andu, Hetron M; Sinyangwe, Peter G; Banda, Fred; Mweene, Aaron S; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Anthrax is endemic in Western and North-western Provinces of Zambia. The disease occurs throughout the year and impacts negatively on the economy of the livestock industry and public health in Zambia. During 1989-1995, there were 1626 suspected cases of anthrax in cattle in Western province and of these 51 were confirmed. There were 220 cases of human anthrax cases in 1990 alone and 248 cases during 1991-1998 with 19.1% and 7.7% case fatality rates, respectively. Interplay of the ecology of affected areas and anthropogenic factors seem to trigger anthrax epidemics. Anthrax has drawn considerable attention in recent years due to its potential use as a biological weapon. In this paper, the history, current status and approaches towards the control of the disease in Zambia are discussed. Quarantine measures restrict trade of livestock and exchange of animals for draught power resulting in poor food security at household levels. Challenges of anthrax control are complex and comprise of socio-political, economical, environmental and cultural factors. Inadequate funding, lack of innovative disease control strategies and lack of cooperation from stakeholders are the major constraints to the control of the disease. It is hoped that the information provided here will stimulate continued awareness for the veterinary and medical authorities to maintain their surveillance and capabilities against the disease. This may lead to a culminating positive impact on livestock and human health in the southern African region.

  11. 2001 anthrax crisis in Washington, D.C.: clinic for persons exposed to contaminated mail.

    PubMed

    Haffer, Andrew S T; Rogers, James R; Montello, Michael J; Frank, Ellen C; Ostroff, Craig

    2002-06-15

    An anthrax prophylaxis clinic is described. In October 2001, four workers from the U.S. Postal Service's Brentwood facility in Washington, D.C., were hospitalized with inhalational anthrax; many others may have been exposed to anthrax spores. U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) teams were deployed to establish an anthrax prophylaxis clinic that would provide education and medication to workers and people who visited the mail facility. The temporary clinic was set up at D.C. General Hospital and was staffed primarily by health care professionals from USPHS. The protocol at the clinic involved three major phases. Phase 1 consisted of gathering information from the patient and distributing educational materials. Phase 2 involved presentations by a physician and a pharmacist concerning anthrax, followed by a question-and-answer session. In phase 3, a pharmacist selected the most appropriate prophylactic agent, dispensed the medication, counseled the patient, and referred patients with flu-like symptoms or skin lesions to a physician. Two floor plans were used to maximize the number of patients seen per hour without jeopardizing patient care. The clinic operated 14 hours a day for 14 days. The 136-member health care team included 52 pharmacists, and medication was dispensed to more than 18,000 patients. The clinic may serve as a model for pharmacists and other professionals in designing and implementing disaster plans. A multidisciplinary team established and operated a clinic to treat persons who may have been exposed to anthrax through contaminated mail.

  12. Suspected anthrax outbreak: Investigation in a rural block of west Bengal and public health response.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Tushar Kanti; Ghosh, Somenath; Dasgupta, Samir; Sarkar, Aditya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is one of the top 10 diseases reported in India and also one of the major causes of death in livestock. This study was conducted to confirm the outbreak of suspected anthrax, determine the transmission mechanism, and implement control measures in Bhatar block of Burdwan district, West Bengal, India. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted through house-to-house visits in Oregram and Kathaldanga villages during the period from May 30, 2013 to June 8, 2013. Out of the 93 persons exposed to anthrax, 11 persons had history of slaughtering, while 82 consumed the meat. All of the 7 cases of suspected anthrax were male (mean age 41.14 ± 10.04 years) and involved in slaughtering the animal. Most cases presented with papule and vesicle over the upper extremity and the trunk. One patient among the suspected cases died. The outbreak was labeled as a suspected anthrax outbreak. A health awareness camp was organized to improve awareness of anthrax among villagers.

  13. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M.; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans, however the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homolog of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbors bpsX-H, Bacillus cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in B. anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-D-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease. PMID:21371137

  14. Investigation of Anthrax Cases in North-East China, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yang; Zhu, Lingwei; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Jun; Ji, Xue; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Nan; Gu, Guibo; Feng, Shuzhang; Qian, Jun; Guo, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    We determined the genotypes of seven Bacillus anthracis strains that were recovered from nine anthrax outbreaks in North-East China from 2010 to 2014, and two approved vaccine strains that are currently in use in China. The causes of these cases were partly due to local farmers being unaware of the presence of anthrax, and butchers with open wounds having direct contact with anthrax-contaminated meat products. The genotype of five of the seven recovered strains was A.Br.001/002 sub-lineage, which was concordant with previously published research. The remaining two cases belongs to the A.Br.Ames sub-lineage. Both of these strains displayed an identical SNR pattern, which was the first time that this genotype was identified in North-East China. Strengthening education in remote villages of rural China is an important activity aimed at fostering attempts to prevent and control anthrax. The genotype of the vaccine strain Anthrax Spore Vaccine No.II was A.Br.008/009 and A.Br.001/002 for the vaccine strain Anthrax Spore Vaccine Non-capsulated. Further studies of their characteristics are clearly warranted.

  15. New Developments in Vaccines, Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxins, and Antibiotic Therapeutics for Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, J.M.; Anderson, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent responsible for anthrax infections, poses a significant biodefense threat. There is a high mortality rate associated with untreated anthrax infections; specifically, inhalation anthrax is a particularly virulent form of infection with mortality rates close to 100%, even with aggressive treatment. Currently, a vaccine is not available to the general public and few antibiotics have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of inhalation anthrax. With the threat of natural or engineered bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the limited population for whom the current drugs are approved, there is a clear need for more effective treatments against this deadly infection. A comprehensive review of current research in drug discovery is presented in this article, including efforts to improve the purity and stability of vaccines, design inhibitors targeting the anthrax toxins, and identify inhibitors of novel enzyme targets. High resolution structural information for the anthrax toxins and several essential metabolic enzymes has played a significant role in aiding the structure-based design of potent and selective antibiotics. PMID:22050756

  16. Passive Immunotherapy Protects against Enteric Invasion and Lethal Sepsis in a Murine Model of Gastrointestinal Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bruce; Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The principal portal for anthrax infection in natural animal outbreaks is the digestive tract. Enteric exposure to anthrax, which is difficult to detect or prevent in a timely manner, could be exploited as an act of terror through contamination of human or animal food. Our group has developed a novel animal model of gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax for evaluation of disease pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics, utilizing vegetative Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) administered to A/J mice (a complement-deficient strain) by oral gavage. We hypothesized that a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) * that neutralizes the protective antigen (PA) component of B. anthracis lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) could be an effective treatment. Although the efficacy of this anti-anthrax PA mAb has been shown in animal models of inhalational anthrax, its activity in GI infection had not yet been ascertained. We hereby demonstrate that passive immunotherapy with anti-anthrax PA mAb, administered at the same time as gastrointestinal exposure to B. anthracis, prevents lethal sepsis in nearly all cases (>90%), while a delay of up to forty-eight hours in treatment still greatly reduces mortality following exposure (65%). Moreover, passive immunotherapy protects against enteric invasion, associated mucosal injury and subsequent dissemination by gastrointestinal B. anthracis, indicating that it acts to prevent the initial stages of infection. * Expired raxibacumab being cycled off the Strategic National Stockpile; biological activity confirmed by in vitro assay. PMID:26426050

  17. Investigation of Anthrax Cases in North-East China, 2010-2014

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yang; Zhu, Lingwei; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Jun; Ji, Xue; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Nan; Gu, Guibo; Feng, Shuzhang; Qian, Jun; Guo, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    We determined the genotypes of seven Bacillus anthracis strains that were recovered from nine anthrax outbreaks in North-East China from 2010 to 2014, and two approved vaccine strains that are currently in use in China. The causes of these cases were partly due to local farmers being unaware of the presence of anthrax, and butchers with open wounds having direct contact with anthrax-contaminated meat products. The genotype of five of the seven recovered strains was A.Br.001/002 sub-lineage, which was concordant with previously published research. The remaining two cases belongs to the A.Br.Ames sub-lineage. Both of these strains displayed an identical SNR pattern, which was the first time that this genotype was identified in North-East China. Strengthening education in remote villages of rural China is an important activity aimed at fostering attempts to prevent and control anthrax. The genotype of the vaccine strain Anthrax Spore Vaccine No.II was A.Br.008/009 and A.Br.001/002 for the vaccine strain Anthrax Spore Vaccine Non-capsulated. Further studies of their characteristics are clearly warranted. PMID:26308449

  18. Passive Immunotherapy Protects against Enteric Invasion and Lethal Sepsis in a Murine Model of Gastrointestinal Anthrax.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bruce; Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M

    2015-09-29

    The principal portal for anthrax infection in natural animal outbreaks is the digestive tract. Enteric exposure to anthrax, which is difficult to detect or prevent in a timely manner, could be exploited as an act of terror through contamination of human or animal food. Our group has developed a novel animal model of gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax for evaluation of disease pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics, utilizing vegetative Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) administered to A/J mice (a complement-deficient strain) by oral gavage. We hypothesized that a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) * that neutralizes the protective antigen (PA) component of B. anthracis lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) could be an effective treatment. Although the efficacy of this anti-anthrax PA mAb has been shown in animal models of inhalational anthrax, its activity in GI infection had not yet been ascertained. We hereby demonstrate that passive immunotherapy with anti-anthrax PA mAb, administered at the same time as gastrointestinal exposure to B. anthracis, prevents lethal sepsis in nearly all cases (>90%), while a delay of up to forty-eight hours in treatment still greatly reduces mortality following exposure (65%). Moreover, passive immunotherapy protects against enteric invasion, associated mucosal injury and subsequent dissemination by gastrointestinal B. anthracis, indicating that it acts to prevent the initial stages of infection. * Expired raxibacumab being cycled off the Strategic National Stockpile; biological activity confirmed by in vitro assay.

  19. Surveillance for anthrax cases associated with contaminated letters, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania, 2001.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christina G; Sandhu, Hardeep S; Crawford, Dana C; Redd, Stephen C; Beach, Michael J; Buehler, James W; Bresnitz, Eddy A; Pinner, Robert W; Bell, Beth P

    2002-10-01

    In October 2001, two inhalational anthrax and four cutaneous anthrax cases, resulting from the processing of Bacillus anthracis-containing envelopes at a New Jersey mail facility, were identified. Subsequently, we initiated stimulated passive hospital-based and enhanced passive surveillance for anthrax-compatible syndromes. From October 24 to December 17, 2001, hospitals reported 240,160 visits and 7,109 intensive-care unit admissions in the surveillance area (population 6.7 million persons). Following a change of reporting criteria on November 8, the average of possible inhalational anthrax reports decreased 83% from 18 to 3 per day; the proportion of reports requiring follow-up increased from 37% (105/286) to 41% (47/116). Clinical follow-up was conducted on 214 of 464 possible inhalational anthrax patients and 98 possible cutaneous anthrax patients; 49 had additional laboratory testing. No additional cases were identified. To verify the limited scope of the outbreak, surveillance was essential, though labor-intensive. The flexibility of the system allowed interim evaluation, thus improving surveillance efficiency.

  20. New developments in vaccines, inhibitors of anthrax toxins, and antibiotic therapeutics for Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, J M; Anderson, A C

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent responsible for anthrax infections, poses a significant biodefense threat. There is a high mortality rate associated with untreated anthrax infections; specifically, inhalation anthrax is a particularly virulent form of infection with mortality rates close to 100%, even with aggressive treatment. Currently, a vaccine is not available to the general public and few antibiotics have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of inhalation anthrax. With the threat of natural or engineered bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the limited population for whom the current drugs are approved, there is a clear need for more effective treatments against this deadly infection. A comprehensive review of current research in drug discovery is presented in this article, including efforts to improve the purity and stability of vaccines, design inhibitors targeting the anthrax toxins, and identify inhibitors of novel enzyme targets. High resolution structural information for the anthrax toxins and several essential metabolic enzymes has played a significant role in aiding the structure-based design of potent and selective antibiotics.

  1. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-04-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans; however, the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homologue of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbours bpsX-H, B. cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in Bacillus anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-d-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease.

  2. Animal models of human anthrax: the Quest for the Holy Grail.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Pierre L

    2009-12-01

    Anthrax is rare among humans, few data can be collected from infected individuals and they provide a fragmentary view of the dynamics of infection and human host-pathogen interactions. Therefore, the development of animal models is necessary. Anthrax has the particularity of being a toxi-infection, a combination of infection and toxemia. The ideal animal model would explore these two different facets and mimic human disease as much as possible. In the past decades, the main effort has been focused on modelling of inhalational anthrax and the perception of specific aspects of the infection has evolved in recent years. In this review, we consider criteria which can lead to the most appropriate choice of a given animal species for modelling human anthrax. We will highlight the positive input and limitations of different models and show that they are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, their contribution to anthrax research can be more rewarding when taken in synergy. We will also present a reappraisal of inhalational anthrax and propose reflections on key points, such as portal of entry, connections between mediastinal lymph nodes, pleura and lymphatic drainage.

  3. Chemical cleaning/disinfection and ageing of organic UF membranes: a review.

    PubMed

    Regula, C; Carretier, E; Wyart, Y; Gésan-Guiziou, G; Vincent, A; Boudot, D; Moulin, P

    2014-06-01

    Membrane separation processes have become a basic unit operation for process design and product development. These processes are used in a variety of separation and concentration steps, but in all cases, the membranes must be cleaned regularly to remove both organic and inorganic material deposited on the surface and/or into the membrane bulk. Cleaning/disinfection is a vital step in maintaining the permeability and selectivity of the membrane in order to get the plant to its original capacity, to minimize risks of bacteriological contamination, and to make acceptable products. For this purpose, a large number of chemical cleaning/disinfection agents are commercially available. In general, these cleaning/disinfection agents have to improve the membrane flux to a certain extent. However, they can also cause irreversible damages in membrane properties and performances over the long term. Until now, there is considerably less literature dedicated to membrane ageing than to cleaning/disinfection. The knowledge in cleaning/disinfection efficiency has recently been improved. But in order to develop optimized cleaning/disinfection protocols there still remains a challenge to better understand membrane ageing. In order to compensate for the lack of correlated cleaning/disinfection and ageing data from the literature, this paper investigates cleaning/disinfection efficiencies and ageing damages of organic ultrafiltration membranes. The final aim is to provide less detrimental cleaning/disinfection procedures and to propose some guidelines which should have been taken into consideration in term of membrane ageing studies. To carry out this study, this article will detail the background of cleaning/disinfection and aging membrane topics in a first introductive part. In a second part, key factors and endpoints of cleaning/disinfection and aging membranes will be discussed deeply: the membrane role and the cleaning parameters roles, such as water quality, storing conditions

  4. Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIT to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates by Margaret M. Hurley and...Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates Margaret M. Hurley and Michael S. Sellers Weapons and...Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORAUW911QX-04-C

  5. Comparison of disinfection byproduct formation from chlorine and alternative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Reckhow, David A

    2007-04-01

    Seven diverse natural waters were collected and treated in the laboratory under five oxidation scenarios (chlorine, chloramine, both with and without preozonation, and chlorine dioxide). The impact of these disinfectants on the formation of disinfection byproducts was investigated. Results showed that preozonation decreased the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and total organic halogen (TOX) for most waters during postchlorination. A net increase in THMs, HAAs and TOX was observed for a water of low humic content. Either decreases or increases were observed in dihaloacetic acids and unknown TOX (UTOX) as a result of preozonation when used with chloramination. Chloramines and chlorine dioxide produced a higher percentage of UTOX than free chlorine. They also formed more iodoform and total organic iodine (TOI) than free chlorine in the presence of iodide. Free chlorine produced a much higher level of total organic chlorine (TOCl) and bromine (TOBr) than chloramines and chlorine dioxide in the presence of bromide.

  6. Role of Clinical Endoscopy in Emphasizing Endoscope Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju

    2015-01-01

    Based on the unexpected Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, it was established that the virus can spread easily, MERS exposure in hospitals carries an extreme risk for infection as well as mortality, and the sharing of information was essential for infection control. Although the incidence of exogenous infections related to contaminated endoscopes is very low, the majority of published outbreaks have been caused by various shortcomings in reprocessing procedures, including insufficient training or awareness. Ever since the inauguration of "Clinical Endoscopy" as an English-language journal of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in 2011, it has published several articles on disinfection of the endoscope and its accessories. Many Science Citation Index journals have also emphasized high-level disinfection of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Many papers have been produced specifically, since the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in 2013. The recent review papers concluded that quality control is the most important issue among all the aspects of procedural care, including the efficiency of the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit and reprocessing room. Thorough reprocessing of endoscopes using high-level disinfection and sterilization methods may be essential for reducing the risk of infection. PMID:26473114

  7. Identifying bacterial spores and anthrax hoax materials by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Brouillette, Carl R.; Smith, Wayne

    2004-12-01

    The distribution of Bacillus anthracis spores through the US postal system in the autumn of 2001, initiated a secondary form of terror, the mailing of hoax materials. In the past three years nearly 20,000 letters containing harmless powders have been mailed, creating additional anxiety. Thus, there is a need for analyzers that can not only identify anthrax-causing spores to save lives, but also identify hoax materials to eliminate time-consuming and costly shutdowns. Recently, we established that Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify both Bacilli endospores and hoax materials. Here we present Raman spectra of several Bacilli spores along with the dipicolinate salts, to further define the abilities of this technology to not only identify hoax materials, but also identify spores at the genus and species level.

  8. In silico design of smart binders to anthrax PA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Michael; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2012-06-01

    The development of smart peptide binders requires an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of recognition which has remained an elusive grail of the research community for decades. Recent advances in automated discovery and synthetic library science provide a wealth of information to probe fundamental details of binding and facilitate the development of improved models for a priori prediction of affinity and specificity. Here we present the modeling portion of an iterative experimental/computational study to produce high affinity peptide binders to the Protective Antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis. The result is a general usage, HPC-oriented, python-based toolkit based upon powerful third-party freeware, which is designed to provide a better understanding of peptide-protein interactions and ultimately predict and measure new smart peptide binder candidates. We present an improved simulation protocol with flexible peptide docking to the Anthrax Protective Antigen, reported within the context of experimental data presented in a companion work.

  9. Cutaneous Anthrax on Eyelid in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Emine; Erturk, Ayse; Erol, Serpil; Parlak, Mehmet; Ozkurt, Zulal

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old patient who was 17 weeks of pregnant referred to our hospital due to a lesion on the eyelid and swelling on her face. Patient's history revealed that she helped her husband for slaughtering of a sick animal and contacted with the meat. A scabby lesion was detected on the inferior eyelid with hyperaemia around, central necrotic appearance and swelling. The diagnosis of anthrax was performed based on her epidemiological data, physical examination findings, and Bacillus anthracis were seen on direct preparation. This case was considered worthy to present since she was pregnant, the disease was located on the inferior eyelid, which is a rare place for location, and caused no complication or sequel either in mother or in baby.

  10. The effects of anthrax lethal toxin on host barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Frucht, David M

    2011-06-01

    The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA). LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs), but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT) leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  11. The Pitfalls of Bioterrorism Preparedness: the Anthrax and Smallpox Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Hillel W.; Gould, Robert M.; Sidel, Victor W.

    2004-01-01

    Bioterrorism preparedness programs have contributed to death, illness, and waste of public health resources without evidence of benefit. Several deaths and many serious illnesses have resulted from the smallpox vaccination program; yet there is no clear evidence that a threat of smallpox exposure ever existed. The anthrax spores released in 2001 have been linked to secret US military laboratories—the resultant illnesses and deaths might not have occurred if those laboratories were not in operation. The present expansion of bioterrorism preparedness programs will continue to squander health resources, increase the dangers of accidental or purposeful release of dangerous pathogens, and further undermine efforts to enforce international treaties to ban biological and chemical weapons. The public health community should acknowledge the substantial harm that bioterrorism preparedness has already caused and develop mechanisms to increase our public health resources and to allocate them to address the world’s real health needs. PMID:15451727

  12. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  13. Quantitative Determination of Lethal Toxin Proteins in Culture Supernatant of Human Live Anthrax Vaccine Bacillus anthracis A16R.

    PubMed

    Zai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ju; Liu, Jie; Li, Liangliang; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-25

    Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis) is the etiological agent of anthrax affecting both humans and animals. Anthrax toxin (AT) plays a major role in pathogenesis. It includes lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET), which are formed by the combination of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF), respectively. The currently used human anthrax vaccine in China utilizes live-attenuated B. anthracis spores (A16R; pXO1+, pXO2-) that produce anthrax toxin but cannot produce the capsule. Anthrax toxins, especially LT, have key effects on both the immunogenicity and toxicity of human anthrax vaccines. Thus, determining quantities and biological activities of LT proteins expressed by the A16R strain is meaningful. Here, we explored LT expression patterns of the A16R strain in culture conditions using another vaccine strain Sterne as a control. We developed a sandwich ELISA and cytotoxicity-based method for quantitative detection of PA and LF. Expression and degradation of LT proteins were observed in culture supernatants over time. Additionally, LT proteins expressed by the A16R and Sterne strains were found to be monomeric and showed cytotoxic activity, which may be the main reason for side effects of live anthrax vaccines. Our work facilitates the characterization of anthrax vaccines components and establishment of a quality control standard for vaccine production which may ultimately help to ensure the efficacy and safety of the human anthrax vaccine A16R.

  14. Ante- and postmortem diagnostic techniques for anthrax: rethinking pathogen exposure and the geographic extent of the disease in wildlife.

    PubMed

    Bagamian, Karoun H; Alexander, Kathleen A; Hadfield, Ted L; Blackburn, Jason K

    2013-10-01

    Although antemortem approaches in wildlife disease surveillance are common for most zoonoses, they have been used infrequently in anthrax surveillance. Classically, anthrax is considered a disease with extremely high mortality. This is because anthrax outbreaks are often detected ex post facto through wildlife or livestock fatalities or spillover transmission to humans. As a result, the natural prevalence of anthrax infection in animal populations is largely unknown. However, in the past 20 yr, antemortem serologic surveillance in wildlife has indicated that not all species exposed succumb to infection, and anthrax exposure may be more widespread than originally appreciated. These studies brought about a multitude of new questions, many of which can be addressed by increased antemortem serologic surveillance in wildlife populations. To fully understand anthrax transmission dynamics and geographic extent, it is important to identify exposure in wildlife hosts and associated factors and, in turn, understand how these influences may drive environmental reservoir dynamics and concurrent disease risk in livestock and humans. Here we review our current understanding of the serologic response to anthrax among wildlife hosts and serologic diagnostic assays used to augment traditional postmortem anthrax surveillance strategies. We also provide recommendations for the use of serology and sentinel species surveillance approaches in anthrax research and management.

  15. Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Jet for Skin Disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creyghton, Yves; Meijer, Rogier; Verweij, Paul; van der Zanden, Frank; Leenders, Paul

    A consortium consisting of the research institute TNO, the medical ­university and hospital St Radboud and two industrial enterprises is working on a non-thermal plasma treatment method for hand disinfection. The group is seeking for cooperation, in particular in the field of validation methods and potential ­standardization for plasma based disinfection procedures. The present paper describes technical progress in plasma source development together with initial microbiological data. Particular properties of the sheet shaped plasma volume are the possibility of treating large irregular surfaces in a short period of time, effective plasma produced species transfer to the surface together with high controllability of the nature of plasma species by means of temperature conditioning.

  16. Disinfecting endoscopes: how not to transmit Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leers, W D

    1980-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the bronchial washings of two patients who underwent bronchoscopy consecutively with the same bronchoscope. Active pulmonary tuberculosis was later confirmed in the first patient, whereas the second patient had clinical and serologic evidence of infection with respiratory syncytial virus. The bronchoscope had been cleaned with an iodophor disinfectant, which had not destroyed the tubercle bacilli. The agent recommended for chemical disinfection of fibreoptic bronchoscopes is 2% glutaraldehyde solution; the instrument should be immersed in it for 10 to 30 minutes. Five hours' exposure to ethylene oxide is recommended for sterilization of instruments. These procedures must be preceded by adequate mechanical cleaning. Then transmission of pathogenic organisms during endoscopy, which can result in nosocomial disease, misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment, will be avoided. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6790150

  17. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  18. [Molecular model of anthrax toxin translocation into target-cells].

    PubMed

    Noskov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is formed from three components: protective antigen (PA), lethal (LF) and edema (EF) factors. PA83 is cleaved by cell surface protease furin to produce a 63-kDa fragment (PA63). PA63 and LF/EF molecules are assembled to anthrax toxin complexes: oligomer PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 3. Assembly is occurred during of binding with cellular receptor or near surface of target-cell. This toxin complex forms pore and induces receptor-mediated endocytosis. Formed endosome consists extracellular liquid with LF/EF and membrane-associated ferments (H+ and K+/Na+-ATPases) and proteins (receptors and others). H+ concentration is increased into endosome as result of K/Na-ATPase-dependent- activity of H+-ATPase. Difference of potentials (between endosome and intracellular liquid) is increased and LF/EF molecules are moved to pore and bound with PA63-oligomer to PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 7 and full block pore (ion-selective channel). Endosome is increased in volume and induces increasing of PA63-oligomer pore to.size of effector complex: LF/EF x 7 + PAl7 x 7 = 750 kDa. Effector complex is translocated from endosome to cytosol by means high difference of potentials (H+) and dissociates from PA47 x 7 complex after cleavage of FFD315-sait by intracellular chymotrypsin-like proteases in all 7 molecules PA63. PA47 x 7 complex (strongly fixed in membrane with debris of hydrophobic loops) return into endosome and pore is destroyed. Endosome pH is decreased rapidly and PA47 x 7 complex is destroyed by endosomal/lysosomal proteases. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is ended by endosome recycling in cell-membrane.

  19. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy and stability of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Vowles, R W; McNally, L; Davis, F; O'Sullivan, D J

    2007-03-01

    Disinfection of dental impressions should be considered as a routine procedure in dental surgeries and dental laboratories. Disinfectants can have deleterious effects on some properties of impression materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy and dimensional stability of a model dental stone, reproduced from five commonly used impression materials (Aquasil soft putty/Aquasil Ultra LV; Aquasil Monophase; Aquasil Ultra Heavy; Impregum F and Provil putty/Provil Light CD wash) retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to three disinfectant solutions (Perform ID; Haz-Tabs and MD 520). Two hundred models were used to investigate the effect of the three disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of the five impression materials. Five impressions were taken for each impression material for each disinfection treatment group. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. All materials demonstrated a percentage change in dimensions when subjected to no disinfection when compared to the brass master die and all materials demonstrated a percentage change in dimension when subjected to the different disinfection procedures. The results of this study have demonstrated that for all of the materials investigated, the changes in dimensional stability were small in the order of microns. These changes may however be of clinical significance for procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy, for example fixed prosthodontics. The materials respond differently depending on the disinfectant used and it may therefore be appropriate that manufacturers recommend the use of particular disinfectants for their products in order to ensure optimum dimensional accuracy and stability.

  20. Status report on analytical methods to support the disinfectant/disinfection by-products regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The U.S. EPA is developng national regulations to control disinfectants and disinfection by-products in public drinking water supplies. Twelve disinfectants and disinfection by-products are identified for possible regulation under this rule. The document summarizes the analytical methods that EPA intends to propose as compliance monitoring methods. A discussion of surrogate measurements that are being considered for inclusion in the regulation is also provided.

  1. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  2. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  3. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... animals on the aircraft shall be cleaned and disinfected using an approved disinfectant listed in § 71.10... stowage area. The disinfectant solution must be applied with a device that creates an aerosol or mist that...

  4. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... animals on the aircraft shall be cleaned and disinfected using an approved disinfectant listed in § 71.10... stowage area. The disinfectant solution must be applied with a device that creates an aerosol or mist that...

  5. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... animals on the aircraft shall be cleaned and disinfected using an approved disinfectant listed in § 71.10... stowage area. The disinfectant solution must be applied with a device that creates an aerosol or mist that...

  6. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... animals on the aircraft shall be cleaned and disinfected using an approved disinfectant listed in § 71.10... stowage area. The disinfectant solution must be applied with a device that creates an aerosol or mist that...

  7. Testing disinfectants in the food factory: phenol coefficient method.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of foods by the environment has direct public health and keeping quality significance. The food factory environment (with raw materials and processing) governs the numbers and types of microorganisms in finished products. Use of the appropriate sampling procedures permits us to discover the magnitude and type of contamination. Microbiological sampling allows objective evaluation of the disinfectants and the sanitation practices and procedures used in the food factory.Disinfectants are antimicrobial pesticides that are primarily used on inanimate surfaces (such as floors, walls, and countertops) to kill infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Antimicrobial pesticides are substances used to kill or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms on inanimate objects and surfaces. Products intended for the control of microorganisms in or on people or animals are considered drugs, not pesticides, and are therefore regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Antimicrobial pesticides are divided into two broad use categories: 1. Non-public health products include those used to control the growth of algae, odor-causing bacteria, and microorganisms causing spoilage, deterioration, and fouling of materials. Examples include antimicrobials used in cooling towers, paints, and paper products. 2. Public health products are intended to control microorganisms infectious to people. Examples include sterilants, which are used to destroy or eliminate all forms of microbial life including fungi, viruses, and all forms of bacteria and their spores; disinfectants, which are used to destroy or irreversibly inactivate infectious fungi and bacteria, but not necessarily their spores; and sanitizers, which are used to reduce, but not necessarily eliminate microorganisms. Examples range from sterilants used to treat surgical instruments to disinfectants applied to hospital floors, walls, and bed linens and sanitizers used on carpets or in laundry additives.

  8. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models: influence of disinfectant solutions and alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Borsato, Thaís Teixeira; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini-Jr, Alcides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds disinfected with 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to models produced using molds which were not disinfected, with 3 alginate materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5 and Jeltrate Plus). The molds were prepared over matrix containing 20-, 50-, and 75-µm lines, performed under pressure with perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following gelation and either disinfected (using one of the solutions by spraying followed by storage in closed jars for 15 min) or not disinfected. The samples were divided into 12 groups (n=5). Molds were filled with dental gypsum Durone IV and 1 h after the start of the stone mixing the models were separated from the tray. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-µm line with 25 mm in length, in accordance with the ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to ANOVA. The 50 µm-line was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the disinfection procedure. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean values of dimensional accuracy in combinations between disinfectant procedure and alginate impression material (p=0.2130) or for independent factors. The disinfectant solutions and alginate materials used in this study are no factors of choice regarding the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

  9. Micropollutants produced by disinfection of wastewater effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Cumming, R.B.; Lee, N.E.; Thompson, J.E.; Lewis, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research conducted with the objective of determining some of the chemical mutagenic characteristics of nonvolatile micropollutants in treated wastewater effluents is summarized. The effluents from nine wastewater plants were examined relative to the chemical effects of the disinfectants chlorine, ozone, and uv light on nonvolatile organic constituents and the formation of mutagenic constituents during disinfection. Results indicate that disinfection by chlorine or ozone can lead to an increase in the number of mutagenic materials in the effluents. (JGB)

  10. Ultra violet disinfection: A 3-year history

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, R.R.; Lindeke, D.R.

    1998-07-01

    The Stillwater Wastewater Treatment Facility is one of nine wastewater treatment facilities operated by the Metropolitan Council Environmental Services in the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area. The facility services the cities of Stillwater, Oak Park Heights, and Bayport. In 1993, an ultra violet disinfection facility began operation to provide the disinfection for the Facility. This presentation discusses the reasons for using ultra violet disinfection in lieu of chlorination/dechlorination facilities, the operating performance, and operating cost factors.

  11. Monitoring Method of Cow Anthrax Based on Gis and Spatial Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Yang, Yong; Wang, Hongbin; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yujun; He, Jianbin; Fan, Honggang

    Geographic information system (GIS) is a computer application system, which possesses the ability of manipulating spatial information and has been used in many fields related with the spatial information management. Many methods and models have been established for analyzing animal diseases distribution models and temporal-spatial transmission models. Great benefits have been gained from the application of GIS in animal disease epidemiology. GIS is now a very important tool in animal disease epidemiological research. Spatial analysis function of GIS can be widened and strengthened by using spatial statistical analysis, allowing for the deeper exploration, analysis, manipulation and interpretation of spatial pattern and spatial correlation of the animal disease. In this paper, we analyzed the cow anthrax spatial distribution characteristics in the target district A (due to the secret of epidemic data we call it district A) based on the established GIS of the cow anthrax in this district in combination of spatial statistical analysis and GIS. The Cow anthrax is biogeochemical disease, and its geographical distribution is related closely to the environmental factors of habitats and has some spatial characteristics, and therefore the correct analysis of the spatial distribution of anthrax cow for monitoring and the prevention and control of anthrax has a very important role. However, the application of classic statistical methods in some areas is very difficult because of the pastoral nomadic context. The high mobility of livestock and the lack of enough suitable sampling for the some of the difficulties in monitoring currently make it nearly impossible to apply rigorous random sampling methods. It is thus necessary to develop an alternative sampling method, which could overcome the lack of sampling and meet the requirements for randomness. The GIS computer application software ArcGIS9.1 was used to overcome the lack of data of sampling sites.Using ArcGIS 9.1 and GEODA

  12. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  13. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  14. Disinfection Addition and Disinfection Changes: What It Means to the LCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This slide presentation’s general points are: Many protective pipe scales are vey dependent on ORP, and hence, state of disinfection. Adding disinfection to anoxic systems will likely cause big chemistry changes in DS and corrosion. Changing disinfectants could cause major l...

  15. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Level Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level goals...

  16. Anthrax toxin targeting of myeloid cells through the CMG2 receptor is essential for establishment of Bacillus anthracis infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Miller-Randolph, Sharmina; Crown, Devorah; Moayeri, Mahtab; Sastalla, Inka; Okugawa, Shu; Leppla, Stephen H

    2010-11-18

    Bacillus anthracis kills through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. Anthrax toxin working via the CMG2 receptor mediates lethality late in infection, but its roles early in infection remain unclear. We generated myeloid-lineage specific CMG2-deficient mice to examine the roles of macrophages, neutrophils, and other myeloid cells in anthrax pathogenesis. Macrophages and neutrophils isolated from these mice were resistant to anthrax toxin. However, the myeloid-specific CMG2-deficient mice remained fully sensitive to both anthrax lethal and edema toxins, demonstrating that targeting of myeloid cells is not responsible for anthrax toxin-induced lethality. Surprisingly, the myeloid-specific CMG2-deficient mice were completely resistant to B. anthracis infection. Neutrophil depletion experiments suggest that B. anthracis relies on anthrax toxin secretion to evade the scavenging functions of neutrophils to successfully establish infection. This work demonstrates that anthrax toxin uptake through CMG2 and the resulting impairment of myeloid cells are essential to anthrax infection.

  17. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on microhardness of acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Baptista, Gabriella Trunckle; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Dekon, Stéfan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the microhardness of acrylic resins denture base. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated: Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone. Each brand of acrylic resin was divided into four groups (n = 7) according to the disinfection method (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine and 1% hypochlorite). Samples were disinfected during 60 days. Before and after disinfection, samples were thermal cycled between 5-55 °C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles. The microhardness was measured using a microhardener, at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2). The microhardness values of all groups reduced over time. QC-20 acrylic resin exhibited the lowest microhardness values. At B and T1 periods, the acrylic resins exhibited statistically greater microhardness values when compared to D and T2 periods. It can be concluded that the microhardness values of the acrylic resins denture base were affected by the thermal cycling and disinfection procedures. However, all microhardness values obtained herein are within acceptable clinical limits for the acrylic resins.

  18. Decontamination formulations for disinfection and sterilization

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Engler, Daniel E.

    2007-09-18

    Aqueous decontamination formulations that neutralize biological pathogens for disinfection and sterilization applications. Examples of suitable applications include disinfection of food processing equipment, disinfection of areas containing livestock, mold remediation, sterilization of medical instruments and direct disinfection of food surfaces, such as beef carcasses. The formulations include at least one reactive compound, bleaching activator, inorganic base, and water. The formulations can be packaged as a two-part kit system, and can have a pH value in the range of 7-8.

  19. Antiviral efficacy of disinfectant solution MRI-1.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Billstrom, M; Randall, S; Buchan, A; Davies, J; Ahmad, A

    1998-01-01

    Disinfectant MRI-1 was prepared by dissolution of non-ionic and ionic detergent in ethanol. The disinfectant inactivated extracellular and intracellular enveloped and non-enveloped viruses including herpes viruses, influenza A and human immunodeficiency disease virus in suspension or on surfaces by pre-exposure or post-exposure to the disinfectant; in addition, cells were disabled as potential hosts for viral infection using concentrations of MRI-1 which were 50-fold less than the operative concentration for disinfection. There was no evidence of in vitro mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium or sensitization or other adverse effect in a guinea pig model or in human subjects.

  20. Are surgical scrubbing and pre-operative disinfection of the skin in orthopaedic surgery reliable?

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Chelo, C; Caputo, F; Conte, M; Fontana, C; Peddis, G; Velluti, C

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to establish the actual effectiveness of pre-surgical disinfection of the patient and surgeon's hands. We evaluated bacterial density and composition on the skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy and the left hand of two surgeons after standard disinfection with povidone-iodine. Three samples were taken after the first 6-min scrub in the first surgical operation from the periungual space of the 1 degrees finger, from the interdigital space between the 2 degrees and 3 degrees fingers and from the transverse palmar crest of the left hand of two surgeons for seven consecutive surgical sessions, for a total of 42 samples, and two samples from the pre-patellar skin and from the popliteal skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy, for a total of 30 samples. Pre-surgical handwashing and disinfection procedures were identical in each case. Pre-surgical disinfection of the patient's skin with povidone-iodine was shown to be completely effective, with 100% of samples negative. Samples taken from the interdigital space and the palmar crest (100% of samples negative) demonstrated the efficacy of disinfection of the surgeon's hands with povidone-iodine, while the periungual space was contaminated in 50% of the samples. The bacterial strains isolated belong to the staphylococcus genus in 100% of the cases, with pathogenic strains in 29.6% of the cases. Standard pre-surgical disinfection of skin in areas easily accessible to the disinfectant is sufficient in itself to guarantee thorough sanitization. Standard scrubbing of the surgeon's hands is insufficient in eliminating bacterial contamination, including pathogenic germs, in the periungual space, where it is probably difficult for the disinfectant to come into contact with the skin.