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Sample records for anti-centromere antibodies aca

  1. Three human chromosomal autoantigens are recognized by sera from patients with anti-centromere antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, W; Bordwell, B; Marino, C; Rothfield, N

    1986-01-01

    We have identified 39 individuals with anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) in our patient population, all of whom have Raynaud's syndrome or disease. We have used sera from the ACA-positive patients and from 123 controls (22 normal individuals and 101 additional patients with either Raynaud's disease or Raynaud's syndrome plus an associated connective tissue disease) to screen the proteins of highly purified human (HeLa) mitotic chromosomes by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Three antigens were recognized by the sera from the ACA-positive patients. These were centromere protein (CENP)-B (80,000 mol wt--recognized by all ACA-positive sera), CENP-A (17,000 mol wt--recognized by 38 of 39 ACA-positive sera), and CENP-C (140,000 mol wt--recognized by 37 of 39 ACA-positive sera). None of these antigens were recognized by any of the 123 control sera, although binding was occasionally seen to other chromosomal antigens. Therefore the ACA response is highly uniform in our patient population. Antibody to CENP-B shows a 100% correlation with anti-centromere staining by indirect immunofluorescence. Images PMID:3511098

  2. Three human chromosomal autoantigens are recognized by sera from patients with anti-centromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, W; Bordwell, B; Marino, C; Rothfield, N

    1986-02-01

    We have identified 39 individuals with anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) in our patient population, all of whom have Raynaud's syndrome or disease. We have used sera from the ACA-positive patients and from 123 controls (22 normal individuals and 101 additional patients with either Raynaud's disease or Raynaud's syndrome plus an associated connective tissue disease) to screen the proteins of highly purified human (HeLa) mitotic chromosomes by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Three antigens were recognized by the sera from the ACA-positive patients. These were centromere protein (CENP)-B (80,000 mol wt--recognized by all ACA-positive sera), CENP-A (17,000 mol wt--recognized by 38 of 39 ACA-positive sera), and CENP-C (140,000 mol wt--recognized by 37 of 39 ACA-positive sera). None of these antigens were recognized by any of the 123 control sera, although binding was occasionally seen to other chromosomal antigens. Therefore the ACA response is highly uniform in our patient population. Antibody to CENP-B shows a 100% correlation with anti-centromere staining by indirect immunofluorescence.

  3. Chromosome Dynamics Visualized with an Anti-Centromeric Histone H3 Antibody in Allium

    PubMed Central

    Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Yamamoto, Maki; Yamaji, Naoki; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Murata, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Due to the ease with which chromosomes can be observed, the Allium species, and onion in particular, have been familiar materials employed in cytogenetic experiments in biology. In this study, centromeric histone H3 (CENH3)-coding cDNAs were identified in four Allium species (onion, welsh onion, garlic and garlic chives) and cloned. Anti-CENH3 antibody was then raised against a deduced amino acid sequence of CENH3 of welsh onion. The antibody recognized all CENH3 orthologs of the Allium species tested. Immunostaining with the antibody enabled clear visualization of chromosome behavior during mitosis in the species. Furthermore, three-dimensional (3D) observation of mitotic cell division was achieved by subjecting root sections to immunohistochemical techniques. The 3D dynamics of the cells and position of cell-cycle marker proteins (CENH3 and α-tubulin) were clearly revealed by immunohistochemical staining with the antibodies. The immunohistochemical analysis made it possible to establish an overview of the location of dividing cells in the root tissues. This breakthrough in technique, in addition to the two centromeric DNA sequences isolated from welsh onion by chromatin immuno-precipitation using the antibody, should lead to a better understanding of plant cell division. A phylogenetic analysis of Allium CENH3s together with the previously reported plant CENH3s showed two separate clades for monocot species tested. One clade was made from CENH3s of the Allium species with those of Poaceae species, and the other from CENH3s of a holocentric species (Luzula nivea). These data may imply functional differences of CENH3s between holocentric and monocentric species. Centromeric localization of DNA sequences isolated from welsh onion by chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) using the antibody was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and ChIP-quantitative PCR. PMID:23236469

  4. Fine Specificity Mapping of Autoantigens Targeted by Anti-Centromere Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Akbarali, Yasmin; Matousek-Ronck, Jennifer; Hunt, Laura; Staudt, Leslie; Reichlin, Morris; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Autoantibodies to centromeric proteins are commonly found in sera of limited scleroderma and other rheumatic disease patients. To better understand the inciting events and possible pathogenic mechanisms of these autoimmune responses, this study identified the common antigenic targets of CENP-A in scleroderma patient sera. Utilizing samples from 263 anti-centromere immunofluorescence positive patients, 93.5% were found to have anti-CENP-A reactivity and 95.4% had anti-CENP-B reactivity by ELISA. Very few patient samples exclusively targeted CENP-A (2.7%) or CENP-B (4.2%). Select patient sera were tested for reactivity with solid phase overlapping decapeptides of CENP-A. Four distinct epitopes of CENP-A were identified. Epitopes 2 and 3 were confirmed by additional testing of 263 patient sera by ELISA for reactivity with these sequences constructed as multiple antigenic peptides. Inhibition CENP-A Western blots also confirmed the specificity of these humoral peptide immune responses in a subset of patient sera. The first three arginine residues (aa 4-6) of CENP-A appear essential for antibody recognition, as replacing these arginines with glycine residues reduced antibody binding to the expressed CENP-A protein by an average of 93.2% (range 80-100%). In selected patients with serial samples spanning nearly a decade, humoral epitope binding patterns were quite stable and showed no epitope spreading over time. This epitope mapping study identifies key antigenic targets of the anti-centromere response and establishes that the majority of the responses depend on key amino-terminal residues. PMID:17210244

  5. Influence of antibody profile in clinical features and prognosis in a cohort of Spanish patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iniesta Arandia, Nerea; Simeón-Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Guillén Del Castillo, Alfredo; Colunga Argüelles, Dolores; Rubio-Rivas, Manuel; Trapiella Martínez, Luis; García Hernández, Francisco José; Sáez Comet, Luis; Egurbide Arberas, María Victoria; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Marí Alfonso, Begoña; Vargas Hitos, José Antonio; Ríos Blanco, Juan José; Todolí Parra, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Carballeira, Monica; Marín Ballvé, Adela; Chamorro Fernández, Antonio Javier; Pla Salas, Xavier; Madroñero Vuelta, Ana Belen; Ruiz Muñoz, Manuel; Fonollosa Pla, Vicent; Espinosa, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    To assess the clinical manifestations and prognosis of Spanish patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) according to their immunological profile. From the Spanish Scleroderma Study Group or RESCLE (Registro de ESCLErodermia as Spanish nomenclature) Registry we selected those patients in which anti-centromere (ACA), anti-topoisomerase I (ATA), and anti-RNA polymerase III (ARA) antibodies had been determined, and a single positivity for each SSc specific antibody was detected. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and survival data were compared according to the serologic status of these antibodies. Overall, 209 SSc patients were included. In 128 (61%) patients ACA was the only positive antibody, 46 (22%) were only positive for ATA, and 35 (17%) for ARA. Of note, the three groups were mutually exclusive. In univariate analysis, patients with ACA presented more frequently limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) (p<0.001), whereas diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) was the most frequent subtype in patients with ATA (54%) and ARA (62%) (both p<0.001). Positive patients for ARA showed the highest prevalence of joint involvement (p<0.001) and those from ATA group had a higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p<0.001). Scleroderma renal crisis was more frequent in the ARA group (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, ACA were associated with female gender and were protective for dcSSc and ILD. ATA were found to be protective for lcSSc and they were independently associated with interstitial reticular pattern. ARA positivity was independently associated with dcSSc. We did not find differences in mortality between the three groups. In Spanish SSc patients, the presence of SSc specific antibodies conferred a distinctive clinical profile.

  6. [Non-identified antinuclear antibodies in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Margot, A; Smet, J; Soyfoo, S

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare auto immune disease characterized by a local or diffuse skin condition and a variable visceral impairment. Anti nuclear antibodies (ANA) can be found in 95 % of patients. The most frequent are the anti topoisomerase 1 or anti Scl 70 and the anti-centromeres. Other antibodies have been reported but they are not conventionally sought in clinical practice. They are referred to as " non identified " ANA. To seek the " non identified " antibodies in patients with scleroderma at Erasme Hospital, to assess their prevalence in this cohort and to correlate their presence with the clinical characteristics. 89 patients out of the cohort of Erasme hospital patients with scleroderma have been looked at. Their clinical and biological data have been identified and a detection of antibodies have been performed by first an immonudot technique and second an EliA technique. 17 out of the 89 patients of our cohort had " non identified " ANA. Among them, antibodies in 11 patients have been identified by the immunodot, among which 7 anti-PmScl 75 and/or 100,3 RNA polymerase III and 1 antifibrillarin. The EliA technique identif ied antibodies in 10 patients among which 5 anti- PmScl, 2 anti RNA polymerase, 2 anti-fibrillarin and 1 anti-centromere. Auto antibodies other than the antitopoisomerase and anti-centromere have been found in patients with scleroderma in our cohort. Certain links exist between the presence of a given antibody and clinical features. We still have to define whether there exist other auto antibodies of which we still are unaware since in some patient no antibodies were detected.

  7. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  8. In Vitro Assembly of Human H/ACA Small Nucleolar RNPs Reveals Unique Features of U17 and Telomerase RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Dragon, François; Pogačić, Vanda; Filipowicz, Witold

    2000-01-01

    The H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are involved in pseudouridylation of pre-rRNAs. They usually fold into a two-domain hairpin-hinge-hairpin-tail structure, with the conserved motifs H and ACA located in the hinge and tail, respectively. Synthetic RNA transcripts and extracts from HeLa cells were used to reconstitute human U17 and other H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) in vitro. Competition and UV cross-linking experiments showed that proteins of about 60, 29, 23, and 14 kDa interact specifically with U17 RNA. Except for U17, RNPs could be reconstituted only with full-length H/ACA snoRNAs. For U17, the 3′-terminal stem-loop followed by box ACA (U17/3′st) was sufficient to form an RNP, and U17/3′st could compete other full-length H/ACA snoRNAs for assembly. The H/ACA-like domain that constitutes the 3′ moiety of human telomerase RNA (hTR), and its 3′-terminal stem-loop (hTR/3′st), also could form an RNP by binding H/ACA proteins. Hence, the 3′-terminal stem-loops of U17 and hTR have some specific features that distinguish them from other H/ACA RNAs. Antibodies that specifically recognize the human GAR1 (hGAR1) protein could immunoprecipitate H/ACA snoRNAs and hTR from HeLa cell extracts, which demonstrates that hGAR1 is a component of H/ACA snoRNPs and telomerase in vivo. Moreover, we show that in vitro-reconstituted RNPs contain hGAR1 and that binding of hGAR1 does not appear to be a prerequisite for the assembly of the other H/ACA proteins. PMID:10757788

  9. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  10. 18 CFR 154.402 - ACA expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false ACA expenditures. 154.402 Section 154.402 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154...

  11. 18 CFR 154.402 - ACA expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false ACA expenditures. 154.402 Section 154.402 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154...

  12. 18 CFR 154.402 - ACA expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ACA expenditures. 154.402 Section 154.402 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154...

  13. 18 CFR 154.402 - ACA expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false ACA expenditures. 154.402 Section 154.402 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154...

  14. 18 CFR 154.402 - ACA expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ACA expenditures. 154.402 Section 154.402 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154...

  15. Alternatives to the ACA's Affordability Firewall.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sarah A; Saltzman, Evan; Cordova, Amado

    2016-05-09

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to increase health insurance coverage while limiting the disruption to individuals with existing sources of insurance coverage, particularly those with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). To limit disruption to those with coverage, the ACA implements the employer mandate, which requires firms with more than 50 employees to offer health insurance or face penalties, and the individual "affordability firewall," which limits subsidies to individuals lacking access to alternative sources of coverage that are "affordable." This article examines the policy impacts of the affordability firewall and investigates two potential modifications. Option 1, which is the "entire family" scenario, involves allowing an exception to the firewall for anyone in a family where the family ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. In Option 2, the "dependents only" scenario, only dependents (and not the worker) become eligible for Marketplace subsidies when the ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. Relative to the ACA, RAND researchers estimate that nongroup enrollment will increase by 4.1 million for Option 1 and by 1.4 million for Option 2. However, the number without insurance only declines by 1.5 million in Option 1 and 0.7 million in Option 2. The difference between the increase in nongroup enrollment and the decrease in uninsurance is primarily due to ESI crowd-out, which is more pronounced for Option 1. Researchers also estimated that about 1.3 million families who have ESI and unsubsidized nongroup coverage under current ACA policy would receive Marketplace subsidies under the alternative affordability firewall scenarios. For these families, health insurance coverage would become substantially more affordable; these families' risk of spending at least 20 percent of income on health care would drop by more than two thirds. We additionally estimated that federal

  16. Autoantibodies in scleroderma and their association with the clinical profile of the disease. A study of 66 patients from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Skare, Thelma Larocca; Fonseca, Adriano Erlon; Luciano, Alan Campos; Azevedo, Pedro Ming

    2011-01-01

    Scleroderma is a fairly rare connective tissue disease whose autoantibody profile is associated with different clinical manifestations. The prevalence of autoantibodies in scleroderma is influenced by race and genetics. To study the prevalence of anti-Scl-70, anti-centromere (ACA) and anti-U1-RNP antibodies in patients with scleroderma in southern Brazil and verify their association with clinical manifestations of the disease. A retrospective study involving 66 patients with scleroderma for the presence of anti-Scl-70, anti-centromere and anti-U1-RNP and of clinical manifestations such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital micro scars, digital necrosis, telangiectasias, calcinosis, pulmonary fibrosis, pleuritis, pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, arthralgia and arthritis, skin sclerosis, joint contractures, tendon friction rubs, pulmonary hypertension, esophageal disorders and renal crisis. The prevalence of anti-Scl-70 was 17.8% , that of ACA was 33.3% and the prevalence of U1 RNP was 11.8%. Anti-Scl-70 was associated with the diffuse form of the disease (p = 0.015), presence of cardiomyopathies (p = 0.016) and digital micro scars (p = 0.05). Anti-centromere was more common in the limited form, although it was not statistically significant, and had a protective role associated with cardiomyopathies (p = 0.005). Anti-U1-RNP was more common in the overlap forms (p = 0.0004). The prevalence and profile of clinical associations of autoantibodies in Brazilian patients with scleroderma are similar to those found in the literature.

  17. Anti-mitochondrial type 5 antibodies and anti-cardiolipin antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and auto-immune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Abuaf, N; Cyna, L; Homberg, J C; Kahn, M F; Ryckewaert, A

    1987-01-01

    Twenty sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and high titre of IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA) were studied in order to evaluate the prevalence of anti-mitochondrial type 5 antibodies (AMA 5). None of these sera were found to be AMA 5 positive but five of 18 were positive for VDRL. Twenty sera from patients with AMA 5 were studied in order to evaluate the prevalence of ACA: only six of 20 were positive for ACA. In contrast to this finding, 15 of the 20 sera positive for AMA 5 were also positive for VDRL (P less than 0.001). The six sera positive for ACA and AMA 5 were absorbed with cardiolipin micelles. This absorption eliminated the ACA activity but not the AMA 5 activity. Despite the clinical similarities between the two groups of patients with AMA 5 or ACA, these data suggest that patients with AMA 5 and patients with ACA belong to two different subsets of SLE or SLE-like syndromes and that AMA 5 antigen is different from cardiolipin. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3311494

  18. Clinical associations of anticentromere antibodies and antibodies to topoisomerase I. A study of 355 patients.

    PubMed

    Weiner, E S; Earnshaw, W C; Senécal, J L; Bordwell, B; Johnson, P; Rothfield, N F

    1988-03-01

    Anticentromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-topoisomerase I (anti-topo I) were assayed in serum samples from 355 patients: 89 with proximal scleroderma; 54 with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasias), without proximal scleroderma; 154 with primary and secondary Raynaud's disease; and 58 with other rheumatic diseases, without Raynaud's disease. Sera from healthy control subjects were also assayed. Using immunoblotting techniques, anti-topo I was detected in 28% of the patients with proximal scleroderma; using immunodiffusion techniques, this antibody was found in only 20% of the same group of patients. Anti-topo I and ACA were found primarily in patients with scleroderma, CREST syndrome, and Raynaud's phenomenon. ACA identified patients with less severe disease, whereas anti-topo I identified patients with skin and cardiac involvement and patients with malignancies.

  19. ACA12 Is a Deregulated Isoform of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Limonta, Margherita; Romanowsky, Shawn; Olivari, Claudio; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Rosenberg, Alexa; Harper, Jeffrey F.; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2014-01-01

    Plant auto-inhibited Ca2+-ATPases (ACA) are crucial in defining the shape of calcium transients and therefore in eliciting plant responses to various stimuli. Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes ten ACA isoforms that can be divided into four clusters based on gene structure and sequence homology. While isoforms from clusters 1, 2 and 4 have been characterized, virtually nothing is known about members of cluster 3 (ACA12 and ACA13). Here we show that a GFP-tagged ACA12 localizes at the plasma membrane and that expression of ACA12 rescues the phenotype of partial male sterility of a null mutant of the plasma membrane isoform ACA9, thus providing genetic evidence that ACA12 is a functional plasma membrane-resident Ca2+-ATPase. By ACA12 expression in yeast and purification by CaM-affinity chromatography, we show that, unlike other ACAs, the activity of ACA12 is not stimulated by CaM. Moreover, full length ACA12 is able to rescue a yeast mutant deficient in calcium pumps. Analysis of single point ACA12 mutants suggests that ACA12 loss of auto-inhibition can be ascribed to the lack of two acidic residues - highly conserved in other ACA isoforms - localized at the cytoplasmic edge of the second and third transmembrane segments. Together, these results support a model in which the calcium pump activity of ACA12 is primarily regulated by increasing or decreasing mRNA expression and/or protein translation and degradation. PMID:24101142

  20. Effects of the ACA on Health Care Cost Containment.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Janet; Marks, Clifford; Pauly, Mark

    2017-02-01

    This brief reviews the evidence on how key ACA provisions have affected the growth of health care costs. Coverage expansions produced a predictable jump in health care spending, amidst a slowdown that began a decade ago. Although we have not returned to the double-digit increases of the past, the authors find little evidence that ACA cost containment provisions produced changes necessary to "bend the cost curve." Cost control will likely play a prominent role in the next round of health reform and will be critical to sustaining coverage gains in the long term.

  1. A Comparitive Study of Anticardiolipin Antibodies among Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients from Western and Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Doley, D; Kakati, S; Saikia, L; Rajadhyaksha, A; Nadkar, Milind; Khadilkar, P; Patwardhan, M; Pradhan, V

    2017-03-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APA) like anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are important cause of venous and arterial thrombosis and other occlusive vascular diseases. Prevalence of these antibodies in SLE patients at the time of diagnosis is not known in Indian SLE patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of ACA in SLE patients from Eastern and Western India and to correlate them with disease activity. Seventy SLE patients from Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, Assam and 85 SLE patients from Rheumatology Department, KEM Hospital, Mumbai were studied. SLE disease activity was evaluated by SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score at the time of evaluation. All patients studied were in an active stage of disease. Demographic data showed significant variations in the clinical manifestations of SLE between two regions. Renal manifestations were higher (42.9%) among SLE patients from Eastern region as compared with 37.6% patients from Western region. These patients were categorized as Lupus Nephritis (LN) and patients that did not show any renal manifestations were categories as non-LN. ACA to IgG and IgM subclasses were tested by ELISA. IgGACA positivity was 20%, 12.9% and IgM-ACA positivity was 18.6%, 12.9% where asIgG + IgM ACA positivity as found in 12.9%, 3.5% patients respectively among SLE patients from Eastern and Western India. ACA positivity was higher among LN patients from Eastern India whereas the same was higher among non-LN patients from Western India. Hence detection of ACA alongwith associated clinical manifestations were helpful to evaluate their possible association with disease severity in SLE patients. A long term follow up of patients having ACA antibodies without thrombotic event is needed to detect their possible thrombotic event in future along with their clinical presentation from these two different geographic regions from India.

  2. Framing, Engagement, and Policy Change: Lessons for the ACA.

    PubMed

    Karch, Andrew; Rosenthal, Aaron

    2017-04-01

    Supporters of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) sometimes speculate that public attitudes toward the law will shift if proponents succeed in focusing attention on its more popular components, but the scholarly literature on framing effects provides ample reason to question their assertion. This article contends that engagement, an alternative rhetorical strategy where advocates address the same policy dimensions as their opponents, is a more promising approach. Extending the engagement literature to the elite context in which most ACA-related decisions are made, it argues that elite-level engagement necessitates the additional task of linking policy change to opponents' broader philosophical and policy goals. Current debates surrounding the application of sales taxes to electronic commerce-a policy arena that seems far removed from health care policy but overlaps with the ACA in ways that make it an appropriate source of lesson drawing-illustrate the potential of an engagement strategy. Recently, many conservative lawmakers who previously opposed policy change have instead embraced online sales taxes as a mechanism for additional tax cuts. Analogous connections may facilitate the diffusion of ACA provisions that presently receive hostile receptions in Republican-leaning states. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  3. 77 FR 65395 - Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program Correction In notice document 2012-26031 appearing on pages 65006-65009 in the issue of October 24, 2012 make the following correction: On page 65007, in the first column, under the...

  4. Medicaid Expansion and ACA Repeal: Evidence From Ohio.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Eric E; Berman, Micah L

    2017-06-01

    To examine the health insurance coverage options for Medicaid expansion enrollees if the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is repealed, using evidence from Ohio, where more than half a million adults have enrolled in the state's Medicaid program through the ACA expansion. The Ohio Medicaid Assessment Survey interviewed 42 000 households in 2015. We report data from a unique battery of questions designed to identify insurance coverage immediately prior to Medicaid enrollment. Ninety-five percent of new Medicaid enrollees in Ohio did not have a private health insurance option immediately before enrollment. These new enrollees are predominantly older, low-income Whites with a high school education or less. Only 5% of new Medicaid enrollees were eligible for an employer-sponsored insurance plan to which they could potentially return in the case of repeal of the ACA. The vast majority of Medicaid expansion enrollees would have no plausible pathway to obtaining private-sector insurance if the ACA were repealed. Demographic similarities between the expansion population and 2016 exit polls suggest that coverage losses would fall disproportionately on members of the winning Republican coalition.

  5. Impact of ACA on the Dinner-for-Three Dynamic.

    PubMed

    Schoonveld, Ed; Coyle, Bill; Markham, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) aims to expand coverage to the previously uninsured, improve the quality of coverage, and help eliminate inefficiencies in the health care market. We evaluated the implications of ACA on the drug industry by examining the impact on the "Dinner-for-Three" dynamic in our health care system. We can think of our system as an odd dinner party in which one person pays (the insurer), one orders the meal (the physician), and yet another eats the meal (the patient). This dynamic requires us to examine each stakeholder and how they interact with one another to assess the impact of the ACA. Of the 6.7 million initial exchange enrollees, ~3.8 million subjects were previously uninsured. A higher percentage of these enrollees are using their pharmacy benefit, and they are disproportionately filling prescriptions for specialty drugs relative to those covered in employer-sponsored plans. Formulary designs in exchange plans are passing on higher cost-sharing for prescription drugs to the patient. ACA has also resulted in the development of accountable care organizations (ACOs); these organizations may play a role going forward in the management of drug spending and the development of formularies and protocols that impact drug prescribing. Payers are tightening control over drug spending and are finding physicians and physician groups increasingly less reluctant allies in doing so. Patients are faced by more complexity than ever in the health care system and are expected to take a more active role in responsibly managing the cost of their care. It is increasingly critical that drug manufacturers develop robust value propositions and communicate that value to all stakeholders. They should re-evaluate trial investment decisions and consider changes in price setting, rebates (how much and to whom), copay programs, and physician and patient support programs in light of changing market needs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  6. ACAS-Xu Initial Self-Separation Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Mike; Baca, Gabe

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this flight test report is to document and report the details of the ACAS Xu (Airborne Collision Avoidance System For Unmanned Aircraft) / Self-Separation flight test series performed at Edwards AFB from November to December of 2014. Included in this document are details about participating aircraft, aircrew, mission crew, system configurations, flight data, flight execution, flight summary, test results, and lessons learned.

  7. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  8. ACA and the Triple Aim: Musings of a Health Care Actuary.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mac

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) promulgated the Triple Aim, which advocates simultaneous improvements in patient experiences, improved population health and lower cost per capita. In 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) promised quality, affordable health care for all Americans. It's fair to assume that the framers of ACA were aware of the Triple Aim, and it is likely that much of ACA was heavily influenced by IHI's positions. So it is reasonable, from time to time, to assess ACA's impact on health care against the Triple Aim principles.

  9. Influence of antiphospholipid antibody positivity on glomerular filtration rate markers in a group of systemic sclerosis patients - a 24-month observation.

    PubMed

    Wielosz, Ewa; Majdan, Maria; Koszarny, Arkadiusz; Dryglewska, Magdalena; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was the assessment of changes in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) during long-term observation in a group of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with and without chronic antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity. The observation comprised 50 patients - 23 with diffuse cutaneous SSc - dcSSc and 27 limited cutaneous SSc - lcSSc. After 24 months we assessed 27 patients (9 died, 14 lost follow up); 24 patients (88%) were treated chronically with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). Patients were investigated for the presence of aPL: to cardiolipin and to β2 glycoprotein I in IgM and IgG classes. Serum levels of creatinine (S-Cr), cystatin C and creatinine clearance values were determined in all patients. According to the presence of a significant level of at least one of aPL antibodies, pts were divided into groups: group I aPL positive: 14 patients, group II aPL negative - 13 patients. We did not find significant differences in S-Cr, cystatin C levels and creatinine clearance before and after 24 months of observation between both groups. In follow up observations, the presence of anti-centromere antibodies was significantly more frequent in the aPL positive, as compared to the aPL negative group (p = 0.01). In follow up observations, the level of anticardiolipin antibodies in IgG class was significantly higher in dcSSc compared to lcSSc patients (p = 0.02). In long-term observation chronic positivity for aPL antibodies does not significantly decrease the GFR in patients with SSc treated with ACEIs.

  10. Increased frequency of class I and II anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma and associated factors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tozkir, Hilmi; Pamuk, Omer Nuri; Duymaz, Julide; Gurkan, Hakan; Yazar, Metin; Sari, Gulce; Tanrikulu, Hazel; Pamuk, Gulsum Emel

    2016-12-01

    There is significant autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and scleroderma (SSc); microchimerism is also thought to play a role in pathogenesis. We determined the frequency of anti-HLA antibodies in SLE and SSc patients and evaluated associated clinical factors. We included 77 SLE patients, 46 SSc patients and 53 healthy controls into the study. Clinical data about the patients were obtained from hospital records. Anti-human leukocyte (anti-HLA) antigen antibody analysis of sera was performed by applying Lifecodes anti-HLA Class I and Class II Screening kits based on xMAP technology. The frequencies of class I and II anti-HLA antibodies were significantly higher in SLE (27.3% and 41.6%) and SSc (26.1% and 41.3%) groups than in healthy controls (1.9% and 5.7%) (all P < 0.001). Frequencies of thrombocytopenia (P = 0.021), anti-ribonucleoprotein (P = 0.037) and anti-Ro (P = 0.027) were significantly higher in the class I antibody-positive SLE group; however, pericarditis was less frequent (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the class II antibody-positive SLE group had more frequent anti-ribosomal P antibody (P = 0.038), but less frequent active disease (P = 0.038). In the SSc group, class I antibody-positive patients had more frequent digital ulcers (P = 0.048) and anti-centromere antibodies (P = 0.01). There was no association of anti-HLA antibodies with pulmonary hypertension and interstitial fibrosis in SSc patients. Both class I and class II antibodies were found to be significantly increased in SLE and SSc. Rather than major organ involvement, anti-HLA antibodies were associated with the presence of other antibodies in both diseases. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Community Benefit Spending By Tax-Exempt Hospitals Changed Little After ACA.

    PubMed

    Young, Gary J; Flaherty, Stephen; Zepeda, E David; Singh, Simone Rauscher; Rosen Cramer, Geri

    2018-01-01

    Provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) encouraged tax-exempt hospitals to invest broadly in community health benefits. Four years after the ACA's enactment, hospitals had increased their average spending for all community benefits by 0.5 percentage point, from 7.6 percent of their operating expenses in 2010 to 8.1 percent in 2014.

  12. Defining the Field: Revisiting the ACA 1995 Definition of Communication Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Charles J.; Morreale, Sherwyn P.; Boileau, Don M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of Association for Communication Administration (ACA) members concerning their awareness and use of the 1995 ACA Definition of the Field of Communication. Finds that 40% of administrators who responded were unaware of the definition. Urges the need to further promote the definition of the field. (NH)

  13. 76 FR 20352 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding Notice of Intent to award Affordable Care Act (ACA) funding to two Emerging Infections Program (EIP) grantees, the Connecticut Department of Public Health and... grantees' Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 non-competitive continuation applications under funding opportunity CI05...

  14. New Mandates and Imperatives in the Revised "ACA Code of Ethics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David M.; Kocet, Michael M.; Cottone, R. Rocco; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Miranti, Judith G.; Moll, E. Christine; Bloom, John W.; Bringaze, Tammy B.; Herlihy, Barbara; Lee, Courtland C.; Tarvydas, Vilia M.

    2009-01-01

    The first major revision of the "ACA Code of Ethics" in a decade occurred in late 2005, with the updated edition containing important new mandates and imperatives. This article provides interviews with members of the Ethics Revision Task Force that flesh out seminal changes in the revised "ACA Code of Ethics" in the areas of confidentiality,…

  15. A Critical Examination of the Assessment Analysis Capabilities of OCLC ACAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lucy E.

    2005-01-01

    Over 500 libraries have employed OCLC's iCAS and its successor Automated Collection Assessment and Analysis Services (ACAS) as bibliometric tools to evaluate monograph collections. This examination of ACAS reveals both its methodological limitations and its feasibility as an indicator of collecting patterns. The results can be used to maximize the…

  16. Revisiting the structure/function relationships of H/ACA(-like) RNAs: a unified model for Euryarchaea and Crenarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Gautheret, Daniel; Leclerc, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    A structural and functional classification of H/ACA and H/ACA-like motifs is obtained from the analysis of the H/ACA guide RNAs which have been identified previously in the genomes of Euryarchaea (Pyrococcus) and Crenarchaea (Pyrobaculum). A unified structure/function model is proposed based on the common structural determinants shared by H/ACA and H/ACA-like motifs in both Euryarchaea and Crenarchaea. Using a computational approach, structural and energetic rules for the guide:target RNA-RNA interactions are derived from structural and functional data on the H/ACA RNP particles. H/ACA(-like) motifs found in Pyrococcus are evaluated through the classification and their biological relevance is discussed. Extra-ribosomal targets found in both Pyrococcus and Pyrobaculum might support the hypothesis of a gene regulation mediated by H/ACA(-like) guide RNAs in archaea. PMID:26240384

  17. ACA12 is a deregulated isoform of plasma membrane Ca²⁺-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Limonta, Margherita; Romanowsky, Shawn; Olivari, Claudio; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Rosenberg, Alexa; Harper, Jeffrey F; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2014-03-01

    Plant auto-inhibited Ca²⁺-ATPases (ACA) are crucial in defining the shape of calcium transients and therefore in eliciting plant responses to various stimuli. Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes ten ACA isoforms that can be divided into four clusters based on gene structure and sequence homology. While isoforms from clusters 1, 2 and 4 have been characterized, virtually nothing is known about members of cluster 3 (ACA12 and ACA13). Here we show that a GFP-tagged ACA12 localizes at the plasma membrane and that expression of ACA12 rescues the phenotype of partial male sterility of a null mutant of the plasma membrane isoform ACA9, thus providing genetic evidence that ACA12 is a functional plasma membrane-resident Ca²⁺-ATPase. By ACA12 expression in yeast and purification by CaM-affinity chromatography, we show that, unlike other ACAs, the activity of ACA12 is not stimulated by CaM. Moreover, full length ACA12 is able to rescue a yeast mutant deficient in calcium pumps. Analysis of single point ACA12 mutants suggests that ACA12 loss of auto-inhibition can be ascribed to the lack of two acidic residues--highly conserved in other ACA isoforms--localized at the cytoplasmic edge of the second and third transmembrane segments. Together, these results support a model in which the calcium pump activity of ACA12 is primarily regulated by increasing or decreasing mRNA expression and/or protein translation and degradation.

  18. [Analysis of AC/A ratio after myopic excimer laser in situ keratomileusis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-ying; Liu, Shuang-zhen

    2003-03-01

    To study the changes of AC/A ratio of myopia after excimer laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). 135 myopia patients were treated by LASIK, their AC/A ratios were measured with synoptohore before surgery and 3 months after surgery. The average AC/A ratios of naked eyes or eyes wearing glasses before surgery and the naked after surgery were (0.724 +/- 0.587) (Delta)/D, (2.754 +/- 1.565) (Delta)/D, (1.618 +/- 1.027) (Delta)/D in turn. There were significant difference among those groups (P < 0.001). That also appeared in different degree of myopia naked before surgery (P < 0.01). We found no significant difference between the groups wearing glasses before surgery and naked after surgery (P > 0.05). A positive correlation was built up between postoperative AC/A ratio and AC/A ratio of wearing glasses or refractive diopter before surgery (r = 0.550, P < 0.001; r = 0.185, P < 0.005). And the postoperative AC/A ratios had a negative correlation to age or length of ocular axis (r = -0.340, P < 0.001; r = -0.192, P < 0.002). The regression equation for postoperative AC/A ratios was figured out as Y((Delta)/D) = 4.080 0 - 0.031 8X(1) - 0.097 1X(2) + 0.325 0X(3) (P < 0.001). X(1) = age (year), X(2) = length of ocular axis (mm), X(3) = preoperative AC/A ratio with weaning glasses ((Delta)/D). The naked AC/A ratios are higher than the preoperative's after LASIK, but lower than the wearing glasses's before surgery. It is influenced by the factors, such as: the preoperative AC/A ratio of wearing glasses, the length of ocular axis and the age.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  20. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... been associated with reproductive difficulties, such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia , premature delivery, and in-vitro fertilization failure Thyroglobulin antibody TgAb Thyroid cancer ; Hashimoto thyroiditis Whenever a thyroglobulin test is performed to see if the antibody is ...

  1. Efficient RNA pseudouridylation by eukaryotic H/ACA ribonucleoproteins requires high affinity binding and correct positioning of guide RNA

    PubMed Central

    Caton, Evan A; Kelly, Erin K; Kamalampeta, Rajashekhar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (H/ACA RNPs) are responsible for introducing many pseudouridines into RNAs, but are also involved in other cellular functions. Utilizing a purified and reconstituted yeast H/ACA RNP system that is active in pseudouridine formation under physiological conditions, we describe here the quantitative characterization of H/ACA RNP formation and function. This analysis reveals a surprisingly tight interaction of H/ACA guide RNA with the Cbf5p–Nop10p–Gar1p trimeric protein complex whereas Nhp2p binds comparably weakly to H/ACA guide RNA. Substrate RNA is bound to H/ACA RNPs with nanomolar affinity which correlates with the GC content in the guide-substrate RNA base pairing. Both Nhp2p and the conserved Box ACA element in guide RNA are required for efficient pseudouridine formation, but not for guide RNA or substrate RNA binding. These results suggest that Nhp2p and the Box ACA motif indirectly facilitate loading of the substrate RNA in the catalytic site of Cbf5p by correctly positioning the upper and lower parts of the H/ACA guide RNA on the H/ACA proteins. In summary, this study provides detailed insight into the molecular mechanism of H/ACA RNPs. PMID:29177505

  2. How Have Health Insurers Performed Financially Under the ACA' Market Rules?

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Hall, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) transformed the market for individual health insurance, so it is not surprising that insurers' transition was not entirely smooth. Insurers, with no previous experience under these market conditions, were uncertain how to price their products. As a result, they incurred significant losses. Based on this experience, some insurers have decided to leave the ACA’s subsidized market, although others appear to be thriving. Examine the financial performance of health insurers selling through the ACA's marketplace exchanges in 2015--the market’s most difficult year to date. Analysis of financial data for 2015 reported by insurers from 48 states and D.C. to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Although health insurers were profitable across all lines of business, they suffered a 10 percent loss in 2015 on their health plans sold through the ACA's exchanges. The top quarter of the ACA exchange market was comfortably profitable, while the bottom quarter did much worse than the ACA market average. This indicates that some insurers were able to adapt to the ACA's new market rules much better than others, suggesting the ACA's new market structure is sustainable, if supported properly by administrative policy.

  3. Changes in stimulus and response AC/A ratio with vision therapy in Convergence Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Mani, Revathy; Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana

    To evaluate the changes in the stimulus and response Accommodative Convergence to Accommodation (AC/A) ratio following vision therapy (VT) in Convergence Insufficiency (CI). Stimulus and response AC/A ratio were measured on twenty five CI participants, pre and post 10 sessions of VT. Stimulus AC/A ratio was measured using the gradient method and response AC/A ratio was calculated using modified Thorington technique with accommodative responses measured using WAM-5500 open-field autorefractor. The gradient stimulus and response AC/A cross-link ratios were compared with thirty age matched controls. Mean age of the CI and control participants were 23.3±5.2 years and 22.7±4.2 years, respectively. The mean stimulus and response AC/A ratio for CI pre therapy was 2.2±0.72 and 6.3±2.0 PD/D that changed to 4.2±0.9 and 8.28±3.31 PD/D respectively post vision therapy and these changes were statistically significant (paired t-test; p<0.001). The mean stimulus and response AC/A ratio for controls was 3.1±0.81 and 8.95±2.5 PD/D respectively. Stimulus and response AC/A ratio increased following VT, accompanied by clinically significant changes in vergence and accommodation parameters in subjects with convergence insufficiency. This represents the plasticity of the AC/A crosslink ratios that could be achieved with vision therapy in CI. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Human intron-encoded Alu RNAs are processed and packaged into Wdr79-associated nucleoplasmic box H/ACA RNPs

    PubMed Central

    Jády, Beáta E.; Ketele, Amandine; Kiss, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Alu repetitive sequences are the most abundant short interspersed DNA elements in the human genome. Full-length Alu elements are composed of two tandem sequence monomers, the left and right Alu arms, both derived from the 7SL signal recognition particle RNA. Since Alu elements are common in protein-coding genes, they are frequently transcribed into pre-mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that the right arms of nascent Alu transcripts synthesized within pre-mRNA introns are processed into metabolically stable small RNAs. The intron-encoded Alu RNAs, termed AluACA RNAs, are structurally highly reminiscent of box H/ACA small Cajal body (CB) RNAs (scaRNAs). They are composed of two hairpin units followed by the essential H (AnAnnA) and ACA box motifs. The mature AluACA RNAs associate with the four H/ACA core proteins: dyskerin, Nop10, Nhp2, and Gar1. Moreover, the 3′ hairpin of AluACA RNAs carries two closely spaced CB localization motifs, CAB boxes (UGAG), which bind Wdr79 in a cumulative fashion. In contrast to canonical H/ACA scaRNPs, which concentrate in CBs, the AluACA RNPs accumulate in the nucleoplasm. Identification of 348 human AluACA RNAs demonstrates that intron-encoded AluACA RNAs represent a novel, large subgroup of H/ACA RNAs, which are apparently confined to human or primate cells. PMID:22892240

  5. Frequency of distracting tasks people do while driving : an analysis of the ACAS FOT data.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-06-01

    This report describes further analysis of data from the advanced collision avoidance system (ACAS) field operational test, a naturalistic driving study. To determine how distracted and nondistracted driving differ, a stratified sample of 2,914 video ...

  6. Driving performance analysis of the ACAS FOT data and recommendations for a driving workload manager.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-12-01

    This report contains analyses of driving performance data from the Advanced Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) Field Operational Test (FOT), with data from nearly 100 drivers and over 100,000 miles of driving. The analyses compared normal and distract...

  7. Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA): a Large Scale Functional Connectivity Data Mining Environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Nixon, Erika; Herskovits, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to study functional connectivity is of great importance to understand normal development and function as well as a host of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Seed-based analysis is one of the most widely used rs-fMRI analysis methods. Here we describe a freely available large scale functional connectivity data mining software package called Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA). ACA enables large-scale seed-based analysis and brain-behavior analysis. It can seamlessly examine a large number of seed regions with minimal user input. ACA has a brain-behavior analysis component to delineate associations among imaging biomarkers and one or more behavioral variables. We demonstrate applications of ACA to rs-fMRI data sets from a study of autism.

  8. How do distracted and normal driving differ : an analysis of the ACAS naturalistic driving data

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-05-01

    To determine how distracted and normal driving differ, this report re-examines : driving performance data from the advanced collision avoidance system (ACAS) field : operational test (FOT), a naturalistic driving study (96 drivers, 136,792 miles). : ...

  9. 78 FR 2445 - Notice of Intent To Renew the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA) Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... and partners for its ongoing operational effectiveness. Apart from the ACA, there is no single..., veterans, women, minorities and other under-utilized and disadvantaged populations; and (5) efforts to...

  10. Grandfathered, Grandmothered, And ACA-Compliant Health Plans Have Equivalent Premiums.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Heidi; Gabel, Jon R; Satorius, Jennifer L; Green, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Many small employers offer employees health plans that are not fully compliant with Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions such as covering preventive services without cost sharing. These "grandfathered" and "grandmothered" plans accounted for about 65 percent of enrollment in the small-group market in 2014. Premium costs for these and ACA-compliant plans were equivalent. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. STA-ACA bypass using the ipsilateral free STA graft as an interposition graft and A3-A3 anastomosis for treatment of bilateral ACA steno-occlusive ischemia.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Agata, Masahiro; Ito, Kiyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2018-04-01

    Anterior cerebral artery (ACA)-related ischemia is a rare entity in patients with atherosclerosis. Some surgical treatments are reported to date. We present the modification of intracranial-intracranial and intracranial-extracranial bypasses for symptomatic bilateral ACA steno-occlusive disease. The A3-A3 bypass followed by the superficial temporal artery-ACA bypass using the ipsilateral free superficial temporal artery graft is useful without harvesting of the radial artery. Bilateral ACA steno-occlusive induced ischemia can be treated with tailored bypass procedures.

  12. The Response AC/A Ratio Before and After the Onset of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the ratio of accommodative convergence per diopter of accommodative response (AC/A ratio) before, during, and after myopia onset. Methods Subjects were 698 children aged 6 to 14 years who became myopic and 430 emmetropic children participating in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error. Refractive error was measured using cycloplegic autorefraction, near work by parent survey, and the AC/A ratio by simultaneously monitoring convergence and accommodative response. The response AC/A ratios of children who became myopic were compared with age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates for emmetropic children from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. Results The response AC/A ratio was not significantly different between the two groups 5 years before onset, then increased monotonically in children who became myopic until reaching a plateau at myopia onset of about 7 Δ/D compared to about 4 Δ/D for children who remained emmetropic (differences between groups significant at P < 0.01 from 4 years before onset through 5 years after onset). A higher AC/A ratio was associated with greater accommodative lag but not with the rate of myopia progression regardless of the level of near work. Conclusions An increasing AC/A ratio is an early sign of becoming myopic, is related to greater accommodative lag, but does not affect the rate of myopia progression. The association with accommodative lag suggests that the AC/A ratio increase is from greater neural effort needed per diopter of accommodation rather than change in the accommodative convergence crosslink gain relationship. PMID:28291868

  13. Combining native MS approaches to decipher archaeal box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particle structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Saliou, Jean-Michel; Manival, Xavier; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Atmanene, Cédric; Bobo, Claude; Branlant, Christiane; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Charpentier, Bruno; Cianférani, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Site-specific isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in RNAs is catalyzed either by stand-alone enzymes or by box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (sno/sRNPs). The archaeal box H/ACA sRNPs are five-component complexes that consist of a guide RNA and the aCBF5, aNOP10, L7Ae, and aGAR1 proteins. In this study, we performed pairwise incubations of individual constituents of archaeal box H/ACA sRNPs and analyzed their interactions by native MS to build a 2D-connectivity map of direct binders. We describe the use of native MS in combination with ion mobility-MS to monitor the in vitro assembly of the active H/ACA sRNP particle. Real-time native MS was used to monitor how box H/ACA particle functions in multiple-turnover conditions. Native MS also unambiguously revealed that a substrate RNA containing 5-fluorouridine (f(5) U) was hydrolyzed into 5-fluoro-6-hydroxy-pseudouridine (f(5) ho(6) Ψ). In terms of enzymatic mechanism, box H/ACA sRNP was shown to catalyze the pseudouridylation of a first RNA substrate, then to release the RNA product (S22 f(5) ho(6) ψ) from the RNP enzyme and reload a new substrate RNA molecule. Altogether, our native MS-based approaches provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process and catalytic mechanism of box H/ACA RNPs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. 76 FR 41261 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, EH10-1003

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... activities including prevention research and health screenings, such as the Community Transformation Grant Program, the Education and Outreach Campaign for Preventative Benefits, and Immunization Programs. The ACA...

  15. The Italian Registry of Antiphospholipid Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, G

    1997-01-01

    The clinical importance of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) derives from their association with a syndrome of venous and arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss and thrombocytopenia known as the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The Italian Registry of Antiphospholipid Antibodies was set up in 1989 for the purpose of collecting a large number of patients with lupus anticoagulant (LA) or anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) for clinical studies in order to obtain more information on the clinical features of APS. The Italian Registry has completed two clinical studies and proposed an international trial on the treatment of APS patients. These activities of the Registry are reviewed herein. Additional information has been obtained from pertinent articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index and Medline. The first study of the Registry was a retrospective analysis of enrolled patients which showed that: a) the prevalence of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia was similar in cases with idiopathic APA or APA secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus, and b) the rate of thrombosis was significantly reduced in patients with severe thrombocytopenia but not in those with only a mild reduction of the platelet count. The second study was a prospective survey of the natural history of the disease, showing that a) previous thrombosis and ACA titer > 40 units were independent predictors of subsequent vascular complications; b) a history of miscarriage or thrombosis is significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome; c) hematological malignancies can develop during follow-up and patients with APA should be considered at increased risk of developing NHL. Thus the possibility of a hematologic neoplastic disease should be borne in mind in the initial evaluation and during the follow-up of these patients. The latest initiative of the Registry was the proposal of an international, randomized clinical trial (WAPS study) aimed at assessing the

  16. First impressions: geographic variation in media messages during the first phase of ACA implementation.

    PubMed

    Gollust, Sarah E; Barry, Colleen L; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Baum, Laura; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2014-12-01

    Many Americans will learn about the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) through the mass media. We examined geographic variation in the volume and content of mass media during the initial two-week rollout of the new health insurance marketplaces in October 2013 across 210 US media markets, using data from the Wesleyan Media Project. We found substantial geographic variation in the volume and tone of insurance product advertisements, political advertisements, and news coverage of the ACA marketplaces. News coverage of the ACA airing in media markets located in states operating federal or partnership marketplaces was more negative than coverage airing in markets located in states running their own marketplaces. Intrastate variation in media volume and content was also substantial and appears distinguishable from the local political climate. Variation in exposure to media messages likely affects public sentiment regarding the ACA and could contribute to geographic differences in insurance enrollment and public perceptions of US health care options. Researchers and policy makers evaluating the implementation of the ACA-and insurance enrollment in the marketplaces in particular-should consider addressing media influences. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  17. Comparative Analysis of ACAS-Xu and DAIDALUS Detect-and-Avoid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Jason T.; Wu, Minghong G.

    2018-01-01

    The Detect and Avoid (DAA) capability of a recent version (Run 3) of the Airborne Collision Avoidance System-Xu (ACAS-Xu) is measured against that of the Detect and AvoID Alerting Logic for Unmanned Systems (DAIDALUS), a reference algorithm for the Phase 1 Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for DAA. This comparative analysis of the two systems' alerting and horizontal guidance outcomes is conducted through the lens of the Detect and Avoid mission using flight data of scripted encounters from a recent flight test. Results indicate comparable timelines and outcomes between ACAS-Xu's Remain Well Clear alert and guidance and DAIDALUS's corrective alert and guidance, although ACAS-Xu's guidance appears to be more conservative. ACAS-Xu's Collision Avoidance alert and guidance occurs later than DAIDALUS's warning alert and guidance, and overlaps with DAIDALUS's timeline of maneuver to remain Well Clear. Interesting discrepancies between ACAS-Xu's directive guidance and DAIDALUS's "Regain Well Clear" guidance occur in some scenarios.

  18. Effects Of The ACA's Health Insurance Marketplaces On The Previously Uninsured: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Anna L; McCormick, Danny; Haas, Jennifer S; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2018-04-01

    Descriptive studies have suggested that the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) health insurance Marketplaces improved access to care. However, no evidence from quasi-experimental studies is available to support these findings. We used longitudinal survey data to compare previously uninsured adults with incomes that made them eligible for subsidized Marketplace coverage (138-400 percent of the federal poverty level) to those who had employer-sponsored insurance before the ACA with incomes in the same range. Among the previously uninsured group, the ACA led to a significant decline in the uninsurance rate, decreased barriers to medical care, increased the use of outpatient services and prescription drugs, and increased diagnoses of hypertension, compared to a control group with stable employer-sponsored insurance. Changes were largest among previously uninsured people with incomes of 138-250 percent of poverty, who were eligible for the ACA's cost-sharing reductions. Our quasi-experimental approach provides rigorous new evidence that the ACA's Marketplaces led to improvements in several important health care outcomes, particularly among low-income adults.

  19. Estimating the Counterfactual: How Many Uninsured Adults Would There Be Today Without the ACA?

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Linda J; Garrett, Bowen; Holahan, John

    2016-01-01

    Time lags in receiving data from long-standing, large federal surveys complicate real-time estimation of the coverage effects of full Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation. Fast-turnaround household surveys fill some of the void in data on recent changes to insurance coverage, but they lack the historical data that allow analysts to account for trends that predate the ACA, economic fluctuations, and earlier public program expansions when predicting how many people would be uninsured without comprehensive health care reform. Using data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) from 2000 to 2012 and the Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) data for 2013 and 2015, this article develops an approach to estimate the number of people who would be uninsured in the absence of the ACA and isolates the change in coverage as of March 2015 that can be attributed to the ACA. We produce counterfactual forecasts of the number of uninsured absent the ACA for 9 age-income groups and compare these estimates with 2015 estimates based on HRMS relative coverage changes applied to CPS-based population estimates. As of March 2015, we find the ACA has reduced the number of uninsured adults by 18.1 million compared with the number who would have been uninsured at that time had the law not been implemented. That decline represents a 46% reduction in the number of nonelderly adults without insurance. The approach developed here can be applied to other federal data and timely surveys to provide a range of estimates of the overall effects of reform. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Prevalence, significance and predictive value of antiphospholipid antibodies in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sipeki, Nora; Davida, Laszlo; Palyu, Eszter; Altorjay, Istvan; Harsfalvi, Jolan; Antal Szalmas, Peter; Szabo, Zoltan; Veres, Gabor; Shums, Zakera; Norman, Gary L; Lakatos, Peter L; Papp, Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence and stability of different antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs) and their association with disease phenotype and progression in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) patients. METHODS: About 458 consecutive patients [Crohn’s disease (CD): 271 and ulcerative colitis (UC): 187] were enrolled into a follow-up cohort study in a tertiary IBD referral center in Hungary. Detailed clinical phenotypes were determined at enrollment by reviewing the patients’ medical charts. Disease activity, medical treatment and data about evolvement of complications or surgical interventions were determined prospectively during the follow-up. Disease course (development f complicated disease phenotype and need for surgery), occurrence of thrombotic events, actual state of disease activity according to clinical, laboratory and endoscopic scores and accurate treatment regime were recorded during the follow-up, (median, 57.4 and 61.6 mo for CD and UC). Sera of IBD patients and 103 healthy controls (HC) were tested on individual anti-β2-Glycoprotein-I (anti-β2-GPI IgA/M/G), anti-cardiolipin (ACA IgA/M/G) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (anti-PS/PT IgA/M/G) antibodies and also anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA IgA/G) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a subgroup of CD (n = 198) and UC patients (n = 103), obtaining consecutive samples over various arbitrary time-points during the disease course, we evaluated the intraindividual stability of the APLA status. Additionally, we provide an overview of studies, performed so far, in which significance of APLAs in IBD were assessed. RESULTS: Patients with CD had significantly higher prevalence of both ACA (23.4%) and anti-PS/PT (20.4%) antibodies than UC (4.8%, P < 0.0001 and 10.2%, P = 0.004) and HC (2.9%, P < 0.0001 and 15.5%, P = NS). No difference was found for the prevalence of anti-β2-GPI between different groups (7.2%-9.7%). In CD, no association was found between APLA and ASCA

  1. 76 FR 41263 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, EH10-1004

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, EH10-1004 Notice of Intent to award Affordable Care Act (ACA) funding to National Association for Public Health Statistics and Information Systems... under funding opportunity EH10-1004, ``National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program.'' AGENCY...

  2. 76 FR 59703 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, RFA-TP-08-001

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, RFA- TP-08-001 AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... of Intent to award Affordable Care Act (ACA) funding to Preparedness and Emergency Response Research... continuation application under Funding Opportunity Announcement RFA-TP- 08-001, ``Preparedness and Emergency...

  3. 75 FR 57819 - Notice of Revision; Notice of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA) Open Meeting and New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Notice of Revision; Notice of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA) Open Meeting and New Members AGENCY: Employment and Training... that the Committee Charter has been recently renewed. The current 2009 ACA charter remains in effect...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Dairy Isolate Lactobacillus acidipiscis ACA-DC 1533.

    PubMed

    Kazou, Maria; Alexandraki, Voula; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2017-01-26

    Lactobacillus acidipiscis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of L. acidipiscis isolated from traditional Greek Kopanisti cheese. Strain ACA-DC 1533 may play a key role in the strong organoleptic characteristics of Kopanisti cheese. Copyright © 2017 Kazou et al.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Dairy Isolate Lactobacillus acidipiscis ACA-DC 1533

    PubMed Central

    Kazou, Maria; Alexandraki, Voula; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactobacillus acidipiscis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of L. acidipiscis isolated from traditional Greek Kopanisti cheese. Strain ACA-DC 1533 may play a key role in the strong organoleptic characteristics of Kopanisti cheese. PMID:28126948

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Yogurt Isolate Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ACA-DC 87.

    PubMed

    Alexandraki, Voula; Kazou, Maria; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2017-08-24

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is widely used in the production of yogurt and cheese. In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ACA-DC 87 isolated from traditional Greek yogurt. Whole-genome analysis may reveal desirable technological traits of the strain for dairy fermentations. Copyright © 2017 Alexandraki et al.

  7. 75 FR 56578 - Renewal of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA), and an Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... the ACA Co-Chairs Regulatory Update on CFR 29.29 and CFR 29.30 Future Opportunities and Challenges for... President, Training and Development, Independent Electrical Contractors, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia. Mr.... Liz Elvin, Senior Director, Workforce Development, AGC of America, Arlington, Virginia. Mr. Frederick...

  8. 77 FR 39516 - Notice of a Public Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    .... Department of Labor, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. The ACA is..., 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Designated... Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Room N-5311, Washington, DC 20210...

  9. 77 FR 75195 - Notice of a Virtual Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Office of Apprenticeship's (OA) homepage: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/ . The ACA is a discretionary... will be prominently posted on the OA homepage: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/ . Members of the public are... OA's homepage: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/ . All meeting participants, whether attending virtually or...

  10. 77 FR 62264 - Notice of a Virtual Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... from the Office of Apprenticeship's (OA) homepage: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/ . The ACA is a... instructions to participate in this meeting will be prominently posted on the OA homepage: http://www.doleta... meeting. All meeting updates will be posted to OA's homepage: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/ . All meeting...

  11. ACA: Phoenix of-or Cooked in-This Dumpster Fire of an Election.

    PubMed

    Kirkner, Richard Mark

    2016-10-01

    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump promise divergent approaches to the ACA if elected. Basically, Clinton wants to improve it; Trump promises to dismantle it. Of course, no president acts in a vacuum, and a lot will also depend on which party controls Congress.

  12. A search for H/ACA snoRNAs in yeast using MFE secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Sverker; Gardner, Paul P; Poole, Anthony M; Hendy, Michael D; Penny, David; Moulton, Vincent

    2003-05-01

    Noncoding RNA genes produce functional RNA molecules rather than coding for proteins. One such family is the H/ACA snoRNAs. Unlike the related C/D snoRNAs these have resisted automated detection to date. We develop an algorithm to screen the yeast genome for novel H/ACA snoRNAs. To achieve this, we introduce some new methods for facilitating the search for noncoding RNAs in genomic sequences which are based on properties of predicted minimum free-energy (MFE) secondary structures. The algorithm has been implemented and can be generalized to enable screening of other eukaryote genomes. We find that use of primary sequence alone is insufficient for identifying novel H/ACA snoRNAs. Only the use of secondary structure filters reduces the number of candidates to a manageable size. From genomic context, we identify three strong H/ACA snoRNA candidates. These together with a further 47 candidates obtained by our analysis are being experimentally screened.

  13. [Effect of Acaí (Euterpe oleracea) on biological expression characteristics of deficiency-heat and deficiency-cold rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Yuan; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Ying-Li; Wang, Zi-Chen; He, Cheng; Qu, Yan; Wang, Sha

    2016-10-01

    To study the effects of Acaí on biological expression characteristics in rats with deficiency-heat and deficiency-cold syndromes, SD rats were divided into blank group, deficiency-heat model group, deficiency-heat+Phellodendri Chinensis Cortex group, deficiency-heat+Acaí high dose and low dose groups, deficiency-cold model group, deficiency-cold+Cinnamomi Cortex group, deficiency-cold+Acaí high dose and low dose groups. The rats were treated with intramuscular injection of hydrocortisone (20 mg•kg⁻¹) or dexamethasone sodium phosphate (0.35 mg•kg⁻¹) for 21 days to set up deficiency-heat model and deficiency-cold models. The levels of cAMP, cGMP, T3, T4 and rT3 were detected by radioimmunoassay. The levels of TP, UA, TC, TG and ALB were detected by colorimetry. The level of cAMP, cAMP/cGMP in serum were reduced in Acaí high dose group (P<0.05, P<0.001). The levels of T3, T4 and rT3 were significantly reduced in the Acaí high dose group (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.05). The levels of TP, UA, TC, TG and ALB were significantly reduced in the Acaí high dose group (P<0.001, P<0.05, P<0.05, P<0.05, P<0.01). However, Acaí had no obvious effects on deficiency-cold models. Acaí showed the same effect with Phellodendri Chinensis Cortex in adjusting the levels of deficiency-heat rats; but unlike Cinnamomi Cortex, Acaí showed no obvious effects in adjusting the levels of deficiency-cold rats. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  15. Arabidopsis ACA7, encoding a putative auto-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase, is required for normal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Noel; León, Gabriel

    2012-04-01

    Microgametogenesis is a complex process that involves numerous well-coordinated cell activities, ending with the production of pollen grains. Pollen development has been studied at the cytological level in Arabidopsis and other plant species, where its temporal time course has been defined. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is still unclear, since a relative small number of genes and/or processes have been identified as essential for pollen development. We have designed a methodology to select candidate genes for functional analysis, based on transcriptomic data obtained from different stages of pollen development. From our analyses, we selected At2g22950 as a candidate gene; this gene encodes a protein belonging to the auto-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase family, ACA7. Microarray data indicate that ACA7 is expressed exclusively in developing pollen grains, with the highest level of mRNA at the time of the second pollen mitosis. Our RT-PCR experiments showed that ACA7 mRNA is detected exclusively in developing flowers. Confocal microscopy experiments showed a plasma membrane localization for the recombinant GFP:ACA7 protein. We identified two different insertional mutant lines, aca7-1 and aca7-2; plants from both mutant lines displayed a normal vegetative development but showed large amounts of dead pollen grains in mature flowers assayed by Alexander's staining. Histological analysis indicated that abnormalities are detected after the first pollen mitosis and we found a strong correlation between ACA7 mRNA accumulation and the severity of the phenotype. Our results indicate that ACA7 is a plasma membrane protein that has an important role during pollen development, possibly through regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  16. Guide-substrate base-pairing requirement for box H/ACA RNA-guided RNA pseudouridylation.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, Meemanage D; Wu, Guowei; Katz, Raviv; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2018-06-05

    Box H/ACA RNAs are a group of small RNAs found in abundance in eukaryotes (as well as in archaea). Although their sequences differ, eukaryotic box H/ACA RNAs all share the same unique hairpin-hinge-hairpin-tail structure. Almost all of them function as guides that primarily direct pseudouridylation of rRNAs and spliceosomal snRNAs at specific sites. Although box H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation has been extensively studied, the detailed rules governing this reaction, especially those concerning the guide RNA-substrate RNA base-pairing interactions that determine the specificity and efficiency of pseudouridylation, are still not exactly clear. This is particularly relevant given that the lengths of the guide sequences involved in base-pairing vary from one box H/ACA RNA to another. Here, we carry out a detailed investigation into guide-substrate base-pairing interactions, and identify the minimum number of base-pairs (8), required for RNA-guided pseudouridylation. In addition, we find that the pseudouridylation pocket, present in each hairpin of box H/ACA RNA, exhibits flexibility in fitting slightly different substrate sequences. Our results are consistent across three independent pseudouridylation pockets tested, suggesting that our findings are generally applicable to box H/ACA RNA-guided RNA pseudouridylation. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. The ACA's 65th Birthday Challenge: Moving from Medicaid to Medicare.

    PubMed

    Ndumele, Chima D; Sommers, Benjamin D; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded Medicaid to millions of low-income near-elderly Americans, facilitating access to health care services, but did not change income eligibility for Medicaid for those 65 years and older. Therefore, following the ACA's coverage expansion, many newly-insured older enrollees will face a complex insurance transition on their 65th birthday: they will lose Medicaid coverage and transition from Medicaid to Medicare as their primary insurer. This transition in primary health insurance coverage includes changes to benefits, patient cost-sharing, and provider reimbursement, which could have profound consequences on the use of health services and associated health outcomes for low-income seniors. Using data from 2012, we estimate that 1.6 million current Medicaid beneficiaries and an additional 1.6 to 2.9 million low-income individuals who will gain Medicaid coverage under the ACA will be likely to make this transition in the next decade. Primary care physicians and policymakers can help mitigate the potential consequences of this insurance transition by preparing patients for Medicare's more restrictive insurance coverage, encouraging patients to sign up for available low-income subsidies, and understanding how the loss of Medicaid coverage impacts out-of-pocket costs.

  18. The H/ACA RNP assembly factor SHQ1 functions as an RNA mimic.

    PubMed

    Walbott, Hélène; Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Blaud, Magali; Réty, Stéphane; Grozdanov, Petar N; Godin, Kate; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Varani, Gabriele; Meier, U Thomas; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2011-11-15

    SHQ1 is an essential assembly factor for H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for ribosome biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and telomere maintenance. SHQ1 binds dyskerin/NAP57, the catalytic subunit of human H/ACA RNPs, and this interaction is modulated by mutations causing X-linked dyskeratosis congenita. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of yeast SHQ1, Shq1p, and its complex with yeast dyskerin/NAP57, Cbf5p, lacking its catalytic domain. The C-terminal domain of Shq1p interacts with the RNA-binding domain of Cbf5p and, through structural mimicry, uses the RNA-protein-binding sites to achieve a specific protein-protein interface. We propose that Shq1p operates as a Cbf5p chaperone during RNP assembly by acting as an RNA placeholder, thereby preventing Cbf5p from nonspecific RNA binding before association with an H/ACA RNA and the other core RNP proteins.

  19. The H/ACA RNP assembly factor SHQ1 functions as an RNA mimic

    PubMed Central

    Walbott, Hélène; Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Blaud, Magali; Réty, Stéphane; Grozdanov, Petar N.; Godin, Kate; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Varani, Gabriele; Meier, U. Thomas; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    SHQ1 is an essential assembly factor for H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for ribosome biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and telomere maintenance. SHQ1 binds dyskerin/NAP57, the catalytic subunit of human H/ACA RNPs, and this interaction is modulated by mutations causing X-linked dyskeratosis congenita. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of yeast SHQ1, Shq1p, and its complex with yeast dyskerin/NAP57, Cbf5p, lacking its catalytic domain. The C-terminal domain of Shq1p interacts with the RNA-binding domain of Cbf5p and, through structural mimicry, uses the RNA–protein-binding sites to achieve a specific protein–protein interface. We propose that Shq1p operates as a Cbf5p chaperone during RNP assembly by acting as an RNA placeholder, thereby preventing Cbf5p from nonspecific RNA binding before association with an H/ACA RNA and the other core RNP proteins. PMID:22085966

  20. Impact of ACA Health Reforms for People With Mental Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kathleen C; Shartzer, Adele; Kurth, Noelle K; Hall, Jean P

    2018-02-01

    This brief report explores the impact of health reform for people with mental illness. The Health Reform Monitoring Survey was used to examine health insurance, access to care, and employment for 1,550 people with mental health conditions pre- and postimplementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and by state Medicaid expansion status. Multivariate logistic regressions with predictive margins were used. Post-ACA reforms, people with mental health conditions were less likely to be uninsured (5% versus 13%; t=-6.89, df=50, p<.001) and to report unmet need due to cost of mental health care (17% versus 21%; t=-3.16, df=50, p=.002) and any health services (46% versus 51%; t=-3.71, df=50, p<.001), and they were more likely to report a usual source of care (82% versus 76%; t=3.11, df=50, p=.002). These effects were experienced in both Medicaid expansion and nonexpansion states. Findings underscore the importance of ACA improvements in the quality of health insurance coverage.

  1. [A case of acute cerebellar ataxia following infectious mononucleosis accompanied by intrathecal anti-glutamate receptor δ2 antibody].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hidetomo; Iijima, Shoji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted because of sore throat and pain in the epigastric region. On admission, she presented with swollen tonsils and hepatosplenomegaly. Blood examinations revealed the presence of atypical lymphocytes, liver damage and anti-VCA IgM and IgG antibodies. These findings led to diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis. After admission, her condition improved, but on hospital day 4, she suddenly developed cerebellar ataxia in the trunk and four limbs. Cranial MRI findings were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected on hospital day 6 showed normal cell counts and normal concentrations of protein and glucose. EB virus DNA and anti-VCA IgM and IgG antibodies were negative and glutamate receptor δ2 antibody was positive in CSF collected on hospital day 11. We diagnosed acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) and performed methylprednisolone pulse therapy. After this therapy, her cerebellar ataxia improved over a few days. This is the first reported case of ACA after EB virus infection presenting with glutamate receptor δ2 antibody in CSF. The glutamate receptor δ2 subunit is expressed on cerebellar Purkinje cells. Therefore, the presence of the antibody may be associated with cerebellar dysfunction. In the present case, secondary immune reactions after EB virus infection may have produced the antibody.

  2. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  3. Key Provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA): A Systematic Review and Presentation of Early Research Findings.

    PubMed

    French, Michael T; Homer, Jenny; Gumus, Gulcin; Hickling, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    To conduct a systematic literature review of selected major provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) pertaining to expanded health insurance coverage. We present and synthesize research findings from the last 5 years regarding both the immediate and long-term effects of the ACA. We conclude with a summary and offer a research agenda for future studies. We identified relevant articles from peer-reviewed scholarly journals by performing a comprehensive search of major electronic databases. We also identified reports in the "gray literature" disseminated by government agencies and other organizations. Overall, research shows that the ACA has substantially decreased the number of uninsured individuals through the dependent coverage provision, Medicaid expansion, health insurance exchanges, availability of subsidies, and other policy changes. Affordability of health insurance continues to be a concern for many people and disparities persist by geography, race/ethnicity, and income. Early evidence also indicates improvements in access to and affordability of health care. All of these changes are certain to ultimately impact state and federal budgets. The ACA will either directly or indirectly affect almost all Americans. As new and comprehensive data become available, more rigorous evaluations will provide further insights as to whether the ACA has been successful in achieving its goals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Potential impact of ACA-related insurance expansion on trauma care reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W; Upadhyaya, Pooja; Najjar, Peter; Tsai, Thomas C; Scott, Kirstin W; Shrime, Mark G; Cutler, David M; Salim, Ali; Haider, Adil H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Nearly one-quarter of trauma patients are uninsured and hospitals recoup less than 20% of inpatient costs for their care. This study examines changes to hospital reimbursement for inpatient trauma care if the full coverage expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were in effect. Methods We abstracted nonelderly adults (ages 18–64y) admitted for trauma from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) during 2010—the last year prior to most major ACA coverage expansion policies. We calculated national and facility-level reimbursements and trauma-related contribution margins using NIS-supplied cost-to-charge ratios and published reimbursement rates for each payer type. Using US census data, we developed a probabilistic microsimulation model to determine the proportion of pre-ACA uninsured trauma patients that would be expected to gain private insurance, Medicaid, or remain uninsured after full implementation of the ACA. We then estimated the impact of these coverage changes on national and facility-level trauma reimbursement for this population. Results 145,849 patients (representing 737,852 patients nationwide) were included. National inpatient trauma costs for 18–64y patients totaled $14.8 billion (95%CI:12.5,17.1). Pre-expansion reimbursements totaled $13.7 billion (10.8,14.7), yielding a national margin of −7.9% (−10.6, −5.1). Post-expansion projected reimbursements totaled $15.0 billion (12.7,17.3), increasing the margin by 9.3 absolute percentage-points to +1.4% (−0.3,+3.2). Of the 263 eligible facilities, 90 (34.2%) had a positive trauma-related contribution margin in 2010, which increased to 171 (65.0%) using post-expansion projections. Those facilities with the highest proportion of uninsured and racial/ethnic minorities experienced the greatest gains. Conclusion Health insurance coverage expansion for uninsured trauma patients has the potential to increase national reimbursement for inpatient trauma care by over one billion

  5. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  6. Messy but Fair: The ACA's Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program and the Notice-and-Comment Process.

    PubMed

    Pan, Janus

    2017-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) promulgated a new Medicare program called the Value-Based Purchasing Program (VBPP) as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). Like many other regulatory agencies, CMS used the Notice-and-Comment process to issue proposed rules, solicit public comments, and then publish final rules. Conventional literature suggests that CMS should disproportionately favor business interests during the Notice-and-Comment process, mainly due to the business interests' greater resources and capacity to draft well-reasoned comments. However, this article argues against this presumption and contends instead that CMS listens equally well to both business interest comments and private citizen comments during the formation of the VBPP. With regard to the VBPP and the ACA, CMS appears to be resisting disproportionate sway by business interests and is instead privileging the ACA's goal of improving healthcare quality.

  7. Understanding state variation in health insurance dynamics can help tailor enrollment strategies for ACA expansion.

    PubMed

    Graves, John A; Swartz, Katherine

    2013-10-01

    The number and types of people who become eligible for and enroll in the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) health insurance expansions will depend in part on the factors that cause people to become uninsured for different lengths of time. We used a small-area estimation approach to estimate differences across states in percentages of adults losing health insurance and in lengths of their uninsured spells. We found that nearly 50 percent of the nonelderly adult population in Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas--but only 18 percent in Massachusetts and 22 percent in Vermont--experienced an uninsured spell between 2009 and 2012. Compared to people who lost private coverage, those with public insurance were more likely to experience an uninsured spell, but their spells of uninsurance were shorter. We categorized states based on estimated incidence of uninsured spells and the spells' duration. States should tailor their enrollment outreach and retention efforts for the ACA's coverage expansions to address their own mix of types of coverage lost and durations of uninsured spells.

  8. Nudging Leads Consumers In Colorado To Shop But Not Switch ACA Marketplace Plans.

    PubMed

    Marzilli Ericson, Keith M; Kingsdale, Jon; Layton, Tim; Sacarny, Adam

    2017-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expanded the use of regulated marketplaces in health insurance, but consumers often fail to shop for plans during open enrollment periods. Typically these consumers are automatically reenrolled in their old plans, which potentially exposes them to unexpected increases in their insurance premiums and cost sharing. We conducted a randomized intervention to encourage enrollees in an ACA Marketplace to shop for plans. We tested the effect of letters and e-mails with personalized information about the savings on insurance premiums that they could realize from switching plans and the effect of generic communications that simply emphasized the possibility of saving. The personalized and generic messages both increased shopping on the Marketplace's website by 23 percent, but neither type of message had a significant effect on plan switching. These findings show that simple "nudges" with even generic information can promote shopping in health insurance marketplaces, but whether they can lead to switching remains an open question. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  9. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-03

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin in the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs.

    PubMed

    Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Leulliot, Nicolas; Meier, U Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin function in a staggering array of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, and assembly of macromolecular complexes, such as RNA polymerase II and small nucleolar (sno) RNPs. However, the molecular mechanism for all of these AAA+ ATPase associated activities is unknown. Here we document that, during the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs (including telomerase), the assembly factor SHQ1 holds the pseudouridine synthase NAP57/dyskerin in a viselike grip, and that pontin and reptin (as components of the R2TP complex) are required to pry NAP57 from SHQ1. Significantly, the NAP57 domain captured by SHQ1 harbors most mutations underlying X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) implicating the interface between the two proteins as a target of this bone marrow failure syndrome. Homing in on the essential first steps of H/ACA RNP biogenesis, our findings provide the first insight into the mechanism of action of pontin and reptin in the assembly of macromolecular complexes.

  11. Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin in the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Leulliot, Nicolas; Meier, U. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin function in a staggering array of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, and assembly of macromolecular complexes, such as RNA polymerase II and small nucleolar (sno) RNPs. However, the molecular mechanism for all of these AAA+ ATPase associated activities is unknown. Here we document that, during the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs (including telomerase), the assembly factor SHQ1 holds the pseudouridine synthase NAP57/dyskerin in a viselike grip, and that pontin and reptin (as components of the R2TP complex) are required to pry NAP57 from SHQ1. Significantly, the NAP57 domain captured by SHQ1 harbors most mutations underlying X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) implicating the interface between the two proteins as a target of this bone marrow failure syndrome. Homing in on the essential first steps of H/ACA RNP biogenesis, our findings provide the first insight into the mechanism of action of pontin and reptin in the assembly of macromolecular complexes. PMID:22923768

  12. ACA dependent coverage provision reduced high out-of-pocket health care spending for young adults.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan H; Golberstein, Ezra; Meara, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    Since September 2010 the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has required that insurers allow children to remain as dependents on their parents' private insurance plans until age twenty-six. Studies have shown that this provision increased coverage rates among young adults. In this article we analyze whether the provision also protected young adults from large and uncertain out-of-pocket expenses. We found that the policy was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the share of young adults facing annual out-of-pocket expenditures greater than $1,500 (decreasing from 4.2 percent to 2.9 percent), compared to an increase in the proportion of their slightly older peers facing such expenditures (increasing from 4.4 percent to 5.4 percent), a net difference of -2.4 percentage points, or 57 percent. We conclude that the dependent coverage provision in the ACA provides financial protection for young adults at a time when they often face high debt burden but low wages. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. How Will Repealing the ACA Affect Medicaid? Impact on Health Care Coverage, Delivery, and Payment.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Rothenberg, Sara; Schmucker, Sara; Gunsalus, Rachel; Beckerman, J. Zoë

    2017-03-01

    ISSUE: The Affordable Care Act enhanced Medicaid's role as a health care purchaser by expanding eligibility and broadening the range of tools and strategies available to states. All states have embraced delivery and payment reform as basic elements of their programs. GOAL: To examine the effects of reducing the size and scope of Medicaid under legislation to repeal the ACA. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Were the ACA's Medicaid expansion to be eliminated and were federal Medicaid funding to experience major reductions through block grants or per capita caps, the effects on system transformation would be significant. Over 70 percent of Medicaid spending is driven by enrollment in a program that covers 74 million people; on a per capita basis Medicaid costs less than Medicare or commercial insurance. States would need to absorb major financial losses by reducing the number of people served, reducing the scope of services covered, introducing higher cost-sharing, or further reducing already low payments. Far from improving quality and efficiency, these changes would cause the number of uninsured to rise while depriving health care providers and health plans of the resources needed to care for patients and invest in the tools that are essential to system transformation

  14. Relative Affordability of Health Insurance Premiums under CHIP Expansion Programs and the ACA.

    PubMed

    Gresenz, Carole Roan; Laugesen, Miriam J; Yesus, Ambeshie; Escarce, José J

    2011-10-01

    Affordability is integral to the success of health care reforms aimed at ensuring universal access to health insurance coverage, and affordability determinations have major policy and practical consequences. This article describes factors that influenced the determination of affordability benchmarks and premium-contribution requirements for Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expansions in three states that sought to universalize access to coverage for youth. It also compares subsidy levels developed in these states to the premium subsidy schedule under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for health insurance plans purchased through an exchange. We find sizeable variability in premium-contribution requirements for children's coverage as a percentage of family income across the three states and in the progressivity and regressivity of the premium-contribution schedules developed. These findings underscore the ambiguity and subjectivity of affordability standards. Further, our analyses suggest that while the ACA increases the affordability of family coverage for families with incomes below 400 percent of the federal poverty level, the evolution of CHIP over the next five to ten years will continue to have significant implications for low-income families.

  15. Reducing Young Adults' Health Care Spending through the ACA Expansion of Dependent Coverage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Novak, Priscilla

    2017-10-01

    To estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 before and after the 2010 implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that extended eligibility for dependent private health insurance coverage. Nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2008 to 2012. We conducted repeated cross-sectional analyses and employed a difference-in-differences quantile regression model to estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 (the treatment group) and ages 27-29 (the control group). Our results show that the treatment group had 14 percent lower overall health care expenditures and 21 percent lower out-of-pocket payments compared with the control group in 2011-2012. The overall reduction in health care expenditures among young adults ages 19-25 in years 2011-2012 was more significant at the higher end of the health care expenditure distribution. Young adults ages 19-25 had significantly higher emergency department costs at the 10th percentile in 2011-2012. Differences in the trends of costs of private health insurance and doctor visits are not statistically significant. Increased health insurance enrollment as a consequence of the ACA provision for dependent coverage has successfully reduced spending and catastrophic expenditures, providing financial protections for young adults. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  17. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  18. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  19. Structure of H/ACA RNP protein Nhp2p reveals cis/trans isomerization of a conserved proline at the RNA and Nop10 binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon-Kyung; Park, Chin-Ju; Fernandez, Cesar F.; Chim, Nicholas; Ding, Yi; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Feigon, Juli

    2011-01-01

    H/ACA small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) function in site-specific pseudouridylation of eukaryotic rRNA and snRNA, rRNA processing, and vertebrate telomerase biogenesis. Nhp2, one of four essential protein components of eukaryotic H/ACA RNPs, forms a core trimer with the pseudouridylase Cbf5 and Nop10 that specifically binds to H/ACA RNAs. Crystal structures of archaeal H/ACA RNPs have revealed how the protein components interact with each other and with the H/ACA RNA. However, in place of Nhp2p, archaeal H/ACA RNPs contain L7Ae, which binds specifically to an RNA K-loop motif absent in eukaryotic H/ACA RNPs, while Nhp2 binds a broader range of RNA structures. We report solution NMR studies of S. cerevisiae Nhp2 (Nhp2p), which reveal that Nhp2p exhibits two major conformations in solution due to cis/trans isomerization of the evolutionarily conserved Pro83. The equivalent proline is in the cis conformation in all reported structures of L7Ae and other homologous proteins. Nhp2p has the expected α-β-α fold, but the solution structures of the major conformation of Nhp2p with trans Pro83 and of Nhp2p-S82W with cis Pro83 reveal that Pro83 cis/trans isomerization affects the positions of numerous residues at the Nop10- and RNA-binding interface. An S82W substitution, which stabilizes the cis conformation, also stabilizes the association of Nhp2p with H/ACA snoRNPs in vivo. We propose that Pro83 plays a key role in the assembly of the eukaryotic H/ACA RNP, with the cis conformation locking in a stable Cbf5-Nop10-Nhp2 ternary complex and positioning the protein backbone to interact with the H/ACA RNA. PMID:21708174

  20. Dysregulation of H/ACA ribonucleoprotein components in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Patricia Carolina; Panero, Julieta; Stanganelli, Carmen; Palau Nagore, Virginia; Stella, Flavia; Bezares, Raimundo; Slavutsky, Irma

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are protective repeats of TTAGGG sequences located at the end of human chromosomes. They are essential to maintain chromosomal integrity and genome stability. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex containing an internal RNA template (hTR) and a catalytic subunit (hTERT). The human hTR gene consists of three major domains; among them the H/ACA domain is essential for telomere biogenesis. H/ACA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex is composed of four evolutionary conserved proteins, including dyskerin (encoded by DKC1 gene), NOP10, NHP2 and GAR1. In this study, we have evaluated the expression profile of the H/ACA RNP complex genes: DKC1, NOP10, NHP2 and GAR1, as well as hTERT and hTR mRNA levels, in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Results were correlated with the number and type of genetic alteration detected by conventional cytogenetics and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization), IGHV (immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region) mutational status, telomere length (TL) and clinico-pathological characteristics of patients. Our results showed significant decreased expression of GAR1, NOP10, DKC1 and hTR, as well as increased mRNA levels of hTERT in patients compared to controls (p≤0.04). A positive correlation between the expression of GAR1-NHP2, GAR1-NOP10, and NOP10-NHP2 (p<0.0001), were observed. The analysis taking into account prognostic factors showed a significant increased expression of hTERT gene in unmutated-IGHV cases compared to mutated-CLL patients (p = 0.0185). The comparisons among FISH groups exhibited increased expression of DKC1 in cases with two or more alterations with respect to no abnormalities, trisomy 12 and del13q14, and of NHP2 and NOP10 compared to those with del13q14 (p = 0.03). The analysis according to TL showed a significant increased expression of hTERT (p = 0.0074) and DKC1 (p = 0.0036) in patients with short telomeres compared to those with long TL. No association between gene expression and clinical

  1. The Impact Of State Policies On ACA Applications And Enrollment Among Low-Income Adults In Arkansas, Kentucky, And Texas.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Benjamin D; Maylone, Bethany; Nguyen, Kevin H; Blendon, Robert J; Epstein, Arnold M

    2015-06-01

    States are taking variable approaches to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion, Marketplace design, enrollment outreach, and application assistance. We surveyed nearly 3,000 low-income adults in late 2014 to compare experiences in three states with markedly different policies: Kentucky, which expanded Medicaid, created a successful state Marketplace, and supported outreach efforts; Arkansas, which enacted the private option and a federal-state partnership Marketplace, but with legislative limitations on outreach; and Texas, which did not expand Medicaid and passed restrictions on navigators. We found that application rates, successful enrollment, and positive experiences with the ACA were highest in Kentucky, followed by Arkansas, with Texas performing worst. Limited awareness remains a critical barrier: Fewer than half of adults had heard some or a lot about the coverage expansions. Application assistance from navigators and others was the strongest predictor of enrollment, while Latino applicants were less likely than others to successfully enroll. Twice as many respondents felt that the ACA had helped them as hurt them (although the majority reported no direct impact), and advertising was strongly associated with perceptions of the law. State policy choices appeared to have had major impacts on enrollment experiences among low-income adults and their perceptions of the ACA. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. Political Ideology and Its Relationship to Perceptions of Social Justice Advocacy among Members of the American Counseling Association (ACA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Janee Marie

    2010-01-01

    Social justice has become an increasingly controversial topic among members of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Specifically, concerns have been raised over what is perceived to be: (a) the liberal political agenda of social justice advocates, (b) the marginalization of conservative counselors, and (c) the inappropriate use of ACA…

  3. Despite Resources From The ACA, Most States Do Little To Help Addiction Treatment Programs Implement Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christina; Abraham, Amanda; Grogan, Colleen M; Pollack, Harold A; Bersamira, Clifford; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expands health insurance for addiction treatment and provides unprecedented opportunities for service growth and delivery model reform. Yet most addiction treatment programs lack the staffing and technological capabilities to respond successfully to ACA-driven system change. In light of these challenges, we conducted a national survey to examine how Single State Agencies for addiction treatment--the state governmental organizations charged with overseeing addiction treatment programs--are helping programs respond to new requirements under the ACA. We found that most Single State Agencies provide little assistance to addiction treatment programs. Most agencies are helping programs develop collaborations with other health service programs. However, fewer than half reported providing help in modernizing systems to support insurance participation, and only one in three provided assistance with enrollment outreach. In the absence of technical assistance, it is unlikely that addiction treatment programs will fully realize the ACA's promise to improve access to and quality of addiction treatment. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. 76 FR 41262 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, EH11-1103

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding, EH11-1103 Notice of Intent to award Affordable Care... opportunity EH11-1103, ``National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program-Network Implementation... under funding opportunity EH11-1103, ``National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program-Network...

  5. Demographic, clinical and antibody characteristics of patients with digital ulcers in systemic sclerosis: data from the DUO Registry.

    PubMed

    Denton, Christopher P; Krieg, Thomas; Guillevin, Loic; Schwierin, Barbara; Rosenberg, Daniel; Silkey, Mariabeth; Zultak, Maurice; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2012-05-01

    The Digital Ulcers Outcome (DUO) Registry was designed to describe the clinical and antibody characteristics, disease course and outcomes of patients with digital ulcers associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The DUO Registry is a European, prospective, multicentre, observational, registry of SSc patients with ongoing digital ulcer disease, irrespective of treatment regimen. Data collected included demographics, SSc duration, SSc subset, internal organ manifestations, autoantibodies, previous and ongoing interventions and complications related to digital ulcers. Up to 19 November 2010 a total of 2439 patients had enrolled into the registry. Most were classified as either limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc; 52.2%) or diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc; 36.9%). Digital ulcers developed earlier in patients with dcSSc compared with lcSSc. Almost all patients (95.7%) tested positive for antinuclear antibodies, 45.2% for anti-scleroderma-70 and 43.6% for anticentromere antibodies (ACA). The first digital ulcer in the anti-scleroderma-70-positive patient cohort occurred approximately 5 years earlier than the ACA-positive patient group. This study provides data from a large cohort of SSc patients with a history of digital ulcers. The early occurrence and high frequency of digital ulcer complications are especially seen in patients with dcSSc and/or anti-scleroderma-70 antibodies.

  6. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  7. Lessons from a Broad-based ACA Outreach Effort: Promises and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Gurley-Calvez, Tami; Hembree, Jessica; Mosley, Jane; LaPierre, Tracey; Aslam, Misbah; Jones, Emily V; Zimmerman, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The Marketplace Coverage Initiative (MCI) sought to expand awareness and ACA Marketplace enrollment in the greater Kansas City Area. The MCI was evaluated through interviews, surveys, and focus groups. Two main findings are particularly relevant for future Marketplace enrollment efforts. First, the link between contacting someone and actual enrollment is tenuous as follow-up is challenging. Outreach efforts that only track contacts, such as appointments and email addresses, lack information needed to assess enrollment. Linking outreach activities to enrollment outcomes leads us to a dramatically different conclusion about using big data and campaign-style tactics than evaluations of similar techniques such as that pioneered by Enroll America in 11 states. Second, there is a large chasm between the knowledge levels of the uninsured and the decisions they face on the Marketplace. Based on these findings, outreach efforts were redesigned for the 2014 open enrollment period to focus on smaller, community-driven projects.

  8. Human H/ACA Small Nucleolar RNPs and Telomerase Share Evolutionarily Conserved Proteins NHP2 and NOP10

    PubMed Central

    Pogacic, Vanda; Dragon, François; Filipowicz, Witold

    2000-01-01

    The H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are involved in pseudouridylation of pre-rRNAs. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four common proteins are associated with H/ACA snoRNAs: Gar1p, Cbf5p, Nhp2p, and Nop10p. In vitro reconstitution studies showed that four proteins also specifically interact with H/ACA snoRNAs in mammalian cell extracts. Two mammalian proteins, NAP57/dyskerin (the ortholog of Cbf5p) and hGAR1, have been characterized. In this work we describe properties of hNOP10 and hNHP2, human orthologs of yeast Nop10p and Nhp2p, respectively, and further characterize hGAR1. hNOP10 and hNHP2 complement yeast cells depleted of Nhp2p and Nop10p, respectively. Immunoprecipitation experiments with extracts from transfected HeLa cells indicated that epitope-tagged hNOP10 and hNHP2 specifically associate with hGAR1 and H/ACA RNAs; they also interact with the RNA subunit of telomerase, which contains an H/ACA-like domain in its 3′ moiety. Immunofluorescence microscopy experiments showed that hGAR1, hNOP10, and hNHP2 are localized in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus and in Cajal (coiled) bodies. Deletion analysis of hGAR1 indicated that its evolutionarily conserved core domain contains all the signals required for localization, but progressive deletions from either the N or the C terminus of the core domain abolish localization in the nucleolus and/or the Cajal bodies. PMID:11074001

  9. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-03-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment.

  10. Dyskeratosis congenita mutations in the H/ACA domain of human telomerase RNA affect its assembly into a pre-RNP

    PubMed Central

    Trahan, Christian; Dragon, François

    2009-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited disorder that implicates defects in the biology of telomeres, which are maintained by telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein with reverse transcriptase activity. Like all H/ACA RNAs, the H/ACA domain of nascent human telomerase RNA (hTR) forms a pre-RNP with H/ACA proteins NAF1, dyskerin, NOP10, and NHP2 in vivo. To assess the pre-RNP assembly of hTR mutants that poorly accumulate in vivo, we developed an in vitro system that uses components of human origin. Pre-RNPs were reconstituted with synthetic 32P-labeled RNAs and 35S-labeled proteins produced in rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and immunoprecipitations were carried out to analyze RNP formation. We show that human NAF1 cannot bind directly to the H/ACA domain of hTR, and requires the core trimer dyskerin-NOP10-NHP2 to be efficiently incorporated into the pre-RNP. This order of assembly seems common to H/ACA RNAs since it was observed with snoRNA ACA36 and scaRNA U92, which are predicted to guide pseudouridylation of 18S rRNA and U2 snRNA, respectively. However, the processing H/ACA snoRNA U17 did not conform to this rule, as NAF1 alone was able to bind it. We also provide the first evidence that DC-related mutations of hTR C408G and Δ378-451 severely impair pre-RNP assembly. Integrity of boxes H and ACA of hTR are also crucial for pre-RNP assembly, while the CAB box is dispensable. Our results offer new insights into the defects caused by some mutations located in the H/ACA domain of hTR. PMID:19095616

  11. Advances in Antibody Design

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Kathryn E.; Tessier, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody–drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  12. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    breast cancer does not have specific antibody drugs like Herceptin, and there is considerable need for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic...mesenchymal transition” or EMT. This process is important in several cancers , but is particularly associated with “triple-negative” breast cancer ...pathways in cancer cells and make a major impact on breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Monoclonal Antibody, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition, Antibody

  13. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  14. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  16. Affinity purification of antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  17. The ACA Medicaid Expansion Waiver in the Keystone State: Do the Medically Uninsured "Got a Friend in Pennsylvania"?

    PubMed

    Olson, Laura Katz

    2015-06-01

    Medicaid is fundamental to near universal health insurance coverage under the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). Its goal of broadening the program to all households with income at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level was thwarted in 2012 by a Supreme Court decision that allowed the states to choose whether or not they would join. This essay seeks to assess the status of Pennsylvania with regard to the Medicaid expansion controversy. It briefly describes the Keystone State's existing Medicaid program and the potential impact of the ACA on its growth. It then discusses Governor Tom Corbett's market-based alternative and what he achieved in his deliberations with the Obama administration. The article also discusses some of the financial considerations facing Pennsylvania policy makers in the expansion decision, the role of three of the more influential lobby groups, and the problematic situation of the medically uninsured population. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  18. [Antibodies against cancer].

    PubMed

    Barriuso Feijóo, J; Sundlov, A; González Barón, M

    2004-12-01

    Within the revolution of molecular biology in cancer, it should be pointed out the role of monoclonal antibodies clinically utilized as if they were "magic bullets". From the works of Kohler and Milstein in 1975 the evolution has been fast and its inclusion in daily clinical practice gradual. Among the more significant there is anti-CD20 that has revolutionized the treatment of lymphomas. Currently, antibodies conjugated with isotopes derived from anti-CD20 have been produced. Trastuzumab antibody against HER2/neu has opened new prospects in the treatment of breast cancer. Cetuximab antibody against EGFR has achieved good results in the treatment of chemotherapy-resistent colon cancer. Bevacizumab is perhaps the most promising antibody against solid tumors, having shown effectiveness as first line therapy in metastatic colon cancer in combination with chemotherapy.

  19. Accommodation, accommodative convergence, and response AC/A ratios before and at the onset of myopia in children.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, Jane; Thorn, Frank; Held, Richard

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate accommodation, accommodative convergence, and AC/A ratios before and at the onset of myopia in children. Refractive error, accommodation, and phorias were measured annually over a period of 3 years in 80 6- to 18-year-old children (mean age at first visit = 11.1 years), including 26 who acquired myopia of at least -0.50 D and 54 who remained emmetropic (-0.25 to + 0.75 D). Refraction was measured by noncycloplegic distance retinoscopy. Concomitant measures of accommodation and phorias were taken for letter targets at 4.0 m and 0.33 m using the Canon R-1 open field-of-view autorefractor with an attached motorized Risley prism and Maddox rod. The accommodation and phoria measurements were used to calculate response AC/A ratios. Compared with children who remained emmetropic, those who became myopic had elevated response AC/A ratios at 1 and 2 years before the onset of myopia, in addition to at onset and 1 year later (t's = -2.97 to -4.04, p < 0.01 at all times). The significantly higher AC/A ratios in the children who became myopic are a result of significantly reduced accommodation. Accommodative convergence was significantly greater in myopes only at onset. These findings suggest that the abnormal oculomotor factors found before the onset of myopia may contribute to myopigenesis by producing hyperopic retinal defocus when a child is engaged in near-viewing tasks.

  20. Structure and Interactions of the CS Domain of Human H/ACA RNP Assembly Protein Shq1

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Cascio, Duilio; ...

    2014-12-29

    Shq1 is an essential protein involved in the early steps of biogenesis and assembly of H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). Shq1 binds to dyskerin (Cbf5 in yeast) at an early step of H/ACA RNP assembly and is subsequently displaced by the H/ACA RNA. Shq1 contains an N-terminal CS and a C-terminal Shq1-specific domain (SSD). Dyskerin harbors many mutations associated with dyskeratosis congenita. Structures of yeast Shq1 SSD bound to Cbf5 revealed that only a subset of these mutations is in the SSD binding site, implicating another subset in the putative CS binding site. Here in this paper, we present the crystalmore » structure of human Shq1 CS (hCS) and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and crystal structures of hCS containing a serine substitution for proline 22 that is associated with some prostate cancers. The structure of hCS is similar to yeast Shq1 CS domain (yCS) and consists of two β-sheets that form an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich fold. The N-terminal affinity tag sequence AHHHHHH associates with a neighboring protein in the crystal lattice to form an extra β-strand. Deletion of this tag was required to get spectra suitable for NMR structure determination, while the tag was required for crystallization. NMR chemical shift perturbation (CSP) experiments with peptides derived from putative CS binding sites on dyskerin and Cbf5 revealed a conserved surface on CS important for Cbf5/dyskerin binding. A HADDOCK (high-ambiguity-driven protein-protein docking) model of a Shq1-Cbf5 complex that defines the position of CS domain in the pre-H/ACA RNP was calculated using the CSP data.« less

  1. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  2. The Cbf5-Nop10 Complex is a Molecular Bracket that Organizes Box H/ACA RNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Hamma, Tomoko; Reichow, Steve L.; Varani, Gabriele

    2005-12-01

    Box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) catalyze RNA pseudouridylation and direct processing of ribosomal RNA, and are essential architectural components of vertebrate telomerases. H/ACA RNPs comprise four proteins and a multihelical RNA. Two proteins, Cbf5 and Nop10, suffice for basal enzymatic activity in an archaeal in vitro system. We now report their cocrystal structure at 1.95-A resolution. We find that archaeal Cbf5 can assemble with yeast Nop10 and with human telomerase RNA, consistent with the high sequence identity of the RNP componenets between archaea and eukarya. Thus, the Cbf5-Nop10 architecture is phylogenetically conserved. The structure shows how Nop10 buttresses the activemore » site of Cbf5, and it reveals two basic troughs that bidirectionally extend the active site cleft. Mutagenesis results implicate an adjacent basic patch in RNA binding. This tripartite RNA-binding surface may function as a molecular bracket that organizes the multihelical H/ACA and telomerase RNAs.« less

  3. Macedocin, a Food-Grade Lantibiotic Produced by Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198

    PubMed Central

    Georgalaki, Marina D.; Van den Berghe, Erika; Kritikos, Dimitrios; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Kalantzopoulos, George; De Vuyst, Luc; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198, a strain isolated from Greek Kasseri cheese, produces a food-grade lantibiotic named macedocin. Macedocin has a molecular mass of 2,794.76 ± 0.42 Da, as determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. Partial N-terminal sequence analysis revealed 22 amino acid residues that correspond with the amino acid sequence of the lantibiotics SA-FF22 and SA-M49, both of which were isolated from the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. Macedocin inhibits a broad spectrum of lactic acid bacteria, as well as several food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, including Clostridium tyrobutyricum. It displays a bactericidal effect towards the most sensitive indicator strain, Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei LMG 13558T, while the producer strain itself displays autoinhibition when it is grown under conditions that do not favor bacteriocin production. Macedocin is active at pHs between 4.0 and 9.0, and it retains activity even after incubation for 20 min at 121°C with 1 atm of overpressure. Inhibition of macedocin by proteolytic enzymes is variable. PMID:12450808

  4. Genome-wide analysis of wheat calcium ATPases and potential role of selected ACAs and ECAs in calcium stress.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Roohi; Williams, Lorraine E; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Virk, Nasar

    2017-10-27

    P 2 - type calcium ATPases (ACAs-auto inhibited calcium ATPases and ECAs-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases) belong to the P- type ATPase family of active membrane transporters and are significantly involved in maintaining accurate levels of Ca 2+ , Mn 2+ and Zn 2+ in the cytosol as well as playing a very important role in stress signaling, stomatal opening and closing and pollen tube growth. Here we report the identification and possible role of some of these ATPases from wheat. In this study, ACA and ECA sequences of six species (belonging to Poaceae) were retrieved from different databases and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. A high degree of evolutionary relatedness was observed among P 2 sequences characterized in this study. Members of the respective groups from different plant species were observed to fall under the same clade. This pattern highlights the common ancestry of P 2- type calcium ATPases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was used to analyse the expression of selected ACAs and ECAs from Triticum aestivum (wheat) under calcium toxicity and calcium deficiency. The data indicated that expression of ECAs is enhanced under calcium stress, suggesting possible roles of these ATPases in calcium homeostasis in wheat. Similarly, the expression of ACAs was significantly different in plants grown under calcium stress as compared to plants grown under control conditions. This gives clues to the role of ACAs in signal transduction during calcium stress in wheat. Here we concluded that wheat genome consists of nine P 2B and three P 2A -type calcium ATPases. Moreover, gene loss events in wheat ancestors lead to the loss of a particular homoeolog of a gene in wheat. To elaborate the role of these wheat ATPases, qRT-PCR was performed. The results indicated that when plants are exposed to calcium stress, both P 2A and P 2B gene expression get enhanced. This further gives clues about the possible role of these ATPases in wheat in calcium management. These findings can be

  5. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  6. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  7. Future of antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Low, Duncan; O'Leary, Rhona; Pujar, Narahari S

    2007-03-15

    Antibody purification seems to be safely ensconced in a platform, now well-established by way of multiple commercialized antibody processes. However, natural evolution compels us to peer into the future. This is driven not only by a large, projected increase in the number of antibody therapies, but also by dramatic improvements in upstream productivity, and process economics. Although disruptive technologies have yet escaped downstream processes, evolution of the so-called platform is already evident in antibody processes in late-stage development. Here we perform a wide survey of technologies that are competing to be part of that platform, and provide our [inherently dangerous] assessment of those that have the most promise.

  8. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the blood of most people with myasthenia gravis . The antibody affects a chemical that sends signals ... Performed This test is used to help diagnose myasthenia gravis . Normal Results Normally, there is no acetylcholine receptor ...

  9. RSV antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus antibody test; RSV serology; Bronchiolitis - RSV test ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  10. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  11. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    of breast cancer does not have specific antibody drugs like Herceptin, and there is considerable need for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic...epithelial to mesenchymal transition” or EMT. This process is important in several cancers , but is particularly associated with “triple-negative” breast ...pathways in cancer cells and make a major impact on breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Monoclonal Antibody, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

  12. Down-Regulation of MicroRNA-210 Confers Sensitivity towards 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol Acetate (ACA) in Cervical Cancer Cells by Targeting SMAD4.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Neoh Hun; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Awang, Khalijah; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate genes posttranscriptionally. Past studies have reported that miR-210 is up-regulated in many cancers including cervical cancer, and plays a pleiotropic role in carcinogenesis. However, its role in regulating response towards anti-cancer agents has not been fully elucidated. We have previously reported that the natural compound 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) is able to induce cytotoxicity in various cancer cells including cervical cancer cells. Hence, this study aims to investigate the mechanistic role of miR-210 in regulating response towards ACA in cervical cancer cells. In the present study, we found that ACA down-regulated miR-210 expression in cervical cancer cells, and suppression of miR-210 expression enhanced sensitivity towards ACA by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed increased expression of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4), which was predicted as a target of miR-210 by target prediction programs, following treatment with ACA. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-210 binds to sequences in 3'UTR of SMAD4. Furthermore, decreased in SMAD4 protein expression was observed when miR-210 was overexpressed. Conversely, SMAD4 protein expression increased when miR-210 expression was suppressed. Lastly, we demonstrated that overexpression of SMAD4 augmented the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of ACA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-210 conferred sensitivity towards ACA in cervical cancer cells by targeting SMAD4. These findings suggest that combination of miRNAs and natural compounds could provide new strategies in treating cervical cancer.

  13. Molecular analysis of HLA-DPB1 alleles in idiopathic systemic sclerosis patients and uranium miners with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rihs, H P; Conrad, K; Mehlhorn, J; May-Taube, K; Welticke, B; Frank, K H; Baur, X

    1996-03-01

    According to clinical mainifestation and autoantibody pattern [anti-Scl-70, anti-centromere antibodies (ACAs)], systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease with heterogenous subgroups. PCR-sequence-specific-oligonucleotide typing was used to study the genetic association of HLA-DPB1 alleles in 54 patients with idiopathic systemic sclerosis, 26 uranium miners with systemic sclerosis and 70 unrelated healthy control subjects. Systemic sclerosis patients with and without former employment in mines were divided into two subgroups according to their scleroderma-typical autoantibody specificities--anti-Scl-70 positive and ACA positive--and third subgroup comprising the rest. Statistical analysis revealed a significantly increased frequency of DPB1*1301(p=0.0001, corrected p=0.011) in idiopathic anti-Scl-70-positive systemic sclerosis cases when compared with unexposed controls. In the same group, we observed an enhanced frequency of DPB1*0601 and *1701 alleles. Since these three alleles carry the information for a glutamic acid residue in position 69 of DPB1, we tested the association of this residue with anti-Scl-70 expression. A strong association between anti-Scl-70 positivity in idiopathic systemic sclerosis patients and amino acid residue 69 of DPB1 was observed when compared with anti-Scl-70-negative idiopathic systemic sclerosis patients (p=0.0009) or unrelated controls (p=0.0007). ACA expression was not associated with the presence of any DPB1 allele tested. The data show that anti-Scl-70 expression in idiopathic systemic sclerosis patients is linked with DPB1*1301 whereas anti-Scl-70-positive miners do not show such a DPB1 association. Futhermore, the data indicate that glutamate 69 of DPB1 might be involved in the susceptibility to idiopathic anti-Scl-70 expression.

  14. Antibodies in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Bianca

    2011-09-01

    In the past century, incidences of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes, have increased dramatically. Obesity and abnormal insulin level are associated with a wide variety of health problems including a markedly increased risk for type II diabetes, fatty liver, hepato-biliary and gallbladder diseases, cardiovascular pathologies, neurodegenerative disorders, asthma and a variety of cancers. The development of therapeutic antibodies has evolved over the past decades into a mainstay of therapeutic options for patients with inflammatory diseases and cancer, while other indication areas such as metabolic diseases have so far only been rarely addressed. Although therapeutic antibodies might have advantages over current type II diabetes treatments like favorable serum half-life and high specificity, their development is also likely to face obstacles. For example the technical feasibility of antibody generation against G protein coupled receptors and transporters is challenging, patient compliance for a likely needle application might be limited, bioavailability in organs involved in the pathogenesis like the brain might be suboptimal and reimbursement issues for high treatment costs have to be taken into account. The current review focuses on the pathogenesis and standard therapeutic approaches as well as antibodies in development and potential antibody targets for type II diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CRYSTALLINE PNEUMOCOCCUS ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John H.; Goebel, Walther F.

    1949-01-01

    1. The immune precipitate formed by antipneumococcus horse serum and the specific polysaccharide is not hydrolyzed by trypsin as is the diphtheria toxin-antitoxin complex, and purified pneumococcus antibody cannot be isolated by the method used for the isolation and crystallization of diphtheria antitoxin. 2. Type I pneumococcus antibody, completely precipitable by Type I polysaccharide, may be obtained from immune horse serum globulin by precipitation of the inert proteins with acid potassium phthalate. 3. The antibody obtained in this way may be fractionated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate into three main parts. One is insoluble in neutral salts but soluble from pH 4.5 to 3.0 and from pH 9.5 to 10.5. This is the largest fraction. A second fraction is soluble in 0.05 to 0.2 saturated ammonium sulfate and the third fraction is soluble in 0.2 saturated ammonium sulfate and precipitated by 0.35 saturated ammonium sulfate. The second fraction can be further separated by precipitation with 0.17 saturated ammonium sulfate to yield a small amount of protein which is soluble in 0.17 saturated ammonium sulfate but insoluble in 0.25 saturated ammonium sulfate. This fraction crystallizes in poorly formed, rounded rosettes. 4. The crystallization does not improve the purity of the antibody and is accompanied by the formation of an insoluble protein as in the case of diphtheria antitoxin. 5. None of the fractions obtained is even approximately homogeneous as determined by solubility measurements. 6. Purified antibody has also been obtained by dissociating the antigen-antibody complex. 7. The protective value of the fractions is quite different; that of the dissociated antibody being the highest and that of the insoluble fraction, the lowest. 8. All the fractions are immunologically specific since they do not precipitate with Type II polysaccharide nor protect against Type II pneumococci. 9. All the fractions give a positive precipitin reaction with antihorse rabbit

  16. Undermining the ACA through the executive branch and federalism: what the Trump administration's approach to health reform means for older Americans.

    PubMed

    Jones, David K; Gusmano, Michael K; Nadash, Pamela; Miller, Edward Alan

    2018-04-12

    The ACA has survived multiple existential threats in the legislative and judicial branches, including dozens of congressional attempts at repeal and two major Supreme Court cases. Even as it seems that the ACA is here to stay, what the law accomplishes is far from settled. The Trump administration is using executive powers to weaken the law, in many cases using the same powers that President Obama used to strengthen the effects of the reform. States have responded by seeking flexibility to pursue reforms, such as work requirements, that could not pass Congress and that were not allowed by the Obama administration. There is no indication that the ACA is imploding as President Trump has predicted and seems to desire, although these changes have a real and substantial impact on the lives of many Americans, including the near-elderly in unique ways.

  17. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  18. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... out for sure? If antibody tests and/or symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by ... who is still experiencing symptoms, to establish the diagnosis or to rule out celiac disease as a part of establishing another diagnosis. Find ...

  19. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lyme disease organism, Borrelia burgdorferi Deer ticks Ticks Lyme disease - Borrelia burgdorferi organism Tick imbedded in the skin Antibodies ... Saunders; 2013:745-747. Steere AC. Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) due to Borrelia burgdorferi . In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  20. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  1. How the ACA's Health Insurance Expansions Have Affected Out-of-Pocket Cost-Sharing and Spending on Premiums.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Solís-Román, Claudia; Parikh, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    One important benefit gained by the millions of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is protection from high out-of-pocket health spending. While Medicaid unambiguously reduces out-of-pocket premium and medical costs for low-income people, it is less certain that marketplace coverage and other types of insurance purchased to comply with the law's individual mandate also protect from high health spending. Goal: To compare out-of-pocket spending in 2014 to spending in 2013; assess how this spending changed in states where many people enrolled in the marketplaces relative to states where few people enrolled; and project the decline in the percentage of people paying high amounts out-of-pocket. Methods: Linear regression models were used to estimate whether people under age 65 spent above certain thresholds. Key findings and conclusions: The probability of incurring high out-of-pocket costs and premium expenses declined as marketplace enrollment increased. The percentage reductions were greatest among those with incomes between 250 percent and 399 percent of poverty, those who were eligible for premium subsidies, and those who previously were uninsured or had very limited nongroup coverage. These effects appear largely attributable to marketplace enrollment rather than to other ACA provisions or to economic trends.

  2. Magnetic and structural transitions in La1-xAxCoO3 ( A=Ca , Sr, and Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, M.; Braden, M.; Kierspel, H.; Senff, D.; Zabara, O.; Zobel, C.; Lorenz, T.

    2009-06-01

    We report thermal-expansion, lattice-constant, and specific-heat data of the series La1-xAxCoO3 for 0≤x≤0.30 with A=Ca , Sr, and Ba. For the undoped compound LaCoO3 , the thermal-expansion coefficient α(T) exhibits a pronounced maximum around T=50K caused by a temperature-driven spin-state transition from a low-spin state of the Co3+ ions at low temperatures toward a higher spin state at higher temperatures. The partial substitution of the La3+ ions by divalent Ca2+ , Sr2+ , or Ba2+ ions causes drastic changes in the macroscopic properties of LaCoO3 . The large maximum in α(T) is suppressed and completely vanishes for x≳0.125 . For A=Ca three different anomalies develop in α(T) with further increasing x , which are visible in specific-heat data as well. Together with temperature-dependent x-ray data, we identify several phase transitions as a function of the doping concentration x and temperature. From these data we propose an extended phase diagram for La1-xCaxCoO3 .

  3. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Functional and Structural Impact of Target Uridine Substitutions on the H/ACA Ribonucleoprotein Particle Pseudouridine Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2010-09-17

    Box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein protein particles catalyze the majority of pseudouridylation in functional RNA. Different from stand alone pseudouridine synthases, the RNP pseudouridine synthase comprises multiple protein subunits and an RNA subunit. Previous studies showed that each subunit, regardless its location, is sensitive to the step of subunit placement at the catalytic center and potentially to the reaction status of the substrate. Here we describe the impact of chemical substitutions of target uridine on enzyme activity and structure. We found that 3-methyluridine in place of uridine inhibited its isomerization while 2{prime}-deoxyuridine or 4-thiouridine did not. Significantly, crystal structures of an archaealmore » box H/ACA RNP bound with the nonreactive and the two postreactive substrate analogues showed only subtle structural changes throughout the assembly except for a conserved tyrosine and a substrate anchoring loop of Cbf5. Our results suggest a potential role of these elements and the subunit that contacts them in substrate binding and product release.« less

  5. Evidence Suggests That The ACA's Tobacco Surcharges Reduced Insurance Take-Up And Did Not Increase Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Abigail S.; Schpero, William L.; Busch, Susan H.

    2017-01-01

    To account for tobacco users' excess health care costs and encourage cessation, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed marketplace plans to impose a surcharge on tobacco users' premiums. Because tax credits were calculated from premiums for non-tobacco-users, this policy greatly increased many smokers' out-of-pocket costs. Using data from the 2011-2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the effect of tobacco surcharges on insurance coverage and smoking cessation in the first year of marketplace implementation, among adults most likely to purchase insurance from state marketplaces. Relative to those facing no surcharges, smokers facing medium or high surcharges had significantly reduced insurance coverage (-4.3 to -11.6 percentage points), but no significant differences in smoking cessation. In contrast, those facing low surcharges showed significantly reduced smoking cessation. Taken together, these findings suggest that tobacco surcharges conflicted with a major goal of the ACA – increased financial protection – without increasing smoking cessation. States should consider these potential effects when deciding whether to constrain the surcharge below the federal limit in the future. PMID:27385231

  6. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26884745

  7. Evidence Suggests That The ACA's Tobacco Surcharges Reduced Insurance Take-Up And Did Not Increase Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Abigail S; Schpero, William L; Busch, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    To account for tobacco users' excess health care costs and encourage cessation, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed insurers to impose a surcharge on tobacco users' premiums for plans offered on the health insurance exchanges, or Marketplaces. Low-income tax credits for Marketplace coverage were based on premiums for non-tobacco users, which means that these credits did not offset any surcharge costs. Thus, this policy greatly increased out-of-pocket premiums for many tobacco users. Using data for 2011-14 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the effect of tobacco surcharges on insurance status and smoking cessation in the first year of the exchanges' implementation, among adults most likely to purchase insurance from them. Relative to smokers who faced no surcharges, smokers facing medium or high surcharges had significantly reduced coverage (reductions of 4.3 percentage points and 11.6 percentage points, respectively), but no significant differences in smoking cessation. In contrast, those facing low surcharges showed significantly less smoking cessation. Taken together, these findings suggest that tobacco surcharges conflicted with a major goal of the ACA-increased financial protection-without increasing smoking cessation. States should consider these potential effects when deciding whether to limit surcharges to less than the federal maximum. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. Natural antibodies to glycans.

    PubMed

    Bovin, N V

    2013-07-01

    A wide variety of so-called natural antibodies (nAbs), i.e. immunoglobulins generated by B-1 cells, are directed to glycans. nAbs to glycans can be divided in three groups: 1) conservative nAbs, i.e. practically the same in all healthy donors with respect to their epitope specificity and level in blood; 2) allo-antibodies to blood group antigens; 3) plastic antibodies related to the first or the second group but discussed separately because their level changes considerably during diseases and some temporary conditions, in particular inflammation and pregnancy. Antibodies from the third group proved to be prospective markers of a number of diseases, whereas their unusual level (below or above the norm) is not necessarily the consequence of disease/state. Modern microarrays allowed the determination of the human repertoire, which proved to be unexpectedly broad. It was observed that the content of some nAbs reaches about 0.1% of total immunoglobulins. Immunoglobulins of M class dominate for most nAbs, constituting up to 80-90%. Their affinity (to a monovalent glycan, in KD terms) were found to be within the range 10(-4)-10(-6) M. Antibodies to Galβ1-3GlcNAc (Le(C)), 4-HSO3Galβ1-4GalNAc (4'-O-SuLN), Fucα1-3GlcNAc, Fucα1-4GlcNAc, GalNAcα1-3Gal (Adi), Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc (P(k)), Galα1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAc (P1), GlcNAcα-terminated glycans, and hyaluronic acid should be noted among the nAbs revealed and studied during the last decade. At the same time, a kind of "taboo" is observed for a number of glycans: antibodies to Le(X) and Le(Y), and almost all gangliosides have not been observed in healthy persons. Many of the revealed nAbs were directed to constrained inner (core) part of glycan, directly adjoined to lipid of cell membrane or protein. The biological function of these nAbs remains unclear; for anti-core antibodies, a role of surveillance on appearance of aberrant, especially cancer, antigens is supposed. The first data related to oncodiagnostics based on

  9. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  10. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  11. HETEROGENETIC ANTIBODIES IN ACUTE HEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Monroe D.; Murphy, William D.; Hanford, V. Lee

    1944-01-01

    A heterogenetic antibody showing fixation of complement with human liver and agglutination of sheep erythrocytes was found in certain cases of acute infective hepatitis. The antigen concerned in these reactions was apparently heat stable and alcohol soluble. Differences from other heterogenetic antigen-antibody systems have been noted. The possible relation of the heterogenetic antibody to liver damage was considered. PMID:19871386

  12. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  13. Blood Group Antibodies in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Doris; Nimrod, Carl

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective survey of the frequency, nature, and effect of blood group antibodies on obstetrical outcome was conducted over 4 years in a large community hospital. A total of 189 antibodies were identified in 165 patients. Twenty clinically significant outcomes occurred, including three stillbirths. All clinically significant cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn were caused by Rh antibodies. PMID:21229104

  14. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  15. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  16. Antiphospholipid antibodies and antiphospholipid syndrome in patients presenting with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diz-Küçükkaya, R; Hacihanefioğlu, A; Yenerel, M; Turgut, M; Keskin, H; Nalçaci, M; Inanç, M

    2001-09-15

    The pathogenetic role and the clinical importance of the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not clear. In this study, the prevalence and clinical significance of APAs were investigated in patients with ITP. Eighty-two newly diagnosed ITP patients were prospectively studied. They were evaluated for the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and immunoglobulin G/M anticardiolipin antibodies (ACAs). Thirty-one patients (37.8%) were APA positive at diagnosis. No statistically significant differences were found between the APA-positive and APA-negative groups regarding gender, initial platelet counts, or response to methylprednisolone therapy. After 5 years of follow-up, cumulative thrombosis-free survival of APA-positive (n = 31) and APA-negative (n = 51) ITP patients was 39% and 97.7%, respectively. A significant difference was found between these groups by log-rank test (P =.0004). In addition, LA was an important risk marker for the development of thrombosis in ITP patients. After a median follow-up of 38 months, 14 ITP patients (45%) who had APA positivity developed clinical features (thrombosis or fetal losses) of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). There were no differences between the APA-positive patients with and without APS regarding the initial platelet counts, response to the therapy, or ACA positivity. The positivity rate for LA was significantly higher in those patients with ITP who developed APS (chi(2): P =.0036; relative risk 7.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-47). In conclusion, this study indicates that a significant proportion of patients initially presenting with ITP and APA positivity developed APS. In patients with ITP, the persistent presence of APAs is an important risk factor for the development of APS.

  17. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  18. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  19. 'Medusa head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 3: Anti-Yo/CDR2, anti-Nb/AP3B2, PCA-2, anti-Tr/DNER, other antibodies, diagnostic pitfalls, summary and outlook.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook.

  20. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    impact substrate usage in AKRs . The blue residues are variable positions between AKR1C1-4. These residues are near the active site and may play a ...with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS...and diagnostic biomarkers. We have developed a new technique allowing for discovery of new antibodies that disrupt a key process in cancer progression

  1. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  2. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  3. Therapeutic Antibodies by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyunbo

    2016-01-01

    Antibody phage display is a major technological platform for the generation of fully human antibodies for therapeutic purposes. The in vitro binder selection by phage display allows researchers to have more extensive control over binding parameters and facilitates the isolation of clinical candidate antibodies with desired binding and/or functional profiles. Since the invention of antibody phage display in late 1980s, significant technological advancements in the design, construction, and selection of the antibody libraries have been made, and several fully human antibodies generated by phage display are currently approved or in various clinical development stages. In this review, the background and details of antibody phage display technology, and representative antibody libraries with natural or synthetic sequence diversity and different construction strategies are described. The generation, optimization, functional and biophysical properties, and preclinical and clinical developments of some of the phage display-derived therapeutic antibodies approved for use in patients or in late-stage clinical trials are also discussed. With evolving novel disease targets and therapeutic strategies, antibody phage display is expected to continue to play a central role in the development of the next generation of therapeutic antibodies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. OsACA6, a P-type 2B Ca(2+) ATPase functions in cadmium stress tolerance in tobacco by reducing the oxidative stress load.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Devesh; Huda, Kazi Md Kamrul; Banu, Mst Sufara Akhter; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Gill, Sarvjeet Singh; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-10-01

    The present study demonstrates the first direct evidence of the novel role of OsACA6 in providing Cd (2+) stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and modulating ROS-scavenging pathway. Cadmium, a non-essential toxic heavy metal, interferes with the plant growth and development. It reaches the leaves through xylem and may become part of the food chain, thus causing detrimental effects to human health. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop strategies for engineering plants for Cd(2+) tolerance and less accumulation. The members of P-type ATPases family transport metal ions including Cd(2+), and thus play important role an ion homeostasis. The present study elucidates the role of P-type 2B Ca(2+) ATPase (OsACA6) in Cd(2+) stress tolerance. The transcript levels of OsACA6 were up-regulated upon Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) exposure. Transgenic tobacco expressing OsACA6 showed tolerance towards Cd(2+) stress as demonstrated by several physiological indices including root length, biomass, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide content. The roots of the transgenic lines accumulated more Cd(2+) as compared to shoot. Further, confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that Cd(2+) exposure altered Ca(2+) uptake in OsACA6 transgenic plants. OsACA6 expression in tobacco also protected the transgenic plants from oxidative stress by enhancing the activity of enzymatic (SOD, CAT, APX, GR) and non-enzymatic (GSH and AsA) antioxidant machinery. Transgenic lines also tolerated Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) stress; however, tolerance for these ions was not as significant as observed for Cd(2+) exposure. Thus, overexpression of OsACA6 confers Cd(2+) stress tolerance in transgenic lines by maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and modulating reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging pathway. The results of the present study will help to develop strategies for engineering Cd(2+) stress tolerance in economically important crop plants.

  5. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project: Advanced Collision Avoidance System for UAS (ACAS Xu) Interoperability White Paper Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The Phase 1 DAA Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) provided requirements for two classes of DAA equipment: equipment Class 1 contains the basic DAA equipment required to assist a pilot in remaining well clear, while equipment Class 2 integrates the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) II system. Thus, the Class 1 system provides RWC functionality only, while the Class 2 system is intended to provide both RWC and Collision Avoidance (CA) functionality, in compliance with the Minimum Aviation System Performance (MASPS) for the Interoperability of Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems. The FAAs TCAS Program Office is currently developing Airborne Collision Avoidance System X (ACAS X) to support the objectives of the Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Next Generation Air Transportation System Program (NextGen). ACAS X has a suite of variants with a common underlying design that are intended to be optimized for their intended airframes and operations. ACAS Xu being is designed for UAS and allows for new surveillance technologies and tailored logic for platforms with different performance characteristics. In addition to Collision Avoidance (CA) alerting and guidance, ACAS Xu is being tuned to provide RWC alerting and guidance in compliance with the SC 228 DAA MOPS. With a single logic performing both RWC and CA functions, ACAS Xu will provide industry with an integrated DAA solution that addresses many of the interoperability shortcomings of Phase I systems. While the MOPS for ACAS Xu will specify an integrated DAA system, it will need to show compliance with the RWC alerting thresholds and alerting requirements defined in the DAA Phase 2 MOPS. Further, some functional components of the ACAS Xu system such as the remote pilots displayed guidance might be mostly references to the corresponding requirements in the DAA MOPS. To provide a seamless, integrated, RWC-CA system to assist the pilot in remaining well clear and avoiding collisions, several

  6. Reparo de aneurisma de artéria ilíaca roto em criança

    PubMed Central

    Hoshiko, Fernando Massaru; Zampieri, Elisa Helena Subtil; Dalio, Marcelo Bellini; Dezotti, Nei Rodrigues Alves; Joviliano, Edwaldo Edner

    2017-01-01

    Resumo Relatamos o caso de uma menina de 12 anos que deu entrada na unidade de emergência com quadro de abdome agudo hemorrágico, massa abdominal pulsátil e instabilidade hemodinâmica. Confirmado o diagnóstico de aneurisma roto de artéria ilíaca direita, foi realizada correção cirúrgica de emergência por reparo aberto com reconstrução extra-anatômica, utilizando enxerto sintético de fino calibre, compatível com a anatomia. O tratamento foi bem-sucedido e a criança apresentou evolução favorável em curto prazo.

  7. California's Early ACA Expansion Increased Coverage And Reduced Out-Of-Pocket Spending For The State's Low-Income Population

    PubMed Central

    Golberstein, Ezra; Gonzales, Gilbert; Sommers, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act has expanded Medicaid to millions of low-income adults since the law first went into effect. While many states implemented the Medicaid expansion since 2014, five states and the District of Columbia took advantage of provisions in the ACA and Medicaid waivers that allowed them to expand public coverage as early as 2010. We examined the impact of California's Low-Income Health Program that began in 2010, using restricted data from the National Health Interview Survey. Our study demonstrates that the county-by-county roll out of expanded eligibility for public insurance in California increased coverage by 7 percentage points (p < 0.05) and reduced the likelihood of any family out-of-pocket medical spending in the past year by 10 percentage points (p < 0.05) among low-income adults. PMID:26438745

  8. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-03-24

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies.

  10. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine,more » and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.« less

  12. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  13. Policy Commercializing Nonprofits in Health: The History of a Paradox From the 19th Century to the ACA

    PubMed Central

    FOX, DANIEL M

    2015-01-01

    Policy Points: Health policy in the United States has, for more than a century, simultaneously and paradoxically incentivized the growth as well as the commercialization of nonprofit organizations in the health sector. This policy paradox persists during the implementation of the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Context For more than a century, policy in the United States has incentivized both expansion in the number and size of tax-exempt nonprofit organizations in the health sector and their commercialization. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) began yet another chapter in the history of this policy paradox. Methods This article explores the origin and persistence of the paradox using what many scholars call “interpretive social science.” This methodology prioritizes history and contingency over formal theory and methods in order to present coherent and plausible narratives of events and explanations for them. These narratives are grounded in documents generated by participants in particular events, as well as conversations with them, observing them in action, and analysis of pertinent secondary sources. The methodology achieves validity and reliability by gathering information from multiple sources and making disciplined judgments about its coherence and correspondence with reality. Findings A paradox with deep historical roots persists as a result of consensus about its value for both population health and the revenue of individuals and organizations in the health sector. Participants in this consensus include leaders of governance who have disagreed about many other issues. The paradox persists because of assumptions about the burden of disease and how to address it, as well as about the effects of biomedical science that is translated into professional education, practice, and the organization of services for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of illness. Conclusions The policy paradox that has incentivized the

  14. Policy commercializing nonprofits in health: the history of a paradox from the 19th century to the ACA.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    POLICY POINTS: Health policy in the United States has, for more than a century, simultaneously and paradoxically incentivized the growth as well as the commercialization of nonprofit organizations in the health sector. This policy paradox persists during the implementation of the Affordable Care Act of 2010. For more than a century, policy in the United States has incentivized both expansion in the number and size of tax-exempt nonprofit organizations in the health sector and their commercialization. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) began yet another chapter in the history of this policy paradox. This article explores the origin and persistence of the paradox using what many scholars call "interpretive social science." This methodology prioritizes history and contingency over formal theory and methods in order to present coherent and plausible narratives of events and explanations for them. These narratives are grounded in documents generated by participants in particular events, as well as conversations with them, observing them in action, and analysis of pertinent secondary sources. The methodology achieves validity and reliability by gathering information from multiple sources and making disciplined judgments about its coherence and correspondence with reality. A paradox with deep historical roots persists as a result of consensus about its value for both population health and the revenue of individuals and organizations in the health sector. Participants in this consensus include leaders of governance who have disagreed about many other issues. The paradox persists because of assumptions about the burden of disease and how to address it, as well as about the effects of biomedical science that is translated into professional education, practice, and the organization of services for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of illness. The policy paradox that has incentivized the growth and commercialization of nonprofits in

  15. Cell-Wall-Bound Proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178: Characterization and Specificity for β-Casein

    PubMed Central

    Tsakalidou, E.; Anastasiou, R.; Vandenberghe, I.; van Beeumen, J.; Kalantzopoulos, G.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178, which was isolated from Greek Kasseri cheese, produces a cell-wall-bound proteinase. The proteinase was removed from the cell envelope by washing the cells with a Ca2+-free buffer. The crude proteinase extract shows its highest activity at pH 6.0 and 40°C. It is inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, showing that the enzyme is a serine-type proteinase. Considering the substrate specificity, the enzyme is similar to the lactococcal PI-type proteinases, since it hydrolyzes β-casein mainly and α- and κ-caseins to a much lesser extent. The cell-wall-bound proteinase from L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178 liberates four main peptides from β-casein, which have been identified. PMID:10223997

  16. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2017-09-01

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these drugs in oncology are particularly interesting because antibodies are designed against specific targets on the tumor cell membrane and immune cells as well as targets in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, these drugs are relatively easy to radiolabel. Noninvasive molecular imaging techniques, such as SPECT and PET, provide information on the whole-body distribution of radiolabeled mAbs and antibody-related therapeutics. Molecular antibody imaging can potentially elucidate drug target expression, tracer uptake in the tumor, tumor saturation, and heterogeneity for these parameters within the tumor. These data can support drug development and may aid in patient stratification and monitoring of the treatment response. Selecting a radionuclide for theranostic purposes generally starts by matching the serum half-life of the mAb or antibody-related therapeutic and the physical half-life of the radionuclide. Furthermore, PET imaging allows better quantification than the SPECT technique. This information has increased interest in theranostics using PET radionuclides with a relatively long physical half-life, such as 89 Zr. In this review, we provide an overview of ongoing research on mAbs and antibody-related theranostics in preclinical and clinical oncologic settings. We identified 24 antibodies or antibody-related therapeutics labeled with PET radionuclides for theranostic purposes in patients. For this approach to become integrated in standard care, further standardization with respect to the procedures involved is required. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. Tissue-specific root ion profiling reveals essential roles of the CAX and ACA calcium transport systems in response to hypoxia in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Xiaohui; Colmer, Timothy David; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Waterlogging is a major abiotic stress that limits the growth of plants. The crucial role of Ca2+ as a second messenger in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli has been widely recognized in plants. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms of Ca2+ distribution within specific cell types in different root zones under hypoxia is poorly understood. In this work, whole-plant physiological and tissue-specific Ca2+ changes were studied using several ACA (Ca2+-ATPase) and CAX (Ca2+/proton exchanger) knock-out Arabidopsis mutants subjected to waterlogging treatment. In the wild-type (WT) plants, several days of hypoxia decreased the expression of ACA8, CAX4, and CAX11 by 33% and 50% compared with the control. The hypoxic treatment also resulted in an up to 11-fold tissue-dependent increase in Ca2+ accumulation in root tissues as revealed by confocal microscopy. The increase was much higher in stelar cells in the mature zone of Arabidopsis mutants with loss of function for ACA8, ACA11, CAX4, and CAX11. In addition, a significantly increased Ca2+ concentration was found in the cytosol of stelar cells in the mature zone after hypoxic treatment. Three weeks of waterlogging resulted in dramatic loss of shoot biomass in cax11 plants (67% loss in shoot dry weight), while in the WT and other transport mutants this decline was only 14–22%. These results were also consistent with a decline in leaf chlorophyll fluorescence (F v/F m). It is suggested that CAX11 plays a key role in maintaining cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis and/or signalling in root cells under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26889007

  18. When public health and genetic privacy collide: positive and normative theories explaining how ACA's expansion of corporate wellness programs conflicts with GINA's privacy rules.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jennifer S

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) contains many provisions intended to increase access to and lower the cost of health care by adopting public health measures. One of these promotes the use of at-work wellness programs by both providing employers with grants to develop these programs and also increasing their ability to tie the price employees pay for health insurance for participating in these programs and meeting specific health goals. Yet despite ACA's specific alteration of three different statues which had in the past shielded employees from having to contribute to the cost of their health insurance based on their achieving employer-designated health markers, it chose to leave alone recently enacted rules implementing the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (GINA), which prohibits employers from asking employees about their family health history in any context, including assessing their risk for setting wellness targets. This article reviews how both the changes made by ACA and the restrictions recently put place by GINA will affect the way employers are likely to structure Wellness Programs. It also considers how these changes reflect the competing social goals of both ACA, which seeks to expand access to the population by lowering costs, and GINA, which seeks to protect individuals from discrimination. It does so by analyzing both positive theories about how these new laws will function and normative theories explaining the likelihood of future friction between the interests of the population of the United States as a whole who are in need of increased and affordable access to health care, and of the individuals living in this country who risk discrimination, as science and medicine continue to make advances in linking genetic make-up to risk of future illness. © 2011 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  19. Fisher: a program for the detection of H/ACA snoRNAs using MFE secondary structure prediction and comparative genomics - assessment and update.

    PubMed

    Freyhult, Eva; Edvardsson, Sverker; Tamas, Ivica; Moulton, Vincent; Poole, Anthony M

    2008-07-21

    The H/ACA family of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) plays a central role in guiding the pseudouridylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). In an effort to systematically identify the complete set of rRNA-modifying H/ACA snoRNAs from the genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a program - Fisher - and previously presented several candidate snoRNAs based on our analysis 1. In this report, we provide a brief update of this work, which was aborted after the publication of experimentally-identified snoRNAs 2 identical to candidates we had identified bioinformatically using Fisher. Our motivation for revisiting this work is to report on the status of the candidate snoRNAs described in 1, and secondly, to report that a modified version of Fisher together with the available multiple yeast genome sequences was able to correctly identify several H/ACA snoRNAs for modification sites not identified by the snoGPS program 3. While we are no longer developing Fisher, we briefly consider the merits of the Fisher algorithm relative to snoGPS, which may be of use for workers considering pursuing a similar search strategy for the identification of small RNAs. The modified source code for Fisher is made available as supplementary material. Our results confirm the validity of using minimum free energy (MFE) secondary structure prediction to guide comparative genomic screening for RNA families with few sequence constraints.

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetism of A 2Co 12As 7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Ovidiu Garlea, V.; Chai, Ping; ...

    2015-08-28

    In this study, ternary intermetallics, A 2Co 12As 7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb), have been synthesized by annealing mixtures of elements in molten Bi at 1223 K. The materials obtained crystallize in the P6 3/m variant of the Zr 2Fe 12P 7 structure type. The unit cell volume shows a monotonic decrease with the increasing atomic number of the rare-earth metal, with the exception of Ce-, Eu-, and Yb-containing compounds. An examination of these outliers with X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) spectroscopy revealed mixed valence of Ce, Eu, and Yb, with the average oxidation states of +3.20(1), +2.47(5), and +2.91(1),more » respectively, at room temperature. Magnetic behavior of A 2Co 12As 7 is generally characterized by ferromagnetic ordering of Co 3d moments at 100–140 K, followed by low-temperature ordering of rare-earth 4f moments. The 3d-4f magnetic coupling changes from antiferromagnetic for A=Pr–Sm to ferromagnetic for A=Ce and Eu–Yb. Finally, polarized neutron scattering experiments were performed to support the postulated ferro- and ferrimagnetic ground states for Ce 2Co 12As 7 and Nd 2Co 12As 7, respectively.« less

  1. Women Saw Large Decrease In Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Contraceptives After ACA Mandate Removed Cost Sharing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nora V; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates that private health insurance plans cover prescription contraceptives with no consumer cost sharing. The positive financial impact of this new provision on consumers who purchase contraceptives could be substantial, but it has not yet been estimated. Using a large administrative claims data set from a national insurer, we estimated out-of-pocket spending before and after the mandate. We found that mean and median per prescription out-of-pocket expenses have decreased for almost all reversible contraceptive methods on the market. The average percentages of out-of-pocket spending for oral contraceptive pill prescriptions and intrauterine device insertions by women using those methods both dropped by 20 percentage points after implementation of the ACA mandate. We estimated average out-of-pocket savings per contraceptive user to be $248 for the intrauterine device and $255 annually for the oral contraceptive pill. Our results suggest that the mandate has led to large reductions in total out-of-pocket spending on contraceptives and that these price changes are likely to be salient for women with private health insurance. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  3. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    PubMed

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies as therapeutics offer new opportunities for the treatment of many tumor diseases. To date, 18 antibody-based drugs are approved for cancer treatment and hundreds of anti-tumor antibodies are under development. The first clinically approved antibodies were of murine origin or human-mouse chimeric. However, since murine antibody domains are immunogenic in human patients and could result in human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) responses, currently mainly humanized and fully human antibodies are developed for therapeutic applications.Here, in vitro antibody selection technologies directly allow the selection of human antibodies and the corresponding genes from human antibody gene libraries. Antibody phage display is the most common way to generate human antibodies and has already yielded thousands of recombinant antibodies for research, diagnostics and therapy. Here, we describe methods for the construction of human scFv gene libraries and the antibody selection.

  4. Effectiveness of the ACA (Availability, Current issues and Anticipation) training programme on GP-patient communication in palliative care; a controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Communicating effectively with palliative care patients has been acknowledged to be somewhat difficult, but little is known about the effect that training general practitioners (GPs) in specific elements of communication in palliative care might have. We hypothesized that GPs exposed to a new training programme in GP-patient communication in palliative care focusing on availability of the GP for the patient, current issues the GP should discuss with the patient and anticipation by the GP of various scenarios (ACA), would discuss more issues and become more skilled in their communication with palliative care patients. Methods In this controlled trial among GPs who attended a two-year Palliative Care Peer Group Training Course in the Netherlands only intervention GPs received the ACA training programme. To evaluate the effect of the programme a content analysis (Roter Interaction Analysis System) was performed of one videotaped 15-minute consultation of each GP with a simulated palliative care patient conducted at baseline, and one at 12 months follow-up. Both how the GP communicated with the patient (‘availability’) and the number of current and anticipated issues the GP discussed with the patient were measured quantitatively. We used linear mixed models and logistic regression models to evaluate between-group differences over time. Results Sixty-two GPs were assigned to the intervention and 64 to the control group. We found no effect of the ACA training programme on how the GPs communicated with the patient or on the number of issues discussed by GPs with the patient. The total number of issues discussed by the GPs was eight out of 13 before and after the training in both groups. Conclusion The ACA training programme did not influence how the GPs communicated with the simulated palliative care patient or the number of issues discussed by the GPs in this trial. Further research should evaluate whether this training programme is effective for GPs who

  5. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause a transfusion reaction (is not clinically significant). Examples of RBC antibodies and their clinical significance are ... online at http://chapters.redcross.org/ca/socal/research/circular.html. Accessed June 2009. Oren, E. and ...

  7. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rheumatic (ru-MAT-ik) disorders, such as lupus . ("Rheumatic" refers to disorders that affect the joints, ... aCL syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome aPL syndrome Hughes syndrome Lupus anticoagulant syndrome Causes Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) occurs ...

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2018.

    PubMed

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M

    The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  9. Antibodies to watch in 2018

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  10. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  11. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed.

  12. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry’s progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the “Antibodies to watch” series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration’s Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  13. Neutralising Antibodies against Ricin Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Julie; Panigai, Laetitia; Lamourette, Patricia; Sauvaire, Didier; Devilliers, Karine; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Créminon, Christophe; Simon, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC50 of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD50). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention. PMID:21633505

  14. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic,more » i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.« less

  15. Down-Regulation of MicroRNA-210 Confers Sensitivity towards 1’S-1’-Acetoxychavicol Acetate (ACA) in Cervical Cancer Cells by Targeting SMAD4

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Neoh Hun; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Awang, Khalijah; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate genes posttranscriptionally. Past studies have reported that miR-210 is up-regulated in many cancers including cervical cancer, and plays a pleiotropic role in carcinogenesis. However, its role in regulating response towards anti-cancer agents has not been fully elucidated. We have previously reported that the natural compound 1’S-1’-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) is able to induce cytotoxicity in various cancer cells including cervical cancer cells. Hence, this study aims to investigate the mechanistic role of miR-210 in regulating response towards ACA in cervical cancer cells. In the present study, we found that ACA down-regulated miR-210 expression in cervical cancer cells, and suppression of miR-210 expression enhanced sensitivity towards ACA by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed increased expression of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4), which was predicted as a target of miR-210 by target prediction programs, following treatment with ACA. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-210 binds to sequences in 3′UTR of SMAD4. Furthermore, decreased in SMAD4 protein expression was observed when miR-210 was overexpressed. Conversely, SMAD4 protein expression increased when miR-210 expression was suppressed. Lastly, we demonstrated that overexpression of SMAD4 augmented the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of ACA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-210 conferred sensitivity towards ACA in cervical cancer cells by targeting SMAD4. These findings suggest that combination of miRNAs and natural compounds could provide new strategies in treating cervical cancer. PMID:28401751

  16. Conserved Composition of Mammalian Box H/ACA and Box C/D Small Nucleolar Ribonucleoprotein Particles and Their Interaction with the Common Factor Nopp140

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunfeng; Isaac, Cynthia; Wang, Chen; Dragon, François; Pogac̆ić, Vanda; Meier, U. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs) mainly catalyze the modification of rRNA. The two major classes of snoRNPs, box H/ACA and box C/D, function in the pseudouridylation and 2′-O-methylation, respectively, of specific nucleotides. The emerging view based on studies in yeast is that each class of snoRNPs is composed of a unique set of proteins. Here we present a characterization of mammalian snoRNPs. We show that the previously characterized NAP57 is specific for box H/ACA snoRNPs, whereas the newly identified NAP65, the rat homologue of yeast Nop5/58p, is a component of the box C/D class. Using coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the nucleolar and coiled-body protein Nopp140 interacts with both classes of snoRNPs. This interaction is corroborated in vivo by the exclusive depletion of snoRNP proteins from nucleoli in cells transfected with a dominant negative Nopp140 construct. Interestingly, RNA polymerase I transcription is arrested in nucleoli depleted of snoRNPs, raising the possibility of a feedback mechanism between rRNA modification and transcription. Moreover, the Nopp140-snoRNP interaction appears to be conserved in yeast, because depletion of Srp40p, the yeast Nopp140 homologue, in a conditional lethal strain induces the loss of box H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs. We propose that Nopp140 functions as a chaperone of snoRNPs in yeast and vertebrate cells. PMID:10679015

  17. Conserved composition of mammalian box H/ACA and box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles and their interaction with the common factor Nopp140.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Isaac, C; Wang, C; Dragon, F; Pogacic, V; Meier, U T

    2000-02-01

    Small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs) mainly catalyze the modification of rRNA. The two major classes of snoRNPs, box H/ACA and box C/D, function in the pseudouridylation and 2'-O-methylation, respectively, of specific nucleotides. The emerging view based on studies in yeast is that each class of snoRNPs is composed of a unique set of proteins. Here we present a characterization of mammalian snoRNPs. We show that the previously characterized NAP57 is specific for box H/ACA snoRNPs, whereas the newly identified NAP65, the rat homologue of yeast Nop5/58p, is a component of the box C/D class. Using coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the nucleolar and coiled-body protein Nopp140 interacts with both classes of snoRNPs. This interaction is corroborated in vivo by the exclusive depletion of snoRNP proteins from nucleoli in cells transfected with a dominant negative Nopp140 construct. Interestingly, RNA polymerase I transcription is arrested in nucleoli depleted of snoRNPs, raising the possibility of a feedback mechanism between rRNA modification and transcription. Moreover, the Nopp140-snoRNP interaction appears to be conserved in yeast, because depletion of Srp40p, the yeast Nopp140 homologue, in a conditional lethal strain induces the loss of box H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs. We propose that Nopp140 functions as a chaperone of snoRNPs in yeast and vertebrate cells.

  18. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  19. Epigenetics of the antibody response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications and microRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and microRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as AID, as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as Blimp-1. These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasias. PMID:23643790

  20. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  1. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Signaling by Antibodies: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bournazos, Stylianos; Wang, Taia T.; Dahan, Rony; Maamary, Jad; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2017-01-01

    IgG antibodies mediate a diversity of immune functions by coupling of antigen specificity through the Fab domain to signal transduction via Fc-Fc receptor interactions. Indeed, balanced IgG signaling through Type I and Type II Fc receptors is required for the control of pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory processes. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that govern IgG-Fc receptor interactions, highlighting the diversity of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions that regulate immunity and inflammation, as well as determine susceptibility to infection and autoimmunity, and responsiveness to antibody-based therapeutics, and vaccine responses. PMID:28446061

  4. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  5. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immunemore » complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.« less

  6. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  7. Antibody distance from the cell membrane regulates antibody effector mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Kirstie L.S.; Chan, H.T. Claude; James, Sonja; Glennie, Martin J.; Cragg, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) such as rituximab is an established means of treating haematological malignancies. Antibodies can elicit a number of mechanisms to delete target cells, including complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). The inherent properties of the target molecule help define which of these mechanisms are more important for efficacy. However, why mAb binding to different epitopes within the same target elicits different levels of therapeutic activity, is often unclear. To specifically address whether distance from the target cell membrane influences the aforementioned effector mechanisms, a panel of fusion proteins consisting of a CD20 or CD52 epitope attached to various CD137 scaffold molecules were generated. The CD137 scaffold was modified through the removal or addition of cysteine-rich extracellular domains, to produce a panel of chimeric molecules which held the target epitope at different distances along the protein. It was shown that CDC and ADCC favoured a membrane proximal epitope, whilst ADCP favoured an epitope positioned further away. These findings were then confirmed using reagents targeting the membrane proximal or distal domains of CD137 itself before investigating these properties in vivo where a clear difference in the splenic clearance of transfected tumour cells was observed. Together, this work demonstrates how altering the position of the antibody epitope is able to change the effector mechanisms engaged and facilitates the selection of mAbs designed to delete target cells through specific effector mechanisms and provide more effective therapeutic agents. PMID:28404636

  8. Antibody Engineering for Pursuing a Healthier Future

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F. U. H.; Wang, Rongzhi; Ling, Sumei; Wang, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of antibody-production techniques, a number of immunoglobulins have been developed on a large scale using conventional methods. Hybridoma technology opened a new horizon in the production of antibodies against target antigens of infectious pathogens, malignant diseases including autoimmune disorders, and numerous potent toxins. However, these clinical humanized or chimeric murine antibodies have several limitations and complexities. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, recent advances in genetic engineering techniques and phage display technique have allowed the production of highly specific recombinant antibodies. These engineered antibodies have been constructed in the hunt for novel therapeutic drugs equipped with enhanced immunoprotective abilities, such as engaging immune effector functions, effective development of fusion proteins, efficient tumor and tissue penetration, and high-affinity antibodies directed against conserved targets. Advanced antibody engineering techniques have extensive applications in the fields of immunology, biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutic medicines. However, there is limited knowledge regarding dynamic antibody development approaches. Therefore, this review extends beyond our understanding of conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, recent advances in antibody engineering techniques together with antibody fragments, display technologies, immunomodulation, and broad applications of antibodies are discussed to enhance innovative antibody production in pursuit of a healthier future for humans. PMID:28400756

  9. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  10. Studies on antiplague haemagglutinating antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sosuke; Chikasato, Yoshio; Hotta, Susumu

    1974-01-01

    The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test has been widely applied in the detection of antiplague antibodies in rodent sera. In the present study, acetone treatment of the test serum was tried in order to improve the specificity of the reaction. It was shown that the IHA titres of acetone-treated sera correlated well with those of untreated sera measured by the standard method recommended by WHO. Essentially the same results were obtained with sera from experimentally immunized rodents and from captured wild rats. In addition to acetone treatment, the sera were treated with 2-mercaptoethanol (ME). The results obtained indicated that the antiplague IHA antibodies produced early after the inoculation of plague bacilli were ME-sensitive, whereas those detected in the later stages or after a second inoculation were ME-resistant. The data suggest that acetone treatment of sera could be useful for the screening of antiplague antibodies, and that treatment with ME is helpful in assessing the time of past plague infections. The present survey has also shown that the positive rates of antiplague antibodies in wild rats trapped in Kobe, one of the largest sea ports in Japan, have so far been very low. PMID:4549347

  11. Dengue antibodies in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Silva, Rejane Cristina; Eid, Andressa Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is an urban arbovirus whose etiologic agent is a virus of the genus Flavorius with four distinct antigen serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4) that is transmitted to humans through the bite of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The Campo Mourão region in Brazil is endemic for dengue fever. OBTECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific to the four serotypes of dengue in donors of the blood donor service in the city of Campo Mourão. Epidemiological records were evaluated and 4 mL of peripheral blood from 213 blood donors were collected in tubes without anticoagulant. Serum was then obtained and immunochromatographic tests were undertaken (Imuno-Rápido Dengue IgM/IgG(TM)). Individuals involved in the study answered a social and epidemiological questionnaire on data which included age, gender and diagnosis of dengue. Only three (1.4%) of the 213 blood tests were positive for IgG anti-dengue antibodies. No donors with IgM antibody, which identifies acute infection, were identified. The results of the current analysis show that the introduction of quantitative or molecular serological methods to determine the presence of anti-dengue antibodies or the detection of the dengue virus in blood donors in endemic regions should be established so that the quality of blood transfusions is guaranteed.

  12. Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Internet]. Ann Arbor (MI): The Regents of the University of Michigan; c1995-2017. Coombs Antibody Test (Indirect ... gov/health/health-topics/topics/bdt/with NorthShore University Health System [Internet]. NorthShore University Health System; c2017. ...

  13. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Encephalitis and AMPA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; van Sonderen, Agnes; Leypoldt, Frank; Houghton, David; Geschwind, Michael; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paredes, Mercedes; Sabater, Lidia; Saiz, Albert; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Graus, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report the clinical features, comorbidities, and outcome of 22 newly identified patients with antibodies to the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR). Methods: This was a retrospective review of patients diagnosed between May 2009 and March 2014. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Results: Patients' median age was 62 years (range 23–81; 14 female). Four syndromes were identified: 12 (55%) patients presented with distinctive limbic encephalitis (LE), 8 (36%) with limbic dysfunction along with multifocal/diffuse encephalopathy, one with LE preceded by motor deficits, and one with psychosis with bipolar features. Fourteen patients (64%) had a tumor demonstrated pathologically (5 lung, 4 thymoma, 2 breast, 2 ovarian teratoma) or radiologically (1 lung). Additional antibodies occurred in 7 patients (3 onconeuronal, 1 tumor-related, 2 cell surface, and 1 tumor-related and cell surface), all with neurologic symptoms or tumor reflecting the concurrent autoimmunity. Treatment and outcome were available from 21 patients (median follow-up 72 weeks, range 5–266): 5 had good response to immunotherapy and tumor therapy, 10 partial response, and 6 did not improve. Eventually 5 patients died; all had a tumor or additional paraneoplastic symptoms related to onconeuronal antibodies. Coexistence of onconeuronal antibodies predicted a poor outcome (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Anti-AMPAR encephalitis usually manifests as LE, can present with other symptoms or psychosis, and is paraneoplastic in 64% of cases. Complete and impressive neurologic improvement can occur, but most patients have partial recovery. Screening for a tumor and onconeuronal antibodies is important because their detection influences outcome. PMID:25979696

  15. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  16. The Impact of the ACA Medicaid Expansions on Health Insurance Coverage through 2015 and Coverage Disparities by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender.

    PubMed

    Wehby, George L; Lyu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Examine the ACA Medicaid expansion effects on Medicaid take-up and private coverage through 2015 and coverage disparities by age, race/ethnicity, and gender. 2011-2015 American Community Survey for 3,137,989 low-educated adults aged 19-64 years. Difference-in-differences regressions accounting for national coverage trends and state fixed effects. Expansion effects doubled in 2015 among low-educated adults, with a nearly 8 percentage-point increase in Medicaid take-up and 6 percentage-point decline in uninsured rate. Significant coverage gains were observed across virtually all examined groups by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Take-up and insurance declines were strongest among younger adults and were generally close by gender and race/ethnicity. Despite the increased take-up however, coverage disparities remained sizeable, especially for young adults and Hispanics who had declining but still high uninsured rates in 2015. There was some evidence of private coverage crowd-out in certain subgroups, particularly among young adults aged 19-26 years and women, including in both individually purchased and employer-sponsored coverage. The ACA Medicaid expansions have continued to increase coverage in 2015 across the entire population of low-educated adults and have reduced age disparities in coverage. However, there is still a need for interventions that target eligible young and Hispanic adults. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Antibodies against mumps virus component proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keita; Iwata, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    The neutralization (NT) test is regarded as the most reliable method for detection of protective antibodies, but is labor-intensive and time consuming. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) is frequently used in sero-epidemiological studies because of its simplicity and ease of use. In this study, immunofluorescent (IF) antibodies against nucleocapsid (N), fusion (F), and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins were investigated in comparison with NT and EIA antibodies. The antibody against N protein was dominant in serum samples obtained from patients with a previous history of mumps infection. Titers of antibodies against F and HN proteins were very low. Many serum samples were positive for EIA but negative for NT, and no significant correlation was noted between NT and EIA antibodies. Among the three component proteins, correlation of EIA and IF antibodies with N protein was relatively good. After vaccination with mumps vaccine, EIA positivity was closely related to the IF antibodies against N protein, and after vaccination NT-positive sera became positive for IF antibodies against F and HN proteins. IF antibodies against F and HN proteins were considered to have a strong association with NT antibodies, and those against N protein were considered to have a strong association with EIA antibodies.

  18. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  19. Specific antibody for pesticide residue determination produced by antibody-pesticide complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new method for specific antibody production was developed using antibody (Ab)-pesticide complex as a unique immunogen. Parathion (PA) was the targeted pesticide, and rabbit polyclonal antibody (Pab) and mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) were used as carrier proteins. The Ab-PA complexes were genera...

  20. Antiphospholipid antibodies in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: a long-term clinical and laboratory follow-up status study from northwest India.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Singh, Surjit; Naseem, Shano; Suri, Deepti; Rawat, Amit; Gupta, Anju; Masih, Joseph; Bose, Sunil

    2014-05-01

    We have previously shown that children with pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) have high incidence of anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLA) and reports suggest that presence of APLA can modify disease expression. While the frequency of APLA has been studied previously in adults with SLE, there is paucity of literature in children especially with regard to long-term follow-up. In the earlier study, we analyzed 27 pSLE patients for the prevalence of APLA; in the present study, we further reviewed the APLA status and its relation with clinical outcome of this cohort of patients over a further 7 year follow-up period. Out of the initial cohort of 27 patients, follow-up APLA testing was available in 21 patients who were tested for APLA at least once during this time. Seven (33.3 %) of these 21 patients were never positive for any of the APLA; 1 (4.8 %) was persistently positive; and 13 (61.9 %) were positive for APLA intermittently or at least once. Overall, APLA positivity for IgG, IgM anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) was comparable, with positivity seen in 10 (47.6 %), 9 (42.9 %) and 9 (42.9 %) cases, respectively. Anti-β2 GP1 antibodies were tested in 11 patients on follow-up, of which 3 (27.3 %) showed positivity. In all, 10 (47.6 %) patients showed positivity for more than 1 APLA. Two (9.5 %) patients showed varying degrees of positivity for LA, ACA, and anti-β2 GP1 antibodies at different times, thereby showing the importance of checking for all APLAs at each time of testing. Out of these 21 patients, 3 (14.3 %) patients had thrombosis, and all 3 patients were positive for APLA. There were 2 (9.5 %) fatalities-both of these had thrombosis and were positive for APLA. Our study shows that pSLE patients on treatment frequently test positive for APLA. Thrombosis was infrequent in this cohort. However, when present it was associated with APLA positivity and high fatality in our experience. On the other hand, presence

  1. Recombinant antibodies and their use in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Shen, Zhihong; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-04-01

    Inexpensive, noninvasive immunoassays can be used to quickly detect disease in humans. Immunoassay sensitivity and specificity are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies are produced biologically. As such, antibody quality and suitability for use in immunoassays cannot be readily determined or controlled by human intervention. However, the process through which high-quality antibodies can be obtained has been shortened and streamlined by use of genetic engineering and recombinant antibody techniques. Antibodies that traditionally take several months or more to produce when animals are used can now be developed in a few weeks as recombinant antibodies produced in bacteria, yeast, or other cell types. Typically most immunoassays use two or more antibodies or antibody fragments to detect antigens that are indicators of disease. However, a label-free biosensor, for example, a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) needs one antibody only. As such, the cost and time needed to design and develop an immunoassay can be substantially reduced if recombinant antibodies and biosensors are used rather than traditional antibody and assay (e.g. enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, ELISA) methods. Unlike traditional antibodies, recombinant antibodies can be genetically engineered to self-assemble on biosensor surfaces, at high density, and correctly oriented to enhance antigen-binding activity and to increase assay sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Additionally, biosensor surface chemistry and physical and electronic properties can be modified to further increase immunoassay performance above and beyond that obtained by use of traditional methods. This review describes some of the techniques investigators have used to develop highly specific and sensitive, recombinant antibody-based biosensors for detection of antigens in simple or complex biological samples.

  2. Viral Epitopes and Monoclonal Antibodies: Isolation of Blocking Antibodies that Inhibit Virus Neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-07-01

    The inability of pathogenic animal viruses to be completely neutralized by antibodies can lead to chronic viral infections in which infectious virus persists even in the presence of excess neutralizing antibody. A mechanism that results in this nonneutralized fraction of virus was defined by the topographical relationships of viral epitopes identified with monoclonal antibodies wherein monoclonal antibodies bind to virus and sterically block the binding of neutralizing antibodies.

  3. STUDIES ON FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY STAINING

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Gerald; Slizys, Irene S.; Chase, Merrill W.

    1961-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the non-specific fluorescent staining of splenic imprints treated with fluorescent sheep antibody globulins. 2. In tissue imprints made with the spleens of antigen-stimulated animals, no morphological distinction was evident between areas showing non-specific fluorescence and specific fluorescence. 3. Elimination of non-specific fluorescence was not achieved by any one, or any combination of the following: (a) conjugating only gamma globulins with fluorescein isothiocyanate; (b) removal of dialyzable fluorescent products on sephadex, followed by concentration through the use of pressure dialysis; (c) use of crystalline preparations of fluorescein isothiocyanate. 4. Individual preparations of fluorescent antibodies were separated by gradient elution chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose into fractions possessing different numbers of fluorescein radicals per molecule of globulin. 5. The coupling ratio of 50 mg fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) per gm of protein, as commonly advocated, can not be recommended for the precise localization of antibody globulin in tissues owing to the capacity of the coupled products to give non-specific fluorescent staining. When crystalline preparations of FITC are used instead of the amorphous product at 50 mg/gm protein, far too high non-specific fluorescence results. 6. A fraction with bright specific fluorescence and no or negligible nonspecific fluorescence was obtained from each fluorescent antibody that was prepared by using 6 to 8 mg of crystalline fluorescein isothiocyanate per gm of globulin and was then subjected to DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gradient elution to eliminate the most highly coupled molecules. PMID:13706641

  4. Thyroid stimulating antibodies in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Attali, J R; Valensi, P; Valeyre, D; Sandre-Banon, D; Sebaoun, J; Battesti, J P

    1994-06-01

    Thyroid disorders, particularly euthyroid goiters and hyperthyroidism, can be observed in sarcoidosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAb) in 21 patients with sarcoidosis. 12 patients out of 21 had simultaneous euthyroid goiter. The others were euthyroid and free of goiter. The TSAb testing was carried out using the rat thyroid fragment perifusion technique. Thyroid response to IgG was determined by the mean rate of T4 release (R) during a 30-min perifusion and the secretion peak (Imax). Antibodies inhibiting TSH binding to its receptors were also looked for. Ten patients were TSAb+ and eleven were TSAb-. There was no difference between the TSAb+ and TSAb- groups in the clinical parameters for sarcoidosis, nor in the number of goiters found (n = 6 for both groups). In 5 out of the 6 cases where goiter was present in the TSAb+ group it was homogeneous and diagnosed at the same time as or after the first signs of sarcoidosis, whereas in 5 out of the 6 cases of goiter in TSAb- patients, it was nodular, diagnosed before sarcoidosis in 3 of them, endemic in one of them, and familial in another. The search for antibodies inhibiting TSH binding to its receptors was negative in 10 out of 21 patients tested. Although the presence of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of patients with sarcoidosis, found here for the first time, remains to be explained, it pleads in favor of the immunologic nature of the association of sarcoidosis with thyroid disorders.

  5. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  6. Antibody repertoire development in camelids.

    PubMed

    De Genst, Erwin; Saerens, Dirk; Muyldermans, Serge; Conrath, Katja

    2006-01-01

    The humoral immune response of the Camelidae is unique as these animals are the only known mammals that seem to possess functional homodimeric heavy-chain antibodies besides the classical heteromeric antibodies composed of heavy (H) and light (L) chains. By definition, the heavy-chain antibodies lack the L-chain, and it was noticed that their H-chain is devoid of the typical first constant domain (CH1) and contains a dedicated variable domain, referred to as VHH. The VHH exon is assembled from separate V-D-J gene segments. The recombined VHH region is subjected to somatic hypermutations; however, the timing and actual mechanism of the class switch from mu to the dedicated gamma-isotype remains elusive. Interestingly, antigen-specific VHHs are easily retrieved after panning of a phage-displayed rearranged V-gene pool cloned from an immunised camelid. These single-domain antigen binding entities possess a number of biophysical properties that offer particular advantages in various medical and biotechnological applications.

  7. Interfacial metal and antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tongqing; Hamer, Dean H; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Sattentau, Quentin J; Kwong, Peter D

    2005-10-11

    The unique ligation properties of metal ions are widely exploited by proteins, with approximately one-third of all proteins estimated to be metalloproteins. Although antibodies use various mechanisms for recognition, to our knowledge, none has ever been characterized that uses an interfacial metal. We previously described a family of CD4-reactive antibodies, the archetype being Q425. CD4:Q425 engagement does not interfere with CD4:HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein binding, but it blocks subsequent steps required for viral entry. Here, we use surface-plasmon resonance to show that Q425 requires calcium for recognition of CD4. Specifically, Q425 binding of calcium resulted in a 55,000-fold enhancement in affinity for CD4. X-ray crystallographic analyses of Q425 in the presence of Ca(2+), Ba(2+), or EDTA revealed an exposed metal-binding site, partially coordinated by five atoms contributed from four antibody complementarity-determining regions. The results suggest that Q425 recognition of CD4 involves direct ligation of antigen by the Q425-held calcium, with calcium binding each ligating atom of CD4 with approximately 1.5 kcal/mol of binding energy. This energetic contribution, which is greater than that from a typical protein atom, demonstrates how interfacial metal ligation can play a unique role in antigen recognition.

  8. Interfacial metal and antibody recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tongqing; Hamer, Dean H.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The unique ligation properties of metal ions are widely exploited by proteins, with approximately one-third of all proteins estimated to be metalloproteins. Although antibodies use various mechanisms for recognition, to our knowledge, none has ever been characterized that uses an interfacial metal. We previously described a family of CD4-reactive antibodies, the archetype being Q425. CD4:Q425 engagement does not interfere with CD4:HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein binding, but it blocks subsequent steps required for viral entry. Here, we use surface-plasmon resonance to show that Q425 requires calcium for recognition of CD4. Specifically, Q425 binding of calcium resulted in a 55,000-fold enhancement in affinity for CD4. X-ray crystallographic analyses of Q425 in the presence of Ca2+, Ba2+, or EDTA revealed an exposed metal-binding site, partially coordinated by five atoms contributed from four antibody complementarity-determining regions. The results suggest that Q425 recognition of CD4 involves direct ligation of antigen by the Q425-held calcium, with calcium binding each ligating atom of CD4 with ≈1.5 kcal/mol of binding energy. This energetic contribution, which is greater than that from a typical protein atom, demonstrates how interfacial metal ligation can play a unique role in antigen recognition. PMID:16195378

  9. [ELISA in the determination of antiphosphatidylserine antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fialová, L; Mikulíková, L; Fisar, Z; Beitlová, D; Malbohan, I

    1996-05-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) are a group of antibodies against various phospholipid antigens. In order to extend the spectrum of examined specificities of antiphospholipid antibodies the authors elaborated an ELISA method for assessment of antiphosphatidyl serine antibodies (APSA). As antigen they used phosphatidyl serine isolated from the white matter of cattle brain. The ELISA method was tested by examining APSA in 12 patients with rheumatic diseases, 24 women with reproductive disorders and 50 patients with testicular tumours and the results were compared with examinations of anticardiolipin antibodies. The concurrent presence of both types of antibodies was recorded in 20.8% women with reproductive disorders and in 14% of the patients with testicular tumours. In these groups antiphosphatidyl serine antibodies were found more frequently.

  10. Antibodies against viruses: passive and active immunization

    PubMed Central

    Law, Mansun; Hangartner, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Antibodies, through passive or active immunization, play a central role in prophylaxis against many infectious agents. While neutralization is a primary function of antibodies in protection against most viruses, the relative contribution of Fc-dependent and complement-dependent antiviral activities of antibodies was found to vary between different viruses in recent studies. The multiple hit model explains how antibodies neutralize viruses and recent data on the stoichiometry of antibody neutralization suggest that the organization of viral surface proteins on viruses, in addition to virus size, influences the level of antibody occupancy required for neutralization. These new findings will improve our strategies in therapeutic antibody engineering and rational vaccine design. PMID:18577455

  11. Methods of identification employing antibody profiles

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann-Michele

    1993-12-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of the set of individual-specific antibodies that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of such antibodies with a particular panel, of n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly be used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing individual-specific antibodies.

  12. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  13. Designing two-in-one antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ignacio Garcia; Espinoza, Luis R

    2009-09-01

    Evaluation of: Bostrom J, Shang-Fan Y, Kan D et al.: Variants of the antibody Herceptin that interact with HER2 and VEGF at the antigen binding site. Science 323, 1610-1614 (2009). The longstanding held notion that one antibody equals one antigen and, hence, one function has been challenged in recent years. Improved technology in antibody production, especially the accumulation of sequence data of immunoglobulin genes and the advent of PCR have made it possible to clone antibody gene repertoires. The current paper provides further challenge to the notion of one antibody = one antigen by developing 'two-in-one' antibodies with an antigen-binding site that binds two distinct proteins with high affinity. A therapeutic variant antibody of Herceptin (Genentech, CA, USA) was isolated that binds the human EGF receptor (HER)2 and also to VEGF. This development may represent a breakthrough discovery and may have significant implications in the therapy of malignant, infectious, allergic and autoimmune disorders.

  14. Modification of Antibody Function by Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Dasch, James R; Dasch, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    The ability to "fine-tune" recombinant antibodies by mutagenesis separates recombinant antibodies from hybridoma-derived antibodies because the latter are locked with respect to their properties. Recombinant antibodies can be modified to suit the application: Changes in isotype, format (e.g., scFv, Fab, bispecific antibodies), and specificity can be made once the heavy- and light-chain sequences are available. After immunoglobulin heavy and light chains for a particular antibody have been cloned, the binding site-namely, the complementarity determining regions (CDR)-can be manipulated by mutagenesis to obtain antibody variants with improved properties. The method described here is relatively simple, uses commercially available reagents, and is effective. Using the pComb3H vector, a commercial mutagenesis kit, PfuTurbo polymerase (Agilent), and two mutagenic primers, a library of phage with mutagenized heavy and light CDR3 can be obtained. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. An innovative and highly drug-tolerant approach for detecting neutralizing antibodies directed to therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sloan, John H; Conway, Richard G; Pottanat, Thomas G; Troutt, Jason S; Higgs, Richard E; Konrad, Robert J; Qian, Yue-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Immunogenicity testing of biotherapeutic drugs is a regulatory requirement. Herein, we describe a drug-tolerant assay for detecting neutralizing antibodies against a therapeutic antibody. Excess target of the therapeutic antibody was incorporated into the detection step of an affinity capture elution assay. Signal generated from binding of antidrug antibody (ADA) to the therapeutic antibody was compared with signal from binding of ADA to the therapeutic antibody preincubated with its target. The results demonstrated that the target blocked binding of the therapeutic antibody to neutralizing monkey ADA and to two anti-idiotypic antibodies. This highly drug-tolerant novel approach enables the detection of neutralizing antibodies and allows for one basic assay format to achieve complete characterization of ADA responses.

  16. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... AK, Litchman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... D, Brostoff J, Roth DB, Roitt IM, eds. Immunology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  17. Individual-specific antibody identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann -Michele

    1989-11-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of a hithertofore unknown set of individual-specific, or IS antibodies, that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of IS antibodies with a particular panel, or n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly by used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing IS antibodies. Identification of inanimate objects, particularly security documents, is similarly affected by associating with the documents, an effective amount of a particular individual's IS antibodies, or conversely, a particular panel of antigens, and forming antibody-antigen complexes with a particular panel of antigens, or a particular individual's IS antibodies, respectively. One embodiment of the instant identification method, termed the blocked fingerprint assay, has applications in the area of allergy testing, autoimmune diagnostics and therapeutics, and the detection of environmental antigens such as pathogens, chemicals, and toxins.

  18. Atypical antibody responses in dengue vaccine recipients.

    PubMed

    Kanesa-Thasan, N; Sun, W; Ludwig, G V; Rossi, C; Putnak, J R; Mangiafico, J A; Innis, B L; Edelman, R

    2003-12-01

    Eight of 69 (12%) healthy adult volunteers vaccinated with monovalent live-attenuated dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidates had atypical antibody responses, with depressed IgM:IgG antibody ratios and induction of high-titer hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing (NT) antibodies to all four DENV serotypes. These features suggested flavivirus exposure prior to DENV vaccination, yet no volunteer had a history of previous flavivirus infection, flavivirus vaccination, or antibody to flaviviruses evident before DENV vaccination. Moreover, production of antibody to DENV by atypical responders (AR) was not accelerated compared with antibody responses in the 61 flavivirus-naive responders (NR). Further evaluation revealed no differences in sex, age, race, DENV vaccine candidate received, or clinical signs and symptoms following vaccination between AR and NR. However, viremia was delayed at the onset in AR compared with NR. A comparative panel of all AR and five randomly selected NR found flavivirus cross-reactive antibody after vaccination only in AR. Unexpectedly, six of eight AR had NT antibodies to yellow fever virus (YFV) > 1:10 before vaccination while NR had none (P = 0.04). The AR also universally demonstrated YFV NT antibody titers > or = 1:160 after DENV vaccination, whereas four of five NR failed to seroconvert (P = 0.02). Yellow fever virus priming broadens the antibody response to monovalent DENV vaccination. The effect of flavivirus priming on the clinical and immunologic response to tetravalent DENV vaccine remains to be determined.

  19. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  20. OsACA6, a P-type IIB Ca²⁺ ATPase promotes salinity and drought stress tolerance in tobacco by ROS scavenging and enhancing the expression of stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Huda, Kazi M K; Banu, M Sufara Akhter; Garg, Bharti; Tula, Suresh; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-12-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) regulates several signalling pathways involved in growth, development and stress tolerance. Cellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis is achieved by the combined action of channels, pumps and antiporters, but direct evidence for a role of Ca²⁺ATPase pumps in stress tolerance is lacking. Here we report the characterization of a Ca²⁺ ATPase gene (OsACA6) from Oryza sativa, and elucidate its functions in stress tolerance. OsACA6 transcript levels are enhanced in response to salt, drought, abscisic acid and heat. In vivo localization identified plasma membranes as an integration site for the OsACA6-GFP fusion protein. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we demonstrate that over-expression of OsACA6 is triggered during salinity and drought stresses. The enhanced tolerance to these stresses was confirmed by changes in several physiological indices, including water loss rate, photosynthetic efficiency, cell membrane stability, germination, survival rate, malondialdehyde content, electrolyte leakage and increased proline accumulation. Furthermore, over-expressing lines also showed higher leaf chlorophyll and reduced accumulation of H₂O₂ and Na⁺ ions compared to the wild-type. Reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed in transgenic lines. The increased proline accumulation and ROS scavenging enzyme activities in transgenic plants over-expressing OsACA6 efficiently modulate the ROS machinery and proline biosynthesis through an integrative mechanism. Transcriptional profiling of these plants revealed altered expression of genes encoding many transcription factors, stress- and disease-related proteins, as well as signalling components. These results suggest that Ca²⁺ ATPases have diverse roles as regulators of many stress signalling pathways, leading to plant growth, development and stress tolerance. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Box H/ACA snoRNAs are preferred substrates for the trimethylguanosine synthase in the divergent unicellular eukaryote Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto; Chakrabarti, Kausik; Pearson, Michael; Benarroch, Delphine; Shuman, Stewart; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    The 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine caps of eukaryal snRNAs and snoRNA are formed by the enzyme Tgs1, which catalyzes sequential guanine-N2 methylations of m7G caps. Atypically, in the divergent unicellular eukaryote Trichomonas vaginalis, spliceosomal snRNAs lack a guanosine cap and the recombinant T. vaginalis trimethylguanosine synthase (TvTgs) produces only m2,7G in vitro. Here, we show by direct metabolic labeling that endogenous T. vaginalis RNAs contain m7G, m2,7G, and m2,2,7G caps. Immunodepletion of TvTgs from cell extracts and TvTgs add-back experiments demonstrate that TvTgs produces m2,7G and m2,2,7G caps. Expression of TvTgs in yeast tgs1Δ cells leads to the formation of m2,7G and m2,2,7G caps and complementation of the lethality of a tgs1Δ mud2Δ strain. Whereas TvTgs is present in the nucleus and cytosol of T. vaginalis cells, TMG-containing RNAs are localized primarily in the nucleolus. Molecular cloning of anti-TMG affinity-purified T. vaginalis RNAs identified 16 box H/ACA snoRNAs, which are implicated in guiding RNA pseudouridylation. The ensemble of new T. vaginalis H/ACA snoRNAs allowed us to predict and partially validate an extensive map of pseudouridines in T. vaginalis rRNA. PMID:22847815

  2. Antibody arrays in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jarad J; Burgess, Rob; Mao, Ying-Qing; Luo, Shuhong; Tang, Hao; Jones, Valerie Sloane; Weisheng, Bao; Huang, Ren-Yu; Chen, Xuesong; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2015-01-01

    All of life is regulated by complex and organized chemical reactions that help dictate when to grow, to move, to reproduce, and to die. When these processes go awry, or are interrupted by pathological agents, diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity, or infections can result. Cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, adipokines, and other chemical moieties make up a vast subset of these chemical reactions that are altered in disease states, and monitoring changes in these molecules could provide for the identification of disease biomarkers. From the first identification of carcinoembryonic antigen, to the discovery of prostate-specific antigen, to numerous others described within, biomarkers of disease are detectable in a plethora of sample types. The growing number of biomarkers for infection, autoimmunity, and cancer allow for increasingly early detection, to identification of novel drug targets, to prognostic indicators of disease outcome. However, more and more studies are finding that a single cytokine or growth factor is insufficient as a true disease biomarker and that a more global perspective is needed to understand true disease biology. Such a broad view requires a multiplexed platform for chemical detection, and antibody arrays meet and exceed this need by performing this detection in a high-throughput fashion. Herein, we will discuss how antibody arrays have evolved, and how they have helped direct new drug target design, helped identify therapeutic disease markers, and helped in earlier disease detection. From asthma to renal disease, and neurological dysfunction to immunologic disorders, antibody arrays afford a bright future for new biomarkers discovery. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Elloumi, Jihene; Jellali, Karim; Jemel, Ikram; Aifa, Sami

    2012-04-01

    Three main targets were subjected for the most approved monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in cancer therapy: EGFR in solid cancer, the clusters of differentiation in blood cancer and VEGF in angiogenesis. Meanwhile side effects, the elevated costs and resistance problems are limiting the efficiency of mAbs as targeted therapy. The combinatory therapy with chemo or radiotherapy has improved the efficiency of mAbs. The present review aims to shed more light on the immunotherapy and the related patents that were developed for cancer treatment.

  4. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Schmidt, Michael M; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-02-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally.

  5. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  6. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  7. Conference scene: progress with promising human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W

    2012-03-01

    Antibodies and antibody-based therapeutics have become big business, with annual sales over US$50 billion, accounting for >6% of worldwide pharmaceutical revenues. Ten molecules have blockbuster status (>US$1 billion), with six generating more than US$6 billion in sales. In excess of 300 products based on this rapidly maturing technology are in clinical trials. The generation and manufacture of human antibodies is now routine, although the cost of goods remains an issue. Optimizing combinations of antibodies with other therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy) is a major short-term goal, while target validation and product differentiation remain significant hurdles if growth is to continue. Some of the notable highlights of the recent 16th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas meeting in Cannes, France are described below. The conference was sponsored by the international journal Human Antibodies, in association with the Integrative Medical Sciences Association (IMSA). The Program Chairman was Professor Mark Glassy, IMSA, San Diego, CA, USA.

  8. Antibodies and tuberculosis: finally coming of age?

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Javid, Babak

    2018-06-05

    Are antibodies important for protection against tuberculosis? The jury has been out for more than 100 years. B cell depletion in experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection failed to identify a major role for these cells in immunity to tuberculosis. However, recent identification of naturally occurring antibodies in humans that are protective during M. tuberculosis infection has reignited the debate. Here, we discuss the evidence for a protective role for antibodies in tuberculosis and consider the feasibility of designing novel tuberculosis vaccines targeting humoral immunity.

  9. LGI1 antibody encephalitis and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dahai; Hao, Qinjian; He, Lan; Wang, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    To describe a case of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 antibody-encephalitis presenting with psychosis. Case report. A young man with leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1-antibody encephalitis initially presented with acute psychotic symptoms, short-term memory loss and faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hippocampal lesions. Electroencephalography revealed frontotemporal slowing of background activity. Increased awareness of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1-antibody encephalitis may promote early recognition and treatment.

  10. [Ma2 antibody and multiple mononeuropathies].

    PubMed

    Ayrignac, X; Castelnovo, G; Landrault, E; Fayolle, H; Pers, Y-M; Honnorat, J; Campello, C; Figarella-Branger, D; Labauge, P

    2008-01-01

    Anti-Ma2 antibodies belong to a family of onconeuronal antibodies that target proteins expressed in brain, testis and several tumors. Previously observed in patients presenting with limbic encephalitis, they seem to be associated with several other paraneoplastic syndromes. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting sensory and motor neuropathy associated with non-small-cell lung cancer who had Ma2-antibodies.

  11. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  12. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  13. Reconciling the Structural Attributes of Avian Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Paul J.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J.; Whisstock, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation. PMID:24737329

  14. Optimizing antibody expression: The nuts and bolts.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Arora, Sushrut; Ravi, Shiva Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Antibodies are extensively utilized entities in biomedical research, and in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. Many of these applications require high amounts of antibodies. However, meeting this ever-increasing demand of antibodies in the global market is one of the outstanding challenges. The need to maintain a balance between demand and supply of antibodies has led the researchers to discover better means and methods for optimizing their expression. These strategies aim to increase the volumetric productivity of the antibodies along with the reduction of associated manufacturing costs. Recent years have witnessed major advances in recombinant protein technology, owing to the introduction of novel cloning strategies, gene manipulation techniques, and an array of cell and vector engineering techniques, together with the progress in fermentation technologies. These innovations were also highly beneficial for antibody expression. Antibody expression depends upon the complex interplay of multiple factors that may require fine tuning at diverse levels to achieve maximum yields. However, each antibody is unique and requires individual consideration and customization for optimizing the associated expression parameters. This review provides a comprehensive overview of several state-of-the-art approaches, such as host selection, strain engineering, codon optimization, gene optimization, vector modification and process optimization that are deemed suitable for enhancing antibody expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also providesmore » an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.« less

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  17. Positivity rates of antithyroid antibody, antinuclear antibody and thyroid peroxidase antibody in different types of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Lim, H K; Bae, M I; Jeong, K H; Shin, M K; Lee, M-H

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is associated with various autoimmune disorders, and organ-specific autoantibodies are frequently found in patients with this disorder. Vitiligo is classically divided into segmental vitiligo (SV) and nonsegmental vitiligo (NSV), and it is believed that the pathogenesis differs between these two types. As the NSV type is related to an autoimmune mechanism, autoantibody detection rates are likely to be higher in the NSV type than in the segmental type; however, no comparative studies have been performed. To analyse the rates of autoantibody positivity according to the clinical features in patients with vitiligo. Rates of antithyroid antibody (Tg Ab), antinuclear antibody (ANA) and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO Ab) positivity were analysed and compared according to the sex, clinical type and age of onset of 807 patients with vitiligo. There were 106 patients with SV (13.1%) and 701 patients with NSV (86.9%). Tg Ab and ANA positivity did not differ between the SV and NSV types. A positive TPO Ab result was obtained in 16 patients with SV (15.1%) and 173 patients with NSV (24.7%). The TPO Ab positivity rate was significantly higher in NSV (χ² = 4.14, P < 0.05). The positivity rates of the three autoantibodies differed significantly according to age of onset (P = 0.001, P = 0.02 and P < 0.001 for Tg Ab, ANA and TPO Ab positivity, respectively). The TPO Ab positivity rate also showed a sex difference (P < 0.001). The positivity rates for the three autoantibodies showed differences according to age of onset and sex. The rates of Tg Ab and ANA positivity showed no significant differences according to clinical type, but the TPO Ab positivity rate was significantly different between SV and NSV. It appears likely that an autoimmune mechanism contributes to the pathogenesis of SV. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  19. Immune Antibody Libraries: Manipulating The Diverse Immune Repertoire for Antibody Discovery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Theam Soon; Chan, Soo Khim

    2016-01-01

    Antibody phage display is highly dependent on the availability of antibody libraries. There are several forms of libraries depending mainly on the origin of the source materials. There are three major classes of libraries, mainly the naïve, immune and synthetic libraries. Immune antibody libraries are designed to isolate specific and high affinity antibodies against disease antigens. The pre-exposure of the host to an infection results in the production of a skewed population of antibodies against the particular infection. This characteristic takes advantage of the in vivo editing machinery to generate bias and specific immune repertoire. The skewed but diverse repertoire of immune libraries has been adapted successfully in the generation of antibodies against a wide range of diseases. We envisage immune antibody libraries to play a greater role in the discovery of antibodies for diseases in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Similar Idiotypes in Antibody-Forming Cells and in Cells Synthesizing Immunoglobulins Without Detectable Antibody Function

    PubMed Central

    Cazenave, P. -A.; Ternynck, T.; Avrameas, S.

    1974-01-01

    The occurrence of immunoglobulins with and without antibody specificity and with and without idiotypic specificity was studied, by use of enzyme-labeled antigen and antibodies, in lymph node cells of rabbits immunized with horse-radish peroxidase and hen ovalbumin. Some cells, containing immunoglobulins without detectable antibody function, were shown to contain idiotypes similar to those found in antibody-producing cells. PMID:4140504

  1. AbDb: antibody structure database—a database of PDB-derived antibody structures

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Saba

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In order to analyse structures of proteins of a particular class, these need to be extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB) files. In the case of antibodies, there are a number of special considerations: (i) identifying antibodies in the PDB is not trivial, (ii) they may be crystallized with or without antigen, (iii) for analysis purposes, one is normally only interested in the Fv region of the antibody, (iv) structural analysis of epitopes, in particular, requires individual antibody–antigen complexes from a PDB file which may contain multiple copies of the same, or different, antibodies and (v) standard numbering schemes should be applied. Consequently, there is a need for a specialist resource containing pre-numbered non-redundant antibody Fv structures with their cognate antigens. We have created an automatically updated resource, AbDb, which collects the Fv regions from antibody structures using information from our SACS database which summarizes antibody structures from the PDB. PDB files containing multiple structures are split and numbered and each antibody structure is associated with its antigen where available. Antibody structures with only light or heavy chains have also been processed and sequences of antibodies are compared to identify multiple structures of the same antibody. The data may be queried on the basis of PDB code, or the name or species of the antibody or antigen, and the complete datasets may be downloaded. Database URL: www.bioinf.org.uk/abs/abdb/ PMID:29718130

  2. Antibodies to watch in 2017

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over 50 investigational monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are currently undergoing evaluation in late-stage clinical studies, which is expected to drive a trend toward first marketing approvals of at least 6–9 mAbs per year in the near-term. In the United States (US), a total of 6 and 9 mAbs were granted first approvals during 2014 and 2015, respectively; all these products are also approved in the European Union (EU). As of December 1, 2016, 6 mAbs (atezolizumab, olaratumab, reslizumab, ixekizumab, bezlotoxumab, oblitoxaximab) had been granted first approvals during 2016 in either the EU or US. Brodalumab, was granted a first approval in Japan in July 2016. Regulatory actions on marketing applications for brodalumab in the EU and US are not expected until 2017. In 2017, first EU or US approvals may also be granted for at least nine mAbs (ocrelizumab, avelumab, Xilonix, inotuzumab ozogamicin, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, romosozumab) that are not yet approved in any country. Based on announcements of company plans for regulatory submissions and the estimated completion dates for late-stage clinical studies, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 6 antibody therapeutics (benralizumab, tildrakizumab, emicizumab, galcanezumab, ibalizumab, PRO-140) that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted during December 2016* or 2017. Other ‘antibodies to watch' in 2017 include 20 mAbs are undergoing evaluation in pivotal studies that have estimated primary completion dates in late 2016 or during 2017. Of these, 5 mAbs are for cancer (durvalumab, JNJ-56022473, ublituximab, anetumab ravtansine, glembatumumab vedotin) and 15 mAbs are for non-cancer indications (caplacizumab, lanadelumab, roledumab, tralokinumab, risankizumab, SA237, emapalumab, suptavumab, erenumab, eptinezumab, fremanezumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, lampalizumab, brolucizumab). Positive results from these

  3. Antibody Characterization Process | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program (ACP) is to have three monoclonal antibodies produced for each successfully expressed/purified recombinant antigen and one antibody per peptide (1 to 3 peptides per protein). To date, over 4000 clones have been screened before selecting the current 393 antibodies. They are winnowed down based on the projected end use of the antibody.

  4. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  5. Anti‑livin antibodies in Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Baumann-Antczak, Aleksandra; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Zamysłowska, Hanna; Ruchała, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Livin belongs to the family of apoptosis inhibitors. High livin expression is observed in malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, breast, and kidneys, but it is not present in differentiated adult tissues. In some malignant processes, anti‑livin antibodies are present. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of anti‑livin antibodies in Hashimoto thyroiditis, a disease characterized by rapid and widespread thyrocyte apoptosis. The study comprised 65 women with Hashimoto thyroiditis and the control group of 40 healthy women. In the majority of the patients, clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism were observed; all patients had high levels of serum antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. A solid‑phase radioimmunoassay in livin‑coated polyethylene tubes using 125I-labeled protein A was used to determine anti-livin antibodies. Significant amounts of anti-livin antibodies were reported in 18 patients (26.8%); 3 patients (4.6%) had borderline antibody levels; while in controls only 1 patient was positive (2.5%, P <0.0001). In Hashimoto thyroiditis, an autoimmune process is more general and involves numerous autoantibodies including an antibody against apoptosis inhibitor - livin. Anti‑livin antibodies cannot serve only as a marker of malignancy because they are also present in autoimmune processes.

  6. Synthetic antibodies: concepts, potential and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Miersch, S; Sidhu, S S

    2012-08-01

    The last 100 years of enquiry into the fundamental basis of humoral immunity has resulted in the identification of antibodies as key molecular sentinels responsible for the in vivo surveillance, neutralization and clearance of foreign substances. Intense efforts aimed at understanding and exploiting their exquisite molecular specificity have positioned antibodies as a cornerstone supporting basic research, diagnostics and therapeutic applications [1]. More recently, efforts have aimed to circumvent the limitations of developing antibodies in animals by developing wholly in vitro techniques for designing antibodies of tailored specificity. This has been realized with the advent of synthetic antibody libraries that possess diversity outside the scope of natural immune repertoires and are thus capable of yielding specificities not otherwise attainable. This review examines the convergence of technologies that have contributed to the development of combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries. It further explores the practical concepts that underlie phage display, antibody diversity and the methods used in the generation of and selection from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries, highlighting specific applications in which design approaches gave rise to specificities that could not easily be obtained with libraries based upon natural immune repertories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  8. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  9. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    PubMed

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Digital gangrene associated with anticentromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Varada; Dhanesh, Es

    2014-03-01

    Anticentromere antibodies have been associated with peripheral vascular occlusive disease, but then it is mostly accompanied by sclerodactyly in the context of a connective tissue disorder. We report a case of digital gangrene in a 75 year old lady with no other associations except positive anticentromere antibodies.

  11. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  13. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS BY 6-MERCAPTOPURINE

    PubMed Central

    Chanmougan, Devendrathan; Schwartz, Robert S.

    1966-01-01

    The administration of 6-MP to rabbits led to either suppression or enhancement of antibody production, depending on when the drug was given in relation to the antigenic challenge. Maximum enhancement of antibody synthesis was found when a small dose of BGG was administered 5 days after the last dose of a 1 wk course of 6-MP. There were no indications that the macrophage system or immunological memory was affected in animals with augmented antibody synthesis. It was proposed that enhancement of antibody production by 6-MP was due to nucleic acids released from cells killed or injured by the drug. It was suggested that lymphocytes incorporating these nucleic acids were transformed into specialized cells capable of direct and immediate stimulation by antigen and lacking immunological memory (hemocytoblasts). A relatively small dose of antigen was apparently capable of stimulating all the hemocytoblasts representing a given clone) with the result that large amounts of antibody rapidly appeared in the serum. PMID:4162484

  15. Antibody to intermediate filaments of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Osung, O A; Chandra, M; Holborow, E J

    1982-01-01

    IgM antibodies against cultures of intermediate filaments (IMF) of the cytoskeleton were demonstrated by immunofluorescence in the sera of 94 (80%) of 118 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis. These antibodies reacted with IMF in cultures of both human fetal fibroblasts and laryngeal carcinoma (HEp2) cells. Of 10 patients from whom paired synovial fluids were also available 8 had anti-IMF antibodies in both serum and fluid. In seronegative RA the incidence of anti-IMF was 40%, in ankylosing spondylitis 25%, in osteoarthrosis 16%, and in normal subjects 14%. Only a minority of RA sera positive for anti-IMF antibodies were also positive for smooth muscle antibody. Absorption experiments suggest that in RA anti-IMF is directed at the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Images PMID:7039524

  16. Photoactivable antibody binding protein: site-selective and covalent coupling of antibody.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yongwon; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Jung-won; Yoon, Jeongwon; Cho, Hyunmin; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2009-02-01

    Here we report new photoactivable antibody binding proteins, which site-selectively capture antibodies and form covalent conjugates with captured antibodies upon irradiation. The proteins allow the site-selective tagging and/or immobilization of antibodies with a highly preferred orientation and omit the need for prior antibody modifications. The minimal Fc-binding domain of protein G, a widely used antibody binding protein, was genetically and chemically engineered to contain a site-specific photo cross-linker, benzophenone. In addition, the domain was further mutated to have an enhanced Fc-targeting ability. This small engineered protein was successfully cross-linked only to the Fc region of the antibody without any nonspecific reactivity. SPR analysis indicated that antibodies can be site-selectively biotinylated through the present photoactivable protein. Furthermore, the system enabled light-induced covalent immobilization of antibodies directly on various solid surfaces, such as those of glass slides, gold chips, and small particles. Antibody coupling via photoactivable antibody binding proteins overcomes several limitations of conventional approaches, such as random chemical reactions or reversible protein binding, and offers a versatile tool for the field of immunosensors.

  17. Bivalent monoclonal IgY antibody formats by conversion of recombinant antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Greunke, Kerstin; Spillner, Edzard; Braren, Ingke; Seismann, Henning; Kainz, Sabine; Hahn, Ulrich; Grunwald, Thomas; Bredehorst, Reinhard

    2006-07-13

    Monoclonal IgY have the potential to become unique tools for diagnostic research and therapeutic purposes since avian antibodies provide several advantages due to their phylogenetic difference when compared to mammalian antibodies. The mechanism of avian immunoglobulin gene diversification renders chicken an excellent source for the generation of recombinant scFv as well as Fab antibody libraries of high diversity. One major limitation of these antibody fragments, however, is their monovalent format, impairing the functional affinity of the molecules and, thereby, their applicability in prevalent laboratory methods. In this study, we generated vectors for conversion of avian recombinant antibody fragments into different types of bivalent IgY antibody formats. To combine the properties of established mammalian monoclonal antibodies with those of IgY constant domains, we additionally generated bivalent murine/avian chimeric antibody constructs. When expressed in HEK-293 cells, all constructs yielded bivalent disulfide-linked antibodies, which exhibit a glycosylation pattern similar to that of native IgY as assessed by lectin blot analysis. After purification by one step procedures, the chimeric and the entire avian bivalent antibody formats were analyzed for antigen binding and interaction with secondary reagents. The data demonstrate that all antibody formats provide comparable antigen binding characteristics and the well established properties of avian constant domains.

  18. Affinity ranking of antibodies using flow cytometry: application in antibody phage display-based target discovery.

    PubMed

    Geuijen, Cecilia A W; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Cox, Freek; Rood, Pauline M L; Throsby, Mark; Jongeneelen, Mandy A C; Backus, Harold H J; van Deventer, Els; Kruisbeek, Ada M; Goudsmit, Jaap; de Kruif, John

    2005-07-01

    Application of antibody phage display to the identification of cell surface antigens with restricted expression patterns is often complicated by the inability to demonstrate specific binding to a certain cell type. The specificity of an antibody can only be properly assessed when the antibody is of sufficient high affinity to detect low-density antigens on cell surfaces. Therefore, a robust and simple assay for the prediction of relative antibody affinities was developed and compared to data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. A panel of eight anti-CD46 antibody fragments with different affinities was selected from phage display libraries and reformatted into complete human IgG1 molecules. SPR was used to determine K(D) values for these antibodies. The association and dissociation of the antibodies for binding to CD46 expressed on cell surfaces were analysed using FACS-based assays. We show that ranking of the antibodies based on FACS data correlates well with ranking based on K(D) values as measured by SPR and can therefore be used to discriminate between high- and low-affinity antibodies. Finally, we show that a low-affinity antibody may only detect high expression levels of a surface marker while failing to detect lower expression levels of this molecule, which may lead to a false interpretation of antibody specificity.

  19. Monoclonal antibody form and function: manufacturing the right antibodies for treating drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric; Owens, S Michael; Henry, Ralph L

    2006-05-26

    Drug abuse continues to be a major national and worldwide problem, and effective treatment strategies are badly needed. Antibodies are promising therapies for the treatment of medical problems caused by drug abuse, with several candidates in preclinical and early clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies can be designed that have customized affinity and specificity against drugs of abuse, and because antibodies can be designed in various forms, in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics can be tailored to suit specific clinical applications (eg, long-acting for relapse prevention, or short-acting for overdose). Passive immunization with antibodies against drugs of abuse has several advantages over active immunization, but because large doses of monoclonal antibodies may be needed for each patient, efficient antibody production technology is essential. In this minireview we discuss some of the antibody forms that may be effective clinical treatments for drug abuse, as well as several current and emerging production systems that could bridge the gap from discovery to patient use.

  20. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  1. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  2. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/labtests/anaantinuclearantibodytest.html ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) Test To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. What is an ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) Test? An ANA test looks for antinuclear antibodies in ...

  3. Principles and application of antibody libraries for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Nar; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2014-12-01

    Antibodies have been used efficiently for the treatment and diagnosis of many diseases. Recombinant antibody technology allows the generation of fully human antibodies. Phage display is the gold standard for the production of human antibodies in vitro. To generate monoclonal antibodies by phage display, the generation of antibody libraries is crucial. Antibody libraries are classified according to the source where the antibody gene sequences were obtained. The most useful library for infectious diseases is the immunized library. Immunized libraries would allow better and selective enrichment of antibodies against disease antigens. The antibodies generated from these libraries can be translated for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review focuses on the generation of immunized antibody libraries and the potential applications of the antibodies derived from these libraries.

  4. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  5. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, David M.; Koup, Richard A.; Ferrari, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Further, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. PMID:28133794

  6. Nystagmus and ataxia associated with antiganglioside antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Nam, Jungmoo; Kwon, Min Jeong; Kim, Jong Kuk; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Antiganglioside antibodies are found in various neurological disorders that constitute a continuum from peripheral neuropathy to encephalitis. However, nystagmus has rarely been described in patients with ataxia associated with antiganglioside antibodies. From January 2008 to July 2009, we identified 3 patients with acute ataxia and nystagmus in 2 University Hospitals of Korea, who were found to have anti-GD1b, anti-GM1, or anti-GQ1b antibodies. In addition to acute ataxia, all 3 patients showed various combinations of nystagmus, which included central positional nystagmus (n = 3), vertical nystagmus (n = 1), and periodic alternating nystagmus (n = 1). The spontaneous and positional nystagmus were mostly detectable only with the elimination of fixation and magnification of the eyes using video goggles. Two patients also exhibited gaze-evoked nystagmus that was noticeable without the aid of video goggles. Patients had serum IgG antibodies to GD1b, GM1, or GQ1b. Cerebrospinal fluid examination, nerve conduction studies, and brain MRI were normal. In all patients, the symptoms and signs resolved over 3-12 months. Various forms of nystagmus with acute ataxia may be a sole or predominant manifestation of disorders related to antiganglioside antibodies. The nystagmus indicates a central pathology involving the cerebellum or brainstem in this antibody-associated disorder. Antiganglioside antibodies should be measured in patients with nystagmus and acute ataxia of undetermined etiology.

  7. Human antibodies to bovine alpha-globulin.

    PubMed

    Foucard, T; Bennich, H; Johansson, S G; Lundkvist, U

    1975-01-01

    Antibodies to bovine gamma-globulin (anti-BGG antibodies) were detectable by a radio-immunoassay in 70% of healthy blood donors but, generally, the titres were low. Significantly increased concentrations of anti-BGG antibodies were found in patients lacking IgA but not in patients with allergic disorders. The anti-BGG antibodies were shown to give rise to falsely high IgE values in the radio-immunosorbent test for IgE determination (RIST) when a sheep anti-IgE antiserum was used. Furthermore, falsely positive results can sometimes be caused by such antibodies in the determination of cow-dander- or cow's-milk-specific IgE by the radio-allergosorbent test (RAST). When a rabbit anti-IgE antiserum was used instead of the sheep anti-IgE, normal IgE levels and negative RAST results were obtained. The difference is explained by the higher degree of cross-reactivity between the anti-BGG antibodies and sheep alpha-globulin than between anti-BGG antibodies and rabbit alpha-globulin.

  8. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  9. Antibody to CCDC104 is associated with a paraneoplastic antibody to CDR2 (anti-Yo).

    PubMed

    Totland, Cecilie; Bredholt, Geir; Haugen, Mette; Haukanes, Bjørn Ivar; Vedeler, Christian A

    2010-02-01

    Patients with cancer may develop paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) in which onconeural antibodies are important diagnostic findings. As the functional role of onconeural antibodies is largely unknown, insight gained by identifying associated antibodies may help to clarify the pathogenesis of the PNS. In this study, we identified patients with Yo antibodies who also had antibodies to an uncharacterized protein called coiled-coil domain-containing protein 104 (CCDC104). We found a significant association between CCDC104 and Yo antibodies (4 of 38, 10.5%), but not other onconeural antibodies (0 of 158) (P = 0.007, Fisher's exact test). The prevalence of CCDC104 antibodies was approximately similar in patients with cancer (8 of 756, 1.1%) and in healthy blood donors (2 of 300, 0.7%). CCDC104 antibodies were not associated with PNS, as this was found in only two of the ten CCDC104-positive patients. The CCDC104 protein, whose function is unknown, is expressed in various human tissues, including the brain, and is localized mainly to the nucleus, but is also found in the cytoplasm. The association between Yo and CCDC104 antibodies may indicate functional similarities.

  10. Immune complexes with cationic antibodies deposit in glomeruli more effectively than cationic antibodies alone.

    PubMed

    Mannik, M; Gauthier, V J; Stapleton, S A; Agodoa, L Y

    1987-06-15

    In previously published studies, highly cationized antibodies alone and in immune complexes bound to glomeruli by charge-charge interaction, but only immune complexes persisted in glomeruli. Because normal IgG does not deposit in glomeruli, studies were conducted to determine whether cationized antibodies can be prepared which deposit in glomeruli when bound to antigen but not when free in circulation. A series of cationized rabbit antiHSA was prepared with the number of added amino groups ranging from 13.3 to 60.2 per antibody molecule. Antibodies alone or in preformed soluble immune complexes, prepared at fivefold or 50-fold antigen excess, were administered to mice. With the injection of a fixed dose of 100 micrograms per mouse, antibodies alone did not deposit in glomeruli with less than 29.6 added amino groups by immunofluorescence microscopy. In contrast, 100 micrograms of antibodies with 23.5 added amino groups in immune complexes, made at fivefold antigen excess, formed immune deposits in glomeruli. With selected preparations of cationized, radiolabeled antibodies, deposition in glomeruli was quantified by isolation of mouse glomeruli. These quantitative data were in good agreement with the results of immunofluorescence microscopy. Immune complexes made at 50-fold antigen excess, containing only small-latticed immune complexes with no more than two antibody molecules per complex, deposited in glomeruli similar to antibodies alone. Selected cationized antibodies alone or in immune complexes were administered to mice in varying doses. In these experiments, glomerular deposition of immune complexes, made at fivefold antigen excess, was detected with five- to 10-fold smaller doses than the deposition of the same antibodies alone. These studies demonstrate that antibody molecules in immune complexes are more likely to deposit in glomeruli by charge-charge interactions than antibodies alone.

  11. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  12. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  13. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  14. Antiphospholipid antibodies: Paradigm in transition

    PubMed Central

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Ahn, Yeon S; Kelley, Roger E; Zivadinov, Robert; Maghzi, Amir H; Etemadifar, Masoud; Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This is a critical review of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL). Most prior reviews focus on the aPL syndrome (APS), a thrombotic condition often marked by neurological disturbance. We bring to attention recent evidence that aPL may be equally relevant to non-thrombotic autoimmune conditions, notably, multiple sclerosis and ITP. Organization After a brief history, the recent proliferation of aPL target antigens is reviewed. The implication is that many more exist. Theories of aPL in thrombosis are then reviewed, concluding that all have merit but that aPL may have more diverse pathological consequences than now recognized. Next, conflicting results are explained by methodological differences. The lupus anticoagulant (LA) is then discussed. LA is the best predictor of thrombosis, but why this is true is not settled. Finally, aPL in non-thrombotic disorders is reviewed. Conclusion The current paradigm of aPL holds that they are important in thrombosis, but they may have much wider clinical significance, possibly of special interest in neurology. PMID:19154576

  15. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS.

  16. Antibodies to watch in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a burgeoning class of therapeutics, with more than 25 approved in countries worldwide. Novel molecules are entering clinical study at a rate of nearly 40 per year, and the commercial pipeline includes approximately 240 mAb therapeutics in clinical studies that have not yet progressed to regulatory approval or been approved. Of particular interest are the 26 mAbs that are currently at Phase 3, when safety and efficacy data critical to approval is established. Phase 3 study lengths are typically two to four years, so results for some studies might be announced in 2010, but data from others might not be presented until 2014. This overview of the 26 candidates provides a brief description of the background and the on-going Phase 3 studies of each mAb. Additional mAbs that have progressed to regulatory review or been approved may also be in Phase 3 studies, but these, as well as Fc fusion proteins, have been excluded. Due to the large body of primary literature about the 26 candidates, only selected references are given, with a focus on recent publications and articles that were relevant to Phase 3 studies. Current as of October 2009, the results presented here will serve as a baseline against which future progress can be measured. PMID:20065640

  17. Strain Dependent Electronic Structure and Band Offset Tuning at Heterointerfaces of ASnO3 (A=Ca, Sr, and Ba) and SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Baniecki, John D.; Yamazaki, Takashi; Ricinschi, Dan; Van Overmeere, Quentin; Aso, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Yusuke; Yamada, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Norifumi; Maran, Ronald; Anazawa, Toshihisa; Valanoor, Nagarajan; Imanaka, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The valence band (VB) electronic structure and VB alignments at heterointerfaces of strained epitaxial stannate ASnO3 (A=Ca, Sr, and Ba) thin films are characterized using in situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies, with band gaps evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with geometric phase analysis is used to resolve strain at atomic resolution. The VB electronic structure is strain state dependent in a manner that correlated with a directional change in Sn-O bond lengths with strain. However, VB offsets are found not to vary significantly with strain, which resulted in ascribing most of the difference in band alignment, due to a change in the band gaps with strain, to the conduction band edge. Our results reveal significant strain tuning of conduction band offsets using epitaxial buffer layers, with strain-induced offset differences as large as 0.6 eV possible for SrSnO3. Such large conduction band offset tunability through elastic strain control may provide a pathway to minimize the loss of charge confinement in 2-dimensional electron gases and enhance the performance of photoelectrochemical stannate-based devices. PMID:28195149

  18. Low-temperature magnetic ordering in the perovskites Pr 1-xA xCoO 3 (A=Ca, Sr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deac, Iosif G.; Tetean, Romulus; Balasz, Istvan; Burzo, Emil

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic and electrical properties of polycrystalline Pr 1-xA xCoO 3 cobaltites with A=Ca, Sr and 0≤ x≤0.5 were studied in the temperature range 4 K≤ T≤1000 K and field up to 7 T. The X-ray analyses show the presence of only one phase having monoclinic or orthorhombic symmetry. The magnetic measurements indicate that the Ca-doped samples have at low temperatures, similar properties to the frustrated magnetic materials. PrCoO 3 is a paramagnetic insulator in the range from 4 to 1000 K. The Sr-doped cobaltites exhibit two phase transitions: a paramagnetic-ferromagnetic (or magnetic phase separated state) phase transition at about 240 K and a second one at about 100 K. The magnetic measurements suggest the presence of magnetic clusters and a change in the nature of magnetic coupling between Co ions at low temperatures. A semiconducting type behavior and high negative magnetoresistance was found for the Ca-doped samples, while the Sr-doped ones were metallic and with negligible magnetoresistance. The results are analyzed in the frame of a phase separation scenario in the presence of the spin-state transitions of Co ions.

  19. Superconducting Sr 2- xAxCuO 2F 2+ δ( A=Ca, Ba): Synthetic Pathways and Associated Structural Rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, M. G.; Slater, P. R.; Hodges, J. P.; Greaves, C.; Edwards, P. P.; Al-Mamouri, M.; Slaski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The low-temperature fluorination of a range of insulating alkaline earth cuprates Sr2-xAxCuO3(A=Ca (0≤x≤2);A=Ba (0≤x≤0.6)) can result in superconducting oxide fluorides Sr2-xAxCuO2F2+δ. In contrast, conventional high-temperature solid-state reactions produce thermodynamically more stable mixtures of oxides and fluorides. Various soft-chemistry fluorination pathways (utilizing F2gas, NH4F,MF2[M=Cu, Zn, Ni, Ag]) are compared with respect to their efficacy and mechanisms. Attention is also focused on the structural features of the mixed-oxide precursor and the final-oxide fluorides to highlight the remarkable structural rearrangements that occur during the low-temperature fluorination. The effects of fluorination of other Sr-Cu-O systems are used to identify the structural requirements of the precursor oxide in order to achieve such transformations.

  20. Complement-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA and MICA antigens are associated with antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junchao; Terasaki, Paul I; Zhu, Dong; Lachmann, Nils; Schönemann, Constanze; Everly, Matthew J; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    We have found antibodies against denatured HLA class I antigens in the serum of allograft recipients which were not significantly associated with graft failure. It is unknown whether transplant recipients also have denatured HLA class II and MICA antibodies. The effects of denatured HLA class I, class II, and MICA antibodies on long-term graft outcome were further investigated based on their ability to fix complement c1q. In this 4-year retrospective cohort study, post-transplant sera from 975 kidney transplant recipients were tested for antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens and these antibodies were further classified based on their ability to fix c1q. Thirty percent of patients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, or MICA antigens. Among them, 8.5% and 21.5% of all patients had c1q-fixing and non c1q-fixing antibodies respectively. There was no significant difference on graft survival between patients with or without antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA. However, when these antibodies were further classified according to their ability to fix c1q, patients with c1q-fixing antibodies had a significantly lower graft survival rate than patients without antibodies or patients with non c1q-fixing antibodies (p=0.008). In 169 patients who lost renal grafts, 44% of them had c1q-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens, which was significantly higher than that in patients with functioning renal transplants (25%, p<0.0001). C1q-fixing antibodies were more significantly associated with graft failure caused by AMR (72.73%) or mixed AMR/CMR (61.9%) as compared to failure due to CMR (35.3%) or other causes (39.2%) (p=0.026). Transplant recipients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, and MICA antigens. However, only c1q-fixing antibodies were associated with graft failure which was related to antibody mediated rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Generalized platform for antibody detection using the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Welch, M Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L; Tague, Michele E; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A; Abruña, Héctor D; Ober, Christopher K

    2014-02-05

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway (ACWOP). Our platform includes a polymer brush-modified surface where specific antibodies bind to conjugated haptens with high affinity and specificity. Hydrogen peroxide provides an electrochemical signal that is mediated by Resorufin/Amplex Red. We characterize the biosensor platform, using model anti-DNP antibodies, with the ultimate goal of designing a versatile device that is inexpensive, portable, reliable, and fast. We demonstrate detection of antibodies at concentrations that fall well within clinically relevant levels.

  2. Basics of Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Ledsgaard, Line; Kilstrup, Mogens; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; McCafferty, John; Laustsen, Andreas H

    2018-06-09

    Antibody discovery has become increasingly important in almost all areas of modern medicine. Different antibody discovery approaches exist, but one that has gained increasing interest in the field of toxinology and antivenom research is phage display technology. In this review, the lifecycle of the M13 phage and the basics of phage display technology are presented together with important factors influencing the success rates of phage display experiments. Moreover, the pros and cons of different antigen display methods and the use of naïve versus immunized phage display antibody libraries is discussed, and selected examples from the field of antivenom research are highlighted. This review thus provides in-depth knowledge on the principles and use of phage display technology with a special focus on discovery of antibodies that target animal toxins.

  3. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  4. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia targets for bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, S S; Cheung, N K

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial gains in our understanding of the genomics of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), patient survival remains unsatisfactory especially among the older age group. T cell-based therapy of lymphoblastic leukemia is rapidly advancing; however, its application in AML is still lagging behind. Bispecific antibodies can redirect polyclonal effector cells to engage chosen targets on leukemia blasts. When the effector cells are natural-killer cells, both antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms could be exploited. When the effectors are T cells, direct tumor cytotoxicity can be engaged followed by a potential vaccination effect. In this review, we summarize the AML-associated tumor targets and the bispecific antibodies that have been studied. The potentials and limitations of each of these systems will be discussed. PMID:28157217

  6. [Possibilities of differentiation of antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Rosenthal, M; Stojan, B

    1975-10-15

    Antinuclear antibodies can give diagnostic informations according to their titre values, the belonging to different classes of immune globulins and on the basis of different patterns of immunofluorescence connection. The determination of granulocyte-specific antibodies which frequently appear in progressive chronic polyarthritis further contributes to the differential-diagnostic classification of diseases of the connective tissue. An antibody against extractable nuclear antigen is specific for the so-called mixed connective tissue disease, an antimitochondrial antibody for the pseudo-LE-syndrome. Moreover, the own examinations resulted in a particularly high and frequent ability of complement fixation of the antinuclear factors in systematic lupus erythematosus and sclerodermy. In contrast to this in the progressive chronic polyarthritis the complement fixation was clearly more insignificant.

  7. ANCA / MPO / PR3 Antibodies Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal limits." For more information, please read the article Reference Ranges and What They Mean . What is being tested? Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies produced by a person's immune system that mistakenly target and attack proteins within the ...

  8. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIT II is clinically suspected. There is a pre-test scoring system that is typically used to determine ... The HIT antibody test is performed when this pre-scoring test shows that a person has a moderate to ...

  9. Imaging of colorectal carcinoma with radiolabeled antibodies.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D M; Goldenberg, H; Sharkey, R M; Lee, R E; Higgenbotham-Ford, E; Horowitz, J A; Hall, T C; Pinsky, C M; Hansen, H J

    1989-10-01

    Colorectal cancer has been the tumor type most frequently studied with radiolabeled antibodies. Among the various antibodies, a majority of patients with colorectal cancer have received xenogeneic polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against carcino-embryonic antigen. This review summarizes the current status of colorectal cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies, ie, radioimmunodetection (RAID), and examines the published studies involving carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies and 17-1A, 19-9, and B72.3, and other monoclonal antibodies. In order to better address the issue of the current and future clinical usefulness of this emerging technology, particular attention is given to the protocols, methods, and results of the published studies. Despite differences in study parameters, antibodies and forms, labels, administration routes and doses, and scanning instruments and methods, it has been found that (1) almost no adverse reactions have been evident; (2) antibody fragments are preferred over whole immunoglobulin G reagents because they achieve higher tumor-to-background ratios earlier, thus reducing or precluding the need for dual-isotope subtraction methods or long delays before imaging; (3) use of antibody fragments, including the monovalent Fab' form, permits imaging with short-lived radionuclides of excellent photon properties, such as 123I and 99mTc; (4) circulating antigens against which the imaging antibody is directed can complex with the injected antibody, but such complexes have not prevented successful RAID; (5) patients with high serum titers of the appropriate antigen target usually have higher rates of positive RAID; (6) patients who are seronegative for the tumor antigen being studied can have positive RAID findings, which can represent the detection of occult lesions; (7) single photon emission computed tomography appears to provide better image resolution than planar scanning; (8) regardless of the sensitivity reported in any particular

  10. [Limbic encephalitis with antibodies against intracellular antigens].

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiko; Kamei, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is often associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), breast cancer, testicular tumors, teratoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and thymoma. The common clinical manifestations of limbic encephalitis are subacute onset, cognitive dysfunction, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are considered to occur because of cytotoxic T cell responses and antibodies against target neuronal proteins that are usually expressed by an underlying tumor. The main intracellular antigens related to limbic encephalitis are Hu, Ma2, and less frequently CV2/CRMP5 and amphiphysin. The anti-Hu antibody, which is involved in cerebellar degeneration and extensive or multifocal encephalomyelitis such as limbic encephalitis is closely associated with a history of smoking and SCLC. The anti-Ma2 antibody is associated with encephalitis of the limbic system, hypothalamus and brain-stem. For this reason, some patients with limbic encephalitis have sleep disorders (including REM sleep abnormalities), severe hypokinesis and gaze palsy in addition to limbic dysfunction. In men aged less than 50 years, anti-Ma2 antibody encephalitis is almost always associated with testicular germ-cell tumors that are occasionally difficult to detect. In older men and women, the most common tumors are non-SCLC and breast cancer. Limbic encephalitis associated with cell-surface antigens (e.g., voltage-gated potassium channels, NMDA receptors) is mediated by antibodies and often improves after a reduction in the antibody titer and after tumor resection. Patients with antibodies against intracellular antigens, except for those with anti-Ma2 antibodies and testicular tumors, are less responsive. Early diagnosis and treatment with immunotherapy, tumor resection or both are important for improving or stabilizing the condition of limbic encephalitis.

  11. History and Practice: Antibodies in Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hey, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies and passive antibody therapy in the treatment of infectious diseases is the story of a treatment concept which dates back more than 120 years, to the 1890s, when the use of serum from immunized animals provided the first effective treatment options against infections with Clostridium tetani and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. However, after the discovery of penicillin by Fleming in 1928, and the subsequent introduction of the much cheaper and safer antibiotics in the 1930s, serum therapy was largely abandoned. However, the broad and general use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine has resulted in the development of multi-resistant strains of bacteria with limited to no response to existing treatments and the need for alternative treatment options. The combined specificity and flexibility of antibody-based treatments makes them very valuable tools for designing specific antibody treatments to infectious agents. These attributes have already caused a revolution in new antibody-based treatments in oncology and inflammatory diseases, with many approved products. However, only one monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, for the prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus, is approved for infectious diseases. The high cost of monoclonal antibody therapies, the need for parallel development of diagnostics, and the relatively small markets are major barriers for their development in the presence of cheap antibiotics. It is time to take a new and revised look into the future to find appropriate niches in infectious diseases where new antibody-based treatments or combinations with existing antibiotics, could prove their value and serve as stepping stones for broader acceptance of the potential for and value of these treatments.

  12. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  14. [Screening serum response special antibodies of U251 cell line from surface display phage antibody library].

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Tan, De-Yong; Qian, Wei; Lai, Jian-Hua; Sun, Gui-Lin

    2004-05-01

    U251 cell is a sensitive cell line to serum, which stops at G0 phase of cell cycle in no-serum medium, and recovers growth when the serum is added into no-serum medium. The cell can express corresponding proteins in different phase of cell cycle. Therefore it is very signification for the study of cell cycle regulation mechanism that explores these proteins. In this paper, the mouse antibody phage display library was added into the bottle in which the serum starvation U251 cells had been cultured, and the special antibody phages were absorbed. Then the absorbed antibody phages were amplified by adding E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Amplified antibody phages were added into bottle in which the serum cultured cell after serum starvation (follow named as serum recovered cells) were incubated, so that the cell absorbed the no-special antibody phages for the serum starvation cell and the special antibody phages were in supernatant. The remaining no-special antibody phages in the supernatant were discarded by repeating above program 3-4 times. The pure special antibody phages were gotten, and amplified by adding the host cell E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Then the host bacterium infected special antibody phage was spread on the plate medium with ampicillin, and the monoclonal antibody phages were gotten. Using same as above program, the monoclonal antibody phages absorbed specially for serum recovered U251 cells were obtained when the serum recovered cells instead of serum starvation cells and serum starvation cells instead of serum recovered cells. In this study, ninety-six positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum starvation cells and eighty-two positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum recovered cells were obtained. By using cell immunochemistry assay, two special signification antibodies were obtained. one (No.11) was the strong response in serum starvation cells, the other (No.2) was the strong

  15. Lichen planus, liver kidney microsomal (LKM1) antibodies and hepatitis C virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Divano, M C; Parodi, A; Rebora, A

    1992-01-01

    No anti-liver kidney microsomal (LKM1) antibodies were detected in 46 patients with LP, 16 of whom had also a chronic liver disease (CLD). In contrast, anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies were found in 10% of patients with LP and in 50% of those with LP and CLD. Anti-HCV antibodies may be considered as a false-positive reaction in 56% of cases, especially when anti-LKM1 antibodies are present. Our findings do not support such a hypothesis, but suggest that CLD in LP patients is, at least in Italy, mostly a postviral chronic active hepatitis.

  16. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  17. [Construction of human phage antibody library and screening for human monoclonal antibodies of amylin].

    PubMed

    Gong, Qian; Li, Chang-ying; Chang, Ji-wu; Zhu, Tie-hong

    2012-06-01

    To screen monoclonal antibodies to amylin from a constructed human phage antibody library and identify their antigenic specificity and combining activities. The heavy chain Fd fragment and light chain of human immunoglobulin genes were amplified from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors using RT-PCR, and then inserted into phagemid pComb3XSS to generate a human phage antibody library. The insertion of light chain or heavy chain Fd genes were identified by PCR after the digestion of Sac I, Xba I, Xho Iand Spe I. One of positive clones was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The specific anti-amylin clones were screened from antibody library against human amylin antigens and then the positive clones were determined by Phage-ELISA analysis. A Fab phage antibody library with 0.8×10(8); members was constructed with the efficacy of about 70%. DNA sequence analysis indicated V(H); gene belonged to V(H);3 gene family and V(λ); gene belonged to the V(λ); gene family. Using human amylin as panning antigen, specific anti-amylin Fab antibodies were enriched by screening the library for three times. Phage-ELISA assay showed the positive clones had very good specificity to amylin antigen. The successful construction of a phage antibody library and the identification of anti-amylin Fab antibodies provide a basis for further study and preparation of human anti-amylin antibodies.

  18. Generation of HER2 monoclonal antibodies using epitopes of a rabbit polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2014-01-25

    One of the issues in using polyclonal antibodies is the limited amount of reagent available from an immunisation, leading to batch-to-batch variation and difficulties in obtaining the same antibody performance when the same antigen is re-immunised into several separate animals. This led to the development of hybridoma technology allowing, at least theoretically, for an unlimited production of a specific binder. Nevertheless, polyclonal antibodies are widely used in research and diagnostics and there exists a need for robust methods to convert a polyclonal antibody with good binding performance into a renewable monoclonal with identical or similar binding specificity. Here we have used precise information regarding the functional recognition sequence (epitope) of a rabbit polyclonal antibody with attractive binding characteristics as the basis for generation of a renewable mouse monoclonal antibody. First, the original protein fragment antigen was used for immunisation and generation of mouse hybridoma, without obtaining binders to the same epitope region. Instead a peptide designed using the functional epitope and structural information was synthesised and used for hybridoma production. Several of the monoclonal antibodies generated were found to have similar binding characteristics to those of the original polyclonal antibody. These monoclonal antibodies detected native HER2 on cell lines and were also able to stain HER2 in immunohistochemistry using xenografted mice, as well as human normal and cancer tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling and docking antibody structures with Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Brian D.; Jeliazkov, Jeliazko R.; Lyskov, Sergey; Marze, Nicholas; Kuroda, Daisuke; Frick, Rahel; Adolf-Bryfogle, Jared; Biswas, Naireeta; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe Rosetta-based computational protocols for predicting the three-dimensional structure of an antibody from sequence (RosettaAntibody) and then docking the antibody to protein antigens (SnugDock). Antibody modeling leverages canonical loop conformations to graft large segments from experimentally-determined structures as well as (1) energetic calculations to minimize loops, (2) docking methodology to refine the VL–VH relative orientation, and (3) de novo prediction of the elusive complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 loop. To alleviate model uncertainty, antibody–antigen docking resamples CDR loop conformations and can use multiple models to represent an ensemble of conformations for the antibody, the antigen or both. These protocols can be run fully-automated via the ROSIE web server (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/) or manually on a computer with user control of individual steps. For best results, the protocol requires roughly 1,000 CPU-hours for antibody modeling and 250 CPU-hours for antibody–antigen docking. Tasks can be completed in under a day by using public supercomputers. PMID:28125104

  20. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and fourmore » Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.« less

  1. Boosting antibody developability through rational sequence optimization.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Daniel; Schulz, Patrick; Litzenburger, Tobias; Spitz, Julia; Hoerer, Stefan; Blech, Michaela; Enenkel, Barbara; Studts, Joey M; Garidel, Patrick; Karow, Anne R

    2015-01-01

    The application of monoclonal antibodies as commercial therapeutics poses substantial demands on stability and properties of an antibody. Therapeutic molecules that exhibit favorable properties increase the success rate in development. However, it is not yet fully understood how the protein sequences of an antibody translates into favorable in vitro molecule properties. In this work, computational design strategies based on heuristic sequence analysis were used to systematically modify an antibody that exhibited a tendency to precipitation in vitro. The resulting series of closely related antibodies showed improved stability as assessed by biophysical methods and long-term stability experiments. As a notable observation, expression levels also improved in comparison with the wild-type candidate. The methods employed to optimize the protein sequences, as well as the biophysical data used to determine the effect on stability under conditions commonly used in the formulation of therapeutic proteins, are described. Together, the experimental and computational data led to consistent conclusions regarding the effect of the introduced mutations. Our approach exemplifies how computational methods can be used to guide antibody optimization for increased stability.

  2. Working towards a consensus for antibody validation.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Peter D; Min, Danxi; Leung, Mei Y

    2014-01-01

    Commercial research antibodies are the most commonly used product in the life science tools market, and their applications represent a significant investment of time and resources for researchers. Frequently however, the quality of antibodies does not meet the expectations of consumers, causing loss of valuable time and money. This can delay research efforts and scientific discovery, or even lead to false, irreproducible results to be published in the scientific literature. This raises the question of whether there should be universal standards for validating antibodies.   During the 1 (st) International Antibody Validation Forum, hosted by St John's Laboratory Ltd on October 15 (th) 2014 at Queen Mary University of London, scientists from academia and industry presented data highlighting quality issues arising from lack of antibody validation. While the forum identified significant current problems in the antibody market, it also discussed future opportunities for improved quality and transparency by encouraging data disclosure and data sharing. This article highlights the key issues and conclusions reached at the forum.

  3. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Principles for computational design of binding antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pszolla, M. Gabriele; Lapidoth, Gideon D.; Norn, Christoffer; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Tyka, Michael D.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural proteins must both fold into a stable conformation and exert their molecular function. To date, computational design has successfully produced stable and atomically accurate proteins by using so-called “ideal” folds rich in regular secondary structures and almost devoid of loops and destabilizing elements, such as cavities. Molecular function, such as binding and catalysis, however, often demands nonideal features, including large and irregular loops and buried polar interaction networks, which have remained challenging for fold design. Through five design/experiment cycles, we learned principles for designing stable and functional antibody variable fragments (Fvs). Specifically, we (i) used sequence-design constraints derived from antibody multiple-sequence alignments, and (ii) during backbone design, maintained stabilizing interactions observed in natural antibodies between the framework and loops of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 2. Designed Fvs bound their ligands with midnanomolar affinities and were as stable as natural antibodies, despite having >30 mutations from mammalian antibody germlines. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis demonstrated atomic accuracy throughout the framework and in four of six CDRs in one design and atomic accuracy in the entire Fv in another. The principles we learned are general, and can be implemented to design other nonideal folds, generating stable, specific, and precise antibodies and enzymes. PMID:28973872

  5. Metabolomics reveals distinct, antibody-independent, molecular signatures of MS, AQP4-antibody and MOG-antibody disease.

    PubMed

    Jurynczyk, Maciej; Probert, Fay; Yeo, Tianrong; Tackley, George; Claridge, Tim D W; Cavey, Ana; Woodhall, Mark R; Arora, Siddharth; Winkler, Torsten; Schiffer, Eric; Vincent, Angela; DeLuca, Gabriele; Sibson, Nicola R; Isabel Leite, M; Waters, Patrick; Anthony, Daniel C; Palace, Jacqueline

    2017-12-06

    The overlapping clinical features of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-antibody (Ab) neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-Ab disease mean that detection of disease specific serum antibodies is the gold standard in diagnostics. However, antibody levels are not prognostic and may become undetectable after treatment or during remission. Therefore, there is still a need to discover antibody-independent biomarkers. We sought to discover whether plasma metabolic profiling could provide biomarkers of these three diseases and explore if the metabolic differences are independent of antibody titre. Plasma samples from 108 patients (34 RRMS, 54 AQP4-Ab NMOSD, and 20 MOG-Ab disease) were analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy followed by lipoprotein profiling. Orthogonal partial-least squares discriminatory analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify significant differences in the plasma metabolite concentrations and produce models (mathematical algorithms) capable of identifying these diseases. In all instances, the models were highly discriminatory, with a distinct metabolite pattern identified for each disease. In addition, OPLS-DA identified AQP4-Ab NMOSD patient samples with low/undetectable antibody levels with an accuracy of 92%. The AQP4-Ab NMOSD metabolic profile was characterised by decreased levels of scyllo-inositol and small high density lipoprotein particles along with an increase in large low density lipoprotein particles relative to both RRMS and MOG-Ab disease. RRMS plasma exhibited increased histidine and glucose, along with decreased lactate, alanine, and large high density lipoproteins while MOG-Ab disease plasma was defined by increases in formate and leucine coupled with decreased myo-inositol. Despite overlap in clinical measures in these three diseases, the distinct plasma metabolic patterns support their distinct serological profiles and confirm that these

  6. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  7. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  8. Single center review of clinicopathological characterization in 77 patients with positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Owaidah, Tarek M; Qurashi, Fat-Hiya M; Al Nounou, Randa M; Al Zahrani, Hazza; Al Mussa, Abdulrahman; Tbakhi, Abdelghani I; Al Daama, Saad; Elkum, Nasser; Roberts, George T

    2003-08-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a thrombophillic disorder characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA). It often occurs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may be associated with recurrent abortions and thrombocytopenia and, occasionally, catastrophic thrombotic events. To examine, retrospectively, the clinico-pathological features of patients with APS detected by the presence of the lupus anticoagulant (LAC). Patients were selected for study on the basis of a positive LAC test on review of the laboratory computer records of the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Following this, a clinical chart review was conducted in order to determine the clinical presentations, treatment and the course of patients identified. The information obtained was entered into an electronic database and subsequently analyzed. Seventy-seven patients were identified and reviewed. Fifty-six (73%) were female and 16 (21%) were children less than 15-years-old. Thirty-two patients (42%) had no clinical events (incidental APS). The syndrome was classified as primary in 40 (52%) patients and secondary in 37 (48%). Out of the 45 (58%) patients who presented with symptoms related to APA 22 (49%) had thrombosis, 24 (53%) had pregnancy failure, and 4 (9%) presented with catastrophic APS. The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was elevated and not corrected by mixing with normal plasma in 47 (61%). On the other hand, the prothrombin time (PT) was normal in 66 (90%). There is a significant difference between aPTT and PT as a screening test with P value of < 0.0001. Tests for anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) were positive in 39 patients (70%). Only 13 (17%) patients had thrombocytopenia. All patients who presented with thrombosis were treated with warfarin but only 5 (23%) had received aspirin. Out of the 22 patients presenting with thrombosis, 12 (55%) had one or more recurrent thrombotic events while only 6 (25%) out of the

  9. Coming-of-Age of Antibodies in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Arora, Sushrut; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Antibody-based therapies have garnered considerable success in recent years. This is due to the availability of strategies to successfully engineer antibodies into humanized forms, better understanding of the biological processes involved in cancer development, the availability of novel recombinant antibody formats, better antibody selection platforms, and improved antibody conjugation methodologies. Such achievements have led to an explosion in the generation of antibodies and antibody-associated constructs for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. In this review, we critically assess recent trends in the development and applications of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs), antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) as cancer therapeutics. We also highlight recent US FDA approvals and clinical trials of antibody-based cancer therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Advances in the study of natural small molecular antibody].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Da-peng

    2012-10-01

    Small molecule antibodies are naturally existed and well functioned but not structurally related to the conventional antibodies. They are only composed of heavy protein chains or light chains, much smaller than common antibody. The first small molecule antibody, called Nanobody was engineered from heavy-chain antibodies found in camelids. Cartilaginous fishes also have heavy-chain antibodies (IgNAR, "immunoglobulin new antigen receptor"), from which single-domain antibodies called Vnar fragments can be obtained. In addition, free light chain (FLC) antibodies in human bodies are being developed as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Comparing to intact antibodies, common advantages of small molecule antibodies are with better solubility, tissue penetration, stability towards heat and enzymes, and comparatively low production costs. This article reviews the structural characteristics and mechanism of action of the Nanobody, IgNAR and FLC.

  11. [Design of next generation antibody drug conjugates].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Dong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2013-07-01

    Chemotherapy remains one of the major tools, along with surgery, radiotherapy, and more recently targeted therapy, in the war against cancer. There have appeared a plethora of highly potent cytotoxic drugs but the poor discriminability between cancerous and healthy cells of these agents limits their broader application in clinical settings. Therapeutic antibodies have emerged as an important class of biological anticancer agents, thanks to their ability in specific binding to tumor-associated antigens. While this important class of biologics can be used as single agents for the treatment of cancer through antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), their therapeutical efficacy is often limited. Antitumor antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the target-specificity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) and the highly active cell-killing drugs, taking advantages of the best characteristics out of both components. Thus, insufficiency of most naked mAbs in cancer therapy has been circumvented by arming the immunoglobulin with cytotoxic drugs. Here mAbs are used as vehicles to transport potent payloads to tumor cells. ADCs contain three main components: antibody, linker and cytotoxics (also frequently referred as payload). Antibodies can recognize and specifically bind to the tumor-specific antigens, leading to an antibody-assisted internalization, and payload release. While ADC has demonstrated tremendous success, a number of practical challenges limit the broader applications of this new class of anticancer therapy, including inefficient cellular uptake, low cytotoxicity, and off-target effects. This review article aims to cover recent advances in optimizing linkers with increased stability in circulation while allowing efficient payload release within tumor cells. We also attempt to provide some practical strategies in resolving the current challenges in this attractive research area, particularly to those new to the field.

  12. Noncanonical Wnt5a-Ca(2+) -NFAT signaling axis in pesticide induced bone marrow aplasia mouse model: A study to explore the novel mechanism of pesticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sukalpa; Chatterjee, Ritam; Law, Sujata

    2016-10-01

    According to case-control studies, long-term pesticide exposure can cause bone marrow aplasia like hematopoietic degenerative disease leading to impaired hematopoiesis and increased risk of aplastic anemia in human subjects. However, the exact mechanism of pesticide mediated hematotoxicity still remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway, a crucial regulator of adult hematopoiesis, in pesticide induced bone marrow aplasia mouse model. Aplasia mouse model was developed following inhalation and dermal exposure of 5% aqueous mixture of common agriculturally used pesticides for 6 h/day for 5 days a week up to 90 days. After that, blood hemogram, marrow smear, cellularity, scanning electron microscopy, extramedullary hematopoiesis and flowcytometric expression analysis of noncanonical Wnt signaling components, such as Wnt 5a, fzd5, NFAT, IFN-γ, intracellular Ca(2+) level were evaluated in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment of the control and pesticide induced aplasia groups of animals. Results showed that pesticide exposed mice were anemic with peripheral blood pancytopenia, hypocellular degenerative marrow, and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Upon pesticide exposure, Wnt 5a expression was severely downregulated with a decline in intracellular Ca(2+) level. Moreover, downstream of Wnt5a, we observed sharp downregulation of NFATc2 transcription factor expression, the major target of pesticide toxicity and its target molecule IFN-γ. Taken together, our result suggests that deregulation of Wnt5a-Ca(2+) -NFAT signaling axis in the hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment plays a crucial role behind the pathogenesis of pesticide mediated bone marrow aplasia by limiting primitive hematopoietic stem cells' ability to maintain hematopoietic homeostasis and reconstitution mechanism in vivo during xenobiotic stress leading to ineffective hematopoiesis and evolution of bone marrow aplasia.

  13. Acquisition through horizontal gene transfer of plasmid pSMA198 by Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 points towards the dairy origin of the species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Rania; Maistrou, Eleni; Plakas, Thomas; Papandreou, Nikos C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Supply, Philip; Renault, Pierre; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus macedonicus is an intriguing streptococcal species whose most frequent source of isolation is fermented foods similarly to Streptococcus thermophilus. However, S. macedonicus is closely related to commensal opportunistic pathogens of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex. We analyzed the pSMA198 plasmid isolated from the dairy strain Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 in order to provide novel clues about the main ecological niche of this bacterium. pSMA198 belongs to the narrow host range pCI305/pWV02 family found primarily in lactococci and to the best of our knowledge it is the first such plasmid to be reported in streptococci. Comparative analysis of the pSMA198 sequence revealed a high degree of similarity with plasmids isolated from Lactococcus lactis strains deriving from milk or its products. Phylogenetic analysis of the pSMA198 Rep showed that the vast majority of closely related proteins derive from lactococcal dairy isolates. Additionally, cloning of the pSMA198 ori in L. lactis revealed a 100% stability of replication over 100 generations. Both pSMA198 and the chromosome of S. macedonicus exhibit a high percentage of potential pseudogenes, indicating that they have co-evolved under the same gene decay processes. We identified chromosomal regions in S. macedonicus that may have originated from pSMA198, also supporting a long co-existence of the two replicons. pSMA198 was also found in divergent biotypes of S. macedonicus and in strains isolated from dispersed geographic locations (e.g. Greece and Switzerland) showing that pSMA198's acquisition is not a recent event. Here we propose that S. macedonicus acquired plasmid pSMA198 from L. lactis via an ancestral genetic exchange event that took place most probably in milk or dairy products. We provide important evidence that point towards the dairy origin of this species.

  14. Similar Idiotypic Specificities in Immunoglobulin Fractions with Different Antibody Functions or Even without Detectable Antibody Function

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, J.; Cazenave, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    Idiotypy has been studied in antibodies against a protein antigen: hen ovalbumin. Various fractions of antisera to hen ovalbumin have been compared from the standpoint of the idiotypic specificities found on the immunoglobulins that they contain. Idiotypic specificities were found to be common to (a) antibodies that were not eluted from the same immunoadsorbent by the same MgCl2 concentration, but by four different concentrations. (b) Antibodies that were precipitable only by hen ovalbumin, only by hen and turkey ovalbumin, or also by duck ovalbumin. (c) Antibodies that were precipitated or not precipitated by the homologous ovalbumin, and proteins apparently devoid of antiovalbumin antibody function. These findings are discussed from the standpoint of (i) the differences in function between the various fractions with the same idiotypic specificities, and (ii) what may be common in the cellular origin of immunoglobulins with a common idiotypic specificity, and what may be different in immunoglobulins with different antibody functions or without antibody function. The same idiotypic specificities have been found in certain IgG and IgM antiovalbumin antibodies. Images PMID:4109410

  15. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. The indirect fluorescent antibody technique as a method for detecting antibodies in aborted fetuses.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R B; Wilkie, B N

    1979-01-01

    In this investigation the indirect fluorescent antibody technique was used to titrate antibodies in bovine sera to parainfluenza 3, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus. These results were compared to those determined on the same samples by hemagglutination inhibition for parainfluenza 3 virus and serum neutralization for bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus. The results of the serological methods agreed closely. The indirect fluorescent antibody technique is a rapid and sensitive method for detecting antibodies and the procedure lends itself to use in diagnostic laboratories. In addition to the above viruses the presence or absence of antibodies to bovine coronavirus and bovine adenovirus 3 were determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique in thoracic fluids from 100 aborted fetuses and 50 nonaborted fetuses. Results on these samples were not compared to hemagglutination inhibition or serum neutralization as the condition of fluid samples from aborted fetuses renders interpretation of such tests unreliable. Antibodies to one or more viruses were detected in 30 of the 100 aborted fetuses and in seven of the 50 nonaborted fetuses. Antibodies to more than one agent were detected in eleven of the 100 aborted and in one of the 50 nonaborted fetuses. Reasons for this occurrence and application of the test in determination of causes of abortion are discussed. PMID:226243

  17. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fabmore » fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.« less

  18. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  19. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  20. Antibody immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy for influenza virus infection: Utilization of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies?

    PubMed

    Berry, Cassandra M

    2018-03-04

    Control programs for emerging influenza are in urgent need of novel therapeutic strategies to mitigate potentially devastating threats from pathogenic strains with pandemic potential. Current vaccines and antivirals have inherent limitations in efficacy, especially with rapid evolutionary changes of influenza viruses. Antibody-based antiviral protection harnesses the natural power of the immune system. Antibodies present prophylactic and therapeutic intervention options for prevention and control of influenza, especially for at-risk populations. Specific monoclonal antibodies are well defined in purity and initial efficacy but polyclonal antibodies are easier to scale-up and cost-effective with long-term efficacy, using batches with broadly neutralizing properties against influenza variants. This review presents the pros and cons of monoclonal versus polyclonal antibody therapy for influenza.

  1. Kotai Antibody Builder: automated high-resolution structural modeling of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuo; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Amada, Karlou; Liang, Shide; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Nakamura, Haruki; Shirai, Hiroki; Standley, Daron M

    2014-11-15

    Kotai Antibody Builder is a Web service for tertiary structural modeling of antibody variable regions. It consists of three main steps: hybrid template selection by sequence alignment and canonical rules, 3D rendering of alignments and CDR-H3 loop modeling. For the last step, in addition to rule-based heuristics used to build the initial model, a refinement option is available that uses fragment assembly followed by knowledge-based scoring. Using targets from the Second Antibody Modeling Assessment, we demonstrate that Kotai Antibody Builder generates models with an overall accuracy equal to that of the best-performing semi-automated predictors using expert knowledge. Kotai Antibody Builder is available at http://kotaiab.org standley@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Isoform specificity of progesterone receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Victoria; Abascal, María F; Giulianelli, Sebastián; May, María; Sequeira, Gonzalo R; Jacobsen, Britta; Lombès, Marc; Han, Julie; Tran, Luan; Molinolo, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone receptors (PR) are prognostic and predictive biomarkers in hormone‐dependent cancers. Two main PR isoforms have been described, PRB and PRA, that differ only in that PRB has 164 extra N‐terminal amino acids. It has been reported that several antibodies empirically exclusively recognize PRA in formalin‐fixed paraffin‐embedded (FFPE) tissues. To confirm these findings, we used human breast cancer xenograft models, T47D‐YA and ‐YB cells expressing PRA or PRB, respectively, MDA‐MB‐231 cells modified to synthesize PRB, and MDA‐MB‐231/iPRAB cells which can bi‐inducibly express either PRA or PRB. Cells were injected into immunocompromised mice to generate tumours exclusively expressing PRA or PRB. PR isoform expression was verified using immunoblots. FFPE samples from the same tumours were studied by immunohistochemistry using H‐190, clone 636, clone 16, and Ab‐6 anti‐PR antibodies, the latter exclusively recognizing PRB. Except for Ab‐6, all antibodies displayed a similar staining pattern. Our results indicate that clones 16, 636, and the H‐190 antibody recognize both PR isoforms. They point to the need for more stringency in evaluating the true specificity of purported PRA‐specific antibodies as the PRA/PRB ratio may have prognostic and predictive value in breast cancer. PMID:29085663

  3. Isoform specificity of progesterone receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Victoria; Abascal, María F; Giulianelli, Sebastián; May, María; Sequeira, Gonzalo R; Jacobsen, Britta; Lombès, Marc; Han, Julie; Tran, Luan; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    Progesterone receptors (PR) are prognostic and predictive biomarkers in hormone-dependent cancers. Two main PR isoforms have been described, PRB and PRA, that differ only in that PRB has 164 extra N-terminal amino acids. It has been reported that several antibodies empirically exclusively recognize PRA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. To confirm these findings, we used human breast cancer xenograft models, T47D-YA and -YB cells expressing PRA or PRB, respectively, MDA-MB-231 cells modified to synthesize PRB, and MDA-MB-231/iPRAB cells which can bi-inducibly express either PRA or PRB. Cells were injected into immunocompromised mice to generate tumours exclusively expressing PRA or PRB. PR isoform expression was verified using immunoblots. FFPE samples from the same tumours were studied by immunohistochemistry using H-190, clone 636, clone 16, and Ab-6 anti-PR antibodies, the latter exclusively recognizing PRB. Except for Ab-6, all antibodies displayed a similar staining pattern. Our results indicate that clones 16, 636, and the H-190 antibody recognize both PR isoforms. They point to the need for more stringency in evaluating the true specificity of purported PRA-specific antibodies as the PRA/PRB ratio may have prognostic and predictive value in breast cancer.

  4. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  5. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  6. Using Phage Display to Create Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dasch, James R; Dasch, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    A variety of phage display technologies have been developed since the approach was first described for antibodies. The most widely used approaches incorporate antibody sequences into the minor coat protein pIII of the nonlytic filamentous phage fd or M13. Libraries of variable gene sequences, encoding either scFv or Fab fragments, are made by incorporating sequences into phagemid vectors. The phagemid is packaged into phage particles with the assistance of a helper phage to produce the antibody display phage. This protocol describes a method for creating a phagemid library. The multiple cloning site (MCS) of the pBluescript KS(-) phagemid vector is replaced by digestion with the restriction enzyme BssHII, followed by the insertion of four overlapping oligonucleotides to create a new MCS within the vector. Next, the 3' portion of gene III (from M13mp18) is amplified and combined with an antibody sequence using overlap extension PCR. This product is inserted into the phagemid vector to create pPDS. Two helper plasmids are also created from the modified pBluescript vector: pLINK provides the linker between the heavy and light chains, and pFABC provides the CH1 domain of the heavy chain. An antibody cDNA library is constructed from the RNA of interest and ligated into pPDS. The phagemid library is electroporated into Escherichia coli cells along with the VCS-M13 helper phage. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus antibodies in commercial immunoglobulin preparations, human serum, and milk.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Zoric, M; Carlsson, B; Jeansson, S; Ekre, H P; Osterhaus, A D; Roberton, D; Hanson, L A

    1993-05-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that fetal antibody production can be induced by maternal antiidiotypic antibodies transferred to the fetus via the placenta. We tested commercial Ig, sera, and milk for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus type 1, using affinity chromatography combined with ELISA systems and virus neutralization techniques. Our results indicate that commercial Ig, serum, and milk samples contain antibodies recognizing idiotypic determinants on antibodies to poliovirus. Several lines of evidence support this conclusion. Thus, in an ELISA with poliovirus as a solid phase, binding of specific antibodies could be inhibited by addition of an eluate from the Ig preparation containing anti-idiotypic antibodies against poliovirus type 1. Also, antiidiotypic antibodies from pooled human Ig, serum, and colostrum samples against poliovirus bound directly to solid-phase-attached MAb against poliovirus type 1. In addition, in a competitive inhibition ELISA, where antiidiotypic antibodies isolated from the Ig preparation competed with the poliovirus antigen for binding to monoclonal or polyclonal idiotypic antibodies on the solid phase, inhibition of antigen binding was seen at low antigen concentrations. When single-donor serum or milk was used, this inhibition was even more pronounced and could be demonstrated at almost all antigen concentrations. The finding that anti-idiotypes are present in maternal serum and milk imply, in agreement with our previous studies, that anti-idiotypes may actively induce a specific immune response in the fetus without previous exposure to the antigen by being transferred across the placenta or by being passively transferred to the newborn via mother's milk.

  8. The distribution of antibodies to streptokinase.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M; Pentecost, B L; Littler, W A; Stockley, R A

    1996-05-01

    To determine the distribution of antibodies to streptokinase that might be anticipated in patients requiring treatment with streptokinase, specific anti-streptokinase antibody titres were determined in a group of subjects from the general population and in a group of patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed to measure specific anti-streptokinase IgG and subclass IgG1 in 95 subjects from the general population and in 160 patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Low titres of IgG1 were found in both the general population (median = 5; range: 0-490) and in the myocardial infarction group (median = 7; range: 0-2000). A minority of subjects in both groups had high titres. The findings suggest that low titres of antibody are widespread in the population. The minority of subjects in both groups who had high titres may explain the infrequent type III immune reactions encountered with streptokinase.

  9. Patent disclosure requirements for therapeutic antibody patents.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Carmela; Trifonova, Anastassia

    2017-08-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have grown to become an important product class within the biopharmaceutical market. A prerequisite to their commercialization is adequate patent protection. Disclosure requirements and the types of claims available in different jurisdictions can impact the scope of protection available for antibodies. Areas covered: A comparative review of statutory bases, patent office practices and selected decisions in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom related to disclosure requirements is provided. Expert opinion: Differences in disclosure requirements exist in different jurisdictions which can impact the type of claims obtained and their survival when attacked in litigation. Including a wide variety of claim types is a key strategy to ensuring therapeutic antibodies are adequately protected. Method of use claims may provide advantages and broader protection in some circumstances and should also be considered.

  10. Migraine and anti-phospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, A; Barklay, L; Lee, M A; Suchowersky, O

    1989-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APA), initially described with SLE, have in recent years received much attention because of an associated increased risk of thrombo-embolic disease, recurrent abortion and thrombocytopenia. Although commonly seen with SLE or other collagen vascular diseases, the antibodies frequently occur in the absence of any such disease. Neurologic complications include transient or permanent ischemic episodes, migraine or related phenomena, myelopathy and a Guillain-Barré type syndrome. In this report we describe the presenting features and clinical course of six patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies where migraine was an early and prominent symptom. All six patients, however, were recognized only after a second more serious event had occurred. As this entity becomes more widely recognized and better treatments evolve an earlier diagnosis of patients with migraine as the only manifestation of APA may prevent the development of other serious complications.

  11. Antibody-based bacterial toxin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Heitz, Jonathon M.; Anis, Nabil A.; Thompson, Roy G.

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a one step assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin or Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled toxins. In the two-step assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified antitoxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or antitoxin IgG in a dose-dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  12. Method for preparation of single chain antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V [New York, NY; Guo, Hong-fen [New York, NY

    2012-04-03

    This invention provides a method for identifying cells expressing a target single chain antibody (scFv) directed against a target antigen from a collection of cells that includes cells that do not express the target scFv, comprising the step of combining the collection of cells with an anti-idiotype directed to an antibody specific for the target antigen and detecting interaction, if any, of the anti-idiotype with the cells, wherein the occurrence of an interaction identifies the cell as one which expresses the target scFv. This invention also provides a method for making a single chain antibody (scFv) directed against an antigen, wherein the selection of clones is made based upon interaction of those clones with an appropriate anti-idiotype, and heretofore inaccessible scFv so made. This invention provides the above methods or any combination thereof. Finally, this invention provides various uses of these methods.

  13. Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, Sara; Ocaña, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2018-05-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are multicomponent molecules constituted by an antibody covalently linked to a potent cytotoxic agent. ADCs combine high target specificity provided by the antibody together with strong antitumoral properties provided by the attached cytotoxic agent. At present, four ADCs have been approved and over 60 are being explored in clinical trials. Despite their effectiveness, resistance to these drugs unfortunately occurs. Efforts to understand the bases underlying such resistance are being carried out with the final purpose of counteracting them. In this review, we report described mechanisms of resistance to ADCs used in the clinic along with other potential ones that may contribute to resistance acquisition. We also discuss strategies to overcome resistance to ADCs. Cancer Res; 78(9); 2159-65. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins; Raffen, Rosemarie; Schiffer, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  15. Anti-DNA antibodies--quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency--in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain--determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes.

  16. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  17. Prenatal toxoplasmosis antibody and childhood autism.

    PubMed

    Spann, Marisa N; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Brown, Alan S

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence that some maternal infections during the prenatal period are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as childhood autism. However, the association between autism and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), an intracellular parasite, remains unclear. The authors examined whether serologically confirmed maternal antibodies to T. gondii are associated with odds of childhood autism in offspring. The study is based on a nested case-control design of a large national birth cohort (N = 1.2 million) and the national psychiatric registries in Finland. There were 874 cases of childhood autism and controls matched 1:1 on date of birth, sex, birthplace and residence in Finland. Maternal sera were prospectively assayed from a national biobank for T. gondii IgM and IgG antibodies; IgG avidity analyses were also performed. High maternal T. gondii IgM antibody was associated with a significantly decreased odds of childhood autism. Low maternal T. gondii IgG antibody was associated with increased offspring odds of autism. In women with high T. gondii IgM antibodies, the IgG avidity was high for both cases and controls, with the exception of three controls. The findings suggest that the relationship between maternal T. gondii antibodies and odds of childhood autism may be related to the immune response to this pathogen or the overall activation of the immune system. Autism Res 2017, 10: 769-777. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Multiplex serology of paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maat, Peter; Brouwer, Eric; Hulsenboom, Esther; VanDuijn, Martijn; Schreurs, Marco W J; Hooijkaas, Herbert; Smitt, Peter A E Sillevis

    2013-05-31

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are devastating neurological disorders secondary to cancer, associated with onconeural autoantibodies. Such antibodies are directed against neuronal antigens aberrantly expressed by the tumor. The detection of onconeural antibodies in a patient is extremely important in diagnosing a neurological syndrome as paraneoplastic (70% is not yet known to have cancer) and in directing the search for the underlying neoplasm. At present six onconeural antibodies are considered 'well characterized' and recognize the antigens HuD, CDR62 (Yo), amphiphysin, CRMP-5 (CV2), NOVA-1 (Ri), and Ma2. The gold standard of detection is the characteristic immunohistochemical staining pattern on brain tissue sections combined with confirmation by immunoblotting using recombinant purified proteins. Since all six onconeural antibodies are usually analyzed simultaneously and objective cut-off values for these analyses are warranted, we developed a multiplex assay based on Luminex technology. Reaction of serial dilutions of six onconeural standard sera with microsphere-bound antigens showed lower limits of detection than with Western blotting. Using the six standard sera at a dilution of 1:200, the average within-run coefficient of variation (CV) was 4% (range 1.9-7.3%). The average between-run within-day CV was 5.1% (range 2.9-6.7%) while the average between-day CV was 8.1% (range 2.8-11.6%). The shelf-life of the antigen coupled microspheres was at least two months. The sensitivity of the multiplex assay ranged from 83% (Ri) to 100% (Yo, amphiphysin, CV2) and the specificity from 96% (CV2) to 100% (Ri). In conclusion, Luminex-based multiplex serology is highly reproducible with high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of onconeural antibodies. Conventional immunoblotting for diagnosis of onconeural antibodies in the setting of a routine laboratory may be replaced by this novel, robust technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  20. Proteomic Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies from Serum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the in vivo dynamics of the polyclonal antibody repertoire in serum, such as that which might arise in response to stimulation with an antigen, is difficult due to the presence of many highly similar immunoglobulin proteins, each specified by distinct B lymphocytes. These challenges have precluded the use of conventional mass spectrometry for antibody identification based on peptide mass spectral matches to a genomic reference database. Recently, progress has been made using bottom-up analysis of serum antibodies by nanoflow liquid chromatography/high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry combined with a sample-specific antibody sequence database generated by high-throughput sequencing of individual B cell immunoglobulin variable domains (V genes). Here, we describe how intrinsic features of antibody primary structure, most notably the interspersed segments of variable and conserved amino acid sequences, generate recurring patterns in the corresponding peptide mass spectra of V gene peptides, greatly complicating the assignment of correct sequences to mass spectral data. We show that the standard method of decoy-based error modeling fails to account for the error introduced by these highly similar sequences, leading to a significant underestimation of the false discovery rate. Because of these effects, antibody-derived peptide mass spectra require increased stringency in their interpretation. The use of filters based on the mean precursor ion mass accuracy of peptide-spectrum matches is shown to be particularly effective in distinguishing between “true” and “false” identifications. These findings highlight important caveats associated with the use of standard database search and error-modeling methods with nonstandard data sets and custom sequence databases. PMID:24684310

  1. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  2. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  3. Evolutionary appearance of genes encoding proteins associated with box H/ACA snoRNAs: Cbf5p in Euglena gracilis, an early diverging eukaryote, and candidate Gar1p and Nop10p homologs in archaebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Gray, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    A reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) approach was used to clone a cDNA encoding the Euglena gracilis homolog of yeast Cbf5p, a protein component of the box H/ACA class of snoRNPs that mediate pseudouridine formation in eukaryotic rRNA. Cbf5p is a putative pseudouridine synthase, and the Euglena homolog is the first full-length Cbf5p sequence to be reported for an early diverging unicellular eukaryote (protist). Phylogenetic analysis of putative pseudouridine synthase sequences confirms that archaebacterial and eukaryotic (including Euglena) Cbf5p proteins are specifically related and are distinct from the TruB/Pus4p clade that is responsible for formation of pseudouridine at position 55 in eubacterial (TruB) and eukaryotic (Pus4p) tRNAs. Using a bioinformatics approach, we also identified archaebacterial genes encoding candidate homologs of yeast Gar1p and Nop10p, two additional proteins known to be associated with eukaryotic box H/ACA snoRNPs. These observations raise the possibility that pseudouridine formation in archaebacterial rRNA may be dependent on analogs of the eukaryotic box H/ACA snoRNPs, whose evolutionary origin may therefore predate the split between Archaea (archaebacteria) and Eucarya (eukaryotes). Database searches further revealed, in archaebacterial and some eukaryotic genomes, two previously unrecognized groups of genes (here designated ‘PsuX’ and ‘PsuY’) distantly related to the Cbf5p/TruB gene family. PMID:10871366

  4. SAbDab: the structural antibody database

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James; Krawczyk, Konrad; Leem, Jinwoo; Baker, Terry; Fuchs, Angelika; Georges, Guy; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Structural antibody database (SAbDab; http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/sabdab) is an online resource containing all the publicly available antibody structures annotated and presented in a consistent fashion. The data are annotated with several properties including experimental information, gene details, correct heavy and light chain pairings, antigen details and, where available, antibody–antigen binding affinity. The user can select structures, according to these attributes as well as structural properties such as complementarity determining region loop conformation and variable domain orientation. Individual structures, datasets and the complete database can be downloaded. PMID:24214988

  5. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2006-10-01

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy.

  6. Schmallenberg virus antibodies detected in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kaba, J; Czopowicz, M; Witkowski, L

    2013-02-01

    Between 24 and 30 July 2012 230 adult goats from three western provinces of Poland bordering on Germany (Western Pomerania, Lubuskie and Lower Silesia) were blood-sampled and tested for antibodies to Schmallenberg virus (SBV) using indirect immunoenzymatic test (ID Screen® Schmallenberg virus indirect, IDvet Innovative Diagnostics). The ELISA test identified 21 seropositive goats - 15 in Western Pomerania (16% of all goats tested in this province), five in Lubuskie (6%) and one in Lower Silesia (2%). Our study demonstrates for the first time the presence of antibodies to SBV in Poland. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Lymphocyte-dependent antibodies in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Pápai, I; Lehrner, J

    1976-01-01

    Lymphocyte-dependent antibodies were revealed in the serum of patients suffering from uveitis of various aetiologies. The serum was incubated with normal uveal tissue and the binding of non-immune human lymphocytes was investigated. In three cases of sympathetic ophthalmitis the lymphocytes accumulated around the melanine granules, while in another 17 patients with uveitis cases the lymphocytes accumulated around the capillaries. Uveal tissue incubated with control sera failed to bound lymphocytes. The lymphocytic infiltration in certain cases of chronic uveitis suggested the role of lymphocyte-mediating antibodies in the aetiology of these cases.

  8. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  9. Automated high throughput microscale antibody purification workflows for accelerating antibody discovery

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Peng; Lee, Sophia; Paluch, Maciej; Kansopon, Joe; Viajar, Sharon; Begum, Zahira; Chiang, Nancy; Nakamura, Gerald; Hass, Philip E.; Wong, Athena W.; Lazar, Greg A.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT To rapidly find “best-in-class” antibody therapeutics, it has become essential to develop high throughput (HTP) processes that allow rapid assessment of antibodies for functional and molecular properties. Consequently, it is critical to have access to sufficient amounts of high quality antibody, to carry out accurate and quantitative characterization. We have developed automated workflows using liquid handling systems to conduct affinity-based purification either in batch or tip column mode. Here, we demonstrate the capability to purify >2000 antibodies per day from microscale (1 mL) cultures. Our optimized, automated process for human IgG1 purification using MabSelect SuRe resin achieves ∼70% recovery over a wide range of antibody loads, up to 500 µg. This HTP process works well for hybridoma-derived antibodies that can be purified by MabSelect SuRe resin. For rat IgG2a, which is often encountered in hybridoma cultures and is challenging to purify via an HTP process, we established automated purification with GammaBind Plus resin. Using these HTP purification processes, we can efficiently recover sufficient amounts of antibodies from mammalian transient or hybridoma cultures with quality comparable to conventional column purification. PMID:29494273

  10. Beyond Antibodies as Binding Partners: The Role of Antibody Mimetics in Bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaowen; Yang, Yu-Ping; Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-06-12

    The emergence of novel binding proteins or antibody mimetics capable of binding to ligand analytes in a manner analogous to that of the antigen-antibody interaction has spurred increased interest in the biotechnology and bioanalytical communities. The goal is to produce antibody mimetics designed to outperform antibodies with regard to binding affinities, cellular and tumor penetration, large-scale production, and temperature and pH stability. The generation of antibody mimetics with tailored characteristics involves the identification of a naturally occurring protein scaffold as a template that binds to a desired ligand. This scaffold is then engineered to create a superior binder by first creating a library that is then subjected to a series of selection steps. Antibody mimetics have been successfully used in the development of binding assays for the detection of analytes in biological samples, as well as in separation methods, cancer therapy, targeted drug delivery, and in vivo imaging. This review describes recent advances in the field of antibody mimetics and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, specifically in diagnostics and other analytical methods.

  11. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Tumor Immunotherapy with Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ursula J. E.; Schlegel, Patrick; Lang, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several therapeutic antibodies have been Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) approved. Although their mechanisms of action in vivo is not fully elucidated, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by natural killer (NK) cells is presumed to be a key effector function. A substantial role of ADCC has been demonstrated in vitro and in mouse tumor models. However, a direct in vivo effect of ADCC in tumor reactivity in humans remains to be shown. Several studies revealed a predictive value of FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism in monoclonal antibody treatment, indicating a potential effect of ADCC on outcome for certain indications. Furthermore, the use of therapeutic antibodies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an interesting option. Studying the role of the FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism and the influence of Killer-cell Immunoglobuline-like Receptor (KIR) receptor ligand incompatibility on ADCC in this approach may contribute to future transplantation strategies. Despite the success of approved second-generation antibodies in the treatment of several malignancies, efforts are made to further augment ADCC in vivo by antibody engineering. Here, we review currently used therapeutic antibodies for which ADCC has been suggested as effector function. PMID:23543707

  12. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    performance in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA ), with little regard for quantification of the full spectrum of variables affecting antibody...Program (ATP) Quality MS2 coat protein (MS2CP) Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...5 2.7 ELISA ................................................................................................................5

  13. Structure and function of CrACA1, the major PM-type Ca2+-ATPase, expressed at the peak of the gravity-directed trans-cell calcium current in spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii.

    PubMed

    Bushart, T J; Cannon, A; Clark, G; Roux, S J

    2014-01-01

    Spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii have proven to be a valuable single-cell system for studying gravity responses. The earliest cellular change directed by gravity in these cells is a trans-cell calcium current, which peaks near 10 h after the spores are induced to germinate. This current is needed for gravity-directed axis alignment, and its peak is coincident with the time period when gravity polarises the direction of subsequent nuclear migration and rhizoid growth. Transcriptomic analysis of genes expressed at the 10-h time point revealed several that encode proteins likely to be key components that either drive the current or regulate it. Notable among these is a plasma membrane (PM)-type Ca(2+) ATPase, CrACA1, whose activity pumping Ca(2+) out of cells is regulated by gravity. This report provides an initial characterisation of the structure and expression of this protein, and demonstrates its heterologous function complementing the K616 mutant of yeast, which is deficient in PM-type Ca(2+) pump activity. Gravity-induced changes in the trans-cell Ca(2+) current occur within seconds, a result consistent with the hypothesis that the force of gravity can rapidly alter the post-translational state of the channels and pumps that drive this current across spore cells. This report identifies a transporter likely to be a key driver of the current, CrACA1, and characterises the role of this protein in early germination and gravity-driven polarity fixation through analysis of expression levels, functional complementation and pharmacological treatments. These data, along with newly available transcriptomic data obtained at the 10-h time point, indicate that CrACA1 is present, functional and likely a major contributing component of the trans-cell Ca(2+) efflux. CrACA1 is not necessary for polar axis alignment, but pharmacological perturbations of it disrupt rhizoid development. These data support and help refine the post-translational modification model for

  14. Striational antibodies in myasthenia gravis: reactivity and possible clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Romi, Fredrik; Skeie, Geir Olve; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Aarli, Johan Arild

    2005-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease caused, in most cases, by antibodies attaching to the acetylcholine receptor. Some myasthenia gravis patients have antibodies that bind in a cross-striational pattern to skeletal and heart muscle tissue sections (striational antibodies). These antibodies react with epitopes on the muscle proteins titin and ryanodine receptor, are found mainly in sera of patients with thymoma and late-onset myasthenia gravis, and may correlate with myasthenia gravis severity. Their presence may predict an unsatisfactory outcome after thymectomy. The detection of titin and ryanodine receptor antibodies provides more specific clinical information than the immunofluorescent demonstration of striational antibodies.

  15. Impact of Uniform Methods on Interlaboratory Antibody Titration Variability: Antibody Titration and Uniform Methods.

    PubMed

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Cheng, Yan H; Long, Thomas; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-01-01

    -Substantial variability between different antibody titration methods prompted development and introduction of uniform methods in 2008. -To determine whether uniform methods consistently decrease interlaboratory variation in proficiency testing. -Proficiency testing data for antibody titration between 2009 and 2013 were obtained from the College of American Pathologists. Each laboratory was supplied plasma and red cells to determine anti-A and anti-D antibody titers by their standard method: gel or tube by uniform or other methods at different testing phases (immediate spin and/or room temperature [anti-A], and/or anti-human globulin [AHG: anti-A and anti-D]) with different additives. Interlaboratory variations were compared by analyzing the distribution of titer results by method and phase. -A median of 574 and 1100 responses were reported for anti-A and anti-D antibody titers, respectively, during a 5-year period. The 3 most frequent (median) methods performed for anti-A antibody were uniform tube room temperature (147.5; range, 119-159), uniform tube AHG (143.5; range, 134-150), and other tube AHG (97; range, 82-116); for anti-D antibody, the methods were other tube (451; range, 431-465), uniform tube (404; range, 382-462), and uniform gel (137; range, 121-153). Of the larger reported methods, uniform gel AHG phase for anti-A and anti-D antibodies had the most participants with the same result (mode). For anti-A antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube room temperature) and 1 of 8 (uniform versus other tube AHG), and for anti-D antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube) and 0 of 8 (uniform versus other gel) proficiency tests showed significant titer variability reduction. -Uniform methods harmonize laboratory techniques but rarely reduce interlaboratory titer variance in comparison with other methods.

  16. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs.

  17. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBC) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis following transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor/recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Study design and results Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; IgM and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes/macrophages, other immune cells and complement; monocyte monolayer assay (MMA); antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC); and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Conclusion Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B antibodies in the IVIG products. PMID:26174897

  19. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  20. Acquisition through Horizontal Gene Transfer of Plasmid pSMA198 by Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 Points towards the Dairy Origin of the Species

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Rania; Maistrou, Eleni; Plakas, Thomas; Papandreou, Nikos C.; Hamodrakas, Stavros J.; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Supply, Philip; Renault, Pierre; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus macedonicus is an intriguing streptococcal species whose most frequent source of isolation is fermented foods similarly to Streptococcus thermophilus. However, S. macedonicus is closely related to commensal opportunistic pathogens of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the pSMA198 plasmid isolated from the dairy strain Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 in order to provide novel clues about the main ecological niche of this bacterium. pSMA198 belongs to the narrow host range pCI305/pWV02 family found primarily in lactococci and to the best of our knowledge it is the first such plasmid to be reported in streptococci. Comparative analysis of the pSMA198 sequence revealed a high degree of similarity with plasmids isolated from Lactococcus lactis strains deriving from milk or its products. Phylogenetic analysis of the pSMA198 Rep showed that the vast majority of closely related proteins derive from lactococcal dairy isolates. Additionally, cloning of the pSMA198 ori in L. lactis revealed a 100% stability of replication over 100 generations. Both pSMA198 and the chromosome of S. macedonicus exhibit a high percentage of potential pseudogenes, indicating that they have co-evolved under the same gene decay processes. We identified chromosomal regions in S. macedonicus that may have originated from pSMA198, also supporting a long co-existence of the two replicons. pSMA198 was also found in divergent biotypes of S. macedonicus and in strains isolated from dispersed geographic locations (e.g. Greece and Switzerland) showing that pSMA198’s acquisition is not a recent event. Conclusions/Significance Here we propose that S. macedonicus acquired plasmid pSMA198 from L. lactis via an ancestral genetic exchange event that took place most probably in milk or dairy products. We provide important evidence that point towards the dairy origin of this species. PMID:25584532

  1. Avaliação da influência de alterações cardíacas na ultrassonografia vascular periférica de idosos

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Alcides José Araújo; Ribeiro, Andréa Campos de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Márcia Marisia Maciel; Negreiros, Sandra de Barros Cobra; Nogueira, Ana Cláudia Cavalcante; Almeida, Osório Luís Rangel; Silva, José Carlos Quináglia e; de Paula, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    Resumo Contexto As cardiopatias podem causar alterações no formato das ondas da ultrassonografia vascular (UV) em vasos periféricos. Essas alterações, tipicamente bilaterais e sistêmicas, são pouco conhecidas e estudadas. Objetivo Avaliar as ondas periféricas da UV de pacientes idosos para identificar alterações decorrentes de cardiopatias. Métodos Foram estudados 183 pacientes idosos submetidos a UV periférica no ano de 2014. Resultados Foram avaliados 102 mulheres (55,7%) e 81 homens (44,3%) com idade entre 60 e 91 anos (média de 70,4±7,2 anos). Encontraram-se alterações pela UV em 84 pacientes (45,9%). Foram identificadas 138 alterações de oito dos 13 tipos descritos na literatura: arritmia, onda bisferiens de pico sistólico, baixa velocidade de pico sistólico, pulsatilidade em veias femorais, bradicardia, taquicardia, onda de pulso parvus tardus e onda de pulso alternans. Houve baixa concordância entre a presença e a não presença de alterações na UV e na avaliação cardiológica. Na análise específica das alterações, os exames tiveram uma concordância variável, que foi boa para o achado de taquicardia, moderada para arritmia e baixa para bradicardia. Não houve concordância entre a UV e os exames cardiológicos para as demais alterações. Conclusões É possível identificar determinadas alterações cardíacas em idosos por meio da análise do formato das ondas periféricas da UV. É importante reconhecer e relatar a presença dessas alterações, pela possibilidade de alertar para um diagnóstico ainda não identificado nesses pacientes. Entretanto, mais estudos são necessários para que seja definida a importância das alterações no formato das ondas Doppler periféricas no reconhecimento de cardiopatias. PMID:29930591

  2. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly

  3. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Rania; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Blom, Jochen; Papandreou, Nikos C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Renault, Pierre; Supply, Philip; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2014-04-08

    Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly, similar findings were

  4. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  5. The emergence of antibody therapies for Ebola.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael; Whaley, Kevin; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary; Zeitlin, Larry

    2015-12-23

    This review describes the history of Ebola monoclonal antibody (mAb) development leading up to the recent severe Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The Ebola virus has presented numerous perplexing challenges in the long effort to develop therapeutic antibody strategies. Since the first report of a neutralizing human anti-Ebola mAb in 1999, the straightforward progression from in vitro neutralization resulting in in vivo protection and therapy has not occurred. A number of mAbs, including the first reported, failed to protect non-human primates (NHPs) in spite of protection in rodents. An appreciation of the role of effector functions to antibody efficacy has contributed significantly to understanding mechanisms of in vivo protection. However a crucial contribution, as measured by post-exposure therapy of NHPs, involved the comprehensive testing of mAb cocktails. This effort was aided by the use of plant production technology where various combinations of mAbs could be rapidly produced and tested. Introduction of appropriate modifications, such as specific glycan profiles, also improved therapeutic efficacy. The resulting cocktail, ZMapp™, consists of three mAbs that were identified from numerous mAb candidates. ZMapp™ \\ is now being evaluated in human clinical trials but has already played a role in bringing awareness to the potential of antibody therapy for Ebola.

  6. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  7. Rubella antibodies in Australian immunoglobulin products.

    PubMed

    Young, Megan K; Bertolini, Joseph; Kotharu, Pushpa; Maher, Darryl; Cripps, Allan W

    2017-08-03

    Rubella antibodies are not routinely measured in immunoglobulin products and there is a lack of information on the titer in Australian products. To facilitate future studies of the effectiveness of passive immunisation for preventing rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, this study measured the concentration of rubella-specific antibodies in Australian intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) human immunoglobulin products suitable for post-exposure prophylaxis using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. The GMT ± GSD for the IM product was 19 ± 1.2 IU/mg (2980 ± 1.2 IU/mL). The GMT ± GSD for the IV product was 12 ± 1.5 IU/mg (729 ± 1.5 IU/mL). At present, Australian guidelines recommend offering non-immune pregnant women exposed to rubella 20 mL of intramuscular immunoglobulin within 72 hours of exposure. This equates to 42,160 IU of rubella antibodies if the lowest titer obtained for the Australian IM product is considered. The same dose would be delivered by 176 mL of the Australian IV product at the lowest measured rubella-specific antibody titer.

  8. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  9. [Antibodies and physiopathogeny of autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Jorge; Ríos-Vaca, Aurelio; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by periportal hepatitis, increased serum globulins and the presence of certain antibodies. The disorder can be classified in three types. Type 1 AIH is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle autoantibodies (SMA) in up to 70-80% of patients. ANA and SMA can be the only antibodies present in 13 and 33% of cases respectively. Type 2 AIH is defined by the presence of liver and kidney antimicrosomal antibodies (LKM1). Type 2 AIH is the only form of the disease in which the autoantigen has been identified: cytochrome mono-oxygenase (P-450 IID6) CYP2D6. In type 3 AIH the presence of anti-SLA/LP (soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas) targets a cytosolic protein involved in the incorporation of selenocysteine into peptidic chains. The pathophysiology of AIH is complex and involves genetic predisposition, previous exposure to antigens (autoantigens), presence of triggering factors and defects in immunoregulation. In spite of the advances in the understanding of AIH, the role of autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of this disease has not been fully established and their presence does not clearly distinguish any prognostic groups. Further investigations will help in the diagnosis of this disorder, the comprehension of its origins and the establishment of new forms of treatment.

  10. Electron Microscopic Observations of Rabbit Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hall, C E; Nisonoff, A; Slayter, H S

    1959-12-01

    Electron micrographs were obtained showing the individual, shadow-cast macromolecules from solutions of purified anti-p-azobenzoate rabbit antibody and of normal gamma-globulin. The two materials look alike and consist mainly of asymmetrical rod-like particles about 30 to 40 A in diameter. Lengths are not constant but the weight average is about 250 A for the antibodies and about 200 A for the gamma-globulin. The average observed dimensions are reasonably consistent with values deduced from physical-chemical methods, although the shape is more nearly that of a cylindrical rod rather than the ellipsoid employed in hydrodynamical theory. Mixtures of antibody and specific dihaptenic dye were examined in attempts to establish the mode of the specific aggregation. At the high dilutions necessary for electron microscopy (0.1 mg./ml.), the effect of the dye was small and tended to be masked by non-specific aggregation on drying. The evidence suggests that under these conditions the specific reaction involves an end-to-end aggregation of the elementary particles to produce a weight average length about twice that of the pure antibody.

  11. Immunosignature: Serum Antibody Profiling for Cancer Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chapoval, Andrei I; Legutki, J Bart; Stafford, Philip; Trebukhov, Andrey V; Johnston, Stephen A; Shoikhet, Yakov N; Lazarev, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer are valuable tools for detection of malignant tumors at early stages in groups at risk and screening healthy people, as well as monitoring disease recurrence after treatment of cancer. However the complexity of the body's response to the pathological processes makes it virtually impossible to evaluate this response to the development of the disease using a single biomarker that is present in the serum at low concentrations. An alternative approach to standard biomarker analysis is called immunosignature. Instead of going after biomarkers themselves this approach rely on the analysis of the humoral immune response to molecular changes associated with the development of pathological processes. It is known that antibodies are produced in response to proteins expressed during cancer development. Accordingly, the changes in antibody repertoire associated with tumor growth can serve as biomarkers of cancer. Immunosignature is a highly sensitive method for antibody repertoire analysis utilizing high density peptide microarrays. In the present review we discuss modern methods for antibody detection, as well as describe the principles and applications of immunosignature in research and clinical practice.

  12. The effects of antibodies on cells

    PubMed Central

    Dumonde, D. C.; Bitensky, Lucille; Cunningham, G. J.; Chayen, J.

    1965-01-01

    Biochemical and histochemical methods were used to study the interaction of antibodies and complement with mouse Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. In the presence of complement, both iso- and hetero-antibodies caused cell lysis with penetration of antibodies into the damaged cells, as detected by immunofluorescence; the cells were then unable to support aerobic glycolysis though they retained their ability to consume oxygen in the presence of succinate. Under these conditions there was unmasking of phospholipid particularly at the cell surface, together with lysosomal changes resulting in diffuse staining for lysosomal acid—phosphatase. In the absence of complement, antibodies did not appear to penetrate the cells which respired normally and were not lysed. However, in these cells there was intense lysosomal activation accompanied by unmasking of cytoplasmic phospholipid; it appeared that an immune reaction confined to the cell surface was able to induce changes in the cytoplasm without acutely impairing the viability of the cell. ImagesFIGS. 1-8FIGS. 9-14 PMID:14245309

  13. Ebola Virus Antibodies in Fruit Bats, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Ariful; Yu, Meng; Anthony, Simon J.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Khan, Salah Uddin; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Lipkin, W. Ian; Luby, Stephen P.; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To determine geographic range for Ebola virus, we tested 276 bats in Bangladesh. Five (3.5%) bats were positive for antibodies against Ebola Zaire and Reston viruses; no virus was detected by PCR. These bats might be a reservoir for Ebola or Ebola-like viruses, and extend the range of filoviruses to mainland Asia. PMID:23343532

  14. Ethanol precipitation for purification of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tscheliessnig, Anne; Satzer, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Schulz, Henk; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-20

    Currently, the golden standard for the purification of recombinant humanized antibodies (rhAbs) from CHO cell culture is protein A chromatography. However, due to increasing rhAbs titers alternative methods have come into focus. A new strategy for purification of recombinant human antibodies from CHO cell culture supernatant based on cold ethanol precipitation (CEP) and CaCl2 precipitation has been developed. This method is based on the cold ethanol precipitation, the process used for purification of antibodies and other components from blood plasma. We proof the applicability of the developed process for four different antibodies resulting in similar yield and purity as a protein A chromatography based process. This process can be further improved using an anion-exchange chromatography in flowthrough mode e.g. a monolith as last step so that residual host cell protein is reduced to a minimum. Beside the ethanol based process, our data also suggest that ethanol could be replaced with methanol or isopropanol. The process is suited for continuous operation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune librariesmore » provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.« less

  16. International intellectual property strategies for therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies need international patent protection as their markets expand to include industrialized and emerging countries. Because international intellectual property strategies are frequently complex and costly, applicants require sound information as a basis for decisions regarding the countries in which to pursue patents. While the most important factor is the size of a given market, other factors should also be considered. PMID:22123063

  17. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  18. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Katja; Leow, Chiuan Yee; Chuah, Candy; McCarthy, James

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR) from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH) or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs) have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described. PMID:29039819

  19. Developing a Salivary Antibody Multiplex Immunoassay to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The etiology and impacts of human exposure to environmental pathogens are of major concern worldwide and, thus, the ability to assess exposure and infections using cost effective, high-throughput approaches would be indispensable. The principal objective of this work is to develop an immunoassay capable of measuring the presence of antibodies in human saliva to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Saliva is particularly attractive in this application because it is noninvasive, cheaper and easier to collect than serum. Antigens from environmental pathogens were coupled to carboxylated microspheres (beads) and used to measure antibodies in very small volumes of human saliva samples using the Luminex xMAP solution-phase assay. Beads were coupled to antigens from Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori, Toxoplasma gondii, noroviruses (G I.1 and G II.4) and hepatitis A virus. To ensure that the antigens were sufficiently coupled to the beads, coupling was confirmed using species-specific, animal-derived primary detection antibodies, followed by incubation with biotinylated anti-species secondary detection antibodies and streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin reporter (SAPE). As a control to measure non-specific binding, one bead set was treated identically to the others except it was not coupled to any antigen. The antigen coupled and control beads were then incubated with prospectively-collected human saliva samples, analyzed on a Luminex 100 platform, and the presence

  20. Neuronal surface antigen antibodies in limbic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Graus, F; Saiz, A; Lai, M; Bruna, J; López, F; Sabater, L; Blanco, Y; Rey, M J.; Ribalta, T; Dalmau, J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report the frequency and type of antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (NSA-ab) in limbic encephalitis (LE). Methods: Analysis of clinical features, neuropathologic findings, and detection of NSA-ab using immunochemistry on rat tissue and neuronal cultures in a series of 45 patients with paraneoplastic (23) or idiopathic (22) LE. Results: NSA-ab were identified in 29 patients (64%; 12 paraneoplastic, 17 idiopathic). Thirteen patients had voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC)-ab, 11 novel NSA (nNSA)-ab, and 5 NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-ab. nNSA-ab did not identify a common antigen and were more frequent in paraneoplastic than idiopathic LE (39% vs 9%; p = 0.03). When compared with VGKC-ab or NMDAR-ab, the nNSA associated more frequently with intraneuronal antibodies (11% vs 73%; p = 0.001). Of 12 patients (9 nNSA-ab, 2 VGKC-ab, 1 NMDAR-ab) with paraneoplastic LE and NSA-ab, concomitant intraneuronal antibodies occurred in 9 (75%). None of these 12 patients improved with immunotherapy. The autopsy of three of them showed neuronal loss, microgliosis, and cytotoxic T cell infiltrates in the hippocampus and amygdala. These findings were compatible with a T-cell mediated neuronal damage. In contrast, 13 of 17 (76%) patients with idiopathic LE and NSA-ab (8 VGKC-ab, 4 NMDAR-ab, 1 nNSA-ab) and 1 of 5 (20%) without antibodies had clinical improvement (p = 0.04). Conclusions: In paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (LE), novel antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (nNSA-ab) occur frequently, coexist with antibodies against intracellular antigens, and these cases are refractory to immunotherapy. In idiopathic LE, the likelihood of improvement is significantly higher in patients with NSA-ab than in those without antibodies. GLOSSARY GAD = glutamic acid decarboxylase; LE = limbic encephalitis; NMDAR = N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor; NSA = neuronal surface antigens; nNSA = novel NSA; SCLC = small-cell lung cancer; VGKC = voltage-gated potassium channels

  1. Mathematical analysis of dengue virus antibody dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Sulanie; Perera, SSN

    2018-03-01

    Dengue is a mosquito borne viral disease causing over 390 million infections worldwide per annum. Even though information on how infection is controlled and eradicated from the body is lacking, antibodies are thought to play a major role in clearing the virus. In this paper, a non-linear conceptual dynamical model with humoral immune response and absorption effect has been proposed for primary dengue infection. We have included the absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells since this effect causes the virus density in the blood to decrease. The time delay that arises in the production of antibodies was accounted and is introduced through a continuous function. The basic reproduction number R0 is computed and a detailed stability analysis is done. Three equilibrium states, namely the infection free equilibrium, no immune equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium were identified and the existence and the stability conditions of these steady states were obtained. Numerical simulations proved the results that were obtained. By establishing the characteristic equation of the model at infection free equilibrium, it was observed that the infection free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable if R0 < 1. A threshold value for the antibody production rate was identified for which the infection gets completely cured even if R0 > 1. Stability regions are identified for infection free equilibrium state with respect to the external variables and it is observed as the virus burst rate increases, the stability regions would decrease. These results implied that for higher virus burst rates, other conditions in the body must be strong enough to eliminate the disease completely from the host. The effect of time delay of antibody production on virus dynamics is discussed. It was seen that as the time delay in production of antibodies increases, the time for viral decline also increased. Also it was observed that the virus count goes to negligible levels within 7 - 14 days after

  2. Influenza virus resistance to human neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Crowe, James E

    2012-01-01

    The human antibody repertoire has an exceptionally large capacity to recognize new or changing antigens through combinatorial and junctional diversity established at the time of V(D)J recombination and through somatic hypermutation. Influenza viruses exhibit a relentless capacity to escape the human antibody response by altering the amino acids of their surface proteins in hypervariable domains that exhibit a high level of structural plasticity. Both parties in this high-stakes game of shape shifting drive structural evolution of their functional proteins (the B cell receptor/antibody on one side and the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins on the other) using error-prone polymerase systems. It is likely that most of the genetic mutations that occur in these systems are deleterious, resulting in the failure of the B cell or virus with mutations to propagate in the immune repertoire or viral quasispecies. A subset of mutations is tolerated in functional surface proteins that enter the B cell or virus progeny pool. In both cases, selection occurs in the population of mutated and unmutated species. In cases where the functional avidity of the B cell receptor is increased significantly, that clone may be selected for preferential expansion. In contrast, an influenza virus that "escapes" the inhibitory effect of secreted antibodies may represent a high proportion of the progeny virus in that host. The recent paper by O'Donnell et al. [C. D. O'Donnell et al., mBio 3(3):e00120-12, 2012] identifies a mechanism for antibody resistance that does not require escape from binding but rather achieves a greater efficiency in replication.

  3. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test...

  6. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H H; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F A; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-17

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  7. Antibody Characterization Lab | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Antibody Characterization Lab (ACL), an intramural reference laboratory located at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research in Frederick, Maryland, thoroughly characterizes monoclonal antibodies or other renewable affinity binding reagents for use in cancer related research.

  8. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  9. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics 2016: The Antibody Society's annual meeting, December 11-15, 2016, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Alfenito, Mark R; Scott, Jamie K; Parren, Paul W H I; Burton, Dennis R; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Lemere, Cynthia A; Messer, Anne; Huston, James S; Carter, Paul J; Veldman, Trudi; Chester, Kerry A; Schuurman, Janine; Adams, Gregory P; Reichert, Janice M

    Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the largest meeting devoted to antibody science and technology and the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in San Diego, CA on December 11-15, 2016. Each of 14 sessions will include six presentations by leading industry and academic experts. In this meeting preview, the session chairs discuss the relevance of their topics to current and future antibody therapeutics development. Session topics include bispecifics and designer polyclonal antibodies; antibodies for neurodegenerative diseases; the interface between passive and active immunotherapy; antibodies for non-cancer indications; novel antibody display, selection and screening technologies; novel checkpoint modulators / immuno-oncology; engineering antibodies for T-cell therapy; novel engineering strategies to enhance antibody functions; and the biological Impact of Fc receptor engagement. The meeting will open with keynote speakers Dennis R. Burton (The Scripps Research Institute), who will review progress toward a neutralizing antibody-based HIV vaccine; Olivera J. Finn, (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine), who will discuss prophylactic cancer vaccines as a source of therapeutic antibodies; and Paul Richardson (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), who will provide a clinical update on daratumumab for multiple myeloma. In a featured presentation, a representative of the World Health Organization's INN expert group will provide a perspective on antibody naming. "Antibodies to watch in 2017" and progress on The Antibody Society's 2016 initiatives will be presented during the Society's special session. In addition, two pre-conference workshops covering ways to accelerate antibody drugs to the clinic and the applications of next-generation sequencing in antibody discovery and engineering will be held on Sunday December 11, 2016.

  10. CiteAb: a searchable antibody database that ranks antibodies by the number of times they have been cited

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research antibodies are used by thousands of scientists working in diverse disciplines, but it is common to hear concerns about antibody quality. This means that researchers need to carefully choose the antibodies they use to avoid wasting time and money. A well accepted way of selecting a research antibody is to identify one which has been used previously, where the associated data has been peer-reviewed and the results published. Description CiteAb is a searchable database which ranks antibodies by the number of times they have been cited. This allows researchers to easily find antibodies that have been used in peer-reviewed publications and the accompanying citations are listed, so users can check the data contained within the publications. This makes CiteAb a useful resource for identifying antibodies for experiments and also for finding information to demonstrate antibody validation. The database currently contains 1,400,000 antibodies which are from 90 suppliers, including 87 commercial companies and 3 academic resources. Associated with these antibodies are 140,000 publications which provide 306,000 antibody citations. In addition to searching, users can also browse through the antibodies and add their own publications to the CiteAb database. Conclusions CiteAb provides a new way for researchers to find research antibodies that have been used successfully in peer-reviewed publications. It aims to assist these researchers and will hopefully help promote progress in many areas of life science research. PMID:24528853

  11. The interfacial character of antibody paratopes: analysis of antibody-antigen structures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh N; Pradhan, Mohan R; Verma, Chandra; Zhong, Pingyu

    2017-10-01

    In this study, computational methods are applied to investigate the general properties of antigen engaging residues of a paratope from a non-redundant dataset of 403 antibody-antigen complexes to dissect the contribution of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic, van der Waals contacts and ionic interactions, as well as role of water molecules in the antigen-antibody interface. Consistent with previous reports using smaller datasets, we found that Tyr, Trp, Ser, Asn, Asp, Thr, Arg, Gly, His contribute substantially to the interactions between antibody and antigen. Furthermore, antibody-antigen interactions can be mediated by interfacial waters. However, there is no reported comprehensive analysis for a large number of structured waters that engage in higher ordered structures at the antibody-antigen interface. From our dataset, we have found the presence of interfacial waters in 242 complexes. We present evidence that suggests a compelling role of these interfacial waters in interactions of antibodies with a range of antigens differing in shape complementarity. Finally, we carry out 296 835 pairwise 3D structure comparisons of 771 structures of contact residues of antibodies with their interfacial water molecules from our dataset using CLICK method. A heuristic clustering algorithm is used to obtain unique structural similarities, and found to separate into 368 different clusters. These clusters are used to identify structural motifs of contact residues of antibodies for epitope binding. This clustering database of contact residues is freely accessible at http://mspc.bii.a-star.edu.sg/minhn/pclick.html. minhn@bii.a-star.edu.sg, chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg or zhong_pingyu@immunol.a-star.edu.sg. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  13. [Pathologico-anatomic contribution to antibody detection in immunopathologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Nozicka, Z

    1991-01-01

    Results of twenty years experience with identification of anti organ autoantibodies occurring mainly during autoimmune diseases are presented. Cryostat sections from human cadaver tissue and albino-rat kidneys were used for the detection of the above mentioned antibodies, by method of two-step (indirect) immunofluorescence. The study describes working schedule of a newly established subspeciality of pathological anatomy--the "histoserology". The main aim of the study was investigate the occurrence of autoantibodies and to asses the correlation between these findings and health condition of patients. The following antibodies were evaluated: antibodies against epithelia and colloid of thyroid gland, the antibody against parietal cells of stomach mucosa, antibodies against striated ducts of salivary gland and basal elements in its excretory ducts, the antibody against suprarenal cortical elements, the antibody against parathyreoidea, the antibody against smooth muscle cells, anti brush-border antibody, and the anti-nuclear factor as well as the antibodies against intercellular substance and basement membrane of epidermis. Antibody against thyroid gland coloid appears to be of diagnostic value for recognizing of Hashimoto and focal thyroiditis. The finding of antibody against parietal cells indicates the probability of pernicious trait in diagnostically unclear anaemias. On the other hand the finding of such antibody is not very useful in classification of gastritis and its subtyping. The appearance of the phenomenon of "shaggy rim" during the assay for antinuclear factor seems to be very reliable for verification of systemic lupus. The antibody against salivary gland striated ducts does not give fundamental support for diagnosis of Sjögren's disease. Very interesting immunopathological phenomenon is an occurrence of antibody binding to basal cells of salivary gland excretory ducts. To our knowledge, this phenomenon is rather typical for the antibody against

  14. [Determination of antibody avidity using passive hemagglutination reaction].

    PubMed

    Gorchakova, Iu L

    1993-01-01

    The antibody avidity index is suggested for the assessment of antibody avidity, that is calculated according to the formula: (T4:T56) x (T4:T37) x (T4:T21), where Tn is the reverse value of antibody titer in the passive hemagglutination test with the same serum at various incubation temperatures. The interpretation of various values of the index is explained, both for the determination of antibody avidity level and for the diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  15. Maternal Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    We have determined that one monoclonal antibody cloned from the memory B cell population of the mother of a child with ASD binds Caspr2. This... child with ASD exhibit antibodies to Caspr2; thus this antibody may contribute to approximately 5% of cases of ASD. We have also determined that the pathogenicity of anti-Caspr2 antibodies is determined, in part, by epitope specificity.

  16. Antibody production using a ciliate generates unusual antibody glycoforms displaying enhanced cell-killing activity

    PubMed Central

    Calow, Jenny; Bockau, Ulrike; Struwe, Weston B.; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Loser, Karin; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody glycosylation is a key parameter in the optimization of antibody therapeutics. Here, we describe the production of the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody rituximab in the unicellular ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. The resulting antibody demonstrated enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, which we attribute to unusual N-linked glycosylation. Detailed chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis revealed afucosylated, oligomannose-type glycans, which, as a whole, displayed isomeric structures that deviate from the typical human counterparts, but whose branches were equivalent to fragments of metabolic intermediates observed in human glycoproteins. From the analysis of deposited crystal structures, we predict that the ciliate glycans adopt protein-carbohydrate interactions with the Fc domain that closely mimic those of native complex-type glycans. In addition, terminal glucose structures were identified that match biosynthetic precursors of human glycosylation. Our results suggest that ciliate-based expression systems offer a route to large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies exhibiting glycosylation that imparts enhanced cell killing activity. PMID:27594301

  17. Panel reactive antibody positivity and associated HLA antibodies in Turkish renal transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Fatma Nurhan; Sezer, Siren; Akcay, Ali; Arat, Zubeyde; Turan, Munire; Gulmus, Sale; Kulah, Eyup; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    Pre- and post-renal transplantation panel reactive antibody (PRA) screening is associated with increased incidence of hyperacute or acute graft rejection and graft loss. This study was designed to find any relationship PRA sensitization and associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies in Turkish renal transplant candidates. We included 340 patients who were in the renal transplantation waiting list in the study. We determined PRA sensitization ratio and the associated anti-HLA IgG antibody distribution of the patient group. The PRA testing was currently performed and levels above 30% were accepted to be positive. The PRA class I positivity was determined in 24 (7%) and class II in 34 (10%) of the patients. The most frequent HLA antibodies for class I were B56, A2, A34, A1, A23, A24 and B61; and for class II were DR11, DR14, DQ7, DR10, DQ5, DR1 and DR7, respectively. From these, the increase of the numbers of anti-HLA class II antibodies was significantly correlated with the increase of PRA sensitization ratio. In conclusion, the identification of the associated HLA-specific antibodies and correlation with the Turkish population HLA antigen distribution will identify the high-risk patients who are candidates for transplantation.

  18. Application of cyclodextrins in antibody microparticles: potentials for antibody protection in spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Vahid; Vatanara, Alireza; Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Nabi Meibodi, Mohsen; Fanaei, Hamed

    2017-07-01

    Dry powder formulations are extensively used to improve the stability of antibodies. Spray drying is one of important methods for protein drying. This study investigated the effects of trehalose, hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin (HPBCD) and beta cyclodextrin (BCD) on the stability and particle properties of spray-dried IgG. D-optimal design was employed for both experimental design and analysis and optimization of the variables. The size and aerodynamic behavior of particles were determined using laser light scattering and glass twin impinger, respectively. In addition, stability, ratio of beta sheets and morphology of antibody were analyzed using size exclusion chromatography, IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy, respectively. Particle properties and antibody stability were significantly improved in the presence of HPBCD. In addition, particle aerodynamic behavior, in terms of fine-particle fraction (FPF), enhanced up to 52.23%. Furthermore, antibody was better preserved not only during spray drying, but also during long-term storage. In contrast, application of BCD resulted in the formation of larger particles. Although trehalose caused inappropriate aerodynamic property, it efficiently decreased antibody aggregation. HPBCD is an efficient excipient for the development of inhalable protein formulations. In this regard, optimal particle property and antibody stability was obtained with proper combination of cyclodextrins and simple sugars, such as trehalose.

  19. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  20. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system...

  2. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  3. A Simple Model System to Demonstrate Antibody Structure and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kennedy, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A model that can be used to show the arrangement of light and heavy chains, disulfide linkages, domains, and subclass variations in antibodies is given. It can be constructed and modified to illustrate Fab, F(ab')2, and Fc fragments, single domain and bifunctional antibodies, and labeling of antibodies. (Author)

  4. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  5. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by... of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own...

  6. ALLOTYPE EXCLUSION IN UNIFORM RABBIT ANTIBODY TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATE

    PubMed Central

    Kindt, Thomas J.; Todd, Charles W.; Eichmann, Klaus; Krause, Richard M.

    1970-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies to streptococcal polysaccharide are described which show selectivity of expression of the allotypic specificities on both the heavy (H) and light (L) chains. One of these antibodies binds weakly to Sephadex. A purification method based on this binding has yielded antibody completely lacking any group a allotypic marker on its H chains. PMID:5419853

  7. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lack of antibodies to NMDAR or VGKC-complex in GAD and cardiolipin antibody-positive refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Peltola, Jukka; Hietaharju, Aki; Sabater, Lidia; Lang, Bethan

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years autoantibodies against neuronal proteins have been identified in several forms of autoimmune encephalitis and epilepsy. NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies are mainly associated with limbic encephalitis (LE) whereas glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and anticardiolipin (ACL) antibodies are more commonly detected in patients with chronic epilepsy. Clinical features vary between these antibodies suggesting the specificity of different neuronal antibodies in seizures. Serum samples of 14 GADA positive and 24 ACL positive patients with refractory epilepsy were analyzed for the presence of VGKC or NMDAR antibodies. No positive VGKC or NMDAR antibodies were found in these patients. The results confirm the different significance of these neuronal antibodies in seizure disorders. Different autoantibodies have different significance in seizures and probably have different pathophysiological mechanisms of actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Monoclonal Antibody Toolkit for C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Gayla; Dour, Scott; Arur, Swathi; Fox, Paul; Nonet, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1), a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10), a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1), a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4), which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2), a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5); to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1); to EHD1 (RME-1) a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1), a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1), a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8) that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60) targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1), a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7) of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1) and to the α-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2) as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1) and cadherin (HMR-1), both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1), which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413) which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7) which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to working

  10. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Afsar, Md. Nure Alam; Huda, M. Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7–9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  11. [Detection and analysis of anti-Rh blood group antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-jun; Wu, Yong; Chen, Bao-chan; Liu, Yan

    2008-06-01

    To study the prevalence and distribution of anti-Rh blood group antibodies in Chinese population and its clinical significance. Irregular antibodies were screened and identified by Microcolum Gel Coomb's test. For those identified as positive anti-Rh samples, monoclonal antibodies (anti-D, -C, -c, -E and -e) were used to identify the specific antigen and confirm the accuracy of the irregular antibody tests. The titers, Ig-types and 37 Degrees Celsius-reactivity were tested to confirm its clinical significance. For evaluation of the origin of irregular antibodies, histories of pregnancy and transfusion were reviewed. For the newborns who had positive antibodies, their mothers were tested simultaneously to confirm the origin of the antibodies. 47 out of 54 000 (0.087%) patients were identified as positive with Rh blood group antibodies.Of them, 27 cases had history of pregnancy, 13 had transfusion and 1 had the histories of both. 6 newborns had antibodies derived form their mothers. The specificity of the antibody was as follows: 29 with anti-E (61.70%), 8 with anti-D (17.02%), anti-cE 5(10.64%), 4 with anti-c (8.51%) and 1 with anti-C (2.13%). All the 47 Rh blood group antibodies were IgG or IgG+IgM, and were reactive to red blood cells with corresponding antigens at 37 Degrees Celsius, with a highest titer of 1:4 096. The prevalence of Rh antibodies is lower in Chinese population as compared with that in White population.Of all the antibodies, anti-E is most frequently identified and anti-D was declining. Alloimmunization by pregnancy and transfusion is the major cause of Rh antibody production. Rh blood group antibodies derived from mothers are the major cause of Non-ABO-HDN.

  12. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  13. [Monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Krawczyńska, A; Robak, T

    1996-01-01

    Immunophenotyping has become an essential component for the study of acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias. The recent development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (Mc Ab) to differentiation antigens (CD) of haematopoetic cells have made it readily available to clinical laboratories in most major hospitals. Immunophenotyping complements standard morphology by providing information on lineage, stage of differentiation and clonality. In addition some of the flow cytometry findings have independent prognostic significance. Monoclonal antibodies useful in defining lineage (B-cell versus T-cell) and stages of differentiation of ALL. It can be also used in identifying characteristic feature of AML and aiding in lineage determination in acute leukaemias that are morphologically undifferentiated. Surface immunophenotyping is especially helpful for recognizing mixed lineage acute leukaemia and diagnosing certain rare entities such as erythroleukaemia (M6), acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (M7) and minimally differentiation acute myeloid leukaemia.

  14. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dunn, D L

    1993-11-01

    One of the marvels of the host immune response is its response to antigenic foreign substances by manufacturing proteins that bind tenaciously to their targets. These proteins are antibodies or immunoglobulins produced in vast diversity during an individual's lifetime. By virtue of this process, the mammalian host possesses the innate ability to mount an initial response to antigens to which there has been no prior experience and to develop an even more effective response on reexposure to these same substances. This capacity to distinguish self from nonself is one of the most basic aspects of the cellular and humoral arms of the immune response and is one of the primary means by which the host combats infection caused by many different types of pathogens. In this context, antibodies have long been recognized as a critical component of host defenses and are capable of binding to invading microbes and microbial toxins.

  16. Detection of antinuclear antibodies in SLE.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka

    2014-01-01

    The antinuclear antibodies (ANA) also known as antinuclear factors (ANF) are unwanted molecules which bind and destroy certain structures within the nucleus. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), they are produced in excess; hence their detection in the blood of patients is important for diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Several methods are available which can be used to detect ANA; nevertheless, indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody test (IF-ANA) is considered a "reference method" for their detection. Though IF-ANA is relatively easier to perform, its interpretation requires considerable skill and experience. The chapter therefore is aimed to provide comprehensive details to readers, not only about its methodology but also the result interpretation and reporting aspects of IF-ANA.

  17. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Goodkin, Howard P

    2016-07-01

    The differential diagnosis of encephalitis in childhood is vast, and evaluation for an etiology is often unrevealing. Encephalitis by way of autoimmunity has long been suspected, as in cases of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; however, researchers have only recently reported evidence of antibody-mediated immune dysregulation resulting in clinical encephalitis. These pathologic autoantibodies, aimed at specific neuronal targets, can result in a broad spectrum of symptoms including psychosis, catatonia, behavioral changes, memory loss, autonomic dysregulation, seizures, and abnormal movements. Autoimmune encephalitis in childhood is often quite different from adult-onset autoimmune encephalitis in clinical presentation, frequency of tumor association, and ultimate prognosis. As many of the autoimmune encephalitides are sensitive to immunotherapy, prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment are paramount. Here we review the currently recognized antibody-mediated encephalitides of childhood and will provide a framework for diagnosis and treatment considerations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein and Antibody Engineering by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Frei, J.C.; Lai, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Phage display is an in vitro selection technique that allows for the rapid isolation of proteins with desired properties including increased affinity, specificity, stability, and new enzymatic activity. The power of phage display relies on the phenotype-to-genotype linkage of the protein of interest displayed on the phage surface with the encoding DNA packaged within the phage particle, which allows for selective enrichment of library pools and high-throughput screening of resulting clones. As an in vitro method, the conditions of the binding selection can be tightly controlled. Due to the high-throughput nature, rapidity, and ease of use, phage display is an excellent technological platform for engineering antibody or proteins with enhanced properties. Here, we describe methods for synthesis, selection, and screening of phage libraries with particular emphasis on designing humanizing antibody libraries and combinatorial scanning mutagenesis libraries. We conclude with a brief section on troubleshooting for all stages of the phage display process. PMID:27586328

  19. Antibody enhancement of free-flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H. P.; Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    1988-01-01

    Specific T cell clones and antibodies (ABs) were developed to study the efficiency of purifying closely associated T cells using Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Enhanced separation is accomplished by tagging cells first with ABs directed against the antigenic determinants on the cell surface and then with ABs against the Fc portion of the first AB. This second AB protrudes sufficiently beyond the cell membrane and glycocalyx to become the major overall cell surface potential determinant and thus causes a reduction of electrophoretic mobility. This project was divided into three phases. Phase one included development of specific T cell clones and separation of these specific clones. Phase two extends these principles to the separation of T cells from spleen cells and immunized lymph node cells. Phase three applies this double antibody technique to the separation of T cytotoxic cells from bone marrow.

  20. Standardized Methods for Detection of Poliovirus Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Testing for neutralizing antibodies against polioviruses has been an established gold standard for assessing individual protection from disease, population immunity, vaccine efficacy studies, and other vaccine clinical trials. Detecting poliovirus specific IgM and IgA in sera and mucosal specimens has been proposed for evaluating the status of population mucosal immunity. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in using dried blood spot cards as a medium for sample collection to enhance surveillance of poliovirus immunity. Here, we describe the modified poliovirus microneutralization assay, poliovirus capture IgM and IgA ELISA assays, and dried blood spot polio serology procedures for the detection of antibodies against poliovirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3.

  1. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (for the radiology administrator).

    PubMed

    Wahl, R

    1992-11-01

    Cheaper, faster, safer, these are not the attributes of 1993 automobiles, but criteria for new diagnostic tests in medicine. To achieve these characteristics, medicine is increasingly looking to biotechnology for answers. And the mother of all biotechnology is monoclonal antibody research. In past issues, Administrative Radiology published articles discussing the role of biotechnology in the development of radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine. In this issue, Richard Wahl, M.D., reviews, in plain talk, the current status and prospects for diagnostic imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Are there any such procedures of value today? Are there any that are FDA approved? Will there ever be such agents that are either useful or approved? If so, will any insurance carrier pay for them? For the answers to these and other "hot" questions, the reader is encouraged to continue on and read this month's Technology Review section.

  2. Development and Characterization of Canine Distemper Virus Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiu; Hao, Liying; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Linxiao; Zhang, Jianpo; Deng, Junhua; Tian, Kegong

    2017-06-01

    Five canine distemper virus monoclonal antibodies were developed by immunizing BALB/c mice with a traditional vaccine strain Snyder Hill. Among these monoclonal antibodies, four antibodies recognized both field and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus without neutralizing ability. One monoclonal antibody, 1A4, against hemagglutinin protein of canine distemper virus was found to react only with vaccine strain virus but not field isolates, and showed neutralizing activity to vaccine strain virus. These monoclonal antibodies could be very useful tools in the study of the pathogenesis of canine distemper virus and the development of diagnostic reagents.

  3. Cloning, bacterial expression and crystallization of Fv antibody fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E´, Jean-Luc; Boulot, Ginette; Chitarra, V´ronique; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Souchon, H´le`ne; Houdusse, Anne; Bentley, Graham A.; Narayana Bhat, T.; Spinelli, Silvia; Poljak, Roberto J.

    1992-08-01

    The variable Fv fragments of antibodies, cloned in recombinant plasmids, can be expressed in bacteria as functional proteins having immunochemical properties which are very similar or identical with those of the corresponding parts of the parent eukaryotic antibodies. They offer new possibilities for the study of antibody-antigen interactions since the crystals of Fv fragments and of their complexes with antigen reported here diffract X-rays to a higher resolution that those obtained with the cognate Fab fragments. The Fv approach should facilitate the structural study of the combining site of antibodies and the further characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  4. Human-based Polyclonal Antibodies to Ricin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-21

    ricin poisoning adding to public anxiety and the potential impact of a ricin attack. Summary of Results During the course of the project, Twinstrand...clearly demonstrated the technical feasibility of producing human hyperimmune polyclonals for ricin poisoning . The investigators developed a...overarching goal of the project was to create an antibody-based countermeasure for the treatment of ricin poisoning . Responding to the Broad Agency

  5. Enhancement of antibody functions through Fc multiplications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Cvitkovic, Romana; Bonnell, Jessica; Chang, Chien-Ying; Koksal, Adem C.; O'Connor, Ellen; Gao, Xizhe; Yu, Xiang-Qing; Wu, Herren; Stover, C. Kendall; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Xiao, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibodies carry out a plethora of functions through their crystallizable fragment (Fc) regions, which can be naturally tuned by the adoption of several isotypes and post-translational modifications. Protein engineering enables further Fc function modulations through modifications of the interactions between the Fc and its functional partners, including FcγR, FcRn, complement complex, and additions of auxiliary functional units. Due to the many functions embedded within the confinement of an Fc, a suitable balance must be maintained for a therapeutic antibody to be effective and safe. The outcome of any Fc engineering depends on the interplay among all the effector molecules involved. In this report, we assessed the effects of Fc multiplication (or tandem Fc) on antibody functions. Using IgG1 as a test case, we found that, depending on the specifically designed linker, Fc multiplication led to differentially folded, stable molecules with unique pharmacokinetic profiles. Interestingly, the variants with 3 copies of Fc improved in vitro opsonophagocytic killing activity and displayed significantly improved protective efficacies in a Klebsiella pneumoniae mouse therapeutic model despite faster clearance compared with its IgG1 counterpart. There was no adverse effect observed or pro-inflammatory cytokine release when the Fc variants were administered to animals. We further elucidated that enhanced binding to various effector molecules by IgG-3Fc created a “sink” leading to the rapid clearance of the 3Fc variants, and identified the increased FcRn binding as one strategy to facilitate “sink” escape. These findings reveal new opportunities for novel Fc engineering to further expand our abilities to manipulate and improve antibody therapeutics. PMID:28102754

  6. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  7. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  8. Antibody therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gasiorowski, Robin E; Clark, Georgina J; Bradstock, Kenneth; Hart, Derek N J

    2014-02-01

    Novel therapies with increased efficacy and decreased toxicity are desperately needed for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The anti CD33 immunoconjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), was withdrawn with concerns over induction mortality and lack of efficacy. However a number of recent trials suggest that, particularly in AML with favourable cytogenetics, GO may improve overall survival. This data and the development of alternative novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have renewed interest in the area. Leukaemic stem cells (LSC) are identified as the subset of AML blasts that reproduces the leukaemic phenotype upon transplantation into immunosuppressed mice. AML relapse may be caused by chemoresistant LSC and this has refocused interest on identifying and targeting antigens specific for LSC. Several mAb have been developed that target LSC effectively in xenogeneic models but only a few have begun clinical evaluation. Antibody engineering may improve the activity of potential new therapeutics for AML. The encouraging results seen with bispecific T cell-engaging mAb-based molecules against CD19 in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphobalstic leukaemia, highlight the potential efficacy of engineered antibodies in the treatment of acute leukaemia. Potent engineered mAb, possibly targeting novel LSC antigens, offer hope for improving the current poor prognosis for AML. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Patrycja J.; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J.; Nara, Peter L.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization. PMID:24725950

  10. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  11. THE ANTIBODY-FORMATION BY POLYSACCHARIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Shoji

    1929-01-01

    1. By complement fixation tests, it has been clearly demonstrated that the sera of rabbits immunized with inulin, soluble starch and dextrine contain specific antibodies. 2. All these immune sera gave a negative precipitation reaction. 3. The kind of dextrine which has a construction very near to starch has an antigenic property, but those in a state of further decomposition do not give rise to antibodies. 4. All the three kinds of polysaccharids have power to produce antibodies without any vehicle. Dextrine is the only one of the three that gives rise to immune bodies more readily when pig serum is added to it. 5. Regarded as antigens, inulin stood first and soluble starch and dextrine next in order. 6. All three kinds of polysaccharids that were employed gave a negative protein color reaction. All of them, however, contained nitrogen. It has been proved that the large portion of the nitrogen contained in the soluble starch is derived from its protein contents. 7. It is suggested that in the production of immune bodies by these three kinds of polysaccharids, proteins might play the part of the vehicle. This is, however, still to be determined. PMID:19869634

  12. THE ANTIBODY-FORMATION BY POLYSACCHARIDS.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, S

    1929-09-30

    1. By complement fixation tests, it has been clearly demonstrated that the sera of rabbits immunized with inulin, soluble starch and dextrine contain specific antibodies. 2. All these immune sera gave a negative precipitation reaction. 3. The kind of dextrine which has a construction very near to starch has an antigenic property, but those in a state of further decomposition do not give rise to antibodies. 4. All the three kinds of polysaccharids have power to produce antibodies without any vehicle. Dextrine is the only one of the three that gives rise to immune bodies more readily when pig serum is added to it. 5. Regarded as antigens, inulin stood first and soluble starch and dextrine next in order. 6. All three kinds of polysaccharids that were employed gave a negative protein color reaction. All of them, however, contained nitrogen. It has been proved that the large portion of the nitrogen contained in the soluble starch is derived from its protein contents. 7. It is suggested that in the production of immune bodies by these three kinds of polysaccharids, proteins might play the part of the vehicle. This is, however, still to be determined.

  13. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Russell, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody: positivity and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Martínez Téllez, Goitybell; Torres Rives, Bárbara; Rangel Velázquez, Suchiquil; Sánchez Rodríguez, Vicky; Ramos Ríos, María Antonia; Fuentes Smith, Lisset Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    To determine positivity and clinical correlation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), taking into account the interference of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). A prospective study was conducted in the Laboratory of Immunology of the National Cuban Center of Medical Genetic during one year. Two hounded sixty-seven patients with indication for ANCA determination were included. ANCA and ANA determinations with different cut off points and assays were determined by indirect immunofluorescense. Anti proteinase 3 and antimyeloperoxidase antibodies were determined by ELISA. Most positivity for ANCA was seen in patients with ANCA associated, primary small-vessel vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of ANCA without positivity for proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase was higher in patients with ANA and little relation was observed between the perinuclear pattern confirmed in formalin and specificity by myeloperoxidase. Highest sensibility and specificity values for vasculitides diagnostic were achieved by ANCA determination using indirect immunofluorescense with a cut off 1/80 and confirming antigenic specificities with ELISA. ANCA can be present in a great number of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders in the population studied. This determination using indirect immunofluorescence and following by ELISA had a great value for vasculitis diagnosis. Anti mieloperoxidasa assay has a higher utility than the formalin assay when ANA is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum antibody titers following routine rabies vaccination in African elephants.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele A; Olea-Popelka, Francisco

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate serum antibody titers in captive African elephants (Loxodonta africana) following routine vaccination with a commercially available, inactivated rabies vaccine. Seroepidemiologic study. 14 captive African elephants from a single herd. Elephants were vaccinated as part of a routine preventive health program. Initially, elephants were vaccinated annually (2 mL, IM), and blood was collected every 4 or 6 months for measurement of rabies virus-neutralizing antibody titer by means of the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. Individual elephants were later switched to an intermittent vaccination schedule to allow duration of the antibody response to be determined. All elephants had detectable antibody responses following rabies vaccination, although there was great variability among individual animals in regard to antibody titers, and antibody titers could be detected as long as 24 months after vaccine administration. Young animals were found to develop an antibody titer following administration of a single dose of the rabies vaccine. Age and time since vaccination had significant effects on measured antibody titers. Results indicated that African elephants developed detectable antibody titers in response to inoculation with a standard large animal dose of a commercially available, inactivated rabies vaccine. The persistence of detectable antibody titers in some animals suggested that vaccination could be performed less frequently than once a year if antibody titers were routinely monitored.

  16. High-level generation of polyclonal antibodies by genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ross S; Johnston, Stephen Albert

    2003-09-01

    Antibodies are important tools for investigating the proteome, but current methods for producing them have become a rate-limiting step. A primary obstacle in most methods for generating antibodies or antibody-like molecules is the requirement for at least microgram quantities of purified protein. We have developed a technology for producing antibodies using genetic immunization. Genetic immunization-based antibody production offers several advantages, including high throughput and high specificity. Moreover, antibodies produced from genetically immunized animals are more likely to recognize the native protein. Here we show that a genetic immunization-based system can be used to efficiently raise useful antibodies to a wide range of antigens. We accomplished this by linking the antigen gene to various elements that enhance antigenicity and by codelivering plasmids encoding genetic adjuvants. Our system, which was tested by immunizing mice with >130 antigens, has shown a final success rate of 84%.

  17. [International classification of various types of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of monoclonal antibodies ("mabs") have been acknowledged during the last two decades. Successive developments led to the marketing of murine antibodies ("o-mab" first, followed by chimeric antibodies ("xi-mab"), humanised antibodies ("zu-mab") and, finally, human monoclonal antibodies ("u-mab"). In order to facilitate the distinction between the various monoclonal antibodies used in clinical practice, an international nomenclature has been proposed with the use of a specific suffix corresponding to the origine/source of "mabs" preceded by an infix referring to the medicine's target. The efforts in developing new types of monoclonal antibodies aimed at improving their pharmacokinetics (longer half-life), pharmacodynamics (better efficacy because of stronger affinity to human receptor), and safety profile (less antigenic and immunogenic reactions). These progresses could be obtained thanks to the remarkable development of molecular biotechnology.

  18. MoFvAb: Modeling the Fv region of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Fuchs, Angelika; Qu, Changtao; Benz, Jörg; Klostermann, Stefan; Antes, Iris; Georges, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the 3-dimensional structure of the antigen-binding region of antibodies enables numerous useful applications regarding the design and development of antibody-based drugs. We present a knowledge-based antibody structure prediction methodology that incorporates concepts that have arisen from an applied antibody engineering environment. The protocol exploits the rich and continuously growing supply of experimentally derived antibody structures available to predict CDR loop conformations and the packing of heavy and light chain quickly and without user intervention. The homology models are refined by a novel antibody-specific approach to adapt and rearrange sidechains based on their chemical environment. The method achieves very competitive all-atom root mean square deviation values in the order of 1.5 Å on different evaluation datasets consisting of both known and previously unpublished antibody crystal structures. PMID:26176812

  19. Antibodies against toluene diisocyanate protein conjugates. Three methods of measurement.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R; Harris, K E; Zeiss, C R

    1983-12-01

    With the use of canine antisera against toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-dog serum albumin (DSA), techniques for measuring antibody against TDI-DSA were evaluated. The use of an ammonium sulfate precipitation assay showed suggestive evidence of antibody binding but high levels of TDI-DSA precipitation in the absence of antibody limit any usefulness of this technique. Double-antibody co-precipitation techniques will measure total antibody or Ig class antibody against 125I-TDI-DSA. These techniques are quantitative. The polystyrene tube radioimmunoassay is a highly sensitive method of detecting and quantitatively estimating IgG antibody. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a rapidly adaptable method for the quantitative estimation of IgG, IgA, and IgM against TDI-homologous proteins. All these techniques were compared and results are demonstrated by using the same serum sample for analysis.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  1. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human anti-CD30 recombinant antibodies by guided phage antibody selection using cell panning

    PubMed Central

    Klimka, A; Matthey, B; Roovers, R C; Barth, S; Arends, J-W; Engert, A; Hoogenboom, H R

    2000-01-01

    In various clinical studies, Hodgkin’s patients have been treated with anti-CD30 immunotherapeutic agents and have shown promising responses. One of the problems that appeared from these studies is the development of an immune response against the non-human therapeutics, which limits repeated administration and reduces efficacy. We have set out to make a recombinant, human anti-CD30 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, which may serve as a targeting moiety with reduced immunogenicity and more rapid tumour penetration in similar clinical applications. Rather than selecting a naive phage antibody library on recombinant CD30 antigen, we used guided selection of a murine antibody in combination with panning on the CD30-positive cell line L540. The murine monoclonal antibody Ki-4 was chosen as starting antibody, because it inhibits the shedding of the extracellular part of the CD30 antigen. This makes the antibody better suited for CD30-targeting than most other anti-CD30 antibodies. We have previously isolated the murine Ki-4 scFv by selecting a mini-library of hybridoma-derived phage scFv-antibodies via panning on L540 cells. Here, we report that phage display technology was successfully used to obtain a human Ki-4 scFv version by guided selection. The murine variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chain genes of the Ki-4 scFv were sequentially replaced by human V gene repertoires, while retaining only the major determinant for epitope-specificity: the heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) of murine Ki-4. After two rounds of chain shuffling and selection by panning on L540 cells, a fully human anti-CD30 scFv was selected. It competes with the parental monoclonal antibody Ki-4 for binding to CD30, inhibits the shedding of the extracellular part of the CD30 receptor from L540 cells and is thus a promising candidate for the generation of anti-CD30 immunotherapeutics. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901379

  3. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  4. [A New Simple Technique for Producing Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies for Antibody Pair Screening in Sandwich-ELISA].

    PubMed

    Zaripov, M M; Afanasieva, G V; Glukhova, X A; Trizna, Y A; Glukhov, A S; Beletsky, I P; Prusakova, O V

    2015-01-01

    A simple and fast method for obtaining biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies was developed usingcontent of hybridoma culture supernatant sufficient to select antibody pairs in sandwich ELISA. The method consists in chemical biotinylation of antigen-bound antibodies in a well of ELISA plate. Using as an example target Vaccinia virus A27L protein it was shown that the yield of biotinylated reactant is enough to set comprehensive sandwich ELISA for a moderate size panel of up to 25 monoclonal antibodies with an aim to determine candidate pairs. The technique is a cheap and effective solution since it avoids obtaining preparative amounts of antibodies.

  5. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Carter, Paul J.; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J.; Clark, Michael R.; Lowe, David C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M.; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S.; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S.; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A.J.; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A.; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Chester, Kerry A.; Glennie, Martin J.; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a –mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  6. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  7. Antibody response to Ehrlichia risticii and antibody reactivity to the component antigens in horses with induced Potomac horse fever.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S K; Mattingly, B L; Shankarappa, B

    1989-10-01

    The antibody response and the antibody reactivity to component antigens of Ehrlichia risticii were studied in horses with induced Potomac horse fever. These horses had no detectable antibodies to E. risticii in their preinoculation (PrI) sera by indirect fluorescent-antibody assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All the horses exhibited typical disease features following experimental infection and responded with specific antibodies, as measured by ELISA and indirect fluorescent-antibody assay. A primary antibody response was detected in 70% of the horses, while a secondary-type antibody response was detected in 30% of the horses by ELISA. In the primary antibody response, a distinct titer was observed at 2 weeks postinoculation (PI), when the immunoglobulin M (IgM)/IgG ratio was 2 to 5, and the overall antibody titer peaked at 6 to 8 weeks PI. The secondary-type antibody response exhibited a characteristic titer at 1 week PI, the IgM and IgG titers were about equal at 2 weeks PI, and the overall antibody titer peaked at 6 weeks PI. A transient depression in the IgG response at 4 weeks PI was observed in both response types. The antibody was maintained at a high titer for over a year in all horses. Western immunoblot reactivity showed that the antisera collected from these infected horses at 4 to 5 weeks PI recognized some or all of the six major E. risticii component antigens (70, 55, 51, 44, 33, and 28 kilodaltons), all of which were apparent surface components. The 6- to 8-week PI antisera recognized up to 16 component antigens, including 9 major antigens (110, 86, 70, 55, 51, 49, 44, 33, and 28 kilodaltons). However, the PrI sera of these horses showed reactivity at various intensities with one to seven of the component antigens. There was no apparent correlation between this reactivity pattern and the subsequent antibody response types.

  8. [Preparation of anti-hCG single domain antibody by antibody grafting technique using an antigen-binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Wang, Qiong; Cheng, Xiaoling; Liu, Mengwen; Wang, Mei; Xin, Huawei

    2018-04-25

    We used the antibody grafting technology to prepare anti-hCG single-domain antibodies on the basis of antigen-binding peptide to simplify the single-domain antibody preparation process and improving the biochemical stability of peptide. By using a universal single-domain antibody backbone (cAbBCII10), CDR1 or CDR3 was replaced by the hCG-binding peptide, and the grafted antibody gene sequences were synthesized and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET30a(+) in fusion with a C-terminal sfGFP gene, i.e. pET30a-(His6)-cAbBCII10-CDR1/hCGBP1-sfGFP and pET30a-(His6)-cAbBCII10-CDR3/hCGBP3-sfGFP. The recombinant plasmids were transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3), and the fusion proteins were induced by IPTG. Highly soluble recombinant fusion proteins were obtained and purified by Ni-NTA affinity column. SDS-PAGE confirmed the purified protein as the target protein. The antigen-antibody binding assay showed that both the CDR1 and CDR3 grafted antibodies have hCG-binding activities. While the titers of the two grafted antibodies were similar, the binding affinity of CDR3 grafted antibody was higher than that of CDR1 grafted protein (about 2-3 times). The grafted antibodies retained the relatively high biochemical stability of the single-domain antibody backbone and were relatively thermostable and alkaline tolerant. The obtained antibodies also had a relatively high antigen-binding specificity to hCG. This study provided a reliable experimental basis for further optimization of anti-hCG single domain antibody by antibody grafting technology using antigen-binding peptide.

  9. Identification of structural variations in the carboxyl terminus of Alzheimer's disease-associated βA4[1–42] amyloid using a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, U L H R; Gribble, S K; Mckenzie, A; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Underwood, J R

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid plaques and amyloid congophilic angiopathy (ACA) in the brains of affected individuals is one of the main pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Within these deposits, the βA4 (Aß) polypeptide represents a major component with the C-terminal 39–43 amino acid variants being most abundant. Using a mouse IgG1 MoAb produced by hybridoma βA4[35–43]-95.2 3B9, which reacts with the epitope is defined by the amino acid residues βA438[GVV]40, this study has identified a unique conformation within the carboxyl terminus of human βA4[1–42]. Although the βA438[GVV]40 sequence is present within the C-termini of human βA4[1–40] and βA4[1–43] and the βA4-containing region of human APP, the βA4[35–43]-95.2 3B9 MoAb (designated MoAb 3B9) does not bind these polypeptides, demonstrating a high degree of specificity for the βA438[GVV]40 epitope as presented within the βA4[1–42] sequence. The βA4[1–42] epitope bound by MoAb 3B9 is sensitive to heating (100°C for 5 min) and is denatured by SDS but not by oxidative radio-iodination of βA4 or by adsorption to plastic surfaces or nitrocellulose. The recognition of βA4 plaque deposits and ACA by MoAb 3B9 within formalin-fixed sections of human AD brain demonstrates the potential of these antibodies for investigating the role of the unique βA4[1–42] conformation in the development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:11422208

  10. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  11. Local and global anatomy of antibody-protein antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meryl; Zhu, David; Zhu, Jianwei; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2018-05-01

    Deciphering antibody-protein antigen recognition is of fundamental and practical significance. We constructed an antibody structural dataset, partitioned it into human and murine subgroups, and compared it with nonantibody protein-protein complexes. We investigated the physicochemical properties of regions on and away from the antibody-antigen interfaces, including net charge, overall antibody charge distributions, and their potential role in antigen interaction. We observed that amino acid preference in antibody-protein antigen recognition is entropy driven, with residues having low side-chain entropy appearing to compensate for the high backbone entropy in interaction with protein antigens. Antibodies prefer charged and polar antigen residues and bridging water molecules. They also prefer positive net charge, presumably to promote interaction with negatively charged protein antigens, which are common in proteomes. Antibody-antigen interfaces have large percentages of Tyr, Ser, and Asp, but little Lys. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in the Ag binding sites might be coupled with Fab domains through organized charge and residue distributions away from the binding interfaces. Here we describe some features of antibody-antigen interfaces and of Fab domains as compared with nonantibody protein-protein interactions. The distributions of interface residues in human and murine antibodies do not differ significantly. Overall, our results provide not only a local but also a global anatomy of antibody structures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Survivors Remorse: antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; DeVico, Anthony L

    2017-01-01

    It is clear that antibodies can play a pivotal role in preventing the transmission of HIV-1 and large efforts to identify an effective antibody-based vaccine to quell the epidemic. Shortly after HIV-1 was discovered as the cause of AIDS, the search for epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies became the driving strategy for an antibody-based vaccine. Neutralization escape variants were discovered shortly thereafter, and, after almost three decades of investigation, it is now known that autologous neutralizing antibody responses and their selection of neutralization resistant HIV-1 variants can lead to broadly neutralizing antibodies in some infected individuals. This observation drives an intensive effort to identify a vaccine to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, there has been less systematic study of antibody specificities that must rely mainly or exclusively on other protective mechanisms, although non-human primate (NHP) studies as well as the RV144 vaccine trial indicate that non-neutralizing antibodies can contribute to protection. Here we propose a novel strategy to identify new epitope targets recognized by these antibodies for which viral escape is unlikely or impossible. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Factors Affecting Formation of Incomplete Vi Antibody in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Sidney; Currie, Julius A.; Tully, Joseph G.

    1965-01-01

    Gaines, Sidney (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Julius A. Currie, and Joseph G. Tully. Factors affecting formation of incomplete Vi antibody in mice. J. Bacteriol. 90:635–642. 1965.—Single immunizing doses of purified Vi antigen elicited complete and incomplete Vi antibodies in BALB/c mice, but only incomplete antibody in Cinnamon mice. Three of six other mouse strains tested responded like BALB/c mice; the remaining three, like Cinnamon mice. Varying the quantity of antigen injected or the route of administration failed to stimulate the production of detectable complete Vi antibody in Cinnamon mice. Such antibody was evoked in these animals by multiple injections of Vi antigen or by inoculating them with Vi-containing bacilli or Vi-coated erythrocytes. The early protection afforded by serum from Vi-immunized BALB/c mice coincided with the appearance of incomplete Vi antibody, 1 day prior to the advent of complete antibody. Persistence of incomplete as well as complete antibody in the serum of immunized mice was demonstrated for at least 56 days after injection of 10 μg of Vi antigen. Incomplete Vi antibody was shown to have blocking ability, in vitro bactericidal activity, and the capability of protecting mice against intracerebral as well as intraperitoneal challenge with virulent typhoid bacilli. Production of incomplete and complete Vi antibodies was adversely affected by immunization with partially depolymerized Vi antigens. PMID:16562060

  14. The state-of-play and future of antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Elgundi, Zehra; Reslan, Mouhamad; Cruz, Esteban; Sifniotis, Vicki; Kayser, Veysel

    2017-12-01

    It has been over four decades since the development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using a hybridoma cell line was first reported. Since then more than thirty therapeutic antibodies have been marketed, mostly as oncology, autoimmune and inflammatory therapeutics. While antibodies are very efficient, their cost-effectiveness has always been discussed owing to their high costs, accumulating to more than one billion dollars from preclinical development through to market approval. Because of this, therapeutic antibodies are inaccessible to some patients in both developed and developing countries. The growing interest in biosimilar antibodies as affordable versions of therapeutic antibodies may provide alternative treatment options as well potentially decreasing costs. As certain markets begin to capitalize on this opportunity, regulatory authorities continue to refine the requirements for demonstrating quality, efficacy and safety of biosimilar compared to originator products. In addition to biosimilars, innovations in antibody engineering are providing the opportunity to design biobetter antibodies with improved properties to maximize efficacy. Enhancing effector function, antibody drug conjugates (ADC) or targeting multiple disease pathways via multi-specific antibodies are being explored. The manufacturing process of antibodies is also moving forward with advancements relating to host cell production and purification processes. Studies into the physical and chemical degradation pathways of antibodies are contributing to the design of more stable proteins guided by computational tools. Moreover, the delivery and pharmacokinetics of antibody-based therapeutics are improving as optimized formulations are pursued through the implementation of recent innovations in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivitymore » of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.« less

  16. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  17. DARPA Antibody Technology Program. Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody Produced by Illumina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    platforms. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Antibody Antibody Technology Program (ATP) Quality Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA ) Biosurveillance Single-chain...2.6 Thermal Stress Test............................................................................................4 2.7 ELISA ...3.5 ELISA Results .................................................................................................11 3.6 SPR Results

  18. Performance of the auxotrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 as host for the production of IL-1β in aerated fed-batch reactor: role of ACA supplementation, strain viability, and maintenance energy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 is an auxotrophic commonly used strain. In this work it has been used as host for the expression and secretion of human interleukin-1β (IL1β), using the cell wall protein Pir4 as fusion partner. To achieve high cell density and, consequently, high product yield, BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] was cultured in an aerated fed-batch reactor, using a defined mineral medium supplemented with casamino acids as ACA (auxotrophy-complementing amino acid) source. Also the S. cerevisiae mutant BY4741 Δyca1 [PIR4-IL1β], carrying the deletion of the YCA1 gene coding for a caspase-like protein involved in the apoptotic response, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor and compared to the parental strain, to test the effect of this mutation on strain robustness. Viability of the producer strains was examined during the runs and a mathematical model, which took into consideration the viable biomass present in the reactor and the glucose consumption for both growth and maintenance, was developed to describe and explain the time-course evolution of the process for both, the BY4741 parental and the BY4741 Δyca1 mutant strain. Results Our results show that the concentrations of ACA in the feeding solution, corresponding to those routinely used in the literature, are limiting for the growth of S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] in fed-batch reactor. Even in the presence of a proper ACA supplementation, S. cerevisiae BY4741 [PIR4-IL1β] did not achieve a high cell density. The Δyca1 deletion did not have a beneficial effect on the overall performance of the strain, but it had a clear effect on its viability, which was not impaired during fed-batch operations, as shown by the kd value (0.0045 h-1), negligible if compared to that of the parental strain (0.028 h-1). However, independently of their robustness, both the parental and the Δyca1 mutant ceased to grow early during fed-batch runs, both strains using most of the available carbon source for

  19. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Antibody Identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Philip J.; Miller, Thomas E.; Fraser, Jane M.

    1990-01-01

    Empirical studies of medical technology students indicate that there is considerable need for additional skill development in performing tasks such as antibody identification. While this need is currently met by on-the-job training after employment, computer-based tutoring systems offer an alternative or supplemental problem-based learning environment that could be more cost effective. We have developed a prototype for such a tutoring system as part of a project to develop educational tools for the field of transfusion medicine. This system provides a microworld in which students can explore and solve cases, receiving assistance and tutoring from the computer as needed.

  20. Monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis lipopolysaccharide and application of the antibody for direct identification of the species.

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Kitami, H; Ohta, K; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the shared antigen of Porphyromonas endodontalis so that we could use the antibody in direct identification and detection of P. endodontalis in infectious material from apical periodontal patients. We established a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEB5) specific for P. endodontalis. BEB5 antibody reacted with all of the P. endodontalis strains tested, but not with any of the other black-pigmented Porphyromonas and Bacteroides spp. The antibody reacted specifically with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of three P. endodontalis strains of different serotypes (O1K1, O1K2, and O1K-). Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis confirmed the specificity of the antibody to these LPSs, because the antibody recognized the typical "repetitive ladder" pattern characteristic of LPS on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels. These observations demonstrate that P. endodontalis LPS is the shared antigen of this species. The antibody can specifically identify P. endodontalis on nitrocellulose membrane blots of bacterial colonies grown on agar. The antibody is also capable of directly detecting the presence of P. endodontalis in infectious material by immunoslot blot assay. These results indicate that LPS is the shared antigen of P. endodontalis and that BEB5 antibody against LPS is a useful one for direct identification and detection of the organisms in samples from apical periodontal patients. Images PMID:1774262

  1. Re-engineering therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease as blood-brain barrier penetrating bi-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, drug development of therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires that these molecules be re-engineered to enable BBB delivery. This is possible by joining the therapeutic antibody with a transporter antibody, resulting in the engineering of a BBB-penetrating bispecific antibody (BSA). Areas covered: The manuscript covers transporter antibodies that cross the BBB via receptor-mediated transport systems on the BBB, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. Furthermore, it highlights therapeutic antibodies for AD that target the Abeta amyloid peptide, beta secretase-1, or the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1. BSAs are comprised of both the transporter antibody and the therapeutic antibody, as well as IgG constant region, which can induce immune tolerance or trigger transport via Fc receptors. Expert opinion: Multiple types of BSA molecular designs have been used to engineer BBB-penetrating BSAs, which differ in valency and spatial orientation of the transporter and therapeutic domains of the BSA. The plasma pharmacokinetics and dosing regimens of BSAs differ from that of conventional therapeutic antibodies. BBB-penetrating BSAs may be engineered in the future as new treatments of AD, as well as other neural disorders.

  2. Monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis lipopolysaccharide and application of the antibody for direct identification of the species.

    PubMed

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Kitami, H; Ohta, K; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1991-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the shared antigen of Porphyromonas endodontalis so that we could use the antibody in direct identification and detection of P. endodontalis in infectious material from apical periodontal patients. We established a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEB5) specific for P. endodontalis. BEB5 antibody reacted with all of the P. endodontalis strains tested, but not with any of the other black-pigmented Porphyromonas and Bacteroides spp. The antibody reacted specifically with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of three P. endodontalis strains of different serotypes (O1K1, O1K2, and O1K-). Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis confirmed the specificity of the antibody to these LPSs, because the antibody recognized the typical "repetitive ladder" pattern characteristic of LPS on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels. These observations demonstrate that P. endodontalis LPS is the shared antigen of this species. The antibody can specifically identify P. endodontalis on nitrocellulose membrane blots of bacterial colonies grown on agar. The antibody is also capable of directly detecting the presence of P. endodontalis in infectious material by immunoslot blot assay. These results indicate that LPS is the shared antigen of P. endodontalis and that BEB5 antibody against LPS is a useful one for direct identification and detection of the organisms in samples from apical periodontal patients.

  3. Limited value of testing for intrinsic factor antibodies with negative gastric parietal cell antibodies in pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Del-Duca, C; Fenton, E; Holding, S; Hirst, J; Doré, P C; Sewell, W A C

    2009-05-01

    The appropriate testing strategy for diagnosing pernicious anaemia using gastric parietal cell (GPC) and/or intrinsic factor antibodies (IFA) is controversial. Intrinsic factor antibodies are found in only about 70% of cases. Indirect immunofluorescence screening for gastric parietal cell antibodies is more sensitive, labour intensive, and less specific. The frequency of antibody positivity (IFA and/or GPC) was retrospectively examined in patients tested for both autoantibodies over a three-year period. It was investigated whether B12 levels were related to antibody status. These findings were validated in a prospective study of IFA in 91 GPC negative patients with low B12 levels. Of 847 samples identified in the retrospective study, 4 (0.47%) were positive for only intrinsic factor antibodies, 731 (86.3%) positive for GPC alone, and 112 (13.2%) for both. Student t test on log-transformed data showed B12 levels had no bearing on autoantibody status. 91 consecutive patients with low B12 levels were tested for both autoantibodies; all were negative for gastric parietal cell antibodies. Only one sample was positive for intrinsic factor antibody using the porcine intrinsic factor assay, but was negative by a human recombinant intrinsic factor-based ELISA. This study provides evidence that testing for gastric parietal cell antibodies is an appropriate screening test for pernicious anaemia, with intrinsic factor antibodies reserved for confirmatory testing or in patients with other autoantibodies that mask the GPC pattern; B12 levels are not related to autoantibody status.

  4. Multi-Donor Longitudinal Antibody Repertoire Sequencing Reveals the Existence of Public Antibody Clonotypes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Setliff, Ian; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Raju, Nagarajan; Bombardi, Robin G; Murji, Amyn A; Scheepers, Cathrine; Ziki, Rutendo; Mynhardt, Charissa; Shepherd, Bryan E; Mamchak, Alusha A; Garrett, Nigel; Karim, Salim Abdool; Mallal, Simon A; Crowe, James E; Morris, Lynn; Georgiev, Ivelin S

    2018-06-13

    Characterization of single antibody lineages within infected individuals has provided insights into the development of Env-specific antibodies. However, a systems-level understanding of the humoral response against HIV-1 is limited. Here, we interrogated the antibody repertoires of multiple HIV-infected donors from an infection-naive state through acute and chronic infection using next-generation sequencing. This analysis revealed the existence of "public" antibody clonotypes that were shared among multiple HIV-infected individuals. The HIV-1 reactivity for representative antibodies from an identified public clonotype shared by three donors was confirmed. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of publicly available antibody repertoire sequencing datasets revealed antibodies with high sequence identity to known HIV-reactive antibodies, even in repertoires that were reported to be HIV naive. The discovery of public antibody clonotypes in HIV-infected individuals represents an avenue of significant potential for better understanding antibody responses to HIV-1 infection, as well as for clonotype-specific vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis: a role for anti-cofactor protein antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sorice, M; Pittoni, V; Griggi, T; Losardo, A; Leri, O; Magno, M S; Misasi, R; Valesini, G

    2000-01-01

    The antigen specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis (IM) was studied using ELISA for the detection of anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI), anti-annexin V, anti-protein S and anti-prothrombin antibodies and TLC immunostaining for the detection of anti-phospholipid antibodies. This technique enabled us to look at antibodies reacting to ‘pure’ phospholipid antigens in the absence of protein contamination. Sera from 46 patients with IM, 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 21 with primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS), 50 with Helicobacter pylori infection and 30 healthy blood donors were tested. This study highlights anti-phospholipid antibodies in patients with IM as specific ‘pure’ anti-cardiolipin antibodies, while in PAPS and SLE patients anti-phosphatidylserine and anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibodies were also found. This investigation also shows that the anti-cardiolipin antibodies found in IM can be present with anti-cofactor protein antibodies. The higher prevalence of anti-cofactor antibodies found in IM sera than in Helicobacter pylori sera may be due to the immunostimulatory effect and/or the polyclonal activation often observed in course of Epstein–Barr virus infection. However, anti-β2-GPI and, to a lesser extent, anti-prothrombin antibodies occur with a significantly lower prevalence in IM than in PAPS patients. This finding suggests that these antibodies should be regarded as the expression of the broad autoimmune syndrome involving the phospholipid-binding plasma proteins. PMID:10792380

  6. A new bead-based human platelet antigen antibodies detection assay versus the monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigens assay.

    PubMed

    Porcelijn, Leendert; Huiskes, Elly; Comijs-van Osselen, Ilona; Chhatta, Aniska; Rathore, Vipul; Meyers, Matthew; de Haas, Masja

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a newly developed Luminex bead-based platelet (PLT) antibody detection method (PAKLx) was compared with the monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA) assay and the LifeScreen Deluxe Luminex bead-based HLA Class I antibody detection method (LMX). Six sera containing anti-human PLT antigen (HPA)-1a (n=2), HPA-1b, HPA-2b, HPA-3a, or HPA-5b were tested in titration. A total of 194 sera, including HPA-1a, -1b, -2a, -2b, -3a, -5a, and -5b antibodies with or without HLA antibodies (n=63); glycoprotein (GP) IV antibodies (n=1); PLT autoantibodies (n=3); HLA antibodies (n=45); and samples with no PLT-reactive antibodies (n=82), were tested in both assays. Comparable levels of sensitivity were obtained for the MAIPA and PAKLx. The PAKLx showed four (6%) false-negative results in 67 sera with HPA or GP-reactive antibodies: anti-HPA-3a (n=1) or anti-HPA-5b (n=3). The PAKLx showed in 10 of the total 194 samples (5%) the presence of antibodies not detected by the MAIPA. This concerned broadly GP-reactive antibodies (n=7), anti-GPIIb/IIIa combined with anti-HPA-3a (n=1), anti-HPA-1a (borderline, n=1), and anti-GPIV (n=1). Testing 175 sera for anti-HLA Class I antibodies in the PAKLx and LMX showed four discrepant results: PAKLx negative and LMX positive, n=3 and n=1, respectively. For the vast majority of the specimens tested (93%) the results of the PAKLx were in concordance with the MAIPA. The PAKLx is a fast, easy to perform, and sensitive PLT antibody screening method. © 2013 AABB.

  7. Antibody specific epitope prediction-emergence of a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Design and manufacture of monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hale, G; Berrie, E; Bird, P

    2004-12-01

    antibodies is fundamental to their use for radioimmunotherapy. Besides the right selection of antibody specificity and affinity, recombinant antibodies can be designed to simplify manufacture and minimise unwanted side effects. Although many innovative new technologies have been developed in recent years, antibodies are still most commonly produced from mammalian cells and purified by column chromatography. Purification methods have to be designed and validated to remove potential contaminants, especially retroviruses, which in principle might be present in mammalian cell lines. Adherence to relevant ''Good Manufacturing Practices'' is mandatory in the production of any medicinal product and there are numerous guidelines regarding the manufacture of antibodies. This article outlines some methods used for fermentation, purification and quality control of antibodies intended for radiolabelling.

  9. Bipolar disorder and antithyroid antibodies: review and case series.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Alberto; Traccis, Francesco; Mosca, Enrica; Serra, Alessandra; Tamburini, Giorgio; Loviselli, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Mood disorders and circulating thyroid antibodies are very prevalent in the population and their concomitant occurrence may be due to chance. However, thyroid antibodies have been repeatedly hypothesized to play a role in specific forms of mood disorders. Potentially related forms include treatment-refractory cases, severe or atypical depression, and depression at specific phases of a woman's life (early gestation, postpartum depression, perimenopausal). With regard to bipolar disorder, studies of specific subgroups (rapid cycling, mixed, or depressive bipolar) have reported associations with thyroid antibodies. Offspring of bipolar subjects were found more vulnerable to develop thyroid antibodies independently from the vulnerability to develop psychiatric disorders. A twin study suggested thyroid antibodies among possible endophenotypes for bipolar disorder. Severe encephalopathies have been reported in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Cases with pure psychiatric presentation are being reported, the antithyroid antibodies being probably markers of some other autoimmune disorders affecting the brain. Vasculitis resulting in abnormalities in cortical perfusion is one of the possible mechanisms.

  10. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-timemore » PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.« less

  11. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  12. SEROLOGICAL TYPING OF STAPHYLOCOCCI BY MEANS OF FLUORESCENT ANTIBODIES I.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jay O.; Oeding, Per

    1962-01-01

    Cohen, Jay O. (Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Ga.) and Per Oeding. Serological typing of staphylococci by means of fluorescent antibodies. I. Development of specific reagents for seven serological factors. J. Bacteriol. 84:735–741. 1962—Fluorescent antibody reagents for identifying seven antigenic factors of staphylococci have been prepared. The fluorescent staining reactions of these reagents were compared to the agglutination reactions with diagnostic cultures of coagulase-positive staphylococci. Correlation between the two serological tests was almost complete with factors a, b, i, and k. The c fluorescent antibody reagent had a somewhat broader spectrum of activity than the corresponding agglutination serum, whereas the m fluorescent antibody reagent stained fewer strains than were agglutinated in m serum. The fluorescent antibody reagent for h factor stained strains possessing h1 factor but not strains possessing only h2 factor. Fluorescent antibody reagents for specific staphylococcal factors did not stain strains of group A streptococci. PMID:14022057

  13. Llama VHH antibody fragments against GFAP: better diffusion in fixed tissues than classical monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Perruchini, Claire; Pecorari, Frederic; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Duyckaerts, Charles; Rougeon, François; Lafaye, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    Camelids produce antibodies made of homodimeric heavy chains, and the antigen-binding region being composed of a single domain called VHH. These VHHs are much smaller than complete IgG. They are also more thermostable and more soluble in water; they should, therefore, diffuse more readily in the tissues. VHHs, expressed in bacteria, are easier to produce than conventional monoclonal antibodies. Because of these special characteristics, these antibody fragments could have interesting developments in immunohistochemistry and in the development of biomarkers. To test the possibility of their use in immunohistochemistry (IHC), we selected the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a well-known marker of astrocytes. One alpaca (Lama pacos) was immunized against GFAP. Lymphocytes were isolated; the DNA was extracted; the VHH-coding sequences were selectively amplified. Three VHHs with a high affinity for GFAP and their corresponding mRNA were selected by ribosome display. Large quantities of the recombinant VHHs coupled with different tags were harvested from transfected bacteria. One of them was shown to immunolabel strongly and specifically to GFAP of human astrocytes in tissue sections. The quality of the IHC was comparable or, in some aspects, superior to the quality obtained with conventional IgG. The VHH was shown to diffuse on a longer distance than conventional monoclonal antibodies in fixed cortical tissue: a property that may be useful in immunolabeling of thick sections.

  14. Assessment of a fluorescent antibody test for the detection of antibodies against epizootic bovine abortion.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Myra T; Anderson, Mark L; Hoar, Bruce R; Pires, Alda F A; Blanchard, Patricia C; Yeargan, Bret V; Teglas, Mike B; Belshaw, Margaret; Stott, Jeffery L

    2014-09-01

    The current study was directed at developing and validating an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) capable of detecting antibodies specific for the agent of epizootic bovine abortion (aoEBA). Sensitivity and specificity was determined by comparing antibody titers from 114 fetuses infected with aoEBA with 68 fetuses diagnosed with alternate infectious etiologies. Data established specificity at 100% and sensitivity at 94.7% when cutoff criteria for a positive test were assigned at a titer of ≥1,000. Potential cross-reactivity was noted in samples from 3 fetuses with antibody titers of 10 or100; all were infected with Gram-positive organisms. The remaining 65 fetuses infected with microbes other than aoEBA, and an additional 12 negative reference sera, did not have detectable titers. The IFAT-based serology assay is rapid, reproducible, and unaffected by fluid color or opacity. Total fetal immunoglobulin (Ig)G was also evaluated as an aid for diagnosing EBA. Significantly higher concentrations of IgG were identified in fetuses infected with aoEBA as compared to those with alternate infectious etiologies. The presence of IgG is a sensitive indicator of EBA and increases the specificity of FAT-based serologic diagnosis when titers are 10 or 100. Taken together, serology and IgG analyses suggest that the incidence of EBA may be underestimated. © 2014 The Author(s).

  15. [Biotechnological advances in monoclonal antibody therapy: the RANK ligand inhibitor antibody].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Emese; Kuluncsics, Zénó; Kiss, Zoltán; Poór, Gyula

    2010-12-26

    Biological drugs have been used since the middle of the last century in medicine. Nowadays we are witnesses of the intensive development and wider administration of these drugs in clinical practice. Around 250 biological drugs are available and more than 350 million patients have been treated since their marketed authorization. Among the biologics there are protein based macromolecules, which mass production can be performed with the help of biotechnology. This term referring to the use of living organisms for production of molecules, was introduced by the Hungarian engineer, Károly Ereky. The present review focuses on the research, production and development of monoclonal antibodies manufactured by biotechnology. Some steps of this development have changed our immunological knowledge and the outcome of several diseases. The development of antibodies was highly recognized by two Nobel prizes. Authors detail the structure and functions of immunoglobulins, and their development, including fully human monoclonal antibodies. The RANKL inhibitor denosumab, a fully human IgG2 monoclonal antibody belongs to this latter group and it is available for treatment of osteoporosis. Authors also summarize the basic process of bone metabolism and the benefits of RANK ligand inhibition.

  16. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy.

  17. Nonspecific Interaction of Streptavidin with Urease-Conjugated Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    11l1llilll li ii________ l__ :’SUFFIELD MEMORANDUM= NO. 1358 NONSPECIFIC INTERACTION OF STREPTAVIDIN WITH UREASE -CONJUGATED ANTIBODIES E LECT- by 92-01626...ESTABLISHMENT SUFFIELD RALSTON ALBERTA Suffield Memorandum No. 1358 Nonspecific Interaction of Streptavidin with Urease -Conjugated Antibodies by H. Gail...mixture, a urease -conjugated antibody. The variations could be diminished by allowing the reagents to stand at room temperature for two to three hours

  18. Class-specific effector functions of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Physiology usually combines polyclonal antibodies of multiple classes in a single humoral response. Beyond their common ability to bind antigens, these various classes of human immunoglobulins carry specific functions which can each serve specific goals. In many cases, the function of a monoclonal therapeutic antibody may thus be modulated according to the class of its constant domains. Depending on the immunoglobulin class, different functional assays will be used in order to evaluate the functional activity of a monoclonal antibody.

  19. Antibody class capture assays for varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, B; Myoraku, C K; Dupuis, K W; Schmidt, N J

    1984-01-01

    Pooled monoclonal antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) were used as "detector" antibodies in a four-phase enzyme immunofluorescence assay for determination of immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, and IgG antibodies to VZV. Polyclonal antisera specific for heavy chains of human IgM, IgA, and IgG were employed as "capture" antibodies on the solid phase. The antibody class capture assay (ACCA) for VZV IgM antibody detected high titers of virus-specific IgM in all patients with varicella and in 5 of 10 zoster patients. VZV IgM antibody was not detected in patients with primary herpes simplex virus infections or in other individuals without active VZV infection, with one exception, a patient with encephalitis who had other serological findings compatible with a reactivated VZV infection. VZV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers demonstrable by ACCA were compared with those measured by solid-phase indirect enzyme immunofluorescence assay (EIFA). VZV IgA antibody titers detected in patients with varicella and zoster were variable and could not be considered to be reliable markers of active VZV infection. IgA antibody titers detected by ACCA tended to be higher than those demonstrated by solid-phase indirect EIFA in varicella and zoster patients. VZV IgG antibody titers detected by ACCA in patients with varicella, and to a lesser extent in zoster patients, were as high as or higher than those demonstrated by solid-phase indirect EIFA. However, ACCA was totally insensitive in detecting VZV IgG antibody in individuals with past infections with VZV and would not be a suitable approach for determination of immunity status to VZV. PMID:6330163

  20. Malaria Prevention by New Technology: Vectored Delivery of Antibody Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0401 TITLE: Malaria Prevention by New Technology : Vectored Delivery of Antibody Genes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gary...CONTRACT NUMBER Malaria Prevention by New Technology : Vectored Delivery of Antibody Genes 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0401 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...whole animals. Using a specific technology originally applied to expression of HIV antibodies, we demonstrated that mice can be protected from