Science.gov

Sample records for anti-eu forces mobilizing

  1. Mobile Strike force 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-23

    ofDirectots (BOD) meein. However, this schdule was preempted by the CSA’s desir to begin msakng decisions on Force = Ol in July3 1994. In order to...two MSGs And three OPPOR regiments. ____ a aw-i In alternatives 5 And 6, the OPFOR reduced the V.i + 8,4U. 6 two Sstoan aveaeof 92pern U___ 9 Ol 7 U...to the MSF. The MSG commander has his own deep fight and sould be asking for MSF support if needed. The MSF fight must be tied into the corps ble espa

  2. Maritime Mobile Force Protection (MMFP) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-28

    Maritime Mobile Force Protection (MMFP) Program by Richard Severinghaus, M.S. Kastley Marvin Jerry Lamb, Ph.D...September 2009 Maritime Mobile Force Protection (MMFP) Program 50816 Richard Severinghaus, M.S. Kastley Marvin Jerry Lamb, Ph.D. Richard Moore Naval...Maritime Mobile Force Protection (MMFP) project provided an on-water demonstration of the feasibility of providing US Coast Guard (USCG) escort

  3. Shaping Air Mobility Forces for Future Relevance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    scholarly Air Uni- versity studies provide independent analysis and constructive discussion on issues important to Air Force commanders, staffs, and...in peace and war. For anyone concerned with the future of air mobility, these command rela- tionships are important because they lay out the geography...coordination with the combatant chain if considering operational and strategic issues. Also important to shaping air mobility policy is that all of

  4. Defense Science Board Task Force on Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Defense Science Board Task Force on Mobility DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited September 2005 Office of the...Defense Science Board (DSB). The DSB is a federal advisory committee established to provide independent advice to the secretary of defense. Statements...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Defense Science Board REPORT NUMBER 3140 Defense Pentagon, Room 3C553 Washington, DC 20301-3140 9. SPONSORINGIMONITORING

  5. Mobile Quarantine Facility unloaded at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Mobile Quarantine Facility, with the three Apollo 11 crewmen inside, is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C141 transport at Ellington Air Force Base early Sunday after a flight from Hawaii. A large crowd was present to welcome Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin Jr. back to Houston following their historic lunar landing mission.

  6. Pension Policy for a Mobile Labor Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, John A.; And Others

    This book analyzes what happens to the pension benefits of workers who quit or are laid off jobs. The first chapter reviews the connection between job mobility and pension portability. Chapter 2 portrays a labor market undergoing changes that often result in reductions in retirement benefits. Chapter 3 describes job change further by examining…

  7. Noncontact intraoral measurement of force-related tooth mobility.

    PubMed

    Göllner, Matthias; Holst, Alexandra; Berthold, Christine; Schmitt, Johannes; Wichmann, Manfred; Holst, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to measure force-related tooth mobility. Vertical and horizontal anterior tooth mobility in 31 healthy periodontal subjects was measured by a noncontact optical measurement technique. The subjects continuously increased the force on each tooth by biting on a load cell. An automated software program recorded tooth displacement at 9-N intervals. Vertical and horizontal displacements were subsequently measured. The vector of tooth mobility in the buccal direction was calculated using the Pythagorean theorem. The average displacements over all subjects for each tooth were determined. Global differences were assessed with the Wilcoxon test. There were no significant differences between contralateral teeth overall load stages. There were no significant differences in tooth mobility between the central and lateral incisors except for in the horizontal direction. However, there were significant differences between central incisor and canine and lateral incisor and canine teeth.

  8. NATO-Warsaw Pact. Force Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Light Aviation Corps (Aviation Ligre de I’ Arme de Terre ) and today these air- fields house two combat helicopter regiments of the Force d’Action Rapide...Boyon convoque des dtats gdndraux de rservistes de l’armde de Terre ," Le Monde, 16 January 1988. 314 RUIZ PALMER 30. For a more extensive treatment of the...34Attention ’J-100,’" Terre , Air, Mer (TAM), No. 431, 25 February 1982, p. 6. 40. Jacques Isnard, "M. Quilts r~pond aux critiques des g6ndraux Arnold et Mry

  9. Group force mobility model and its obstacle avoidance capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Sean A.; Huang, Dijiang

    2009-10-01

    Many mobility models attempt to provide realistic simulation to many real world scenarios. However, existing mobility models, such as RPGM [X. Hong, M. Gerla, G. Pei, C. Chiang, A group mobility model for ad hoc wireless networks, in: Proceedings of ACM/IEEE MSWiM'99, Seattle, WA, August 1999, pp. 53-60] and others, fail to address many aspects. These limitations range from mobile node (MN) collision avoidance, obstacle avoidance, and the interaction of MNs within a group. Our research, the group force mobility model (GFMM) [S.A. Williams, D. Huang, A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006], proposes a novel idea which introduces the concept of attraction and repulsion forces to address many of these limitations. Williams and Huang [A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006] described some of the limitations and drawbacks that many models neglect. This model effectively simulates the interaction of MNs within a group, the interaction of groups to one another, the coherency of a group, and the avoidance of collision with groups, nodes, and obstacles. This paper provides an overview of GFMM and particularly illustrates the GFMM's ability to avoid collision with obstacles, which is a vital property to posses in order to provide a realistic simulaition. We compare our model with the commonly used RPGM model and provide statistical assessments based on connectivity metrics such as link changed, link duration, and relative speed. All will be detailed and explained in this paper.

  10. The Mobile Obstacle Detachment of the Soviet Ground Forces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    reproduced in whole or in part without permission of the Commander, US Army% Russian Institute, APO ,lew York 09053. This 6ocument has been cleared for...artificial obstacles is an integral part of modern ground force tactical operations. Obstacles of all types are used by forces for a wide variety of...overlooked or relegated to a posi- tion of relatively low importance. 3 Although the mobile obstacle detachment com- prises only a very small part of

  11. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the…

  12. Joint Logistics Component Commander and the Mobility Air Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    ii AFIT/ GMO /ENS/01E-6 JOINT LOGISTICS COMPONENT COMMANDER AND THE MOBILITY AIR FORCES GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Presented...2001 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED iii AFIT/ GMO /ENS/01E-6 JOINT LOGISTICS COMPONENT COMMANDER...84 BIBLIOGRAPHY........................................................................................................... 85 viii AFIT/ GMO /ENS

  13. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the…

  14. Sediment mobility in a forced riffle-pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, B. J.; Roy, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    Forced riffle-pools occur in gravel-bed rivers where a large nonalluvial element leads to local scour and deposition. To manage rivers where this type of morphology is found and to specify restoration measures that mimic this process, more field data on sediment mobility in forced riffle-pools is needed. The objectives of this study are to describe the spatial variability of sediment mobility and deposition in a developing forced riffle-pool and to use high-resolution flow velocity measurements to explain the observed dynamics. The field site is a forced riffle-pool in Moras Creek, a 6-m-wide gravel-bed stream with a 1.2% bed slope in Quebec, Canada. Topography and the movement of sediment particles equipped with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags are surveyed through a series of competent floods. Bed shear stress is estimated from near-bed measurements of time-averaged velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. The sediment transport regime of the creek is characterized by partial mobility, exponential distributions of path lengths, and a negative relation between particle size and path length. Full mobility occurs in the center of the pool and over the exit slope where flow is accelerated from the constriction of flow during two events above the bankfull discharge. Partial mobility occurs during the same events over the entrance slope to the pool. Lateral gradients of deposition and mobility suggest that the majority of sediment in motion is routed over the side bar at the entrance to the pool. High levels of turbulence intensity that occur as a result of flow deceleration may explain the removal of finer sediments from the head of the pool.

  15. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-03-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the conceptual difficulties often associated with understanding centripetal force and typical "elevator-type problems" that are inherent in so many amusement park rides that move, lift, and drop riders. This article provides some sample data and examples from a visit to Six Flags Great America.

  16. Many-body force and mobility measurements in colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Jason W.

    We have extended a sensitive probe of colloidal interparticle forces, blinking optical tweezers, to allow measurements of forces among groups of more than two particles. This dissertation focuses on bridging the gap between microscopic pair interactions and bulk behavior in colloidal systems by using this technique to explore the regime of few-body interactions between micron-size polymer beads suspended in oil. Electrostatic forces and each component of the mobility tensor of small groups of colloidal particles are simultaneously measured using blinking optical tweezers. When the electrostatic screening length is longer than the inter-particle separation, forces are found to be non-pairwise additive. Both pair and multi-particle forces are well described by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation with constant potential boundary conditions. These findings may play an important role in understanding the structure and stability of a wide variety of systems, from micron-sized particles in oil to aqueous nanocolloids. The measurement technique presented here should be simple to further extend to systems of heterogeneous, non-spherical particles arranged in arbitrary three dimensional geometries.

  17. Preparing Air Force Mobility Experts for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    RESEARCH PROJECT Thomas C. Gilster, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /ENS/01E-04 AIR FO W Appr . DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense or US Government. iii AFIT/ GMO /ENS/01E-04 PREPARING AIR FORCE MOBILITY EXPERTS FOR...Masters of Air Mobility Thomas C. Gilster, B.S., M.A. Major, USAF June 2001 iv AFIT/ GMO /ENS/01E-04 PREPARING AIR FORCE MOBILITY EXPERTS

  18. Laterally forced equatorial perturbations in a linear model. Part II: Mobile forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Chidong Zhang )

    1993-03-15

    Impacts of atmospheric mean zonal flows on equatorial perturbations laterally forced by extratropical mobile sources in a linear model are examined. An analytical solution of the model with a constant mean zonal flow reveals that amplitudes of forced waves can be significantly modulated by the mean zonal flow through its Doppler-shift effect on the forcing frequency. In general, amplitudes of westward-propagating waves, such as the Rossby and mixed Rossby-gravity waves, tend to be larger in mean westerlies than in mean easterlies for low-frequency forcing but smaller in mean westerlies for high-frequency forcing. The opposite dependence on the mean zonal flow applies to eastward-propagating waves, such as the Kelvin wave. The model numerical solutions show that the spatial structure of the laterally forced equatorial perturbation as a whole is sensitive to the mean zonal flow. Particularly, a substantial zonal variation in the equatorial perturbation occurs when the mean zonal flow varies in longitude. The main conclusion of this study emphasizes that the impact of the mean zonal flow on different equatorial waves is generally not the same and also varies with the forcing frequency. The study supports the speculation that the mean-flow impact is a contributing factor to the coherence between the longitudinal distributions of the atmospheric mean zonal wind field and laterally forced wave activity observed in the tropical upper troposphere.

  19. The Association Between Knee Extensor Force Steadiness, Force Accuracy, and Mobility in Older Adults Who Have Fallen.

    PubMed

    Chung-Hoon, Kaiwi; Tracy, Brian L; Dibble, Leland E; Marcus, Robin L; Burgess, Paul; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Older adults often experience limited mobility, lower extremity muscle weakness, and increased fall risk. Furthermore, when older adults perform tasks that require control of submaximal force, impairments in their ability to maintain steady and accurate force output have been reported. Such problems may be related to deteriorating levels of mobility, particularly in older adults who have fallen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between muscle force steadiness (MFS) or muscle force accuracy (MFA) of the knee extensors and mobility in older adults who have fallen. Twenty older adults ((Equation is included in full-text article.)= 77.5 ± 7 years, 5 males and 15 females) with 2 or more comorbid conditions and who experienced a fall in the past year underwent assessment of maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the knee extensors. A submaximal target force of 50% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction was used to determine concentric and eccentric (ECC) steadiness (the fluctuations in force production) and accuracy (the average distance of the mean force from the target force) measures. Mobility was indicated by the 6-minute walk test, the Timed Up and Go, stair ascent, and stair descent tests. Correlation analysis was used to assess the relationship between measures of muscle force control and mobility. The correlations between muscle force steadiness and mobility were not significant (P > .05) for either contraction type. However, MFA during ECC contractions only was correlated significantly with all measures of mobility-6 minute walk test (r = -0.48; P = .03), Timed Up and Go (r = 0.68; P = .01), stair ascent (r = 0.60; P = .01), and stair descent (r = 0.75; P < .01). The identification of the relationship between ECC MFA and mobility in older adults who have fallen is novel. Although the correlations are not causal, these relationships suggest that inaccurate force output during ECC contractions of the knee

  20. The European teaching force: Conditions, mobility and qualifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Janet

    1992-11-01

    Full realisation of the original aims of the EC — freedom of movement, services, capital and labour — coincides with an increasing focus on the role and function of teachers, on their supply and management and on their level of qualifications and expertise as the key to the provision of the high quality education provision which the new single Europe needs. As the largest occupational group within the EC with a pivotal position in the restructuring of education, lifelong learning and the management of human resources, teachers have come under the political spotlight. How they are selected, trained and qualified, what a government expects from their work and how their contribution to society is recognised and recompensed varies from country to country. This article provides basic facts on the conditions of service in the teaching forces in Member States and considers whether the Single Market principle can be extended to educational provision and teacher mobility in the light of evidence from the EC and the Nordic countries.

  1. The association between knee extensor force steadiness, force accuracy and mobility in older adults who have fallen

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Hoon, Kaiwi; Tracy, Brian L.; Dibble, Leland E.; Marcus, Robin L.; Burgess, Paul; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults often experience impaired mobility, lower extremity muscle weakness, and increased fall risk. Furthermore, when older adults perform tasks that require control of submaximal force, impairments in their ability to maintain steady and accurate force output has been reported. Such problems may be related to deteriorating levels of mobility, particularly in older adults who have fallen. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between muscle force steadiness (MFS) or muscle force accuracy (MFA) of the knee extensors and mobility in older adults who have fallen. Methods Twenty older adults (x̄ = 77.5 ± 7yrs, 5 males and 15 females) with 2 or more co-morbid conditions and who experienced a fall in the past year underwent assessment of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors. A submaximal target force of 50% of their MVIC was used to determine concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) steadiness (the fluctuations in force production) and accuracy (the average distance of the mean force from the target force) measures. Mobility was indicated by the 6 minute walk test (6MWT), the timed up and go (TUG), stair ascent (StA), and stair descent (StD) tests. Correlation analysis was used to assess the relation between measures of muscle force control and mobility. Results The correlations between MFS and mobility were not significant (p>0.05) for either contraction type. However, MFA during ECC contractions only, were correlated significantly with all measures of mobility: 6MWT (r=−0.48, p=0.03), TUG (r=0.68, p=0.01), StA (r=0.60, p=0.01), StD (r=0.75, p<0.01). Conclusion The identification of the relationship between ECC MFA and mobility in older adults who have fallen is novel. While the correlations are not causal, these relationships suggest inaccurate force output during ECC contractions of the knee extensors is linked to impaired mobility. PMID:25695470

  2. Use of a Mobile Application to Help Students Develop Skills Needed in Solving Force Equilibrium Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Eunice

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free mobile engineering application (app) called Autodesk® ForceEffect™ to provide students assistance with spatial visualization of forces and more practice in solving/visualizing statics problems compared to the traditional pencil-and-paper method. ForceEffect analyzes static rigid-body systems using free-body…

  3. Use of a Mobile Application to Help Students Develop Skills Needed in Solving Force Equilibrium Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Eunice

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free mobile engineering application (app) called Autodesk® ForceEffect™ to provide students assistance with spatial visualization of forces and more practice in solving/visualizing statics problems compared to the traditional pencil-and-paper method. ForceEffect analyzes static rigid-body systems using free-body…

  4. The Director of Mobility Forces’ Role in the Command Control of Air Mobility Assets During Humanitarian Relief Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    U. S . Government. AFIT/ GMO /ENS/00E-02 Examining the Director of Mobility...RESEARCH PROJECT Timothy E. Bush, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /ENS/00E-02 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...steadfast love, support and inspiration throughout the past year and our adventure together in the USAF. Also to my children , thank you for your

  5. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek…

  6. Force-dependent mobility and entropic rectification in tubes of periodically varying geometry.

    PubMed

    Dagdug, Leonardo; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Zitserman, Vladimir Yu; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2012-06-07

    We investigate transport of point Brownian particles in a tube formed by identical periodic compartments of varying diameter, focusing on the effects due to the compartment asymmetry. The paper contains two parts. First, we study the force-dependent mobility of the particle. The mobility is a symmetric non-monotonic function of the driving force, F, when the compartment is symmetric. Compartment asymmetry gives rise to an asymmetric force-dependent mobility, which remains non-monotonic when the compartment asymmetry is not too high. The F-dependence of the mobility becomes monotonic in tubes formed by highly asymmetric compartments. The transition of the F-dependence of the mobility from non-monotonic to monotonic behavior results in important consequences for the particle motion under the action of a time-periodic force with zero mean, which are discussed in the second part of the paper: In a tube formed by moderately asymmetric compartments, the particle under the action of such a force moves with an effective drift velocity that vanishes at small and large values of the force amplitude having a maximum in between. In a tube formed by highly asymmetric compartments, the effective drift velocity monotonically increases with the amplitude of the driving force and becomes unboundedly large as the amplitude tends to infinity.

  7. GENERAL: Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shu-Huan

    2009-10-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  8. The European Teaching Force: Conditions, Mobility and Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janet

    1992-01-01

    Describes the teaching profession in European Common Market (ECM) states, reviewing differences in importance of education, salaries, status, rewards, working conditions, and training. Discusses teacher mobility between member states and feasibility of a single market among ECM states. Describes common market for primary school teachers in…

  9. Tactical Mobility of the Medium Weight Force in Urban Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    least developed country population center would include an old colonial city center surrounded by post-colonial modern buildings, strip areas, and...attempt to minimize the technological advantage of the U.S. military. Both emerging doctrine and the development of a full spectrum medium weight force... development of a full spectrum medium weight force – known as the Interim Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) – provide ample evidence that the U.S. Army

  10. Joint mobilization forces and therapist reliability in subjects with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tragord, Bradley S; Gill, Norman W; Silvernail, Jason L; Teyhen, Deydre S; Allison, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study determined biomechanical force parameters and reliability among clinicians performing knee joint mobilizations. Methods: Sixteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and six therapists participated in the study. Forces were recorded using a capacitive-based pressure mat for three techniques at two grades of mobilization, each with two trials of 15 seconds. Dosage (force–time integral), amplitude, and frequency were also calculated. Analysis of variance was used to analyze grade differences, intraclass correlation coefficients determined reliability, and correlations assessed force associations with subject and rater variables. Results: Grade IV mobilizations produced higher mean forces (P<0.001) and higher dosage (P<0.001), while grade III produced higher maximum forces (P = 0.001). Grade III forces (Newtons) by technique (mean, maximum) were: extension 48, 81; flexion 41, 68; and medial glide 21, 34. Grade IV forces (Newtons) by technique (mean, maximum) were: extension 58, 78; flexion 44, 60; and medial glide 22, 30. Frequency (Hertz) ranged between 0.9–1.1 (grade III) and 1.4–1.6 (grade IV). Intra-clinician reliability was excellent (>0.90). Inter-clinician reliability was moderate for force and dosage, and poor for amplitude and frequency. Discussion: Force measurements were consistent with previously reported ranges and clinical constructs. Grade III and grade IV mobilizations can be distinguished from each other with differences for force and frequency being small, and dosage and amplitude being large. Intra-clinician reliability was excellent for all biomechanical parameters and inter-clinician reliability for dosage, the main variable of clinical interest, was moderate. This study quantified the applied forces among multiple clinicians, which may help determine optimal dosage and standardize care. PMID:24421632

  11. Oakland Crack Task Force: A Portrait of Community Mobilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Donald; Baker, Ralph F.

    The Oakland Crack Task Force (OCTF) was created by concerned citizens to combat the problems caused by crack cocaine and ensure the future existence of the family, especially the black family, using community resources and no outside funding. Goals are to educate the community about crack; identify and access prevention, intervention, treatment,…

  12. The System Engineering Approach: Taiwan Navy Incorporation of Mobile Devices (Smartphone) into Its Force Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ENGINEERING APPROACH: TAIWAN NAVY INCORPORATION OF MOBILE DEVICES (SMARTPHONE) INTO ITS FORCE STRUCTURE by Wei-yang Lee June 2015 Thesis Advisor...June 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE SYSTEM ENGINEERING APPROACH: TAIWAN NAVY INCORPORATION OF...Taiwan navy’s maneuverability and capability in the information age. This thesis uses a system engineering approach to research various mobile security

  13. Tiny Feel: A New Miniature Tactile Module Using Elastic and Electromagnetic Force for Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Heon; Kim, Sang-Youn; Book, Wayne J.; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    For tactile feedback in mobile devices, the size and the power consumption of tactile modules are the dominant factors. Thus, vibration motors have been widely used in mobile devices to provide tactile sensation. However, the vibration motor cannot sufficiently generate a great amount of tactile sensation because the magnitude and the frequency of the vibration motor are coupled. For the generation of a wide variety of tactile sensations, this paper presents a new tactile actuator that incorporates a solenoid, a permanent magnet and an elastic spring. The feedback force in this actuator is generated by elastic and electromagnetic force. This paper also proposes a tiny tactile module with the proposed actuators. To construct a tiny tactile module, the contactor gap of the module is minimized without decreasing the contactor stroke, the output force, and the working frequency. The elastic springs of the actuators are separated into several layers to minimize the contactor gap without decreasing the performance of the tactile module. Experiments were conducted to investigate each contactor output force as well as the frequency response of the proposed tactile module. Each contactor of the tactile module can generate enough output force to stimulate human mechanoreceptors. As the contactors are actuated in a wide range of frequency, the proposed tactile module can generate various tactile sensations. Moreover, the size of the proposed tactile module is small enough to be embedded it into a mobile device, and its power consumption is low. Therefore, the proposed tactile actuator and module have good potential in many interactive mobile devices.

  14. Handgrip explosive force is correlated with mobility in the elderly women.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lucio Santos; Fernandes, Marcos Henrique; Schettino, Ludmila; DA Silva Coqueiro, Raildo; Pereira, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of explosive force, through rate of force development (RFD) and contractile impulse (CI), from handgrip strength data seems to be useful and promising information to study the aging of musculoskeletal system and health status. We aimed to test the hypothesis that, in elderly women, the handgrip explosive force could be better associated to the functional mobility than maximum handgrip strength. Handgrip strength and the performance of Timed Up & Go Test (TUG) were measured from sixty-five community-dwelling healthy elderly women. The average slope of the moment-time curve (Δ moment/Δ time) over the time interval of 0-200 ms relative to the onset of contraction was calculated to provide the RFD and CI. The highest strength achieved during the isometric contraction was used as maximum handgrip strength. Pearson correlations were used to assess the strength of the relationship between the handgrip strength parameters (Maximum strength and explosive force from 0-200 ms) and TUG test performance from older women. The correlation analysis showed that the TUG test performance was inversely correlated to the handgrip strength parameters, with better relationship with explosive force parameters. The handgrip explosive force seems to be a promising predictor of functional mobility of elderly women, since it showed a better relationship with functional mobility than maximum handgrip strength.

  15. Fluctuation-induced forces in the presence of mobile carrier drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Boris

    2017-08-01

    A small polarizable object (an atom, molecule, or nanoparticle), placed above a medium with flowing dc current in it, is considered. It is shown that the dc current can have a strong effect on the force exerted on the particle. The Casimir-Lifshitz force, well studied in the absence of current, gets modified due to drifting mobile carriers in the medium. Furthermore, a force in the lateral direction appears. This force is a nonmonotonic function of the drift velocity and its maximal value is comparable with the Casimir-Lifshitz force. If the temperatures of the medium and the particle are different, this lateral force can be directed along the current (drag) or in the opposite direction (antidrag).

  16. Horizontal Distance Travelled by a Mobile Experiencing a Quadratic Drag Force: Normalized Distance and Parametrization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vial, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the problem of the horizontal distance travelled by a mobile experiencing a quadratic drag force. We show that by introducing a normalized distance, the problem can be greatly simplified. In order to parametrize this distance, we use the Pearson VII function, and we find that the optimal launch angle as a function of the initial…

  17. [Prospects of the use of mobile MRI scanner in medical service of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Troyan, V N; Dydykin, A V; Rikun, A O; Filisteev, P A; Zayats, V V; Zhigalov, A A

    2015-10-01

    Computed tomography is currently one of the most informative methods of diagnostics of a broad range of injuries and diseases, as well as an effective additional mean for various surgical interventions thank to intraoperative use. In this regard, the question of the necessity of the use of this diagnostic technology in mobile hospitals is one of the current tasks. The article analyses the experience of the use of mobile CT scanners at the medical service of the armed forces of foreign states and provides calculations indicating the necessity of the introduction of mobile CT scanners into the hospital link. The review and classification of mobile CT scanners have allowed to formulate technical requirements for their hardware capabilities, as well as to draw conclusions about the conditions of their effective use.

  18. Do experienced physiotherapists and final year physiotherapy trainees apply similar force during posterior-to-anterior lumbar mobilization techniques?

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dany H; Longtin, Christian; Berbiche, Djamal; Gaudreault, Nathaly

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to quantify the force applied during posterior-to-anterior lumbar vertebrae mobilizations of different grades (I to IV) and compare that force between experienced physiotherapists and final year physiotherapy students. Four experienced physiotherapists and four final year physiotherapy students participated in this study along with five healthy asymptomatic individuals. A manual therapy table positioned over three force plates allowed for measurements of the force oscillation frequency and intensity applied during grade I, II, III and IV posterior-to-anterior (PA) mobilizations at two lumbar vertebral levels (L2 and L4). Mixed model ANOVAs were used to compare the force applied between the experienced physiotherapists and students, and between the various grades. The results showed that the mean oscillation frequency was similar between the groups for all grades. Grade I and grade IV PA mobilizations showed similar mean oscillation frequency as did grade II and III PA mobilizations. The minimum and maximum force applied was higher for the physiotherapists than for the students for all mobilization grades (p values < 0.05). Similar mean maximum force values were recorded for PA mobilizations between grade I and II and between grade III and grade IV. Grade III and IV PA mobilizations yielded higher mean maximum force values than those recorded during grade I and grade II PA mobilizations. The method used in this study allowed for quantification of the force applied during lumbar PA mobilizations. Experienced physiotherapists apply greater force than physiotherapy students across all grades, despite similar oscillation frequency.

  19. Adaptive robust motion/force control of holonomic-constrained nonholonomic mobile manipulators.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Ming, Aiguo

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, adaptive robust force/motion control strategies are presented for mobile manipulators under both holonomic and nonholonomic constraints in the presence of uncertainties and disturbances. The proposed control is robust not only to parameter uncertainties such as mass variations but also to external ones such as disturbances. The stability of the closed-loop system and the boundedness of tracking errors are proved using Lyapunov stability synthesis. The proposed control strategies guarantee that the system motion converges to the desired manifold with prescribed performance and the bounded constraint force. Simulation results validate that the motion of the system converges to the desired trajectory, and the constraint force converges to the desired force.

  20. Cable force monitoring system of cable stayed bridges using accelerometers inside mobile smart phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Yu, Yan; Hu, Weitong; Jiao, Dong; Han, Ruicong; Mao, Xingquan; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jinping

    2015-03-01

    Cable force is one of the most important parameters in structural health monitoring system integrated on cable stayed bridges for safety evaluation. In this paper, one kind of cable force monitoring system scheme was proposed. Accelerometers inside mobile smart phones were utilized for the acceleration monitoring of cable vibration. Firstly, comparative tests were conducted in the lab. The test results showed that the accelerometers inside smartphones can detect the cable vibration, and then the cable force can be obtained. Furthermore, there is good agreement between the monitoring results of different kinds of accelerometers. Finally, the proposed cable force monitoring system was applied on one cable strayed bridge structure, the monitoring result verified the feasibility of the monitoring system.

  1. Training Toddlers Seated on Mobile Robots to Steer Using Force-Feedback Joystick.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S K; Xi Chen; Ragonesi, C; Galloway, J C

    2012-01-01

    The broader goal of our research is to train infants with special needs to safely and purposefully drive a mobile robot to explore the environment. The hypothesis is that these impaired infants will benefit from mobility in their early years and attain childhood milestones, similar to their healthy peers. In this paper, we present an algorithm and training method using a force-feedback joystick with an "assist-as-needed" paradigm for driving training. In this "assist-as-needed" approach, if the child steers the joystick outside a force tunnel centered on the desired direction, the driver experiences a bias force on the hand. We show results with a group study on typically developing toddlers that such a haptic guidance algorithm is superior to training with a conventional joystick. We also provide a case study on two special needs children, under three years old, who learn to make sharp turns during driving, when trained over a five-day period with the force-feedback joystick using the algorithm.

  2. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed Central

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two compiled physiotherapy programs: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (±SD) age for all participants was 59 ± 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score ≥20 points or ≥50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0–100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7–16) over 5–12 weeks and 20 (18–24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (≥20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Used to Improve the Mobility of InSb-based Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. B.; Lindstrom, S. C.; Goldammer, K. J.; Liu, W. K.; Santos, M. B.

    1998-03-01

    High mobility InSb-based quantum wells grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrates have great promise as magnetic field detectors and high-speed low-current transistors. Unfortunately, the large mismatch between InSb and GaAs (14%) makes the growth of high-quality low dislocation density InSb/AlInSb structures problematic. In-plane ex-situ atomic force microscopy is an ideal tool to investigate the morphology and dislocation density of such MBE-grown quantum wells. The surface morphology reflects the morphology of the well/barrier interfaces when ultra-thin cap layers are used. Typical topographic scans show roughness due to the formation of spiral pyramidal structures centered on threading screw dislocations as well as oriented abrupt steps related to these dislocations. The surface concentration of these features correlates with the low temperature electron mobility indicating that this morphology may be a factor limiting electron mobility in these quantum wells. Approaches to increase the mobility through the improvement of the morphology will be discussed.

  4. Particle mobilization in porous media: Temperature effects on competing electrostatic and drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhenjiang; Bedrikovetsky, Pavel; Badalyan, Alexander; Hand, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The fluid flow in natural reservoirs mobilizes fine particles. Subsequent migration and straining of the mobilized particles in rocks greatly reduce reservoir permeability and well productivity. This chain of events typically occurs over the temperature ranges of 20-40°C for aquifers and 120-300°C for geothermal reservoirs. However, the present study might be the first to present a quantitative analysis of temperature effects on the forces exerted on particles and of the resultant fines migration. Based on torque balance between electrostatic and drag forces acting on attached fine particles, we derived a model for the maximum retention concentration and used it to characterize the detachment of multisized particles from rock surfaces. Results showed that electrostatic force is far more affected than water viscosity by temperature variation. An analytical model for flow toward wellbore that is subject to fines migration was derived. The experiment-based predictive modeling of the well impedance for a field case showed high agreement with field historical data (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.99). It was found that the geothermal reservoirs are more susceptible to fine particle migration than are conventional oilfields and aquifers.

  5. Use of a Mobile Application to Help Students Develop Skills Needed in Solving Force Equilibrium Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunice

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free mobile engineering application (app) called Autodesk® ForceEffect™ to provide students assistance with spatial visualization of forces and more practice in solving/visualizing statics problems compared to the traditional pencil-and-paper method. ForceEffect analyzes static rigid-body systems using free-body diagrams (FBDs) and provides solutions in real time. It is a cost-free software that is available for download on the Internet. The software is supported on the iOS™, Android™, and Google Chrome™ platforms. It is easy to use and the learning curve is approximately two hours using the tutorial provided within the app. The use of ForceEffect has the ability to provide students different problem modalities (textbook, real-world, and design) to help them acquire and improve on skills that are needed to solve force equilibrium problems. Although this paper focuses on the engineering mechanics statics course, the technology discussed is also relevant to the introductory physics course.

  6. Distributed and Mobile Collaboration for Real Time Epidemiological Surveillance during Forces Deployments.

    PubMed

    Chaudet, Hervé; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Texier, Gaëtan; Tournebize, Olivier; Pellegrin, Liliane; Queyriaux, Benjamin; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a pilot project of a real time syndromic surveillance system in French armed forces for early warning of biological attack by mass destruction weapons. For simulating the situation of a theatre of operations and its organisation, an electronic syndromic surveillance system covering all branches of service in French Guiana (about 3,000 persons) has been deployed and connected to a surveillance centre in France. This system has been design taking in account a collaborative view of epidemiological surveillance and the mobility of forces in extreme conditions. Several kinds of hardware, from rugged personal digital assistant to desktop computer, and several telecommunication links, from PSTN to satellite data links, are used. This system allows a quick report of cases, which are georeferenced. In the first results, some problems associated with the human and the technical aspects have been reported, in association with some immediate advantages.

  7. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monitor changes over time, instruments and procedures with a sufficient reliability are needed. The Q Force is an innovative mobile muscle strength measurement instrument suitable to measure in various degrees of extension. Measurements between 110 and 130° extension present the highest values and the most significant increase after training. The objective of this study is to determine the test-retest reliability of muscle strength measurements by the Q Force in older adults in 110° extension. Forty-one healthy older adults, 13 males and 28 females were included in the study. Mean (SD) age was 81.9 (4.89) years. Isometric muscle strength of the Quadriceps muscle was assessed with the Q Force at 110° of knee extension. Participants were measured at two sessions with a three to eight day interval between sessions. To determine relative reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. To determine absolute reliability, Bland and Altman Limits of Agreement (LOA) were calculated and t-tests were performed. Relative reliability of the Q Force is good to excellent as all ICC coefficients are higher than 0.75. Generally a large 95 % LOA, reflecting only moderate absolute reliability, is found as exemplified for the peak torque left leg of -18.6 N to 33.8 N and the right leg of -9.2 N to 26.4 N was between 15.7 and 23.6 Newton representing 25.2 % to 39.9 % of the size of the mean. Small systematic differences in mean were found between measurement session 1 and 2. The present study shows that the Q Force has excellent relative test-retest reliability, but limited absolute test-retest reliability. Since the Q Force is relatively cheap and mobile it is suitable for

  8. Bilateral Force Feedback Control with Different Configurations Based on Dimensional Scaling for Realization of Mobile-Hapto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Wataru; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    Recent advances in control technology have contributed to the development of robot systems for communication with humans. Robot systems recognize the environment on the basis of audio-visual information. Recognition methods based on audio-visual feedback have been developed by many researchers. Recently, haptic information has attracted attention as the third type of multimedia information. This paper proposes a force feedback method for systems with different motion areas, named “mobile-hapto”. Sense of touch is useful for remote manipulation. The mobile-hapto consists of a mobile robot with an infinite area for motion and a joystick that is fixed at a given position and can be operated manually. To realize of force feedback in the “mobile-hapto”, bilateral control with dimensional scaling is proposed. In this case, intuitive manipulation becomes possible when using the “mobile-hapto”. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by experimental results.

  9. Mobile detection assessment and response systems (MDARS): a force protection physical security operational success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoop, Brian; Johnston, Michael; Goehring, Richard; Moneyhun, Jon; Skibba, Brian

    2006-05-01

    executed by the Air Force Robotics Lab (AFRL). The REDCAR used an MDARS PUV as the central robotic technology and expanded the concept to incorporate a smaller high speed platform (SCOUT) equipped with lethal, non-lethal and challenge components as an engagement platform and, in a marsupial configuration on the MDARS, a small UGV that can be deployed to investigate close quarters areas. The Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) program further expands these concepts by incorporating and adapting other mobile/tactical force protection equipment with a more robust Unmanned Ground Vehicle into an "Expeditionary" configuration to provide the current force with a rapidly deployable force protection system that can operate in austere less structured and protected environments. A USAMPS/ MANCEN sponsored "FIRRE System Demonstration" in Iraq is scheduled to begin in FY '07.

  10. Development of a mobile sensor for robust assessment of river bed grain forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, G.; Hoey, T.; Sventek, J.; Hodge, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The forces experienced by sediment grains at entrainment and during transport, and those exerted on river beds, are significant for the development of river systems and landscape evolution. The assessment of local grain forces has been approached using two different methodologies. The first approach uses static impact sensors at points or cross-sections to measure velocity and/or acceleration. A second approach uses mobile natural or artificial 'smart' pebbles instrumented with inertia micro-sensors for directly measuring the local forces experienced by individual grains. The two approaches have yielded significantly different magnitudes of impact forces. Static sensors (piezoelectric plates connected to accelerometers) temporally smooth the impacts from several grains and infrequently detect the higher forces (up to ×100g) generated by direct single-grain impacts. The second method is currently unable to record the full range of impacts in real rivers due to the low measurement range of the deployed inertia sensors (×3g). Laboratory applications have required only low-range accelerometers, so excluding the magnitude of natural impacts from the design criteria. Here we present the first results from the development of a mobile sensor, designed for the purpose of measuring local grain-forces in a natural riverbed. We present two sets of measurements. The first group presents the calibration of a wide range micro-accelerometer from a set of vertical drop experiments (gravitational acceleration) and further experiments on a shaking table moving with pre-defined acceleration. The second group of measurements are from incipient motion experiments performed in a 9m x0.9m flume (slope 0.001 to 0.018) under steadily increasing discharge. Initially the spherical sensor grain was placed on an artificial surface of hemispheres of identical diameter to the sensor (111mm). Incipient motion was assessed under both whole and half-diameter exposure for each slope. Subsequently

  11. Forced residential mobility and social support: impacts on psychiatric disorders among Somali migrants.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kamaldeep; Mohamud, Salaad; Warfa, Nasir; Curtis, Sarah; Stansfeld, Stephen; Craig, Tom

    2012-04-17

    Somali migrants fleeing the civil war in their country face punishing journeys, the loss of homes, possessions, and bereavement. On arrival in the host country they encounter poverty, hostility, and residential instability which may also undermine their mental health. An in-depth and semi-structured interview was used to gather detailed accommodation histories for a five year period from 142 Somali migrants recruited in community venues and primary care. Post-codes were verified and geo-mapped to calculate characteristics of residential location including deprivation indices, the number of moves and the distances between residential moves. We asked about the reasons for changing accommodation, perceived discrimination, asylum status, traumatic experiences, social support, employment and demographic factors. These factors were assessed alongside characteristics of residential mobility as correlates of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders. Those who were forced to move homes were more likely to have an ICD-10 psychiatric disorder (OR = 2.64, 1.16-5.98, p = 0.02) compared with those moving through their own choice. A lower risk of psychiatric disorders was found for people with larger friendship networks (0.35, 0.14-0.84, p = 0.02), for those with more confiding emotional support (0.42, 0.18-1.0, p = 0.05), and for those who had not moved during the study period (OR = 0.21, 0.07-0.62, p = 0.01). Forced residential mobility is a risk factor for psychiatric disorder; social support may contribute to resilience against psychiatric disorders associated with residential mobility.

  12. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation.

    PubMed

    Zia, Roseanna N; Swan, James W; Su, Yu

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  13. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna N.; Swan, James W.; Su, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  14. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Roseanna N. Su, Yu; Swan, James W.

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261–290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16–29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375–400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1–29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle

  15. Wind and tidal forcing of a buoyant plume, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Pennock, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    AVHRR satellite imagery and in situ observations were combined to study the motion of a buoyant plume at the mouth of Mobile Bay, Alabama. The plume extended up to 30 km from shore, with a thickness of about 1 m. The inner plume, which was 3-8 m thick, moved between the Bay and inner shelf in response to tidal forcing. The tidal prism could be identified through the movement of plume waters between satellite images. The plume responded rapidly to alongshore wind, with sections of the plume moving at speeds of more than 70 cm s-1, about 11% of the wind speed. The plume moved predominantly in the direction of the wind with a weak Ekman drift. The enhanced speed of the plume relative to normal surface drift is probably due to the strong stratification in the plume, which limits the transfer of momentum into the underlying ambient waters. ?? 1993.

  16. Directed Binding of Gliding Bacterium, Mycoplasma mobile, Shown by Detachment Force and Bond Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Nakane, Daisuke; Mizutani, Masaki; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile, a fish-pathogenic bacterium, features a protrusion that enables it to glide smoothly on solid surfaces at a velocity of up to 4.5 µm s−1 in the direction of the protrusion. M. mobile glides by a repeated catch-pull-release of sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface by hundreds of 50-nm flexible “legs” sticking out from the protrusion. This gliding mechanism may be explained by a possible directed binding of each leg with sialylated oligosaccharides, by which the leg can be detached more easily forward than backward. In the present study, we used a polystyrene bead held by optical tweezers to detach a starved cell at rest from a glass surface coated with sialylated oligosaccharides and concluded that the detachment force forward is 1.6- to 1.8-fold less than that backward, which may be linked to a catch bond-like behavior of the cell. These results suggest that this directed binding has a critical role in the gliding mechanism. PMID:27353751

  17. Accuracy and repeatability of the Pedar Mobile system in long-term vertical force measurements.

    PubMed

    Hurkmans, H L P; Bussmann, J B J; Benda, E; Verhaar, J A N; Stam, H J

    2006-01-01

    Portable insole pressure systems can be used to measure the vertical force during long-term (hours) measurements to determine the patient's amount of weight bearing during daily activities in the hospital and at home. Especially for long-term measurements, the amount and duration of loading pressure insoles can have a large influence on the accuracy, as previous studies found a time-dependent behavior after a relatively short period (minutes) of constant loading. Therefore, this study assessed the accuracy and repeatability of a portable capacitive insole system (Pedar, Novel(GmbH)) to measure vertical force during long-term loading. Static loading experiments were performed during which the Pedar insoles were loaded with 5 and 10 N/cm2 for 7 h. Dynamic loading experiments were performed with one Pedar insole which was cyclically loaded with 300, 500 and 1000 N during two sessions of 1200 load cycles. The static and dynamic experiments were repeated 3 days later. Accuracy, due to offset drift, decreased in time during the start of the static experiments (percent error: -1.9% to 0.3% at hour 0; 26.3% to 34% at hour 7). The percent error for the dynamic experiments ranged from -16% to -19%, from -3% to -7% and from -8% to approximately 0% when the insole was loaded with 300, 500 and 1000 N, respectively. The amount of drift ranged from 12 to 62 N for the 500 and 1000 N loads, respectively. The mean day-to-day percentage difference for the static and dynamic experiments ranged from -2.3% to 0.5%, and from -2.9% to 3.0%, respectively. The results indicate that drift correction is necessary for accurate assessment of vertical force by the Pedar Mobile system to determine the amount of weight bearing during long-term measurements.

  18. Strategic Mobility 21: SM21 CONOPS Revised - Phase II, Joint Force Deployment and Distribution Support Platform: Joint Operational Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-02

    vendor managed inventory ( VMI ) applications. 6.2 Strategic Mobility 21 – Joint Experimentation and Demonstration Campaign Phases The...United States Joint Force Command USMC US Marine Corps USTRANSCOM US Transportation Command VMI Vendor Managed Inventory WMS Warehouse Management ...fulfillment center for vendor - managed inventory and Business-to-Business (B to B) and Business to Customer (B to C) transactions.

  19. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  20. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the "leg" of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the "leg" protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transforming AMC Test & Evaluation: Using Effects-Based Mobility and AFSO21 to Build a Direct Investment into Air Force Modernization and Recapitalization (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    emerging doctrine called Effects-Based Mobility ( EBM ) to connect the joint fight with the T&E Enterprise. The authors also used Air Force Smart Operations...The authors set out to answer these questions by using Effects-Based Mobility ( EBM ) and Air Force Smart Operations 21 (AFSO21). EBM is an...emerging air mobility doctrine that focuses efforts on “Critical Factors” that generate effects.7 The authors used EBM to build a connection between

  2. Creating A Theater-Based Operational Link Between Strategic Mobility and Theater-Level Logistics For The Joint Task Force Commander

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    inadequately sustained by logistical replenishment.xix History shows logistics-sourced culmination can render the accomplishment of strategic objectives...Patterson AFB, OH: Air University. Air Force Institute of Technology, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96N-4, November 1996. Koko, Richard W. Strategic Mobility for...Mobility Forces and Command and Control of Airlift. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH: Air University, Air Force Institute of Technology, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96N

  3. Forced gradient infiltration experiments: effect on the release processes of mobile particles and organic contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagels, B.; Reichel, K.; Totsche, K. U.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile colloidal and suspended matter is likely to affect themobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the unsaturatedsoil zone at contaminated sites. We studied the release of mobile (organic) particles (MOPs), which include among others dissolved and colloidal organic matter in response to forced sprinkling infiltration and multiple flow interrupts using undisturbed zero-tensionlysimeters. The aim was to assess the effect of these MOPs on the exportof PAHs and other contaminants in floodplain soils. Seepage water samples were analyzed for dissolvedand colloidal organic carbon (DOC), PAH, suspended particles, pH, electrical conductivity, turbidity,zeta potential and surface tension in the fraction smaller 0.7 m. In additional selected PAH were analysed in the size fraction > 0.7 m. Bromide was used as a conservative tracer to determine the flow regime. First arrival of bromide was detected 3.8 hours after start of irrigation. The concentration gradually increased and reached a level of C/C0=0.1 just before the flow interrupt (FI). After flow was resumed, effluent bromide concentration was equal to the concentration before the FI. Ongoing irrigation caused a breakthrough wave, which continuously increased until the bromide concentration reached ~100% of the input concentration. A high-intensity rain event of 4 L m -2 h-1 upon summer-dried lysimeters results in a release of particles in a the size of 250-400 nm. In addition it seems that with the initial exported seepage water surface-active agents are released which is indicated by the decrease of the surface to 60 mN m-1 (Pure water: 72mN m-1). The turbidity values range from 8-14 FAU. The concentration of DOC is about 30-40 mg L-1 in the initial effluent fractions and equilibrates to 15 mg L-1 with ongoing percolation. The PAHs in the fraction < 0.7 m amount to 0.02 g L-1, and 0.05 g L-1 in the fraction > 0.7 m. After establishing steady state flow conditions, first arrival of bromide was detected

  4. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  5. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  6. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  7. Intra-theater Air Mobility and Theater Distribution for the Joint Force Commander: Is the United States Central Command Model the Best

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    that the CENTCOM model need not be universally applicable to other geographic commands in order to have an effective intra-theater air mobility ...and differences. The author demonstrated the universal applicability of CENTCOM‟s intra-theater air mobility and theater distribution model to other...AU/SAASS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES AIR UNIVERSITY INTRA-THEATER AIR MOBILITY AND THEATER DISTRIBUTION FOR THE JOINT FORCE

  8. INFLUENCE OF VISCOUS AND BUOYANCY FORCES ON THE MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE DURING SURFACTANT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization is one of the most important considerations in the development and implementation of surfactant-based remediation technologies. Column experiments were performed to investigate the onset and extent of tetrachloroethyle...

  9. INFLUENCE OF VISCOUS AND BUOYANCY FORCES ON THE MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE DURING SURFACTANT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization is one of the most important considerations in the development and implementation of surfactant-based remediation technologies. Column experiments were performed to investigate the onset and extent of tetrachloroethyle...

  10. The welfare effects of labour force growth with internationally mobile capital.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R

    1994-02-01

    "This paper examines some economic effects of population growth, due to natural increase and immigration.... An objective is to assess how immigration and natural labour supply growth impact on international equilibrium when trade in produced inputs is induced by population changes. For the most part our analysis is based on theories on international factor mobility.... Natural population growth will be analysed as a byproduct of the factor mobility studies." excerpt

  11. Handbook for Supervisors of Air Force Reserve Personnel in Mobilization Augmentee Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Accounting and Finance Center, Denver, CO. Office of Reserve Affairs.

    The duties of supervisors of Air Force reserve personnel are discussed in this handbook. The organization of the Air Force is diagrammed, with duties explained for all administrative personnel. The handbook details the supervisor's responsibilities and tells how to utilize reservists during their tours of duty. This guide also discusses how to…

  12. Development of walking analysis system consisting of mobile force plate and motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Wataru; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Aikawa, Masataka; Shiojima, Kouzou; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    In walking analysis, which is one useful method for efficient physical rehabilitation, the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientation data are measured during walking. In the past, these data were measured by a 3D motion analysis system consisting of high-speed cameras and force plates, which must be installed in the floor. However, a conventional 3D motion analysis system can measure the ground reaction force and the center of pressure just on force plates during a few steps. In addition, the subjects' stride lengths are limited because they have to walk on the center of the force plate. These problems can be resolved by converting conventional devices into wearable devices. We used a measuring device consisting of portable force plates and motion sensors. We developed a walking analysis system that calculates the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientations and measured a walking subject to estimate this system. We simultaneously used a conventional 3D motion analysis system to compare with our development system and showed its validity for measurements of ground reaction force and the center of pressure.

  13. The Need for the Next Special Operations ForcesMobility Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    AFSOC relies on the AC-130 for strike missions, the MC-130P for helicopter /tilt rotor air refueling, the MC-130H and CV-22 for SOF mobility, and a...infiltration and extraction of SOF. A tilt-rotor aircraft allows the CV-22 to fly like a C-130, but land and takeoff like a helicopter . Thus far...designation will be the MC-130J and it will conduct helicopter refueling and SOF mobility needs. The MC-130J will certainly slow the aging of

  14. THE FUTURE OF THE EUROPEAN AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND: AN ANALYSIS OF CAPABILITY ENHANCEMENTS FROM THE ITALIAN AIR FORCE AND AIR MOBILITY COMMAND

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-15

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE FUTURE OF THE EUROPEAN AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND: AN ANALYSIS OF CAPABILITY ENHANCEMENTS FROM THE ITALIAN ...AIR FORCE AND AIR MOBILITY COMMAND By Luca Mazzini, Lieutenant Colonel, Italian Air Force A Research Report Submitted to the Faculty In...official policy or position of the US government, the Department of Defense, the Air University, or the Italian Air Force. In accordance with Air

  15. Conversion of the Forces Mobilization Model (FORCEMOB) from FORTRAN to C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    to simulate and analyze nuclear reactors .5 FOR-C also was used to convert Cloudy, a model funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and...than a simple game such as Pacman and has many more LOC. In this vein, algorithmic information theory describes objects in terms of the...FORTRAN to C. Idaho National Laboratory used FOR-C to convert RELAP5-3D, a Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded model used

  16. Mobile Geospatial Information Systems for Land Force Operations: Analysis of Operational Needs and Research Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    intentions to subordinates. The Platoon Commander could activate remote video devices from fixed and mobile cameras to gather and record...software SW 28 Processor Samsung S3C 2440, 520 MHz 29 Memory 128 MB RAM Expansion? ? 30 Data Supported ? GPS level of accuracy ? 31...ARM 29 Memory 256MB RAM, 256MB Flash Expansion? multiple ports, SDHC card slot, expansion connector for firmware update 30 Data Supported

  17. Air Mobility Issues 2002. Air Force Jounral of Logistics. Volume 26, Number 1, Spring 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    logistics flights at overseas en route units—which maintain a forward supply location stocked with C-17, C-141, and C-5 parts and in some cases spare...aircraft cargo. Roll-on/roll-off capability implies the ability not only to drive rolling stock cargo—such as high-mobility multipurpose wheeled...identification system intended to exchange surveillance and command and control (C2) information among various C2 platforms and weapons platforms to enhance

  18. Effect of general flexibility on thumb-tip force generation - implication for mobilization and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Tzu; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Lin, Se-Wei; Su, Fong-Ching

    2009-10-01

    Pain involving basal joints of the thumb is one of the major occupation-related disorders for orthopedic physiotherapists and manual therapists. The thumb-tip force generation while performing manual techniques may be influenced not only by the specific manual techniques employed but also by general flexibility of the therapist. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of general flexibility and different techniques on thumb-tip force generation. Twenty-three subjects with no exposure to manual techniques and 15 physical therapy clinicians with at least 3 years of orthopedic experience participated. The general flexibility of each subject was assessed by Beighton score (BS). Each subject was requested to exert a maximal force on a six-component load cell with the thumb unsupported (T1), with the rest of digits supported (T2), and with interphalangeal joint of the thumb supported by the index (T3).The thumb-tip force was normalized by body weight. The thumb-tip force generation is influenced not only by the differences in technique employed by the therapists, but also by the general flexibility of the therapists. Physiotherapists with excessive thumb flexibility are advised to perform PA glide with IP joint supported to protect the thumb joints from injury.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility of a growing cell studied by photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonin, Mario; Bálint, Stefan; Mestres, Pau; Martınez, Ignacio A.; Petrov, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    Living cells have spatially localized charged groups such as nucleus, cell walls, and others that can move in an external electric field providing the cell electrophoretic mobility (EPM). We suggest to monitor the EPM of a single living cell during its growth using optical tweezers combined with a position detector. As an example, we studied the EPM during the yeast growth, and we observed a nonmonotonic behavior of the EPM during the cell cycle, such as that the maximal EPM was observed at the initial stage of the growth, strongly reducing when the cell cycle is near its final stage.

  20. Mobile measurements of climate forcing agents: Application to methane emissions from landfill and natural gas compression.

    PubMed

    Jakober, Chris A; Mara, Steve L; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Herner, Jorn D

    2015-04-01

    Measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) source emissions provides data for validation of GHG inventories, which provide the foundation for climate change mitigation. Two Toyota RAV4 electric vehicles were outfitted with high-precision instrumentation to determine spatial and temporal resolution of GHGs (e.g., nitrous oxide, methane [CH4], and carbon dioxide [CO2]), and other gaseous species and particulate metrics found near emission sources. Mobile measurement platform (MMP) analytical performance was determined over relevant measurement time scales. Pollutant residence times through the sampling configuration were measured, ranging from 3 to 11 sec, enabling proper time alignment for spatial measurement of each respective analyte. Linear response range for GHG analytes was assessed across expected mixing ratio ranges, showing minimal regression and standard error differences between 5, 10, 30, and 60 sec sampling intervals and negligible differences between the two MMPs. GHG instrument drift shows deviation of less than 0.8% over a 24-hr measurement period. These MMPs were utilized in tracer-dilution experiments at a California landfill and natural gas compressor station (NGCS) to quantify CH4 emissions. Replicate landfill measurements during October 2009 yielded annual CH4 emissions estimates of 0.10±0.01, 0.11±0.01, and 0.12±0.02 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent (MTCO2E). These values compare favorably to California GHG Emissions Inventory figures for 2007, 2008, and 2009 of 0.123, 0.125, and 0.126 MTCO2E/yr, respectively, for this facility. Measurements to quantify NGCS boosting facility-wide emissions, during June 2010 yielded an equivalent of 5400±100 TCO2E/yr under steady-state operation. However, measurements during condensate transfer without operational vapor recovery yield an instantaneous emission rate of 2-4 times greater, but was estimated to only add 12 TCO2E/yr overall. This work displays the utility for mobile GHG measurements to validate existing

  1. Erosion and transport of particulates by forced jet impinging jet on a mobile sediment bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfman, Kyle; Mulinti, Rahul; Kiger, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    The work reports on the erosion and suspended flux characteristics of a forced impinging jet, as a prototypical surrogate to better understand the problem of rotorcraft brownout. Coherent vortex rings are generated through oscillatory forcing of a vertical impinging jet onto a sediment bed. Early in the flow development, annular ripple dunes are formed and steadily grow, the wavelength and growth rate depending largely on the particle size and flow conditions. In order to provide a reliable prediction of erosion for more realistic flows, such as those found in rotorcrafts, a parametric study was performed for several particle sizes and mixtures. PTV is used to correlate vertical and horizontal fluxes with resulting changes in the ground profiles. A single-phase PIV study detailing the changes in the vortex ring characteristics after the bed has reached a stable erosion pattern is also reported. This work is supported by the AFSOR under grant FA95500810406.

  2. Data Supporting Mobile Application Development for Use within the Marine Air-Ground Task Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS 3G third generation 4G fourth generation AAR after action report AFRICOM United States Africa command ACE air combat...is in the process of returning to its amphibious roots by positioning itself as what the 35th Commandant, General James Amos (2012), calls “a...crises quickly. General Amos refers to this mindset in Expeditionary Force 21 as being “expeditionary” in nature—to be able to deploy and arrive

  3. The Proficiency Puzzle: Maintaining Airmanship In America’s Mobility Force Since 9-11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    minimums of the flying organization or business .17 The Air Force defines aircrew members as “proficient when they can perform tasks at the minimum...Empowering Human Performance – Where do we go from here?” PACDEFF (The Pacific and Australasian CRM Developers’ and Facilitators’ Forum) Conference, 2011... statistical analysis, but the results are still important. Since 11 September 2001, the C-17 community has experienced eight Class A mishaps.29

  4. Design and test of a hybrid foot force sensing and GPS system for richer user mobility activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  5. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals. PMID:24189333

  6. Acute effects of different stretching durations on passive torque, mobility, and isometric muscle force.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Iwata, Masahiro; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Tsuchida, Wakako; Inoue, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    Static stretching is widely applied in various disciplines. However, the acute effects of different durations of stretching are unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the acute effects of different stretching durations on muscle function and flexibility, and provide an insight into the optimal duration of static stretching. This randomized crossover trial included 24 healthy students (17 men and 7 women) who stretched their right hamstrings for durations of 20, 60, 180, and 300 seconds in a random order. The following outcomes were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as markers of lower-limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), dynamic passive torque (DPT), stiffness, straight leg raise (SLR), and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Static passive torque was significantly lower after 60, 180, and 300 seconds of stretching compared with that after 20-second stretching, and stiffness decreased significantly after 180- and 300-second stretching (p < 0.05). In addition, DPT and stiffness were significantly lower after 300 seconds than after 20-second stretching (p < 0.05), and SLR increased significantly after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Straight leg raise was higher after 180- and 300-second stretching than after 20-second stretching and higher after 300-second stretching than after 60-second stretching (p < 0.05). Isometric muscle force significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Therefore, increased duration of stretching is associated with a decrease in SPT but an increase in SLR. Over 180 seconds of stretching was required to decrease DPT and stiffness, but isometric muscle force decreased regardless of the stretching duration. In conclusion, these results indicate that longer durations of stretching are needed to provide better flexibility.

  7. Motion planning of mobile multi-limb robotic systems subject to force and friction constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhani, Akhil; Dubowsky, Steven

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented to generate motions for a class of multilimb robotic systems enabling them to apply large static forces over large ranges of motion without saturating actuator effort limits, system-environment friction constraints, kinematic joint limits, or geometric workspace obstacles. The approach, termed the force-workspace (FW) approach, maps these constraints into the system C-space to form constraint obstacles using a recursive subdivision process. To generate motions along which actuator efforts can be specified without violating system constraints, paths are planned that avoid these constraint obstacles. The method permits the shape of the paths to be controlled using any configuration-dependent performance criterion. The FW approach was applied to a proposed three-limb planar climbing robot whose task is to climb upwards between two vertical walls by pushing outwards to generate frictional support. Motions were planned automatically within the system FW, enabling it to lift itself upwards using two limbs at a time, and a gait was planned to enable it to switch limbs and climb continuously.

  8. Motion planning of mobile multi-limb robotic systems subject to force and friction constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhani, Akhil; Dubowsky, Steven

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented to generate motions for a class of multilimb robotic systems enabling them to apply large static forces over large ranges of motion without saturating actuator effort limits, system-environment friction constraints, kinematic joint limits, or geometric workspace obstacles. The approach, termed the force-workspace (FW) approach, maps these constraints into the system C-space to form constraint obstacles using a recursive subdivision process. To generate motions along which actuator efforts can be specified without violating system constraints, paths are planned that avoid these constraint obstacles. The method permits the shape of the paths to be controlled using any configuration-dependent performance criterion. The FW approach was applied to a proposed three-limb planar climbing robot whose task is to climb upwards between two vertical walls by pushing outwards to generate frictional support. Motions were planned automatically within the system FW, enabling it to lift itself upwards using two limbs at a time, and a gait was planned to enable it to switch limbs and climb continuously.

  9. Mobilizing a low-income African-American community around tobacco control: a force field analysis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G A; Reed, D F; Scheider, H

    1995-11-01

    A statewide tobacco control campaign in California has been highly successful in reducing public exposure to the health hazards of secondhand smoke. Over 250 cities and counties in California have enacted local ordinances to regulate smoking in public places and workplaces. Although low-income people of color are disproportionately affected by the use of tobacco, the issue of regulating secondhand smoke tends to be a lower priority in communities that are confronted by other, more immediately pressing social justice issues, such as high rates of violence and lack of economic opportunity. This article describes the process undertaken by a county health department to mobilize a low-income African American community in a San Francisco Bay Area city to support a local ordinance mandating 100% smoke-free workplaces and restaurants. These efforts are more likely to succeed if health advocates (1) reframe issues in a context that acknowledges the political, economic, and social justice realities and strengths of the community; (2) organize within existing local networks and foster the integration of tobacco issues into the group's existing work; and (3) can defer their own agendas during times of community grieving and healing.

  10. Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2009-03-18

    This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated

  11. Contact structure, mobility, environmental impact and behaviour: the importance of social forces to infectious disease dynamics and disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Ronan F; Gurley, Emily S; Salje, Henrik; Bloomfield, Laura S P; Jones, James H

    2017-05-05

    Human factors, including contact structure, movement, impact on the environment and patterns of behaviour, can have significant influence on the emergence of novel infectious diseases and the transmission and amplification of established ones. As anthropogenic climate change alters natural systems and global economic forces drive land-use and land-cover change, it becomes increasingly important to understand both the ecological and social factors that impact infectious disease outcomes for human populations. While the field of disease ecology explicitly studies the ecological aspects of infectious disease transmission, the effects of the social context on zoonotic pathogen spillover and subsequent human-to-human transmission are comparatively neglected in the literature. The social sciences encompass a variety of disciplines and frameworks for understanding infectious diseases; however, here we focus on four primary areas of social systems that quantitatively and qualitatively contribute to infectious diseases as social-ecological systems. These areas are social mixing and structure, space and mobility, geography and environmental impact, and behaviour and behaviour change. Incorporation of these social factors requires empirical studies for parametrization, phenomena characterization and integrated theoretical modelling of social-ecological interactions. The social-ecological system that dictates infectious disease dynamics is a complex system rich in interacting variables with dynamically significant heterogeneous properties. Future discussions about infectious disease spillover and transmission in human populations need to address the social context that affects particular disease systems by identifying and measuring qualitatively important drivers.This article is part of the themed issue 'Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. An Analysis of the Status of and Factors Influencing Mobility of the Air Force Civilian Logistician. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    AFIT in 1969, Captain Donald Gober and Mr. John Malouf stated that "varied experience gained in different geographical areas should upgrade the... Gober and Malouf study mentioned earlier was conducted in 1969. Their results also revealed a general lack of mobility on the part of civilians within...civilian mobility during the time span between the Gober and Malouf in 1969 and Wilson in 1985. And neither of these studies attempted to measure the

  13. Chi(1) rotamer populations and angles of mobile surface side chains are accurately predicted by a torsion angle database potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Kuszewski, John

    2002-03-27

    The equilibrium angles and distributions of chi(1) rotamers for mobile surface side chains of the small, 63-residue, B1 domain of protein L have been calculated from the static crystal structure by rigid body/torsion angle simulated annealing using a torsion angle database potential of mean force and compared to those deduced by Monte Carlo analysis of side chain residual dipolar couplings measured in solution. Good agreement between theory and experiment is observed, indicating that for side chains undergoing rotamer averaging that is fast on the chemical shift time scale, the equilibrium angles and distribution of chi(1) rotamers are largely determined by the backbone phi/psi torsion angles.

  14. Recognition and Classification of Road Condition on the Basis of Friction Force by Using a Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tatsuhito; Katsura, Seiichiro

    A person operating a mobile robot in a remote environment receives realistic visual feedback about the condition of the road on which the robot is moving. The categorization of the road condition is necessary to evaluate the conditions for safe and comfortable driving. For this purpose, the mobile robot should be capable of recognizing and classifying the condition of the road surfaces. This paper proposes a method for recognizing the type of road surfaces on the basis of the friction between the mobile robot and the road surfaces. This friction is estimated by a disturbance observer, and a support vector machine is used to classify the surfaces. The support vector machine identifies the type of the road surface using feature vector, which is determined using the arithmetic average and variance derived from the torque values. Further, these feature vectors are mapped onto a higher dimensional space by using a kernel function. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimental results.

  15. Final Environmental Assessment for Wide Area Coverage Construct Land Mobile Network Communications Infrastructure Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR WIDE AREA COVERAGE CONSTRUCT LAND MOBILE NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS...effects to the above resources are anticipated. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK WAC Environmental...Hill communication site include adding trunked radio equipment and microwave equipment to the existing shelter and tower. Teton Ridge Communication

  16. Investigating the Response of a Density Field to Variable Forcing Conditions in a River-Dominated, Microtidal Estuary, Mobile Bay, AL.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, J.; Dzwonkowski, B.

    2016-02-01

    Long-term time series from six water quality monitoring stations throughout Mobile Bay, AL, were used to investigate the spatial and temporal variability in the density field in response to a range of forcing conditions. Near-bottom density was measured at 3 stations along the main axis of the estuary and used to calculate horizontal density gradients in response to river flow. The observed longitudinal gradients were strongest during periods of low discharge in the summer and weaker gradients were associated with periods of high river discharge during late winter and early spring. A linear decrease in the horizontal density gradients with increasing discharge was observed in Mobile Bay. This is a different response than those observed in partial mixed meso-tidal systems (e.g. Narragansett Bay, Delaware Bay), where the density gradients follow a power law dependence with the horizontal density gradient increasing with increasing river discharge. Additional analyses on the response of the density field under varying wind and tidal ranges are currently underway. The importance of these forcing conditions on the density field has significant implications on the structure and strength of the circulation and associated water quality within estuarine systems.

  17. Systems Concepts for Integrated Air Defense of Multinational Mobile Crisis Reaction Forces (Concepts de systemes pour la defense aerienne integree de forces internationales mobiles d’intervention en situation de crise)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    of Dr Theodore von Kármán, a leading aerospace scientist, who early on recognised the importance of scientific support for the Allied Armed Forces...invitation to hold this symposium in their country. ix Systems Concepts and Integration Panel Chairman: Vice-Chairman: Dr Edwin B. STEAR Prof. Luis M.B...Rovisco Pais United States 1049-001 Lisboa Codex Portugal TECHNICAL PROGRAMME COMMITTEE Dr Edwin B. STEAR Prof. N. ALEMDAROGLU Institute for Defense

  18. China’s Anti-Access/Area Denial Strategy and Implications for Special Operations Forces Air Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Command and General Staff College CGSC 731 McClellan Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-1350 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...States Air Force School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2014-02...NUMBER 201 Reynolds Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-2134 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10

  19. Sequencing sit-to-stand and upright posture for mobility limitation assessment: determination of the timing of the task phases from force platform data.

    PubMed

    Mazzà, Claudia; Zok, Mounir; Della Croce, Ugo

    2005-06-01

    The identification of quantitative tools to assess an individual's mobility limitation is a complex and challenging task. Several motor tasks have been designated as potential indicators of mobility limitation. In this study, a multiple motor task obtained by sequencing sit-to-stand and upright posture was used. Algorithms based on data obtained exclusively from a single force platform were developed to detect the timing of the motor task phases (sit-to-stand, preparation to the upright posture and upright posture). To test these algorithms, an experimental protocol inducing predictable changes in the acquired signals was designed. Twenty-two young, able-bodied subjects performed the task in four different conditions: self-selected natural and high speed with feet kept together, and self-selected natural and high speed with feet pelvis-width apart. The proposed algorithms effectively detected the timing of the task phases, the duration of which was sensitive to the four different experimental conditions. As expected, the duration of the sit-to-stand was sensitive to the speed of the task and not to the foot position, while the duration of the preparation to the upright posture was sensitive to foot position but not to speed. In addition to providing a simple and effective description of the execution of the motor task, the correct timing of the studied multiple task could facilitate the accurate determination of variables descriptive of the single isolated phases, allowing for a more thorough description of the motor task and therefore could contribute to the development of effective quantitative functional evaluation tests.

  20. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  1. Brick Kiln Emissions Quantified with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory During the Short Lived Climate Forcing (SLCF) 2013 Campaign in Guanajuato Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Herndon, S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Zavala, M.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Brick kiln emissions are suspected to be a major source of atmospheric black carbon (BC) in developing countries; and black carbon's role as a short lived climate forcing (SLCF) pollutant is widely recognized. The SLCF-Mexico brick kiln study was conducted from 12-17 March 2013 in Mexico's Guanajuato state. Three different types of brick kilns were investigated (MK2, traditional, and traditional three tier) providing data on the effects of different kiln designs on particle and gas phase emissions. The BC and gaseous combustion emissions from these kilns were measured during both the fire stage and the subsequent smoldering stage with real-time instruments deployed on the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory, and quantified utilizing flux tracer gases released adjacent to the brick kiln. This method allows examination of the brick kiln plume's evolution as it transits downwind from the source. Particulate measurements conducted by the mobile laboratory included the multi angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure black carbon mass, cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPSext) monitor to measure extinction and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) measurements of black carbon. The SP-AMS instrument combines the ability to measure black carbon with the ability to determine the chemical composition of the other particulate matter (PM) components associated with black carbon particles. The variance of PM chemical composition will be examined as a function of burning stage and kiln type and compared to other black carbon PM sources. Gas phase exhaust species measured included CO, CO2, NOx, SO2, CH4, C2H6, as well as a variety of VOCs (acetonitrile, benzene etc.) measured with a PTR-MS instrument. All of these measurements will be examined to construct emission ratios evaluating how these vary with different kiln types and different firing conditions. The evolution of particulate matter and gas phase species as they transit away from the source will also be examined.

  2. Comprehensive size-determination of whole virus vaccine particles using gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too.

  3. Conformational dynamics of single molecules visualized in real time by scanning force microscopy: macromolecular mobility on a substrate surface in different vapours.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, M O; Tartsch, B; Khokhlov, A R; Sheiko, S S; Borner, H G; Matyjaszewski, K; Möller, M

    2004-09-01

    We describe a technique to visualize and effect in real time motion and conformational transitions of single macromolecules. Two steps are involved. First, scanning force microscopy (SFM) was applied to detect in situ conformational transitions of single polymer molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface. Secondly, these changes were induced by controlled variations of environmental conditions in a microscope environmental chamber. In particular, we have revealed that exposure of a substrate with adsorbed macromolecules to vapours of different nature was able to increase molecular mobility and to stimulate conformational transitions of the polymer chains on the surface. Realization of SFM observation in a variable vapour environment was not as difficult as in liquid media. Variations of the vapour composition affected the oscillation dynamics of the cantilever with the scanning probe only to a small extent, and did not impede continuation of the scanning procedure. In fact, the characteristic times of the observed conformational changes were large enough (minutes to dozens of minutes) for sampling images repeatedly. Although recording of an SFM image was slow and required several minutes, we were able to visualize step-by-step the successive stages of the slow conformational transformation of the macromolecules adhering to the substrate, i.e. to investigate a molecular response to the environment changes in real time. Here, we studied the reversible collapse-decollapse transitions of cylindrical poly(methacrylate)-graft-poly(n-butyl acrylate) brush-like macromolecules exposed to different vapours. Single macromolecules on mica tended to assume a compacted globular conformation when exposed to the vapour of compounds, which due to their amphiphilic nature adsorb on mica and lower the surface energy of the substrate (e.g. alcohols). By contrast, the macromolecules adopted extended two-dimensional worm-like conformations in the vapours of compounds having high values

  4. [Workplace injuries and professional mobility correlated with health problems. The potential and limitations of the ISTAT Labour Force survey--July 1999].

    PubMed

    Vannoni, Francesca; Mamo, C; Demaria, M; Ceccarelli, C; Costa, G

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge on the occupational and social factors that influence the relationship between illness, absence from work and occupational mobility is at present insufficient. To map out, by social class and occupational group, the impact of health problems on work and the distribution of accidents and morbidity associated with occupation. Using data from the National Survey of the Italian Labour Force (ISTAT, 1999), covering a sample of 200,384 subjects, prevalence odds ratios of morbidity, work injuries and change of occupation due to health problems were calculated by social class and occupation, adjusting for age and residence. The working class showed a higher risk, due to health problems, of a reduction in time worked (OR = 3.70 in men and OR = 4.10 in women), of choosing to work part-time (OR = 2.04 in men and OR = 2.27 in women), or of withdrawing from the workforce (for artisans, skilled manual workers, farmers and agricultural labourers OR = 1.63 in men and OR = 1.47 in women). This class was also at a greater disadvantage not only with respect to accident rates (OR = 1.85 in men and OR = 1.88 in women), but also with respect to the time needed for post-trauma rehabilitation and return to work (for absences of one week to one month: OR = 1.67 and 1.83 for men and women, respectively; for absences of more than one month: OR = 1.29 and OR = 1.69). Moreover, the working class, when compared to other social classes, had a higher rate of suffering from illness, physical impairment or other physical and psychological problems caused or aggravated by working activity (25% in men and 32% in women). The ISTAT National Survey provides an estimate of minor accidents with prognoses of less than three days, including those not reported to the National Institute for Insurance against Occupational Accidents and Diseases (INAIL). This allows a preliminary exploration of the relationship between health problems and occupational mobility; however, it seems necessary to collect

  5. Surface complexation modeling of groundwater arsenic mobility: Results of a forced gradient experiment in a Red River flood plain aquifer, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, Søren; Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming; Nhan, Pham Quy; Hoa, Le Quynh; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Long, Tran Vu; Viet, Pham Hung; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2012-12-01

    Three surface complexation models (SCMs) developed for, respectively, ferrihydrite, goethite and sorption data for a Pleistocene oxidized aquifer sediment from Bangladesh were used to explore the effect of multicomponent adsorption processes on As mobility in a reduced Holocene floodplain aquifer along the Red River, Vietnam. The SCMs for ferrihydrite and goethite yielded very different results. The ferrihydrite SCM favors As(III) over As(V) and has carbonate and silica species as the main competitors for surface sites. In contrast, the goethite SCM has a greater affinity for As(V) over As(III) while PO43- and Fe(II) form the predominant surface species. The SCM for Pleistocene aquifer sediment resembles most the goethite SCM but shows more Si sorption. Compiled As(III) adsorption data for Holocene sediment was also well described by the SCM determined for Pleistocene aquifer sediment, suggesting a comparable As(III) affinity of Holocene and Pleistocene aquifer sediments. A forced gradient field experiment was conducted in a bank aquifer adjacent to a tributary channel to the Red River, and the passage in the aquifer of mixed groundwater containing up to 74% channel water was observed. The concentrations of As (<0.013 μM) and major ions in the channel water are low compared to those in the pristine groundwater in the adjacent bank aquifer, which had an As concentration of ˜3 μM. Calculations for conservative mixing of channel and groundwater could explain the observed variation in concentration for most elements. However, the mixed waters did contain an excess of As(III), PO43- and Si which is attributed to desorption from the aquifer sediment. The three SCMs were tested on their ability to model the desorption of As(III), PO43- and Si. Qualitatively, the ferrihydrite SCM correctly predicts desorption for As(III) but for Si and PO43- it predicts an increased adsorption instead of desorption. The goethite SCM correctly predicts desorption of both As(III) and PO43

  6. Driving forces of researchers mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Carletti, Timoteo

    2014-05-01

    Starting from the dataset of the publication corpus of the APS during the period 1955-2009, we reconstruct the individual researchers trajectories, namely the list of the consecutive affiliations for each scholar. Crossing this information with different geographic datasets we embed these trajectories in a spatial framework. Using methods from network theory and complex systems analysis we characterise these patterns in terms of topological network properties and we analyse the dependence of an academic path across different dimensions: the distance between two subsequent positions, the relative importance of the institutions (in terms of number of publications) and some socio-cultural traits. We show that distance is not always a good predictor for the next affiliation while other factors like ``the previous steps'' of the career of the researchers (in particular the first position) or the linguistic and historical similarity between two countries can have an important impact. Finally we show that the dataset exhibit a memory effect, hence the fate of a career strongly depends from the first two affiliations.

  7. Sustainment of Expeditionary Forces in the Pacific Theater during the Second World War: The Development of the Advanced Base and Mobile Base Programs and Their Relevance Today

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-19

    flood the staging areas from Pearl Harbor. As the campaign came to a close, the Navy’s challenge became the requirement to sustain the 23 mobile...b) the Hawaiian Islands; (2) Hongkong and the insular possessions which the British Empire now holds or may hereafter acquire in the Pacific Ocean

  8. Social Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Todd; Goldstein, Noah J; Fox, Craig R

    2017-09-25

    This article reviews research from several behavioral disciplines to derive strategies for prompting people to perform behaviors that are individually costly and provide negligible individual or social benefits but are meaningful when performed by a large number of individuals. Whereas the term social influence encompasses all the ways in which people influence other people, social mobilization refers specifically to principles that can be used to influence a large number of individuals to participate in an activity. The motivational force of social mobilization is amplified by the fact that others benefit from the encouraged behaviors, and its overall impact is enhanced by the fact that people are embedded within social networks. This article may be useful to those interested in the provision of public goods, collective action, and prosocial behavior, and we give special attention to field experiments on election participation, environmentally sustainable behaviors, and charitable giving. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69 is January 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Joint Force Pre-Deployment Training: An Initial Analysis and Product Definition (Strategic Mobility 21: IT Planning Document for APS Demonstration Document (Task 3.7)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-13

    pre-deployment training program “living design” first documented in 1995 and periodically updated over the past fifteen years. The report updates the...education and training. This report updates an advanced Joint force pre-deployment training program “living design” first documented in 1995 and...26 DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIRST COMPUTER BASED

  10. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  11. Human and Organizational Factors in the U.S. Naval Construction Force: A Qualitative Analysis of the U.S. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Peacetime Deployment Construction Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    written over the years by student officers at other universities. Over the past 15 years, officers such as Commander Edouard Gonzales , Commander Mark...operation and maintenance is assigned to the resident NMCB. Bravo Company (staffed primarily with electricians and plumbers) are the main work force...often cross-assignment for Builders and Steelworkers between Bravo Company (tasked with ensuring quality of Camp structures) and Charlie Company

  12. Mobility management in mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medidi, Sirisha; Golshani, Forouzan

    2002-07-01

    There is an emerging interest in integrating mobile wireless communication with the Internet based on the Ipv6 technology. Many issues introduced by the mobility of users arise when such an integration is attempted. This paper addresses the problem of mobility management, i.e., that of tracking the current IP addresses of mobile terminals and sustaining active IP connections as mobiles move. The paper presents some architectural and mobility management options for integrating wireless access to the Internet. We then present performance results for Mobile IPv4, route optimization and Mobile IPv6.

  13. Cookstove Emissions Quantified with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory During the Short Lived Climate Forcing (SLCF) 2013 Campaign in Pátzcuaro Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Abraham, R.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Fortner, E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Knighton, B.; Herndon, S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Masera, O.; Berrueta, V.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon emissions are a major contributor to climate change, with cookstoves being one of the top sources. The SLCF cookstove study was conducted in March 2013 at the Interdisciplinary Group for Appropriate Rural Technology (GIRA) in Pátzcuaro, Mexico. Seven different types of wood-burning cookstoves were measured giving insight to the effects of different designs and operating conditions on particle and gas phase emissions. High-time resolution measurements of emissions were made. For most of the cookstoves, measurements were made throughout a standard water boiling test. The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory conducted these emission measurements utilizing extractive sampling from the stove exhaust. Sample flow to the gas phase instruments was extracted directly from the stovepipe and then quickly diluted with nitrogen. Sample flows for the particulate instruments were taken at points under a meter from the exit of the stovepipe, after dilution with ambient air. The key particulate instrument was the Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), which provided measurements of black carbon, divided into several sub-components, along with other classes of particulate matter classified by chemical composition. Gas phase measurements conducted included CO, CO2, NO, NOx, SO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, and a variety of VOCs (including benzene, methanol, acetaldehyde, toluene, acetone, acetonitrile, and terpene) measured with a PTR-MS instrument. All of these measurements will be examined to construct emission ratios evaluating how these vary with different cookstove types and different stove operating conditions. Comparisons will be made to previous measurements of cookstove emissions in the literature, with a focus on the variety of particulate measurements reported.

  14. Universal predictability of mobility patterns in cities

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Chen; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Despite the long history of modelling human mobility, we continue to lack a highly accurate approach with low data requirements for predicting mobility patterns in cities. Here, we present a population-weighted opportunities model without any adjustable parameters to capture the underlying driving force accounting for human mobility patterns at the city scale. We use various mobility data collected from a number of cities with different characteristics to demonstrate the predictive power of our model. We find that insofar as the spatial distribution of population is available, our model offers universal prediction of mobility patterns in good agreement with real observations, including distance distribution, destination travel constraints and flux. By contrast, the models that succeed in modelling mobility patterns in countries are not applicable in cities, which suggests that there is a diversity of human mobility at different spatial scales. Our model has potential applications in many fields relevant to mobility behaviour in cities, without relying on previous mobility measurements. PMID:25232053

  15. Soft Soil Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-11

    torque and tractive effort. Strain gage applications are custom for each installation and require a physical calibration to determine the output...full-scale range Engine speed ± 0.5% of full-scale range Drawbar force ± 0.5% of full-scale range Wheel or sprocket output torque ± 1% of...The data bus can provide key information for mobility tests, including gear ranges selected and attained, torque converter status, throttle position

  16. Forces Mobilization Model (FORCEMOB): Unclassified Training Tutorial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    FORCEMOB Conceptual Overview 17 This page is intentionally blank. 18 Measuring Economic...modeling program used in the Risk Assessment and Mitigation Framework for Strategic Materials (RAMF-SM) in support of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA...essential demands. Military demand encompasses both base military needs (Future Years Defense Program spending) and conflict military needs (the “extra

  17. Fuel Reduction for the Mobility Air Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Kim, Scott Hardiman, Somi Seong, Fred Timson, John Tonkinson, Duncan Long, Nidhi Kalra, Paul Dreyer, Artur Usanov, Kay Sullivan Faith, Benjamin F...several industry experts who gave us important insights into commercial aviation best practices. Tom Kane, Ronald Lane, Richard Rolland, and John ...Rice, Mark Stevens, John Dorris, and John Skorupa at Boeing offered perspective on energy efficiency improvements to current aircraft as well as a

  18. Fixing the Mobility Air Forces New Way

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    in a significant increase in the number of TFI aircrews required. In response to this impact , AMC has included volunteerism incentives to reduce... volunteerism and career decisions. Another potential adverse impact that may manifest itself is the limitations of the different types of Title 10 orders...close association between AC units and their TFI ARC partners, all AMC allocations have the potential to impact the ARC…Close coordination and continued

  19. Transnational Mobility and International Academic Employment: Gatekeeping in an Academic Competition Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    This article draws upon concepts developed in recent empirical and theoretical work on high skilled and academic mobility and migration including accidental mobility, forced mobility and negotiated mobility. These concepts inform a situated, qualitative study of mobility among international postdoctoral researchers in life sciences and engineering…

  20. Transnational Mobility and International Academic Employment: Gatekeeping in an Academic Competition Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    This article draws upon concepts developed in recent empirical and theoretical work on high skilled and academic mobility and migration including accidental mobility, forced mobility and negotiated mobility. These concepts inform a situated, qualitative study of mobility among international postdoctoral researchers in life sciences and engineering…

  1. Mobilization Handbook for Installation Manpower Planners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Manpower Mobilization Planning ," and as a supplement to policy guidance contained in DoD Directive .40j.31, "Mobilization Management of the DoD Civilian...Work Force." It’s purpose is to help reinforce mobilization readiness by providing a planning reference guide for Continental United States (CONUS...installations of the Department of Defense (DoD). It is designed to assist local manpower and personnel planners in anticipating and planning the

  2. In vivo measurements of humeral movement during posterior glenohumeral mobilizations.

    PubMed

    Talbott And, Nancy R; Witt, Dexter W

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo posterior translational movements occurring in the glenohumeral joint during posterior mobilizations and to determine the intratester reliability of those posterior translational movements. Twenty-eight individuals (17 females, 11 males) participated in this study. One physical therapist utilized a Kaltenborn approach to apply three grades of posterior humeral mobilization. A hand held dynamometer was used to quantify the force used during each grade of mobilization. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize and measure posterior humeral movement. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics for force and posterior movement, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for intrarater reliability of force and posterior movement during each grade of mobilization and paired t-tests to compare movement and force between grades of mobilization. Mean posterior movement (mm) measurements were 3.0, 8.2 and 10.7 for grade I, grade II and grade III mobilizations, respectively. Mean force (Newtons) measurements used during mobilization were 41.7, 121.5 and 209.4 for grade I, grade II and grade III mobilizations, respectively. The ICCs ranged from 0.849 to 0.905 for movement and from 0.717 to 0.889 for force. Force and measurement values were significantly different between grades of mobilization and between dominant and non-dominant arms. Gender was found to be significantly associated with force. Mean movements and mean forces occurring during posterior mobilization increased with increasing grades. Intratester reliability was high for all grades of manual mobilization supporting the use of subjective feedback to determine appropriate force application. Quantification of forces and movements helps to clarify parameters that can serve as a reference for clinical practice.

  3. Mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  4. Mobilization Responses to Warning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    reluctance by those leaders to authorized some form of response (political, economic or military) to counter early warning indicators. Strategic...MOBILIZATION RESPONSES TO WARNING Jil This document has been aIpproved L.A INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE OF THE ARMED FORCES 83 12 29 034 4 N;. -nou-n_. -Aa- f",1...48 BILIZATION RESPONSES TO WARNING MSP #46 AY 82/83 A ERFORMING :)S REPR’~ ’.,MSEP - 8.ZNRZ ~R~AN% MBEQ,’ GREGORY W. MASON, LTC, USA S ~ SI% R NAN1ZA

  5. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  6. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  7. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  8. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  9. Control of Mobility Air Forces: Should the Director of Mobility Forces Command?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    but it is definitely not an operational cure -all. 29 Tunner, 174-175. 30 Tunner, 171. 17 31...42 Roger G. Miller, 103-105. 21 command relationship. While Vittles was a success it was not without its problems. The operational hiccups

  10. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  11. Teleautonomous guidance for mobile robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstein, J.; Koren, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Teleautonomous guidance (TG), a technique for the remote guidance of fast mobile robots, has been developed and implemented. With TG, the mobile robot follows the general direction prescribed by an operator. However, if the robot encounters an obstacle, it autonomously avoids collision with that obstacle while trying to match the prescribed direction as closely as possible. This type of shared control is completely transparent and transfers control between teleoperation and autonomous obstacle avoidance gradually. TG allows the operator to steer vehicles and robots at high speeds and in cluttered environments, even without visual contact. TG is based on the virtual force field (VFF) method, which was developed earlier for autonomous obstacle avoidance. The VFF method is especially suited to the accommodation of inaccurate sensor data (such as that produced by ultrasonic sensors) and sensor fusion, and allows the mobile robot to travel quickly without stopping for obstacles.

  12. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  13. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  14. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  15. Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-03

    In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

  16. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  17. Mobile Support For Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2014, p. 51. .................................................................................9 Figure 3. GCSS-MC Mobile App Architecture...21 Figure 4. GCSS-MC Mobile App Modules...............................................................22...Figure 5. GCSS-MC Mobile App Login Screen .......................................................23 Figure 6. GCSS-MC App Main Screen

  18. Quicklook Air Mobility Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    mobility system in AMPCALC. We discussed formulation logic of the mobility cycle. We presented ramp use optimization and tanker optimization...VB)............................................ 10 Visual Basic for Applications ( VBA ...22 The Mobility System In AMPCALC ....................................................................... 22 Tanker Optimization

  19. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  20. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  1. Forced Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  2. AEA/USA Task Force on Voluntary Learning. Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Thomas W., Ed.

    The use of law, force, social pressure, and other forms of compulsion to "encourage" lifelong learning and to expand the market for adult education has been a growing concern for many adult educators. Because of the proliferation of requirements for mandatory continuing education (MCE), a task force was formed to study MCE, and to mobilize opinion…

  3. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  4. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  5. Cell injury by electric forces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raphael C

    2005-12-01

    The molecular architecture of biological systems is heavily influenced by the highly polar interactions of water. Thus, macromolecules such as proteins that are highly water soluble must be electrically polar. Energy generation methods needed to support cell metabolic processes depend on compartmentalizing mobile ions and thus require electrical ion transport barriers such as membranes. One consequence of these biological design constraints is vulnerability to injury by electrical forces. Supraphysiological electric forces cause damage to cells and tissues by disrupting cell membranes and altering the conformation of biomolecules. In addition, prolonged passage of electrical current leads to damage by thermal mechanisms. This review will focus on the non-thermal effects.

  6. Colloid mobilization by fluid displacement fronts in channels.

    PubMed

    Lazouskaya, Volha; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Wang, Gang; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Jin, Yan

    2013-09-15

    Understanding colloid mobilization during transient flow in soil is important for addressing colloid and contaminant transport issues. While theoretical descriptions of colloid detachment exist for saturated systems, corresponding mechanisms of colloid mobilization during drainage and imbibition have not been considered in detail. In this work, theoretical force and torque analyses were performed to examine the interactive effects of adhesion, drag, friction, and surface tension forces on colloid mobilization and to outline conditions corresponding to the mobilization mechanisms such as lifting, sliding, and rolling. Colloid and substrate contact angles were used as variables to determine theoretical criteria for colloid mobilization mechanisms during drainage and imbibition. Experimental mobilization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microspheres with drainage and imbibition fronts was investigated in hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels using a confocal microscope. Colloid mobilization differed between drainage and imbibition due to different dynamic contact angles and interfacial geometries on the contact line. Experimental results did not fully follow the theoretical criteria in all cases, which was explained with additional factors not included in the theory such as presence of aggregates and trailing films. Theoretical force and torque analyses resulted in similar mobilization predictions and suggested that all mobilization mechanisms contributed to the observed colloid mobilization.

  7. Intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  8. 143. MOBILE HIGH PRESSURE NITROGEN CART STORED IN CONTROL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    143. MOBILE HIGH PRESSURE NITROGEN CART STORED IN CONTROL ROOM (214), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Force protection

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-31

    This paper is concerned with rapid, continuous inspection of vehicles entering military facilities or compounds, searching for high explosives, or the rapid survey of facilities if it is found that security has been breached. The author reviews methods which are in use now, including: x-rays; x-ray tomography; thermal or fast neutrons; quadrupole resonance; trace detection; electron capture; chemiluminesence; ion mobility spectroscopy; mass spectroscopy; antibodies; and layered, synergistic approaches. He then discusses the limitations of these methods and proposes new approaches which are a combination of old techniques such as weighing vehicles with technological advances in some present methods.

  10. Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robots

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly, Howard R.; Shipers, Larry R.

    1999-07-14

    Long-term nuclear material storage will require in-vault data verification, sensor testing, error and alarm response, inventory, and maintenance operations. System concept development efforts for a comprehensive nuclear material management system have identified the use of a small flexible mobile automation platform to perform these surveillance and maintenance operations. In order to have near-term wide-range application in the Complex, a mobile surveillance system must be small, flexible, and adaptable enough to allow retrofit into existing special nuclear material facilities. The objective of the Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robot project is to satisfy these needs by development of a human scale mobile robot to monitor the state of health, physical security and safety of items in storage and process; recognize and respond to alarms, threats, and off-normal operating conditions; and perform material handling and maintenance operations. The system will integrate a tool kit of onboard sensors and monitors, maintenance equipment and capability, and SNL developed non-lethal threat response technology with the intelligence to identify threats and develop and implement first response strategies for abnormal signals and alarm conditions. System versatility will be enhanced by incorporating a robot arm, vision and force sensing, robust obstacle avoidance, and appropriate monitoring and sensing equipment.

  11. Defense Science Board 1996 Summer Study Task Force On Tactics and Technology for 21st Century Military Superiority. Volume 2, Part 1. Supporting Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    for Mobile 1-53 Forces" Reza Eftekari, MITRE Corporation 1.5. "Theater Tactical Communications" 1-69 Charles W. Niessen, MIT Lincoln Laboratory II...distributed force is the initial JTF 3 GEITING EFFECTIVE FORCES TO THEATER ENHANCE STRATEGIC MOBILITY OF ROBUST FORCES EFFECTIVENESS ENHANCE EFFECTIVENESS...tactical means of mobility . The following scenario provides a framework for illustrating how a Leading Edge Strike Force (LESTFOR) could be

  12. An Analysis of the Potential Use of Red Horse Capabilities and Training Activities to Perform or Accelerate Air Force Environmental Cleanups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    a highly skilled, mobile , self-sufficient Air Force combat engineering force capable of rapid response and independent operations to support...HORSE was formed to provide a mobile civil engineering unit, self-sufficient, and organic to the Air Force. That is, RED HORSE squadrons must be manned... mobile , self-sufficient Air Force combat engineering force capable of rapid response and independent operations to support contingency operations

  13. Force decomposition in robot force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  14. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  15. Unilateral arm strength training improves contralateral peak force and rate of force development.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Michael; Macquaide, Niall; Helgerud, Jan; Hoff, Jan; Kemi, Ole Johan

    2008-07-01

    Neural adaptation following maximal strength training improves the ability to rapidly develop force. Unilateral strength training also leads to contralateral strength improvement, due to cross-over effects. However, adaptations in the rate of force development and peak force in the contralateral untrained arm after one-arm training have not been determined. Therefore, we aimed to detect contralateral effects of unilateral maximal strength training on rate of force development and peak force. Ten adult females enrolled in a 2-month strength training program focusing of maximal mobilization of force against near-maximal load in one arm, by attempting to move the given load as fast as possible. The other arm remained untrained. The training program did not induce any observable hypertrophy of any arms, as measured by anthropometry. Nevertheless, rate of force development improved in the trained arm during contractions against both submaximal and maximal loads by 40-60%. The untrained arm also improved rate of force development by the same magnitude. Peak force only improved during a maximal isometric contraction by 37% in the trained arm and 35% in the untrained arm. One repetition maximum improved by 79% in the trained arm and 9% in the untrained arm. Therefore, one-arm maximal strength training focusing on maximal mobilization of force increased rapid force development and one repetition maximal strength in the contralateral untrained arm. This suggests an increased central drive that also crosses over to the contralateral side.

  16. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  17. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  18. Mobile multimedia understanding applications: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, mobile devices are quickly reaching almost every corner of our daily life in a variety of forms: personal media players, smart phones, netbooks, and tablets. Besides the more powerful, smaller, and more versatile hardware, another driving force is the vast number of software applications ("apps") on those mobile devices. A number of mobile apps employ intelligent multimedia understanding (MU) technologies. This paper gives an overview of such apps. The focus is not on the underlying MU techniques, which are already covered by a huge amount of literature. Instead, it attempts to shed some light on the junction of mobile apps and MU. For this purpose, it addresses a number of important aspects: unique requirements and characteristics of MU-related apps, values brought in by MU, typical MU technologies, various system architectures, available development tools, and related standards.

  19. Mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Herndon, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of optimum mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators involves matching the criteria for emergency response with the available technology. This paper presents a general background to teleoperations, a potpourri of the manipulator systems available, and an argument for force reflecting manipulation. The theme presented is that the accomplishment of humanlike endeavors in hostile environments will be most successful when man model capabilities are utilized. The application of recent electronic technology to manipulator development has made new tools available to be applied to emergency response activities. The development activities described are products of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  20. The effect of shoulder position on inferior glenohumeral mobilization.

    PubMed

    Witt, Dexter W; Talbott, Nancy R

    2017-03-09

    Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Inferior mobilizations are used to treat patients with shoulder dysfunctions. Common positions recommended for promoting an inferior glide include: (1) an open-packed position (OPP) in which the shoulder is in 55° of abduction, 30° of horizontal adduction, and no rotation; (2) neutral position (NP) of the shoulder; and (3) position of 90° of shoulder abduction (ABDP). Studies comparing the impact of position on inferior mobilization are lacking. To determine the effect of shoulder position on humeral movement and mobilization force during inferior mobilizations. Twenty-three subjects were tested bilaterally. Subjects were placed in the OPP, and an ultrasound transducer placed over the superior glenohumeral joint. As inferior mobilization forces were applied through a dynamometer, ultrasound images were taken at rest and during 3 grades of inferior mobilization. This process was repeated in the NP and the ABDP. In the NP, movements during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations were 1.8, 3.8, and 4.5 mm, respectively. Movements measured in the OPP (1.0, 2.4, and 3.6 mm, respectively) and in the ABDP (1.0, 2.2, and 2.3 mm, respectively) were less. Forces were higher in the NP during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations (51.8, 138.7, and 202.1 N, respectively) than in the OPP (37.2, 91.2, and 139.9 N, respectively) and the ABPD (42.5, 115.3, and 165.5 N, respectively). Mobilization position altered the movement and force during inferior mobilizations. Shoulder position should be considered when utilizing inferior mobilizations. NA. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the mobility of minerals in magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of magma chambers at all scales is driven by thermal evolution as well as internal fluid dynamic and crystal processes. Crystal mobilization is also observed in porphyritic lava flows and crystal cargos found in some magmatic intrusions. In this study we observe the various forces that may be acting on minerals that are growing within magma chambers and assess whether they may cause mobilization. Particle mobility depends upon the direction and magnitude of the forces that are acting on a crystal, as well as the geometry and structure of the bed. Particles at the fluid-pile interface can be mobilized if they are not geometrically trapped, while the majority of the particles which compose the pile are trapped by a column of crystals above them and can only be mobilized once the crystals overhead are mobilized. Mobilization of crystals occurs when the vertical uplift forces overcome the resistive forces. These uplift forces may come from buoyant fluid flow or from volatiles. Resistive forces come from cohesion of crystals within the pile and growth of grains. Experiments have been performed driving convection thermally within a tank filled with fluid and a particle pile composed of two types of inert, spherical particles of the same size, show the different styles of mobilization when particles are exposed to forces by convecting fluid. The two particles types have different density (one closely matched to the liquid and one of increased density) and are mixed with different density profiles. The different piles show different mobilization styles depending on the mixing regime, mixing ratios (ratio of light to heavy particles), the density contrast between fluid and particle and the temperature difference. The mobilization regimes observed within our experiments are rolling, puffs and fountains, with the degree of mobilization increasing as more low density particles are brought closer to the interface. When light particles are overlain by heavy

  2. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  3. Understanding seasonal mobilities, health and wellbeing to Sanya, China.

    PubMed

    Kou, Lirong; Xu, Honggang; Hannam, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    Both the ageing of the Chinese population and elderly mobility impact on the Chinese social infrastructure, triggering challenges to maintain elderly wellbeing. This paper reflects on the notion that seasonal mobility promotes wellbeing, and explores how two crucial factors, namely, forced migration and health conditions, influence the relations between seasonal retirement mobility and wellbeing. This study analyses amenity-led seasonal retired mobilities to Sanya as a case study, and adopts and develops a conceptual framework for relations between mobility and wellbeing in terms of daily activity, sociality, and context through seasonal mobility. Qualitative methods including participant observation, non-participant observation, in-depth interviews, and mobile ethnography were used to collect data. This revealed the heterogeneity of health conditions, and the constrained mobilities of seasonal retirees. Health and willingness for mobility are shown as significant factors in influencing the relations between mobility and wellbeing, which are in turn complicated and dynamic. Seasonal mobilities bring about difficulties for retirees particularly in terms of their efforts to reconstruct their previous life and self-continuities. However, it is argued that these retirees can merely maintain temporary and superficial wellbeing due to constant health concerns and uncertainties over potential temporary or permanent return to their places of origin. Those with serious health problems have more limitations, sacrificing other aspects of wellbeing for physical health. Practical implications from state, destination, and individual levels to better facilitate seasonal mobility and promote wellbeing are provided.

  4. Estimating the Operating and Support Cost Difference between Royal Australian Air Force C-130E and C-130H Hercules Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Telephone Interview. Forces Mobility Directorate. Air Force Cost Center, Arlington VA, 25 August 1992. 19. Horngren , Charles T. and George...October 1991. 17. Greenway, Major Charles R. Telephone Interview. Forces Mobility Directorate. Air Force Cost Center, Arlington VA, 23 July 1992. 18

  5. Biomechanical measures of knee joint mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Silvernail, Jason L; Gill, Norman W; Teyhen, Deydre S; Allison, Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical properties of specific manual therapy techniques in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Methods Twenty subjects (7 female/13 male, age 54±8 years, ht 1·7±0·1 m, wt 94·2±21·8 kg) participated in this study. One physical therapist delivered joint mobilizations (tibiofemoral extension and flexion; patellofemoral medial–lateral and inferior glide) at two grades (Maitland’s grade III and grade IV). A capacitance-based pressure mat was used to capture biomechanical characteristics of force and frequency during 2 trials of 15 second mobilizations. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1) for intrarater reliability and 2×4 repeated measures analyses of variance and post-hoc comparison tests. Results Force (Newtons) measurements (mean, max.) for grade III were: extension 45, 74; flexion 39, 61; medial–lateral glide 20, 34; inferior glide 16, 27. Force (Newtons) measurements (mean, max.) for grade IV were: extension 57, 76; flexion 47, 68; medial–lateral glide 23, 36; inferior glide 18, 35. Frequency (Hz) measurements were between 0·9 and 1·2 for grade III, and between 2·1 and 2·4 for grade IV. ICCs were above 0·90 for almost all measures. Discussion and conclusion Maximum force measures were between the ranges reported for cervical and lumbar mobilization at similar grades. Mean force measures were greater at grade IV than III. Oscillation frequency and peak-to-peak amplitude measures were consistent with the grade performed (i.e. greater frequency at grade IV, greater peak-to-peak amplitude at grade III). Intrarater reliability for force, peak-to-peak amplitude and oscillation frequency for knee joint mobilizations was excellent. PMID:22851879

  6. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function.

  7. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  8. What Effect Did General Order Number 1 and the Force Protection Measures Have on Task Force Eagle Operations in Bosnia During Implementation Force?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Intelligence CIMIC Civil Military Information Center COL Colonel COMEAGLE Commander Task Force Eagle COMIFOR Commander Implementation Force CSS Combat Service...Protection Team FWF Former Warring Factions HMMWV High Mobility, Multipurpose, Wheeled Vehicle HUMINT Human Intelligence G2 Divisional Intelligence ...security, personal protective services, and supported by intelligence , counterintelligence and other security programs.7 This is more useful as it clearly

  9. ECG by mobile technologies.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Malik, Marek

    Mobile electrocardiographs consist of three components: a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone), an electrocardiographic device or accessory, and a mobile application. Mobile platforms are small computers with sufficient computational power, good quality display, suitable data storage, and several possibilities of data transmission. Electrocardiographic electrodes and sensors for mobile use utilize unconventional materials, e.g. rubber, e-textile, and inkjet-printed nanoparticle electrodes. Mobile devices can be handheld, worn as vests or T-shirts, or attached to patient's skin as biopatches. Mobile electrocardiographic devices and accessories may additionally record other signals including respiratory rate, activity level, and geolocation. Large-scale clinical studies that utilize electrocardiography are easier to conduct using mobile technologies and the collected data are suitable for "big data" processing. This is expected to reveal phenomena so far inaccessible by standard electrocardiographic techniques.

  10. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  12. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  13. Coriolis Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  14. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  15. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  16. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  17. Dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Tchoń, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    By analogy to the definition of the dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for robotic manipulators, we have designed a dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators built of a non-holonomic mobile platform and a holonomic on-board manipulator. The endogenous configuration space approach has been exploited as a source of conceptual guidelines. The new inverse guarantees a decoupling of the motion in the operational space from the forces exerted in the endogenous configuration space and annihilated by the dual Jacobian inverse. A performance study of the new Jacobian inverse as a tool for motion planning is presented.

  18. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  19. Residential mobility microsimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifei; Wu, Lun

    2010-09-01

    Residential mobility refers to the spatial movement of individuals and households between dwellings within an urban area. This considerable amount of intra-urban movement affects the urban structure and has significant repercussions for urban transportation. In order to understand and project related impacts, a considerable number of residential mobility models has been developed and used in the regional planning process. Within this context, the history and state-of-art residential mobility models are discussed and indicated. Meanwhile, a residential mobility Microsimulation model, called URM-Microsim (Urban Residential Mobility Microsimulation), is introduced and discussed.

  20. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  1. Comparative studies of perceived vibration strength for commercial mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Siak Piang

    2014-05-01

    A mobile phone, also known as cell phone or hand phone, is among the most popular electrical devices used by people all over the world. The present study examines the vibration perception of mobile phones by co-relating the relevant design parameters such as excitation frequency, and size and mass of mobile phones to the vibration perception survey by volunteers. Five popular commercially available mobile phone models were tested. The main findings for the perception surveys were that higher vibration frequency and amplitude of the peak acceleration would result in stronger vibration perception of the mobile phones. A larger contact surface area with the palms and figures, higher peak acceleration and the associated larger peak inertia force may be the main factors for the relatively higher vibration perception. The future design for the vibration alert of the mobile phones is likely to follow this trend.

  2. Bending stiffness of the lumbar spine subjected to posteroanterior manipulative force.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Y W; Tsung, Bonnie Y S; Tong, Pin; Evans, John

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the bending stiffness of the spine when it is subjected to posteroanterior mobilization force. The lumbar spine was modeled as an initially curved beam column supported over the rib cage and the pelvis. Posteroanterior mobilization was assumed to be three-point bending of the beam. The mobilization force was measured by the mounting of a force plate onto the manipulation couch, where electromagnetic sensors measured the change in spinal curvature. The bending stiffness of the spine was derived from the force and curvature data. The technique developed in this study provided highly repeatable data. The theoretical analysis suggests that the pelvic rotation produced by mobilization may be used clinically to indicate the magnitude of the mobilization force. Future research may employ the present method to determine how back pain may affect the bending stiffness of the spine. The bending stiffness values reported in this study will be valuable to future modeling work.

  3. 12 CFR 22.7 - Forced placement of flood insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Forced placement of flood insurance. 22.7... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 22.7 Forced placement of flood insurance. If a bank, or a servicer acting... or mobile home and any personal property securing the designated loan is not covered by flood...

  4. 12 CFR 22.7 - Forced placement of flood insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Forced placement of flood insurance. 22.7... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 22.7 Forced placement of flood insurance. If a bank, or a servicer acting... or mobile home and any personal property securing the designated loan is not covered by flood...

  5. 12 CFR 22.7 - Forced placement of flood insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Forced placement of flood insurance. 22.7... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 22.7 Forced placement of flood insurance. If a bank, or a servicer acting... or mobile home and any personal property securing the designated loan is not covered by flood...

  6. 12 CFR 22.7 - Forced placement of flood insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forced placement of flood insurance. 22.7... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 22.7 Forced placement of flood insurance. If a bank, or a servicer acting... or mobile home and any personal property securing the designated loan is not covered by flood...

  7. 12 CFR 22.7 - Forced placement of flood insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forced placement of flood insurance. 22.7... HAVING SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARDS § 22.7 Forced placement of flood insurance. If a bank, or a servicer acting... or mobile home and any personal property securing the designated loan is not covered by flood...

  8. The Origins of Forced Labor in the Witwatersrand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeti, Moitsadi

    1986-01-01

    Gold mining brought a forced labor system to Witwatersrand, South Africa, in the 1880s as African laborers were rounded up from the hinterland and delivered to the mines. The system produced low wages, high mortality, and the loss of chances for upward mobility. Forced labor persists today in South African mines. (VM)

  9. The Origins of Forced Labor in the Witwatersrand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeti, Moitsadi

    1986-01-01

    Gold mining brought a forced labor system to Witwatersrand, South Africa, in the 1880s as African laborers were rounded up from the hinterland and delivered to the mines. The system produced low wages, high mortality, and the loss of chances for upward mobility. Forced labor persists today in South African mines. (VM)

  10. Adaptive mobility aids for the elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Glenn; Gunderson, James; Cvetanovich, Michael; Kell, Steven; Graves, S.; Felder, Robin A.

    2001-10-01

    Loss of mobility in the elderly causes a significant economic burden to caregivers and is one of the most significant determinants of depression and loss of muscle strength and productivity in this age group. Mobility aids can assist with locomotion by providing physical support, however they fail to provide direction guidance and avoidance of obstacles and hazards. This talk will focus on design of intelligent adaptive wheeled walkers. By allowing the user varying degrees of control, from complete to collaborative, these walkers afford the user with the feeling of control, while helping to increase the ease and safety of their daily travels. The control systems of these walkers differ from those of other mobility aids and mobile robots because they must both assist in mobility and provide balance and support, but also give directional aid if necessary. These functions must be performed in a tight loop adaptation with a human whose input may be difficult to predict. Through the use of a wheeled walker equipped with force and sonar sensors, we were able to develop an intelligent self-guided mobility aid that can provide improved independence, autonomy, and quality of life for the elderly.

  11. Modelling dengue epidemic spreading with human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, D. H.; Dorso, C. O.; Otero, M.

    2016-04-01

    We explored the effect of human mobility on the spatio-temporal dynamics of Dengue with a stochastic model that takes into account the epidemiological dynamics of the infected mosquitoes and humans, with different mobility patterns of the human population. We observed that human mobility strongly affects the spread of infection by increasing the final size and by changing the morphology of the epidemic outbreaks. When the spreading of the disease is driven only by mosquito dispersal (flight), a main central focus expands diffusively. On the contrary, when human mobility is taken into account, multiple foci appear throughout the evolution of the outbreaks. These secondary foci generated throughout the outbreaks could be of little importance according to their mass or size compared with the largest main focus. However, the coalescence of these foci with the main one generates an effect, through which the latter develops a size greater than the one obtained in the case driven only by mosquito dispersal. This increase in growth rate due to human mobility and the coalescence of the foci are particularly relevant in temperate cities such as the city of Buenos Aires, since they give more possibilities to the outbreak to grow before the arrival of the low-temperature season. The findings of this work indicate that human mobility could be the main driving force in the dynamics of vector epidemics.

  12. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper.

  13. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  14. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  15. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  16. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  17. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  18. New arctic mobile rig design completed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    A major breakthrough in concrete design makes the arctic mobile drilling structure, Zee Star 120, up to 20% lighter in comparison to conventional concrete construction with diaphragm walls. The structure's design is based on the space frame principle that permits an optimum distribution of the forces and, therefore, a minimization of concrete quantities as well as reinforcement and prestressing. In the fabrication process, this principle is combined with an industrial precasting system and methods of assembly.

  19. Mobile Dental Units at the Deckplate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    The concept of bringing dental care to the active duty member can be traced back as far as World War I. More than 80 years later, this still holds...true. Today, Mobile Dental Units (MDU) seek out the patient, saving hundreds and thousands of man-hours which would otherwise be consumed by patients...the force they support. The site chosen for this analysis was Naval Dental Center, Southwest, in San Diego, Ca. This command was chosen because it is

  20. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone.

  1. The lubrication force between two viscous drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Schonberg, Jeffrey A.; Rallison, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The present determination of the hydrodynamic force resisting the relative motion of two unequal drops moving in Stokes flow conditions along their line of centers assumes that the drops are in near-contact, and possess sufficiently high interfacial tension to remain spherical. Depending on the ratio of drop viscosity to that of the continuous phase, as well as on the ratio of the distance between drops to their reduced radius, three possible flow situations arise: these correspond to nearly-rigid drops, drops with partially mobile interfaces, and drops with fully mobile interfaces.

  2. Posteroanterior spinal mobilization: state of the art review and discussion.

    PubMed

    Björnsdóttir, S V; Kumar, S

    1997-02-01

    Posteroanterior spinal mobilization is a commonly used technique among physical therapists to diagnose and treat lower back pain patients. Human subjects and instruments have been used to test for the reliability of physical therapists' ability to detect intervertebral motion, but studies confirm unreliable testing. Despite documented efficacy of manual treatment the mechanical response to posteroanterior spinal mobilization is not well understood, and this has been emphasized in recent studies. Various modes of instrumental methodology have been used for objective measurements of force application and joint displacement. Some instruments serve to mobilize the spine others serve as measurement tools for mobilization. The literature does not provide a gold standard for the ideal magnitude of force applied or joint displacement. The terminology used in the field of manual therapy is often confusing, and terms need to be defined. A review and discussion is presented here to highlight the issues and gaps.

  3. Teachers without Borders: Consequences of Teacher Labor Force Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastian, Kevin C.; Henry, Gary T.

    2015-01-01

    Many states have responded to teacher shortages by granting certification to individuals traditionally prepared out-of-state; now, out-of-state prepared teachers comprise a sizable percentage of the teacher workforce in many states. We know little about these teachers, and therefore, in the present study, we estimate the effectiveness of…

  4. Overland Mobility of the Forces in the Canadian Environment,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-14

    appear-,7 to offer possibilities. ...1/23 -23- STON 5 TEE POTENTIAL6 Of CANAIAN !1N1JSTKY 1. The Indusry The great majority of the motor vehicles sed In...auto analysis systems, sel analysis systems, life cycle Costing, maintenance at low temperatures. u. Deslt for Value - cost engineering, value

  5. Optimizing the Weapons Officer in the Mobility Air Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    operational squadron. The other 5 MAF WOs were outplaced into Tier 2 cadre, OSK, or executive officer positions. In the final timeline question, Question 10...Tier 2 duties. Some attend IDE and are outplaced to a staff level position post-graduation. While some staff jobs are predicated on the school the

  6. Fuel Reduction for the Mobility Air Forces: Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    us important insights into commercial aviation best practices. Tom Kane, Ronald Lane, Richard Rolland, and John Dietrich at Atlas provided...Katherine Blakeley, and Ronald O’Rourke, “Department of Defense Energy Initiatives: Background and Issues for Congress,” Washington, D.C...557 ACSS/GFEAC, April 1, 2008a. 19 Graham Warwick, “How Many Bin Bags to Empty an A340?” Aviation Week, blog post, March 20, 2013. 20 Amy

  7. Hybrid Power: Mobility Air Forces and Foreign Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-21

    over, the leaflet shows the Afghan tearing open the packet. The word " Halal " is at the upper right of the reverse side to show that the food was...aid of that country through food distribution, water purification technology and medical aid. Since time is of the essence, a large USAF strategic... food , shelter, and sanitation. The American tsunami relief effort was called Operation UNIFIED ASSISTANCE. By the time the operation was declared

  8. Mobile Tactical HF/VHF/EW System for Ground Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Electronic Counter-Countermeasures (ECCM) are actions taken to ensure friendly use of the electromagnetic spectrum against ECM. ECCN includes...detectable) using data such as that stored on magnetic tape, video "photographs’, and electronic storage on data file (such as disks). e. Evaluation The

  9. An Initial Look at Adjacent Band Interference Between Aeronautical Mobile Telemetry and Long-Term Evolution Wireless Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-04

    LONG-TERM EVOLUTION WIRELESS SERVICE KIP TEMPLE AIR FORCE TEST CENTER EDWARDS AFB, CA 4 July 2016 4 1 2 T W...ADJACENT BAND INTERFERENCE BETWEEN AERONAUTICAL MOBILE TELEMETRY AND LONG-TERM EVOLUTION WIRELESS SERVICE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...AT ADJACENT BAND INTERFERENCE BETWEEN AERONAUTICAL MOBILE TELEMETRY AND LONG-TERM EVOLUTION WIRELESS SERVICE Kip Temple Air Force

  10. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  11. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  12. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  13. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  14. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-21

    Erin Whittle, 14, (seated) and Brianna Johnson, 14, look on as Louis Stork, 13, attempts a simulated landing of a space shuttle at StenniSphere. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  15. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  16. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  17. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  18. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  19. Mobility Test Article (MTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A concept of a possible Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) built for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This Mobility Test Article (MTA) is one of many that provided data contributing to the design of the LRV, developed under the direction of MSFC. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions.

  20. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  1. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Erin Whittle, 14, (seated) and Brianna Johnson, 14, look on as Louis Stork, 13, attempts a simulated landing of a space shuttle at StenniSphere. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  2. Robotics vehicle mobility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorge, Kurt H.; Pond, James E.

    2000-07-01

    A nine-month study was conducted under the direction of Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in Warren, MI. to determine the best platform design for inherent all-terrain mobility of an unmanned robotic vehicle in the 15000-2500 lb. range. Reference platforms were the DEMO III 4x4 and the Utah State University 6x6 with omni-directional wheels. The study systematically developed desired top- down design-driving capabilities, operational needs, and mobility concepts supported by extensive analysis using the NATO Reference Mobility Model and literature searches. Maximizing mobility over all terrain and resisting immobilization were emphasized in order to minimize sensor computational burdens while maximizing the probability of timely mission accomplishment. Several wheeled, tracked and hybrid platform concepts were evaluated. Significant improvements in cross- country mobility, obstacle negotiation and self-extraction capability were achieved with hybrid solutions. Final concept development focused on an 8x8 swiveling wheeled platform with band track overlays. Conclusions of the study were: a technology demonstrator platform should be built for mobility validation and NRMM II refinemment; a robotic- vehicle-specific NRMM II mobility scenario should be developed; and sensor solutions for unmanned mobility platforms should be revisited.

  3. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  4. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  5. Extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.; Rouen, M. N.; Lutz, C. C.; Mcbarron, J. W., II

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consisted of a highly mobile, anthropomorphic pressure vessel and a portable life support system. The EMU used for the first lunar landing is described along with the changes made in the EMU design during the program to incorporate the results of experience and to provide new capabilities. The performance of the EMU is discussed.

  6. Biphasic cell responses on laterally mobile films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2013-03-01

    The engineering of polymer surfaces or matrices that are capable of controlling cell adhesion has been widely explored. In nearly all of these works, the polymer chains (and ligands) are chemically attached to the underlying substrate, and therefore these systems are inherently static. By contrast, cellular environments such as the extracellular matrix (ECM) are dynamic and remodeled by biochemical reactions and biophysical forces. Borrowing this concept from Nature, we created polymer films by an interfacial self-assembly process, whereby individual chains can exhibit lateral mobility (in-plane diffusive motion). NIH 3T3 fibroblasts seeded on such RGD-presenting polymer films show biphasic responses in spreading and adhesion strength to lateral mobility, with a minimal response for intermediate mobility values. Futhermore, preliminary immuno-staining experiments reveal that the total area of focal adhesions demonstrates a similar biphasic trend to the cellular-scale behaviors. In contrast, actin filaments or stress fibers appear to be unaffected by the substrate lateral mobility. These results show that lateral mobility is an important, although not fully explored aspect of mechano-sensing by cells, and can potentially give new perspectives on cell-ECM interactions. National Science Foundation

  7. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  8. Mobile Energy Laboratory Use Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This document provides a framework for the use of four Mobile Energy Laboratories (MELs) by federal agencies. These laboratories are made available by the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to measure and analyze the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application. The MELs are customized passenger buses converted to provide transportation and storage of sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment. The MELs also provide mobile work space for specially trained engineers and technicians. One MEL is currently assigned to each of the following agencies: Department of the Army, Department of the Air Force, Department of the Navy, and Department of Energy. Experience over the past five years has indicated the need for centralized MEL administration, application scheduling, test procedure development, user training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests for MEL use and the economies available by having trained full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. Other evidence suggests that a regional, rather than Departmental, administration can reduce the costs of MEL relocation.

  9. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  10. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  11. Seamless Mobility Mechanisms for Micro Mobile MPLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanguanwongthong, Tubtim; Saengudomlert, Poompat; Tubtiang, Arnon

    Efficient mobility management is one of the most important challenges in mobile networks. Since roaming between wireless cells can cause long handoff latency and high packet loss, it can result in poor quality of services for delay-sensitive applications and for applications requiring reliable transmission. In this paper, we propose a new seamless micro-mobility management framework for Micro Mobile MPLS (called MiM-MPLS) to overcome the packet loss problem while maintaining low handoff latency. In addition, we propose a combination of MiM-MPLS and the existing MFC-Micro Mobile MPLS [3],[4] (called MiM-MFC-MPLS) to further enhance the handoff performance. MiM-MPLS and MiM-MFC-MPLS provide efficient handoff mechanisms through the use of pre-established Label Switched Paths (LSPs), the L2 trigger, and local registration. The handoff mechanisms for (L2 and L3) intra handoffs and for an inter handoff in these frameworks are described in detail. The performance is analyzed in terms of the signaling cost of registration updates, handoff latency, packet loss, buffer size requirement, and delay jitter. Compared to existing handoff frameworks, the results show that the proposed MiM-MPLS and MiM-MFC-MPLS can provide no packet loss while maintaining low signaling cost of registration updates, handoff latency, and delay jitter at the cost of some buffer space. In particular, MiM-MFC-MPLS has the best handoff performance (i.e., the lowest signaling cost of registration updates, handoff latency, and delay jitter) among all the frameworks that we considered at the cost of some buffer space.

  12. LinkMind: Link Optimization in Swarming Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    2011-01-01

    A swarming mobile sensor network is comprised of a swarm of wirelessly connected mobile robots equipped with various sensors. Such a network can be applied in an uncertain environment for services such as cooperative navigation and exploration, object identification and information gathering. One of the most advantageous properties of the swarming wireless sensor network is that mobile nodes can work cooperatively to organize an ad-hoc network and optimize the network link capacity to maximize the transmission of gathered data from a source to a target. This paper describes a new method of link optimization of swarming mobile sensor networks. The new method is based on combination of the artificial potential force guaranteeing connectivities of the mobile sensor nodes and the max-flow min-cut theorem of graph theory ensuring optimization of the network link capacity. The developed algorithm is demonstrated and evaluated in simulation. PMID:22164070

  13. LinkMind: link optimization in swarming mobile sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    2011-01-01

    A swarming mobile sensor network is comprised of a swarm of wirelessly connected mobile robots equipped with various sensors. Such a network can be applied in an uncertain environment for services such as cooperative navigation and exploration, object identification and information gathering. One of the most advantageous properties of the swarming wireless sensor network is that mobile nodes can work cooperatively to organize an ad-hoc network and optimize the network link capacity to maximize the transmission of gathered data from a source to a target. This paper describes a new method of link optimization of swarming mobile sensor networks. The new method is based on combination of the artificial potential force guaranteeing connectivities of the mobile sensor nodes and the max-flow min-cut theorem of graph theory ensuring optimization of the network link capacity. The developed algorithm is demonstrated and evaluated in simulation.

  14. Operational space support to tactical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Owen E.

    The use of military spacecraft for supporting strategic forces is discussed emphasizing the requirements of ground mobile forces and the availability of space-based resources. Specific attention is given to the incompatibility of the Milsatcom communications network and military needs for combat situations. The need for assured access to tactical communications free of electronic jammers is identified, and the characteristics of tactical user equipment are set forth. The idea of a 'Space Hummer' is proposed which receives and processes multifrequency data in a high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle. The proposed vehicle is described in terms of existing and deficient technologies required for its implementation, and scenarios for its use in covert and other operations are reviewed. Important technological challenges for the use of space support include reduced antenna sizes, data fusion, and wideband connectivity, and some of these areas are currently being investigated.

  15. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  16. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-12-16

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  17. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  18. Mobile Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  19. C-130 Force Structure: Air Force Addressed Statutory Elements in Its Report, but Decided Not to Transfer Certain Aircraft as Proposed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    provides life- cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 required the Air...Air Force indicated instead its intent to redirect the transfer of the 10 C-130J aircraft from Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi to Little Rock ...Air Force Base in Arkansas. Figure 1 shows a C-130J aircraft taking off from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. Air Mobility Command manages the

  20. Transformation of Taiwan’s Reserve Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    Administration is responsible for mobilizing Tai- wan’s medical personnel, facilities, medicines , and related sup- plies. Its mission is to plan for...sovereignty to the PRC.3 Taiwan’s democratic system of government— an alternative to the PRC’s authoritarian model—presents an existen- tial challenge to CCP...force preservation.10 This phase would involve deployment of military aircraft to hardened shelters and alternative operating locations, including

  1. Reserve Forces of the NATO Armies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-05

    question was more difficult. The occupation of Kuwait and uncertainty of the Soviet threat are slowing down the impetus to make changes to the reserve...forces in some countries. As an example, long term decicions on changes to reserve systems in the United States will probably have to wait until units...the Militia, making it the largest element in the Primary Reserve.14 The Militia is under the control of the Mobile Command. It is organized

  2. Rebalancing the Active and Reserve Component Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    inventory, manpower, cost, and policy/guidance (i.e. deploy to dwell, deployment length, volunteerism rate). The demand/requirements driver is...that varied the availability of RC forces by modifying their deploy-to-dwell ratio and increasing the volunteerism rate during non-rotational...construct to ensure compatibility with the deploy-to-dwell rates, volunteerism and mobilization of the Reserve Component. This will enhance the

  3. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    PubMed

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  4. Acceleration of absolute negative mobility.

    PubMed

    Regtmeier, Jan; Grauwin, Sebastian; Eichhorn, Ralf; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario; Ros, Alexandra

    2007-07-01

    Recently, the counter intuitive migration phenomenon of absolute negative mobility (ANM) has been demonstrated to occur for colloidal particles in a suitably arranged post array within a microfluidic device [1]. This effect is based on the interplay of Brownian motion, nonlinear dynamics induced through microstructuring, and nonequilibrium driving, and results in a particle movement opposite to an applied static force. Simultaneously, the migration of a different particle species along the direction of the static force is possible [19], thus providing a new tool for particle sorting in microfluidic device format. The so far demonstrated maximum velocities for micrometer-sized spheres are slow, i. e., in the order of 10 nm per second. Here, we investigate numerically, how maximum ANM velocities can be significantly accelerated by a careful adjustment of the post size and shape. Based on this numerical analysis, a post design is developed and tested in a microfluidic device made of PDMS. The experiment reveals an order of magnitude increase in velocity.

  5. Tactical Mobile Communications (Communications tactiques mobiles)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    spectrum of R&T activities is covered by 7 Panels, dealing with: "* SAS Studies, Analysis and Simulation "* SCI Systems Concepts and Integration "* SET...SS microwave links, etc. The emerging PSC, UMTS concepts and systems will embody integrated mobile communications in the coming decade. At the same...calls, but also manages the users, PSTN (Public Switched Telephone supplementary services and is the host for the Network ) users and ISDN ( Integrated

  6. The Current and Future Force Acquisition Strategy and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    mobility .”19 The force will rely on more complex integrated systems providing near real time information. Applying the technology S-curve to the FCS... Mobility Enhancements, IP Network Appliqué’s, ) Operating System Operating System Abstraction Services Network Infrastructure Services SOS...Board on Army Science and Technology, STAR 21 : Strategic Technologyies for the Army of the Twenty-First Century (National Acadamy Press, 1992), 234

  7. [Mobile slaughter facilities].

    PubMed

    Briese, A

    1996-02-01

    Mobile slaughter is commonly discussed as alternative method to slaughter avoiding transportation stress in slaughter animals. In 1994 mobile slaughter became part of the coalition-contract between the two major parties, SPD and GRUNE, in the Department HESSEN. In the article the actual principles, problems to cope with EU-legislation and hygiene-standards, chances and risks of mobile slaughter are discussed. Assuming that some of the major problems concerning hygiene, workers security and waste-deposit can be solved, mobile slaughter seems to bring an improvement in animal welfare and advantages in related meet quality. The slightly higher costs may be acceptable in welfare-interested, high-quality market sections.

  8. Persuasive Mobile Health Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Wylie, Carlos; Coulton, Paul

    With many industrialized societies bearing the cost of an increasingly sedentary lifestyle on the health of their populations there is a need to find new ways of encouraging physical activity to promote better health and well being. With the increasing power of mobile phones and the recent emergence of personal heart rate monitors, aimed at dedicated amateur runners, there is now a possibility to develop “Persuasive Mobile Health Applications” to promote well being through the use of real-time physiological data and persuade users to adopt a healthier lifestyle. In this paper we present a novel general health monitoring software for mobile phones called Heart Angel. This software is aimed at helping users monitor, record, as well as improve their fitness level through built-in cardio-respiratory tests, a location tracking application for analyzing heart rate exertion over time and location, and a fun mobile-exergame called Health Defender.

  9. AUSSAT mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowland, Wayne L.; Wagg, Michael; Simpson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    An overview of AUSSAT's planned mobile satellite system is given. The development program which is being undertaken to achieve the 1992 service date is described. Both business and technical aspects of the development program are addressed.

  10. Mobile Tools | Smokefree 60+

    Cancer.gov

    These mobile resources can help you quit when you're on the go. SmokefreeTXT SmokefreeTXT is a mobile text messaging service designed for adults across the United States who are trying to quit smoking. The program offers 24/7 encouragement, advice, and tips to help smokers quit smoking and stay quit. If you are interested in signing up, fill out this form.

  11. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-21

    Louis Stork, 13, and Erin Whittle, 14, look on as Brianna Johnson, 14, conducts a 'test' of a space shuttle main engine in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  12. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  13. Stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cottler-Fox, Michele H; Lapidot, Tsvee; Petit, Isabelle; Kollet, Orit; DiPersio, John F; Link, Dan; Devine, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Successful blood and marrow transplant (BMT), both autologous and allogeneic, requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) capable of homing to the marrow cavity and regenerating a full array of hematopoietic cell lineages in a timely fashion. At present, the most commonly used surrogate marker for HPCs is the cell surface marker CD34, identified in the clinical laboratory by flow cytometry. Clinical studies have shown that infusion of at least 2 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg recipient body weight results in reliable engraftment as measured by recovery of adequate neutrophil and platelet counts approximately 14 days after transplant. Recruitment of HPCs from the marrow into the blood is termed mobilization, or, more commonly, stem cell mobilization. In Section I, Dr. Tsvee Lapidot and colleagues review the wide range of factors influencing stem cell mobilization. Our current understanding focuses on chemokines, proteolytic enzymes, adhesion molecules, cytokines and stromal cell-stem cell interactions. On the basis of this understanding, new approaches to mobilization have been designed and are now starting to undergo clinical testing. In Section II, Dr. Michele Cottler-Fox describes factors predicting the ability to mobilize the older patient with myeloma. In addition, clinical approaches to improving collection by individualizing the timing of apheresis and adjusting the volume of blood processed to achieve a desired product are discussed. Key to this process is the daily enumeration of blood CD34(+) cells. Newer methods of enumerating and mobilizing autologous blood HPCs are discussed. In Section III, Dr. John DiPersio and colleagues provide data on clinical results of mobilizing allogeneic donors with G-CSF, GM-CSF and the combination of both as relates to the number and type of cells collected by apheresis. Newer methods of stem cell mobilization as well as the relationship of graft composition on immune reconstitution

  14. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louis Stork, 13, and Erin Whittle, 14, look on as Brianna Johnson, 14, conducts a 'test' of a space shuttle main engine in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  15. Mobile Uninterruptible Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed mobile unit provides 20 kVA of uninterruptible power. Used with mobile secondary power-distribution centers to provide power to test equipment with minimal cabling, hazards, and obstacles. Wheeled close to test equipment and system being tested so only short cable connections needed. Quickly moved and set up in new location. Uninterruptible power supply intended for tests which data lost or equipment damaged during even transient power failure.

  16. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Slavens, Brooke A.; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J.; Aurit, Christine M.; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C.; Harris, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI. PMID:26442251

  17. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility.

    PubMed

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

  18. Teeth mobility measurement: a laser vibrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Castellini, P; Scalise, L; Tomasini, E P

    1998-10-01

    This work presents a new technique based on the assessment of the mobility degree through the application of dynamic loads and the measurement of the tooth displacement with a laser Doppler vibrometer. Measurements of the mobility degree have been made, up to now, by the application of static loads and the measurement of the consequent displacement. The results obtained with the measurement technique proposed by Muhlemann (1967) have been validated by O'Leary et al. (1964) and by Persson and Sweson (1980). This approach, however, has not been clinically disseminated both because of the high cost of the equipment and, above all, because of the difficulty in performing the measurements. The ratio between the maximum of the tooth displacement and the input force peak has been considered as the mobility degree index. Dynamic loads have been applied and measured on teeth, with a small hammer and a load cell. The consequent displacement of tooth has been measured with a Laser Doppler vibrometer that allows easy to use and versatile noncontact measurements with high accuracy and sensitivity (< 0.1 mm/sec). An introductory in vitro study has been carried out on real teeth extracted and mounted on structures with different-stiffness silicone cast (stiffness of the support is one of the parameters responsible for teeth mobility), in order to evaluate the technique. An in vivo study has also been carried out on different teeth of a healthy patient. It is possible to observe the agreement between the O'Leary results and ones obtained in this work. The practicality of the procedure has also been demonstrated. Good correspondence between data available in literature and results obtained has been demonstrated. The use of the technique here proposed could allow having a deeper knowledge of the behavior of the periodontal teeth system: the tooth mobility under dynamic loads. With this new technique, it will be possible to quickly measure a pathological mobility of the tooth, before

  19. Biomechanical effects of mobile computer location in a vehicle cab.

    PubMed

    Saginus, Kyle A; Marklin, Richard W; Seeley, Patricia; Simoneau, Guy G; Freier, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the best location to place a conventional mobile computer supported by a commercially available mount in a light truck cab. U.S. and Canadian electric utility companies are in the process of integrating mobile computers into their fleet vehicle cabs. There are no publications on the effect of mobile computer location in a vehicle cab on biomechanical loading, performance, and subjective assessment. The authors tested four locations of mobile computers in a light truck cab in a laboratory study to determine how location affected muscle activity of the lower back and shoulders; joint angles of the shoulders, elbows, and wrist; user performance; and subjective assessment. A total of 22 participants were tested in this study. Placing the mobile computer closer to the steering wheel reduced low back and shoulder muscle activity. Joint angles of the shoulders, elbows, and wrists were also closer to neutral angle. Biomechanical modeling revealed substantially less spinal compression and trunk muscle force. In general, there were no practical differences in performance between the locations. Subjective assessment indicated that users preferred the mobile computer to be as close as possible to the steering wheel. Locating the mobile computer close to the steering wheel reduces risk of injuries, such as low back pain and shoulder tendonitis. Results from the study can guide electric utility companies in the installation of mobile computers into vehicle cabs. Results may also be generalized to other industries that use trucklike vehicles, such as construction.

  20. Libraries and the Mobile Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Cody

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, cell phones and mobile devices are ubiquitous. The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones, and over half of them have mobile access to the Internet through a phone or other mobile device. For libraries to stay relevant, they must be able to offer content and services through the mobile web. In this issue of "Library Technology…

  1. Mobility decline in old age.

    PubMed

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to promote mobility in old age.

  2. Control Based Mobile Ad Hoc Networking for Survivable, Dynamic, Mobile Special Operation Force Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Edge Network Technologies ( SAPIENT ) ....................................................... 13 F. NETWORK LAYER...14]. 2. Situational Aware Protocols in Edge Network Technologies ( SAPIENT ) SAPIENT is another program running under DARPA to ease the bandwidth

  3. Leading Air Mobility Operations in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (Maxwell Paper, Number 28)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    authorities. 2 It should give us all pause that we-the Defense Department, the Air Force, and the Mobility Air 1 2 LEADING AIR MOBILITY OPERATIONS Forces...the importance of NGOs’ ob- jectives in the attainment of your own military, strategic, and political objectives. Chapter 1 of AFDD 2 -3 covers the...organizations. 2 1 Tenet 2 : It’s called Information, not Intelligence It took several years of ever more intense involvement in complex operations

  4. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  5. Impaired neural activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Declines in functional mobility are common with advancing age, though the physiological determinants underlying this problem are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that muscle power, the product of force and velocity, is an independent predictor of mobility function in older adul...

  6. Blended Learning via Mobile Social Media & Implementation of "EDMODO" in Reading Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagci, Tahsin

    2015-01-01

    Almost there is nowhere that we don't use permeated smart technology. Increasingly developing mobile and wireless innovations forced us to integrate them to all fields in our lives. The latest trend in education is now blended learning and applications of mobile learning in educational environments. Pervasive and augmented usage of social media…

  7. Linking Career Mobility with Corporate Loyalty: How Does Job Change Relate to Organizational Commitment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondratuk, Tammy B.; Hausdorf, Peter A.; Korabik, Karen; Rosin, Hazel M.

    2004-01-01

    Today's organizations are undergoing constant and substantial change due to many internal and external forces. These changes are impacting on the inter- and intra-organizational career mobility of managers and employees. This research assessed the relationship between career mobility history and a recent internal or external job change on…

  8. From Orphans to Scholars: Narratives of Educational Mobility of Khmer International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Jacob C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to social and economic forces in Cambodia, marginalized youth rarely experience educational mobility without intervention from external organizations. This study presents the results of a narrative study on the educational mobility of seven Khmer international students pursuing higher education in the United States who share the common…

  9. The contingency medical force: chronic challenge, new solution.

    PubMed

    Moloff, A L; Denny, S

    2001-03-01

    To keep pace with the changing requirements of the U.S. Army's combat doctrine, the U.S. Army Medical Department continually modifies its combat health support doctrine and unit organizations. This includes creating more capable, deployable, and mobile units. Unfortunately, as units become more capable, they become less mobile and deployable. As a result, striking a proper balance between capability, mobility, and deployability poses a significant challenge. In 1998, the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital designed a rapidly deployable, air transportable medical module capable of supporting a brigade-sized contingency force (approximately 3,000 personnel) with level or echelon I to III medical care in an austere and ambiguous environment. This module, known as the contingency medical force (CMF), also provides command and control capabilities for this initial medical force and the transition to a more robust health care structure. Conducted over an 8-month period, the design process began with a staff exercise using the deliberate planning process model and culminated in a validation exercise monitored by external observers/controllers at the Combat Maneuver Training Center in Germany. This article describes the planning process, development, and initial deployment of the CMF. The CMF was then deployed on short notice to Albania in support of Task Force Hawk, the Army component of Joint Task Force Noble Anvil.

  10. Mobile applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Endly, Dawnielle C; Henley, Jill; Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    With advancements in mobile technology, cellular phone-based mobile applications (apps) may be used in the practice and delivery of dermatologic care. To identify and categorize the variety of current mobile apps available in dermatology for patients and providers. Dermatology-related search terms were queried in the online app stores of the most commonly used mobile platforms developed by Apple, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, and Windows. Applications were assigned to categories based on description. Popularity, price, and reviews were recorded and target audiences were determined through websites offering online mobile apps. Number, type, and price of mobile apps in dermatology. A total of 229 dermatology-related apps were identified in the following categories: general dermatology reference (61 [26.6%]), self-surveillance/diagnosis (41 [17.9%]), disease guide (39 [17.0%]), educational aid (20 [8.7%]), sunscreen/UV recommendation (19 [8.3%]), calculator (12 [5.2%]), teledermatology (8 [3.5%]), conference (6 [2.6%]), journal (6 [2.6%]), photograph storage/sharing (5 [2.2%]), dermoscopy (2 [0.9%]), pathology (2 [0.9%]), and other (8 [3.5%]). The most reviewed apps included Ultraviolet ~ UV Index (355 reviews), VisualDx (306), SPF (128), iSore (61), and SpotMole (50). There were 209 unique apps, with 17 apps existing on more than 1 operating system. More than half of the apps were offered free of charge (117 [51.1%]). Paid apps (112 [48.9%]) ranged from $0.99 to $139.99 (median, $2.99). Target audiences included patient (117 [51.1%]), health care provider (94 [41.0%]), and both (18 [7.9%]). The widespread variety and popularity of mobile apps demonstrate a great potential to expand the practice and delivery of dermatologic care.

  11. Screened Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaš, M. S.

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate that a very recently obtained formula for the force on a slab in a material planar cavity based on the calculation of the vacuum Lorentz force [C. Raabe and D.-G. Welsch, Phys. Rev. A 71, 013814 (2005)] describes a (medium) modified Casimir force and, in addition to it, a medium-assisted force. The latter force also describes the force on the cavity medium. For dilute media, it implies the atom-mirror interaction of the Casimir-Polder type at large and of the Coulomb type at small atom-mirror distances of which the sign is insensitive to the polarizability type (electric or magnetic) of the atom.

  12. Mobilizing Political Action on Behalf of Future Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldy, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Our failure to mobilize sufficient effort to fight climate change reflects a combination of political and economic forces, on both the national and the global level. To state the problem in its simplest terms, writes Joseph Aldy, future, unborn generations would enjoy the benefits of policies to reduce carbon emissions whereas the current…

  13. The Mobility Assistance Program. A Comprehensive Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Laurabeth H.

    The Mobility Assistance Program (MAP) was established to assist U.S. Department of Education employees affected by the reduction in force (RIF). MAP's mission was to provide career transition and outplacement job search assistance to RIF-affected employees. It provided these services: job search, personnel support, training, and professional…

  14. Society Membership Profile: Employment Mobility and Career Change. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn; Kellman, Dawn

    Information on the influence of employment mobility and career change on the flexibility of the physics labor force is provided, noting the past several decades have brought a dramatic roller coaster of changes to the physics community. Five sections are as follows: membership composition (demographics, professional self-identification, and…

  15. 1. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF MOBILE SERVICE TOWER (MST). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF MOBILE SERVICE TOWER (MST). CABLE TRAY SHED IN FOREGROUND. MICROWAVE ANTENNAS AND AIR-CONDITIONING PORCH ON EAST SIDE OF MST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Society Membership Profile: Employment Mobility and Career Change. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn; Kellman, Dawn

    Information on the influence of employment mobility and career change on the flexibility of the physics labor force is provided, noting the past several decades have brought a dramatic roller coaster of changes to the physics community. Five sections are as follows: membership composition (demographics, professional self-identification, and…

  17. Immigrants, Schooling, and Social Mobility: Does Culture Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Hans, Ed.; Perlmann, Joel, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of essays by Dutch and American scholars on the complex relationship between structural and cultural forces shaping the life chances of ethnic minorities. The papers are: (1) "Introduction: The Role of Culture in Explanations of Social Mobility" (Hans Vermeulen); (2) "Introduction: The Persistence of…

  18. Immigrants, Schooling, and Social Mobility: Does Culture Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Hans, Ed.; Perlmann, Joel, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of essays by Dutch and American scholars on the complex relationship between structural and cultural forces shaping the life chances of ethnic minorities. The papers are: (1) "Introduction: The Role of Culture in Explanations of Social Mobility" (Hans Vermeulen); (2) "Introduction: The Persistence of…

  19. Measurement of mobility and damping of floors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. F.; Liasjø, K. H.

    1982-04-01

    Point mobility and damping (loss factor) were measured for different types of wooden and concrete floors in occupied buildings. A vertically applied excitation force was used. Various types of woodworking machines and workshop equipment were present during the tests in order to give a practical measure of floor damping. For comparison, the characteristics of a free concrete slab with point supports at each corner, a newly constructed unfurnished office building, and an experimental floating floor were also measured. Measurements were made in three frequency bands in the range from 5 to 1600 Hz. For concrete floors maximum point mobility was typically in the region 10 -4-10 -7 m/N s, and for wooden floors, typically 10 -2-10 -4 m/N s. Loss factors were typically in the region 0.01-0.6, depending on floor construction and frequency.

  20. Mobility in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of a charged projectile in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is simulated. A net force F, opposed by a combination of collisional scattering and gas friction, causes projectiles to drift at a mobility-limited velocity up. The mobility μp=up/F of the projectile's motion is obtained. Two regimes depending on F are identified. In the high-force regime, μp∝F0.23, and the scattering cross section σs diminishes as up-6/5. Results for σs are compared with those for a weakly coupled plasma and for two-body collisions in a Yukawa potential. The simulation parameters are based on microgravity plasma experiments.

  1. Mobility in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with gas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of a charged projectile in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is simulated. A net force F, opposed by a combination of collisional scattering and gas friction, causes projectiles to drift at a mobility-limited velocity up. The mobility μp=up/F of the projectile's motion is obtained. Two regimes depending on F are identified. In the high-force regime, μp∝F0.23, and the scattering cross section σs diminishes as up-6/5. Results for σs are compared with those for a weakly coupled plasma and for two-body collisions in a Yukawa potential. The simulation parameters are based on microgravity plasma experiments.

  2. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  3. Three-dimensional atomic force microscopy: interaction force vector by direct observation of tip trajectory.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Krishna P; Grayer, Justin S; King, Gavin M

    2013-11-13

    The prospect of a robust three-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) holds significant promise in nanoscience. Yet, in conventional AFM, the tip-sample interaction force vector is not directly accessible. We scatter a focused laser directly off an AFM tip apex to rapidly and precisely measure the tapping tip trajectory in three-dimensional space. This data also yields three-dimensional cantilever spring constants, effective masses, and hence, the tip-sample interaction force components via Newton's second law. Significant lateral forces representing 49 and 13% of the normal force (Fz = 152 ± 17 pN) were observed in common tapping mode conditions as a silicon tip intermittently contacted a glass substrate in aqueous solution; as a consequence, the direction of the force vector tilted considerably more than expected. When addressing the surface of a lipid bilayer, the behavior of the force components differed significantly from that observed on glass. This is attributed to the lateral mobility of the lipid membrane coupled with its elastic properties. Direct access to interaction components Fx, Fy, and Fz provides a more complete view of tip dynamics that underlie force microscope operation and can form the foundation of a three-dimensional AFM in a plurality of conditions.

  4. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    PubMed Central

    Jebaseeli Samuelraj, Ananthi; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point. PMID:26366431

  5. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    PubMed

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  6. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glenohumeral mobility in primates.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2007-01-01

    This study refutes the traditional idea that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is more mobile than that of other primates, a belief that forms a basis for the two prominent theories of hominoid evolution. According to the brachiation theory, many anatomical features of the hominoid shoulder (including those of the glenohumeral joint) increase shoulder mobility and are interpreted as adaptations for brachiation. The slow climbing theory explains the same set of features as adaptations for slow climbing. The slow-climbing primates should therefore also possess these features, and their glenohumeral mobility should be the same as that of hominoids and be higher than that of other primates. This study presents three-dimensional glenohumeral mobility data, measured using a single video camera method on fresh specimens. The results show that the hominoid glenohumeral joint is actually less mobile than those of non-hominoid primates, including the habitually slow-climbing lorines, but it is characterized by a smooth excursion in the scapulocranial direction. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Autonomous mobile communication relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Everett, Hobart R.; Manouk, Narek; Verma, Ambrish

    2002-07-01

    Maintaining a solid radio communication link between a mobile robot entering a building and an external base station is a well-recognized problem. Modern digital radios, while affording high bandwidth and Internet-protocol-based automatic routing capabilities, tend to operate on line-of-sight links. The communication link degrades quickly as a robot penetrates deeper into the interior of a building. This project investigates the use of mobile autonomous communication relay nodes to extend the effective range of a mobile robot exploring a complex interior environment. Each relay node is a small mobile slave robot equipped with sonar, ladar, and 802.11b radio repeater. For demonstration purposes, four Pioneer 2-DX robots are used as autonomous mobile relays, with SSC-San Diego's ROBART III acting as the lead robot. The relay robots follow the lead robot into a building and are automatically deployed at various locations to maintain a networked communication link back to the remote operator. With their on-board external sensors, they also act as rearguards to secure areas already explored by the lead robot. As the lead robot advances and RF shortcuts are detected, relay nodes that become unnecessary will be reclaimed and reused, all transparent to the operator. This project takes advantage of recent research results from several DARPA-funded tasks at various institutions in the areas of robotic simulation, ad hoc wireless networking, route planning, and navigation. This paper describes the progress of the first six months of the project.

  9. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  10. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  11. [Mobility and balance].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katrin; Kressig, Reto W

    2008-08-01

    Quality of life is strongly associated with the mobility of elderly people. Falls often cause restricted mobility, a decline in activities of daily living and an increased risk of institutionalisation. Frailty, commonly associated with aging, is a biologic syndrome of decreased resistance to stressors, resulting from declines across multiple physiological systems. Changes in mobility and gait constitute part of the frailty syndrome. Since more than one third of persons over the age of 65 fall each year, prevention of falls is very important. Already while taking the patients' history special emphasis should be laid on matters associated with an increased risk of falling, such as the use of more than four medications. To assess mobility several brief tests exist (i.e. Timed up & go [17], Walking while Talking [20]) which immediately yield information regarding mobility and falling risk. Patients with poor performance on such tests or those with a history of several falls should undergo a spatio-temporal gait analysis in order to determine a possible cause as well as suitable interventions. Additionally, the objective measurement of temporo-spatial gait parameters under dual task conditions may detect deficits in cognitive function. Several interventions have been shown to have favourable effects on gait stability and the occurrence of falls. Proprioceptive problems can be partially compensated for by wearing special shoes. Also, different movement exercises such as Tai Chi Chuan, Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics and social dancing are associated with better balance and gait safety, and a reduction of falls.

  12. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-06

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  13. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications.

  14. Mobilization: Preparedness, Manpower, Industrial. A Selective Bibliography, 1918-1979

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    for theCrunch. (History of the Citizen-Soldier as an Emergency Force for Defen of U,S.)," Maj, Reginald Hargreaves, Ret, National Guardsman 18: 8... Stanley Lawrence Defense Manpower. Washington, DSC.: U.S. Industrial College of the Armed Forces, 197U lU5p. UA 23 .A31 D3 197U Falk, Stanley ...64, January 1952 ’•Modern Force Planning." Stanley R. Resor. Ordnance 54: 151-154, September-October 1969 "More on Mobilization Planning; a Key to

  15. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  16. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  17. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  18. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  19. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  20. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  1. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  2. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  3. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  4. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  5. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  6. Mobility of Plasmids†

    PubMed Central

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Francia, M. Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts. PMID:20805406

  7. Mobility of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Francia, M Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts.

  8. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  9. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  10. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  11. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  12. Mobile physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Ying, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Because both computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems and mobile technologies such as handheld devices have the potential to greatly impact the industry's future, IT vendors, hospitals, and clinicians are simply merging them into a logical convergence--"CPOE on a handheld"--with an expectation of full functionality on all platforms: computer workstations, rolling laptops, tablet PCs, and handheld devices. For these trends to succeed together, however, this expectation must be revised to establish a distinct category--mobile physician order entry (MPOE)--that is different from CPOE in form, function, and implementation.

  13. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  14. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  15. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  16. The Space Mobile Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, David

    2017-01-01

    The definition and development of the next generation space communications and navigation architecture is underway. The primary goals are to remove communications and navigations constraints from missions and to enable increased autonomy. The Space Mobile Network (SMN) is an architectural concept that includes new technology and operations that will provide flight systems with an similar user experience to terrestrial wireless mobile networks. This talk will describe the SMN and its proposed new features, such as Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN), optical communications, and User Initiated Services (UIS).

  17. Transforming U.S. Forces and the World: Are They Connected?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    would defense them to . Al Jazeera, CDs, be prayers 5 times less mobilize DVDs a day; otherwise big * Western education goat-herding efforts - Disappear...may lie more in the ability to mobilize moderate Muslims to the mutual cause, since they are being attacked even more than the Americans are and may...are not likely to bring down the global economy. Whatever their aspirations, they are too dispersed. They have mobilized local forces against them

  18. Role of trapping and crowding as sources of negative differential mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiesi, Marco; Stella, Attilio L.; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the crowding in an environment does not necessarily trigger negative differential mobility of strongly pushed particles. Moreover, the choice of the model, in particular the kind of microscopic jump rates, may be very relevant in determining the mobility. We support these points via simple examples and we therefore address recent claims saying that crowding in an environment is likely to promote negative differential mobility. Trapping of tagged particles enhanced by increasing the force remains the mechanism determining a drift velocity not monotonous in the driving force.

  19. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  20. Mobilization and homing of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Vázquez, Antonio; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are a population of precursor cells that posses the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. In the bone marrow (BM), HSCs warrant blood cell homeostasis, but at the same time a stable pool of functional cells must be constantly maintained. For this, HSCs constitute a model in which subpopulations of quiescent and active adult stem cells co-exist in the same tissue, in specific microenvironment called stem-cell "niches." These microenvironments keep the stem cells at quiescent (osteoblastic niche) for its self-renewal and activate the stem cells (vascular niche) for proliferation and/or injury repair, maintaining a dynamic balance between self-renewal and differentiation. HSC reside in the bone marrow but can be forces into the blood, a process termed mobilization used clinically to harvest large number of cells for transplantation. At the same time, homing to the BM is necessary to optimize cell engraftment. Here, we summarize current understanding of HSC niche characteristics, and the physiological and pathological mechanisms that guide HSC mobilization both within the BM and to distant niches in the periphery. Mobilization and Homing are mirror process depending on an interplay between chemokines, chemokine receptors, intracellular signaling, adhesion moleculas and proteases. The interaction between SDF-1/CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 is critical to retain HSCs within the bone marrow. Current mobilization strategies used in clinic, mainly G-CSF cytokine, are well tolerated but often produce suboptimal number of collected HSCs. Novel agents (AMD3100, stem cell factor, GROßT.) are being developed to enhance the mobilization to modify the signaling into the niche and boost the stem cell harvest, increasing the number of HSCs available for the transplant.

  1. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  2. Distributed Mobility Management Scheme for Mobile IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakikawa, Ryuji; Valadon, Guillaume; Shigechika, Noriyuki; Murai, Jun

    Mobile IPv6 and Network Mobility (NEMO) have been standardized as IP extensions. While these technologies are planned to be adopted by several communities, such as the vehicle, aviation, and cellular industries, Mobile IPv6 has serious deployment issues such as scalability, protocol resilience, and redundancy. In these technologies, a special router called a home agent is introduced to support the movement of mobile nodes. This home agent introduces overlapping, inefficient routes, and becomes a single point of failure and a performance bottleneck. In this paper, a new concept for scalable and dependable mobility management scheme is proposed. Multiple home agents serve the same set of mobile nodes. The Home Agent Reliability protocol and Home Agent migration are introduced to achieve this concept. We also propose an overlay network named a Global Mobile eXchange (GMX) that efficiently handles data traffic from and to mobile nodes, and operates home agents as would an Internet eXchange Point (IXP).

  3. ATHLETE: A Mobility and Manipulation System for Mobile Lunar Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. H.

    2008-03-01

    ATHLETE is a mobility and manipulation system considered by recent Lunar Architecture Teams. This presentation will discuss the possible use of ATHLETE-based mobile habitats for global-scale scientific exploration of the moon.

  4. Income Inequality and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloome, Deirdre

    2015-03-01

    Is there a relationship between family income inequality and income mobility across generations in the United States? As family income inequality rose in the United States, parental resources available for improving children's health, education, and care diverged. The amount and rate of divergence also varied across US states. Researchers and policy analysts have expressed concern that relatively high inequality might be accompanied by relatively low mobility, tightening the connection between individuals' incomes during childhood and adulthood. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and various government sources, this paper exploits state and cohort variation to estimate the relationship between inequality and mobility. Results provide very little support for the hypothesis that inequality shapes mobility in the United States. The inequality children experienced during youth had no robust association with their economic mobility as adults. Formal analysis reveals that offsetting effects could underlie this result. In theory, mobility-enhancing forces may counterbalance mobility-reducing effects. In practice, the results suggest that in the US context, the intergenerational transmission of income may not be very responsive to changes in inequality.

  5. Income Inequality and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bloome, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Is there a relationship between family income inequality and income mobility across generations in the United States? As family income inequality rose in the United States, parental resources available for improving children’s health, education, and care diverged. The amount and rate of divergence also varied across US states. Researchers and policy analysts have expressed concern that relatively high inequality might be accompanied by relatively low mobility, tightening the connection between individuals’ incomes during childhood and adulthood. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and various government sources, this paper exploits state and cohort variation to estimate the relationship between inequality and mobility. Results provide very little support for the hypothesis that inequality shapes mobility in the United States. The inequality children experienced during youth had no robust association with their economic mobility as adults. Formal analysis reveals that offsetting effects could underlie this result. In theory, mobility-enhancing forces may counterbalance mobility-reducing effects. In practice, the results suggest that in the US context, the intergenerational transmission of income may not be very responsive to changes in inequality. PMID:26388653

  6. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-10-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  7. Mobility and Transparency of Vocational Qualifications: An Overview of Studies on the Tourism, Chemical and Healthcare Sectors in Europe. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Sten; Richards, Greg; Rolfe, Heather; Skar, Mariann

    Three studies covering the tourism, chemical industry, and healthcare sectors in the European Union investigated patterns of cross-border mobility at the sector level. Special focus was on transparency of vocational qualifications and the relation between transparency and mobility. A serious lack of information on labor force mobility within…

  8. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  9. Mobile intercept of storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The primary goal was to acquire lightning data to serve as ground truth for U2 overflights. Researchers were successful in instrumenting the Univ. of Mississippi/National Severe Storms Lab. (UM/NSSL) mobile laboratory and in coordinating storm intercept through communication to the U2 provided by airplane guidance at NSSL and through direct communication with the U2 pilot from a portable transceiver in the mobile lab. A demonstration showed that a mobile laboratory can be directed within a large geographical area and used to collect ground truth data for comparison with airborne data on a routine basis with proper utilization of forecasts, nowcasts, and communication among all participants. After the U2 flights, researchers turned their attention solely to intercepting severe storms within the area of Oklahoma with good Doppler radar coverage. They incorporated a second vehicle, which followed the mobile lab and from which they released instrumented balloons. This project utilized a standard meteorological rawinsonde and a balloon-borne electric field meter. They were successful in flying, tracking, and receiving data from mobily launched balloons on several days. Researchers believe that they have demonstrated the ability to obtain meteorological and electrical data in severe storms using instrumented balloons. This also includes the capability to launch into the mesocyclone region and for multiple launches in the same storm.

  10. A Mobile Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Since 2008, when iStanford stormed onto the college scene as the first campus mobile app, schools from Amarillo College (Texas) to Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) have rushed to create their own offerings. Some have elected to do the work in-house; others have licensed the software from a vendor. Still others hope to bottle the same magic that…

  11. Mobile Learning for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bestwick, Angel; Campbell, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Parents and educational professionals are asking the question, "Are schools preparing students for their future lives?" Mobile technologies such as smart phones, iPods, GPS systems, iPads, and a constant stream of information drive much of people's world and work. The use of such technologies increases with each passing day. But how often do…

  12. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  13. Mobile lighting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  14. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of Mathematical Apps targeting different mathematical concepts and the various types of mobile devices available present a demanding and challenging problem to the teaching and learning in the field of mathematics. In an attempt to address this issue, a few Apps were selected, implemented and tested in this work. [For complete…

  15. Autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Mattaboni, P.J.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes a mobile robot of the type having (a) a vision system, (b) memory means for storing data derived from the robot vision system, and (c) a computer for processing data derived from the robot's vision system, the improvement wherein the robot's vision system comprises (i) a first array of ranging transducers for obtaining data on the position and distance of far objects in a volume of space, the transducers of the first array being symmetrically disposed on the mobile robot with respect to an axis of symmetry within the mobile robot. Each transducer of the first array is fixed in position with respect to that axis of symmetry and sees a portion of the volume of space seen by its entire array; (ii) a second array of ranging transducers for obtaining data of the position and distance of near objects in the same or an overlapping volume of space, the transducers of the second array being symmetrically disposed on the mobile robot with respect to the axis of symmetry. Each transducer of the second array is fixed in position with respect to the axis of symmetry and sees a portion of the volume of space seen by its entire array, the angle of view of the transducers of the second array being different from the angle of view of the transducers of the first array with respect to the same object in space; and (iii) means for polling the ranging transducers in sequences determined by the computer.

  16. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  17. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  18. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  19. The Uranus Mobile Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Schematics 26 Wi List of Figures 1 Neptune and Pluto .. .. .. .. .. ... .. ... ... ... ... .... 2 2 Uranus...began building our first mobile robot, Pluto (see Figure 1 a). We envisioned Pluto as the ultimate indoor robot within the grasp of current technology...smooth arced trajectory while rotating about its center. This omni-directionality combined with very precise positioning would allow Pluto to easily

  20. Indigenization of urban mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zimo; Lian, Defu; Yuan, Nicholas Jing; Xie, Xing; Rui, Yong; Zhou, Tao

    2017-03-01

    The identification of urban mobility patterns is very important for predicting and controlling spatial events. In this study, we analyzed millions of geographical check-ins crawled from a leading Chinese location-based social networking service (Jiepang.com), which contains demographic information that facilitates group-specific studies. We determined the distinct mobility patterns of natives and non-natives in all five large cities that we considered. We used a mixed method to assign different algorithms to natives and non-natives, which greatly improved the accuracy of location prediction compared with the basic algorithms. We also propose so-called indigenization coefficients to quantify the extent to which an individual behaves like a native, which depends only on their check-in behavior, rather than requiring demographic information. Surprisingly, the hybrid algorithm weighted using the indigenization coefficients outperformed a mixed algorithm that used additional demographic information, suggesting the advantage of behavioral data in characterizing individual mobility compared with the demographic information. The present location prediction algorithms can find applications in urban planning, traffic forecasting, mobile recommendation, and so on.

  1. Mobile Learning for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bestwick, Angel; Campbell, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Parents and educational professionals are asking the question, "Are schools preparing students for their future lives?" Mobile technologies such as smart phones, iPods, GPS systems, iPads, and a constant stream of information drive much of people's world and work. The use of such technologies increases with each passing day. But how often do…

  2. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  3. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin; Martin, Lee

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for an approach to mobile learning that leverages students' informal digital practices as resources for designing mathematics classrooms activities. We briefly describe two exploratory designs along these lines, one featuring the use of photos taken by students outside class and the other centered on their recording and…

  4. Spousal Mobility and Earnings

    PubMed Central

    MCKINNISH, TERRA

    2008-01-01

    An important finding in the literature on migration has been that the earnings of married women typically decrease with a move, while the earnings of married men often increase with a move, suggesting that married women are more likely to act as the “trailing spouse.” This article considers a related but largely unexplored question: what is the effect of having an occupation that is associated with frequent migration on the migration decisions of a household and on the earnings of the spouse? Further, how do these effects differ between men and women? The Public Use Microdata Sample from the 2000 U.S. decennial census is used to calculate migration rates by occupation and education. The analysis estimates the effects of these occupational mobility measures on the migration of couples and the earnings of married individuals. I find that migration rates in both the husband’s and wife’s occupations affect the household migration decision, but mobility in the husband’s occupation matters considerably more. For couples in which the husband has a college degree (regardless of the wife’s educational level), a husband’s mobility has a large, significant negative effect on his wife’s earnings, whereas a wife’s mobility has no effect on her husband’s earnings. This negative effect does not exist for college-educated wives married to non-college-educated husbands. PMID:19110900

  5. ORION mobile unit design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunn, D. L.; Wu, S. C.; Thom, E. H.; Mclaughlin, F. D.; Sweetser, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the design of the ORION mobile system is presented. System capability and performance characteristics are outlined. Functional requirements and key performance parameters are stated for each of the nine subsystems. A master design and implementation schedule is given.

  6. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  7. Essays on Teacher Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jeremy A.

    2012-01-01

    The allocation of quality teachers across schools is of interest because of both the importance and costliness of teachers as inputs in the education production process. Furthermore, because teachers have preferences over their workplace characteristics, this allocation across schools is nonrandom. This research examines teacher mobility within…

  8. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  9. Mobile automatic metabolic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, B. G.; Currie, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Two flexible pipes, attached to face mask, are connected to spirometers in mobile cart. Inhaled air volume is measured as it is drawn from one spirometer, and exhaled air volume is measured as it is breathed into second spirometer. Sensor is used to monitor heartbeat rate.

  10. Mobilizing the Moral Majority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebman, Robert C.

    The Moral Majority has been more successful in mobilizing conservative Christians than three other evangelical groups--Third Century Publishers, Christian Voice, and the Religious Roundtable. According to the literature on social movements, four possible explanations for the success of such groups are that they have access to financial resources,…

  11. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  12. Mobile Library Filming Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Claud E.

    This report contains details of the study and performance test of the Mobile Filming Library Device which consists of a camera and self contained power source. Because of the cost savings and service improvement characteristics, this technique involving the use of a microfilm intermediate in the preparation of copies of material filed in full size…

  13. The Mobile Costume Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Cindy; Nelson, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties of costume construction for high school theater productions. Advances a plan (and provides a design) for a mobile costume shop which contains the basic needs of a functional costume facility, using only 60 square feet of space. Lists every element and implement needed. (PA)

  14. When Mobility Disrupts Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jean Louise M.; Fien, Hank; Paine, Stan C.

    2008-01-01

    Student mobility is a common phenomenon that disproportionately affects students in high-poverty schools. Research shows that students who move repeatedly are likely to fall behind in reading and other academic areas. This article reviews proactive strategies that high-poverty districts and schools are using to reduce the harmful effects of…

  15. A Mobile Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Since 2008, when iStanford stormed onto the college scene as the first campus mobile app, schools from Amarillo College (Texas) to Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) have rushed to create their own offerings. Some have elected to do the work in-house; others have licensed the software from a vendor. Still others hope to bottle the same magic that…

  16. Visions of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It is almost a foregone conclusion that the mobile device will become an indispensable tool for learning in the future. That's why "T.H.E. Journal" asked a number of educators to let their imaginations go wild and conjure up visions of the future of the device in the classroom. This paper presents the views of educators who conjure up the mobile…

  17. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  18. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.

    2002-01-01

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  19. Defining a 21st Century Air Force (Services) Business Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-10

    Virtual Fitness Kiosks Set Up at 66 Locations. Air Force News. September 11, 2013. http://www.af.mil/mobile/News/tabid/252/Article/467089/virtual...fitness- kiosks -set-up-at-66-locations.aspx (accessed September 11, 2013). Joint Chiefs of Staff. Joint Publication 1 - Doctrine for the Armed

  20. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  1. Advanced extravehicular mobility unit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1982-01-01

    Components of the advanced extravehicular mobility unit (suit) are described. Design considerations for radiation protection, extravehicular operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effector, anthropometric definition, lighting, and equipment turnaround are addressed.

  2. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the U.S. EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality (formerly the Office of Mobile Sources).

  3. Social Mobility and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, William H.

    1978-01-01

    Examines data related to social mobility and social participation of Americans. Topics include educational and occupational mobility; voting; volunteer work; charitable giving; community participation; views on religion; and anomie. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  4. Social Mobility and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, William H.

    1978-01-01

    Examines data related to social mobility and social participation of Americans. Topics include educational and occupational mobility; voting; volunteer work; charitable giving; community participation; views on religion; and anomie. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  5. Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    jerk application. (c) Negative jerk application. Group (a). Application of positve jerk. Force is increased from initial value to force of resistance...fundamentals of the new emerging area of autonomous robotics . The goal of this research is to develop a theory of design and functioning of Intelligent...scientific research. This report contributes to a new rapidly developing area of autonomous robotics . Actual experience of dealing with autonomous robots (or

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the Delta II Heavy rocket waits the arrival of the mobile service tower with three additional solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Nine 46-inch-diameter, stretched SRBs will help launch the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of three cryogenically cooled science instruments and an 0.85-meter telescope, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-22

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the Delta II Heavy rocket waits the arrival of the mobile service tower with three additional solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Nine 46-inch-diameter, stretched SRBs will help launch the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of three cryogenically cooled science instruments and an 0.85-meter telescope, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket waits to be lifted up and moved into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket waits to be lifted up and moved into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is nearly erect for its move into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is nearly erect for its move into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is moved into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is moved into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket waits to be lifted up into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket waits to be lifted up into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is raised off the transporter before lifting and moving it into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is raised off the transporter before lifting and moving it into the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is lifted up the mobile service tower. In the background is pad 17-A. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is lifted up the mobile service tower. In the background is pad 17-A. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers on Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, prepare the first stage of a Delta II rocket for its lift up the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers on Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, prepare the first stage of a Delta II rocket for its lift up the mobile service tower. The rocket is being erected to launch the Space InfraRed Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  14. Development and Control of Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Mobile Robot for Acquisition of Road Environmental Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Naoya; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Acquisition of information about the environment around a mobile robot is important for purposes such as controlling the robot from a remote location and in situations such as that when the robot is running autonomously. In many researches, audiovisual information is used. However, acquisition of information about force sensation, which is included in environmental information, has not been well researched. The mobile-hapto, which is a remote control system with force information, has been proposed, but the robot used for the system can acquire only the horizontal component of forces. For this reason, in this research, a three-wheeled mobile robot that consists of seven actuators was developed and its control system was constructed. It can get information on horizontal and vertical forces without using force sensors. By using this robot, detailed information on the forces in the environment can be acquired and the operability of the robot and its capability to adjust to the environment are expected to improve.

  15. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  16. Mobile Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, Lucretia M.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method research study investigated the beliefs of university faculty regarding mobile learning. As well as to determine if providing technology professional development to university faculty supports the increase of mobile learning opportunities in higher education. This study used the Beliefs About Mobile Learning Inventory (BAMLI) to…

  17. Mobile Phone Radiation and Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A possible link between cancer and the usage of mobile phones has been widely discussed in the media in the last 10 years. It is no surprise that students keep asking their physics teacher for advice regarding the handling of mobile phones and mobile phone radiation. This article aims to help teachers include this interesting topic in the…

  18. Libraries and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of mobile phones--and smartphones in particular--people are slowly moving away from the notion that mobile phones are just for making calls and texting. This coupled with the fact that the uptake of mobile phones hit the 5 billion mark in 2010 has spurred many libraries to offer services that can be used by their patrons on these…

  19. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sward, David

    1988-05-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  20. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  1. Promoting mobility in older people.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-home mobility is necessary for accessing commodities, making use of neighborhood facilities, and participation in meaningful social, cultural, and physical activities. Mobility also promotes healthy aging as it relates to the basic human need of physical movement. Mobility is typically assessed either with standardized performance-based tests or with self-reports of perceived difficulty in carrying out specific mobility tasks. Mobility declines with increasing age, and the most complex and demanding tasks are affected first. Sometimes people cope with declining functional capacity by making changes in their way or frequency of doing these tasks, thus avoiding facing manifest difficulties. From the physiological point of view, walking is an integrated result of the functioning of the musculoskeletal, cardio-respiratory, sensory and neural systems. Studies have shown that interventions aiming to increase muscle strength will also improve mobility. Physical activity counseling, an educational intervention aiming to increase physical activity, may also prevent mobility decline among older people. Sensory deficits, such as poor vision and hearing may increase the risk of mobility decline. Consequently, rehabilitation of sensory functions may prevent falls and decline in mobility. To promote mobility, it is not enough to target only individuals because environmental barriers to mobility may also accelerate mobility decline among older people. Communities need to promote the accessibility of physical environments while also trying to minimize negative or stereotypic attitudes toward the physical activity of older people.

  2. Libraries and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of mobile phones--and smartphones in particular--people are slowly moving away from the notion that mobile phones are just for making calls and texting. This coupled with the fact that the uptake of mobile phones hit the 5 billion mark in 2010 has spurred many libraries to offer services that can be used by their patrons on these…

  3. Mobile Technology in Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jueming; Kinshuk

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and staff members with various online educational services. With the recent developments in mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By…

  4. Mobile Multicast in Hierarchical Proxy Mobile IPV6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizah Mohd Aman, Azana; Hashim, Aisha Hassan A.; Mustafa, Amin; Abdullah, Khaizuran

    2013-12-01

    Mobile Internet Protocol Version 6 (MIPv6) environments have been developing very rapidly. Many challenges arise with the fast progress of MIPv6 technologies and its environment. Therefore the importance of improving the existing architecture and operations increases. One of the many challenges which need to be addressed is the need for performance improvement to support mobile multicast. Numerous approaches have been proposed to improve mobile multicast performance. This includes Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP), Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6), Fast Mobile IPv6 (FMIPv6) and Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6). This document describes multicast context transfer in hierarchical proxy mobile IPv6 (H-PMIPv6) to provide better multicasting performance in PMIPv6 domain.

  5. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  6. Lathe tool force

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes a computer program that computes the forces exerted on a lathe tool as a part is being machined. The program is based on a mechanistic model which assumes that the normal force on the tool face is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the chip that is being removed from the part. This report gives transcripts of program runs, a comparison with experimentally measured forces, a bibliography, and a listing of the program.

  7. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  8. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  9. Cases in Joint Force Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    forces in the future. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Force Development; Joint Force Development; Air War College Curriculum; Force Planning; Military Planning; Joint...6 1. Class Participation .....................................................................................7 2. Term ...Paper Prospectus ..............................................................................7 3. Term Paper

  10. Intelligent mobility research for robotic locomotion in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, Michael; Beckman, Blake; Digney, Bruce; Vincent, Isabelle; Ricard, Benoit

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section of Defence R&D Canada - Suffield is best described by its mission statement, which is "to augment soldiers and combat systems by developing and demonstrating practical, cost effective, autonomous intelligent systems capable of completing military missions in complex operating environments." The mobility requirement for ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings must increase significantly if robotic technology is to augment human efforts in these roles and environments. The intelligence required for autonomous systems to operate in complex environments demands advances in many fields of robotics. This has resulted in large bodies of research in areas of perception, world representation, and navigation, but the problem of locomotion in complex terrain has largely been ignored. In order to achieve its objective, the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section is pursuing research that explores the use of intelligent mobility algorithms designed to improve robot mobility. Intelligent mobility uses sensing, control, and learning algorithms to extract measured variables from the world, control vehicle dynamics, and learn by experience. These algorithms seek to exploit available world representations of the environment and the inherent dexterity of the robot to allow the vehicle to interact with its surroundings and produce locomotion in complex terrain. The primary focus of the paper is to present the intelligent mobility research within the framework of the research methodology, plan and direction defined at Defence R&D Canada - Suffield. It discusses the progress and future direction of intelligent mobility research and presents the research tools, topics, and plans to address this critical research gap. This research will create effective intelligence to improve the mobility of ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings to assist the Canadian Forces in their future urban operations.

  11. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. ); Waters, E.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  12. No fifth force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  13. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  14. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  15. Seed storage oil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Storage oil mobilization starts with the onset of seed germination. Oil bodies packed with triacylglycerol (TAG) exist in close proximity with glyoxysomes, the single membrane-bound organelles that house most of the biochemical machinery required to convert fatty acids derived from TAG to 4-carbon compounds. The 4-carbon compounds in turn are converted to soluble sugars that are used to fuel seedling growth. Biochemical analysis over the last 50 years has identified the main pathways involved in this process, including beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis. In the last few years molecular genetic dissection of the overall process in the model oilseed species Arabidopsis has provided new insight into its complexity, particularly with respect to the specific role played by individual enzymatic steps and the subcellular compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle. Both abscisic acid (ABA) and sugars inhibit storage oil mobilization and a substantial degree of the control appears to operate at the transcriptional level.

  16. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  17. Atomistic simulations of grain and interphase boundary mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, J. J.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, atomistic simulations have provided valuable insights into the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of grain and interphase boundaries. In this work, we provide a brief overview of kinetic processes occurring at migrating interfaces and survey various molecular dynamics techniques for extracting grain boundary mobilities. The advantages and disadvantages of fluctuation and applied driving force methods will be discussed. In addition, we review recent examples of simulations that have identified structural phase transformations at grain boundaries. Finally, simulations that have investigated the mobility and atomic mechanisms of growth of an fcc-bcc interphase boundary are summarized.

  18. Advanced Fuzzy Potential Field Method for Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Wook; Kwak, Hwan-Joo; Kang, Young-Chang; Kim, Dong W.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced fuzzy potential field method for mobile robot obstacle avoidance is proposed. The potential field method primarily deals with the repulsive forces surrounding obstacles, while fuzzy control logic focuses on fuzzy rules that handle linguistic variables and describe the knowledge of experts. The design of a fuzzy controller—advanced fuzzy potential field method (AFPFM)—that models and enhances the conventional potential field method is proposed and discussed. This study also examines the rule-explosion problem of conventional fuzzy logic and assesses the performance of our proposed AFPFM through simulations carried out using a mobile robot. PMID:27123001

  19. Advanced Fuzzy Potential Field Method for Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Wook; Kwak, Hwan-Joo; Kang, Young-Chang; Kim, Dong W

    2016-01-01

    An advanced fuzzy potential field method for mobile robot obstacle avoidance is proposed. The potential field method primarily deals with the repulsive forces surrounding obstacles, while fuzzy control logic focuses on fuzzy rules that handle linguistic variables and describe the knowledge of experts. The design of a fuzzy controller--advanced fuzzy potential field method (AFPFM)--that models and enhances the conventional potential field method is proposed and discussed. This study also examines the rule-explosion problem of conventional fuzzy logic and assesses the performance of our proposed AFPFM through simulations carried out using a mobile robot.

  20. Mobile Data Access

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-11

    F19628-93-C-0193, the Intel Corporation, the National Science Foundation, AT&T, and Lucent Technologies . The views and conclusions contained herein...in other locations must resort to some alternative wireless technology ; moving between these technologies yields significant variation. There is one...supporting infrastructure, and poor security and robustness, are inherent to mobile systems and will not be ehminated by technological progress. The

  1. High Mobility Conjugated Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-20

    PTTP) were also investigated by density functional theory (DFT) with the goal of understanding the effect of intramolecular charge transfer on the...10 -210 A10 The electronic structures of PTHQx and PTTP calculated by the 01 , ’°- density functional theory showed LUMO levels of -2.73 and -3.42 0...the design of high mobility semiconductors for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and other organic electronic devices. Although the tricyclic

  2. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250 degrees Centigrade, and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  3. Integrated mobile robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amidi, Omead; Thorpe, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the structure, implementation, and operation of a real-time mobile robot controller which integrates capabilities such as: position estimation, path specification and tracking, human interfaces, fast communication, and multiple client support. The benefits of such high-level capabilities in a low-level controller was shown by its implementation for the Navlab autonomous vehicle. In addition, performance results from positioning and tracking systems are reported and analyzed.

  4. Corps Mobilization Posture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    lation. The " one - stop " service concept is fundamental among these elements. Despite what the Corps’ internal structure may be, external customers (e.g...34 one - stop " service dictates that there be a total vertical and lateral communi- cations network between the lead district and all elements that must...should approve the " one - stop " service concept for application to advance mobilization planning and execution. b. COE should approve the concept of MC

  5. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  6. Mobility Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-17

    vehicle designs and technologies • Does not benefit from advances in simulation and computational capabilities 1970 NRMMQualitative UNCLASSIFIED Building...Scale Demonstration: Physics-Based Mobility M&S Computational Burden • Hardware: Cray XC40 32 cores • Software: IVRESS; Contact method: DEM-P • Run...Challenging Nature of Terramechanics Heterogeneity Multi-Physics Scalability Dynamics Multi-Scale UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Quantum Computing Compute Cost

  7. Pulmonary Function, Muscle Strength, and Incident Mobility Disability in Elders

    PubMed Central

    Buchman, Aron S.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Evans, Denis A.; Bennett, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle strength, including leg strength and respiratory muscle strength, are relatively independently associated with mobility disability in elders. However, the factors linking muscle strength with mobility disability are unknown. To test the hypothesis that pulmonary function mediates the association of muscle strength with the development of mobility disability in elders, we used data from a longitudinal cohort study of 844 ambulatory elders without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project with a mean follow-up of 4.0 years (SD = 1.39). A composite measure of pulmonary function was based on spirometric measures of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Respiratory muscle strength was based on maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure and leg strength based on hand-held dynamometry. Mobility disability was defined as a gait speed less than or equal to 0.55 m/s based on annual assessment of timed walk. Secondary analyses considered time to loss of the ability to ambulate. In separate proportional hazards models which controlled for age, sex, and education, composite measures of pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and leg strength were each associated with incident mobility disability (all P values < 0.001). Further, all three were related to the development of incident mobility disability when considered together in a single model (pulmonary function: hazard ratio [HR], 0.721; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577, 0.902; respiratory muscle strength: HR, 0.732; 95% CI, 0.593, 0.905; leg strength: HR, 0.791; 95% CI, 0.640, 0.976). Secondary analyses examining incident loss of the ability to ambulate revealed similar findings. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of pulmonary function and muscle strength are relatively independently associated with the development of mobility disability in the elderly. PMID:19934353

  8. Graphene mobility mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties.

  9. Graphene mobility mapping.

    PubMed

    Buron, Jonas D; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U; Petersen, Dirch H; Caridad, José M; Jessen, Bjarke S; Booth, Timothy J; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-07-24

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties.

  10. Graphene mobility mapping

    PubMed Central

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties. PMID:26204815

  11. Networking a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Gerard T.

    1994-10-01

    Conventional mobile robotic systems are `stand alone'. Program development involves loading programs into the mobile, via an umbilical. Autonomous operation, in this context, means `isolation': the user cannot interact with the program as the robot is moving around. Recent research in `swarm robotics' has exploited wireless networks as a means of providing inter- robot communication, but the population is still isolated from the human user. In this paper we report on research we are conducting into the provision of mobile robots as resources on a local area computer network, and thus breaking the isolation barrier. We are making use of new multimedia workstation and wireless networking technology to link the robots to the network in order to provide a new type of resource for the user. We model the robot as a set of resources and propose a client-server architecture as the basis for providing user access to the robots. We describe the types of resources each robot can provide and we outline the potential for cooperative robotics, human-robot cooperation, and teleoperation and autonomous robot behavior within this context.

  12. Cameras in mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummela, Ville; Viinikanoja, Jarkko; Alakarhu, Juha

    2006-04-01

    One of the fastest growing markets in consumer markets today are camera phones. During past few years total volume has been growing fast and today millions of mobile phones with camera will be sold. At the same time resolution and functionality of the cameras has been growing from CIF towards DSC level. From camera point of view the mobile world is an extremely challenging field. Cameras should have good image quality but in small size. They also need to be reliable and their construction should be suitable for mass manufacturing. All components of the imaging chain should be well optimized in this environment. Image quality and usability are the most important parameters to user. The current trend of adding more megapixels to cameras and at the same time using smaller pixels is affecting both. On the other hand reliability and miniaturization are key drivers for product development as well as the cost. In optimized solution all parameters are in balance but the process of finding the right trade-offs is not an easy task. In this paper trade-offs related to optics and their effects to image quality and usability of cameras are discussed. Key development areas from mobile phone camera point of view are also listed.

  13. Mobile EEG in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative to these recordings, their use is still not introduced everywhere. We surveyed Dutch neurologists and patients and evaluated a novel mobile EEG device (Mobita, TMSi). Key specifications were compared with three other current mobile EEG devices. We shortly discuss algorithms to assist in the review process. Thirty percent (33 out of 109) of Dutch neurologists reported that home EEG recordings are used in their hospital. The majority of neurologists think that mobile EEG can have additional value in investigation of unclear paroxysms, but not in the initial diagnosis after a first seizure. Poor electrode contacts and signal quality, limited recording time and absence of software for reliable and effective assistance in the interpretation of EEGs have been important constraints for usage, but in recent devices discussed here, many of these problems have been solved. The majority of our patients were satisfied with the home EEG procedure and did not think that our EEG device was uncomfortable to wear, but they did feel uneasy wearing it in public.

  14. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  15. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures: a longitudinal clinical study of 44 permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment. Furthermore, the effect of age, location of the fracture on the root, and observation period on mobility values was analyzed. Mobility values were measured for 44 of 95 previous reported root-fractured permanent incisors. Mobility changes were measured with a Mühlemanns periodontometer and noninjured incisors served as controls. The mobility values represented the labial-lingual excursion of the root measured in μm when the tooth received a frontal and a palatal impact of 100 g force. In 18 cases of hard tissue healing (HT), a slightly increased mobility was seen after 3 months and 1 year, and a normalization of mobility value was usually found after 5 and 10 years. In 17 cases of PDL healing, generally a higher mobility was found in comparison with root fractures healing with hard tissue, and a consistent decrease in mobility value was found in the course of the 10 year observation period. A tendency for reduced mobility over time was found, a relation that could possibly be explained by the known general decrease in tooth mobility with increasing age. Finally, nine cases of nonhealing with initial interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment resulted in increasing mobility values possibly related to a lateral breakdown of the PDL in relation to the fracture line. In control teeth, a lowering of mobility was found over the course of a 10-year observation period. In conclusion, mobility changes appeared to reflect the radiographic healing stages and known age effects upon tooth mobility.

  16. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  17. Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

    1999-03-09

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

  18. Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

    1998-04-28

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

  19. Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jun; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miguel; Xiao, Xudong

    1998-01-01

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

  20. Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jun; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miguel; Xiao, Xudong

    1999-01-01

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

  1. Studies on deaf mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  2. Effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on force steadiness in quadriceps femoris during force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle group plays an essential role in human movement, such as standing, walking and running. The ability to maintain a steady force during physical activity of the human lower limb is important for mobility, postural control and balance. Although prolonged mechanical vibration of the muscle-tendon unit can moderate the efficacy of synaptic input from Ia afferent onto the α-motor neuron pathway, the effect of prolonged tendon vibration on fluctuations of knee extensor force has received little attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on the force steadiness of the QF muscle. Nine healthy men performed a submaximal force-matching task involving isometric knee extension before and after patellar tendon vibration or quiet seated rest (n = 7, control condition) for 30 min. The target force was 2.5, 10 and 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized to EMG amplitude during the MVC. The knee extension force and the EMG amplitude of vastus medialis during the MVC were significantly reduced after the vibration, but did not significantly decrease in the control condition. Fluctuations of force and normalized EMG of individual QF muscles at each submaximal force level did not significantly change after the vibration. We conclude that prolonged patellar tendon vibration does not influence the force steadiness of the QF muscle during an isometric force-matching task.

  3. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  4. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  5. New force in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Fischbach, E.; Sudarsky, D.; Szafer, A.; Talmadge, C.; Aronson, S.H.

    1986-10-15

    We review recent experimental and theoretical work dealing with the proposed fifth force. Further analysis of the original Eoetvoes experiments has uncovered no challenges to our original assertion that these data evidence a correlation characteristic of the presence of a new coupling to baryon number or hypercharge. Various models suggest that the proposed fifth force could be accomodated naturally into the existing theoretical framework.

  6. Air Force Officer Cohesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    and Staff College, 1980. 11. Craver , M.L., "No Surprise in Why Pilots Leave Service." Air Force Times, June 4, 1979, p. 23. 12. Wood, Frank R., U.S...34Institution Building In The All- Volunteer Force." Air University Review, September- October 1983, pp. 38-49. Craver , M.L., "No Surprise In Why Pilots Leave

  7. Manning the Future Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-03

    Marnane source. 21 48Michael L. Waclawski , Recruiting a Quality Force for the 21 st Century Army…Challenges and Opportunities, Strategy Research Project...the 21st Century. Strategy Research Project. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army War College, 12 March 2000. Waclawski , Michael L. Recruiting a Quality Force

  8. SCM-Forcing Data

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang, Shuaiqi; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  9. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  10. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  11. Effects of region of origin and geographic mobility on perceptual dialect categorization

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that listeners’ region of origin and geographic mobility affect their perception of dialect-specific properties of speech in vowel identification and dialect categorization tasks. The present study examined the perceptual dialect classification performance of four groups of listeners using a six-alternative forced-choice categorization task. The residential history of the listeners was manipulated so that the four groups of listeners differed in terms of region of origin (Northern or Midland United States) and geographic mobility (Mobile or Non-Mobile). Although residential history did not significantly affect accuracy in the categorization task, both region of origin and geographic mobility were found to affect the underlying perceptual similarity structure of the different regional varieties. Geographically local dialects tended to be confused more often than nonlocal dialects, although this effect was attenuated by geographic mobility. PMID:21423820

  12. Nanofluids mediating surface forces.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2012-11-01

    Fluids containing nanostructures, known as nanofluids, are increasingly found in a wide array of applications due to their unique physical properties as compared with their base fluids and larger colloidal suspensions. With several tuneable parameters such as the size, shape and surface chemistry of nanostructures, as well as numerous base fluids available, nanofluids also offer a new paradigm for mediating surface forces. Other properties such as local surface plasmon resonance and size dependent magnetism of nanostructures also present novel mechanisms for imparting tuneable surface interactions. However, our fundamental understanding, experimentally and theoretically, of how these parameters might affect surface forces remains incomplete. Here we review recent results on equilibrium and dynamic surface forces between macroscopic surfaces in nanofluids, highlighting the overriding trends in the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise nanofluids and the surface forces they mediate. We also discuss the challenges that confront existing surface force knowledge as a result of this new paradigm.

  13. Tele-Operation of a Mobile Haptic System Using Dynamical Modal Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Wataru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Recent advances in control technology have contributed to the development of robot systems for communication. Robot systems recognize their environment on the basis of audio-visual information. Recognition methods based on audio-visual feedback have been developed by many researchers. Apart from auditory and visual information, haptic information has recently attracted attention as the third type of multimedia information. The sense of touch is useful for remote manipulation. Feedback of haptic information is realized by bilateral control. In conventional research, most systems are constructed using a master-slave system in which the master-slave systems have the same mechanical structure. However, very few studies have been carried out on force feedback systems with different mechanical structures. This paper proposes a novel control method for mobile-hapto, which involves force feedback using mobility systems. In this study, the mobile-hapto consists of a mobile robot that can move in an infinite area for motion and a joystick that is fixed at a given position and can be operated manually. To realize of force feedback in the mobile-hapto, a modal transformation matrix for bilateral control is proposed. The proposed modal transformation matrix is able to change the dimension of the controlled value. The joystick is treated as a pedal by changing two dimensions of the mobile robot position. The mobile-hapto is possible to be subjected to intuitive manipulation. The validity of the proposed method is experimentally verified.

  14. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided.

  15. Drag force on spheres confined on the center line of rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    van der Sman, R G M

    2010-11-01

    Via Lattice Boltzmann simulations we show there is a great deal of universality in the reduced mobility of spheres moving along the centre line of capillaries or rectangular microchannels. The reduced mobility follows a generalization of the Haberman-Sayre correlation, which is a function of the degree of confinement, e. This quantity e=d(p)/D(e), is defined as the ratio of the particle diameter and the length scale D(e), which is a weighted mean of the square root of the cross section area D(A), and the hydraulic diameter D(h). The force experienced by spheres in pressure driven flow can be described by a generalized Faxen theorem, combined with effective medium theory. This force can be decomposed in a drag force and a pressure gradient force, both inversely proportional to the reduced mobility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multidomain proteins under force.

    PubMed

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  17. Multidomain proteins under force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Andrés Rivas-Pardo, Jaime; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-01

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91—two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins—ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  18. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  19. From mobile mental health to mobile wellbeing: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The combination of smart phones, wearable sensor devices and social media offer new ways of monitoring and promoting mental and physical wellbeing. In this contribution, we describe recent developments in the field of mobile healthcare (or mHealth), by focusing in particular on mobile mental health applications. First, we examine the potential benefits associated with this approach, providing examples from existing projects. Next, we identify and explain possible differences in focus between mobile mental health and mobile wellbeing applications. Finally, we discuss some open challenges associated with the implementation of this vision, ranging from the lack of evidence-based validation to privacy, security and ethical concerns.

  20. Adaptive mobility management scheme in hierarchical mobile IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bo; Song, Junde

    2004-04-01

    Hierarchical mobile IPv6 makes the mobility management localized. Registration with HA is only needed while MN moving between MAP domains. This paper proposed an adaptive mobility management scheme based on the hierarchical mobile IPv6. The scheme focuses on the MN operation as well as MAP operation during the handoff. Adaptive MAP selection algorithm can be used to select a suitable MAP to register with once MN moves into a new subnet while MAP can thus adaptively changing his management domain. Furthermore, MAP can also adaptively changes its level in the hierarchical referring on the service load or other related information. Detailed handoff algorithm is also discussed in this paper.

  1. Gliding Direction of Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Morio, Hanako; Kasai, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile glides in the direction of its cell pole by a unique mechanism in which hundreds of legs, each protruding from its own gliding unit, catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. In this study, we found that 77% of cells glided to the left with a change in direction of 8.4° ± 17.6° μm−1 displacement. The cell body did not roll around the cell axis, and elongated, thinner cells also glided while tracing a curved trajectory to the left. Under viscous conditions, the range of deviation of the gliding direction decreased. In the presence of 250 μM free sialyllactose, in which the binding of the legs (i.e., the catching of sialylated oligosaccharides) was reduced, 70% and 30% of cells glided to the left and the right, respectively, with changes in direction of ∼30° μm−1. The gliding ghosts, in which a cell was permeabilized by Triton X-100 and reactivated by ATP, glided more straightly. These results can be explained by the following assumptions based on the suggested gliding machinery and mechanism: (i) the units of gliding machinery may be aligned helically around the cell, (ii) the legs extend via the process of thermal fluctuation and catch the sialylated oligosaccharides, and (iii) the legs generate a propulsion force that is tilted from the cell axis to the left in 70% and to the right in 30% of cells. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasmas are bacteria that are generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide. Although these species appear to consistently glide in the direction of the protrusion, their exact gliding direction has not been examined. This study analyzed the gliding direction in detail under various conditions and, based on the results, suggested features of the machinery and the mechanism of gliding. PMID:26503848

  2. The Terregator Mobile Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Configuration 17 4.3 Locomotor 19 4.3.1 Base Frame 20 4.3.2 Motors and Drive Train 21 4.3.3 Roll Frame 25 4.3.4 Rack Mount Enclosure 26 4.4 On-Board...Constraints The Terregator, designed to support various sensors, supplies a mounting surface on the maneuverable base vehicle. The real-time computer...mobile base to deploy and develop these navigation modes. The vehicle, therefore, had to supply a mounting surface on a maneuverable base vehicle; but

  3. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  4. Mobile Language Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-18

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 August 2001 - 15-Aug-03 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F61775-01-C0006 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mobile...The proposed effort spans two years and is divided into four tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 will be completed in the first year and Tasks 3 and 4 are to be...of the first year’s research and availability of funding, the second years tasks include: Task 3: Security architecture Task 4 : Java Card and JCVM

  5. Resource Prospector Mobility Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-28

    A lightweight simulator version of NASA's Resource Prospector undergoes a mobility test in a regolith bin at the agency's Kennedy Space center in Florida. The Resource Prospector mission aims to be the first mining expedition on another world. Operating on the moon’s poles, the robot is designed to use instruments to locate elements at a lunar polar regions, then excavate and sample resources such as hydrogen, oxygen and water. These resources could support human explores on their way to destinations such as farther into the solar system.

  6. Resource Prospector Mobility Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-28

    Outside a regolith bin at the agency's Kennedy Space center in Florida, an engineer operates controls for a lightweight simulator version of NASA's Resource Prospector during a mobility test. The Resource Prospector mission aims to be the first mining expedition on another world. Operating on the moon’s poles, the robot is designed to use instruments to locate elements at a lunar polar regions, then excavate and sample resources such as hydrogen, oxygen and water. These resources could support human explores on their way to destinations such as farther into the solar system.

  7. Resource Prospector Mobility Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-28

    Engineers wearing protecting garb, make adjustments to a lightweight simulator version of NASA's Resource Prospector undergoes a mobility test in a regolith bin at the agency's Kennedy Space center in Florida. The Resource Prospector mission aims to be the first mining expedition on another world. Operating on the moon’s poles, the robot is designed to use instruments to locate elements at a lunar polar regions, then excavate and sample resources such as hydrogen, oxygen and water. These resources could support human explores on their way to destinations such as farther into the solar system.

  8. Mobility and HIV.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people are vulnerable to HIV because they live in poor areas with little privacy, have different sexual relationships, and lack information about sexual health and services. In response to these problems, HIV prevention and care programs were initiated. The programs include: 1) involving migrant workers as both interviewers and outreach workers to better understand the idea of the migrants per Coordination of Action Research on Mobility and AIDS; 2) improving living conditions; 3) access of migrants to information and services; 4) improving the rights of the people; 5) increasing income; and 6) access to sexual health information that concerns exposure of HIV through different sexual partners.

  9. Mobile Bay turbidity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.; Schroeder, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The termination of studies carried on for almost three years in the Mobile Bay area and adjacent continental shelf are reported. The initial results concentrating on the shelf and lower bay were presented in the interim report. The continued scope of work was designed to attempt a refinement of the mathematical model, assess the effectiveness of optical measurement of suspended particulate material and disseminate the acquired information. The optical characteristics of particulate solutions are affected by density gradients within the medium, density of the suspended particles, particle size, particle shape, particle quality, albedo, and the angle of refracted light. Several of these are discussed in detail.

  10. Mobilizing Black America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Hospital Charlotte, NC 1881 1966 Shaw Memorial Hospital Oxford, NC 1953 1967 Hunter Clinic Hospital Marlin, TX 1923 1967 St. Martin Pornes Hospital Mobile...D.C.: October 27, 1991), p. 12. 25 Ibid, p. 12. 18 "I didn’t have a babysitter for my other kids ." (5) "I didn’t have time." and (6) One addict...economy, including drug trafficking. He says: "Crack has created a new Horatio Alger myth for inner-city kids searching for meaning and upward

  11. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  12. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  13. Dielectrophoretic Force Imaging of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Garth J.

    2004-03-01

    A new scanning probe microscopic technique is demonstrated, exploiting AC electrokinetic forces for real-time functional imaging of biological interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) describes the mobility of particles in radio-frequency AC electric fields and is related to the frequency-dependent polarizability. Similar to the forces in optical trapping, DEP interactions are greatest for large field gradients, such as those adjacent to highly curved electrodes. Moderate AC potentials (5 Vpp) are more than sufficient to induce surface forces strong enough for reliable feedback during imaging. Simply changing the AC frequency can change the nature of the DEP force from repulsive to attractive. By scanning the AC frequency, dielectrophoretic spectroscopy using light with a wavelength of ˜ 1/2 km can be performed with spatial resolution of a few nanometers (about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude below the diffraction-limit), representing a new level of achievement in near-field microscopy. Among other things, the facile applicability of DEP imaging in aqueous media is ideally suited for ultrahigh resolution microscopy of biological systems, including supported lipid bilayer membranes, immobilized organelles, and living cells.

  14. Absolute negative mobility in a one-dimensional overdamped system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ru-Yin; Nie, Lin-Ru; Pan, Wan-Li; Zhang, Jian-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    A one-dimensional overdamped system consisting of a symmetric periodic potential, a constant bias force and a trichotomous noise was investigated. In the frame of master equations, we derived analytical expression of its current. By means of numerical calculations, the results indicate that the current first increases, then decreases and finally increases with the bias force increasing, i.e., an absolute negative mobility (ANM) phenomenon. Our further investigations presented dependence of the ANM phenomenon on parameters of the noise. Its intrinsic physical mechanism was also open up, and a minimal model with ANM phenomenon is demonstrated.

  15. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  16. Intelligent mobility for robotic vehicles in the army after next

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, Grant R.; Goetz, Richard C.; Gorsich, David J.

    1999-07-01

    The TARDEC Intelligent Mobility program addresses several essential technologies necessary to support the army after next (AAN) concept. Ground forces in the AAN time frame will deploy robotic unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) in high-risk missions to avoid exposing soldiers to both friendly and unfriendly fire. Prospective robotic systems will include RSTA/scout vehicles, combat engineering/mine clearing vehicles, indirect fire artillery and missile launch platforms. The AAN concept requires high on-road and off-road mobility, survivability, transportability/deployability and low logistics burden. TARDEC is developing a robotic vehicle systems integration laboratory (SIL) to evaluate technologies and their integration into future UGV systems. Example technologies include the following: in-hub electric drive, omni-directional wheel and steering configurations, off-road tires, adaptive tire inflation, articulated vehicles, active suspension, mine blast protection, detection avoidance and evasive maneuver. This paper will describe current developments in these areas relative to the TARDEC intelligent mobility program.

  17. Trends in Mobile Application Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Adrian; Ondrus, Jan

    Major software companies, such as Apple and Google, are disturbing the relatively safe and established actors of the mobile application business. These newcomers have caused significant structural changes by imposing and enforcing their own rules for the future of mobile application development. The implications of these changes do not only concern the mobile network operators and mobile phone manufacturers. This changed environment also brings additional opportunities and constraints for current mobile application developers. Therefore, developers need to assess what their options are and how they can take advantages of these current trends. In this paper, we take a developer’s perspective in order to explore how the structural changes will influence the mobile application development markets. Moreover, we discuss what aspects developers need to take into account in order to position themselves within the current trends.

  18. Two-Armed, Mobile, Sensate Research Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelberger, J. F.; Roberts, W. Nelson; Ryan, David J.; Silverthorne, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The Anthropomorphic Robotic Testbed (ART) is an experimental prototype of a partly anthropomorphic, humanoid-size, mobile robot. The basic ART design concept provides for a combination of two-armed coordination, tactility, stereoscopic vision, mobility with navigation and avoidance of obstacles, and natural-language communication, so that the ART could emulate humans in many activities. The ART could be developed into a variety of highly capable robotic assistants for general or specific applications. There is especially great potential for the development of ART-based robots as substitutes for live-in health-care aides for home-bound persons who are aged, infirm, or physically handicapped; these robots could greatly reduce the cost of home health care and extend the term of independent living. The ART is a fully autonomous and untethered system. It includes a mobile base on which is mounted an extensible torso topped by a head, shoulders, and two arms. All subsystems of the ART are powered by a rechargeable, removable battery pack. The mobile base is a differentially- driven, nonholonomic vehicle capable of a speed >1 m/s and can handle a payload >100 kg. The base can be controlled manually, in forward/backward and/or simultaneous rotational motion, by use of a joystick. Alternatively, the motion of the base can be controlled autonomously by an onboard navigational computer. By retraction or extension of the torso, the head height of the ART can be adjusted from 5 ft (1.5 m) to 6 1/2 ft (2 m), so that the arms can reach either the floor or high shelves, or some ceilings. The arms are symmetrical. Each arm (including the wrist) has a total of six rotary axes like those of the human shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints. The arms are actuated by electric motors in combination with brakes and gas-spring assists on the shoulder and elbow joints. The arms are operated under closed-loop digital control. A receptacle for an end effector is mounted on the tip of the wrist and

  19. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  20. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  1. Ghana social mobilization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tweneboa-Kodua, A; Obeng-Quaidoo, I; Abu, K

    1991-01-01

    In order to increase communication channels for child survival and development, the government and UNICEF Ghana undertook a "social mobilization analysis." This analysis included three studies that aimed to identify individuals and existing organizations with the potential to serve as health communicators and to determine the type of assistance that they needed to maximize their effectiveness in this role. The first study surveyed governmental institutions, trade unions, revolutionary organizations, traditional leaders, and others and found a largely untapped reservoir of capacities to promote child health, with varying levels of current involvement. The primary need identified was for information and training materials. The second study focused on the mass media and revealed a low coverage of maternal and child health topics and the need for better cooperation between journalists and health professionals. The third study assessed sources of health information for parents and found several sources, such as religious organizations, women's groups, and school teachers that could be mobilized to promote child health. Recommendations are made for the use of the findings.

  2. Mobile Health Technology Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Nilsen, Wendy J.; Abernethy, Amy; Atienza, Audie; Patrick, Kevin; Pavel, Misha; Riley, William T.; Shar, Albert; Spring, Bonnie; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Hedeker, Donald; Honavar, Vasant; Kravitz, Richard; Lefebvre, R. Craig; Mohr, David C.; Murphy, Susan A.; Quinn, Charlene; Shusterman, Vladimir; Swendeman, Dallas

    2013-01-01

    Creative use of new mobile and wearable health information and sensing technologies (mHealth) has the potential to reduce the cost of health care and improve well-being in numerous ways. These applications are being developed in a variety of domains, but rigorous research is needed to examine the potential, as well as the challenges, of utilizing mobile technologies to improve health outcomes. Currently, evidence is sparse for the efficacy of mHealth. Although these technologies may be appealing and seemingly innocuous, research is needed to assess when, where, and for whom mHealth devices, apps, and systems are efficacious. In order to outline an approach to evidence generation in the field of mHealth that would ensure research is conducted on a rigorous empirical and theoretic foundation, on August 16, 2011, researchers gathered for the mHealth Evidence Workshop at NIH. The current paper presents the results of the workshop. Although the discussions at the meeting were cross-cutting, the areas covered can be categorized broadly into three areas: (1) evaluating assessments; (2) evaluating interventions; and, (3) reshaping evidence generation using mHealth. This paper brings these concepts together to describe current evaluation standards, future possibilities and set a grand goal for the emerging field of mHealth research. PMID:23867031

  3. Autonomous mobile platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakashan, A.; Samuel, S. D.; Shankar, J.; Vishal, Moondhra; Shivaswaroopa, S.; Vijayasimha, K.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a partially intelligent mobile platform. The mobile robot derives its intelligence from sensors such as ultrasonic range finders, a mouse and a set of microswitches. Motion is assumed to bee on a plane two dimensional surface. The platform consists of two front wheels and two rear wheels. While the front wheels are undriven, the rear wheels are individually driven by two motors to realize both forward movement as well as steering. Ultrasonic range finders have been employed to plan an obstacle free path. A mouse like arrangement is fitted in the platform's underside, with the mouse ball in contact with the surface of travel, to help the host to keep track of the platform's current position. A single chip microcontroller based card has been designed for communication between the platform and the host IBM PC. This is part of the work carried out at the department of Electronics, S.J. College of Engineering, Mysore, India.

  4. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  5. Mobility in old age.

    PubMed

    Walsh, K; Roberts, J; Bennett, G

    1999-12-01

    Immobility is common in older people and may impact on their dental care. Immobility in old age may have physical, psychological and environmental causes. Immobile elderly people often suffer from a number of diseases which worsen their mobility. Arthritis, osteoporosis, hip fracture, stroke and Parkinson's disease are among the most common causes of immobility in old age. Complications of immobility such as orthostatic hypotension may occur in the dental patient. Careful history-taking and a thorough physical examination by the physician are the most important parts of the assessment process. This assessment should lead to a list of active problems and treatment should then be aimed at these problems. Active management, carried out by the multidisciplinary team, will lead to improvements in mobility and lessen the frequency and severity of the complications of immobility. This broad description thus provides the basis for a wide understanding for the special problems that the immobile patient present to the practitioner and ways of overcoming the problems.

  6. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  7. [The locations of mobile geriatric teams in France].

    PubMed

    Salles, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Mobile geriatric teams fulfil several missions in healthcare facilities. They work within and outside hospitals. A nationwide study was carried out in 2011 and a task force was created within the French geriatric and gerontology society (SFGG) to standardise the practices of these teams in France and emphasise their place at the heart of the health care pathway of the elderly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Computer-Based Instruction within Transportation Mobility Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    students to skip over material they know and concentrate on their weak areas (50:15). In addition, good programs provide reinforcement and...be computer programmers. In addition, the thrust of Air Force training at the unit level is usually to teach and reinforce concepts that do not call...procedures employed in mobility parallel those used in noncontingency operations. Therefore, if CBI is effective in the APT, it is logical to assume its

  9. Mobile Manipulators for Assisted Living in Residential Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    periods of time. We have developed a technique for modeling routinely occurring events and scoring sensor allocation strategies based on the “cost” of...cases the falls are recur- rent ( Tinetti 2003) and {� occur at home. Further- more, � � of hip fractures are caused by falls, �� of those...contact forces with a mobile manip- ulator. In Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Tinetti , M. 2003

  10. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  11. Quantized Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2012-12-07

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large-separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential, we find (i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3ħcα(2)/8π(2)d(4) and (ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with the same type of carrier and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore electrically tunable in ambipolar materials such as graphene. The Casimir force is suppressed when one mirror is a charge-neutral graphene system in a filling factor ν=0 quantum Hall state.

  12. Air Force Junior ROTC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, James A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the Junior Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) program presently being operated in 275 units across the country. It is basically a three year course in aerospace studies and leadership education. (BR)

  13. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  14. Riveting-force gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Gage monitors riveting forces applied when components are mounted on printed-circuit boards. Correct swaging pressures have been established for specific substrate materials such as phenolics and ceramics.

  15. Nongravitational forces on comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented and discussed for determining the effects of nongravitational forces on the orbits of comets. These methods are applied to short-period and long-period comets. Results are briefly described.

  16. Relativistic linear restoring force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-09-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke’s law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: dp/dt or dp/dτ. Either formulation recovers Hooke’s law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we introduce a form of retardation appropriate for the description of a linear (in displacement) force arising from the interaction of a pair of particles with a relativistic field. The procedure is akin to replacing Coulomb’s law in electromagnetism with a retarded form (the first correction in the full relativistic case). This retardation leads to the expected oscillation, but with amplitude growth in both its relativistic and non-relativistic incarnations.

  17. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  18. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  19. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  20. Re-thinking residential mobility

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Maarten; Findlay, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges. PMID:27330243

  1. Neighborhood context and residential mobility.

    PubMed

    Lee, B A; Oropesa, R S; Kanan, J W

    1994-05-01

    This paper extends the search for neighborhood contextual effects to residential mobility. We propose that neighborhood consists of subjective and objective domains, both of which are crosscut by substantive (social/physical) and temporal (current/change) dimensions. Measures of neighborhood characteristics consistent with our conceptualization are used to estimate the impact of context on mobility thoughts and on actual mobility in a sample of Nashville residents. Although individual statuses such as age and tenure remain important antecedents of mobility, subjective features of neighborhood context also play a role--albeit limited and indirect--in the decision to move or to stay.

  2. New agents in HSC mobilization.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mélanie J; Nilsson, Susan K; Cao, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood (PB) is the most common source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for autologous transplantation. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the most commonly used mobilization agent, yet despite its widespread use, a considerable number of patients still fail to mobilize. Recently, a greater understanding of the interactions that regulate HSC homeostasis in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has enabled the development of new molecules that mobilize HSC through specific inhibition, modulation or perturbation of these interactions. AMD3100 (plerixafor), a small molecule that selectively inhibits the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is approved for mobilization in combination with G-CSF in patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Nevertheless, identifying mobilization strategies that not only enhance HSC number, but are rapid and generate an optimal "mobilized product" for improved transplant outcomes remains an area of clinical importance. In recent times, new agents based on recombinant proteins, peptides and small molecules have been identified as potential candidates for therapeutic HSC mobilization. In this review, we describe the most recent developments in HSC mobilization agents and their potential impact in HSC transplantation.

  3. On mobile media rights management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong H.

    2004-10-01

    Over the last three years, mobile handsets have evolved from voice based services to multimedia terminals that is gradually leading towards a new era of consumer entertainment fostered by mobile communications and consumer networks. The need for Mobile Digital Rights Management (MDRM) solutions is thus intensified in order to safeguard mobile media content. Various types of content protection solutions have been proposed. In this paper, we investigate current status, the standardization effort, and the challenges in the development of MDRM technologies. Sample state-of-the-art media security technologies for MDRM are also discussed.

  4. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  5. Mobile Router Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, under a NASA Space Act Agreement with Cisco Systems, has been performing joint networking research to apply Internet-based technologies and protocols to space-based communications. As a result of this research, NASA performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and the transport-level protocol. In addition, Cisco Systems developed the mobile router for both commercial and Government markets. The code has become part of the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) as of release 12.2 (4) T--which will make this capability available to the community at large. The mobile router is software code that resides in a network router and enables entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both Government and commercial sectors, including the "wireless battlefield." NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is also a key enabling technology for aviation-based information applications. Mobile routing will make it possible for information such as weather, air traffic control, voice, and video to be transmitted to aircraft using Internet-based protocols. This technology shows great promise in reducing congested airways and mitigating aviation disasters due to bad weather. The mobile router can also be incorporated into emergency vehicles (such as ambulances and life-flight aircraft) to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and health-care experts, enabling the timely application of emergency care. Commercial applications include entertainment services, Internet protocol (IP) telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour buses, aircraft, and eventually cars. A mobile router, which is based on mobile IP, allows hosts (mobile nodes) to seamlessly "roam" among various IP

  6. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also

  7. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  8. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  9. New force in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Fischbach, E.; Sudarsky, D.; Szafer, A.; Talmadge, C.; Aronson, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical work dealing with the proposed fifth force. Further analysis of the original Eotvos experiments has uncovered no challenges to our original assertion that these data evidence a correlation characteristic of the presence of a new coupling to baryon number or hypercharge. Various models suggest that the proposed fifth force could be accommodated naturally into the existing theoretical framework. 40 refs.

  10. Health of the Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    disease exacts a toll on one’s quality of life, requiring sustained clinical management to avoid severe health outcomes or complications. The six...been avoided with the delivery of high- quality outpatient treatment and disease management. They can serve as potential markers of health sys- tem...Create a healthier force for tomorrow. HEALTH FORCE OF THE NOVEMBER 2015 Introduction Performance Triad Sleep Activity Nutrition

  11. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  12. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  13. Optical ``Bernoulli'' forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanies by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analogue as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ >ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g. metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force. [This talk is based on Phys. Rev. A 88, 023829 (2013).] Supported in part by the U.S. Army Research Office under contract W911NF-13-D-0001.

  14. The missing climate forcing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Lacis, A.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-01-01

    Observed climate change is consistent with radiative forcings on several time-scales for which the dominant forcings are known, ranging from the few years after a large volcanic eruption to glacial-to-interglacial changes. In the period with most detailed data, 1979 to the present, climate observations contain clear signatures of both natural and anthropogenic forcings. But in the full period since the industrial revolution began, global warming is only about half of that expected due to the principal forcing, increasing greenhouse gases. The direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols contributes only little towards resolving this discrepancy. Unforced climate variability is an unlikely explanation. We argue on the basis of several lines of indirect evidence that aerosol effects on clouds have caused a large negative forcing, at least -1 Wm-2, which has substantially offset greenhouse warming. The tasks of observing this forcing and determining the microphysical mechanisms at its basis are exceptionally difficult, but they are essential for the prognosis of future climate change.

  15. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  16. Mobile Learning with a Mobile Game: Design and Motivational Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Gerhard; Goth, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. This paper describes the design of the MobileGame prototype, exploring the opportunities to support learning through an orientation game in a university setting. The paper first introduces the scenario and then describes the general architecture of the prototype.…

  17. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  18. Mobile Perspectives: On Websites. Mobile Matters--Communication Trumps Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology is a favorite discussion topic among senior IT leaders and higher education administrators. Mobile is the future for content delivery. Colleges and universities need to establish a strategy now and make the decisions necessary to take advantage of this communication opportunity. In this article, the author recommends making…

  19. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  20. Mobile Learning with a Mobile Game: Design and Motivational Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Gerhard; Goth, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. This paper describes the design of the MobileGame prototype, exploring the opportunities to support learning through an orientation game in a university setting. The paper first introduces the scenario and then describes the general architecture of the prototype.…