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Sample records for anti-helicobacter pylori activity

  1. Flavonoids with anti-Helicobacter pylori activity from Cistus laurifolius leaves.

    PubMed

    Ustün, Osman; Ozçelik, Berrin; Akyön, Yakut; Abbasoglu, Ufuk; Yesilada, Erdem

    2006-12-06

    Cistus laurifolius flower buds are used traditionally in folk medicine against gastric ailments. In a prior study we showed that the chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius had a potent anti-ulcer activity. It has been known that there is a causal relationship between peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection. Then in a previous study, we demonstrated that chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius possessed a significant anti-Helicobacter pylori activity. We designed this study to isolate and define the active component(s) involved in the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract through activity-guided fractionation procedures. The chloroform extract was fractionated by using various chromatography techniques, i.e., Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography and six compounds were isolated (1-6). Each of these six compounds' anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was tested in vitro and was measured as minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values by using agar dilution method. The compound 2 had the highest activity against Helicobacter pylori (MIC 3.9 microg/mL). Its chemical structure was elucidated as quercetin 3-methyl ether (isorhamnetin) by various spectroscopic techniques. We believe that the therapeutic effect of Cistus laurifolius in ulcer is at least partially related to its effect on Helicobacter pylori. We hope that the isolated flavonoid having anti-Helicobacter pylori activity ultimately can be utilized as an alternative or additive agent to the current therapy.

  2. Screening test for anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of traditional Chinese herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Chen, Ye; Li, Jing; Qing, He-Ping; Wang, Ji-De; Zhang, Ya-Li; Long, Bei-Guo; Bai, Yang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity of 50 traditional Chinese herbal medicines in order to provide the primary evidence for their use in clinical practice. METHODS: A susceptibility test of water extract from 50 selected traditional Chinese herbal medicines for in vitro H. pylori Sydney strain 1 was performed with broth dilution method. Anti-H. pylori activity of the selected Chinese herbal medicines was evaluated according to their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). RESULTS: The water extract from Rhizoma Coptidis, Radix Scutellariae and Radix isatidis could significantly inhibit the H. pylori activity with their MIC less than 7.8 mg/mL, suggesting that traditional Chinese herbal medicines have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects and can thus be used in treatment of H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Rhizoma Coptidis, Radix Scutellariae and Radix isatidis are the potential sources for the synthesis of new drugs against H. pylori. PMID:21105198

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of fermented milk with lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Chi-Rei; Fang, Tony J; Guo, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2011-06-01

    Ten strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated for their anti-Helicobacter pylori effects. The bactericidal activity and organic acid content in spent culture supernatants (SCS) from fermented milk were measured. In addition, the exclusion effect of SCS against H. pylori infection of human gastric epithelial AGS cells was assayed. Three LAB strains, LY1, LY5 and IF22, showed better anti-Helicobacter effects than the other strains. There were no significant differences in the bactericidal activity of LAB strains between original SCS, artificial SCS and SCS treated by heating or protease digestion. However, neutralised SCS lost this activity. These results suggest that the anti-H. pylori activity of SCS may be related to the concentration of organic acids and the pH value but not to protein components. In the AGS cell culture test, both fermented LY5-SCS and artificial LY5-SCS significantly reduced H. pylori infection and urease activity (P < 0.05). In this study, in vitro methods were used to screen potential probiotics with anti-H. pylori activity. This may provide an excellent and rapid system for studying probiotics in the functional food and dairy industries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of some newly synthesized derivatives of xanthone.

    PubMed

    Klesiewicz, Karolina; Karczewska, Elżbieta; Budak, Alicja; Marona, Henryk; Szkaradek, Natalia

    2016-11-01

    A series of 20 xanthone derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity. Qualitative and quantitative in vitro tests using the Kirby-Bauer method (agar disc-diffusion method) were performed. The tested compounds were screened against clarithromycin- and/or metronidazole-resistant strains of H. pylori. As a reference, Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains were examined. On the basis of microbiological assays, xanthones can be considered as potential anti-H. pylori agents. They displayed significant activity against the examined strains, which was higher against the bacteria resistant to metronidazole than clarithromycin. The lowest MIC values ranging up to 20 mg l(-1) were observed for the following compounds: 3, 4, 8, 9, 12, 19 (against the metronidazole-resistant strains) and the compound 10 (against the clarithromycin-resistant strain). These preliminary results for screening of xanthone derivatives form a part of an ongoing study of the structure-activity relationships of a large group of compounds. Microbiological assays will be conducted afterwards to determine the mechanism of xanthones' action against H. pylori.

  5. Anti-Helicobacter pylori and urease inhibition activities of some traditional medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad; Anwar, Farooq; Naz, Fauqia; Mehmood, Tahir; Saari, Nazamid

    2013-02-07

    Different parts of Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile, Calotropis procera (Aiton) W.T. Aiton, Adhatoda vasica Nees, Fagoniaar abica L. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. are traditionally used in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of common ailments like nausea, cold, cough, asthma, fevers, diarrhea, sore throat, swelling, etc. The present study was aimed to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter pylori and urease inhibition activities of extracts produced from the above selected medicinal plants native to Soon Valley (home to an old civilization) in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Methanol, acetone and water extracts of the plants were evaluated for anti-bacterial activity against thirty four clinical isolates and two reference strains of H. pylori. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined using the agar dilution method and compared with some standard antibiotics like amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CLA), tetracycline (TET) and metronidazole (MNZ), used in the triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. H. pylori urease inhibition activity of the extracts was assessed by the phenol red method, wherein, Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to determine Michaelis-Menten constants for elucidating the mechanism of inhibition. Methanol and acetone extracts from Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera exhibited stronger anti-H. pylori activity than MNZ, almost comparable activity with TET, but were found to be less potent than AMX and CLT. The rest of the extracts exhibited lower activity than the standard antibiotics used in this study. In the H. pylori urease inhibitory assay, methanol and acetone extracts of Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera showed significant inhibition. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated a competitive mechanism for extract of Acacia nilotica, whereas extract of Calotropis procera exhibited a mixed type of inhibition.

  6. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of bioactive components isolated from Hericium erinaceus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Hui; Li, Liang; Shang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Tan, Qi

    2016-05-13

    The fungus Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Pers is used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat symptoms related to gastric ulcers. Different extracts from the fungus were assessed for anti-Helicobacter pylori activity to investigate the antibacterial activity of the ethanol extracts from H. erinaceus and verify the traditional indication of use. The fruiting bodies of H. erinaceus were concentrated with ethanol by HPD-100 macroporous resin and the whole extract was partitioned by petroleum ether and chloroform to afford fractions with using a silica gel column. Several pure compounds of petroleum ether extracts were obtained and analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The activity of the extracts and fractions towards H. pylori was assessed by the microdilution assay and by the disk diffusion assay in vitro. From the most active fraction, two pure compounds were isolated and identified as the main components with anti-H. pylori activity from the fungus H. erinaceus. The cytotoxicity of these two compounds against the human erythroleu-kemia cell line K562 was also evaluated. The crude ethanol extracts from the fungus H. erinaceus were inhibitory to H. pylori. The petroleum ether extracts (PE1s, PE2s) and the chloroform extracts (TEs) demonstrated strong inhibition to H. pylori. The inhibition of H. pylori was observed through an agar dilution test with minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) values from 400μg/mL to 12.5µg/mL. Two pure compounds, 1-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methyl-1-butanone and 2,5-bis(methoxycarbonyl)terephthalic acid were isolated from the petroleum ether fractions and identified using (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra analysis. The MIC value for 1-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methyl-1-butanone was 12.5-50µg/mL and the MIC value for 2,5-bis(methoxycarbonyl)terephthalic acid was 6.25-25µg/mL. Both two compounds showed weak cytotoxicity against K562 with IC50<200mM. This study revealed that the extracts from petroleum ether contribute to

  7. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of a flavonoid rich extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra and its probable mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Asha, Mannanthendil Kumaran; Debraj, Debnath; Prashanth, D'souza; Edwin, Jothie Richard; Srikanth, H S; Muruganantham, Nithyanantham; Dethe, Shekhar Michael; Anirban, Bhaskar; Jaya, Balachandran; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Agarwal, Amit

    2013-01-30

    Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn. is regarded useful for peptic ulcer in traditional systems of medicine in India and Helicobacter pylori has been considered as one of the causative factors for peptic ulcer. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter pylori action of GutGard(®), a flavonoid rich extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra and further to elucidate the possible mechanisms of its anti-Helicobacter pylori action. Agar dilution and microbroth dilution methods were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of GutGard(®) against Helicobacter pylori. Protein synthesis, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase assays and anti-adhesion assay in human gastric mucosal cell line were performed to understand the mechanisms of anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of GutGard(®). GutGard(®) exhibited anti-Helicobacter pylori activity in both agar dilution and microbroth dilution methods. Glabridin, the major flavonoid present in GutGard(®) exhibited superior activity against Helicobacter pylori while glycyrrhizin did not show activity even at 250 μg/ml concentration. In protein synthesis assay, GutGard(®) showed a significant time dependent inhibition as witnessed by the reduction in (35)S methionine incorporation into Helicobacter pylori ATCC 700392 strain. Additionally, GutGard(®) showed a potent inhibitory effect on DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase with IC(50) value of 4.40 μg/ml and 3.33 μg/ml respectively. However, the extract did not show significant inhibition on the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucosal cell line at the tested concentrations. The present study shows that, GutGard(®) acts against Helicobacter pylori possibly by inhibiting protein synthesis, DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence of the anti-Helicobacter pylori, gastroprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of Cuphea aequipetala infusion.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Espinosa, Juan Francisco; Arroyo-García, Oscar; García-Valencia, Guillermo; Linares, Edelmira; Bye, Robert; Romero, Irma

    2014-02-03

    Cuphea aequipetala (Lythraceae) is a medicinal plant highly appreciated in Mexico to treat stomach ailments such as pain and burning sensation, stomach infections, ulcers, diarrhea, dysentery, and different types of tumors and bruises. In this work, the infusion of aerial parts of this plant (CAI) was investigated for its polypharmacological potential. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was assessed by broth dilution method. Pharmacological studies included acute toxicity in mice using Lorke´s model, anti-inflammatory activity by xylene and TPA induced ear edema assay, as well as gastroprotection with ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. DPPH and ABTS assays were used to determine antioxidant capacity. Polyphenols and flavonoid contents were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method and AlCl3 reaction, respectively. CAI showed good anti-Helicobacter pylori activity with a MIC of 125μg/mL. The infusion was not toxic according to Lorke's model with a LD50 greater than 5g/kg. CAI exhibited low anti-edematogenic action in the models assayed. Oral administration of 300mg/kg CAI significantly reduced gastric lesions by 87.9%. The effect was reversed only by indomethacin and N-ethylmaleimide demonstrating the role of endogenous prostaglandins and sulfhydryl compounds in gastroprotection. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of CAI were 109.9mg GAE/g DW and 28.1mg QE/g DW, respectively, and the infusion exhibited a good antioxidant activity that is thought to play a role in its biological activity. The analysis of a preliminary fractionation of the infusion indicates that the complete extract conserves all its pharmacological activities in contrast to fractionated extracts. Cuphea aequipetala is a promising native herb in an integral therapy for the treatment of bacterial or non-bacterial gastric ulcer because it possesses some anti-inflammatory properties, as well as exhibits good gastroprotective and antibacterial effects. It represents an important source for the

  9. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Liu, Yu; Li, Ning; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Hong; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Xue-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bactericidal effects of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (CAL) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: For in vitro experiments, the inhibitory activity of CAL was tested using an agar dilution method; H. pylori strain NCTC11637 was incubated on Columbia blood agar plates containing serial concentrations of CAL. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the absence of H. pylori colonies on the agar plate. Time-kill curves were used to evaluate bactericidal activity; the average number of colonies was calculated at 0, 2, 8 and 24 h after liquid incubation with concentrations of CAL at 0.5, 1, and 2 × MIC. For in vivo experiments, H. pylori-infected mice were randomly divided into CAL, triple therapy (lansoprazole, metronidazole, and clarithromycin), blank control, or H. pylori control groups. The eradication ratios were determined by positive findings from rapid urease tests (RUTs) and by histopathology. RESULTS: In vitro, the MIC of CAL against H. pylori was 16 mg/L. The time-kill curves showed a stable and persistent decreasing tendency with increasing CAL concentration, and the intensity of the bactericidal effect was proportional to dose; the 1 and 2 × MIC completely inhibited the growth of H. pylori at 24 h. In vivo, the eradication ratios in the CAL group were 60% (6/10) by RUT and 50% (5/10) by histopathology. Ratios in the triple therapy group were both 70% (7/10), and there was no difference between the CAL and triple therapy groups. Histopathologic evaluation revealed massive bacterial colonization on the surface of gastric mucosa and slight infiltration of mononuclear cells after inoculation with H. pylori, but no obvious inflammation or other pathologic changes in gastric mucosa of mice from CAL and triple therapy groups. CONCLUSION: CAL demonstrates effective bactericidal activity against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25892867

  10. In vitro and In vivo Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activities of Centella asiatica Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong-Mei; Choi, Myung-Joo; Kim, Jae Min; Lee, Kye Wan; Park, Yu Hwa; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of developing upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. However, treatment failure is a major cause of concern mainly due to possible recurrence of infection, the side effects, and resistance to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the activities of Centella asiatica leaf extract (CAE) against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against 55 clinically isolated strains of H. pylori were tested using an agar dilution method. The MICs of CAE ranged from 0.125 mg/mL to 8 mg/mL, effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth was 2 mg/mL. The anti-H. pylori effects of CAE in vivo were also examined in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice. CAE was orally administrated once daily for 3 weeks at doses of 50 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg. CAE at the 50 mg/kg dose significantly reduced H. pylori colonization in mice gastric mucosa. Our study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effects of CAE against H. pylori infection, and it suggests that CAE may be useful as an alternative therapy. PMID:27752495

  11. Anti-Helicobacter pylori and antiulcerogenic activity of Aframomum pruinosum seeds on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure Brigitte; Nanfack Nana, Blandine; Eyoum Bille, Bertrand; Tchuenteu Tchuenguem, Roland; Nguepi, Eveline

    2017-12-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most common diseases affecting mankind. Although there are many products used for its treatment, most of these products produce severe adverse reactions requiring the search for novel compounds. Some Afromomum species are used traditionally to cure acute gastritis. To evaluate the antiulcer activity of the methanol extract of Aframomum pruinosum Gagnepain (Zingiberaceae) seeds against two major etiologic agents of peptic ulcer disease; Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The anti-Helicobacter activity of A. pruinosum was evaluated using the broth microdilution method. After oral administration of indomethacin (5 mg/kg) for 5 consecutive days, gastric ulcerated animals were divided into control group and five other groups: three groups that recieved respectively 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg of plant extract, the fourth group received Maalox (50 mg/kg) and the fifth group, Misoprostol (100 μg/kg), respectively, for 5 days. Ulcer areas, gastric mucus content and nitric oxide gastric levels of animals were assessed 24 h after this treatment. A. pruinosum extract shows a moderate anti-Helicobacter activity with an MIC value of 128 μg/mL. A. pruinosum extract, like Misoprostol and Maalox, markedly reduces the % of ulcerated area from 8.15 ± 0.33 to 1.71 ± 0.44% (500 mg/kg). It also increased significantly mucus and NO gastric production with respective values of 4.44 ± 1.35 and 965.81 ± 106.74 μmol/g (500 mg/kg). These findings suggest that A. pruinosum methanol extract possesses antiulcer properties as ascertained by the comparative decreases in ulcer areas, increase of mucus and NO gastric production.

  12. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of diallyl sulphides and protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-hu; Hsu, Cheng-chin; Yin, Mei-chin

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro inhibitory effects of diallyl disulphide (DADS), diallyl trisulphide (DAT), roselle calyx extract and protocatechuic acid (PA) on the growth of Helicobacter pylori (15 susceptible, 11 clarithromycin-resistant and 9 metronidazole-resistant strains) were studied. The inhibition zone was determined after each agent had been heated at 25, 60, 100 degrees C for 60 min. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each agent was determined by the tube dilution assay. The results showed that heat treatment did not affect the anti-H. pylori activity of DADS, DAT, roselle calyx extract and PA, and the MIC values of these agents against test H. pylori strains were in the range 8-64 mg/L. The time-kill study assay for DAT and PA at 1x MIC was monitored in Muller Hinton broth supplemented with 10% horse blood or mice stomach homogenate. Both DAT and PA inhibited the growth of all test H. pylori in broth and mice stomach homogenate (p < 0.05); however, the inhibitory effects of these two agents were less in mice stomach homogenate than in broth (p < 0.05). DAT at 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 mg/L and PA at 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48 mg/L were used for urease activity assay. These two agents significantly reduced urease activity of test H. pylori strains (p < 0.05), in which DAT and PA at 1x MIC reduced the urease activity of H. pylori to 70% and 40%, respectively. These agents, based on their lower MIC values and heat tolerance, might be useful in the prevention or therapy of H. pylori. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Isolation of Abscisic Acid from Korean Acacia Honey with Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, SeGun; Hong, InPyo; Woo, SoonOk; Jang, HyeRi; Pak, SokCheon; Han, SangMi

    2017-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is linked to the development of the majority of peptic ulcers and some types of gastric cancers, and its antibiotic resistance is currently found worldwide. This study is aimed at evaluating the anti-H. pylori activity of Korean acacia honey and isolating the related active components using organic solvents. The crude acacia honey was extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and n-butanol. The EtOAc extract was subjected to octadecyl-silica chromatography. The extracts and fractions were then examined for anti-H. pylori activity using the agar well diffusion method. The antimicrobial activity of abscisic acid against H. pylori was investigated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and by performing a time-kill assay. Abscisic acid related to the botanical origins of acacia honey from Korea has been analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The MICs and MBCs of abscisic acid were 2.7 ± 1.3 and 6.9 ± 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. The bactericidal activity of abscisic acid (at 10.8 μg/mL corresponding to 4 × MIC) killed the organism within 36-72 h. These results suggest that abscisic acid isolated from Korean acacia honey has antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Abscisic acid isolated from Korean acacia honey can be therapeutic and may be further exploited as a potential lead candidate for the development of treatments for H. pylori-induced infections. The crude acacia honey was extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, EtOAc, and n-butanolThe EtOAc extract yielded eight fractions and four subfractions were subsequently obtained chromatographicallyAbscisic acid was isolated from one subfractionAll the solvent extracts and fractions showed antibacterial activity against H. pyloriAbscisic acid exhibited antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Abbreviations used: MeOH: Methanol; EtOAc: Ethyl acetate; TSB: Trypticase soy broth

  14. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti- Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl) blume

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose β-Mangostin (BM) from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. Materials and methods BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. Results BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound showed intense periodic acid–Schiff staining to the gastric mucus layer and marked amount of alcian blue binding to free gastric mucus. BM significantly increased the gastric homogenate content of prostaglandin E2 glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds. The compound inhibited the lipid peroxidation revealed by the reduced gastric content of malondialdehyde. Moreover, BM upregulate HSP70 expression and downregulate Bax expression. Furthermore, the compound showed interesting anti-H. pylori activity. Conclusion Thus, it could be concluded that BM possesses gastroprotective activity, which could be attributed to the antisecretory, mucus production, antioxidant, HSP70, antiapoptotic, and anti-H. pylori mechanisms. PMID:26834460

  15. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti- Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl) blume.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    β-Mangostin (BM) from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound showed intense periodic acid-Schiff staining to the gastric mucus layer and marked amount of alcian blue binding to free gastric mucus. BM significantly increased the gastric homogenate content of prostaglandin E2 glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds. The compound inhibited the lipid peroxidation revealed by the reduced gastric content of malondialdehyde. Moreover, BM upregulate HSP70 expression and downregulate Bax expression. Furthermore, the compound showed interesting anti-H. pylori activity. Thus, it could be concluded that BM possesses gastroprotective activity, which could be attributed to the antisecretory, mucus production, antioxidant, HSP70, antiapoptotic, and anti-H. pylori mechanisms.

  16. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity of Isocoumarin Paepalantine: Morphological and Molecular Docking Analysis.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, João Paulo L; Rodrigues, Ricardo P; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R

    2017-05-12

    The Helicobacterpylori bacterium is one of the main causes of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and even gastric cancer. It affects an average of half of the world population. Its difficult eradication depends upon multi-drug therapy. Since its classification as a group 1 carcinogenic by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the importance of H. pylori eradication has obtained a novel meaning. There is considerable interest in alternative therapies for the eradication of H. pylori using compounds from a wide range of natural products. In the present study, we investigated the antibacterial property of the isocoumarin paepalantine against H. pylori and it exhibited significant anti-H. pylori activity at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 128 μg/mL and at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 256 μg/mL. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed significant morphological changes of the bacterial cell as a response to a sub-MIC of paepalantine, suggesting a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) inhibition. Computational studies were carried out in order to study binding modes for paepalantine in PBP binding sites, exploring the active and allosteric sites. The data from the present study indicates that paepalantine exhibits significant anti-H. pylori activity, most likely by inhibiting membrane protein synthesis.

  17. Chromone and chromanone glucosides from Hypericum sikokumontanum and their anti-Helicobacter pylori activities.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naonobu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Nakano, Tatsuro; Shibata, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Tomihiko; Sekiya, Michiko; Ikeshiro, Yasumasa; Takaishi, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Chromone glucosides, takanechromones A-C (1, 2 and 5) and chromanone glucosides, named takanechromanones A and B (3 and 4), were isolated from the methanolic extracts of Hypericumsikokumontanum together with 27 known compounds. Their structures were established based on spectroscopic evidence. The isolated compounds and some chromone derivatives were assayed for antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

  18. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of crude N-acetylneuraminic acid isolated from glycomacropeptide of whey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Min-Jung; Choi, Jin-A; Na, Dae-Seung; Kim, Jin-Beom; Na, Chun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. An increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori arouses demand on alternative non-antibiotic-based therapies. In this study, we freshly prepared crude N-acetylneuraminic acid obtained from glycomacropeptide (G-NANA) of whey through a neuraminidase-mediated reaction and evaluated its antibacterial ability against H. pylori and H. felis. Overnight cultures of the H. pylori were diluted with fresh media and different concentrations (1-150 mg/mL) of crude G-NANA were added directly to the culture tube. Bacterial growth was evaluated by measuring the optical density of the culture medium and the number of viable bacteria was determined by a direct count of the colony forming units (CFU) on agar plates. For the in vivo study, mice were orally infected with 100 µL (5×108 cfu/mL) of H. felis four times at a day's interval, accompanied by a daily administration of crude G-NANA or vehicle. A day after the last infection, the mice were daily administered the crude G-NANA (0, 75, and 300 mg/mL) for 10 days and euthanized. Their stomachs were collected and bacterial colonization was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Crude G-NANA inhibited H. pylori's growth and reduced the number of viable bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, crude G-NANA inhibited bacterial colonization in the mice. These results showed that crude G-NANA has antibacterial activity against Helicobacter and demonstrated its therapeutic potential for the prevention of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis induced by Helicobacter infection in humans. PMID:27382378

  19. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  20. FR145715, a novel histamine H2 receptor antagonist, with specific anti-Helicobacter pylori activities.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Ito, H; Higaki, M; Higaki, M; Matsumoto, Y; Kamimura, T; Katsura, Y; Tomishi, T; Inoue, Y; Takasugi, H; Tomoi, M; Krakowka, S; Yoshida, K

    1999-08-13

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) with a mean minimal inhibitory concentration value of 0.32 microg/ml. Moreover, FR145715 showed no anti-microbial effects on 25 other bacteria examined. In addition, in vivo experiments using gnotobiotic piglets infected with H. pylori, FR145715 (16 mg/kg, t.i.d.) completely eliminated the organism with reduced intensity of inflammation, when treated orally for 10 days. These data demonstrate that FR145715 is a novel histamine H2 receptor antagonist having potent and selective anti-H. pylori activities as well as cytoprotective properties. The present data suggest that FR145715 might be useful for the patients suffering from ulcer relapse, since the drug might be able to eradicate H. pylori in the stomach, which is considered a key factor to cause ulcer recurrence in humans.

  1. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and essential oil composition of Thymus caramanicus from Iran.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Nariman, Farahnaz; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Hadiand, Javad; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad

    2009-08-01

    The essential oil of the dried aerial parts of Thymus caramanicus at full flowering stage was prepared by hydrodistillation with a yield of 2.5% oil. The oil analysis by a combination of capillary GC and GC-MS revealed 26 components of which carvacrol (68.9%) was the main component, followed by p-cymene (6.0%), thymol (5.3%), gamma-terpinene (4.6%) and borneol (4.0%) representing 98.9% of the total oil. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was determined against ten clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using disc diffusion, as well as measurement of minimum inhibitory concentrations. The results showed high inhibitory activity against all test bacteria by the disc diffusion method (zones of inhibition of 50.0 - 65.0 mm). Minimum inhibitory concentration values were within the range 14.5 - 58.0 microg/mL for the clinical isolates.

  2. Natural products and food components with anti-Helicobacter pylori activities

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Trang, Vu Thu; Morimoto, Norihito; Nishida, Yoshie; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes in over half of the world’s population. H. pylori that establishes life-long infection in the stomach is definitely associated with gastro-duodenal diseases and a wide variety of non-gastrointestinal tract conditions such as immune thrombocytopenia. Triple therapy which consists of a proton pump inhibitor and combinations of two antibiotics (amoxicillin, clarithromycin or amoxicillin, metronidazol) is commonly used for H. pylori eradication. Recently, the occurrence of drug-resistant H. pylori and the adverse effect of antibiotics have severely weakened eradication therapy. Generally antibiotics induce the disturbance of human gastrointestinal microflora. Furthermore, there are inappropriate cases of triple therapy such as allergy to antibiotics, severe complications (liver and/or kidney dysfunction), the aged and people who reject the triple therapy. These prompt us to seek alterative agents instead of antibiotics and to develop more effective and safe therapy with these agents. The combination of these agents actually may result in lower a dose of antibiotics. There are many reports world-wide that non-antibiotic substances from natural products potentially have an anti-H. pylori agent. We briefly review the constituents derived from nature that fight against H. pylori in the literature with our studies. PMID:25083070

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of non-living, heat-killed form of lactobacilli including Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2017-06-15

    Some strains of lactic acid bacteria are reported to inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori and proposed to be useful to support so-called triple therapy for H. pylori. Although most strains must be alive to exert their anti-H. pylori activity, some lactobacilli strains are effective even when dead. One possible underlying mechanism of such an activity of non-living lactobacilli is reportedly co-aggregation with H. pylori. In this study, we found that a non-living heat-killed form of Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088 (HK-LJ88) and also that of some other lactobacilli inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro. Furthermore, the number of H. pylori in the infected stomach of germ-free mice was significantly decreased by the repeated oral administration of HK-LJ88. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed that no co-aggregation had occurred between H. pylori and HK-LJ88; instead, deformations of H. pylori (e.g. disappearance of spiral, bending of cell body, coccoid formation, degradations, etc.) appeared after incubation for 24 h with HK-LJ88. These results suggest that HK-LJ88 inhibited H. pylori activity probably not by co-aggregation but by some unknown mechanism involving HK-LJ88's cell surface molecules and that even non-living lactobacilli are possibly useful to support H. pylori eradication therapy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Anti-Helicobacter Pylori Activities of Shoya Powder and Essential Oils of Thymus Vulgaris and Eucalyptus Globulus

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, D; Mobarez, A Mohabati; Tohidpour, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, an infective agent of more than 50% of the world population is prominent to be the main causative factor in the etiologies of chronic, active or type B gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors. A high prevalence of this bacterium in dental plaque is always reported. Pharmacological treatment of H. pylori infections includes administration of 3-fold therapeutic regimens which are typically used to suppress H. pylori activity. However, antibiotic resistance frequently develops as a consequence of such treatment. Thus, searching for alternative therapies for H. pylori infections is of special interest. Materials and Methods: In this study, anti H. pylori activities of a traditional antimicrobial drug so-called Shoya and also essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus were investigated using antimicrobial analysis and serological screening methods. Results: The agar dilution method results revealed the Shoya with the highest inhibitory effect against H. pylori. Also serological screening on tested mice showed a significant effect of this drug in lowering the sera amount of anti H. pylori specific IgA and IgG titers. Both of the essential oils showed different degrees of antibacterial effect against H. pylori. Conclusion: The obtained results showed the antibacterial effect of Shoya powder and Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus and purposes new therapeutical alternatives to control the H. pylori infection. Additional studies and clinical trials are necessary to approve the use of these data in health care and pharmacopeia systems. PMID:22927892

  5. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis 3 is due to secretion of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, I V; Bressollier, P; Verneuil, B; Fenet, B; Sorokulova, I B; Mégraud, F; Urdaci, M C

    2001-11-01

    A limited number of antibiotics can be used against Helicobacter pylori infection, and resistance jeopardizes the success of treatment. Therefore, a search for new agents is warranted. The use of probiotics to enhance gastrointestinal health has been proposed for many years, but the scientific basis of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of probiotics has not yet been clearly delineated. Probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis 3, whose safety has previously been demonstrated, is known to have antagonistic properties against species of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In the present study, it was also found to inhibit H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori activity present in the cell-free supernatant was not related to pH or organic acid concentration. It was heat stable and protease insensitive. At least two antibiotics, detected by thin-layer chromatography (R(f) values, 0.47 and 0.85, respectively) and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis, were found to be responsible for this anti-H. pylori activity. All H. pylori strains tested were sensitive to both compounds. One of these compounds was identified as amicoumacin A, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties. MICs for H. pylori determined in solid and liquid media ranged between 1.7 and 6.8 microg/ml and 0.75 and 2.5 microg/ml, respectively. The underestimation of MICs determined in solid medium may be due to physicochemical instability of the antibiotic under these test conditions. An additive effect between amicoumacin A and the nonamicoumacin antibiotic against H. pylori was demonstrated.

  6. In Vitro Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity of the Probiotic Strain Bacillus subtilis 3 Is Due to Secretion of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Irina V.; Bressollier, Philippe; Verneuil, Bernard; Fenet, Bernard; Sorokulova, Irina B.; Mégraud, Francis; Urdaci, Maria C.

    2001-01-01

    A limited number of antibiotics can be used against Helicobacter pylori infection, and resistance jeopardizes the success of treatment. Therefore, a search for new agents is warranted. The use of probiotics to enhance gastrointestinal health has been proposed for many years, but the scientific basis of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of probiotics has not yet been clearly delineated. Probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis 3, whose safety has previously been demonstrated, is known to have antagonistic properties against species of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In the present study, it was also found to inhibit H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori activity present in the cell-free supernatant was not related to pH or organic acid concentration. It was heat stable and protease insensitive. At least two antibiotics, detected by thin-layer chromatography (Rf values, 0.47 and 0.85, respectively) and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis, were found to be responsible for this anti-H. pylori activity. All H. pylori strains tested were sensitive to both compounds. One of these compounds was identified as amicoumacin A, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties. MICs for H. pylori determined in solid and liquid media ranged between 1.7 and 6.8 μg/ml and 0.75 and 2.5 μg/ml, respectively. The underestimation of MICs determined in solid medium may be due to physicochemical instability of the antibiotic under these test conditions. An additive effect between amicoumacin A and the nonamicoumacin antibiotic against H. pylori was demonstrated. PMID:11600371

  7. Mechanochemical synthesis and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori and uresase inhibitory activities of novel zinc(II)-famotidine complex.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Hughes, Roy W; Khan, Safyan A; Reynolds, Paul A; Enne, Virve I; Sajjad-ur-Rahman; Mirza, Akmal S

    2010-06-01

    The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of a zinc complex with famotidine is described. The complex was characterized by microanalysis and a number of spectroscopic techniques. The complex was of M:L dihydrate type. Derivatization of famotidine with zinc appears to enhance the activity of the drug by inhibiting the growth of Helicobacter pylori (two reference and 34 clinical isolates). The complex inhibited the growth of H. pylori in an MIC range of 1-8 microg mL(-1). The anti-H. pylori activity of the zinc-famotidine complex against antibiotic-resistant strains was nearly comparable to that of antibiotic-susceptible strains. The complex was found to be far less toxic than the parent drug, as demonstrated by its higher LD(50) value. In the human urease enzyme inhibition assay the complex exhibited significant inhibition. The new complex appears to be more useful in eradicating both the antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant strains of H. pylori.

  8. Is a one-week course of triple anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy sufficient to control active duodenal ulcer?

    PubMed

    Tepes, B; Krizman, I; Gorensek, M; Gubina, M; Orel, I

    2001-07-01

    Triple therapy currently forms the cornerstone of the treatment of patients with Helicobacter pylori-positive duodenal ulcer. To establish whether prolonged antisecretory therapy is necessary in patients with active duodenal ulcer. A total of 77 patients with H. pylori-positive duodenal ulcer were included in a prospective, controlled, double-blind study. All patients received a 7-day treatment with omeprazole 20 mg b.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.d. and amoxicillin 1000 mg b.d. Patients in the omeprazole group underwent an additional 14-day therapy with omeprazole 20 mg; patients in placebo group received placebo. Endoscopy was performed upon inclusion in the study and after 3 and 8 weeks. Seventy-four patients were eligible for a per protocol analysis after 3 weeks, and 65 after 8 weeks. After 3 weeks, the healing rate was 89% in the omeprazole group and 81% in the placebo group (P=0.51). After 8 weeks, the ulcer healed in 97% of the patients in the total group (95% CI: 92.7-100%). H. pylori was eradicated in 88% of patients in the omeprazole group and in 91% in the placebo group (P=1.0). No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in ulcer-related symptoms or in ulcer healing. In patients with H. pylori-positive duodenal ulcer, a 7-day triple therapy alone is sufficient to control the disease.

  9. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Potential of Artemisinin and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Suchandra; Chinniah, Annalakshmi; Pal, Anirban; Kar, Sudip K.

    2012-01-01

    The antimalarial drug artemisinin from Artemisia annua demonstrated remarkably strong activity against Helicobacter pylori, the pathogen responsible for peptic ulcer diseases. In an effort to develop a novel antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agent containing such a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide, a series of analogues (2 natural and 15 semisynthetic molecules), including eight newly synthesized compounds, were investigated against clinical and standard strains of H. pylori. The antimicrobial spectrum against 10 H. pylori strains and a few other bacterial and fungal strains indicated specificity against the ulcer causing organism. Of five promising molecules, a newly synthesized ether derivative β-artecyclopropylmether was found to be the most potent compound, which exhibited MIC range, MIC90, and minimum bactericidal concentration range values of 0.25 to 1.0 μg/ml, 1.0 μg/ml, and 1 to 16 μg/ml, respectively, against both resistant and sensitive strains of H. pylori. The molecule demonstrated strong bactericidal kinetics with extensive morphological degeneration, retained functional efficacy at stomach acidic pH unlike clarithromycin, did not elicit drug resistance unlike metronidazole, and imparted sensitivity to resistant strains. It is not cytotoxic and exhibits in vivo potentiality to reduce the H. pylori burden in a chronic infection model. Thus, β-artecyclopropylmether could be a lead candidate for anti-H. pylori therapeutics. Since the recurrence of gastroduodenal ulcers is believed to be mainly due to antibiotic resistance of the commensal organism H. pylori, development of a candidate drug from this finding is warranted. PMID:22687518

  10. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori action of 30 Chinese herbal medicines used to treat ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jun Yan; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2005-04-26

    Infection by Helicobacter pylori has been ascertained to be an important etiologic impetus leading usually to chronic active gastritis and gastric ulcer with growing incidences worldwide. Utilizing as the test pathogen a standard and five clinic strains of Helicobacter pylori, the antibacterial action was assessed in vitro with ethanol extracts of 30 Chinese herbal medicines which have been frequently prescribed since ancient times for treating gastritis-like disorders. Among the 30 tested materials, the ethanol extracts of Abrus cantoniensis (Fabaceae), Saussurea lappa (Asteraceae) and Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) were strongly inhibitory to all test strains (MICs: approximately 40 microg/ml), and Hippophae rhamnoides (Elaeagnaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii (Liliaceae), Magnolia officinalis and Schisandra chinensis (Magnoliaceae), Corydalis yanhusuo (Papaveraceae), Citrus reticulata (Rutaceae), Bupleurum chinense and Ligusticum chuanxiong (Apiaceae) substantially active with MICs close to 60.0 microg/ml. As to antibacterial actions of the aqueous extracts of the same drugs, those derived from Cassia obtusifolia (Fabaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii and Eugenia caryophyllata were remarkably inhibitory against all the six Helicobacter pylori strains (MICs: approximately 60 microg/ml). The work compared almost quantitatively the magnitude of the anti-Helicobacter pylori actions of the 30 most prescribed gastritis-treating Chinese herbal drugs, and located as well some source plants where potent anti-Helicobacter pylori phytochemicals could be characterized.

  11. Anti-Helicobacter pylori xanthones of Garcinia fusca.

    PubMed

    Nontakham, Jannarin; Charoenram, Napaporn; Upamai, Wanchalerm; Taweechotipatr, Malai; Suksamrarn, Sunit

    2014-08-01

    A new geranylated xanthone derivative, fuscaxanthone I (1), along with nine xanthones (2-9 and 11), a biphenyl (10) and three biflavonoids (12-14) were isolated from the roots of Garcinia fusca Pierre. Compounds 8, 10 and 11-14 were reported from this plant species for the first time. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS. The isolated compounds were evaluated for antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori. Cowaxanthone (5) and fukugiside (14) exhibited stronger inhibitory activity against H. pylori DMST reference strain at MICs 4.6 and 10.8 μM, respectively, than that of the control metronidazole. Isojacareubin (8) displayed the most potent activity against H. pylori HP40 clinical isolate with MIC 23.9 μM, which was approximately two times greater than that of the standard drug amoxicillin.

  12. The effect of simulated gastric environments on the anti-Helicobacter activity of garlic oil.

    PubMed

    O'Gara, E A; Maslin, D J; Nevill, A M; Hill, D J

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the effects of simulated gastric conditions upon the anti-Helicobacter pylori effects of garlic oil (GO). Time course viability experiments assessed the anti-H. pylori activity of GO (16 and 32 microg ml(-1)) in simulated gastric environments. Rapid anti-H. pylori action of GO was observed in artificial gastric juice. Mucus (1-5%) was strongly protective of H. pylori both alone and in the presence of GO, but its protective effect was antagonized by GO. Peptone (5-15 g l(-1)) caused a dose-dependent reduction in the anti-H. pylori activity of GO. Rapeseed oil (5.7-17 g l(-1)) greatly diminished the anti-H. pylori activity of GO. Dextrin (44 and 133 g l(-1)) exhibited direct anti-H. pylori effects and added to those of GO. Simulated meal mixtures decreased but did not eliminate the anti-H. pylori activity of 32 mug ml(-1) GO. The anti-H. pylori activity of GO was noticeably affected by food materials and mucin. However, substantial activity remained under simulated gastric conditions. Further investigation of the therapeutic potential of GO against H. pylori is therefore warranted. Garlic oil may be useful as an alternative treatment against H. pylori, a major cause of gastrointestinal infections in humans.

  13. Preliminary phytochemical screening and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of acetone and aqueous extracts of the stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Njume, Collise; Afolayan, Anthony J; Ndip, Roland N

    2011-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and other problems associated with combination therapy have generated a considerable interest in the search for alternative therapeutic agents. In order to identify novel sources of such agents, the antimicrobial activity of five solvent extracts of the stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea was investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori and a reference strain NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. The active phytocomponents were detected by TLC and indirect bioautography. All the extracts exhibited anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 21 mm. The acetone and aqueous extracts showed potent anti-H. pylori activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90)) values ranging from 0.06-2.50 mg/mL, whereas those for the control antibiotics ranged from 0.001-5.0 mg/mL. The acetone extract was highly bactericidal at 1.2 mg/mL with complete elimination of the organisms within 18 h. The activity of both acetone and aqueous extracts was better than metronidazole (p<0.05). Most of the active phytocomponents were located in the acetone extract; R(f)≤0.62 with >90% inhibition. These results demonstrate that the acetone and aqueous extracts of S. birrea may contain compounds with therapeutic activity; therefore, they may represent potential sources of new anti-H. pylori regimen. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Helicobacter Activities of Eryngium foetidum (Apiaceae), Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae), and Galinsoga ciliata (Asteraceae) against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Eyoum Bille, Bertrand; Nguepi, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of extracts of Bidens pilosa, Galinsoga ciliata, and Eryngium foetidum against 6 clinical strains of Helicobacter pylori in vitro and in vivo. Broth microdilution method was used in vitro. In vivo, Swiss mice were inoculated with H. pylori and divided into 5 groups; the control group received the vehicle and the four others received 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum and ciprofloxacin (500 mg/kg) for 7 days, respectively. Helicobacter pylori colonization and number of colonies in gastric biopsies culture were assessed on days 1 and 7 after treatment. The lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) and the best spectrum of bactericidal effect (MBC/MIC = 1) were obtained with the methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum. The number of H. pylori infected animals was 17% (plant-extract) and 0% (ciprofloxacin) compared to 100% for the infected untreated group. Plant-extract (381.9 ± 239.5 CFU) and ciprofloxacin (248 ± 153.2 CFU) significantly reduced bacterial load in gastric mucosa compared to untreated, inoculated mice (14350 ± 690 CFU). Conclusion. The present data provided evidence that methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum could be a rich source of metabolites with antimicrobial activity to fight Helicobacter pylori infections. PMID:27631003

  15. One week's anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment for duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, R P; Gummett, P A; Misiewicz, J J; Karim, Q N; Walker, M M; Baron, J H

    1994-01-01

    This open study tested whether eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) heals duodenal ulcers as well as decreasing recurrence. H pylori was detected in patients with endoscopic duodenal ulcers by histology, CLO-test, culture, and 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT). Tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate (120 mg) and amoxycillin (500 mg) each four times daily, were given for seven days, with 400 mg metronidazole five times a day on days 5-7. The 13C-UBT was repeated immediately after treatment and endoscopy repeated within 21 days. After treatment unhealed ulcers were reinspected one month later and healed ulcers followed up by 13C-UBT alone for 12 months. Of 45 patients, 44 were available for follow up. Mean pretreatment excess delta 13CO2 excretion was 25.6 per mil, which fell to 2.4 per mil immediately after finishing treatment, indicating clearance of H pylori in every patient. At the second endoscopy (median interval 20 days from start of treatment) 33 of 44 (75%) duodenal ulcers had healed. Ten of the remaining 11 duodenal ulcers were smaller and those 10 healed in the next two weeks with no further treatment. Two patients' ulcers that initially healed with clearance of H pylori recurred three weeks later (both had metronidazole resistant H pylori). H pylori was eradicated in 28 of 44 (64%) patients (13C-UBT negative for median follow up 10.2 months). Overall 41 of 43 (93%, 95% confidence intervals 81%-99%) duodenal ulcers were healed at one month. This study suggests that one week of anti-H pylori triple treatment is effective in healing duodenal ulcers. PMID:8307442

  16. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori potential of methanol extract of Allium ascalonicum Linn. (Liliaceae) leaf: susceptibility and effect on urease activity.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Bolanle A; Anyiam, Festus M

    2004-05-01

    The crude methanol extract of the leaf of Allium ascalonicum was screened in vitro against fi ve strains of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) (ATCC 24376, UCH 97001, UCH 97009, UCH 98026 and UCH 99039) for antibacterial activity by the agar diffusion method in Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with de fi brinated horse blood. All the strains were inhibited by the extract to varying degrees. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extract against all the tested strains ranged from 6.25 to 12.5 mg/mL. The effects of increasing concentrations of the extract on the urease activity of three of the Helicobacter pylori strains were investigated further. The results showed that increasing the concentration of the extract decreased the urease activity of all the strains tested. Phytochemical screening of the plant showed that it contains alkaloids, cardiac glycosides and saponins. The anti-Hp activity observed is discussed in relation to the chemical constituents reportedly isolated from these plants and their traditional uses. The result of this work suggests that Allium ascalonicum has some therapeutic potential against Helicobacter pylori infection, which could be explored for patients with gastroduodenal disorders.

  17. Anti-gastric adenocarcinoma activity of 2-Methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, an anti-Helicobacter pylori compound from Impatiens balsamina L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Lin, Yi-Han

    2012-12-01

    2-Methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (MeONQ) from Impatiens balsamina L. exhibited strong anti-H. pylori activity in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of MeONQ against gastric adenocarcinoma (MKN45 cell line) and propose the relevant mechanisms. MeONQ resulted in serious necrosis via superoxide anion catastrophe when the treatment doses were higher than 50μM, whereas apoptosis occurred at low treatment doses (25-50μM) through the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. Necrosis is the dominant mode of cell death. MeONQ exhibited high ability to induce gastric adenocarcinoma necrosis, showing good potential as a candidate agent for H. pylori infection related disease therapy.

  18. Does the antibody production ability affect the serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG titer?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Ah; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, Hee Won; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between serum titers of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) immunoglobulin G (IgG) and hepatitis B virus surface antibody (HBsAb). METHODS Korean adults were included whose samples had positive Giemsa staining on endoscopic biopsy and were studied in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)/HBsAb serologic assay, pepsinogen (PG) assay, and H. pylori serologic test on the same day. Subjects were excluded if they were positive for HBsAg, had a recent history of medication, or had other medical condition(s). We analyzed the effects of the following factors on serum titers of HBsAb and the anti-H. pylori IgG: Age, density of H. pylori infiltration in biopsy samples, serum concentrations of PG I and PG II, PG I/II ratio, and white blood cell count. RESULTS Of 111 included subjects, 74 (66.7%) exhibited a positive HBsAb finding. The serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer did not correlate with the serum HBsAb titer (P = 0.185); however, it correlated with the degree of H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy (P < 0.001) and serum PG II concentration (P = 0.042). According to the density of H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy, subjects could be subdivided into those with a marked (median: 3.95, range 0.82-4.00) (P = 0.458), moderate (median: 3.37, range 1.86-4.00), and mild H. pylori infiltrations (median: 2.39, range 0.36-4.00) (P < 0.001). Subjects with a marked H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy had the highest serological titer, whereas in subjects with moderate and mild H. pylori infiltrations titers were correspondingly lower (P < 0.001). After the successful eradication, significant decreases of the degree of H. pylori infiltration (P < 0.001), serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer (P < 0.001), and serum concentrations of PG I (P = 0.028) and PG II (P = 0.028) were observed. CONCLUSION The anti-H. pylori IgG assay can be used to estimate the burden of bacteria in immunocompetent hosts with H. pylori infection, regardless

  19. Vitamin C concentration in gastric juice before and after anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, B; Rood, J C; Fontham, E T; Malcom, G T; Hunter, F M; Sobhan, M; Johnson, W D; Correa, P

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the change of vitamin C concentration (ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid) in gastric juice after anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment, and to relate any observed change to gastric pH, inflammatory compromise of the gastric mucosa, plasma vitamin C concentration, and smoking habits. Plasma and gastric juice vitamin C, fasting gastric juice pH, gastric histology, and smoking status were studied in 70 patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis before and after therapy. Gastric juice ascorbic acid increased significantly after H. pylori clearance. For the most part, this change was confined to patients who experienced reduction of gastric pH. It was also related to improvement of the compromise of the gastric epithelium, reduction of the proportion of vitamin C composed by dehydroascorbic acid, and increase of the gastric juice/plasma vitamin C concentration gradient. Smokers had lower vitamin C concentrations in plasma and gastric juice before and after H. pylori clearance than nonsmokers. The findings are consistent with a causal association between H. pylori infection and low ascorbic acid levels in gastric juice, and support two mechanisms for this association: increased oxidation and a decreased secretion of ascorbic acid.

  20. Synthesis of the spiroacetal-containing anti-Helicobacter pylori agents CJ-12,954 and CJ-13,014.

    PubMed

    Brimble, Margaret A; Bryant, Christina J

    2006-11-21

    The first synthesis of the spiroacetal-containing anti-Helicobacter pylori agents ent-CJ-12,954 and ent-CJ-13,014 is reported based on the union of a heterocycle-activated spiroacetal-containing sulfone fragment with a phthalide-containing aldehyde fragment; comparison of the 1H and 13C NMR data, optical rotations and HPLC retention times of the synthetic compounds (3S,2"S,5"S,7"S)-(1a) and (3S,2"S,5"R,7"S)-(2a) and the (3R)-diastereomers (3R,2"S,5"S,7"S)-(1b) and (3R,2"S,5"R,7"S)- (2b) with the naturally occurring compounds established that the synthetic isomers (1a) and (2a) were in fact enantiomeric to the natural products CJ-12,954 and CJ-13,014.

  1. Effect of dietary anti-Helicobacter pylori-urease immunoglobulin Y on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Nomura, S; Masaoka, T; Goshima, H; Kamata, N; Kodama, Y; Ishii, H; Kitajima, M; Nomoto, K; Hibi, T

    2004-07-01

    Recently, chicken egg yolk was recognized as an inexpensive antibody source, and the therapeutic usefulness of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY) in oral passive immunization has been investigated. Although multiple antibiotic treatments eradicate most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections, therapy fails in 10-15% of cases due to the development of drug resistance. Consequently, it is important that new, more broadly based therapies for the treatment of H. pylori infection should be identified. The present study evaluated the effect, on H. pylori infection, of IgY prepared from egg yolk of hens immunized with H. pylori urease (anti-HpU IgY). Seventeen asymptomatic volunteers diagnosed as H. pylori-positive by the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) were orally administered anti-HpU IgY for 4 weeks. Four weeks later, UBT values were significantly decreased although no case showed H. pylori eradication. An H. pylori-positive 53-year-old female gastritis patient administered anti-HpU IgY plus lansoprazole for 8 weeks showed a decrease in serum pepsinogen (PG) I and UBT values as well as an increase in the PG I/II ratio. In conclusion, anti-HpU IgY may mitigate H. pylori-associated gastritis and partially attenuate gastric urease activity. Furthermore, anti-HpU IgY combined with antacids appears to ameliorate gastric inflammation. These encouraging results may represent a novel approach to the management of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease.

  2. Comparative analysis of anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of Laminaria japonica and Oenothera biennis extracts in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Su; Shin, Kyungha; Jeon, Joseph H.; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Yoon-Bok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-eliminating effects of FEMY-R7, composed of Laminaria japonica and Oenothera biennis extracts, were investigated in mice and humans. Male C57BL/6 mice were infected with the bacteria by intragastric inoculation (1×109 CFU/mouse) 3 times at 2-day intervals, and simultaneously, orally treated twice a day with total 20, 64 or 200 mg/kg/day FEMY-R7 for 2 weeks. In Campylobcter-like organism (CLO)-detection tests on gastric mucosa and feces, FEMY-R7 reduced the urease-positive reactivity in a dose-dependent manner; i.e., the positivity ratios were decreased to 70, 20, and 10% for gastric mocosa and to 80, 50, and 20% for feces. In a clinical sudy, human subjects, confirmed to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, were orally administered twice a day with capsules containing total 100, 320 or 1,000 mg/man/day FEMY-R7 (matching doses for 20, 64 or 200 mg/kg/day, respectively, in mice from a body surface area-based dose translation) for 8 weeks. FEMY-R7 decreased the positivity ratios in feces to 70, 40, and 30%, respectively. In bacterial culture, H. pylori was identified from the CLO-positive stools of mice and humans. The bacterial identification ratios exhibited a good correlation between the matching doses in mice and humans. It is suggested that FEMY-R7 could be a promising functional food without tolerance as an adjunct to reduce the dosage of antibiotics for the treatment of recurrent H. pylori infection. PMID:25806078

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Su; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Kim, Jihyun; Shin, Kyungha; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Youngjin; Jeon, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-eliminating effects of FEMY-R7, composed of fucoidan and evening primrose extract, were investigated in mice and humans. Male C57BL/6 mice were infected with the bacteria by intragastric inoculation (1×109 CFU/mouse) 3 times at 2-day intervals, and simultaneously, orally treated twice a day with 10 or 100 mg/kg FEMY-R7 for 2 weeks. In Campylobcter-like organism-detection test, FEMY-R7 markedly reduced the urease-positive reactivity. In a clinical sudy, human subjects, confirmed to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, were orally administered twice a day with a capsule containing 150 mg FEMY-R7 for 8 weeks. FEMY-R7 significantly decreased both the Delta over baseline-value in urea breath test and the serum pepsinogens I and II levels. The results indicate that FEMY-R7 not only eliminates H. pylori from gastric mucosa of animals and humans, but also improves gastric function. PMID:25324874

  4. New Activities for Isolated Compounds from Convolvulus austro-aegyptiacus as Anti-ulcerogenic, Anti-Helicobacter pylori and Their Mimic Synthesis Using Bio-guided Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Amani S; Al-Rifai, Asmaa A; El-Meligy, Reham M; Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Zain, Mohamed E

    2015-06-10

    Bio-guided fractionation of the total alcoholic extract of Convolvulus austro-aegyptiacus was screened for its anti-ulcerogenic activity, using an absolute-ethanol-induced ulcer model at 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses. Two compounds were isolated from the butanol extract of C. austro-aegyptiacus and identified by (1) H and (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance as scopoletin and scopolin. The isolated compounds (50 mg/kg) showed a remarkable anti-ulcerogenic activity because they exhibited control-ulcer protection by 16.7% and 90.8%, respectively. The acute toxicity study showed that the extract is highly safe; the median lethal dose (LD50) was more than 4000 mg/kg. Moreover, the obtained results were confirmed by the sub-chronic toxicity because the rats that have been administered 1000 mg/kg of the extract for 15 consecutive days showed no alteration in the liver and kidney functions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Pterocarpus santalinus: an In Vitro study on its anti-Helicobacter pylori effect.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Shoba; Veeraraghavan, Mani; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-02-01

    The anti-H. pylori activity of Pterocarpus santalinus (PS), a traditional herb, has been assessed and compared with that of bismuth subcitrate, through in vitro studies employing rat gastric epithelial cell cultures and H. pylori isolates from gastric mucosal biopsy patients. The MIC of PS was found to be 20 microg/mL. H. pylori was co-cultivated with rat gastric epithelial cells in the presence/absence of PS at its MIC. A reduction in the activity of urease, a normal appearance of the epithelial cells on electron microscopic examination, a decrease in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase suggests the possible anti-H. pylori activity of PS. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Anti-ulcer and anti-Helicobacter pylori potentials of the ethyl acetate fraction of Physalis alkekengi L. var. franchetii (Solanaceae) in rodent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Sui Lou; Zhang, Jiong Yi; Song, Xiao Ning; Zhang, Zhi Yong; Li, Jing Feng; Li, Song

    2017-09-28

    Physalis alkekengi L. var. franchetii (Solanaceae) has been widely used in Chinese folk medicine due to its wide distribution throughout the country, for the treatment of a wide range of diseases including heat and cold, sore throat, fever, fungal infection, inflammation, toothache, rheumatism, burn, analgesic, ulcer and urinary diseases. However, the effect of P. alkekengi var. franchetii on ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection has not been reported to date. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, anti-Helicobacter pylori and analgesic properties of ethyl acetate fraction of the crude aqueous methanolic extract from the aerial parts of the plant P. alkekengi L. var. franchetii in rodents. Acute toxicity of the crude extract of P. alkekengi L. var. franchetii (PAF) was evaluated in rats. The petroleum ether fraction (PEF), butanol fraction (BF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and aqueous fraction (AF) of crude aqueous methanolic extract from PAF were screened for anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer potential at doses of 100, 250 and 500mg/kg (p.o.), using carrageenin-induced hind paw edema and ethanol-induced gastric lesions test in rats. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of EAF was assayed subsequently. In addition, three doses of EAF were evaluated for analgesic activity using hot plate and writhing tests, respectively. Finally, we performed a phytochemical analysis of EAF. Four fractions of crude extract from PAF significantly reduced the paw volume in carrageenin-induced hind paw edema model at different doses (100, 250 and 500mg/kg, p.o.). The fraction EAF at a dose of 500mg/kg exhibited the highest (75.92%) (0.150 ± 0.045***, ***p < 0.001) anti-inflammatory potential, which is similar to indomethacin (***P < 0.001)(0.120 ± 0.014***, 80.74% inhibition of inflammation) at 5mg/kg. Pretreatment with EAF (500mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced the intensity of gastric mucosal damage and showed higher gastroprotective

  7. Chemical composition and anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of Satureja bachtiarica Bunge essential oil.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Moradi, Parisa; Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Momtaz, Hassan; Hamedi, Behzhad

    2015-01-15

    Resistance of H. pylori strains to common antibiotics has been developed in different parts of the world and continues to increase. It is important to investigate the novel and efficient anti-H. pylori drugs, among which the plants would be suitable sources. Satureja bachtiarica Bunge is traditionally used as antimicrobial agent. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of S. bachtiarica Bunge essential oil against 10 clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods. The chemical composition of essential oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Carvacrol (45.5%) and thymol (27.9%) were the primary constituents of oil, followed by p-cymene (4.4%), and γ-terpinene (4.0%). S. bachtiarica essential oil showed strong antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of H. pylori (17.6 ± 1.1 mm and 0.035 ± 0.13 μl/ml). Carvacrol, as the first main component, had a significant role in this effect, whereas in the presence of thymol, the antibacterial effect of carvacrol was reduced. Therefore, S. bachtiarica essential oil can be applied as an alternative agent for treatment of H. pylori infections. More studies would be required to better clarify its mechanism of action on H. pylori.

  8. Anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of CaG-NANA, a new sialic acid derivative

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ku, Hyun-Jeong; Noh, Hye-Ji; Cho, Hyang-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Kyong; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the bactericidal effects of calcium chelated N-acetylneuraminic acid-glycomacropeptide (CaG-NANA) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS For manufacture of CaG-NANA, calcium (Ca) was combined with glycomacropeptide (GMP) by chelating, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) was produced with Ca-GMP substrate by an enzymatic method. The final concentration of each component was 5% Ca, 7% NANA, 85% GMP, and 3% water. For in vitro study, various concentrations of CaG-NANA were investigated under the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). For in vivo study, CaG-NANA was administered orally for 3 wk after H. pylori infection. The levels of inflammatory cytokines in blood were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and eradication of H. pylori was assessed by histological observation. RESULTS The time-kill curves showed a persistent decrease in cell numbers, which depended on the dose of CaG-NANA, and MIC of CaG-NANA against H. pylori was 0.5% in vitro. Histopathologic observation revealed no obvious inflammation or pathologic changes in the gastric mucosa in the CaG-NANA treatment group in vivo. The colonization of H. pylori was reduced after CaG-NANA treatment. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-10 were also decreased by CaG-NANA. CONCLUSION CaG-NANA demonstrates effective anti-bactericidal activity against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27895975

  9. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Azizan, Ainnul Hamidah Syahadah; Mohan, Syam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hadi, A Hamid A; Ketuly, Kamal Aziz; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-07-19

    Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect.

  10. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. Methods DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. Results DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. Conclusions The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect. PMID:23866830

  11. Anti-Helicobacter pylori and thrombin inhibitory components from Chinese dragon's blood, Dracaena cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Zhang, Ping; Yu, Haiping; Li, Jia; Wang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Weimin

    2007-10-01

    Chemical studies on the constituents of Dracaena cochinchinensis led to the discovery of eight new flavonoid derivatives ( 1- 8) along with 14 known compounds ( 9- 22). The identification and structural elucidation of these isolates were based on spectral analyses. All isolates were tested for antibacterial activities against Helicobacter pylori (ATCC43504) and thrombin inhibitory effects. As a result, new flavonoid derivatives 6 and 7 and (2 S)-4',7-dihydroxy-8-methylflavan ( 11) were found to be most efficacious against H. pylori (ATCC43504) with MIC values of 29.5, 29.5, and 31.3 microM, respectively, and the seven new flavonoid derivatives ( 1- 7) and one known biflavonoid ( 9) were observed to exhibit moderate thrombin inhibitory activity.

  12. Correlations between the CagA Antigen and Serum Levels of Anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA in Children.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Chun Woo; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Jun, Jin-Su; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    We tested correlations between anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA levels and the urease test, anti-CagA protein antibody, degree of gastritis, and age. In total, 509 children (0-15 years) were enrolled. Subjects were stratified as 0-4 years (n = 132), 5-9 years (n = 274), and 10-15 years (n = 103) and subjected to the urease test, histopathology, ELISA, and western blot using whole-cell lysates of H. pylori strain 51. The positivity rate in the urease test (P = 0.003), the degree of chronic gastritis (P = 0.021), and H. pylori infiltration (P < 0.001) increased with age. The median titer for anti-H. pylori IgG was 732.5 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 689.0 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 966.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P < 0.001); the median titer for anti-H. pylori IgA was 61.0 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 63.5 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 75.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P < 0.001). The CagA-positivity rate was 26.5% at 0-4 years, 36.5% at 5-9 years, and 46.6% at 10-15 years for IgG (P = 0.036), and 11.3% at 0-4 years, 18.6% at 5-9 years, and 23.3% at 10-15 years for IgA (P < 0.001). Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA titers increased with the urease test grade, chronic gastritis degree, active gastritis, and H. pylori infiltration. Presence of CagA-positivity is well correlated with a high urease test grade and high anti-H. pylori IgG/IgA levels.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of amoxicillin loaded dual molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihui; Hou, Jiapeng; Wang, Yuyan; Chai, Miaolin; Xiong, Yan; Lu, Weiyue; Pan, Jun

    2015-12-30

    This paper reports studies on preparation and evaluation of amoxicillin loaded dual molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (Amo/Dual-MIPs) designed for anti-H. pylori therapy. Both MNQA and AmoNa were chosen as templates to prepare Dual-MIPs using inverse microemulsion polymerization method. NQA was modified with myristic acid (MNQA) to become amphiphilic and assist in leaving NQA cavities on the surface of Dual-MIPs for H. pylori adhesion. AmoNa was applied to produce imprinting sites in Dual-MIPs for rebinding AmoNa to exert its anti-H. pylori effect. Batch rebinding test demonstrated a preferential rebinding effect of NQA toward the Dual-MIPs. In vivofluorescence imaging showed the prolonged residence time of Dual-MIPs in H. pylori infected mice stomachs after intragastric administration of nanoparticles.In vivo H. pylori clearance tests indicated Amo/Dual-MIPs had a better aniti-H. pylori effect than amoxicillin powder did. In conclusion, Amo/Dual-MIPs may provide an alternative drug delivery strategy for anti-H. pylori therapy.

  14. Development of anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulins Y (IgYs) in quail

    PubMed Central

    Najdi, S.; Nikbakht Brujeni, G.; Sheikhi, N.; Chakhkar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that cause the stomach infection in more than 50% of human population worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of anti-H. pylori immunoglobulins Y (IgYs) production in quails and evaluate the effect of the different methods of immunization on titers of IgY in egg yolks. Whole cell bacterial antigen was used for immunization of quails. Forty Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica) were divided into four groups. The first group intramuscularly immunized with one dose of antigen (3 × 108 inactivated bacteria) whereas the second group injected with half dose. Third group administered orally. Yolk IgY was isolated using precipitation method of water dilution combined with chloroform. Dot-blot and ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were used for determining the specificity and quantifying the titer of IgY in egg yolks. Results showed that quails as well as chickens are able to produce anti-H. pylori IgY. Quails antibodies have high titer and specificity that can be used in therapeutic and research purposes. This study indicated that higher amounts of antigen can not develop higher titer of IgY and injection is not necessary for efficient immunization of the quail against H. pylori. PMID:27822235

  15. Terminalia catappa L.: a medicinal plant from the Caribbean pharmacopeia with anti-Helicobacter pylori and antiulcer action in experimental rodent models.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro Silva, Laísa; Damacena de Angelis, Célio; Bonamin, Flavia; Kushima, Hélio; José Mininel, Francisco; Campaner Dos Santos, Lourdes; Karina Delella, Flavia; Luis Felisbino, Sergio; Vilegas, Wagner; Regina Machado da Rocha, Lucia; Aparecido Dos Santos Ramos, Matheus; Maria Bauab, Tais; Toma, Walber; Akiko Hiruma-Lima, Clelia

    2015-01-15

    Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) is a medicinal plant listed as a pharmacopeia vegetable from Caribbean to treat gastritis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and healing effect of the aqueous fraction (FrAq) obtained from the leaves of Terminalia catappa and to determine the antiulcer mechanism of action in experimental rodent models and its activity to Helicobacter pylori. In rodents, the FrAq was challenged by different necrotizing agents, such as absolute ethanol and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The antiulcer mechanism of action of FrAq was assessed and the healing effects of the fraction after seven and 14 days of treatment was evaluated by matrix metalloproteinase activity (MMP-2 and MMP-9). The toxicological effect of subacute treatment with FrAq during 14 days of treatment was also analyzed. The anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was determined by microdilution. The phytochemical study of the fraction was analyzed by experiments with FIA-ESI-IT-MS(n) (Direct Flow Analysis-ionization Electrospray Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a photodiode array (PDA). Oral treatment with FrAq (25mg/kg) significantly decreased the number of ulcerative lesions induced by ethanol and ischemia/reperfusion injury. The action of FrAq was mediated by the activation of defensive mucosa-protective factors, such as increases in mucus production, the nitric oxide (NO) pathway and endogenous prostaglandins. Oral treatment with FrAq for seven and 14 days significantly reduced the lesion area (80% and 37%, respectively) compared to the negative control group. Analyses of MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity from gastric mucosa confirmed the accelerated gastric healing effect of FrAq. This extract also presented considerable activity against Helicobacter pylori. The mass spectrum and MS/MS of the aqueous fraction indicates the existence of many different phenolic compounds, including punicalagin

  16. Lifestyle and anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G antibody among outpatients.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, N; Inoue, M; Tajima, K; Tominaga, S; Matsuura, A; Kobayashi, S; Ariyoshi, Y

    1997-11-01

    Since eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is thought to be a preventive measure against stomach cancer, several studies have examined factors associated with the infection. This paper reports the association of the infection with lifestyle factors observed in a hospital-based case-control study. Cases were 140 anti-H. pylori IgG antibody-positive outpatients (75 males and 65 females). Controls were 52 antibody-negative outpatients (22 males and 30 females). Both groups had undergone gastroscopy at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between February 1995 and February 1997, and lifestyle data collected on the first visit were linked to calculate odds ratios. A strong association was observed with smoking among males; age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 7.85, 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.03-30.4. Rice breakfast (OR = 3.74; 95% CI, 1.30-10.8) and soybean paste soup (every day vs. occasionally, OR = 5.24; 95% CI, 1.80-15.2) were also associated with antibody positivity in males, but not in females. In females, pickled Chinese cabbage (> or = 1/week vs. < or = 3/month, OR = 2.82; 95% CI, 1.06-7.48) and lettuce (> or = 1/week vs. < or = 3/month, OR = 2.90; 95% CI, 1.09-7.76) were significantly associated with positivity. Multivariate analysis gave similar estimates for the above factors. Although the association between smoking and H. pylori infection has not been detected in past studies of a general population, except one recent one, this study on outpatients suggested a possible association. Smoking may work as a cofactor disturbing incidental eradication of H. pylori by antibacterial agents administered for other reasons.

  17. Gastroprotective and anti-Helicobacter pylori potential of herbal formula HZJW: safety and efficacy assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula, HZJW, has been applied in clinics in China for gastrointestinal disorders. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its efficacy and safety remained to be defined. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the formula HZJW for its gastroprotective potential, possible effect on Helicobacter pylori along with safety to justify its anti-ulcer action and safe clinical application. Methods The gastroduodenal cytoprotective potential was evaluated in rodent experimental models (HCl/Ethanol and NSAID-induced ulcer protocols). The anti-H. pylori property was assessed by agar dilution assay in vitro and analysis in vivo including rapid urease test, immunogold test and histopathology. For toxicity assessment, acute toxicity study was performed according to fixed dose procedure with a single oral administration of HZJW to mice. In the oral chronic toxicity, rats (80 males, 80 females) were administrated HZJW orally in 0, 1000, 2500, or 5000 mg/kg/day doses for 26 weeks (n = 40/group of each sex). Clinical signs, mortality, body weights, feed consumption, ophthalmology, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, organ weights and histopathology were examined at the end of the 13- and 26-week dosing period, as well as after the 4-week recovery period. Results In the HCl/Ethanol-induced ulcer model, it was observed that oral administration with HZJW (260, 520 and 1040 mg/kg) and ranitidine (250 mg/kg) significantly reduced the ulcerative lesion index (116.70 ± 36.4, 102.20 ± 18.20, 84.10 ± 12.1 and 73.70 ± 16.70) in a dose-dependent manner, respectively, with respect to control group (134.10 ± 31.69). Significant inhibition was also observed in ulcerative index from aspirin-induced ulcer model, with decreases of 35.40 ± 5.93, 31.30 ± 8.08, 26.80 ± 8.27and 20.40 ± 6.93 for the groups treated with HZJW and ranitidine, in parallel to controls (41.60

  18. Synthesis and assignment of the absolute configuration of the anti-Helicobacter pylori agents CJ-12,954 and CJ-13,014.

    PubMed

    Brimble, Margaret A; Bryant, Christina J

    2007-09-07

    The synthesis of the spiroacetal-containing anti-Helicobacter pylori agents (3S,2''S,5''S,7''S)- (ent-CJ-12,954) and (3S,2''S,5''R,7''S)- (ent-CJ-13,014) has been carried out based on the convergent union of a 1:1 mixture of heterocycle-activated spiroacetal sulfones and with (3S)-phthalide aldehyde . The synthesis of the (3R)-diastereomers (3R,2''S,5''S,7''S)- and (3R,2''S,5''R,7''S)- was also undertaken in a similar manner by union of (3R)-phthalide aldehyde with a 1:1 mixture of spiroacetal sulfones and . Comparison of the (1)H and (13)C NMR data, optical rotations and HPLC retention times of the synthetic compounds (3S,2''S,5''S,7''S)- and (3S,2''S,5''R,7''S)- and the (3R)-diastereomers (3R,2''S,5''S,7''S)- and (3R,2''S,5''R,7''S)-, with the naturally occurring compounds, established that the synthetic isomers and were in fact enantiomeric to the natural products CJ-12,954 and CJ-13,014. The (2S,8S)-stereochemistry in protected dihydroxyketone , the precursor to the mixture of spiroacetal sulfones and was established via union of readily available (S)-acetylene with aldehyde in which the (4S)-stereochemistry was established via asymmetric allylation. Deprotection and cyclization of protected dihydroxyketone afforded an inseparable 1:1 mixture of spiroacetal alcohols and that were converted into a 1:1 inseparable mixture of spiroacetal sulfones and . Phthalide-aldehyde was prepared via intramolecular acylation of bromocarbamate in which the (3S)-stereochemistry was established via asymmetric CBS reduction of ketone .

  19. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G titer correlates with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density, and levels of serum biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tu, Huakang; Sun, Liping; Dong, Xiao; Gong, Yuehua; Xu, Qian; Jing, Jingjing; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Clinical implications of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer were unclear. This study investigated the associations of serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density and levels of serum biomarkers, including pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII, PGI/II ratio and gastrin-17. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Study participants were from a screening program in northern China. Serum anti-H. pylori IgG measurements were available for 5922 patients with superficial gastritis. Serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer and serum biomarkers were measured using ELISA, and gastric biopsies were evaluated using standardized criteria. RESULTS. In patients with mild, moderate or severe superficial gastritis, the mean serum anti-H. pylori IgG titers were 17.3, 33.4 and 54.4 EIU (p for trend < 0.0001), respectively. As mucosal H. pylori density score increased from 0 to 3, the mean serum anti-H. pylori IgG titers also increased from 24.7 to 44.8 EIU (p for trend < 0.0001). Serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer was associated positively with serum PGI, PGII and gastrin-17 concentrations and negatively with PGI/II ratio, and the association was the strongest for PGII. The mean PGII concentration of the patients in the highest quartile of IgG titer was twice the mean concentration of the patients in the lowest quartile (17.2 vs. 8.6 EIU, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS. Our results suggest that serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer was associated positively with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density and concentrations of serum PGI, PGII and gastrin-17, and negatively with PGI/II ratio.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of combined serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody and serum pepsinogen concentrations for screening for gastric cancer risk in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shota; Azumi, Motoi; Muneoka, Yusuke; Nishino, Katsuhiko; Ishikawa, Takashi; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2017-05-26

    A combination of assays for the presence of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody (HPA) and serum pepsinogen (PG) concentrations can be used to screen for gastric cancer risk. In Japan, this "ABC method" is considered an effective means of stratifying gastric cancer risk. This study aimed to ascertain its cost-effectiveness for assessing gastric cancer risk. A Markov model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of two strategies for gastric cancer-risk screening over a 30-year period: the ABC method, which uses a combination of assessing the presence of HPA and measuring serum PG concentrations and scheduling endoscopies accordingly, and annual endoscopic screening. Clinical and epidemiological data on variables in the model were obtained from published reports. Analyses were made from the perspective of the Japanese health care payer. According to base-case analysis, the ABC method cost less than annual endoscopic screening (64,489 vs. 64,074 USD) and saved more lives (18.16 vs. 18.30 quality-adjusted life years). One-way analyses confirmed the robustness of the cost-effectiveness results. The probability that the ABC method is cost-effective in Japanese individuals aged 50 years was 0.997. A combination of HPA and serum PG assays, plus scheduling endoscopy accordingly, is a cost-effective method of screening for gastric cancer risk in Japan.

  1. Complete long-term response to radiotherapy of gastric early-stage marginal zone lymphoma resistant to both anti-Helicobacter pylori antibiotics and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, P G; Corbella, F; Valentino, F; Bergonzi, M; Sangalli, C; Perfetti, V; Corazza, G R

    2009-03-01

    The optimal approach to patients with gastric lymphoma of extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) that resist to anti-Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication therapy is still to be defined. From January 1997 to December 2004, we observed 24 patients affected with newly diagnosed early-stage and HP-positive gastric lymphoma of the MALT type. Five of them resisted to oral anti-HP antibiotic regimens and to subsequent one (two patients) or two (three patients) chemotherapy regimens. Age ranged between 51 and 77 years (median 70); three were females. Translocation (11;18) was ascertained in one subject. They were admitted to local radiation therapy with a total dose of 30 Gy. All such resistant patients achieved complete remission after radiotherapy. No relapses were observed after 21, 45, 48, 52, and 67 months of uninterrupted follow-up. Early toxicity was very low and consisted of mild nausea. Late toxicity or secondary malignancy was not recorded so far. Radiotherapy proved to be effective and safe for early-stage HP-positive gastric extranodal lymphoma of MALT type that is resistant to anti-HP eradication antibiotics and to following chemotherapy. Radiotherapy might be suggested as principal salvage therapy after resistance to HP eradication, instead of chemotherapy.

  2. Development of pH-responsive chitosan/heparin nanoparticles for stomach-specific anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Chiung-Hung; Wu, Yu-Shiun; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Chiou, Shu-Fen; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2009-07-01

    The microorganism now known as Helicobacter pylori is considered to be an important factor in the etiology of peptic ulcers. It can secrete urease enzyme and buffer gastric acids to survive in the stomach. H. pylori can colonize the gastric mucosa and preferentially adheres near the cell-cell junctions of the gastric mucous cells. In this study, pH-responsive nanoparticles were produced instantaneously upon the addition of heparin solution to a chitosan solution with magnetic stirring at room temperature. The nanoparticles appeared to have a particle size of 130-300 nm, with a positive surface charge, and were stable at pH 1.2-2.5, allowing them to protect an incorporated drug from destructive gastric acids. We also demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles can adhere to and infiltrate cell-cell junctions and interact locally with H. pylori infection sites in intercellular spaces.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of derivatives of the phthalide-containing antibacterial agents spirolaxine methyl ether, CJ-12,954, CJ-13,013, CJ-13,102, CJ-13,104, CJ-13,108 and CJ-13,015.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Fiona J; Fraser, John D; Wilson, Zoe E; Heapy, Amanda M; Robinson, James E; Bryant, Christina J; Flowers, Christopher L; Brimble, Margaret A

    2008-06-01

    The naturally occurring phthalide-containing antibiotics spirolaxine methyl ether, CJ-12,954, CJ-13,013, CJ-13,015, CJ-13,102, CJ-13,103, CJ-13,104 and CJ-13,108, have been reported to exhibit anti-H. pylori activity. However, the exact stereochemistry of spirolaxine methyl ether, CJ-12,954 or CJ-13,013, contributing to this observed activity has not been confirmed. The anti-H. pylori activity of several analogues of spirolaxine methyl ether, CJ-12,954 and CJ-13,013 of defined stereochemistry together with the anti-H. pylori activity of several indole analogues of the simpler phthalide-containing antibiotics CJ-13,102, CJ-13,104, CJ-13,108 and CJ-13,015 is reported herein. A 1:1 mixture of spiroacetals 5b and 6b in which the phthalide substituent exhibited (3R)-stereochemistry was sixty times more active than the corresponding 1:1 mixture of spiroacetals with (3S)-stereochemistry. Notably, the unnatural (2''S)-diastereomer of spirolaxine methyl ether exhibited more potent anti-H. pylori activity than the natural product spirolaxine methyl ether. The 4,6-dimethoxyindoles 9, 10, 11 and 13 were all found to be less active than their parent compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Chain-shortened 4,6-dimethoxyindole analogue 12 of CJ-13,108 3 and 4,6-dimethoxyindole-spiroacetal 13 exhibited weak anti-H. pylori activity thus providing future opportunity for drug discovery programs.

  4. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Antibody Profiles in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-Positive and EBV-Negative Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Camargo, M Constanza; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Torres, Javier; Liao, Linda M; Morgan, Douglas R; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Dominguez, Ricardo L; Yatabe, Yasushi; Kim, Sung; Rocha-Guevara, Erick R; Lissowska, Jolanta; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, but about 9% of cases harbor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the tumor cells. There is limited evidence on the possible interaction or antagonism between these infectious agents in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared H. pylori serologic profiles of EBV-positive (n = 58) and EBV-negative (n = 111) noncardia gastric cancer patients from the United States National Cancer Institute's International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium. EBV positivity of tumors was assessed by in situ hybridization. Serum levels of 15 antibodies to immunogenic proteins of H. pylori (Cad, CagA, Cagδ, CagM, Catalase, GroEL, HcpC, HP0231, HP0305, HpaA, HyuA, NapA, Omp, UreA, VacA) were assessed using bead-based multiplex serology. Logistic regression models were used to adjust odds ratios (OR) for country, age, sex, and year of diagnosis. Seropositivity to individual proteins ranged up to 90% overall. Antibodies to Catalase were borderline associated with tumor EBV positivity (adjusted OR = 3.15, p = .0024, Bonferroni corrected p = .036). Distributions of other antibodies did not vary by tumor EBV status. Similarity of host-response indicates the essential etiological role of H. pylori in EBV-positive gastric cancer. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparative analysis of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography, and the titer of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG focusing on the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Nobutake; Hirano, Chigaya; Takahashi, Yu; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Nakayama, Chiemi; Matsuda, Rie; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Chihiro; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Ryoichi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGI-ES) and double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography (UGI-XR) are two major image-based methods to diagnose atrophic gastritis, which is mostly induced by Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there have been few studies directly comparing them. Atrophic gastritis was evaluated using the data of 962 healthy subjects who underwent UGI-ES and UGI-XR within 1 year. Based on UGI-ES and UGI-XR, 602 subjects did not have atrophic gastritis and 254 subjects did have it. Considering UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis as the standard, sensitivity and specificity of UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 92.0 % (254/276) and 92.8 % (602/649), respectively. The seven-grade Kimura-Takemoto classification of UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis showed a strong and significant association with the four-grade UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis. Sensitivity and specificity of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG to detect UGI-ES/UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 89.4 % (227/254) and 99.8 % (601/602), indicating that atrophic gastritis can be overlooked according to serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG alone.

  6. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori effects of medicinal mushroom extracts, with special emphasis on the Lion's Mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaodong; Tan, Qi; Liu, Ruina; Yu, Kangying; Li, Pingzuo; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Although the medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus is used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine to treat chronic superficial gastritis, the underlining pharmaceutical mechanism is yet to be fully understood. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of extracts prepared from the fruiting bodies of 14 mushroom species (H. erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Cordyceps militaris, Pleurotus eryngii, P. ostreatus, Agrocybe aegerita, Lentinus edodes, Agaricus brasiliensis, A. bisporus, Coprinus comatus, Grifola frondosa, Phellinus igniarius, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizygus marmoreus) were determined against Helicobacter pylori using laboratory strains of ATCC 43504 and SS1 as well as 9 clinical isolates via an in vitro microplate agar diffusion assay. Ethanol extracts (EEs) of 12 mushrooms inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro, with MIC values <3 mg/mL. EEs of H. erinaceus and G. lucidum also inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 7360;10 mg/mL) but had no effect on the growth of two Escherichia coli test strains (MIC >10 mg/mL). MIC values of ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of H. erinaceus against 9 clinical isolates of H. pylori ranged between 62.5 and 250 µg/mL. The bacteriostatic activity of EAFs was found to be concentration-dependant, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values for H. pylori ATCC 43504 were 73.0 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. The direct inhibitory effect of EEs and EAFs of H. erinaceus against H. pylori could be another pharmaceutical mechanism of medicinal mushrooms-besides the immunomodulating effect of polysaccharides, suggested previously-in the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal disorders. Further research to identify the active component(s) is currently undertaking in our laboratory.

  7. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  8. Antibacterial effects of grape extracts on Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph C; Huang, Guohui; Haley-Zitlin, Vivian; Jiang, Xiuping

    2009-02-01

    Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities were determined by agar dilution, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and cell proliferation assays following treatment with various grape extracts. Muscadine grape skin possessed the strongest activity, followed by grape synergy (skin and seed) and seed, suggesting that higher phenolic levels do not necessarily determine overall anti-H. pylori efficacy.

  9. Bioactive compounds of Crocus sativus L. and their semi-synthetic derivatives as promising anti-Helicobacter pylori, anti-malarial and anti-leishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Celeste; Bizzarri, Bruna; Gidaro, Maria Concetta; Carradori, Simone; Mollica, Adriano; Luisi, Grazia; Granese, Arianna; Alcaro, Stefano; Costa, Giosuè; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Masia, Carla; Sisto, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Crocus sativus L. is known in herbal medicine for the various pharmacological effects of its components, but no data are found in literature about its biological properties toward Helicobacter pylori, Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp. In this work, the potential anti-bacterial and anti-parasitic effects of crocin and safranal, two important bioactive components in C. sativus, were explored, and also some semi-synthetic derivatives of safranal were tested in order to establish which modifications in the chemical structure could improve the biological activity. According to our promising results, we virtually screened our compounds by means of molecular modeling studies against the main H. pylori enzymes in order to unravel their putative mechanism of action.

  10. Long-Term Garlic or Micronutrient Supplementation, but Not Anti-Helicobacter pylori Therapy, Increases Serum Folate or Glutathione Without Affecting Serum Vitamin B-12 or Homocysteine in a Rural Chinese Population1–4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujue; Zhang, Lian; Moslehi, Roxana; Ma, Junling; Pan, Kaifeng; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Weidong; Brown, Linda Morris; Hu, Yuangreng; Pee, David; Gail, Mitchell H.; You, Weicheng

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 7.3-y supplementation with garlic and micronutrients and of anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment with amoxicillin (1 g twice daily) and omeprazole (20 mg twice daily) on serum folate, vitamin B-12, homocysteine, and glutathione concentrations were assessed in a rural Chinese population. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, factorial trial was conducted to compare the ability of 3 treatments to retard the development of precancerous gastric lesions in 3411 subjects. The treatments were: 1) anti-H. pylori treatment with amoxicillin and omeprazole; 2) 7.3-y supplementation with aged garlic and steam-distilled garlic oil; and 3) 7.3-y supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium. All 3 treatments were given in a 23 factorial design to subjects seropositive for H. pylori infection; only the garlic supplement and vitamin and selenium supplement were given in a 22 factorial design to the other subjects. Thirty-four subjects were randomly selected from each of the 12 treatment strata. Sera were analyzed after 7.3 y to measure effects on folate, vitamin B-12, homocysteine, and glutathione concentrations. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and smoking indicated an increase of 10.2% (95%CI: 2.9–18.1%) in serum folate after garlic supplementation and an increase of 13.4% (95%CI: 5.3–22.2%) in serum glutathione after vitamin and selenium supplementation. The vitamin and selenium supplement did not affect other analytes and the amoxicillin and omeprazole therapy did not affect any of the variables tested. In this rural Chinese population, 7.3 y of garlic supplementation increased the serum folate concentration and the vitamin and selenium supplement increased that of glutathione, but neither affected serum concentrations of vitamin B-12 or homocysteine. PMID:19056661

  11. Activities of muscadine grape skin and polyphenolic constituents against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Jiang, X

    2013-04-01

    To identify active phenolic constituents in muscadine grape skin (MGS) extracts and determine interactions among compounds while further exploring their anti-Helicobacter pylori potential in vitro. The inhibitory effects of quercetin and resveratrol, active polyphenols identified in MGS extracts, against H. pylori were investigated. Quercetin and resveratrol significantly (P < 0.05) reduced H. pylori counts regardless of pH with minimal bactericidal concentrations of 256 and 128 μg ml(-1), respectively. MGS extracts displayed the highest efficacy, suggesting additional unidentified compounds not determined in this study. Time-course viability experiments showed a dose-dependent anti-H. pylori response to quercetin and resveratrol. Interestingly, neither quercetin nor resveratrol affected H. pylori outer membrane (OM) integrity as determined by 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) uptake assays. However, treatment with MGS extract did increase NPN uptake, indicating OM destabilization possibly by additional unknown components. Furthermore, quercetin was found to enter H. pylori as measured by HPLC supporting intracellular drug accumulation. Quercetin and resveratrol possess strong anti-H. pylori activity in vitro and are independent of pH. Our results also suggest that these compounds do not affect H. pylori OM integrity as previously hypothesized and that the primary antimicrobial activity of quercetin may be linked to interactions with intracellular components. The anti-H. pylori effects of quercetin and resveratrol suggest that these compounds may be useful in the dietary prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and gastric carcinoma among young adults. Research Group on Prevention of Gastric Carcinoma among Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, S; Wada, O; Nakajima, T; Nishi, T; Kobayashi, O; Konishi, T; Inaba, Y

    1995-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori is recognized as one of the possible causes of gastric carcinoma. There have been few studies on the relationship between H. pylori and gastric carcinoma in patients younger than 40 years. Data and sera were collected from the cases (105 hospitalized patients younger than 40 years with gastric carcinoma from 9 hospitals in the Kanto-Shin-Etsu Area in Japan) and controls (102 hospitalized control subjects and 101 screening control subjects) whose sex and age (within 4 years) were matched. The serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibody was measured, and the odds ratio (OR) for the association between seropositivity and gastric carcinoma was calculated. The OR (95% confidence interval) was 13.3 (5.3-35.6). For women, the OR was 32.8, whereas for men it was 6.8. The OR for patients with early gastric carcinoma was 20.8, and for patients with advanced disease, it was 10.8. The OR for intestinal-type carcinoma was 18.0, and for diffuse-type carcinoma, it was 12.8. The OR for proximal carcinoma was 11.3, and for distal carcinoma it was 14.8. The OR for these young subjects was considerably larger than that for the older subjects in previously published studies. Among those younger than 40 years of age, early stage carcinoma has a stronger association with H. pylori than advanced carcinoma, and intestinal- and diffuse-type carcinomas have an association with H. pylori.

  13. Increasing gastric juice pH level prior to anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy may be beneficial to the healing of duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Yun; Wang, Juan; Yan, Guo-Chao; Huo, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Li-Juan; Chu, Jian-Kun; Niu, Wei-Wei; Duan, Zhi-Ying; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Yu

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the efficacy of clarithromycin-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-infected duodenal ulcer when combined with different pH levels of gastric juices. A total of 160 patients with Hp-infected duodenal ulcers were randomly allocated into two groups. Patients in the treatment group (n=80) were administered a 20-mg dose of omeprazole twice daily for 1 week and then the treatment and control groups (n=80) received therapy for Hp infection and duodenal ulcers. We observed the ulcer healing stage, the content of anti-Hp IgA in gastric juice and the Hp eradication rate before and after proton pump inhibitor therapy in the two groups. Results revealed that the Hp eradication rate in the treatment group was 93% compared with 81% in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The ulcer healing rate in the treatment group was 93%, compared with 70% in the control group (P<0.05). A positive linear correlation was observed between gastric pH and the content of anti-Hp IgA in gastric juice (P<0.05). Increasing gastric pH prior to anti-Hp therapy may be beneficial to the eradication of Hp and for promoting the healing of duodenal ulcers.

  14. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Assay for Serum Anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG Antibody and Serum Pepsinogen Levels--The ABC Method.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yasuharu; Nagata, Yasuhiko; Hiratsuka, Ryuuta; Kawase, Yoshihiko; Tominaga, Tatsurou; Takeuchi, Shunji; Sakagami, Shinya; Ishida, Shusei

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and gastric atrophy are both risk factors for gastric cancer. Recently it has been found that X-ray examination for gastric cancer screening does not have much effect on the detection rate for gastric cancer in Japan. A candidate for a new mass screening for gastric cancer, the ABC method, using the combination assay of Hp and serum pepsinogen, was useful for identifying the development of gastric cancer in high-risk and low-risk populations. People with higher cancer risk are recommended to receive endoscopy. The ABC method was carried out as a gastric cancer mass-screening on the initiative of Nishitokyo Medical Association in Nishitokyo city from 2011. This paper reviewed the present status of gastric cancer screening using the ABC method, including the latest results of our ongoing screening. We report results for 36,627 individuals from 2011 to 2013. Among them, 16,965 received blood examination for the ABC method. Of those, 8,083 planned to undergo endoscopic examination according to stratification of the risk for the development of gastric cancer. In fact, a total of 2,911 individuals underwent endoscopic examination. Gastric cancer was detected in 65 patients, including 52 (80%) diagnosed with early gastric cancer. The ABC method was not organized screening but opportunistic screening. X-ray examination was the organized screening that was ongoing during the same period. Detection cost for 1 gastric cancer case using the ABC method was cheaper than the conventional X-ray screening method (¥1,267,452 vs. ¥2,807,763). Although further large epidemiological studies are required, the ABC method might be positioned as an effective mass screening for gastric cancer. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Analysis and anti-Helicobacter activity of sulforaphane and related compounds present in broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L.) sprouts.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon-Kwan; Kim, Jun-Ran; Ahn, Young-Joon; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-06-09

    A crude methanol extract prepared from fresh broccoli sprouts was extracted with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol sequentially. Residual water fraction was obtained from the residual aqueous layer. The greatest inhibition zones (>5 cm) were noted for Helicobacter pylori strain by the chloroform extract, followed by the hexane extract (5.03 cm), the ethyl acetate extract (4.90 cm), the butanol extract (3.10 cm), and the crude methanol extract (2.80 cm), whereas the residual water fraction did not show any inhibition zone. Including sulforaphane, five sulforaphane-related compounds were positively identified in the chloroform extract, of which 5-methylsulfinylpentylnitrile was found in the greatest concentration (475.7 mg/kg of fresh sprouts), followed by sulforaphane (222.6 mg/kg) and 4-methylsulfinylbutylnitrile (63.0 mg/kg). Among 18 sulforaphane and related compounds synthesized (6 amines, 6 isothiocyanates, and 6 nitriles), 2 amines, 6 isothiocyanates, and 1 nitrile exhibited >5 cm inhibitory zones for H. pylori strain. The results indicate that broccoli sprouts can be an excellent food source for medicinal substances.

  16. Antibacterial activity of Tabebuia impetiginosa Martius ex DC (Taheebo) against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Sung-Eun; Piao, Xiang-Lan; Takeoka, Gary R; Wong, Rosalind Y; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2006-04-21

    The growth-inhibiting activity of Tabebuia impetiginosa Martius ex DC dried inner bark-derived constituents against Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504 was examined using paper disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) bioassays. The activity of the isolated compounds was compared to that of the commercially available anti-Helicobacter pylori agents, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and tetracycline. The biologically active components of Tabebuia impetiginosa dried inner bark (taheebo) were characterized by spectroscopic analysis as 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone, anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, and 2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone (lapachol). With the paper disc diffusion assay 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone exhibited strong activity against Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504 at 0.01 mg/disc. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, lapachol and metronidazole were less effective, exhibiting moderate anti-Helicobacter pylori activity at 0.1 mg/disc. Amoxicillin and tetracycline were the most potent compounds tested, displaying very strong activity at 0.005 mg/disc. 2-(Hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone exhibited moderate activity at this dose. Tetracycline still had strong activity at 0.001 mg/disc while amoxicillin had little activity at this dose. In the MIC bioassay, 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone (2 microg/mL), anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (8 microg/mL), and lapachol (4 microg/mL) were more active than metronidazole (32 microg/mL) but less effective than amoxicillin (0.063 microg/mL) and tetracycline (0.5 microg/mL). The anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives (structurally related to lapachol), 1,4-naphthoquinone, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin), 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (lawsone), 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (plumbagin), 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone), and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (dichlone) was also evaluated using the paper disc

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of Patchouli Alcohol, a Naturally Occurring Tricyclic Sesquiterpene, against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y F; Lian, D W; Chen, Y Q; Cai, Y F; Zheng, Y F; Fan, P L; Ren, W K; Fu, L J; Li, Y C; Xie, J H; Cao, H Y; Tan, B; Su, Z R; Huang, P

    2017-06-01

    This study further evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Helicobacter pylori activities and potential underlying mechanism of patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene. In the in vitro assay, the capacities of PA to inhibit and kill H. pylori were tested on three standard strains at different pH values and on 12 clinical isolates. The effects of PA on H. pylori adhesion (and its alpA, alpB, and babA genes), motility (and its flaA and flaB genes), ultrastructure, and flagellation were investigated. Moreover, the H. pylori resistance to and postantibiotic effect (PAE) of PA were determined. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of PA on H. pylori eradication and gastritis were examined. Results showed that MICs of PA against three standard strains (pH 5.3 to 9) and 12 clinical isolates were 25 to 75 and 12.5 to 50 μg/ml, respectively. The killing kinetics of PA were time and concentration dependent, and its minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were 25 to 75 μg/ml. In addition, H. pylori adhesion, motility, ultrastructure, and flagellation were significantly suppressed. PA also remarkably inhibited the expression of adhesion genes (alpA and alpB) and motility genes (flaA and flaB). Furthermore, PA treatment caused a longer PAE and less bacterial resistance than clarithromycin and metronidazole. The in vivo study showed that PA can effectively eradicate H. pylori, inhibit gastritis, and suppress the expression of inflammatory mediators (COX-2, interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]). In conclusion, PA can efficiently kill H. pylori, interfere with its infection process, and attenuate gastritis with less bacterial resistance, making it a potential candidate for new drug development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Identification of Helicobacter pylori in skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Missall, Tricia A; Pruden, Samuel; Nelson, Christine; Fohn, Laurel; Vidal, Claudia I; Hurley, M Yadira

    2012-06-01

    A 23-year-old Chinese man presented with a 3-year history of a pruritic eruption. On examination, pink urticarial papules associated with hyperpigmented reticulated patches were noted on his neck, back, and upper chest. Histopathology revealed vacuolar interface dermatitis and numerous gram-negative rods within a dilated hair follicle. The organisms were reactive with anti-Helicobacter pylori immunohistochemisty. The histologic findings and clinical presentation support the diagnosis of prurigo pigmentosa. Additional testing demonstrated a positive urease breath test and serum H. pylori IgG antibodies. The patient was referred to gastroenterology and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After treatment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed chronic gastritis without evidence of H. pylori infection and his skin showed reticulated hyperpigmented patches without evidence of active inflammatory papules. Although previous reports have associated prurigo pigmentosa to H. Pylori gastritis, this is the first report of H. pylori organisms identified in a skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

  19. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles through Reduction with Solanum xanthocarpum L. Berry Extract: Characterization, Antimicrobial and Urease Inhibitory Activities against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhammad; Anwar, Farooq; Janjua, Muhammad Ramzan Saeed Ashraf; Iqbal, Muhammad Awais; Rashid, Umer

    2012-01-01

    A green synthesis route for the production of silver nanoparticles using methanol extract from Solanum xanthocarpum berry (SXE) is reported in the present investigation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNps), having a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band centered at 406 nm, were synthesized by reacting SXE (as capping as well as reducing agent) with AgNO3 during a 25 min process at 45 °C. The synthesized AgNps were characterized using UV–Visible spectrophotometry, powdered X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the time of reaction, temperature and volume ratio of SXE to AgNO3 could accelerate the reduction rate of Ag+ and affect the AgNps size and shape. The nanoparticles were found to be about 10 nm in size, mono-dispersed in nature, and spherical in shape. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of synthesized AgNps was tested against 34 clinical isolates and two reference strains of Helicobacter pylori by the agar dilution method and compared with AgNO3 and four standard drugs, namely amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CLA), metronidazole (MNZ) and tetracycline (TET), being used in anti-H. pylori therapy. Typical AgNps sample (S1) effectively inhibited the growth of H. pylori, indicating a stronger anti-H. pylori activity than that of AgNO3 or MNZ, being almost equally potent to TET and less potent than AMX and CLA. AgNps under study were found to be equally efficient against the antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible strains of H. pylori. Besides, in the H. pylori urease inhibitory assay, S1 also exhibited a significant inhibition. Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that the mechanism of inhibition was noncompetitive. PMID:22949839

  20. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infected mice with Bryophyllum pinnatum, a medicinal plant with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, reduces bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure Brigitte; Eyoum Bille, Bertrand; Tchouangueu, Thibau Flaurant; Nguepi, Eveline; Leundji, Hubert

    2017-12-01

    Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Kurz (Crassulaceae) is a plant known for its antiulcer properties. This study evaluates the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of Bryophyllum pinnutum methanol extract with a mouse model and its antioxidant properties. Dried leaves of Bryophyllum pinnutum were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter activity of extract samples in vitro. Swiss mice were inoculated with a suspension of Helicobacter pylori and divided into control group and four others that received 125, 250, 500 mg/kg of methanol extract or ciprofloxacin (500 mg/kg), respectively, for 7 days. Helicobacter pylori colonization and bacterial load of mouse stomach was assessed on day 1 and 7 post-treatment. The antioxidant activity of Bryophyllum pinnutum was evaluated through DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and reducing power assay. Methanol extract showed a significant anti-Helicobacter activity with MIC and MBC values of 32 and 256 μg/mL, respectively. Bryophyllum pinnatum and ciprofloxacin reduced H. pylori colonization of gastric tissue from 100% to 17%. Bryophyllum pinnatum extract (85.91 ± 52.91 CFU) and standard (25.74 ± 16.15 CFU) also reduced significantly (p < 0.05) bacterial load of gastric mucosa as compared to untreated infected mice (11883 ± 1831 CFU). DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and reducing power assays showed IC50 values of 25.31 ± 0.34, 55.94 ± 0.68 and 11.18 ± 0.74 μg/mL, respectively. The data suggest that the methanol extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum could inhibit Helicobacter pylori growth, and may also acts as an antioxidant to protect gastric mucosa against reactive oxygen species.

  1. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associate Urease by Labdane Diterpenoids Isolated from Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rafik U; Dawane, Ashwini A; Pawar, Rajendra P; Gond, Dhananjay S; Meshram, Rohan J; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-Helicobacter pylori and its associated urease activity of labdane diterpenoids isolated from Andrographis paniculata. A molecular docking analysis was performed by using ArgusLab 4.0.1 software. The results obtained indicate that compound A possesses strong inhibition to H. pylori, 28 ± 2.98 (minimum inhibitory concentration, 9 µg/mL), and its urease, 85.54 ± 2.62% (IC50 , 20.2 µg/mL). Compounds B, C, and D also showed moderate inhibition to H. pylori and its urease. The obtained results were in agreement with the molecular docking analysis of compounds. The phytochemicals under investigation were found to be promising antibacterial agents. Moreover, the isolated compounds can be considered as a resource for searching novel anti-H. pylori agents possessing urease inhibition.

  2. Volatile compounds in the stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea (Anacardiaceae) possess antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Njume, C; Afolayan, A J; Green, E; Ndip, R N

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify phytochemicals with anti-Helicobacter pylori activity from the stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea. The plant crude extract was fractionated by silica gel column and thin layer chromatography techniques, initially with ethyl acetate (EA) and subsequently with a combination of ethyl acetate/methanol/water (EMW). Further fractionation and identification of the phytoconstituents was achieved by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The antimicrobial activity of the fractions and compounds was evaluated against five metronidazole- and clarithromycin-resistant strains of H. pylori as well as a reference strain ATCC 43526 using the microbroth dilution technique. Amoxicillin was included in the experiments as a positive control antibiotic. Of the 18 fractions collected, 16 demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(50)) values ranging from 310 μg/mL to 2500 μg/mL. Two of the fractions (EMW fraction 6 and EA fraction 1) revealed the presence of 5 and 24 compounds, respectively, representing 40.5% and 86.57% of the total composition. Most of the compounds were essential oils, with terpinen-4-ol being the most abundant agent (35.83%), followed by pyrrolidine (32.15%), aromadendrene (13.63%) and α-gurjunene (8.77%). MIC(50) ranges for amoxicillin, terpinen-4-ol and pyrrolidine were 0.0003-0.06 μg/mL, 0.004-0.06 μg/mL and 0.005-6.3 μg/mL, respectively. The inhibitory activities of terpinen-4-ol and pyrrolidine were similar to amoxicillin (P>0.05). Most of these compounds are being reported in this plant for the first time and may represent new sources of therapeutically useful compounds against H. pylori. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunobiological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins.

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, M A; Rossano, F; Catalanotti, P; Liguori, G; Capasso, C; Ceccarelli, M T; Marinelli, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out on some biological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins in vitro. We extracted and purified a porin with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with H. pylori porins showed a decrease of chemotaxis, of adherence to nylon wool, and of chemiluminescence. Used as chemotaxins in place of zymosan-activated serum or as chemotaxinogens in place of zymosan, the porins induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration. Human monocytes and lymphocytes cultivated in the presence of H. pylori porins released cytokines. Release of the various cytokines studied was obtained with differentiated kinetics and at various porin concentrations. Starting only 3 h after culture, tumor necrosis factor alpha is released quickly, reaching a peak at 18 h, at a porin concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears later, with a peak at 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells. Lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori porins release gamma interferon after 18 h of culture at higher concentrations of porins (20 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells). Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is released from 6 to 48 h at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, while both IL-3 and IL-4 are released after 18 h of culture at different porin concentrations (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, respectively). Our results lead us to think that during H. pylori infection, surface components, porins in particular, are able to induce a series of chain reactions ranging from the inflammatory to the immunological responses. Images PMID:8132346

  4. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  5. Probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C biofilm formation on AGS and Caco-2 cells and Helicobacter pylori inhibition.

    PubMed

    Salas-Jara, M J; Sanhueza, E A; Retamal-Díaz, A; González, C; Urrutia, H; García, A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of the human isolate Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C to form biofilm and synthesize exopolysaccharide on abiotic and biotic models is described. These properties were compared with the well-known Lactobacillus casei Shirota to better understand their anti-Helicobacter pylori probiotic activities. The two strains of lactobacilli synthesized exopolysaccharide as detected by the Dubois method and formed biofilm on abiotic and biotic surfaces visualized by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, these strains inhibited H. pylori urease activity by up to 80.4% (strain UCO-979C) and 66.8% (strain Shirota) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, but the two species showed equal levels of inhibition (~84%) in colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. The results suggest that L. fermentum UCO-979C has probiotic potential against H. pylori infections. However, further analyses are needed to explain the increased activity observed against the pathogen in AGS cells as compared to L. casei Shirota.

  6. Carotenoid composition and in vitro pharmacological activity of rose hips.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Radó-Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Kawase, Masami; Satoh, Kazue; Tanaka, Toru; Tani, Satoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Gyémánt, Nóra; Molnár, József

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare carotenoid extracts of Rose hips (Rosa canina L.) with regard to their phytochemical profiles and their in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), cytotoxic, multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal and radical scavenging activity. Carotenoid composition was investigated in the different fractionation of rose hips, using extraction methods. Six main carotenoids - epimers of neochrome, lutein, zeaxanthin, rubixanthin, lycopene, β,β-carotene - were identified from Rose hips by their chromatographic behavior and UV-visible spectra, which is in accordance with other studies on carotenoids in this plant material. The active principles in the carotenoid extract might differ, depending upon the extraction procedures.

  7. In vitro activities of new quinolones against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, M; Fera, M T; Cecchetti, V; Tabarrini, O; Losi, E; Cusumano, V; Teti, G

    1997-01-01

    Compounds belonging to a new class of quinolones in which the fundamental C-6 fluorine atom was replaced were evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against 32 Helicobacter pylori strains. Since these substitutions resulted in higher inhibitory activities, these new desfluoroquinolones may be useful in eradicating H. pylori infections. PMID:9420062

  8. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Salem, Eyad M; Yar, Talay; Bamosa, Abdullah O; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Yasawy, Mohamed I; Alsulaiman, Raed M; Randhawa, Muhammad A

    2010-01-01

    A large number of diseases are ascribed to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), particularly chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection with antimicrobial agents can lead to regression of H. pylori-associated disorders. Antibiotic resistance against H. pylori is increasing, and it is necessary to find new effective agents. Nigella sativa seed (NS), a commonly used herb, possesses in vitro anti-helicobacter activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of NS in eradication of H. pylori infection in non-ulcer dyspeptic patients. The study was conducted on 88 adult patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2008, with dyspeptic symptoms and found positive for H. pylori infection by histopathology and urease test. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups, receiving i) triple therapy (TT) comprising of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole [n= 23], ii) 1 g NS + 40 mg omeprazole (OM) [n= 21], iii) 2 g NS + OM [n= 21] or iv) 3 g NS + OM [n= 23]. Negative H. pylori stool antigen test four weeks after end of treatment was considered as eradication. H. pylori eradication was 82.6, 47.6, 66.7 and 47.8% with TT, 1 g NS, 2 g NS and 3 g NS, respectively. Eradication rates with 2 g NS and TT were statistically not different from each other, whereas H. pylori eradication with other doses was significantly less than that with TT (P < 0.05). Dyspepsia symptoms improved in all groups to a similar extent. N. sativa seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple therapy. Further clinical studies combining N. sativa with antibiotics are suggested.

  9. Catechins and Sialic Acid Attenuate Helicobacter pylori-Triggered Epithelial Caspase-1 Activity and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jyh-Chin; Yang, Hung-Chih; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wang, Teh-Hong; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Kao, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    The inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway in immune cells plays a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis; however, the regulation of this pathway in the gastric epithelium during Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of catechins (CAs), sialic acid (SA), or combination of CA and SA (CASA) on H. pylori-induced caspase-1-mediated epithelial damage, as well as H. pylori colonization in vitro (AGS cells) and in vivo (BALB/c mice). Our results indicate that the activity of caspase-1 and the expression of its downstream substrate IL-1β were upregulated in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. In addition, we observed increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase gp91phox, CD68, caspase-1/IL-1β, and apoptosis, but decreased autophagy, in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected mice. We have further demonstrated that treatment with CASA led to synergistic anti-H. pylori activity and was more effective than treatment with CA or SA alone. In particular, treatment with CASA for 10 days eradicated H. pylori infection in up to 95% of H. pylori-infected mice. Taken together, we suggest that the pathogenesis of H. pylori involves a gastric epithelial inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway, and our results show that CASA was able to attenuate this pathway and effectively eradicate H. pylori infection. PMID:23653660

  10. Bactericidal activity of Pistacia lentiscus mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Leone, E; Bona, S; Carretto, E; Perversi, L

    2001-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of mastic gum, a resin obtained from the Pistacia lentiscus tree, against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were obtained by a microdilution assay. Mastic gum killed 50% of the strains tested at a concentration of 125 microg/ml and 90% at a concentration of 500 microg/ml. The influence of sub-MBCs of mastic gum on the morphologies of H. pylori was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The lentiscus resin induced blebbing, morphological abnormalities and cellular fragmentation in H. pylori cells.

  11. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Enany, Shymaa; Abdalla, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ), clarithromycin (CLR), tetracycline (TET), and amoxicillin (AMX) by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach. PMID:26691482

  12. Comparative Study of Nigella sativa and Triple Therapy in Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Patients with Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Eyad M.; Yar, Talay; Bamosa, Abdullah O.; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Yasawy, Mohamed I.; Alsulaiman, Raed M.; Randhawa, Muhammad A.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: A large number of diseases are ascribed to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), particularly chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection with antimicrobial agents can lead to regression of H. pylori–associated disorders. Antibiotic resistance against H. pylori is increasing, and it is necessary to find new effective agents. Nigella sativa seed (NS), a commonly used herb, possesses in vitro anti-helicobacter activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of NS in eradication of H. pylori infection in non-ulcer dyspeptic patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 88 adult patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2008, with dyspeptic symptoms and found positive for H. pylori infection by histopathology and urease test. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups, receiving i) triple therapy (TT) comprising of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole [n= 23], ii) 1 g NS + 40 mg omeprazole (OM) [n= 21], iii) 2 g NS + OM [n= 21] or iv) 3 g NS + OM [n= 23]. Negative H. pylori stool antigen test four weeks after end of treatment was considered as eradication. Results: H. pylori eradication was 82.6, 47.6, 66.7 and 47.8% with TT, 1 g NS, 2 g NS and 3 g NS, respectively. Eradication rates with 2 g NS and TT were statistically not different from each other, whereas H. pylori eradication with other doses was significantly less than that with TT (P < 0.05). Dyspepsia symptoms improved in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusions: N. sativa seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple therapy. Further clinical studies combining N. sativa with antibiotics are suggested. PMID:20616418

  13. Lymphocytic gastritis is not associated with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Roberts, Cory A; Lager, Donna J; Putcha, Rajesh V; Jain, Rajeev; Lewin, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG), characterized by marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in the gastric mucosa, has been frequently associated with both celiac disease (CD) and H. pylori gastritis. The aim of this study was to review and correlate the morphology of LG with the presence of CD and H. pylori. Gastric biopsies diagnosed with LG from 1/1/2006 to 8/1/2013 at our institution and corresponding small bowel biopsies, when available, were reviewed for verification of the diagnosis and to assess for the presence of H. pylori and CD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for H. pylori was performed on all gastric biopsies. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-four of the 56 cases that met inclusion criteria demonstrated significant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis as the predominant histologic abnormality; however, none were associated with H. pylori infection by IHC staining. Two cases that also showed a prominent intra-epithelial and lamina propria neutrophilic infiltrate were both positive for H. pylori and were excluded from further study. Of the 36 small bowel biopsies available, 19 (53%) showed changes in CD. LG is not a distinct clinicopathologic entity, but a morphologic pattern of gastric injury that can be secondary to a variety of underlying etiologies. When restricted to cases with lymphocytosis alone, LG is strongly associated with CD and not with active H. pylori infection. However, cases that also show significant neutrophilic infiltrate should be regarded as "active chronic gastritis" and are often associated with H. pylori infection. A morphologic diagnosis of LG should prompt clinical and serologic workup to exclude underlying CD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  15. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori urease activity by sucralfate and sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1997-06-01

    The effect of gastroprotective agents, sucralfate and sulglycotide, on the in vitro activity of H. pylori urease was investigated. The bacterium was subjected to sonication, centrifuged, and the supernatant used as an enzyme source. The assays revealed that the rate of urea degradation was proportional to enzyme protein up to 100 micrograms and remained constant with time for 10 min. Introduction of sucralfate or sulglycotide to the assay system led to the reduction in the rate of ammonia production. With both drugs the optimal inhibition was attained at 10 micrograms/ml, at which dose a 63.1% decrease in urease activity occurred with sucralfate and a 70.2% inhibition was obtained with sulglycotide. The findings demonstrate that the inhibitory action of sucralfate and sulglycotide on H. pylori urease activity may be of value in the treatment of gastric disease associated with H. pylori infection.

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Honey on Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Nzeako, Basil C; Al-Namaani, Faiza

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This project aimed to assess the antibacterial potential of various brands of honey sold in Muscat area on some isolates of H. pylori and to determine if there is any synergy between honey and amoxycillin or clarithromycin used in the treatment of H. pylori gastritis and duodenal ulcer. Methods: Eight samples of commercial honey were used in the experiment after they were checked for purity by sub-culturing on blood agar and incubating for 48 hours at 37°c. Honey samples showing gross contamination were discarded. Purified culture isolates of H. pylori from our laboratory stock cultures were swabbed on chocolate plate using 1x 104 cfu/ml. One hundred microlitres (100μl) of various honey samples were placed on each plate which was subsequently incubated microaerophilically at 37ºc for 3 days. The presence or absence of growth inhibition zones on each plate was noted and an average zone size of each honey was taken. Honey samples with high zone sizes were further diluted from 1:2–1:8 to find the end-points of their growth inhibition concentrations and the experiment was repeated in triplicates. The synergistic effect between honey, amoxycillin and clarithromycin was done in triplicates by placing honey at various distances between each antibiotic after swabbing chocolate agar with 1x 104 cfu/ml of H. pylori. The plates were incubated as before. Results: All honey samples produced growth inhibition zones with H. pylori no at dilution of honey but had different zone sizes at 1:2–1:8 dilutions. Black Forest honey had the highest antibacterial activity followed by Langnese honey. None of the honeys had a synergistic effect with either clarithromycin or amoxycillin. Conclusion: We conclude that, in vitro, some honey brands possess antibacterial activity against H. pylori and that no synergy or antagonism was observed between honey and clarithromycin or honey and amoxicillin using H. pylori as a test organism. Though no synergy or antagonism was observed

  18. In Vitro Activity of Diphenyleneiodonium toward Multidrug-Resistant Helicobacter pylori Strains.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun-Won; Kim, Su Young; Park, Hee Jung; Chung, Chang Su; Lee, Hee Woo; Lee, Sun Mi; Kim, Inki; Pak, Jhang Ho; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jeong, Jin-Yong

    2017-09-15

    The increased resistance of Helicobacter pylori to antibiotics has increased the need to develop new treatments for this bacterium. The aim of our study was to identify new drugs with anti-H. pylori activity. We screened a small molecule library-the library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC), which includes 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds-to identify inhibitors of H. pylori growth. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant H. pylori strains were determined using the agar dilution method. We identified diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) as a novel anti-H. pylori agent. The MIC values for DPI were <0.03 µg/mL against all tested H. pylori strains. DPI also exhibited strong antibacterial activity against common gram-negative and gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. DPI may be a candidate anti-H. pylori drug for future development.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of curcumin against Helicobacter pylori isolates from India and during infections in mice.

    PubMed

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2009-04-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 microg/ml to 50 microg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Curcumin against Helicobacter pylori Isolates from India and during Infections in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T.; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G. Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 μg/ml to 50 μg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin. PMID:19204190

  1. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles: Structural Features and In Vivo and In Vitro Therapeutic Effects against Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Sadaf; Ali, Asghar; Anwar, Farooq; Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Shakir, Imran; Yaqoob, Aqdas; Hasan, Sara; Khan, Safyan Akram; Sajjad-ur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates in vivo and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) efficacy of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) prepared via a cost-effective green chemistry route wherein Peganum harmala L. seeds extract was used as a reducing and capping agent. The structural features, as elucidated by surface plasmon resonance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, revealed the Ag-NPs synthesized to be polydispersed in nature and spherical in shape with 5–40 nm size. A typical Ag-NPs suspension (S5), with size being 15 nm, when tested in vitro against forty-two local isolates and two reference strains, showed a considerable anti-H. pylori activity. In case of in vivo trial against H. pylori induced gastritis, after oral administration of 16 mg/kg body weight of S5 for seven days, a complete clearance was recorded in male albino rates. In comparative time-killing kinetics, S5 exhibited dose- and time-dependent anti-H. pylori activity that was almost similar to tetracycline and clarithromycin, less than amoxicillin, but higher than metronidazole. Furthermore, S5 was found to be an equally effective anti-H. pylori agent at low (≤4) and high pH with no drug resistance observed even up to 10 repeated exposures while a significant drug resistance was recorded for most of the standard drugs employed. The present results revealed the potential of the synthesized Ag-NPs as safer bactericidal agents for the treatment of H. pylori induced gastritis. PMID:25214825

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation protects gastric epithelial cells from Helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Cao, Hanwei; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Krishna, Uma; Hobbs, Stuart S.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Peek, Richard M.; Cover, Timothy L.; Washington, M. Kay; Wilson, Keith T.; Polk, D. Brent

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Helicobacter pylori infection disrupts the balance between gastric epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis, which is likely to lower the threshold for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection is associated with EGF receptor (EGFR) activation through metalloproteinase-dependent release of EGFR ligands in gastric epithelial cells. Since EGFR signaling regulates cell survival, we investigated whether activation of EGFR following H. pylori infection promotes gastric epithelial survival. Methods Mouse conditionally immortalized stomach epithelial cells (ImSt) and AGS cells, as well as wild-type and kinase-defective EGFR (EGFRwa2) mice, were infected with the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13. Apoptosis, caspase activity, EGFR activation (phosphorylation) and EGFR downstream targets were analyzed. Results Inhibiting EGFR kinase activity or decreasing EGFR expression significantly increased H. pylori-induced apoptosis in ImSt. Blocking H. pylori-induced EGFR activation with a heparin-binding (HB)-EGF neutralizing antibody or abrogating a disintegrin and matrix metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM-17) expression increased apoptosis of H. pylori-infected AGS and ImSt, respectively. Conversely, pretreatment of ImSt with HB-EGF completely blocked H. pylori-induced apoptosis. H. pylori infection stimulated gastric epithelial cell apoptosis in EGFRwa2, but not in wild-type mice. Furthermore, H. pylori-induced EGFR phosphorylation stimulated PI3K-depnedent activation of the anti-apoptotic factor Akt, increased expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2, and decreased expression of the pro-apoptotic factor Bax. Conclusions EGFR activation by H. pylori infection has an anti-apoptotic effect in gastric epithelial cells that appears to involve Akt signaling and Bcl family members. These findings provide important insights into the mechanisms of H. pylori-associated tumorigenesis. PMID:19250983

  3. Association of Helicobacter pylori Antioxidant Activities with Host Colonization Proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Olczak, Adriana A.; Seyler, Jr., Richard W.; Olson, Jonathan W.; Maier, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the importance of two separate antioxidant activities in Helicobacter pylori, we tested the abilities of strains with mutations in either tpx (encoding thiolperoxidase) or ahpC (encoding alkyl hydroperoxide reductase [AhpC]) to colonize the stomachs of mice. The tpx strain was clearly more sensitive than the parent strain to both oxygen and cumene hydroperoxide. The strain colonized only 5% of the inoculated mice. Two different classes of oxygen-sensitive ahpC mutants in the type strain (ATCC 43504) were recently described (A. A. Olczak, J. W. Olson, and R. J. Maier, J. Bacteriol. 184:3186-3193, 2002). The same two classes of mutants were recovered upon ahpC mutagenesis of the mouse-adapted strain, SS1. Neither of these mutants was able to colonize mouse stomachs, whereas 78% of the mice inoculated with the parent strain became H. pylori positive. PMID:12496216

  4. Partial characterization and effect of omeprazole on ATPase activity in Helicobacter pylori by using permeabilized cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belli, W A; Fryklund, J

    1995-01-01

    ATPase activity in permeabilized cells of Helicobacter pylori as well as those of Helicobacter felis and Campylobacter jejuni was analyzed. The ATPase activities in these cells were most susceptible to sodium azide, fluoroaluminate, and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, which are typical inhibitors of F ATPases. Optimal values for maximal activity were found to be at approximately pH 6.4, 6.0, and 6.0 for C. jejuni, H. pylori, and H. felis, respectively. The substituted benzimidazole compounds omeprazole, lansoprazole, and Eisai 3810 were found to have no effect on the F ATPase activity of H. pylori at concentrations which are inhibitory for cell growth (MICs). In addition, an extracellular, vanadate-susceptible ATPase activity was detected in H. pylori, which was also relatively insusceptible to the benzimidazole compounds. Thus, the mechanism of killing mediated by omeprazole and related compounds in Helicobacter pylori does not appear to be due to diminished ATPase activity. PMID:7486907

  5. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori urease activity in vivo by the synthetic nickel binding protein Hpn.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Kerstin A; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B; Henklein, Peter; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the most common cause of gastroduodenal ulcerations worldwide. Adaptation of H. pylori to the acidic environment is mediated by urease splitting urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. Whereas neutralization of acid by ammonia is essential for gastric H. pylori colonization, the catalytic activity of urease is mediated by nickel ions. Therefore, nickel uptake and metabolism play key roles in H. pylori infection and urease is considered first line target for drug development and vaccination. Since nickel binding within H. pylori cells is mediated by the Histidine-rich protein designated Hpn, we investigated whether nickel binding by a synthetic Hpn is capable of abrogating urease activity of live H. pylori in liquid cultures. Supplementation of growth media with synthetic Hpn completely inhibited urease acitivity in live cells, indicating that H. pylori nickel uptake is effectively blocked by Hpn. Thus, nickel chelation by Hpn is stronger than nickel uptake of H. pylori offering therapeutic use of Hpn. Although the nickel binding of Hpn was confirmed by binding assays in vitro, its use in anti-H. pylori directed strategy will further need to be adapted to the gastric environment given that protons interfere with nickel binding and Hpn is degraded by pepsin.

  6. Sofalcone, a mucoprotective agent, increases the cure rate of Helicobacter pylori infection when combined with rabeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Isomoto, Hajime; Furusu, Hisashi; Ohnita, Ken; Wen, Chun-Yang; Inoue, Kenichiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The mucoprotective agents, sofalcone and polaprezinc have anti-Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) activities. We determined the therapeutic effects of sofalcone and polaprezinc when combined with rabeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin for Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-five consecutive outpatients with peptic ulcer and H pylori infection were randomly assigned to one of the following three groups and medicated for 7 d. Group A: triple therapy with rabeprazole (10 mg twice daily), clarithromycin (200 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin (750 mg twice daily). Group B: sofalcone (100 mg thrice daily) plus the triple therapy. Group C: polaprezinc (150 mg twice daily) plus the triple therapy. Eradication was considered successful if 13C-urea breath test was negative at least 4 wk after cessation of eradication regimens or successive famotidine in the cases of active peptic ulcer. RESULTS: On intention-to-treat basis, H pylori cure was achieved in 43 of 55 (78.2%) patients, 47 of 54 (87.0%) and 45 of 56 (80.4%) for the groups A, B and C respectively. Using per protocol analysis, the eradication rates were 81.1% (43/53), 94.0% (47/50) and 84.9% (45/53) respectively. There was a significant difference in the cure rates between group A and B. Adverse events occurred in 10, 12 and 11 patients, from groups A, B and C respectively, but the events were generally mild. CONCLUSION: The addition of sofalcone, but not polaprezinc, significantly increased the cure rate of H pylori infection when combined with the rabeprazole-amoxicillin-clarithromycin regimen. PMID:15786539

  7. Comparison of antimicrobial activity of zinc chloride and bismuth subsalicylate against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Usman, Muhammad Waqas; Awan, Safia; Naz, Shagufta; Jafri, Fatima; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2014-08-01

    We determined the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori to ZnCl, compared its sensitivity to bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) and clarithromycin (CLR) that are used for the treatment of H. pylori infection and its activity at different gastric pH. One hundred sixteen clinical isolates of H. pylori strains were chosen. Agar gel dilution method was used to determine the susceptibility of H. pylori isolates to ZnCl 40 μg/ml, BSS 20 μg/ml, and CLR 2 μg/ml. Suspension of 10(9) bacteria/μl was streaked on the blood agar plate. The control consisted of H. pylori incubated without ZnCl, BSS, and CLR. One hundred ten H. pylori strains (95%) were susceptible to ZnCl 40 μg/ml compared to 114 (98%) to BSS 20 μg/ml (p=0.002) and 92 (79%) to CLR 2 μg/ml (p=0.602). H. pylori isolates from patients with nonulcer dyspepsia and from peptic ulcer were equally susceptible to ZnCl 40 μg/ml (90/96 vs. 26/26, p=0.208). H. pylori associated with chronic gastritis and chronic active gastritis were equally susceptible to ZnCl. H. pylori demonstrated susceptibility to ZnCl in vitro. H. pylori susceptibility to ZnCl 40 μg/ml was greater than BSS and comparable to CLR. ZnCl may be used in the treatment of H. pylori infection.

  8. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-07-21

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability.

  9. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  10. In vitro activity of olive oil polyphenols against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Romero, Concepción; Medina, Eduardo; Vargas, Julio; Brenes, Manuel; De Castro, Antonio

    2007-02-07

    Helicobacter pylori is linked to a majority of peptic ulcers and to some types of gastric cancer, and resistance of the microorganism to antibiotic treatment is now found worldwide. Virgin olive oil is an unrefined vegetable oil that contains a significant amount of phenolic compounds. Under simulated conditions, we have demonstrated that these substances can diffuse from the oil into the gastric juice and be stable for hours in this acidic environment. In vitro, they exerted a strong bactericidal activity against eight strains of H. pylori, three of them resistant to some antibiotics. Among the phenolic compounds, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon showed the strongest bactericidal effect at a concentration as low as 1.3 microg/mL. Although the experimental conditions are different from other reported works, this bactericidal concentration is much lower than those found for phenolic compounds from tea, wine, and plant extracts. These results open the possibility of considering virgin olive oil a chemopreventive agent for peptic ulcer or gastric cancer, but this bioactivity should be confirmed in vivo in the future.

  11. Activation of Helicobacter pylori causes either autoimmune thyroid diseases or carcinogenesis in the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Astl, J; Šterzl, I

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in stimulation of immune system, development of autoimmune endocrinopathies as autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and on other hand induction of immunosupresion activates gastric and extra-gastric diseases such as gastric ulcer or cancer. It causes persistent lifelong infection despite local and systemic immune response. Our results indicate that Helicobacter pylori might cause inhibition of the specific cellular immune response in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with or without autoimmune diseases such as AT. We cannot also declare the carcinogenic effect in oropharynx. However the association of any infection agents and cancerogenesis exists. The adherence of Helicobacter pylori expression and enlargement of benign lymphatic tissue and the high incidence of the DNA of Helicobacter pylori in laryngopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer is reality. LTT appears to be a good tool for detection of immune memory cellular response in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and AT. All these complications of Helicobacter pylori infection can be abrogated by successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  12. Activities of muscadine grape skin and quercetin against Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Wang, J; Kasman, L; Jiang, X; Haley-Zitlin, V

    2011-01-01

    To explore the preventative potential of muscadine grape skin (MGS) and the single flavonoid, quercetin, as an alternative means for ameliorating Helicobacter pylori infection and/or the H. pylori-induced inflammatory response in mice. The antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties of MGS and quercetin, a major phenolic constituent, were evaluated against H. pylori in vitro and in vivo. The antimicrobial activity of quercetin was evaluated against 11 H. pylori strains in vitro with inhibition of all strains at 128-64 μg ml(-1) . In vivo studies showed a moderate reduction in H. pylori counts following treatment with 5 and 10% MGS or quercetin (25 mg kg(-1) body weight) in addition to significantly reduced inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ) when compared with untreated mice. MGS and quercetin did not significantly reduce H. pylori growth in a mouse model. However, these products were effective in regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori infection. Our results suggest that H. pylori infection may be reduced or prevented via the consumption of fruits rich in certain phenolic compounds (e.g. quercetin) such as muscadine grapes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Effects of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Expressions and Functional Activities of Human Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Transport Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guorong; Jin, Hai; Deng, Shili; Xu, Jingyu; Liu, Xuemei; Xie, Rui; Tuo, Biguang

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced duodenal ulcerogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of H. pylori infection on the expressions and functional activities of human duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins and hope to further clarify the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The experiments were performed in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, and H. pylori-negative healthy subjects. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion was measured by Ussing Chamber technology. The expressions of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and SLC26A6 (solute-linked carrier 26 gene A6), in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were markedly lower than those in healthy controls. Basal and both forskolin- and prostaglandin E2 -stimulated duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretions in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were also lower than those in healthy controls. After anti-H. pylori treatment for H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion and CFTR and SLC26A6 expressions in H. pylori-eradicated patients recovered to levels comparable to healthy controls, but those were found to be not significantly altered in non-H. pylori-eradicated patients. The further results showed that decreases in the H. pylori-induced CFTR and SLC26A6 expression were related to the severity and virulent factors of H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection impairs the expressions and functional activities of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR and SLC26A6, which contributes to the development of duodenal ulcer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Role of Activated Protein C in Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Satoko; Gabazza, Esteban Cesar; Taguchi, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Michihiko; Nakashima, Shigehito; Suzuki, Koji; Adachi, Yukihiko; Imoto, Ichiro

    2000-01-01

    The protein C (PC) pathway has recently been suggested to play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory response. To further extend the anti-inflammatory effect of activated PC (APC) in vivo, particularly its biological relevance to human disease, the activity of APC in the mucosa of patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and the effect of vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA), cytotoxin-associated antigen (CagA), and H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on PC activation were evaluated. This study comprised 35 patients with chronic gastritis. There were 20 patients with and 15 without H. pylori infection. The levels of PC and APC-PC inhibitor (PCI) complex were measured by immunoassays. The level of PC was significantly decreased and the level of APC-PCI complex was significantly increased in biopsy specimens from gastric corpus and antrum in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis as compared to H. pylori-negative subjects. The concentrations of VacA, CagA, and LPS were significantly correlated with those of the APC-PCI complex in biopsy mucosal specimens from the gastric corpus and antrum. H. pylori LPS, VacA, and CagA induced a dose-dependent activation of PC on the surface of monocytic cells. APC inhibited the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced by H. pylori LPS. Overall, these results suggest that H. pylori infection is associated with increased APC generation in the gastric mucosa. The inhibitory activity of APC on TNF-α secretion may serve to protect H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage. PMID:10768983

  15. Helicobacter pylori Resists the Antimicrobial Activity of Calprotectin via Lipid A Modification and Associated Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Radin, Jana N.; Cullen, Thomas W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Skaar, Eric P.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori is one of several pathogens that persist within the host despite a robust immune response. H. pylori elicits a proinflammatory response from host epithelia, resulting in the recruitment of immune cells which manifests as gastritis. Relatively little is known about how H. pylori survives antimicrobials, including calprotectin (CP), which is present during the inflammatory response. The data presented here suggest that one way H. pylori survives the nutrient sequestration by CP is through alteration of its outer membrane. CP-treated H. pylori demonstrates increased bacterial fitness in response to further coculture with CP. Moreover, CP-treated H. pylori cultures form biofilms and demonstrate decreased cell surface hydrophobicity. In response to CP, the H. pylori Lpx lipid A biosynthetic enzymes are not fully functional. The lipid A molecules observed in H. pylori cultures treated with CP indicate that the LpxF, LpxL, and LpxR enzyme functions are perturbed. Transcriptional analysis of lpxF, lpxL, and lpxR indicates that metal restriction by CP does not control this pathway through transcriptional regulation. Analyses of H. pylori lpx mutants reveal that loss of LpxF and LpxL results in increased fitness, similar to what is observed in the presence of CP; moreover, these mutants have significantly increased biofilm formation and reduced cell surface hydrophobicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism of H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobial activity of CP via lipid A modification strategies and resulting biofilm formation. PMID:26646009

  16. Activity of omeprazole on Helicobacter pylori and relation to toxicity of strains.

    PubMed Central

    Figura, N; Armellini, D; Bugnoli, M; Bayeli, P F; Gennari, C; Crabtree, J E

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To see whether the activity of omeprazole on Helicobacter pylori is associated with toxicity of strains; to determine whether omeprazole inhibited vacuolisation of cells in culture induced by H pylori cytotoxin and by ureas, and if omeprazole prevented H pylori motility. METHODS--Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of omeprazole were determined for seven cytotoxic and five non-cytotoxic H pylori strains. Omeprazole at different concentrations was incubated with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic extracts of H pylori, or with purified H pylori urease, and added to cells in culture. Inhibition of motility by omeprazole was tested in semi-solid medium. RESULTS--MIC90 of omeprazole was 40 micrograms/ml. MICs for cytotoxic and noncytotoxic organisms were similar. Omeprazole did not prevent vacuolisation induced by the cytotoxic extract, but at high concentrations it inhibited the formation of vacuoles induced by urease. Motility was not inhibited by the drug. CONCLUSIONS--H pylori cytotoxin is not the target of the antimicrobial activity of omeprazole. Should the drug reach clinically effective concentrations in vivo, it could potentially prevent the mucosal damage caused by the vacuolising activity of urease. PMID:8027398

  17. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: from molecular pathogenesis to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Wen

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) was originally identified as a virulence factor of H. pylori for its ability to activate neutrophils to generate respiratory burst by releasing reactive oxygen species. Later on, HP-NAP was also found to be involved in the protection of H. pylori from DNA damage, supporting the survival of H. pylori under oxidative stress. This protein is highly conserved and expressed by virtually all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The majority of patients infected with H. pylori produced antibodies specific for HP-NAP, suggesting its important role in immunity. In addition to acting as a pathogenic factor by activating the innate immunity through a wide range of human leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, HP-NAP also mediates adaptive immunity through the induction of T helper cell type I responses. The pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP not only make it play an important role in disease pathogenesis but also make it a potential candidate for clinical use. Even though there is no convincing evidence to link HP-NAP to a disease outcome, recent findings supporting the pathogenic role of HP-NAP will be reviewed. In addition, the potential clinical applications of HP-NAP in vaccine development, clinical diagnosis, and drug development will be discussed.

  18. In vitro activity of artemisone and artemisinin derivatives against extracellular and intracellular Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Francesca; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Masia, Carla; Bonomi, Arianna; Coccè, Valentina; Marano, Giuseppe; Haynes, Richard K; Miani, Alessandro; Farronato, Giampietro; Taramelli, Donatella

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro activity of the new artemisinin derivative artemisone as well as other molecules of the same class against Helicobacter pylori and their effects when combined with standard antibiotics were evaluated. Since H. pylori can be internalised into gastric epithelial cells, the effects of artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone against intracellular H. pylori were also investigated. Bacteriostatic [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)] and bactericidal [minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)] activities were assessed against 24 clinical strains of H. pylori with different antibiotics susceptibilities. Artemisone showed MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.25 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, and an MBC50 value of 0.5 mg/L. Artemisone was synergistic with amoxicillin in 60% of strains, with clarithromycin in 40% and with metronidazole in 20%. There was no interaction between artemisone and omeprazole or bismuth citrate. Against intracellular H. pylori, only dihydroartemisinin at 2× MIC caused a 1 log10 CFU decrease after 18 h and 24 h of incubation. This is the first demonstration in vitro of the activity of artemisinin derivatives against intracellular H. pylori and indicates that artemisone has the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of H. pylori infection, especially in combination with antibiotics.

  19. Lon protease affects the RdxA nitroreductase activity and metronidazole susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tu, I-Fan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    The lon gene of Helicobacter pylori strains is constitutively expressed during growth. However, virtually nothing is understood concerning the role of Lon in H. pylori. This study examined the function and physiological role of Lon in H. pylori (HpLon) using a trapping approach to identify putative Lon binding partners in the bacterium. Protease-deficient Lon was expressed and served as the bait in trapping approach to capture the interacting partners in H. pylori. The antibiotic susceptibility of wild-type and lon derivative mutants was determined by the E test trips and the disc diffusion assay. The effect of HpLon on RdxA activity was detected the change in NADPH oxidation and metronidazole reduction by spectrophotometer. Lon in Helicobacter pylori (HpLon) interacting partners are mostly associated with metronidazole activation. lon mutant presents more susceptible to metronidazole than that of the wild type, and this phenotype is recovered by complementation of the wild-type Lon. We found that the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA(+) ) module of HpLon causes a decrease in both NADPH oxidase and Mtz reductase activity in RdxA, a major Mtz-activating enzyme in H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance of H. pylori causes the serious medical problem worldwide. In this study, HpLon is involved in metronidazole susceptibility among H. pylori strains. We provide the evidence that HpLon alters RdxA activity in vitro. The decrease in metronidazole activation caused by HpLon is possibly prior to accumulate mutation in rdxA gene before the metronidazole-resistant strains to be occurred. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Bactericidal Activity of Carbon Monoxide–Releasing Molecules against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Ana F.; Parente, Margarida R.; Justino, Marta C.; Oleastro, Mónica; Nobre, Lígia S.; Saraiva, Lígia M.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogen that establishes long life infections responsible for chronic gastric ulcer diseases and a proved risk factor for gastric carcinoma. The therapeutic properties of carbon-monoxide releasing molecules (CORMs) led us to investigate their effect on H. pylori. We show that H. pylori 26695 is susceptible to two widely used CORMs, namely CORM-2 and CORM-3. Also, several H. pylori clinical isolates were killed by CORM-2, including those resistant to metronidazole. Moreover, sub-lethal doses of CORM-2 combined with metronidazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin was found to potentiate the effect of the antibiotics. We further demonstrate that the mechanisms underpinning the antimicrobial effect of CORMs involve the inhibition of H. pylori respiration and urease activity. In vivo studies done in key cells of the innate immune system, such as macrophages, showed that CORM-2, either alone or when combined with metronidazole, strongly reduces the ability of H. pylori to infect animal cells. Hence, CORMs have the potential to kill antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. PMID:24386154

  1. Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B E; Cohen, H; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium which causes chronic gastritis and plays important roles in peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. H. pylori has been found in the stomachs of humans in all parts of the world. In developing countries, 70 to 90% of the population carries H. pylori. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is lower. There appears to be no substantial reservoir of H. pylori aside from the human stomach. Transmission can occur by iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes. H. pylori is able to colonize and persist in a unique biological niche within the gastric lumen. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which appears essential to the survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A variety of tests to diagnose H. pylori infection are now available. Histological examination of gastric tissue, culture, rapid urease testing, DNA probes, and PCR analysis, when used to test gastric tissue, all require endoscopy. In contrast, breath tests, serology, gastric juice PCR, and urinary excretion of [15N]ammonia are noninvasive tests that do not require endoscopy. In this review, we highlight advances in the detection of the presence of the organism and methods of differentiating among types of H. pylori, and we provide a background for appropriate chemotherapy of the infection. PMID:9336670

  2. Helicobacter pylori Urease Suppresses Bactericidal Activity of Peroxynitrite via Carbon Dioxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Hideo; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Akaike, Takaaki; Kubota, Tatsuo; Sawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori can produce a persistent infection in the human stomach, where chronic and active inflammation, including the infiltration of phagocytes such as neutrophils and monocytes, is induced. H. pylori may have a defense system against the antimicrobial actions of phagocytes. We studied the defense mechanism of H. pylori against host-derived peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a bactericidal metabolite of nitric oxide, focusing on the role of H. pylori urease, which produces CO2 and NH3 from urea and is known to be an essential factor for colonization. The viability of H. pylori decreased in a time-dependent manner with continuous exposure to 1 μM ONOO−, i.e., 0.2% of the initial bacteria remained after a 5-min treatment without urea. The bactericidal action of ONOO− against H. pylori was significantly attenuated by the addition of 10 mM urea, the substrate for urease, whereas ONOO−-induced killing of a urease-deficient mutant of H. pylori or Campylobacter jejuni, another microaerophilic bacterium lacking urease, was not affected by the addition of urea. Such a protective effect of urea was potentiated by supplementation with exogenous urease, and it was almost completely nullified by 10 μM flurofamide, a specific inhibitor of urease. The bactericidal action of ONOO− was also suppressed by the addition of 20 mM NaHCO3 but not by the addition of 20 mM NH3. In addition, the nitration of l-tyrosine of H. pylori after treatment with ONOO− was significantly reduced by the addition of urea or NaHCO3, as assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. These results suggest that H. pylori-associated urease functions to produce a potent ONOO− scavenger, CO2/HCO3−, that defends the bacteria from ONOO− cytotoxicity. The protective effect of urease may thus facilitate sustained bacterial colonization in the infected gastric mucosa. PMID:10899833

  3. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tomoyuki; Kita, Masakazu; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Imamura, Shigeyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Mitsufuji, Shoji; Kodama, Tadashi; Kashima, Kei; Imanishi, JirO

    2003-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen responsible for gastroduodenal diseases in humans. Although the eradication of H. pylori using antibiotics often improves gastroduodenal diseases, resistance to the antibiotics is emerging. The antimicrobial effect of essential oils and the development of resistance to the essential oils were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Thirteen essential oils used in this study completely inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro at a concentration of 0.1% (v/v). Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) and Lippia citriodora (lemon verbena) were bactericidal against H. pylori at 0.01% at pH 4.0 and 5.0. Resistance to lemongrass did not develop even after 10 sequential passages, whereas resistance to clarithromycin developed under the same conditions. In in vivo studies, the density of H. pylori in the stomach of mice treated with lemongrass was significantly reduced compared with untreated mice. These results demonstrate that the essential oils are bactericidal against H. pylori without the development of acquired resistance, suggesting that essential oils may have potential as new and safe agents for inclusion in anti-H. pylori regimens.

  4. Modification of Helicobacter pylori Peptidoglycan Enhances NOD1 Activation and Promotes Cancer of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J; Forsberg, Lennart S; Azadi, Parastoo; Gomez, Martin A; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M

    2015-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses peptidoglycan from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering peptidoglycan structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag(+) strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore, we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Coculture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA(-) isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA(-) mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, preactivation of NOD1 before bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared with noncancer samples harvested from the same patients. These results indicate that peptidoglycan deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Activates IL-6-STAT3 Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells: Potential Roles for Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Piao, Juan-Yu; Lee, Hee Geum; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Park, Sin-Aye; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Na, Hye-Kyung; Cha, Young-Nam; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation is still not fully understood. In this study, we investigated H. pylori-induced activation of STAT3 signaling in AGS human gastric cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori, and STAT3 activation was assessed by Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunocytochemistry. To demonstrate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H. pylori-activated STAT3 signaling, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was utilized. The expression and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The interaction between IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) was determined by the immunoprecipitation assay. H. pylori activates STAT3 as evidenced by increases in phosphorylation on Tyr(705) , nuclear localization, DNA binding and transcriptional activity of this transcription factor. The nuclear translocation of STAT3 was also observed in H. pylori-inoculated mouse stomach. In the subsequent study, we found that H. pylori-induced STAT3 phosphorylation was dependent on IL-6. Notably, the increased IL-6 expression and the IL-6 and IL-6R binding were mediated by ROS produced as a consequence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori-induced STAT3 activation is mediated, at least in part, through ROS-induced upregulation of IL-6 expression. These findings provide a novel molecular mechanism responsible for H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Age dependent hypergastrinaemia in children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis--evidence of early acquisition of infection.

    PubMed Central

    McCallion, W A; Ardill, J E; Bamford, K B; Potts, S R; Boston, V E

    1995-01-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis causes achlorhydria, a powerful stimulus to gastrin secretion. If H pylori infection is acquired primarily in early childhood, then the degree of hypergastrinaemia in seropositive children should be age dependent. Anti-Helicobacter antibodies and fasting gastrin concentrations were measured in 439 children aged 4 to 13 years attending hospital for routine day case surgery not connected with any gastrointestinal disorder. Thirty per cent were seropositive for H pylori. There was an inverse relationship between the fasting gastrin concentration and age; the mean fasting gastrin in children aged 4-5 years, 155 ng/l, was significantly higher than that seen in children aged 12-13 years, 90 ng/l. The more noticeable hypergastrinaemia seen in young children with H pylori associated gastritis may reflect achlorhydria associated with acute H pylori infection and suggests that this is primarily acquired in early childhood. PMID:7672676

  7. Modification of Helicobacter pylori peptidoglycan enhances NOD1 activation and promotes cancer of the stomach

    DOE PAGES

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; ...

    2015-03-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan (PGN) into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses PGN from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering PGN structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore,more » we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Co-culture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA$-$ isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA$-$ mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, pre-activation of NOD1 prior to bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared to non-cancer samples harvested from the same patients. In conclusion, these results indicate that PGN deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.« less

  8. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Torres, Javier; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    TLRs and NLRs participate in the immune system recognition of Helicobacter pylori. However, little is known about the mechanisms leading to inflammasome activation by H. pylori and if NLRs in neutrophils are involved in the process. We studied how NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome components are involved in IL-1β maturation in human neutrophils in response to the infection and if they are dependent on T4SS (type IV secretion system) and TLRs. Human neutrophils were cultured and infected with the 26695 or the VirD4- H. pylori strains; the IL-1β concentration was analyzed by ELISA, and we also evaluated the activation of TLRs 2 and 4. The infection of neutrophils with both strains of H. pylori induced production of IL-1β and expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome components such as apoptosis-associated speck-like protein with CARD domain and NLRP3 protein. The infection also increased the activity of caspase-1, which is required for the maturation of IL-1β. Our study shows, for the first time, that H. pylori infection induces the expression and activation of components of NLRP3 inflammasomes in human neutrophils and that the activation is independent of a functional T4SS and TLR2 and TLR4. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associated Urease by Palmatine: Investigation on the Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li-Hua; Xu, Yi-Fei; Liu, Yu-Hong; Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Dou, Yao-Xing; Su, Rui; Su, Zi-Ren; Huang, Ping; Xie, Jian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and the possible inhibitory effect on its associated urease by Palmatine (Pal) from Coptis chinensis, and explored the potential underlying mechanism. Results indicated that Pal exerted inhibitory effect on four tested H. pylori strains (ATCC 43504, NCTC 26695, SS1 and ICDC 111001) by the agar dilution test with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 100 to 200 μg/mL under neutral environment (pH 7.4), and from 75 to 100 μg/mL under acidic conditions (pH 5.3), respectively. Pal was observed to significantly inhibit both H. pylori urease (HPU) and jack bean urease (JBU) in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 0.53 ± 0.01 mM and 0.03 ± 0.00 mM, respectively, as compared with acetohydroxamic acid, a well-known urease inhibitor (0.07 ± 0.01 mM for HPU and 0.02 ± 0.00 mM for JBU, respectively). Kinetic analyses showed that the type of urease inhibition by Pal was noncompetitive for both HPU and JBU. Higher effectiveness of thiol protectors against urease inhibition than the competitive Ni2+ binding inhibitors was observed, indicating the essential role of the active-site sulfhydryl group in the urease inhibition by Pal. DTT reactivation assay indicated that the inhibition on the two ureases was reversible, further supporting that sulfhydryl group should be obligatory for urease inhibition by Pal. Furthermore, molecular docking study indicated that Pal interacted with the important sulfhydryl groups and inhibited the active enzymatic conformation through N-H ∙ π interaction, but did not interact with the active site Ni2+. Taken together, Pal was an effective inhibitor of H. pylori and its urease targeting the sulfhydryl groups, representing a promising candidate as novel urease inhibitor. This investigation also gave additional scientific support to the use of C. chinensis to treat H. pylori-related gastrointestinal diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Pal might be

  10. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases. PMID:27667993

  11. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  12. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Murty, V L; Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-11-01

    1. A glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin was identified in the extracellular material elaborated by Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen implicated in the etiology of gastric disease. 2. The purified enzyme displayed an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa, and exhibited maximum activity at pH 5.7 in the presence of 0.3% Triton X-100 and 100 mM CaCl2. 3. The H. pylori glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin was inhibited by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide. The inhibitory effect was proportional to the concentration of sulglycotide up to 20 micrograms/ml, at which a 98% decrease in mucin desulfation occurred. However, the drug lost the inhibitory effect following its chemical desulfation. 4. The results demonstrate that sulglycotide is a potent inhibitor of H. pylori glycosulfatase and, hence, may be of value in the treatment of gastric disease associated with this bacterial infection.

  13. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against Helicobacter pylori strains.

    PubMed

    Cellini, L; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Genovese, S; Locatelli, M; Di Giulio, M

    2014-07-01

    Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) is a herbal remedy widely used for a variety of illnesses; A. vera leaf extracts have been promoted for detoxification, cure constipation, help flush out toxins and wastes from the body, promote digestion and are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer for cytoprotective action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of A. vera inner gel against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Abruzzo region, Italy. The inner gel of leaves of a 5-year-old plant of A. vera was extracted, homogenized and tested from 800 to 1.56 mg ml(-1) against 14 clinical strains and one reference strain of H. pylori using the broth microdilution methodology. Furthermore, the sample of A. vera was investigated for the chemical fingerprint of anthraquinones. The inhibitory concentrations of A. vera inner gel were similar to the bactericidal ones, with values ranging from 6.25 to 800 mg ml(-1) . Fifty per cent of the detected strains, independently of their susceptibility profile, were inhibited in their growth at 100 mg ml(-1) . Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against H. pylori and, therefore, in combination with antibiotics, could represent a novel strategy for the treatment of the infection of H. pylori, especially in cases of multiresistance. The study demonstrates that the Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains. These findings may impact on the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon of H. pylori, proposing the A. vera inner gel as a novel effective natural agent for combination with antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori gastric infection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shaik Mahaboob; Khan, Aleem A; Ahmed, Irshad; Musaddiq, M; Ahmed, Khaja S; Polasa, H; Rao, L Venkateswar; Habibullah, Chittoor M; Sechi, Leonardo A; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2005-01-01

    Background Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. Aim The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and time course lethal effects at various pH. Methods A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089) were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Results Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 μg/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance. PMID:16371157

  15. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shaik Mahaboob; Khan, Aleem A; Ahmed, Irshad; Musaddiq, M; Ahmed, Khaja S; Polasa, H; Rao, L Venkateswar; Habibullah, Chittoor M; Sechi, Leonardo A; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2005-12-21

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and time course lethal effects at various pH. A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089) were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 mug/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance.

  16. Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, H.; Rothenbacher, D.; Bode, G.; Adler, G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of patients attending a general practitioner. Active H pylori infection was measured by the 15C-urea breath test and detailed quantitative information on smoking and on alcohol and coffee consumption was obtained by a standardised self administered questionnaire. SETTING: One general practice in Germany. SUBJECTS: 447 patients aged 15-79 who had not had peptic ulcer disease or treatment for H pylori infection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of H pylori infection according to smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of infection was 21% (94/447). There was no significant relation between smoking and active H pylori infection. Alcohol consumption showed a negative dose-response relation and coffee consumption a positive dose-response relation with active infection. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for patients who drank < or = 75 g and > 75 g of ethanol a week compared with non-drinkers were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.59) and 0.33 (0.16 to 0.68), respectively (P value for trend 0.005, assuming that 1 litre of beer and 0.51 of wine contain on average 50 g of ethanol in south Germany). Adjusted odds ratios for patients who drank < 3 cups and > or = 3 cups of coffee per day compared with those who did not drink coffee were 1.49 (0.71 to 3.12) and 2.49 (1.23 to 5.03), respectively (P value for trend 0.007). CONCLUSION: These results suggest a protective effect of alcohol consumption against active infection with H pylori and an opposite effect of coffee consumption. PMID:9420488

  17. Anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of selected Pakistani medicinal plants in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Shahryar, Saeeda; Usmanghani, Khan; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan; Jafri, Wasim; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2012-05-07

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Due to its high global prevalence and uprising resistance to available antibiotics, efforts are now directed to identify alternative source to treat and prevent associated disorders. In the present study, effect of selected indigenous medicinal plants of Pakistan was evaluated on the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a bid to rationalize their medicinal use and to examine the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects in gastric epithelial cells. AGS cells and clinically isolated Helicobacter pylori strain (193C) were employed for co-culture experiments. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and cytotoxic effects of the selected plants were determined by serial dilution method and DNA fragmentation assay respectively. ELISA and flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the effect on IL-8 secretion and ROS generation in Helicobacter pylori-infected cells. At 100μg/ml, extracts of Alpinia galangal, Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum tamala, Mentha arvensis, Myrtus communis, Oligochaeta ramose, Polygonum bistorta, Rosa damascena, Ruta graveolens, Syzygium aromaticum, Tamarix dioica, and Terminalia chebula exhibited strong inhibitory activity against IL-8 secretion. Of these, four extracts of Cinnamomum cassia, Myrtus communis, Syzygium aromaticum, and Terminalia chebula markedly inhibited IL-8 secretion at both 50 and 100μg/ml. Cinnamomum cassia was further assessed at different concentrations against Helicobacter pylori and TNF-α stimulated IL-8 secretion, which displayed significant suppression of IL-8 in a concentration-dependent-manner. Among the plants examined against ROS generation, Achillea millefolium, Berberis aristata, Coriandrum sativum, Foeniculum vulgare, Matricaria chamomilla and Prunus domestica demonstrated significant suppression of ROS from Helicobacter pylori-infected cells (p<0.01). Results of the study

  18. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of some Vietnamese medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Dung, Pham Phuong; Nhi, Nguyen Vang Thi Yen; Hoang, Nguyen van Minh; Hieu, Tran Trung

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infectious bacteria. The infection is highly associated with a number of the most important disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including gastritis, duodenitis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer. In addition, widespread use of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance. Metabolites of plants, particularly higher plants, have been suggested as alternative potential sources for antibacterial products due to their safe. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial activities of crude ethanolic extracts of seventeen Vietnamese medicinal plants toward one reference strain and three clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using broth micro-dilution bioassay. The antibacterial activities of these extracts were also compared with those of seven antibiotics, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole. The extracts of Ampelopsis cantoniensis and Cleistocalyx operculatus showed highest antibacterial activity with MIC (MBC) values of 0.31 - 0.97 (2.5 - 5) mg/mL, followed by the extracts of Hedyotis diffusa and Ardisia silvestris with MIC (MBC) values of 1.04 - 1.94 (7.5 - 10) mg/mL. The remaining plant extracts exhibited moderate, low and very low or no active to the H. pylori strains. Further studies are needed to determine the active compounds from the extracts that showed high antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  19. Cytotoxic isolates of Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Diseases decrease K+-dependent ATPase Activity in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Shanjana, Awasthi; Archana, Ayyagari

    2003-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacterium that plays a central role in the etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. However, not all H. pylori positive cases develop advanced disease. This discriminatory behavior has been attributed to the difference in virulence of the bacteria. Among all virulence factors, cytotoxin released by H. pylori is the most important factor. In this work, we studied variation in H. pylori isolates from Indian dyspeptic patients on the basis of cytotoxin production and associated changes in K+-dependent ATPase (one of its targets) enzyme activity in HeLa cells. Methods The patients were retrospectively grouped on the basis of endoscopic and histopathological observation as having gastritis or peptic ulcer. The HeLa cells were incubated with the broth culture filtrates (BCFs) of H. pylori isolates from patients of both groups and observed for the cytopathic effects: morphological changes and viability. In addition, the K+-dependent ATPase activity was measured in HeLa cells extracts. Results The cytotoxin production was observed in 3/7 (gastritis) and 4/4 (peptic ulcer) H. pylori isolates. The BCFs of cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains reduced the ATPase activity of HeLa cells to 40% of that measured with non-cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains (1.33 μmole Pi/mg protein and 3.36 μmole Pi/mg protein, respectively, p < 0.05). The decreased activity of ATPase enzyme or the release of cytotoxin also correlated with the increased pathogenicity indices of the patients. Conclusions Our results suggest that the isolation of cytotoxic H. pylori is more common in severe form of acid peptic diseases (peptic ulcer) than in gastritis patients from India. Also the cytotoxin released by H. pylori impairs the ion-transporting ATPase and is a measure of cytotoxicity. PMID:14604441

  20. Differential regulation of urease activity in Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Clara; Stoof, Jeroen; Beckwith, Catherine S; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2005-12-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a pathogen of rodents, which causes diverse enteric and hepatic inflammatory diseases and malignancies. The urease enzyme is an important colonization factor of gastric Helicobacter species like Helicobacter pylori, but little is known about the role and regulation of urease in enterohepatic Helicobacter species. Here it is reported that urease activity of H. hepaticus does not contribute to acid resistance, and that it is nickel-responsive at the post-translational level. H. hepaticus strain ATCC 51449 did not grow or survive at pH 3.0, and supplementation with urea or NiCl2 did not abrogate this acid sensitivity. Furthermore, urease enzyme activity of H. hepaticus was acid-independent, which contrasts with the acid-induced urease system of H. pylori. Nickel supplementation of Brucella medium resulted in a tenfold increase in urease activity in both H. hepaticus and H. pylori, but the maximum level of urease activity in H. hepaticus was still three- to fivefold lower when compared to H. pylori in the same conditions. The increase in urease activity of H. hepaticus was not associated with elevation of urease mRNA or protein levels. Inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol did not affect nickel-responsive induction of urease activity in H. hepaticus, and confirmed that nickel induction occurs at the post-translational level, probably by activation of preformed apo-enzyme. In conclusion, both the role of the urease enzyme and the regulation of urease activity differ between the enterohepatic pathogen H. hepaticus and the gastric pathogen H. pylori.

  1. Activities of Garlic Oil, Garlic Powder, and Their Diallyl Constituents against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    O'Gara, E. A.; Hill, D. J.; Maslin, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori disease is reduced with Allium vegetable intake. This study was designed to assess the in vivo anti-H. pylori potential of a variety of garlic substances. The garlic materials all showed substantial but widely differing anti-H. pylori effects against all strains and isolates tested. The MICs (range, 8 to 32 μg/ml) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) (range, 16 to 32 μg/ml) of undiluted garlic oil (GO) were smaller than those of garlic powder (GP) (MIC range, 250 to 500 μg/ml; MBC range, 250 to 500 μg/ml) but greater than the MIC of allicin (4.0 μg/ml) (Table 2) present in GP. Allicin (MIC, 6 μg/ml; MBC, 6 μg/ml) was more potent than diallyl disulfide (MIC range, 100 to 200 μg/ml; MBC range, 100 to 200 μg/ml), its corresponding sulfide, but of a strength similar to that of diallyl tetrasulfide (MIC range, 3 to 6 μg/ml; MBC range, 3 to 6 μg/ml). Antimicrobial activity of the diallyl sulfides increased with the number of sulfur atoms. Time course viability studies and microscopy showed dose-dependent anti-H. pylori effects with undiluted GO, GP, allicin, and diallyl trisulfide after a lag phase of ca. 1 to 2 h. Substantial in vitro anti-H. pylori effects of pure GO and GP and their diallyl sulfur components exist, suggesting their potential for in vivo clinical use against H. pylori infections. PMID:10788416

  2. Helicobacter pylori augments growth of gastric cancers via the lipopolysaccharide-toll-like receptor 4 pathway whereas its lipopolysaccharide attenuates antitumor activities of human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Chochi, Kentaro; Ichikura, Takashi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Majima, Takashi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Kawabata, Toshinobu; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Ono, Satoshi; Seki, Shuhji; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2008-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori is reportedly involved in the development of gastric cancer. We investigated the mechanisms by which H. pylori affects gastric cancer growth and antitumor immunities in the host, focusing on H. pylori-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). H. pylori and four gastric cancer cell lines (MKN28, MKN45, NUGC3, and KATOIII) were used. We examined the effect of H. pylori or its LPS stimulation on cancer growth and the involvement of the H. pylori LPS-toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. We also examined the cytotoxicities of H. pylori/LPS-stimulated human mononuclear cells (MNC) against gastric cancer cells and the effect of H. pylori LPS stimulation on cytokine production by MNC. H. pylori, as well as its LPS, augmented the growth of gastric cancers, all of which expressed TLR4. Neutralization of TLR4 almost completely abrogated the H. pylori-induced proliferative activity of cancer cells. Escherichia coli LPS also augmented cancer growth via the LPS-TLR4 pathway. However, only H. pylori-derived LPS attenuated the cytotoxicity of MNC against gastric cancer cells. Stimulation with H. pylori/LPS also down-regulated perforin production in cancer cell-cocultured CD56+ natural killer cells. H. pylori LPS induced neither interleukin-12 nor IFN-gamma production by MNC, although E. coli LPS did induce production of both significantly. Nevertheless, interleukin-12 stimulation restored the IFN-gamma-producing capacity of H. pylori LPS-stimulated MNC. H. pylori augmented the growth of gastric cancers via the LPS-TLR4 pathway, whereas it attenuated the antitumor activity and IFN-gamma-mediated cellular immunity of MNC. H. pylori infection might thereby promote proliferation and progression of gastric cancers.

  3. Expression of catalytically active recombinant Helicobacter pylori urease at wild-type levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L T; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    The genes encoding Helicobacter pylori urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzymatic activity, however, has been very weak compared with that in clinical isolates of H. pylori. Conditions under which near wild-type urease activity was achieved were developed. E. coli. SE5000 containing recombinant H. pylori urease genes was grown in minimal medium containing no amino acids, NiCl2 was added to 0.75 microM, and structural genes ureA and ureB (pHP902) were overexpressed in trans to the complete urease gene cluster (pHP808). Under these conditions, E. coli SE5000 pHP808/pHP902) expressed a urease activity up to 87 mumol of urea per min per mg of protein (87 U/mg of protein), a level approaching that of wild-type H. pylori UMAB41 (100 U/mg of protein), from which the genes were cloned. Poor catalytic activity of recombinant clones grown in Luria broth or M9 medium containing 0.5% Casamino Acids was due to chelation of nickel ions by medium components, particularly histidine and cysteine. In cultures containing these amino acids, 63Ni2+ was prevented from being transported into cells and was not incorporated into urease protein. As a consequence, M9 minimal medium cultures containing histidine or cysteine produced only 0.05 and 0.9%, respectively, of active urease produced by control cultures containing no amino acids. We conclude that recombinant H. pylori urease is optimally expressed when Ni2+ transport is not inhibited and when sufficient synthesis of urease subunits UreA and UreB is provided. Images PMID:8500893

  4. Inhibitory Activities of Palmatine from Coptis chinensis Against Helicobactor pylori and Gastric Damage.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joohee; Choi, Jae Sue; Jeong, Choon-Sik

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important factor of gastric disease in clinical practice. Moreover, smoking, stress and a poor diet may be additive factors for gastric damage. With these factors, increasing infection of H. pylori triggers gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. To develop a new protective agent, we are concerned with plant-derived extract. The extract of Coptis chinensis (C. chinensis) and its constituents were investigated to assess their protective activities against gastric damage. The C. chinensis extract showed a scavenging effect against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals, inhibition of H. pylori colonization and antiulcerogenic activities in rat. In particular, palmatine derived from C. chinensis was found to be the novel protective agent. It is better than the C. chinensis extract, berberine, a well-known constituent of C. chinensis. We suggest that palmatine from the root cortex of C. chinensis may be a good candidate for the development of new pharmaceuticals to prevent gastric disease.

  5. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy on gastric antral myoelectrical activity and gastric emptying in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, H; Azuma, T; Ito, S; Abe, Y; Ono, H; Suto, H; Ito, Y; Yamazaki, Y; Kohli, Y; Kuriyama, M

    1999-10-01

    Dysmotility of the gastroduodenal region and delayed gastric emptying have been considered to play roles in non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation of the gastric mucosa may affect gastric motility. To evaluate the effects of H. pylori eradication therapy on gastrointestinal motility and symptoms in NUD patients. : Forty-six NUD patients were examined for gastric emptying, antral myoelectrical activity, H. pylori infection, and symptom scores. In H. pylori-positive NUD patients, gastric emptying, antral myoelectrical activity, and symptom scores were also analysed 2 months after cure of H. pylori infection. Sixty-seven per cent of NUD patients were H. pylori-positive. Both abnormal gastric emptying and antral myoelectrical activity were observed in NUD patients. H. pylori-positive NUD patients were divided into three groups according to their gastric emptying: the delayed group, the normal group, and the rapid group. In the delayed and rapid gastric emptying groups, the emptying and symptom scores were improved significantly by eradication. There was no improvement in symptom scores in the normal gastric emptying NUD group by the eradication therapy. Disturbed gastric emptying and antral myoelectrical activity play roles in NUD. H. pylori-induced disturbed gastric emptying may cause some NUD symptoms. Gastric emptying and symptom scores are improved by H. pylori eradication therapy in NUD patients with disturbed gastric emptying; H. pylori eradication therapy is effective in H. pylori-positive NUD patients with disturbed gastric emptying.

  6. No evidence for Helicobacter pylori in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Hulimavu, Shwetha R; Mohanty, Leeky; Tondikulam, Narayan V; Shenoy, Sadhana; Jamadar, Saleha; Bhadranna, Abhishek

    2014-09-01

    Oral lichen planus is a T-cell-mediated mucosal disease of unknown etiology. Numerous predisposing factors have been put forward in the etiology of this disease. This includes stress, drugs, genetic susceptibility, certain viruses, and bacterial infections. Recently, there have been studies published on possible role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of mucocutaneous diseases including oral lichen planus (OLP). The aim of this study was to detect immunohistochemically the presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral lichen planus. Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 50 cases of OLP and 10 cases of normal buccal mucosal biopsies and 6 endoscopic biopsies of patients with peptic ulcer (control group) were sectioned and stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Serial sections of same were stained immunohistochemically using Anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and observed under microscope for presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori. Except for the control group, none of the cases of OLP and normal buccal mucosal biopsies showed positivity for Helicobacter pylori. As we did not detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in any of the OLP cases, we question the role of these organisms in the pathogenesis of OLP planus if any. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of nitric oxide production and proliferation activity of recombinant Bacterioferritin of Helicobacter pylori on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a specific pathogen found in the human stomach. The Bacterioferritin of Helicobacter pylori is a major virulence factor of this pathogen which little is known about its effect on immune system. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of recombinant Bacterioferritin Helicobacter pylori on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity and viability of macrophages derived from mice peritoneal. The Bacterioferritin protein of Helicobacter pylori was cloned and purified. Mice peritoneal macrophages were purified and cultured. Different concentrations of recombinant protein were used to stimulate macrophages which had received LPS simultaneously. Cell survival and nitric oxide (NO) production were measured subsequently. Our results elucidated that the recombinant protein induced a significant NO production at a dose of 30 μg/ml (P < 0.01) compared to the control which was accompanied by increasing in the viability of macrophages at dosage of 30 μg/ml. According to our findings, recombinant protein stimulates peritoneal macrophages to produce NO and does not have cytotoxic effect. Therefore, it is suggested that recombinant Bacterioferritin can be studied further as a vaccine candidate for Immunotherapy purposes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  9. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  10. Helicobacter pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses. H. pylori , which used to be called Campylobacter pylori , also can cause peptic ulcers (commonly known ... H. Pylori Antigen Food Safety for Your Family Campylobacter Infections Pyloric Stenosis Peptic Ulcers Digestive System Vomiting ...

  11. The Importance of Toll-like Receptors in NF-κB Signaling Pathway Activation by Helicobacter pylori Infection and the Regulators of this Response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a common pathogenic bacterium in the stomach that infects almost half of the population worldwide and is closely related to gastric diseases and some extragastric diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Both the Maastricht IV/Florence consensus report and the Kyoto global consensus report have proposed the eradication of H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer as H.pylori has been shown to be a major cause of gastric carcinogenesis. The interactions between H. pylori and host receptors induce the release of the proinflammatory cytokines by activating proinflammatory signaling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a central role in inflammation, immune response, and carcinogenesis. Among these receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are classical pattern recognition receptors in the recognition of H. pylori and the mediation of the host inflammatory and immune responses to H. pylori. TLR polymorphisms also contribute to the clinical consequences of H. pylori infection. In this review, we focus on the functions of TLRs in the NF-κB signaling pathway activated by H. pylori, the regulators modulating this response, and the functions of TLR polymorphisms in H.pylori-related diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Helicobacter pylori in colorectal neoplasms: is there an aetiological relationship?

    PubMed

    Jones, Mary; Helliwell, Peter; Pritchard, Colin; Tharakan, Joseph; Mathew, Joseph

    2007-05-12

    This pilot study was carried out to determine whether Helicobacter pylori can be detected in normal colon or in association with colorectal neoplasia. Paraffin processed colonic tissue blocks of normal colonic mucosa (n = 60), and patients diagnosed as adenoma (n = 60), and adenocarcinoma (n = 60) were retrieved from our archive; the adenoma group included tubular (n = 20), tubulovillous (n = 20) and villous adenomas (n = 20). 4 mum sections were stained by immunohistochemical methods using anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies (polyclonal NCL-HPp and monoclonal NCL-C-jejuni). Significant numbers of Helicobacter pylori were identified in tubular adenomas (OR = 11.13; 95%CI = 1.62-76.70), tubulovillous adenomas (OR = 10.45; 95%CI = 1.52-71.52) and adenocarcinomas (OR = 8.13; 95%CI = 1.40-46.99) compared to controls: there was no association in numbers of Helicobacter pylori and villous adenomas (OR = 2.95; 95%CI = 0.29-9.96). We conclude that although, in this pilot study, there appears to be an association in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori with some, but not all, colorectal neoplasms, we can not infer causality from these results. These findings need to be further substantiated with a prospective study and the use of molecular biological techniques to determine a causal association.

  13. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ∼50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ∼130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori.

  14. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  15. [Fermented milk can act as adjunctive therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: A Meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Shuyue; Shen, Xi; He, Miao; Shi, Lei; Li, Ming; Huang, Chengyu; He, Fang

    2016-07-01

    To systematically evaluate the clinical effect of cultured milk products as adjunctive therapy in the anti- Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment.
 The randomized controlled trials (RCT) and Quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials (Quasi-RCT), which were used to evaluate the efficacy and safety of eradicating H. pylori by fermented milk-based routine treatment, were searched and collected in Pubmed, Embase, CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), CBM (Chinese BioMedical Literature Database), Wangfang Database, VIP (VIP Citation Database) from establishment of these database to February 2015. The combined relative risk (RR) of H. pylori eradication rate and the rate of side effects were analyzed. Sub-group and sensitivity analysis was performed, and the publication bias was also tested. 
 A total of 9 studies including 1 644 cases were identified. The H. pylori eradication rate was 79.5% in fermented milk products combined with routine therapy, and 67.0% in routine therapy. The combined RR of H. pylori eradication rate was 1.186 (95% CI 1.118-1.257), and the combined RR of total side effects was 0.706 (95% CI 0.373-1.340).
 Cultured milk products as adjunctive therapy is effective in improving the eradication rate during eradication therapy for H. pylori. However, it could not effectively decrease the risk of side effects.

  16. Helicobacter pylori HP0425 Targets the Nucleus with DNase I-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Min; Choe, Min-Ho; Asaithambi, Killivalavan; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Lee, Kon Ho; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins has a significant impact on host cell pathology. Helicobacter pylori have many nuclear targeting proteins that translocate into the nucleus of host cells. H. pylori HP0425, annotated as hypothetical, has a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, but its function has not been demonstrated. The aim of this experiment was to address the nuclear translocation of HP0425 and determine the effect of HP0425 pathology on host cells. To investigate the nuclear localization of HP0425, it was expressed in AGS and MKN-1 cells as a GFP fusion protein (pEGFP-HP0425), and its localization was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Recombinant HP0425 (rHP0425) protein was overproduced as a GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by glutathione-affinity column chromatography. Purified rHP0425 was examined for cytotoxicity and DNase activity. The pEGFP-HP0425 fluorescence was expressed in the nucleus and cytosol fraction of cells, while it was localized in the cytoplasm in the negative control. This protein exhibited DNase activity under various conditions, with the highest DNase activity in the presence of manganese. In addition, the rHP0425 protein efficiently decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that HP0425 carrying a nuclear localization signal sequence translocates into the nucleus of host cells and degrades genomic DNA by DNase I-like enzymatic activity, which is a new pathogenic strategy of H. pylori in the host. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide Binds to CD14 and Stimulates Release of Interleukin-8, Epithelial Neutrophil-Activating Peptide 78, and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 by Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Charles M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Keates, Sarah; Linevsky, Joanne K.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis is characterized by leukocyte infiltration of the gastric mucosa. The aims of this study were to determine whether H. pylori-derived factors stimulate chemokine release from human monocytes and to ascertain whether H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may be responsible for this effect. Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to an H. pylori water extract (HPE) or to purified H. pylori LPS. Levels of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The contribution of H. pylori LPS to monocyte activation was determined by using the LPS antagonist Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RSLA) and a blocking monoclonal antibody to CD14 (60bca). HPE increased monocyte secretion of IL-8, ENA-78, and MCP-1. Heat treatment of HPE did not reduce its ability to activate monocytes. Purified H. pylori LPS also stimulated monocyte chemokine production but was 1,000-fold less potent than Salmonella minnesota lipid A. RSLA blocked H. pylori LPS-induced monocyte IL-8 release in a dose-dependent fashion (maximal inhibition 82%, P < 0.001). RSLA also inhibited HPE-induced IL-8 release (by 93%, P < 0.001). The anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody 60bca substantially inhibited IL-8 release from HPE-stimulated monocytes (by 88%, P < 0.01), whereas the nonblocking anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody did not. These experiments with potent and specific LPS inhibitors indicate that the main monocyte-stimulating factor in HPE is LPS. H. pylori LPS, acting through CD14, stimulates human monocytes to release the neutrophil-activating chemokines IL-8 and ENA-78 and the monocyte-activating chemokine MCP-1. Despite its low relative potency, H. pylori LPS may play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis. PMID:9784544

  18. Impact of Helicobacter pylori eradication on refractory thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic HCV awaiting antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, A S; El Hawary, A T; Hamed, E F; Hassaneen, A M

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of delaying treatment of HCV due to severe thrombocytopenia is challenging. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of active helicobacter infection as a claimed cause of thrombocytopenia in a cohort of Egyptian patients with chronic active HCV awaiting combined anti-viral therapy. The study included 400 chronic HCV patients with thrombocytopenia. Laboratory investigations included liver function tests, real time quantitative PCR, reticulocytic count, ESR, ANA, bone marrow aspiration, measurement of anti-helicobacter antibodies, and helicobacter stool antigen. Positive cases for active H. pylori were given the standard triple therapy for 2 weeks. Helicobacter stool antigen was detected 4 weeks after termination of therapy and the change in platelet count was detected 1 month after eradication. A total of 248 out of 281 seropositive patients for H. pylori (88.3 %) showed positive stool antigen (p = 0.01). Eradication was achieved in 169 (68.1 %) patients with platelet mean count 114.9 ± 18.8 × 10(3)/μl with highly significant statistical difference from pretreatment value (49.7 ± 9.2 × 10(3)/μl, p = 0.000). Seventy-nine patients were resistant to conventional triple therapy and given a 7-day course of moxifloxacin-based therapy; 61 patients responded (77.1 %) with mean platelet improvement from 76.4 ± 17.4 × 10(3)/μl to 104.2 ± 15.2 × 10(3)/μl (p = 0.000). The non-responders showed no improvement in their platelet count (74.6 ± 20.5 vs. 73.6 ± 15.3 × 10(3)/ul, P = 0.5). Eradication of active H. pylori in HCV augments platelet count and enhances the early start of antiviral therapy.

  19. Shuttle cloning and nucleotide sequences of Helicobacter pylori genes responsible for urease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Labigne, A; Cussac, V; Courcoux, P

    1991-01-01

    Production of a potent urease has been described as a trait common to all Helicobacter pylori so far isolated from humans with gastritis as well as peptic ulceration. The detection of urease activity from genes cloned from H. pylori was made possible by use of a shuttle cosmid vector, allowing replication and movement of cloned DNA sequences in either Escherichia coli or Campylobacter jejuni. With this approach, we cloned a 44-kb portion of H. pylori chromosomal DNA which did not lead to urease activity when introduced into E. coli but permitted, although temporarily, biosynthesis of the urease when transferred by conjugation to C. jejuni. The recombinant cosmid (pILL585) expressing the urease phenotype was mapped and used to subclone an 8.1-kb fragment (pILL590) able to confer the same property to C. jejuni recipient strains. By a series of deletions and subclonings, the urease genes were localized to a 4.2-kb region of DNA and were sequenced by the dideoxy method. Four open reading frames were found, encoding polypeptides with predicted molecular weights of 26,500 (ureA), 61,600 (ureB), 49,200 (ureC), and 15,000 (ureD). The predicted UreA and UreB polypeptides correspond to the two structural subunits of the urease enzyme; they exhibit a high degree of homology with the three structural subunits of Proteus mirabilis (56% exact matches) as well as with the unique structural subunit of jack bean urease (55.5% exact matches). Although the UreD-predicted polypeptide has domains relevant to transmembrane proteins, no precise role could be attributed to this polypeptide or to the UreC polypeptide, which both mapped to a DNA sequence shown to be required to confer urease activity to a C. jejuni recipient strain. Images PMID:2001995

  20. Evidence for the Active Role of a Novel Nuclease from Helicobacter pylori in the Horizontal Transfer of Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Eyleen J.; Pinto, A. Viviana; Petroni, E. Alejandro; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Ielpi, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, causes gastritis, and is associated with ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori is naturally competent for transformation. Natural genetic transformation is believed to be essential for the genetic plasticity observed in this species. While the relevance of horizontal gene transfer in H. pylori adaptiveness and antibiotic resistance is well documented, the DNA transformation machinery components are barely known. No enzymatic activity associated with the transformation process has been determined experimentally and described. We isolated, microsequenced, and cloned a major DNA nuclease from H. pylori. This protein, encoded by the open reading frame hp0323, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, NucT, has a cation-independent thermostable nuclease activity that preferentially cleaves single-stranded DNA. NucT is associated with the membrane. NucT-deficient H. pylori strains are one or more orders of magnitude less efficient than the parental strain for transformation with either chromosomal or self-replicating plasmid DNA. To the best of our knowledge, NucT is the first nuclease identified in a gram-negative natural transformation system, and its existence suggests that there is a mechanism of DNA processing and uptake similar to the mechanisms in well-studied gram-positive systems. PMID:15090498

  1. TLR9 and NF-κB Are Partially Involved in Activation of Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and Its Purified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils. PMID:24987851

  2. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  3. Can Helicobacter pylori be eradicated with high-dose proton pump inhibitor in extensive metabolizers with the CYP2C19 genotypic polymorphism?

    PubMed

    Ormeci, A; Emrence, Z; Baran, B; Soyer, O M; Gokturk, S; Evirgen, S; Akyuz, F; Karaca, C; Besisik, F; Kaymakoglu, S; Ustek, D; Demir, K

    2016-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) metabolism and pharmacokinetics are regulated by cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphism plays an import role in the metabolism of PPIs. The three possible genotypes for CYP2C19 each has a distinct effect on the pharmacodynamics of PPIs. Homozygote extensive metabolizers (HomEM) are the most frequent genotype and have two wild-types (non-mutant) (*1/*1) alleles. HomEM is associated with increased enzyme activity, which increases the rate of PPI metabolism. Intragastric pH, which is required for eradication, is lowest in HomEM. In HomEMs, an insufficient increase in intragastric pH results in decreased anti-Helicobacter pylori (HP) efficacy of the antibiotics and, therefore, lower eradication rates. We determined whether the HP eradication rate would increase after high-dose PPI treatment of extensive PPI metabolizers who had been treated unsuccessfully with a standard PPI dose. In our report, increasing the PPI dosage in patients with genotype polymorphisms may be effective on eradication rates. Eradication rates are directly affected by CYP2C19 polymorphisms, and eradication treatments should be planned considering such genotypic polymorphisms. Hence, CYP2C19 genotyping prior to treatment may facilitate determination of the optimum PPI dose to improve the therapeutic outcome. However, further researches are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  4. Remarkable in vitro bactericidal activity of bismuth(III) sulfonates against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Philip C; Busse, Madleen; Deacon, Glen B; Ferrero, Richard L; Junk, Peter C; MacLellan, Jonathan G; Vom, Amelia

    2012-10-14

    Four new tris-substituted bismuth(III) sulfonates of general formula [Bi(O(3)SR)(3)] (R = phenyl 1, p-tolyl 2, 2,4,6-mesityl 3 and S-(+)-10-camphoryl 4) have been synthesised and characterised. Their synthesis by solvent-free (SF) and solvent-mediated (SM) methods has been explored and their activity against Helicobacter pylori has been investigated. The compounds 1-4 display a remarkable in vitro activity against three laboratory strains of H. pylori (B128, 26,695 and 251) with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.049 μg mL(-1) for the strains B128 and 26,695, and 0.781 μg mL(-1) for the clinical isolate 251. This places most MIC values in the nano-molar region and demonstrates the strong influence of the sulfonate group on the bactericidal properties. The novel solid state structure [Bi(8)(O(3)SMes)(20)(SO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(6)]·(C(7)H(8))(7)5·(C(7)H(8))(7), derived from the SM reaction under reflux conditions, is presented and the incorporation of the two inorganic sulfate anions in the centre of the wheel-like bismuth sulfonate cluster explained.

  5. Structure-Activity Relationship for Sulfonamide Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori α-Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Modak, Joyanta K; Liu, Yu C; Supuran, Claudiu T; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-12-22

    α-Carbonic anhydrase of Helicobacter pylori (HpαCA) plays an important role in the acclimation of this oncobacterium to the acidic pH of the stomach. Sulfonamide inhibitors of HpαCA possess anti-H. pylori activity. The crystal structures of complexes of HpαCA with a family of acetazolamide-related sulfonamides have been determined. Analysis of the structures revealed that the mode of sulfonamide binding correlates well with their inhibitory activities. In addition, comparisons with the corresponding inhibitor complexes of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) indicated that HpαCA possesses an additional, alternative binding site for sulfonamides that is not present in HCAII. Furthermore, the hydrophobic pocket in HCAII that stabilizes the apolar moiety of sulfonamide inhibitors is replaced with a more open, hydrophilic pocket in HpαCA. Thus, our analysis identified major structural features can be exploited in the design of selective and more potent inhibitors of HpαCA that may lead to novel antimicrobials.

  6. Inverse relation of serum Helicobacter pylori antibody titres and extent of intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, H; Inoue, F; Yoshida, Y

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To clarify the relation between the serum titre of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) antibody and the extent of intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa. METHODS: The serum anti-H pylori IgG titres of 95 asymptomatic individuals (mean age 65 years) undergoing an annual health examination were measured and compared with the extent of intestinal metaplasia (absent, moderate, or extensive), determined by examination of multiple endoscopic mucosal biopsy specimens. Serum pepsinogen I (PGI) levels, as a marker for gastric atrophy, were also measured. RESULTS: The prevalence of seropositivity for H pylori antibody was high (> 80%), regardless of the extent of metaplasia. However, there was a negative association between the extent of metaplasia and the anti-H pylori titre: 75% of the subjects in the group without metaplasia had high (3+) antibody levels, as did 43% with moderate, and 37% with extensive metaplasia (absent v extensive). The inverse relation between the titre and the extent of metaplasia was evident when examined in those with normal PGI (> 30 ng/ml), whereas no such relation was apparent in subjects with low PGI (< or = 30 ng/ml). CONCLUSIONS: The anti-H pylori titre correlates inversely with the extent of intestinal metaplasia, particularly in subjects with less marked gastric atrophy. PMID:8655674

  7. Impact of helicobacter pylori infection on the activities of urease and lipase enzymes in patients with giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Abou El-Hoda, Mostafa M; Osman, Hassan M; Rasha, Mona M; Douidar, Nabil L; Enany, Ahmed Y

    2007-01-01

    The study of the effect of Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori organisms coexistence on the activities of urease and lipase enzymes was the aim of this work which was done through choosing 50 cases of giardiasis in addition to 10 normal individuals chosen as a control group (free from giardiasis). It is well known that H. pylori is considered one of the most important causes of gastric and duodenal inflammations which could predispose to ulcers and hypochlorhydria leading to increased susceptibility to giardiasis as it is known that HCl acts as a chemical barrier to microbes. The biochemical tests were done to investigate the activity of both urease and lipase enzymes extracted from the gastric juice of patients and controls. A significant increase in urease activity in the group having combined infection (giardiasis and H.pylori) than the group infected with G.lamblia alone and the control group was found. The same findings were obtained regarding the lipase activity. In the present work, both infections H. pylori and G. lamblia coexisted in 75% of epigastric pain cases which could be explained on the basis that both organisms predispose to each other.

  8. Activation of IκB Kinase β and NF-κB Is Essential for Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils▿

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Ayako; Maeda, Shin; Shibata, Wataru; Hikiba, Yohko; Sakamoto, Kei; Nakagawa, Hayato; Ohmae, Tomoya; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Keiji; Muto, Susumu; Itai, Akiko; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil model of Helicobacter pylori infection resembles human gastritis. In this study, we investigated the role of NF-κB activation in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Activated macrophages were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa and were identified as being important cells with potent activation of NF-κB, which plays an important part in producing proinflammatory cytokines. Macrophage depletion by the administration of clodronate resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils infected with H. pylori. In macrophages, the inhibition of IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which is a critical kinase for NF-κB activation, resulted in lower proinflammatory cytokine expression caused by heat-killed H. pylori cells. Furthermore, treatment with IKKβ inhibitor resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils with H. pylori gastritis. Collectively, our data suggest that H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation critically depends on the efficient recruitment and activation of macrophages, with sufficient NF-κB activation. PMID:18070894

  9. Role of gastric antioxidant and anti-Helicobactor pylori activities in antiulcerogenic activity of plantain banana (Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca).

    PubMed

    Goel, R K; Sairam, K; Rao, C V

    2001-07-01

    Studies with plantain banana (Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca) have indicated its ulcer protective and healing activities through its predominant effect on various mucosal defensive factors [Sanyal et.al, Arch Int Pharmacodyn, 149 (1964) 393; 155 (1965) 244]. Oxidative stress and Helicobactorpylori colonization are considered to be important factors in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers. In the present study methanolic extract of plantain banana pulp (BE) was evaluated for its (i) antiulcer and antioxidant activities in 2 hr cold restraint stress and (ii) anti-H.pylori activity in vitro. The extract (BE, 50 mg/kg, twice daily for 5 days) showed significant antiulcer effect and antioxidant activity in gastric mucosal homogenates, where it reversed the increase in ulcer index, lipid peroxidation and super oxide dismutase values induced by stress. However it did not produce any change in catalase values, which was significantly decreased by stress. Further, in the in vitro study. BE (0.32-1,000 microg/ml) did not show any anti-H.pylori activity. The results suggest absence of anti-H. pyloric activity of methanolic extract of banana in vitro and its antioxidant activity may be involved in its ulcerprotective activity.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of Sapindus mukorossi and Rheum emodi extracts against H pylori: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Khan, Aleem A; Tiwari, Santosh K; Habeeb, Mohammed Aejaz; Khaja, MN; Habibullah, CM

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Sapindus mukorossi (S. mukorossi) and Rheum emodi (R. emodi). METHODS: Powders of S. mukorossi and R. emodi were extracted successively with petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform and ethanol and were concentrated in vacuum. The disk diffusion method was used for in vitro studies and in vivo studies were performed on male Wister rats. Thirty resistant clinical isolates of H pylori, as determined by their antibiotic sensitivity patterns by E-test, along with two Gram +ve (S. aureus, B. subtilis) and two Gram -ve (E. coli, P. vugaris) organisms were screened for their susceptibility patterns against these extracts. RESULTS: In our screening, all 30 resistant isolates and the other four organisms (two Gram +ve S. aureus, B. subtilis and two Gram -ve, E. coli, P. vugaris) were sensitive to the test compounds. It was found that ethanol and chloroform extracts of S. mukorossi and ethanol and benzene extracts of R. emodi inhibited H pylori at very low concentrations. In the in vitro study, the isolates showed a considerable zone of inhibition at very low concentrations (10 μg/mL) for both the extracts. In the in vivo study, the H pylori infection was cleared with minimal doses of extracts of S. mukorossi (2.5 mg/mL) and R. emodi (3.0 mg/mL) given orally for seven days. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that the extracts of S. mukorossi and R. emodi inhibited the growth of pylori in vitro and, in in vivo studies, the H pylori infection cleared within seven days at very low concentrations. We also found that H pylori did not acquire resistance against these herbal extracts even after 10 consecutive passages. PMID:17131475

  11. Structure of RdxA: an oxygen insensitive nitroreductase essential for metronidazole activation in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Rojas, Adriana L.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Hoffman, Paul S.; Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The RdxA oxygen insensitive nitroreductase of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the susceptibility of this organism to the redox active prodrug metronidazole (MTZ). Loss-of-function mutations in rdxA are primarily responsible for resistance to this therapeutic. RdxA exhibits potent NADPH oxidase activity under aerobic conditions and metronidazole reductase activity under strictly anaerobic conditions. Here we report the crystal structure of RdxA, which is a homodimer exhibiting domain swapping and containing two molecules of FMN bound at the dimer interface. We have found a gap between the side chain of Tyr47 and the isoalloxazine ring of FMN that seems appropriate for substrate binding. The structure does not include residues 97–128, which corresponds to a locally unstable part of the NTR from E. coli, and might be involved in cofactor binding. Comparison of H pylori RdxA to other oxidoreductases of known structure suggests RdxA may belong to a new subgroup of oxidoreductases in which a cysteine sidechain close to the FMN cofactor could be involved in the reductive activity. In this respect, mutation of C159 to A or S (C159A/S) has resulted in loss of MTZ reductase activity, but not NADPH oxidase activity. The RdxA structure allows interpretation of the many loss-of-function mutations previously described, including those affecting C159, a residue whose interaction with FMN is required for nitroreduction of MTZ. Our studies provide unique insights into the redox behavior of the flavin in this key enzyme for metronidazole activation, and with potential use in gene therapy. PMID:23039228

  12. Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey.

    PubMed

    al Somal, N; Coley, K E; Molan, P C; Hancock, B M

    1994-01-01

    Honey is a traditional remedy for dyspepsia, and is still used for this by some medical practitioners although there is no rational basis for its use. The finding that Helicobacter pylori is probably the causative agent in many cases of dyspepsia has raised the possibility that the therapeutic action of honey may be due to its antibacterial properties. Consequently, the sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori to honey was tested, using isolates from biopsies of gastric ulcers. It was found that all five isolates tested were sensitive to a 20% (v/v) solution of manuka honey in an agar well diffusion assay, but none showed sensitivity to a 40% solution of a honey in which the antibacterial activity was due primarily to its content of hydrogen peroxide. Assessment of the minimum inhibitory concentration by inclusion of manuka honey in the agar showed that all seven isolates tested had visible growth over the incubation period of 72 h prevented completely by the presence of 5% (v/v) honey.

  13. Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey.

    PubMed Central

    al Somal, N; Coley, K E; Molan, P C; Hancock, B M

    1994-01-01

    Honey is a traditional remedy for dyspepsia, and is still used for this by some medical practitioners although there is no rational basis for its use. The finding that Helicobacter pylori is probably the causative agent in many cases of dyspepsia has raised the possibility that the therapeutic action of honey may be due to its antibacterial properties. Consequently, the sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori to honey was tested, using isolates from biopsies of gastric ulcers. It was found that all five isolates tested were sensitive to a 20% (v/v) solution of manuka honey in an agar well diffusion assay, but none showed sensitivity to a 40% solution of a honey in which the antibacterial activity was due primarily to its content of hydrogen peroxide. Assessment of the minimum inhibitory concentration by inclusion of manuka honey in the agar showed that all seven isolates tested had visible growth over the incubation period of 72 h prevented completely by the presence of 5% (v/v) honey. PMID:8308841

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori: synergistic inhibition of urease activity by monoclonal antibody combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, K; Mizuta, T; Tonokatu, Y; Fukuda, Y; Okamura, H; Hayashi, T; Shimoyama, T; Tamura, T

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori NCTC 11637 were found to clearly inhibit the urease activity. Interestingly, synergistic inhibition by two MAbs recognizing different subunits was also observed. Ten MAbs were produced and classified as two isotypes of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass, IgG1, and IgG2a. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that five MAbs recognized the large subunit and the other five recognized the small subunit of the urease. Among the MAbs, L2 and S2, which recognized the large and the small subunits, respectively, were also able to inhibit the urease activity of clinical isolates from H. pylori-infected patients. The combination of L2 and S2 led to augmented synergistic inhibition. L2, but not S2, could also inhibit the urease activity from Helicobacter mustelae; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed that L2 cross-reacted with this urease. These results suggested that the epitope recognized by L2 had a structure common to both Helicobacter species and may be involved in the active site of the urease. In contrast to the MAbs, a polyclonal antibody in sera from mice immunized with H. pylori urease did not have the ability to inhibit H. pylori urease activity. However, the polyclonal antibody retained the ability to abolish the inhibitory action of these MAbs. Moreover, other MAbs which could not inhibit H. pylori urease activity also abolished the inhibitory action. Images PMID:1383158

  15. Prediction of extracellular proteases of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori reveals proteolytic activity of the Hp1018/19 protein HtrA.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Wessler, Silja; Schneider, Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies.

  16. Prediction of Extracellular Proteases of the Human Pathogen Helicobacter pylori Reveals Proteolytic Activity of the Hp1018/19 Protein HtrA

    PubMed Central

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:18946507

  17. Estimating the prevalence of active Helicobacter pylori infection in a rural community with global positioning system technology-assisted sampling.

    PubMed

    Melius, E J; Davis, S I; Redd, J T; Lewin, M; Herlihy, R; Henderson, A; Sobel, J; Gold, B; Cheek, J E

    2013-03-01

    We investigated a possible outbreak of H. pylori in a rural Northern Plains community. In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly sampled 244 households from a geocoded emergency medical system database. We used a complex survey design and global positioning system units to locate houses and randomly selected one eligible household member to administer a questionnaire and a 13C-urea breath test for active H. pylori infection (n = 166). In weighted analyses, active H. pylori infection was detected in 55·0% of the sample. Factors associated with infection on multivariate analysis included using a public drinking-water supply [odds ratio (OR) 12·2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·9-50·7] and current cigarette smoking (OR 4·1, 95% CI 1·7-9·6). People who lived in houses with more rooms, a possible indicator of decreased crowding in the home, were less likely to have active H. pylori infections (OR 0·7, 95% CI 0·5-0·9 for each additional room).

  18. A 21-35 kDa Mixed Protein Component from Helicobacter pylori Activates Mast Cells Effectively in Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ran-Jing; Sun, He-Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Han-Mei; Li, Bin; Yan, Hong-Tao; Lan, Chun-Hui; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Zhuo; Wu, Jin-Jin; Wu, Chao

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) seem to involve in the etiology of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). But studies of the pathogenic mechanism are very little. In this study, we detected the serum-specific anti-H. pylori IgG and IgE antibodies in 211 CSU and 137 normal subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), evaluated the direct activation effects of H. pylori preparations and its protein components on human LAD2 mast cell line in vitro, and analyzed the specific protein ingredients and functions of the most effective H. pylori mixed protein component using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and ELISA assay. In CSU patients, the positive rate of anti-H. pylori IgG positive rate was significantly higher than that in normal controls, and the anti-H. pylori IgE levels had no statistical difference between H. pylori-infected patients with and without CSU. Further studies suggested that H. pylori preparations can directly activate human LAD2 mast cell line in a dose-dependent manner and its most powerful protein component was a mixture of 21-35 kDa proteins. Moreover, the 21-35 kDa mixed protein component mainly contained 23 kinds of proteins, which can stimulate the release of histamine, TNF-a, IL-3, IFN-γ, and LTB4 by LAD2 cells in a dose-dependent or time-dependent manner. A 21-35 kDa mixed protein component should be regarded as the most promising pathogenic factor contributing to the CSU associated with H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  20. Genotyping of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma in Iranian Patients with Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Hossein; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection as a serious problem in both adults and children can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and possibly gastric cancer. The aim of the current study was to survey antibiotic resistance and also to determine influence of PPARγ polymorphism in patients with H. pylori infection. During an 11-month-period, 98 H. pylori isolates were collected from 104 biopsy specimens. In vitro susceptibility of H. pylori isolates to 4 antimicrobial agents metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline were assessed by quantitative method according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guideline. PPARγ polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. The frequency of H. pylori infection in our study was 94.2%. In vitro susceptibility data showed that highest level of resistance was related to metronidazole (66.3%), and the majority of H. pylori isolates were highly susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline (94.9% and 96.9%, respectively). Genotypic frequencies were 25.5% for CC (Pro12Pro), 40.8% for GC (Pro12Ala) and 33.7% for GG (Ala12Ala). In our study, CG genotype had highest distributions among infected patients with H. pylori. The study suggests that the PPAR-γ Pro12Ala polymorphism could be evaluated as a potential genetic marker for susceptibility to gastric cancer in the presence of H. pylori infection.

  1. Modification of Helicobacter pylori peptidoglycan enhances NOD1 activation and promotes cancer of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J.; Forsberg, Lennart S.; Azadi, Parastoo; Gomez, Martin A.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-03-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan (PGN) into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses PGN from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering PGN structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore, we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Co-culture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA$-$ isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA$-$ mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, pre-activation of NOD1 prior to bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared to non-cancer samples harvested from the same patients. In conclusion, these results indicate that PGN deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.

  2. Antisecretory, Gastroprotective, Antioxidant and Anti-Helicobcter Pylori Activity of Zerumbone from Zingiber Zerumbet (L.) Smith

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Fai, Loke Mun; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Background Zingiber zerumbet Smith is a perennial herb, broadly distributed in many tropical areas. In Malaysia, it’s locally known among the Malay people as “lempoyang” and its rhizomes, particularly, is widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease beyond other gastric disorders. Aim of the study The aim of the current study is to evaluate the gastroprotective effect of zerumbone, the main bioactive compound of Zingiber zerumbet rhizome, against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. Materials and Methods Rats were pre-treated with zerumbone and subsequently exposed to acute gastric ulcer induced by absolute ethanol administration. Following treatment, gastric juice acidity, ulcer index, mucus content, histological analysis (HE and PAS), immunohistochemical localization for HSP-70, prostaglandin E2 synthesis (PGE2), non-protein sulfhydryl gastric content (NP-SH), reduced glutathione level (GSH), and malondialdehyde level (MDA) were evaluated in ethanol-induced ulcer in vivo. Ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and anti-H. pylori activity were investigated in vitro. Results The results showed that the intragastric administration of zerumbone protected the gastric mucosa from the aggressive effect of ethanol-induced gastric ulcer, coincided with reduced submucosal edema and leukocyte infiltration. This observed gastroprotective effect of zerumbone was accompanied with a significant (p <0.05) effect of the compound to restore the lowered NP-SH and GSH levels, and to reduce the elevated MDA level into the gastric homogenate. Moreover, the compound induced HSP-70 up-regulation into the gastric tissue. Furthermore, zerumbone significantly (p <0.05) enhanced mucus production, showed intense PAS stain and maintained PG content near to the normal level. The compound exhibited antisecretory activity and an interesting minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori strain. Conclusion The results of the present

  3. Helicobacter pylori Induces Serine Phosphorylation of EGFR via Novel TAK1-p38 Activation Pathway in an HB-EGF-Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Refaat, Alaa; Zhou, Yue; Sualeh Muhammad, Jibran; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Saiki, Ikuo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with gastric epithelial cells can result in the activation of transcription factor NF-κB via TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). In this study, we have demonstrated the role of H. pylori in the activation of EGFR via TAK1-mediated phosphorylation of p38. Gastric epithelial AGS or MKN-45 cells were co-cultured with wild-type or cagA(-) H. pylori strains. H. pylori was added to the cells, and the activation of EGFR, p65 (NF-κB) subunit, p38, ERK, and TAK1 was examined by Western blotting. Infected cells were pretreated with or without ligands, chemical inhibitors, anti-HB-EGF antibody, and siRNAs to evaluate the effects on phosphorylation of various EGFR residues. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were performed to detect the internalization of EGFR. Incubating cells with wild-type and CagA(-) H. pylori strains resulted in the rapid and transient phosphorylation of serine residues of EGFR. RNAi experiments using siRNA against TAK1 and p38 pathways blocked the phosphorylation of serine residue. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry revealed that EGFR was internalized in H. pylori-infected cells after EGFR phosphorylation in a p38-dependent manner. In contrast, pretreatment with gefitinib and anti-HB-EGF antibody did not block both the phosphorylation and internalization of EGFR. Helicobacter pylori induces internalization of EGFR via novel TAK1-p38-serine activation pathway which is independent of HB-EGF. The interaction between TAK1 and EGFR in H. pylori-infected cells might open new dimensions in understanding H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Natural Honey Against H. pylori Infection Via Suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M M; Abouzied, Mekky M

    2016-07-01

    Natural honey has been used as a medicine since ancient times. Honey is widely known for its antibacterial properties against H. pylori; however, the mechanisms of its antibacterial activity are not fully known. The present study was performed to examine the molecular mechanisms by which natural honey can inhibit H. pylori infection in gastric epithelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to measure NF-κB- and AP-1-DNA binding activity. Western blotting was used to detect IκB-α and COX-2 expression. H. pylori induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity in gastric epithelial cells. Manuka honey inhibited H. pylori-induced NF-κB and AP-1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Maximum inhibition of H. pylori-induced NF-κB and AP-1 by manuka honey was observed at concentrations of 20% at 1-2 h. Pre-treatment of AGS cells with other commercial natural honeys also inhibited H. pylori-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. Honey prevented H. pylori-induced degradation of IκB-α protein and downregulated COX-2 protein levels. Our findings suggest that natural honey exerts its inhibitory effects against H. pylori by inhibiting NF-κB and AP-1 activation and downregulation of COX-2 expression. These results provide new mechanistic insights into honey effects in the suppression of H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of p21, p53 expression, and Ki-67 proliferative activities in the gastric mucosa of children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Saf, Coskun; Gulcan, Enver Mahir; Ozkan, Ferda; Cobanoglu Saf, Seyhan Perihan; Vitrinel, Ayca

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori that is generally acquired in childhood and infects the gastric mucosa is considered to be responsible for many pathobiological changes that are linked to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Although the majority of studies on the subject have been carried out in adults, there are a limited number of studies on children that reflect the early period of infection and may be of greater significance. We aimed to determine the role of H. pylori infection and/or gastritis in several histopathological changes, p53, p21, and cell proliferation-associated Ki-67 antigen expression in the gastric mucosa. We studied 60 patients with a mean age of 7.5 ± 4.5 years at referral. On the basis of endoscopic appearance and the evaluation of the gastric antral specimens, the patients were divided into three groups: patients without gastritis, patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis, and patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis. To determine the expression of p53, Ki-67, and p21 in gastric biopsy specimens, immunohistochemical stains were performed. The incidence of neutrophil activity, which was one of our histopathologic parameters, was significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. The presence of lymphoid aggregate was more frequent in H. pylori ± gastritis groups than the nongastritis group. p53 expression was found to be significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the nongastritis group. Ki-67 and p21 expressions were significantly more frequent in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. When we evaluated the density of H. pylori, as the density of bacteria increases, we found that the expressions of p53, p21, and Ki-67 increased significantly. Expression of the studied precancerous markers in significant amounts indicates the importance of childhood H. pylori infection in the constitution of gastric cancer in adulthood.

  6. High exposure, spontaneous clearance, and low incidence of active Helicobacter pylori infection: the Sorbo San Basile study.

    PubMed

    Luzza, Francesco; Suraci, Evelina; Larussa, Tiziana; Leone, Isabella; Imeneo, Maria

    2014-08-01

    A decreased incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection has been prospected to occur nowadays. To evaluate the exposure to H. pylori, prevalence and incidence of active infection, and related risk factors in the general population. In a small town of Southern Italy (932 inhabitants), 595 (3-97 years) and 157 (12-82 years) subjects among those with no evidence of active H. pylori infection participated at baseline and 10 years later, respectively. A questionnaire was administered. Active H. pylori infection was assessed by (13) C-urea breath test (UBT). Serum VacA and CagA antibodies were determined. Of 518 subjects who were evaluated by both UBT and serology, 310 (59.8%) were UBT positive, 479 (92.4%) VacA positive, and 369 (71.2%) CagA positive. Subjects UBT negative and serology positive were 169 (32%), ranging 1 (14.2%) to 29 (82.8%) from last to first decades of life. Age, female gender, and people per room were independent risk factors for subjects UBT positive compared to those UBT negative and serology positive. Ten years later, subjects who became UBT positive were four of 157 (0.25% per year) while those who became seropositive for VacA and/or CagA were 17 of 26 (6.5% per year). H. pylori infection is highly dynamic with wide range of spontaneous clearance. It is easily cleared in the first decades of life, more recent years, less crowded homes, and males. It disappears and recurs more often than it was previously thought, implying that the current decline in its prevalence is due to real clearance instead of a fall in infection rate. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chlorambucil versus observation after anti-Helicobacter therapy in gastric MALT lymphomas: results of the international randomised LY03 trial

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Barry W; Qian, Wendi; Linch, David; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Smith, Paul; Jakupovic, Ira; Burton, Cathy; Souhami, Robert; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Capella, Carlo; Traulle, Catherine; Levy, Michael; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Ferreri, Andres J M; Ambrosetti, Achille; Pinotti, Graziella; Martinelli, Giovanni; Vitolo, Umberto; Cavalli, Franco; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Zucca, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are uncommon tumours characterised by a tendency to remain localised for long periods. The aetiological association between MALT lymphomas and Helicobacter pylori is well established. The role of additional chemotherapy after H. pylori eradication in localised MALT lymphomas is unclear. The LY03 trial was designed to establish whether chlorambucil after treatment for H. pylori would help prevent recurrence. Patients were treated with antibiotics for H. pylori infection. Those with successful eradication of H. pylori and no evidence of progression of lymphoma were eligible for randomisation to chlorambucil or observation. Two hundred and thirty-one patients were registered. Ninety-seven percent patients had H. pylori eradicated after antibiotics and 59% achieved macroscopically normal gastric mucosa. One hundred and ten patients were randomised. With a median follow-up of 58 months, six patients were dead and 17 had recurrent/progressive disease. The recurrence/progression rates at 5 years were 11% for chlorambucil, and 21% for observation with a difference of 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −9% to 29%, P = 0·15. No difference was detected in recurrence/progression-free survival [Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0·96, 95% CI = 0·41–2·2, P = 0·91] or overall survival (HR = 1·93, 95% CI = 0·39–9·58, P = 0·42). This is the first randomised trial to show there is no good evidence to support that additional single agent chemotherapy to anti-H. pylori treatment contributes to prevent recurrence in localised gastric MALT lymphomas. PMID:19036078

  8. Arginase 2 deletion leads to enhanced M1 macrophage activation and upregulated polyamine metabolism in response to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Asim, Mohammad; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A; Verriere, Thomas; Lewis, Nuruddeen D; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-10-01

    We reported that arginase 2 (ARG2) deletion results in increased gastritis and decreased bacterial burden during Helicobacter pylori infection in mice. Our studies implicated a potential role for inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2), as Arg2 (-/-) mice exhibited increased NOS2 levels in gastric macrophages, and NO can kill H. pylori. We now bred Arg2 (-/-) to Nos2 (-/-) mice, and infected them with H. pylori. Compared to wild-type mice, both Arg2 (-/-) and Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice exhibited increased gastritis and decreased colonization, the latter indicating that the effect of ARG2 deletion on bacterial burden was not mediated by NO. While Arg2 (-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced M1 macrophage activation, Nos2 (-/-) and Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice did not demonstrate these changes, but exhibited increased CXCL1 and CXCL2 responses. There was an increased expression of the Th1/Th17 cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 17, in gastric tissues and splenic T-cells from Arg2 (-/-), but not Nos2 (-/-) or Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice. Gastric tissues from infected Arg2 (-/-) mice demonstrated increased expression of arginase 1, ornithine decarboxylase, adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1, spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase 1, and spermine oxidase, along with increased spermine levels. These data indicate that ARG2 deletion results in compensatory upregulation of gastric polyamine synthesis and catabolism during H. pylori infection, which may contribute to increased gastric inflammation and associated decreased bacterial load. Overall, the finding of this study is that ARG2 contributes to the immune evasion of H. pylori by restricting M1 macrophage activation and polyamine metabolism.

  9. Linked color imaging improves endoscopic diagnosis of active Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Osamu; Yagi, Nobuaki; Onozawa, Yuriko; Kimura-Tsuchiya, Reiko; Majima, Atsushi; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Horii, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kentaro; Tomie, Akira; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Konishi, Hideyuki; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Linked color imaging (LCI) is a new image-enhanced endoscopy technique using a laser light source to enhance slight differences in mucosal color. The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of LCI and conventional white light imaging (WLI) endoscopy for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed images from 60 patients examined with WLI and LCI endoscopy between October 2013 and May 2014. Thirty patients had H. pylori infections, and other thirty patients tested negative for H. pylori after eradication therapy. Four endoscopists evaluated the 2 types of images to determine which was better at facilitating a diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Results: H. pylori infection was identified with LCI by enhancing the red appearance of the fundic gland mucosa. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for diagnosing H. pylori infection using WLI were 74.2 %, 81.7 %, and 66.7 %, respectively, while those for LCI were 85.8 %, 93.3 %, and 78.3 %, respectively. Thus, the accuracy and sensitivity for LCI were significantly higher than those for WLI (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). The kappa values for the inter- and intraobserver variability among the 4 endoscopists were higher for LCI than for WLI. Conclusions: H. pylori infection can be identified by enhancing endoscopic images of the diffuse redness of the fundic gland using LCI. LCI is a novel image-enhanced endoscopy and is more useful for diagnosing H. pylori infection than is WLI. PMID:27556101

  10. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primarily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in H pylori infected subjects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in association with atrophic gastritis induced by H pylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentration. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may result from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations before and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels. PMID:19009647

  11. Helicobacter pylori promotes invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer cells through activation of AP-1 and up-regulation of CACUL1.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Li-qing; Bai, Pei-song; Da, Rong; Sun, Hong; Qi, Xiao-gai; Ma, Jie-qun; Zhao, Ru-ming; Chen, Nan-zheng; Nan, Ke-jun

    2013-11-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is important in the development and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in gastric tumors remain elusive. CACUL1 has been cloned and identified as a novel gene that is expressed in many types of cancer and is involved in cell cycle regulation and tumor growth. The current study aimed to examine the expression of CACUL1 in gastric cancer samples and analyze its correlation with H. pylori infection. We found that CACUL1 was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and negatively correlated with gastric cancer differentiation and TNM stage. In addition, CACUL1 expression was high in H. pylori-infected tissues compared with H. pylori non-infected tissue. We found that H. pylori could up-regulate CACUL1 expression through activating protein 1. The up-regulation of CACUL1 expression could promote matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to increase invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. These results suggested that H. pylori-triggered CACUL1 production occurred in an activating protein 1-dependent manner and regulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to affect the invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, CACUL1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of aggressive gastric cancer.

  12. Helicobacter pylori induces Snail expression through ROS-mediated activation of Erk and inactivation of GSK-3β in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Lee, Hee Geum; Piao, Juan-Yu; Zhong, Xiancai; Lee, Ha-Na; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kim, Wonki; Kim, Do-Hee; Cha, Young-Nam; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been known to be implicated in human gastric carcinogenesis. Snail, the zinc-finger transcription factor known as a key inducer of changes in the cell shape and morphogenetic movement, is aberrantly overexpressed and correlates with lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether H. pylori could induce Snail activation to provoke these changes. Using a cell scatter assay, we noticed that human gastric cancer AGS cells infected with H. pylori underwent morphological changes as well as disruption of cell-cell interaction, which was then reversed by silencing of Snail by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, infection with H. pylori resulted in an increased intracellular level of Snail in gastric cancer cells, which was abrogated in the presence of U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors of MEK/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways, respectively. Cycloheximide pulse-chase experiments coupled with immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the induction of Snail by H. pylori was regulated at multiple levels, including increased transcription of Snail mRNA, inhibition of protein degradation, and enhancement of nuclear translocation of Snail. Pre-treatment of AGS cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, attenuated the H. pylori-induced activation of Erk, its binding to Snail promoter, inactivation of GSK-3β, and accumulation of Snail. Collectively, these findings suggest that the upregulation of Snail expression induced by H. pylori and transformation to a spindle-like shape as a consequence in gastric cancer cells are attributable to ROS-mediated activation of Erk and the inhibition of GSK-3β signaling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. In vitro bactericidal activity of Jinghua Weikang Capsule and its individual herb Chenopodium ambrosioides L. against antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xue-Zhi; Li, Ning; Cheng, Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the bactericidal effects of Jinghua Weikang Capsule and its major component Chenopodium ambrosioides L. on antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori. Four clinical antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains were isolated and incubated in liquid medium containing Jinghua Weikang Capsule or Chenopodium ambrosioides L. By means of time-kill curve method, the average colony counts and bactericidal rate were calculated at time points of 0, 4, 8 and 24 h after the incubation and the time-kill curves were charted. Both Jinghua Weikang Capsule and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. at a concentration of 0.64 g/L showed obvious bactericidal effect against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori after 4 h of incubation. Jinghua Weikang Capsule and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. are considered to be active against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori in vitro.

  14. Chromatin and DNA methylation dynamics of Helicobacter pylori-induced COX-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Pero, Raffaela; Peluso, Silvia; Angrisano, Tiziana; Tuccillo, Concetta; Sacchetti, Silvana; Keller, Simona; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Bruni, Carmelo B; Lembo, Francesca; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2011-02-01

    COX-2 expression is altered in gastrointestinal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection may have a critical role in COX-2 disregulation. We undertook this study to investigate possible chromatin and DNA methylation changes occurring early during COX-2 gene activation as a direct consequence of Hp-gastric cells interaction. We show that Hp infection is followed by different expression, chromatin and DNA methylation changes including: (i) biphasic activation of COX-2 gene; (ii) rapid remodulation of HDACs expression and activity, increased acetylation and release of HDAC from COX-2 promoter; (iii) transient gradual increase of H3 acetylation and H3K4 dimethylation and decrease of H3K9 dimethylation; (iv) late and long-lasting increase of H3K27 trimethylation; (v) rapid cyclical DNA methylation/demethylation events at 8 specific CpG sites (-176, -136, +25, +36, +57, +82, +198, +231) surrounding the COX-2 gene transcriptional start site. Our data indicate that specific chromatin and DNA methylation changes occur at COX-2 gene in the first phases of Hp exposure in cultured gastric cells as a primary response to host-parasite interaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Saccharomyces boulardii expresses neuraminidase activity selective for α2,3-linked sialic acid that decreases Helicobacter pylori adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed

    Sakarya, Serhan; Gunay, Necati

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is an established risk factor for gastric malignancy. Antibiotic combination therapy can eradicate H. pylori. As these same regimens can evoke adverse effects and resistance, new alternative therapies or adjunctive treatments are needed. A probiotic approach may provide a novel strategy for H. pylori treatment. In the current study, two probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri, and a probiotic yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii, were evaluated for their ability to influence H. pylori viability, adherence to gastric and duodenal cells, as well as the effect of S. boulardii on cell surface expression of sialic acid. Our results indicate that S. boulardii contains neuraminidase activity selective for α(2-3)-linked sialic acid. This neuraminidase activity removes surface α(2-3)-linked sialic acid, the ligand for the sialic acid-binding H. pylori adhesin, which in turn, inhibits H. pylori adherence to duodenal epithelial cells. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori protease activity towards growth factors by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-09-01

    Infection with H. pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Here, we examined the susceptibility of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) to degradation by H. pylori protease, and assessed the effect of a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, on this process. The 125I-labeled EGF, bFGF, TGF beta and PDGF were incubatet with H. pylori protease, obtained from the filtrates of saline washes of the bacterium culture, in the presence of 0-100 micrograms sulglycotide. The results showed that, under the assay conditions, H. pylori protease caused only 5% degradation of EGF and 7% degradation of bFGF. However, the protease evoked a 61.7% degradation of PDGF and a 62.3% degradation of TGF beta. Introduction of sulglycotide to the reaction assay system caused a dose-dependent inhibition in PDGF and TGF beta proteolysis by the H. pylori enzyme. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with sulglycotide at 100 micrograms/ml, at which dose an 84.4% decrease in PDGF and 88.3% decrease in TGF beta degradation was achieved. The results provide a strong evidence for the effectiveness of sulglycotide in the protection of gastric mucosal growth factors against degradation by H. pylori.

  17. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  18. Functional (13)C-urea and glucose hydrogen/methane breath tests reveal significant association of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in individuals with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Enko, Dietmar; Kriegshäuser, Gernot

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is considered to alter the bacterial flora in the upper gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed at investigating the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with active H. pylori infection assessed by functional breath testing. A total of 109 outpatients, who were referred for the H. pylori(13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) by general practitioners and specialists, were also tested for the presence of SIBO by the glucose hydrogen (H2)/methane (CH4) breath test (HMBT). A detailed anamnesis was carried out about the history of H. pylori infection, eradication therapies, proton pump inhibitor intake, and comorbidities. In total, 36/109 (33.0%) patients had a positive H. pylori(13)C-UBT, and 35/109 (32.1%) patients had a positive glucose HMBT, the latter being indicative of SIBO. Interestingly, individuals with a positive H. pylori(13)C-UBT were significantly more often associated with a positive glucose HMBT (p=0.002). Cohen's κ measuring agreement between the (13)C-UBT and the glucose HMBT was 0.31 (confidence intervals: 0.12-0.50) (p=0.001). Altogether, 19 of 54 (35.2%) patients, who had completed up to four eradication therapies, were diagnosed with SIBO by HMBT. H. pylori infection was found to be significantly associated with the presence of SIBO as determined by functional breath testing. In addition, SIBO rates appeared to have increased after completed eradication therapies. However, further longitudinal studies are warranted to fully elucidate the relationship and treatment modalities of coincident H. pylori infection and SIBO. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicobacter pylori: a sexually transmitted bacterium?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral sex (fellatio) is a very common sexual activity. H. pylori is mainly a gastric organism, but studies have reported that infected individuals may permanently or transiently carry H. pylori in their mouth and saliva. Material and methods A Pubmed search was conducted using the words infection, oral sex and urethritis. Results The existing studies support the hypothesis that H. pylori could be a causative agent of non–gonococcal urethritis. Conclusions It is possible that H. pylori may be transmitted via the act of fellatio in the urethra. Further research is required to explore the role of H. pylori in sexually transmitted urethritis. PMID:25667764

  20. A case of Helicobacter pylori-negative intramucosal well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma with intestinal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Suto, Hiroyuki; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Naito, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2015-02-01

    A woman in her 30s visited our hospital with stool abnormality. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a depressed lesion on the greater curvature of the gastric antrum. The tumor was diagnosed as a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma based on the analysis of the biopsy specimen. The rapid urease test, histological examination, and serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody indicated that the patient was Helicobacter pylori negative. Gastric mucosal atrophy was not evident on esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Complete cure en bloc resection was successfully performed. The tumor was confined to the mucosa (pT1a-M). Immunohistochemistry showed positive CD10, MUC2, and CDX2 expression and negative MUC5AC and MUC6 expression. Thus, the phenotype was diagnosed as the intestinal phenotype. Helicobacter pylori-negative, well-differentiated early gastric cancer with intestinal phenotype has not been previously reported. Here, we report a rare and valuable case of Helicobacter pylori-negative early gastric cancer with intestinal phenotype treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection.

  1. Bismuth(III) 5-sulfosalicylate complexes: structure, solubility and activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Philip C; Deacon, Glen B; Ferrero, Richard L; Junk, Peter C; Karrar, Abdulgader; Kumar, Ish; MacLellan, Jonathan G

    2009-08-28

    Treatment of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (H(3)Ssal) with BiPh(3) results in the formation of the first dianionic carboxylate-sulfonate bismuth complex, [PhBi(HSsal)H(2)O](infinity) 1a, and its ethanol analogue [PhBi(HSsal)EtOH](infinity) 1b (space group P2(1)/c), while Bi(OAc)(3) gives the mixed monoanionic and dianionic complex, {[Bi(HSsal)(H(2)Ssal)(H(2)O)(3)](2) x 2 H(2)O}(infinity) 2 (space group P1). The three complexes are all polymeric in the solid state as determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, with extended frameworks constructed from dimeric [Bi(HSsal)](2), 1a and 1b, or from [Bi(HSsal)(H(2)Ssal)](2) units, 2. The heteroleptic bismuth complexes 1a and 2 display remarkable aqueous solubility, 10 and 2.5 mg ml(-1) respectively, resulting in a clear solution of pH 1.5. In contrast, 1b is essentially insoluble in aqueous environments. All three complexes show significant activity against the bacterium Helicobacter pylori of <6.25 microg ml(-1).

  2. The impact of bismuth addition to sequential treatment on Helicobacter pylori eradication: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Basyigit, Sebahat; Kefeli, Ayse; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Yeniova, Abdullah Ozgür; Asilturk, Zeliha; Hokkaomeroglu, Murat; Uzman, Metin; Nazligul, Yasar

    2015-10-25

    The success of the current anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment protocols is reported to decrease by years, and research is needed to strengthen the H. pylori eradication treatment. Sequential treatment (ST), one of the treatment modalities for H. pylori eradication, includes amoxicillin 1 gr b.i.d and proton pump inhibitor b.i.d for first 5 days and then includes clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d, metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d and a proton pump inhibitor b.i.d for remaining 5 days. In this study, we investigated efficacy and tolerability of bismuth addition in to ST. We included patients that underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in which H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histological examination of antral and corporal gastric mucosa biopsy. Participants were randomly administered ST or bismuth containing ST (BST) protocols for the first-line H. pylori eradication therapy. Participants have been tested by urea breath test for eradication success 6 weeks after the completion of treatment. One hundred and fifty patients (93 female, 57 male) were enrolled. There were no significant differences in eradication rates for both intention to treat population (70.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 66.3-74.1% vs. 71.8%, 95% CI: 61.8-81.7%, for ST and BST, respectively, p>0.05) and per protocol population (74.6%, 95% CI: 63.2-85.8% vs. 73.7%, 95% CI: 63.9-83.5% for ST and BST, respectively, p>0.05). Despite the undeniable effect of bismuth, there may be several possible reasons of unsatisfactory eradication success. Drug administration time, coadministration of other drugs, possible H. pylori resistance to bismuth may affect the eradication success. The addition of bismuth subcitrate to ST regimen does not provide significant increase in eradication rates.

  3. Aqueous and organic solvent-extracts of selected south African medicinal plants possess antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori: inhibitory and bactericidal potential.

    PubMed

    Njume, Collise; Jide, Afolayan A; Ndip, Roland N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638) using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(50)) values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC(50) values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05) as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  4. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Njume, Collise; Jide, Afolayan A.; Ndip, Roland N.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638) using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05) as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity. PMID:22016616

  5. Helicobacter pylori activates the TLR2/NLRP3/caspase-1/IL-18 axis to induce regulatory T-cells, establish persistent infection and promote tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katrin N; Müller, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is both a normal constituent of the human gastric microbiota as well as a pathogen tightly associated with severe gastric disorders. The ability of H. pylori to activate the inflammasome and caspase-1 in antigen-presenting and other cells, and the resulting processing and release of caspase-1-dependent cytokines, impacts both the immunomodulatory and pathogenic activities of H. pylori. This article summarizes recent insights by us and others on the bacterial and host prerequisites of inflammasome activation. H. pylori predominantly activates the NLRP3 inflammasome through a process that requires TLR2-dependent licensing. We identified the urease enzyme, a colonization determinant known to be required for acid adaptation, as critically required for activation of the TLR2/NLRP3/caspase-1 axis. The phenotypes of urease mutants, as well as mouse strains defective for TLR2 or NLRP3, are discussed with respect to their ability to support persistent colonization, immune tolerance and immunity to H. pylori.

  6. Helicobacter pylori activates the TLR2/NLRP3/caspase-1/IL-18 axis to induce regulatory T-cells, establish persistent infection and promote tolerance to allergens

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Katrin N; Müller, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is both a normal constituent of the human gastric microbiota as well as a pathogen tightly associated with severe gastric disorders. The ability of H. pylori to activate the inflammasome and caspase-1 in antigen-presenting and other cells, and the resulting processing and release of caspase-1-dependent cytokines, impacts both the immunomodulatory and pathogenic activities of H. pylori. This article summarizes recent insights by us and others on the bacterial and host prerequisites of inflammasome activation. H. pylori predominantly activates the NLRP3 inflammasome through a process that requires TLR2-dependent licensing. We identified the urease enzyme, a colonization determinant known to be required for acid adaptation, as critically required for activation of the TLR2/NLRP3/caspase-1 axis. The phenotypes of urease mutants, as well as mouse strains defective for TLR2 or NLRP3, are discussed with respect to their ability to support persistent colonization, immune tolerance and immunity to H. pylori. PMID:26727421

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid loaded lipid nanoparticles with bactericidal activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Catarina Leal; Nunes, Cláudia; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Correia, Marta; Machado, José Carlos; Gonçalves, Inês C; Reis, Celso A; Reis, Salette; Martins, M Cristina L

    2017-03-15

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in fish oil, has been described as a promising molecule to the treatment of Helicobacter pylori gastric infection. However, due to its highly unsaturated structure, DHA can be easily oxidized loosing part of its bioactivity. This work aims the nanoencapsulation of DHA to improve its bactericidal efficacy against H. pylori. DHA was loaded into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) produced by hot homogenization and ultrasonication using a blend of lipids (Precirol ATO5(®), Miglyol-812(®)) and a surfactant (Tween 60(®)). Homogeneous NLC with 302±14nm diameter, -28±3mV surface charge (dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering) and containing 66±7% DHA (UV/VIS spectroscopy) were successfully produced. Bacterial growth curves, performed over 24h in the presence of different DHA concentrations (free or loaded into NLC), demonstrated that nanoencapsulation enhanced DHA bactericidal effect, since DHA-loaded NLC were able to inhibit H. pylori growth in a much lower concentrations (25μM) than free DHA (>100μM). Bioimaging studies, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and also imaging flow cytometry, demonstrated that DHA-loaded NLC interact with H. pylori membrane, increasing their periplasmic space and disrupting membrane and allowing the leakage of cytoplasmic content. Furthermore, the developed nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to human gastric adenocarcinoma cells at bactericidal concentrations. DHA-loaded NLC should, therefore, be envisaged as an alternative to the current treatments for H. pylori infection.

  8. Up-regulation of neutrophil activating protein in Helicobacter pylori under high-salt stress: structural and phylogenetic comparison with bacterial iron-binding ferritins.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Sun, Yu-Huan; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2013-06-01

    It is generally accepted that most gastrointestinal diseases are probably caused by the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). In this study we have focused on the comparison of protein expression profiles of H. pylori grown under normal and high-salt conditions by a proteomics approach. We have identified about 190 proteins whose expression levels changed after growth at high salt concentration. Among these proteins, neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) was found to be consistently up-regulated under osmotic stress brought by high salts. We have investigated the effect of high salt on secondary and tertiary structures of NapA by circular dichroism spectroscopy followed by analytical ultracentrifugation to monitor the change of quaternary structure of recombinant NapA with increasing salt concentration. The loss of iron-binding activity of NapA coupled with noticeable energetic variation in protein association of NapA as revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry was found under high salt condition. The phylogenetic tree analysis based on sequence comparison of 16 protein sequences encompassing NapA proteins and ferritin of H. pylori and other prokaryotic organisms pointed to the fact that all H. pylori NapA proteins of human origin are more homologous to NapA of Helicobacter genus than to other bacterial NapA. Based on computer modeling, NapA proteins from H. pylori of human isolates are found more similar to ferritin from H. pylori than to NapA from other species of bacteria. Taken together, these results suggested that divergent evolution of NapA and ferritin possessing dissimilar and diverse sequences follows a path distinct from that of convergent evolution of NapA and ferritin with similar dual functionality of iron-binding and ferroxidase activities.

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum B7 inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth and attenuates gastric inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sunanliganon, Chompoonut; Thong-Ngam, Duangporn; Tumwasorn, Somying; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the anti-Helicobacter property of Lactobacillus plantarum B7 (L. plantarum) B7 supernatants in vitro and the protective effects of L. plantarum B7 on serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), gastric malondialdehyde (MDA) level, apoptosis, and histopathology in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastric inflammation in rats. METHODS: In vitro, the inhibition of H. pylori growth was examined using L. plantarum B7 supernatants at pH 4 and pH 7 and at the concentration of 1×, 5× and 10× on plates inoculated with H. pylori. The inhibitory effect of H. pylori was interpreted by the size of the inhibition zone. In vitro, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups including group 1 (control group), group 2 (H. pylori infected group), group 3 (H. pylori infected with L. plantarum B7 106 CFUs/mL treated group) and group 4 (H. pylori infected with L. plantarum B7 1010 CFUs/mL treated group). One week after H. pylori inoculation, L. plantarum B7 106 CFUs/mL or 1010 CFUs/mL were fed once daily to group 3 and group 4, respectively, for one week. Blood and gastric samples were collected at the end of the study. RESULTS: In vitro, at intact pH 4, mean inhibitory zone diameters of 8.5 mm and 13 mm were noted at concentrations of 5× and 10× of L. plantarum B7 supernatant disks, respectively. At adjusted pH 7, L. plantarum B7 supernatants at concentrations of 5× and 10× yielded mean inhibitory zone diameters of 6.5 mm and 11 mm, respectively. In the in vitro study, in group 2, stomach histopathology revealed mild to moderate H. pylori colonization and inflammation. The level of gastric MDA and epithelial cell apoptosis were significantly increased compared with group 1. The serum TNF-α level was significant decreased in group 3 compared with group 2 (P < 0.05). In addition, L. plantarum B7 treatments resulted in a significant improvement in stomach pathology, and decreased gastric MDA level and apoptotic epithelial cells

  10. Antimicrobial activity and postantibiotic effect of flurithromycin against Helicobacter pylori strains.

    PubMed

    Fera, M T; Giannone, M; Pallio, S; Tortora, A; Blandino, G; Carbone, M

    2001-02-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of flurithromycin on 49 clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori was investigated. The MICs were determined using an agar dilution technique. Flurithromycin inhibited the growth of H. pylori strains with MIC(50) and MIC(90) values of 0.156 and 0.625 mg/l, respectively. The postantibiotic effects (PAE) were studied on ten strains, by exposure of the bacteria to flurithromycin at five and ten times MIC for 1 or 2 h. Regrowth was determined by measuring the viable counts after drug removal by a 10(3) dilution procedure. All PAEs increased as a function of concentration and time of exposure. The mean duration of PAEs varied between 1.5 and 6 h. These data are encouraging since macrolides play a key role in the clinical treatment of H. pylori infections, and the strong PAE caused by flurithromycin may contribute to the in vivo efficacy of this drug.

  11. Composition of the essential oil of two Nepeta species and in vitro evaluation of their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Kalpoutzakis, E; Aligiannis, N; Mentis, A; Mitaku, S; Charvala, C

    2001-12-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the aerial parts of Nepeta camphorata and Nepeta argolica ssp. dirphya were analysed by GC-MS. A total of 52 components were identified and significant differences (qualitative and quantitative) were observed between the two samples. 1,8-Cineol and two nepetalactones were found to be the major components of the oil of N. camphorata and N. argolica ssp. dirphya respectively. The in vitro activity, of the two oils and the three above mentioned isolated compounds, against 25 clinically isolated and commercial strains of Helicobacter pylori was investigated and some activity was found.

  12. Peptides from Pisum sativum L. enzymatic protein digest with anti-adhesive activity against Helicobacter pylori: structure-activity and inhibitory activity against BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Michael; Euler, Marco; Georgi, Gilda; Mank, Marko; Stahl, Bernd; Hensel, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Identification of anti-adhesive peptides against Helicobacter pylori obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of seed proteins from Pisum sativum L. (Fabaceae). Bioassay-guided fractionation of protein tryptic digest by ultrafiltration, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and reversed phase chromatography (RPC) were used. Identification of bioactive peptides was achieved by MALDI-TOF-MS. Adhesion of H. pylori was monitored by two different assays, using a quantitative in vitro assay on human AGS cells with evaluation of bacterial binding by flow cytometry, beside a semi-quantitative in situ adhesion assay using FITC-labelled H. pylori on human stomach tissue sections. From two highly active fractions (F3, F3.3) two anti-adhesive peptides (S3, S5) were identified. Neither F3 nor S3 or S5 had any cytotoxic effect against H. pylori. By hemagglutination assay and semiquantitative dot blot overlay assay with immobilized ligands it was shown that F3 interacts specifically with H. pylori adhesins BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin, while S3 and S5 inhibit only BabA. It was demonstrated that BabA, usually interacting with carbohydrate motifs such as fucosylated blood group antigens, interacts with the peptide moieties. Bioactive peptides from pea protein could be applied as functional ingredients for protecting infants and children against infections such as H. pylori. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  14. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  15. Clarithromycin modulates Helicobacter pylori-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB through classical and alternative pathways in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yen-Chun; Ho, Shu-Peng; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Chang, Chi-Sen; Huang, Lan-Ru

    2014-02-01

    Infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori stimulates the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the upregulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Activation of NF-κB can occur through classical (p50/p65) and alternative (p52/RelB) pathways. The role of the bacterial cag pathogenicity island (PAI) in these events is controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that the CagA protein is required for H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and upregulation of IL-8 expression, and for clarithromycin (CAM) to exert its molecular effects. Cultured KATO-III human gastric cancer cells were treated with extracts of H. pylori strains ATCC43504 (cag PAI(+)) and ATCC51932 (cag PAI(-)) for 24 h. NF-κB and phospho-IκB protein expression was then evaluated using western blotting. IL-8 mRNA expression was evaluated using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Following the separation of the proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, proteomes of the two bacterial extracts were compared using nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis. Although the protein profiles of the two extracts differed, both extracts induced IκBα phosphorylation, upregulation of IL-8 expression, and NF-κB activation through classical and alternative pathways. In cells treated with either of the bacterial extracts, CAM inhibited H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and upregulation of IL-8 expression. These results suggested that CagA is not required for H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and upregulation of IL-8 expression in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori-induced NF-κB signaling can occur through classical and alternative activation pathways, and that CAM inhibits these two pathways.

  16. Is a 7-day Helicobater pylori treatment enough for eradication and inactivation of gastric inflammatory activity?

    PubMed

    Robles-Jara, Carlos; Robles-Medranda, Carlos; Moncayo, Manuel; Landivar, Byron; Parrales, Johnny

    2008-05-14

    To compare the efficacy of a 7-d vs 10-d triple therapy regarding H pylori eradication, endoscopic findings and histological gastric inflammatory inactivation in the Ecuadorian population. 136 patients with dyspepsia and H pylori infection were randomized in 2 groups (68 per group): group 1, 7-d therapy; group 2, 10-d therapy. Both groups received the same medication and daily dosage: omeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and amoxicillin 1 g bid. Endoscopy was performed for histological assessment and H pylori infection status before and 8 wk after treatment. H pylori was eradicated in 68% of group 1 vs 83.8% of group 2 for the intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) (P = 0.03; OR = 2.48; 95% CI, 1.1-5.8), and 68% in group 1 vs 88% in group 2 for the per-protocol analysis (PP) (P = 0.008; OR = 3.66; 95% CI, 1.4-10). Endoscopic gastric mucosa normalization was observed in 56.9% in group 1 vs 61.2% in group 2 for ITT, with similar results for the PP, the difference being statistically not significant. The rate of inflammatory inactivation was 69% in group 1 vs 88.7% in group 2 for ITT (P = 0.007; OR = 3.00; 95% CI, 1.2-7.5), and 69% in group 1 vs 96% in group 2 for PP (P = 0.0002; OR = 7.25; 95% CI, 2-26). In this Ecuadorian population, the 10-d therapy was more effective than the 7-d therapy for H pylori eradication as well as for gastric mucosa inflammatory inactivation.

  17. The influences of pepsin concentrations and pH levels on the disinfective activity of ozone nanobubble water against helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Inoue, Jun; Takenaka, Mamoru; Hoshi, Namiko; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Nishiumi, Shin; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi; Ohdaira, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the utility of ozone nanobubble water (NBW3) for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach, we tested the influence of pepsin concentrations and pH levels on the disinfective activity of NBW3, and the cytotoxicity of NBW3 against mammalian cells and mucosa. Different concentrations of pepsin were dissolved in NBW3, and the bactericidal activity was tested on H. pylori. NBW3 was adjusted to different pH levels (2.0-7.4) and the bactericidal activity on H. pylori was also tested. To examine the cytotoxicity of NBW3, AGS cells, human gastric epithelial cells, were treated with NBW3 and the viability of the cells was evaluated in vitro. Furthermore, NBW3 was administered to mice and gastric mucosal damage was evaluated by histology. Pepsin reduced the disinfective activity of NBW3 on H. pylori in a pepsin concentration-dependent manner. NBW3 showed stable disinfective activity at all pH levels examined. Cytotoxicity of NBW3 against human gastric epithelial cells and gastric mucosa was not observed in our experimental setting. NBW3 can sustain its disinfective activity in wide range of pH levels and show no cytotoxicity on mammalian cells and tissue. Pepsin can inhibit NBW3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Activation of EGFR and ERBB2 by Helicobacter pylori Results in Survival of Gastric Epithelial Cells with DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Yan, Fang; Barry, Daniel P.; Sierra, Johanna Carolina; Delgado, Alberto G.; Hill, Salisha; Casero, Robert A.; Bravo, Luis E.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Correa, Pelayo; Polk, D. Brent; Washington, M. Kay; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The gastric cancer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori upregulates spermine oxidase (SMOX) in gastric epithelial cells, causing oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and DNA damage. A subpopulation of SMOXhigh cells are resistant to apoptosis, despite their high levels of DNA damage. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation can regulate apoptosis, we determined its role in SMOX-mediated effects. METHODS SMOX, apoptosis, and DNA damage were measured in gastric epithelial cells from H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice (which have attenuated EGFR activity), Egfr wild-type mice, or in infected cells incubated with EGFR inhibitors or deficient in EGFR. Phosphoproteomic analysis was performed. Two independent tissue microarrays containing each stage of disease, from gastritis to carcinoma, and gastric biopsies from Colombian and Honduran cohorts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS SMOX expression and DNA damage were decreased, and apoptosis increased in H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice. H pylori-infected cells with deletion or inhibition of EGFR had reduced levels of SMOX, DNA damage, and DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed increased EGFR and ERBB2 signaling. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of a phosphorylated (p)EGFR–ERBB2 heterodimer and pERBB2; knockdown of ErbB2 facilitated apoptosis of DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. SMOX was increased in all stages of gastric disease, peaking in tissues with intestinal metaplasia, whereas pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, and pERBB2 were increased predominantly in tissues demonstrating gastritis or atrophic gastritis. Principal component analysis separated gastritis tissues from patients with cancer vs those without cancer. pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, pERBB2, and SMOX were increased in gastric samples from patients whose disease progressed to intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia, compared with patients whose disease did not progress. CONCLUSIONS In an analysis

  19. Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Moyat, Mati; Velin, Dominique

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common infections in human beings worldwide. H. pylori express lipopolysaccharides and flagellin that do not activate efficiently Toll-like receptors and express dedicated effectors, such as γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), arginase, that actively induce tolerogenic signals. In this perspective, H. pylori can be considered as a commensal bacteria belonging to the stomach microbiota. However, when present in the stomach, H. pylori reduce the overall diversity of the gastric microbiota and promote gastric inflammation by inducing Nod1-dependent pro-inflammatory program and by activating neutrophils through the production of a neutrophil activating protein. The maintenance of a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa and the direct action of virulence factors (vacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A) confer pro-carcinogenic activities to H. pylori. Hence, H. pylori cannot be considered as symbiotic bacteria but rather as part of the pathobiont. The development of a H. pylori vaccine will bring health benefits for individuals infected with antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains and population of underdeveloped countries.

  20. Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyat, Mati; Velin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common infections in human beings worldwide. H. pylori express lipopolysaccharides and flagellin that do not activate efficiently Toll-like receptors and express dedicated effectors, such as γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), arginase, that actively induce tolerogenic signals. In this perspective, H. pylori can be considered as a commensal bacteria belonging to the stomach microbiota. However, when present in the stomach, H. pylori reduce the overall diversity of the gastric microbiota and promote gastric inflammation by inducing Nod1-dependent pro-inflammatory program and by activating neutrophils through the production of a neutrophil activating protein. The maintenance of a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa and the direct action of virulence factors (vacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A) confer pro-carcinogenic activities to H. pylori. Hence, H. pylori cannot be considered as symbiotic bacteria but rather as part of the pathobiont. The development of a H. pylori vaccine will bring health benefits for individuals infected with antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains and population of underdeveloped countries. PMID:24914318

  1. Helicobacter pylori-induced Sonic Hedgehog expression is regulated by NFκB pathway activation: the use of a novel in vitro model to study epithelial response to infection.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Michael A; Feng, Rui; Aihara, Eitaro; Engevik, Amy C; Montrose, Marshall H; Ottemann, Karen M; Zavros, Yana

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to acute induction of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the stomach that is associated with the initiation of gastritis. The mechanism by which H. pylori induces Shh is unknown. Shh is a target gene of transcription factor Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB). We hypothesize that NFκB mediates H. pylori-induced Shh. To visualize Shh ligand expression in response to H. pylori infection in vivo, we used a mouse model that expresses Shh fused to green fluorescent protein (Shh::GFP mice) in place of wild-type Shh. In vitro, changes in Shh expression were measured in response to H. pylori infection using 3-dimensional epithelial cell cultures grown from whole dissociated gastric glands (organoids). Organoids were generated from stomachs collected from the fundic region of control and mice expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (PC-Shh(KO) mice). Within 2 days of infection, H. pylori induced Shh expression within parietal cells of Shh::GFP mice. Organoids expressed all major gastric cell markers, including parietal cell marker H(+) ,K(+) -ATPase and Shh. H. pylori infection of gastric organoids induced Shh expression; a response that was blocked by inhibiting NFκB signaling and correlated with IκB degradation. H. pylori infection of PC-Shh(KO) mouse-derived organoids did not result in the induction of Shh expression. Gastric organoids allow for the study of the interaction between H. pylori and the differentiated gastric epithelium independent of the host immune response. H. pylori induces Shh expression from the parietal cells, a response mediated via activation of NFκB signaling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection ...

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helicobacter Pylori Infections Page Content Article Body Most people, ... always) caused by bacteria—specifically, an organism called Helicobacter pylori. H pylori infections occur at a low ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection and markers of gastric cancer risk in Alaska Native persons: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Keck, James W; Miernyk, Karen M; Bulkow, Lisa R; Kelly, Janet J; McMahon, Brian J; Sacco, Frank; Hennessy, Thomas W; Bruce, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alaska Native persons experience gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates that are three to four times higher than in the general United States population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pepsinogen I, pepsinogen I/II ratio, anti-Helicobacter pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibody levels, and blood group for their associations with gastric cancer development in Alaska Native people. METHODS: The present analysis was a retrospective case-control study that matched gastric cancers reported to the Alaska Native Tumor Registry from 1969 to 2008 to three controls on known demographic risk factors for H pylori infection, using sera from the Alaska Area Specimen Bank. Conditional logistic regression evaluated associations between serum markers and gastric cancer. RESULTS: A total of 122 gastric cancer cases were included, with sera predating cancer diagnosis (mean = 13 years) and 346 matched controls. One hundred twelve cases (91.8%) and 285 controls (82.4%) had evidence of previous or ongoing H pylori infection as measured by anti-H pylori antibody levels. Gastric cancer cases had a 2.63-fold increased odds of having positive anti-H pylori antibodies compared with their matched controls (P=0.01). In a multivariate model, non-cardia gastric cancer (n=94) was associated with anti-H pylori antibodies (adjusted OR 3.92; P=0.004) and low pepsinogen I level (adjusted OR 6.04; P=0.04). No association between gastric cancer and blood group, anti-CagA antibodies or pepsinogen I/II ratio was found. CONCLUSION: Alaska Native people with gastric cancer had increased odds of previous H pylori infection. Low pepsinogen I level may function as a precancer marker for noncardia cancer. PMID:24945184

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and markers of gastric cancer risk in Alaska Native persons: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keck, James William; Miernyk, Karen M; Bulkow, Lisa R; Kelly, Janet J; McMahon, Brian J; Sacco, Frank; Hennessy, Thomas W; Bruce, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    Alaska Native persons experience gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates that are three to four times higher than in the general United States population. To evaluate pepsinogen I, pepsinogen I/II ratio, anti-Helicobacter pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibody levels, and blood group for their associations with gastric cancer development in Alaska Native people. The present analysis was a retrospective case-control study that matched gastric cancers reported to the Alaska Native Tumor Registry from 1969 to 2008 to three controls on known demographic risk factors for H pylori infection, using sera from the Alaska Area Specimen Bank. Conditional logistic regression evaluated associations between serum markers and gastric cancer. A total of 122 gastric cancer cases were included, with sera predating cancer diagnosis (mean = 13 years) and 346 matched controls. One hundred twelve cases (91.8%) and 285 controls (82.4%) had evidence of previous or ongoing H pylori infection as measured by anti-H pylori antibody levels. Gastric cancer cases had a 2.63-fold increased odds of having positive anti-H pylori antibodies compared with their matched controls (P=0.01). In a multivariate model, noncardia gastric cancer (n=94) was associated with anti-H pylori antibodies (adjusted OR 3.92; P=0.004) and low pepsinogen I level (adjusted OR 6.04; P=0.04). No association between gastric cancer and blood group, anti-CagA antibodies or pepsinogen I/II ratio was found. Alaska Native people with gastric cancer had increased odds of previous H pylori infection. Low pepsinogen I level may function as a precancer marker for noncardia cancer.

  6. Omeprazole may exert both a bacteriostatic and a bacteriocidal effect on the growth of Helicobacter pylori (NCTC 11637) in vitro by inhibiting bacterial urease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mirshahi, F; Fowler, G; Patel, A; Shaw, G

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the potential antibacterial effect of omeprazole, a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor, on the growth of Helicobacter pylori in vitro and to evaluate the effect of this compound on bacterial urease activity. METHODS: The growth of H pylori was observed in liquid culture in the presence and absence of omeprazole (0.8 mg/ml). Urease activity was evaluated in aliquots removed from two hour cultures by monitoring the initial change in absorbency at 560 nm in the presence of 0.02% phenol red. RESULTS: The minimum inhibitory concentration of omeprazole against H pylori was 0.8 mg/ml. The concentration of omeprazole required to inhibit growth was dependent on inoculum density: omeprazole (0.8 mg/ml) prevented growth from a 1 x 10(6) cfu/ml inoculum, but not from the higher inocula of 10(7) or 10(8) cfu/ml. This is the first study to demonstrate that omeprazole exerts a bacteriocidal effect against low bacterial densities and a bacteriostatic effect when bacterial density is high. When used at the onset of growth, this concentration of omeprazole has a bacteriocidal effect after four hours, although it exerts a bacteriostatic effect when added to cultures after the exponential phase. Bacterial urease activity is competitively inhibited by omeprazole in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that omeprazole exerts both a bacteriocidal and a bacteriostatic effect against H pylori and competitively inhibits bacterial extracellular urease activity. PMID:9659264

  7. Effects of sucralfate and sulglycotide treatment on active gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa in non-ulcer dyspepsia patients.

    PubMed

    Barbara, L; Biasco, G; Capurso, L; Dobrilla, G; Lalli, A; Paganelli, G M; Pallone, F; Torsoli, A

    1990-09-01

    We conducted a double-blind randomized treatment study on patients affects by non-ulcer dyspepsia in whom multiple biopsy specimens showed active gastritis. Patients were given either 3 g/day of sucralfate (n = 39) or 600 mg/day of sulglycotide (n = 50) for 6 wk, a glycopeptide isolated from pig duodenum constituents. Endoscopy was carried out at baseline and at the end of treatment. We took biopsies from the gastric body (twice) and antrum (six times) at each endoscopy in order to determine grade and extent of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization. Both treatments induced a marked regression of active gastritis (sucralfate group: p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.0001, respectively, in body and in antrum; sulglycotide group: p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Conversely, Helicobacter pylori colonization remained unchanged at the end of the treatments. At baseline, a close relationship was found between grade of active inflammation in each biopsy and Helicobacter pylori density. After therapy, the association was lost in each treatment group. These results suggest that there can be a remission of active gastritis in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia even without changes in Helicobacter pylori colonization. This result can be achieved by enhancing the protective properties of the gastric mucosa.

  8. Helicobacter pylori in sedentary men is linked to higher heart rate, sympathetic activity, and insulin resistance but not inflammation or oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cherkas, Andriy; Eckl, Peter; Guéraud, Françoise; Abrahamovych, Orest; Serhiyenko, Victoria; Yatskevych, Ostap; Pliatsko, Mykhailo; Golota, Sergii

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare anthropometric parameters, body composition, hormonal and inflammatory profiles, oxidative stress indices, and heart rate variability (HRV) in Heliobacter pylori (H.pylori) positive and negative healthy sedentary participants. Methods Among 30 recruited apparently healthy male participants (age between 20 and 40) enrolled in this cross-sectional study, 18 were H.pylori negative and 12 were positive (stool antigen test). Participants underwent routine physical examination and body composition determination. The following biochemical parameters were determined in blood: fasting whole blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin, C-peptide, cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone, C-reactive protein, interleukins 6 and 10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and the urinary level of 1,4-dihydroxynonane mercapturic acid. For HRV evaluation, electrocardiogram in supine position and in orthostatic test was performed. Results H.pylori contamination was not significantly associated with any changes in anthropometric parameters, body composition, blood pressure, fasting glucose, or glycated hemoglobin levels. No significant difference was found for inflammatory markers as well as 1,4-dihydroxynonane mercapturic acid. H.pylori-positive participants, however, had significantly higher heart rate (P = 0.009), sympathetic/parasympathetic balance in orthostatic test (P = 0.029), fasting insulin level (P = 0.037), and HOMA-index (P = 0.047). Conclusions H.pylori contamination is linked to a significantly higher heart rate, sympathetic activation, and increased insulin resistance, while inflammatory and oxidative stress markers remain unaffected in healthy sedentary male subjects. PMID:27106356

  9. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  10. Enzyme–ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5′-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    PubMed Central

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme 5′-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures. PMID:20954236

  11. Construction of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain expressing a fusion protein of Omp22 and HpaA from Helicobacter pylori for oral vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongguang; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Fan, Qingtang; Sun, Nan; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-11-01

    To develop orally administrated anti-Helicobacter pylori vaccination, a Lactococcus lactis strain was genetically constructed for fusion expression of H. pylori protective antigens HpaA and Omp22. The fusion gene of omp22 and hpaA with an adapter encoding three glycines was cloned from a plasmid pMAL-c2x-omp22-hpaA into Escherichia coli MC1061 and L. lactis NZ3900 successively using a shutter vector pNZ8110. Expression of the fusion gene in L. lactis was induced with nisin resulting in production of proteins with molecular weights of 50 and 28 kDa. Both of them were immunoreactive with mouse anti-H. pylori sera as determined via western blotting. Oral vaccination of BALB/c mice using the L. lactis strain carrying pNZ8110-omp22-hpaA elicited significant systematic humoral immune response (P < 0.05). This is the first report showing that a fusion protein of two H. pylori antigens was efficiently expressed in L. lactis with immunogenicity. This is a considerable step towards H. pylori vaccines.

  12. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  13. Cure of Helicobacter pylori-positive active duodenal ulcer patients: a double-blind, multicentre, 12-month study comparing a two-week dual vs a one-week triple therapy. GISU (Interdisciplinary Group for Ulcer Study).

    PubMed

    Di Mario, F; Battaglia, F; Dal Bò, N; Leandro, G; Benedetti, E; Bottona, E; Caroli, A; Costan-Biedo, F; De Bastiani, R; Germanà, B; Andrea Grassi, S; Madia, D; Marcon, V; Marin, R; Monica, F; Olivieri, P; Orzes, N; Pilotto, A; Ronzani, G; Saggioro, A; Tafner, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare a two-week dual therapy to a one-week triple therapy for the healing of duodenal ulcer and the eradication of the Helicobacter pylori infection. A total of 165 patients with active duodenal ulcer were enrolled in the study. At entry, endoscopy, clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed. Histology and the rapid urease test were used to diagnose Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients received either lansoprazole 30 mg plus amoxycillin 1 g bid for two weeks (two-week, dual therapy) or lansoprazole 30 mg plus amoxycillin 1 g plus tinidazole 500 mg bid for one week plus lansoprazole qd for an additional week (one-week, triple therapy). Two and twelve months after cessation of therapy, endoscopy and clinical assessments were repeated. Duodenal ulcer healing and Helicobacter pylori eradication were both significantly greater (p<0.0001) in the triple therapy group (healing: 98.6%; Helicobacter pylori cure rate: 72.6%) than in the dual therapy group (healing: 77.3%; Helicobacter pylori cure rate: 33.3%). Ulcers healed more frequently in Helicobacter pyloricured than in Helicobacter pylori-not cured patients (94.9% vs. 77.2%; p<0.0022). After one year, Helicobacter pylori eradication was re-confirmed in 46/58 patients previously treated with the triple therapy and in 10/40 patients treated with the dual therapy [p<0.0001]. Only three duodenal ulcer relapses were observed throughout follow-up: all were in Helicobacter pylori-not cured patients. Triple therapy was more effective than dual both in curing Helicobacter pylori infection and healing active duodenal ulcers. The speed of ulcer healing obtained after only 7 days of antibiotics and 14 days of proton pump inhibitors confirmed that longer periods of anti ulcer therapy were not necessary. Helicobacter pylori -not cured patients had more slowly healing ulcers which were more apt to relapse when left untreated.

  14. Efficacy and safety of probiotics as adjuvant agents for Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LV, ZHIFA; WANG, BEN; ZHOU, XIAOJIANG; WANG, FUCAI; XIE, YONG; ZHENG, HUILIE; LV, NONGHUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether probiotics could help to improve the eradication rates and reduce the side effects associated with anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment, and to investigate the optimal time and duration of probiotic administration during the treatment, thus providing clinical practice guidelines for eradication success worldwide. By searching Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Science Citation Index, all the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics as adjuvant agents of anti-H. pylori standard triple-therapy regimens with placebo or no treatment were selected. Statistical analysis was performed with the Comprehensive Meta Analysis Software. Subgroup, meta-regression and sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Twenty-one RCTs involving a total of 3,814 participants met the inclusion criteria. The pooled eradication rates of the probiotic group were 80.3% (1,709/2,128) by intention-to-treat (ITT) and 83.8% (1,709/2,039) by pro-protocol analyses; the pooled relative risk (RR) by ITT for probiotic supplementation versus treatment without probiotics was 1.12 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06–1.19]. A reduced risk of overall H. pylori therapy-related adverse effects was also found with probiotic supplementation (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40–0.91). The subgroup analyses showed that probiotic supplementation prior and subsequent to the treatment regimen both improved eradication rates for H. pylori infection. Furthermore, probiotic treatment lasting >2 weeks and including Lactobacillus or multiple probiotic strains significantly enhanced the efficacy. In conclusion, supplementation with probiotics for H. pylori eradication may be effective in increasing eradication rates and decreasing therapy-related side effects. Probiotic administration prior or subsequent to therapy and for a duration of >2 weeks may increase the eradication efficacy. PMID:25667617

  15. Making bispirin: synthesis, structure and activity against Helicobacter pylori of bismuth(III) acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Philip C; Blair, Victoria L; Ferrero, Richard L; Junk, Peter C; Kumar, Ish

    2013-04-11

    Reaction of Bi(O(t)Bu)3 with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid = aspH) in dry toluene results in the bismuth(III) complex, [Bi(O2C(C6H4)OAc)3]∞ 1 (O2C(C6H4)OAc = asp), minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Helicobacter pylori ≥ 6.25 μg mL(-1), while the inclusion of a stoichiometric equivalent of KO(t)Bu leads to crystals of the bismuthate salt [KBi(O2C(C6H4)OAc)4]∞ 2.

  16. Construction of a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector for gene transfer in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W K; An, Y S; Kim, K H; Kim, S H; Song, J Y; Ryu, B D; Choi, Y J; Yoon, Y H; Baik, S C; Rhee, K H; Cho, M J

    1997-01-01

    In this study, a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector was constructed for transferring DNA into H. pylori. The smallest cryptic plasmid (1.2 kb), pHP489, among those harbored by 77 H. pylori isolates was selected as a base replicon for constructing vectors. HindIII-digested pHP489 was ligated with a kanamycin resistance gene [aph(3')-III], which originated from Campylobacter jejuni, to produce the recombinant plasmid pHP489K. pHP489K was efficiently transformed into and stably maintained in H. pylori strains. The shuttle vector pBHP489K (3.6 kb) was constructed by the recombination of pHP489, ColE1, and aph(3')-III sequences. pBHP489K was reciprocally transformed into and maintained in both H. pylori and E. coli. Introduction of the shuttle vector clone DNA (pBHP489K/AB; 6.7 kb), containing the ureA and ureB genes of H. pylori, into urease-negative mutants of H. pylori led to the restoration of their urease activity. The transformants were confirmed to contain the incoming plasmid DNA. pBHP489K satisfied the requirements for an H. pylori-E. coli shuttle vector, implying that it might be a useful vector for investigating pathogenicity and restriction-modification systems of H. pylori. PMID:9406406

  17. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. We calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid. Funded by National Science Foundation award CBET-1252182.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid.

  19. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal TGF-α ectodomain shedding and EGFR transactivation involves Rac1/p38 MAPK-dependent TACE activation.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2016-02-01

    Infection of gastric mucosa by H. pylori triggers a pattern of inflammatory responses characterized by the rise in proinflammatory cytokine production, up-regulation in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and the induction in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we report on the role of MAPK/p38 and Rac1 in the regulation of H. pylori LPS-induced TGF-α ectodomain shedding and EGFR transactivation. We show that stimulation of gastric mucosal cells with the LPS, reflected in p38 phosphorylation, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock180 activation and the rise in Rac1-GTP level, is accompanied by the activation of membrane-associated metalloprotease, (TACE) also known as ADAM17, responsible for soluble TGF-α release. Further, we reveal that the LPS-induced TGF-α shedding and EGFR transactivation involves the TACE activation through phosphorylation by p38 that requires Rac1 participation. Moreover, we demonstrate that up-regulation in H. pylori LPS-elicited Rac1-GTP membrane translocation plays a pivotal role in recruitment of the activated p38 to the membrane for TACE activation through phosphorylation on Thr(735). Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence as to the essential function of Rac1 in TACE activation, TGF-α ectodomain shedding, and the EGFR transactivation.

  20. Antibacterial Effects of Grape Extracts on Helicobacter pylori▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph C.; Huang, Guohui; Haley-Zitlin, Vivian; Jiang, Xiuping

    2009-01-01

    Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities were determined by agar dilution, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and cell proliferation assays following treatment with various grape extracts. Muscadine grape skin possessed the strongest activity, followed by grape synergy (skin and seed) and seed, suggesting that higher phenolic levels do not necessarily determine overall anti-H. pylori efficacy. PMID:19047390

  1. Studies on the cytoprotective and antisecretory activity of ebrotidine. A review.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, S I; Márquez, M; Torres, J; Ortiz, J A

    1997-04-01

    Gastric mucosa is exposed to various aggressive factors such as stress, ulcerogenic drugs including acetyl-salicylic acid(ASA)-like agents, ethanol, bacteria, particularly Helicobacter pylori (Hp), and various endogenous irritants such as acid-pepsin secretion and bile salts. The maintenance of the mucosal barrier depends upon the activation of the pre-epithelial (mucus-alkali secretion), epithelial (surface-active phospholipids and rapid mucosal restitution) and post-epithelial (mucosal microcirculation, sensory nerves and mast cells) components of mucosal defense. Ebrotidine (N-[(E)-[[2-[[[2-[(diaminomethylene)amino]- 4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]ethyl]amino]methylene]-4-bromo-benzenesulfonamid e, CAS 100981-43-9, FI-3542) is the first of a new generation of H2-receptor antagonists with both antisecretory and cytoprotective activities. Its inhibitory action is similar to that of ranitidine and approximately tenfold greater than cimetidine, and is accompanied by a small and transient increase in plasma gastrin levels. In contrast to ranitidine and other H2-receptor antagonists, ebrotidine exerts a unique cytoprotection against injury by various ulcerogens such as ethanol, ammonia, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), stress and ASA or acidified taurocholate. The mechanism of this protection by ebrotidine is not clear, but it has been shown to stimulate mucus secretion, to increase the quality of adherent mucus gel and to increase gastric mucosal blood flow (GBF), possibly due to enhanced mucosal formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO). The cytoprotective effects of ebrotidine were observed in rats and confirmed also in humans with gastric lesions induced by ethanol or ASA. Ebrotidine also exerts anti-Helicobacter pylori (Hp) effects by interfering with surface receptors of epithelial cells and inhibiting urease, protease and lipase activity, and by counteracting the noxious effects of Hp-related substances such as ammonia and lipopoly-saccharides (LPS).

  2. Effects of omeprazole and eradication of Helicobacter pylori on gastric and duodenal mucosal enzyme activities and DNA in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Vetvik, K; Schrumpf, E; Mowinckel, P; Aase, S; Andersen, K J

    1994-11-01

    Duodenal and gastric content of mucosal enzymes in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients differs from that of controls. The purpose of this study has been to examine the effect of omeprazole and eradication of Helicobacter pylori on mucosal enzymes in DU patients. The enzyme activities of seven gastric and duodenal mucosal marker enzymes from the brush border, lysosomes, and mitochondria have been studied. In study I the measurements were made in 29 patients with an active DU before and after 14 days of omeprazole treatment. In study II 22 duodenal ulcer patients were given bismuth subnitrate, oxytetracycline, and metronidazole (triple therapy) for 2 weeks to eradicate H. pylori. Biopsy specimens were taken from the duodenum and the stomach for enzyme measurements and histologic assessment. In study II additional specimens were obtained from the prepyloric region for urease tests and culture of H. pylori. The ulcer healing rates were more than 90% after both omeprazole and triple therapy. H. pylori was eradicated in 86% after triple therapy. The activities of the brush-border enzymes lactase, neutral-alpha-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucyl-beta-naphthylamidase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (gamma-GT) increased significantly in the duodenal bulb and the descending duodenum during treatment with omeprazole. No changes in duodenal enzyme activity were detected after triple therapy, whereas a significant fall in gamma-GT and acid phosphatase activities was seen in the stomach. The mucosal DNA in the gastric antrum decreased both after treatment with omeprazole and after triple therapy. A similar decrease in mucosal DNA of the gastric antrum was demonstrated after both omeprazole and triple therapy with bismuth subnitrate, oxytetracycline, and metronidazole. Omeprazole also affects the content of duodenal mucosal enzymes, whereas triple therapy particularly affects the gastric mucosal enzyme activity.

  3. Crude Preparations of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Activating Akt-Nrf2 and mTOR–IκB Kinase–NF-κB Pathways in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Rho, Da Jeong; Jeon, Jong Ik; Kim, Young-Jeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori sheds outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain many surface elements of bacteria. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in directing the nature of adaptive immune responses against H. pylori, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in regulating function of DCs. In addition, HO-1 is important for adaptive immunity and the stress response. Although H. pylori-derived OMVs may contribute to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection, responses of DCs to OMVs have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of H. pylori-derived crude OMVs in modulating the expression of HO-1 in DCs. Exposure of DCs to crude H. pylori OMVs upregulated HO-1 expression. Crude OMVs obtained from a cagA-negative isogenic mutant strain induced less HO-1 expression than OMVs obtained from a wild-type strain. Crude H. pylori OMVs activated signals of transcription factors such as NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2. Suppression of NF-κB or Nrf2 resulted in significant attenuation of crude OMV-induced HO-1 expression. Crude OMVs increased the phosphorylation of Akt and downstream target molecules of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), such as S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Suppression of Akt resulted in inhibition of crude OMV-induced Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression. Furthermore, suppression of mTOR was associated with inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), NF-κB, and HO-1 expression in crude OMV-exposed DCs. These results suggest that H. pylori-derived OMVs regulate HO-1 expression through two different pathways in DCs, Akt-Nrf2 and mTOR–IKK–NF-κB signaling. Following this induction, increased HO-1 expression in DCs may modulate inflammatory responses in H. pylori infection. PMID:27185786

  4. The Effect of Probiotic Plus Prebiotic Supplementation on the Tolerance and Efficacy of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Quadruple Therapy: a Randomized Prospective Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghi, Afshin; Pourkazemi, Aydin; Khosravani, Mohsen; Fakhrie Asl, Saba; Amir Maafi, Alireza; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Abaspour Rahimabad, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Standard anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment fails in the eradication of the organism in almost 10-35% of the patients and has different side effects. Recent studies have proposed that probiotic supplementations with or without prebiotic may improve the eradication rate and diminish the side effects, although it is still a controversial issue. We aimed to investigate the effect of probiotic with prebiotic supplementation on the eradication rate and side effects of anti H. pylori quadruple therapy. METHODS 76 patients with a positive biopsy specimen for H. pylori were enrolled. They were randomized to receive quadruple therapy of bismuth, clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and omeprazole for 14 days and also the synbiotic or the placebo. We asked them to answer study questionnaires at the beginning and during the treatment. Finally, urea breath test was done 8 weeks after the treatment. RESULTS The eradication rate was significantly better in the synbiotic group by intention-to-treat analysis (p<0.05). Treatment side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, flatulence, constipation, and taste abnormality were similar in both groups but anorexia was significantly better in the synbiotic group (p <0.05). CONCLUSION The eradication rate was significantly better in the synbiotic group by intention-to-treat analysis (p<0.05). Treatment side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, flatulence, but could improve the eradication by augmenting the treatment tolerance and compliance. PMID:27698967

  5. Detection of serum antibodies to CagA and VacA and of serum neutralizing activity for vacuolating cytotoxin in patients with Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Donati, M; Moreno, S; Storni, E; Tucci, A; Poli, L; Mazzoni, C; Varoli, O; Sambri, V; Farencena, A; Cevenini, R

    1997-01-01

    Thirty patients with dyspepsia, with histological diagnosis of gastritis, and with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (n = 13) or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (n = 17) were admitted to the study. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin-producing strains (Tox+) were isolated from 14 (46.7%) patients, whereas non-cytotoxin-producing (Tox-) H. pylori strains were isolated from the remaining patients. Of 30 patients studied, 20 (66.7%) had serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity in vitro. Fourteen patients with Tox+ H. pylori strains showed serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity and serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies reactive with both 87-kDa H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and 128-kDa cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) by immunoblotting using native enriched preparations of VacA and CagA proteins from H. pylori culture supernatants as the antigens. A 94-kDa antigen cross-reacting with the 87-kDa VacA protein could be demonstrated in culture supernatant with immune sera from humans and animals. All patients (n = 10) lacking serum neutralizing activity were also negative for IgG or IgA against VacA antigen, whereas 6 of the 10 patients showed IgG serum antibody responses against CagA antigen. The prevalence of antibodies to VacA and CagA antigens was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients with gastritis (20 and 26 patients for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 30 patients) than in H. pylori culture-negative controls (0 of 27 for both VacA and CagA) and in randomly selected blood donors (17 and 21 for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 120 subjects). All patients with PUD had antibodies to CagA, whereas 13 of 17 (76.5%) patients with NUD had anti-CagA antibodies. Serum IgG antibodies to VacA were present in 9 (69.2%) patients with PUD of 13 patients and in 11 (64.7%) patients with NUD of 17 patients. Anti-CagA antibodies seemed to correlate better with PUD than anti-VacA antibodies. PMID:9220168

  6. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells.

    PubMed

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F G

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection.

  7. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection. PMID:28401064

  8. Clinicopathological characteristics of invasive gastric Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Jonathan; Wieczorek, Tad; Selig, Martin; Cheung, Hoiwan; Shen, Jeanne; Odze, Robert; Deshpande, Vikram; Zukerberg, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori organisms have been observed deep within the stomach mucosa with an "intracellular" appearance, although the clinicopathological characteristics of such cases remain poorly understood. We analyzed 18 cases of deep mucosal H pylori and associated clinical (sex, age, history of H pylori infection, or proton pump inhibitor [PPI] use, medications, smoking, alcohol use, comorbidities, treatment response) and pathological (presence of lymphoid aggregates, intestinal metaplasia, PPI effect, active and/or chronic inflammation, quantity of invasive versus surface H pylori) characteristics. Electron microscopy was performed on 6 cases with the highest burden of invasive H pylori. Within our sample, 3 of 16 had a history of H pylori infection, 10 of 15 were receiving PPIs at the time of biopsy, and 12 of 13 had a negative posttreatment follow-up. Histology revealed that invasive H pylori were more commonly associated with chronic inflammation, in both the antrum (15/15 chronic, 8/15 acute) and fundus (17/18 chronic, 8/18 acute). Electron microscopy showed organisms within intercellular and luminal spaces, but no intracellular organisms. Deep mucosal H pylori often have an intracellular appearance but are contained within intercellular and luminal spaces and are responsive to standard therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-10-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects.

  10. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects. PMID:26457024

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  12. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue. PMID:24914325

  13. In Vitro Activities of Rabeprazole, a Novel Proton Pump Inhibitor, and Its Thioether Derivative Alone and in Combination with Other Antimicrobials against Recent Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yoshiyuki; Akahane, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Oana, Kozue; Takahashi, Yuko; Okimura, Yukie; Okabe, Tadashi; Gotoh, Akira; Katsuyama, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The MICs of rabeprazole sodium (RPZ), a newly developed benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), against 133 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains revealed a higher degree of activity than the another two PPIs, lansoprazole and omeprazole. Time-kill curve assays of RPZ, when combined with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, or metronidazole, disclosed that synergistic effects were demonstrated in combination with each antibiotic examined. Moreover, no apparent antagonistic effect appeared among all of the strains tested. PMID:10639386

  14. In vitro activities of rabeprazole, a novel proton pump inhibitor, and its thioether derivative alone and in combination with other antimicrobials against recent clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Y; Akahane, T; Yamaguchi, M; Oana, K; Takahashi, Y; Okimura, Y; Okabe, T; Gotoh, A; Katsuyama, T

    2000-02-01

    The MICs of rabeprazole sodium (RPZ), a newly developed benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), against 133 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains revealed a higher degree of activity than the another two PPIs, lansoprazole and omeprazole. Time-kill curve assays of RPZ, when combined with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, or metronidazole, disclosed that synergistic effects were demonstrated in combination with each antibiotic examined. Moreover, no apparent antagonistic effect appeared among all of the strains tested.

  15. Human Trefoil Factor 2 Is a Lectin That Binds α-GlcNAc-capped Mucin Glycans with Antibiotic Activity against Helicobacter pylori*

    PubMed Central

    Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Bonar, David; Schloerer, Nils; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer and remains an important health care challenge. The trefoil factor peptides are a family of small highly conserved proteins that are claimed to play essential roles in cytoprotection and epithelial repair within the gastrointestinal tract. H. pylori colocalizes with MUC5AC at the gastric surface epithelium, but not with MUC6 secreted in concert with TFF2 by deep gastric glands. Both components of the gastric gland secretome associate non-covalently and show increased expression upon H. pylori infection. Although blood group active O-glycans of the Lewis-type form the basis of H. pylori adhesion to the surface mucin layer and to epithelial cells, α1,4-GlcNAc-capped O-glycans on gastric mucins were proposed to inhibit H. pylori growth as a natural antibiotic. We show here that the gastric glycoform of TFF2 is a calcium-independent lectin, which binds with high specificity to O-linked α1,4-GlcNAc-capped hexasaccharides on human and porcine stomach mucin. The structural assignments of two hexasaccharide isomers and the binding active glycotope were based on mass spectrometry, linkage analysis, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, glycan inhibition, and lectin competition of TFF2-mucin binding. Neoglycolipids derived from the C3/C6-linked branches of the two isomers revealed highly specific TFF2 binding to the 6-linked trisaccharide in GlcNAcα1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Fucα1-2Galβ1-3)GalNAc-ol(Structure 1). Supposedly, lectin TFF2 is involved in protection of gastric epithelia via a functional relationship to defense against H. pylori launched by antibiotic α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin glycans. Lectin-carbohydrate interaction may have also an impact on more general functional aspects of TFF members by mediating their binding to cell signaling receptors. PMID:25124036

  16. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5-8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations.

  17. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5–8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations. PMID:17371778

  18. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in United States Navy submarine crews.

    PubMed

    Jackman, R P; Schlichting, C; Carr, W; Dubois, A

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is elevated in German submarine crews and in United States Navy (USN) surface fleet personnel, but H. pylori prevalence in USN submariners was unknown. The goal of the study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in the crews of USN nuclear submarines compared to other military personnel and to the general US population. The presence of H. pylori IgG antibodies was determined in serum samples using a commercial ELISA. Only 47 out of 451 submariners (9.4%) were H. pylori positive, which is similar to that of the US general population with a similar level of education. In contrast, H. pylori prevalence is significantly higher in US Army recruits (26%), USN surface fleet personnel (25%), and German diesel submariners (38%). These data demonstrate that submarine service (and by inference activity requiring isolation and close contact, per se) is not a risk factor for H. pylori infection.

  19. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Phosphorylation-Independent Activity of Atypical Response Regulators of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Jennifer; Sickmann, Albert; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The genome of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori harbors a remarkably low number of regulatory genes, including three and five open reading frames encoding two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, respectively, which are putatively involved in transcriptional regulation. Two of the response regulator genes, hp1043 and hp166, proved to be essential for cell growth, and inactivation of the response regulator gene hp1021 resulted in a severe growth defect, as indicated by a small-colony phenotype. The sequences of the receiver domains of response regulators HP1043 and HP1021 differ from the consensus sequence of the acidic pocket of the receiver domain which is involved in the phosphotransfer reaction from the histidine kinase to the response regulator. Using a genetic complementation system, we demonstrated that the function of response regulator HP166, which is essential for cell growth, can be provided by a mutated derivative carrying a D52N substitution at the site of phosphorylation. We found that the atypical receiver sequences of HP1043 and HP1021 are not crucial for the function of these response regulators. Phosphorylation of the receiver domains of HP1043 and HP1021 is not needed for response regulator function and may not occur at all. Thus, the phosphorylation-independent action of these regulators differs from the well-established two-component paradigm. PMID:15838037

  1. Phosphorylation-independent activity of atypical response regulators of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Schär, Jennifer; Sickmann, Albert; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-05-01

    The genome of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori harbors a remarkably low number of regulatory genes, including three and five open reading frames encoding two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, respectively, which are putatively involved in transcriptional regulation. Two of the response regulator genes, hp1043 and hp166, proved to be essential for cell growth, and inactivation of the response regulator gene hp1021 resulted in a severe growth defect, as indicated by a small-colony phenotype. The sequences of the receiver domains of response regulators HP1043 and HP1021 differ from the consensus sequence of the acidic pocket of the receiver domain which is involved in the phosphotransfer reaction from the histidine kinase to the response regulator. Using a genetic complementation system, we demonstrated that the function of response regulator HP166, which is essential for cell growth, can be provided by a mutated derivative carrying a D52N substitution at the site of phosphorylation. We found that the atypical receiver sequences of HP1043 and HP1021 are not crucial for the function of these response regulators. Phosphorylation of the receiver domains of HP1043 and HP1021 is not needed for response regulator function and may not occur at all. Thus, the phosphorylation-independent action of these regulators differs from the well-established two-component paradigm.

  2. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development. PMID:27713775

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  4. Effects of sulglycotide on inflammation and epithelial cell turnover in active Helicobacter pylori+ chronic gastritis. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bazuro, G E; Dezi, A; Pallotta, L; Masci, P; Teodori, L; Trinca, M L; Koch, M; Capurso, L

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Sulglycotide were evaluated in a pilot study of active H. pylori+ atrophic gastritis. Ten informed patients (mean age 51 +/- 13 years) entered a double-blind study. Five received Sulglycotide 400 mg three times a day for one year, the other 5, placebo. At 0, 30, 90, 270, and 360 days of treatment, patients underwent endoscopic examinations with multiple biopsies. Morphometric studies (number of inflammatory cells and percent gland volume), morphologic studies (according to the Sydney system), and flow cytofluorimetry were performed in all cases. Compared to findings in the placebo group, patients treated with Sulglycotide showed a reduced number of inflammatory cells and an increase in gland volume 120 days after treatment. While the difference was not statistically significant, the trend was confirmed by the morphologic patterns. Flow cytofluorimetry revealed an increase in the percentage of cells in the G2 phase (full maturation) and a parallel drop in the S phase (premitotic synthesis) in the Sulglycotide group only in the first three months. These data would appear to indicate an acceleration of gastric epithelial cell maturation and a decrease in the inflammatory infiltrate under the effect of Sulglycotide.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and pregnancy-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cardaropoli, Simona; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is investigated in gastric diseases even during pregnancy. In particular, this Gram-negative bacterium seems to be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. During the last decade, the relationship among H. pylori and several extra-gastric diseases strongly emerged in literature. The correlation among H. pylori infection and pregnancy-related disorders was mainly focused on iron deficiency anemia, thrombocytopenia, fetal malformations, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. H. pylori infection may have a role in the pathogenesis of various pregnancy-related disorders through different mechanisms: depletion of micronutrients (iron and vitamin B12) in maternal anemia and fetal neural tube defects; local or systemic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines release and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders and pre-eclampsia; cross-reaction between specific anti-H. pylori antibodies and antigens localized in placental tissue and endothelial cells (pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, miscarriage). Since H. pylori infection is most likely acquired before pregnancy, it is widely believed that hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy could activate latent H. pylori with a negative impact not only on maternal health (nutritional deficiency, organ injury, death), but also on the fetus (insufficient growth, malformation, death) and sometime consequences can be observed later in life. Another important issue addressed by investigators was to determine whether it is possible to transmit H. pylori infection from mother to child and whether maternal anti-H. pylori antibodies could prevent infant’s infection. Studies on novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods for H. pylori are no less important, since these are particularly sensitive topics in pregnancy conditions. It could be interesting to study the possible correlation between H

  6. [Frequency of Helicobacter pylori nitroreductase RdxA mutations for metronidazole activation in a population in the Cauca Department, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Claudia Patricia; Quiroga, Andrés Javier; Sierra, Carlos H; Trespalacios, Alba Alicia

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to metronidazole is a key factor associated with Helicobacter pylori treatment failure. Even though resistance is mostly associated with RdxA nitroreductase mutations, studies of this H. pylori protein in Popayán (Colombia) are still incipient. To evaluate the frequency of mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase in a population of patients with H. pylori-positive gastrointestinal disease. We amplified the DNA of 170 gastric biopsies by PCR to detect mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase. An analysis of DNA sequences translated into amino acid sequences was done and then compared to the reference strain 26695. The frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in this study population was 78%. Its most frequent distribution was found in positions D59N (153 samples), R131K (101 samples), R90K (97 samples), A118T (42 samples), I160F (32 samples) and H97T (26 samples), and meaningful stop codons Q50*, D59*; E75*, C159* and I160* in five, one, three, ten and six samples, respectively. The most common virulence genotype was vacAs1/m1 cagA negative (48.6 %). The high frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in H. pylori isolates in Popayán (Colombia) indicates that empirical therapy with metronidazole may not be a valid option for the eradication of H. pylori in patients of the studied population.

  7. Effects of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Vetvickova, Jana; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a well-established natural molecule with significant biological and pharmaceutical effects. Its effects on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been repeatedly confirmed both in animal and human models. This study directly compared five different samples to evaluate if the effects are general or if they differ among samples. Methods Using a mouse model, we studied the effects of curcumin on lipid peroxide (LPO) level, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and urease activity, number of colonized bacteria, levels of anti-H. pylori antibodies, biofilm formation, IFN-γ, IL-4, gastrin and somatostatin levels in serum, and minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, we evaluated the effects on biofilm production and antibacterial antibody response. Results In all tests, one sample (Sabinsa) was consistently the most active. Conclusions All curcumin samples showed some anti-H. pylori effects, but only some of the tested samples had significant activity. PMID:28149841

  8. Structural and functional insights into the regulation of Helicobacter pylori arginase activity by an evolutionary nonconserved motif.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Meena, Shiv Kumar; Alam, Mashkoor; Nayeem, Shahid M; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2013-01-22

    Urea producing bimetallic arginases are essential for the synthesis of polyamine, DNA, and RNA. Despite conservation of the signature motifs in all arginases, a nonconserved ¹⁵³ESEEKAWQKLCSL¹⁶⁵ motif is found in the Helicobacter pylori enzyme, whose role is yet unknown. Using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic assays, metal analyses, circular dichroism, heat-induced denaturation, molecular dynamics simulations and truncation studies, we report here the significance of this motif in catalytic function, metal retention, structural integrity, and stability of the protein. The enzyme did not exhibit detectable activity upon deletion of the motif as well as on individual mutation of Glu155 and Trp159 while Cys163Ala displayed significant decrease in the activity. Trp159Ala and Glu155Ala show severe loss of thermostability (14-17°) by a decrease in the α-helical structure. The role of Trp159 in stabilization of the structure with the surrounding aromatic residues is confirmed when Trp159Phe restored the structure and stability substantially compared to Trp159Ala. The simulation studies support the above results and show that the motif, which was previously solvent exposed, displays a loop-cum-small helix structure (Lys161-Cys163) and is located near the active-site through a novel Trp159-Asp126 interaction. This is consistent with the mutational analyses, where Trp159 and Asp126 are individually critical for retaining a bimetallic center and thereby for function. Furthermore, Cys163 of the helix is primarily important for dimerization, which is crucial for stimulation of the activity. Thus, these findings not only provide insights into the role of this motif but also offer a possibility to engineer it in human arginases for therapeutics against a number of carcinomas.

  9. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  10. Acetaldehyde and ethanol production by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Salmela, K S; Roine, R P; Höök-Nikanne, J; Kosunen, T U; Salaspuro, M

    1994-04-01

    By virtue of possessing alcohol dehydrogenase activity, cytosol prepared from Helicobacter pylori produces toxic acetaldehyde from ethanol in vitro. To approach the in vivo situation in the stomach, we have now investigation whether intact H. pylori--without addition of exogenous nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide--also forms acetaldehyde. Furthermore, to assess the energy metabolism of H. pylori, we determined whether the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction can run in the opposite direction with ethanol as the end-product and thereby yield energy for the organism. Intact H. pylori formed acetaldehyde already at low ethanol concentrations (at 0.5% ethanol, acetaldehyde, 64 +/- 21 and 75 +/- 9 mumol/l (mean +/- SEM) for strains NCTC 11637 and NCTC 11638, respectively). H. pylori produced ethanol in concentrations that can be significant for the energy metabolism of the organism. Acetaldehyde production by H. pylori may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases associated with the organism. The primary function of H. pylori alcohol dehydrogenase may, however, be alcoholic fermentation and consequent energy production under microaerobic conditions.

  11. Helicobacter pylori as an oncogenic pathogen, revisited.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2017-03-21

    Gastric cancer is an inflammation-associated malignancy aetiologically related to infection with the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, which is considered a necessary but insufficient cause. Unless treated, H. pylori causes life-long acute and chronic gastric inflammation resulting in progressive gastric mucosal damage that may result in gastric cancer. The rate of progression from superficial gastritis, to an atrophic metaplastic mucosa, and ultimately to cancer relates to the virulence of the infecting H. pylori as well as host and environmental factors. H. pylori virulence is a reflection of its propensity to cause severe gastric inflammation. Both mucosal inflammation and H. pylori can cause host genomic instability, including dysregulation of DNA mismatch repair, stimulation of expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, abnormal DNA methylation and dysregulation of  micro RNAs, which may result in an accumulation of mutations and loss of normal regulation of cell growth. The difference in cancer risk between the most and least virulent H. pylori strain is only approximately 2-fold. Overall, none of the putative virulence factors identified to date have proved to be disease-specific. The presence, severity, extent and duration of inflammation appear to be the most important factors and current evidence suggests that any host, environmental or bacterial factor that reliably enhances the inflammatory response to the H. pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer.

  12. Characterization of the NAD(P)H Oxidase and Metronidazole Reductase Activities of the RdxA Nitroreductase of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Olekhnovich, Igor N.; Goodwin, Avery; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ) is widely used in combination therapies against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Resistance to this drug is common among clinical isolates and results from loss of function mutations in rdxA, which encodes an oxygen insensitive nitroreductase (NTR). The RdxA-associated MTZ-reductase activity of H. pylori is lost upon cell disruption. Here we provide a mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon. Under aerobic conditions, His6-tagged RdxA protein (purified from Escherichia coli), catalyzed NAD(P)H-dependent reductions of nitroaromatic and quinone substrates including: nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin, furazolidone, CB1954, and 1,4 benzoquinone, but not MTZ. Unlike other NTRs, His6-RdxA exhibited potent NAD(P)H oxidase activity (kcat = 2.8 s−1) which suggested two possible explanations for the role of oxygen in MTZ reduction: 1) NAD(P)H oxidase activity promotes cellular hypoxia (nonspecific reduction of MTZ); and 2) molecular oxygen out-competes MTZ for reducing equivalents. The first hypothesis was eliminated upon finding that rdxA expression, while increasing MTZ toxicity in both E. coli and H. pylori constructs, did not increase paraquat toxicity even though both are of similar redox potential. The second hypothesis was confirmed by demonstrating NAD(P)H-dependent MTZ-reductase activity (apparent Km = 122 ± 58 μM, kcat = 0.24 s−1) under strictly anaerobic conditions. The MTZ reductase activity of RdxA was 60-times greater than for NfsB (E. coli NTR), but 10 times lower than the NADPH-oxidase activity. Whether molecular oxygen directly competes with MTZ or alters the redox state of the FMN cofactors is discussed. PMID:19438716

  13. Gastroprotection as an example: antiadhesion against Helicobacter pylori, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of aqueous extracts from the aerial parts of Lippia integrifolia Hieron.

    PubMed

    Marcial, Guillermo; Sendker, Jandirk; Brandt, Simone; de Lampasona, Marina Perotti; Catalán, César A N; de Valdez, Graciela Font; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-09-11

    -induced NO-secretion. The traditional use of aqueous extracts from Lippia integrifolia for gastric inflammation seems to be rationalized: besides anti-inflammatory effects on stomach cells antiadhesive properties of the extracts against the main bacterial inductor of gastritis Helicobacter pylori were identified. Additional effects for stimulation of innate immunity and potential radical scavenging effects may additionally contribute to the activity of the extracts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inflammation, DNA Damage, Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Spanou, Evangelia; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Varvarigou, Anastasia; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Sougioultzis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of almost half human population. It has evolved to escape immune surveillance, establishes lifelong inflammation, predisposing to genomic instability and DNA damage, notably double strand breaks. The epithelial host cell responds by activation of DNA damage repair (DDR) machinery that seems to be compromised by the infection. It is therefore now accepted that genetic damage is a major mechanism operating in cases of H. pylori induced carcinogenesis. Here, we review the data on the molecular pathways involved in DNA damage and DDR activation during H. pylori infection. PMID:28289428

  15. Bismuth-containing quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Lessons from China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Graham, David Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Antimicrobial resistance has continued to undermine many popular anti-Helicobacter pylori therapies. Antibiotic resistance to commonly used anti-H. pylori drugs in China has increased remarkably making China an ideal site to identify regimens that remain effective despite widespread antimicrobial resistance. Bismuth is one of the few antimicrobials to which resistance does not develop. Factors contributing to H. pylori treatment success include host factors (e.g., genetic differences in metabolism of the drugs used), bacterial factors (e.g., susceptibility) and details of the regimen (e.g., doses, dosing interval, dosing in relation of meals, formulation, etc). Methods We reviewed the recent experience in China with bismuth-containing quadruple therapies. The experience consists of 16 studies with 25 arms involving 1,971 patients to identify successful regimens (defined as reliably obtaining 90% or greater eradication per protocol) deserving of further study. Results Despite high rates of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials, several regimens were able to achieve high success. These were characteristically 14 day regimens containing a proton pump inhibitor and either tetracycline and metronidazole or furazolidone and amoxicillin. Conclusions We propose approaches for further development including for optimization and simplification relation to convenience and side effects (e.g., twice rather than three or 4 times daily or administration at the noon and evening meal instead of at breakfast and evening) while maintaining effectiveness ≥ 90%. Studies in China identified regimens that were highly effective despite the high prevalence of resistance to metronidazole, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides. Multicenter randomized studies will be required to confirm which is best. PMID:23778309

  16. Functional and evolutionary analyses of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK) protein with strong oxidative and chaperone activity characterized by a highly diverged dimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Łasica, Anna M; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Drabik, Karolina; Dobosz, Aneta M; Godlewska, Renata; Nowak, Elżbieta; Collet, Jean-Francois; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori does not encode the classical DsbA/DsbB oxidoreductases that are crucial for oxidative folding of extracytoplasmic proteins. Instead, this microorganism encodes an untypical two proteins playing a role in disulfide bond formation - periplasmic HP0231, which structure resembles that of EcDsbC/DsbG, and its redox partner, a membrane protein HpDsbI (HP0595) with a β-propeller structure. The aim of presented work was to assess relations between HP0231 structure and function. We showed that HP0231 is most closely related evolutionarily to the catalytic domain of DsbG, even though it possesses a catalytic motif typical for canonical DsbA proteins. Similarly, the highly diverged N-terminal dimerization domain is homologous to the dimerization domain of DsbG. To better understand the functioning of this atypical oxidoreductase, we examined its activity using in vivo and in vitro experiments. We found that HP0231 exhibits oxidizing and chaperone activities but no isomerizing activity, even though H. pylori does not contain a classical DsbC. We also show that HP0231 is not involved in the introduction of disulfide bonds into HcpC (Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C), a protein involved in the modulation of the H. pylori interaction with its host. Additionally, we also constructed a truncated version of HP0231 lacking the dimerization domain, denoted HP0231m, and showed that it acts in Escherichia coli cells in a DsbB-dependent manner. In contrast, HP0231m and classical monomeric EcDsbA (E. coli DsbA protein) were both unable to complement the lack of HP0231 in H. pylori cells, though they exist in oxidized forms. HP0231m is inactive in the insulin reduction assay and possesses high chaperone activity, in contrast to EcDsbA. In conclusion, HP0231 combines oxidative functions characteristic of DsbA proteins and chaperone activity characteristic of DsbC/DsbG, and it lacks isomerization activity.

  17. Functional and evolutionary analyses of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK) protein with strong oxidative and chaperone activity characterized by a highly diverged dimerization domain

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Łasica, Anna M.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Drabik, Karolina; Dobosz, Aneta M.; Godlewska, Renata; Nowak, Elżbieta; Collet, Jean-Francois; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori does not encode the classical DsbA/DsbB oxidoreductases that are crucial for oxidative folding of extracytoplasmic proteins. Instead, this microorganism encodes an untypical two proteins playing a role in disulfide bond formation – periplasmic HP0231, which structure resembles that of EcDsbC/DsbG, and its redox partner, a membrane protein HpDsbI (HP0595) with a β-propeller structure. The aim of presented work was to assess relations between HP0231 structure and function. We showed that HP0231 is most closely related evolutionarily to the catalytic domain of DsbG, even though it possesses a catalytic motif typical for canonical DsbA proteins. Similarly, the highly diverged N-terminal dimerization domain is homologous to the dimerization domain of DsbG. To better understand the functioning of this atypical oxidoreductase, we examined its activity using in vivo and in vitro experiments. We found that HP0231 exhibits oxidizing and chaperone activities but no isomerizing activity, even though H. pylori does not contain a classical DsbC. We also show that HP0231 is not involved in the introduction of disulfide bonds into HcpC (Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C), a protein involved in the modulation of the H. pylori interaction with its host. Additionally, we also constructed a truncated version of HP0231 lacking the dimerization domain, denoted HP0231m, and showed that it acts in Escherichia coli cells in a DsbB-dependent manner. In contrast, HP0231m and classical monomeric EcDsbA (E. coli DsbA protein) were both unable to complement the lack of HP0231 in H. pylori cells, though they exist in oxidized forms. HP0231m is inactive in the insulin reduction assay and possesses high chaperone activity, in contrast to EcDsbA. In conclusion, HP0231 combines oxidative functions characteristic of DsbA proteins and chaperone activity characteristic of DsbC/DsbG, and it lacks isomerization activity. PMID:26500620

  18. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  19. Activation of Helicobacter pylori CagA by tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for dephosphorylation of host cell proteins in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Püls, Jurgen; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2002-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori type I strains harbour the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI), a 37 kb sequence,which encodes the components of a type IV secretion system. CagA, the first identified effector protein of the cag-PAI, is translocated into eukaryotic cells and tyrosine phosphorylated (CagAP-tyr) by a host cell tyrosine kinase. Translocation of CagA induces the dephosphorylation of a set of phosphorylated host cell proteins of unknown identity. CagA proteins of independent H. pylori strains vary in sequence and thus in the number and composition of putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs). The CagA protein of H. pylori strain J99 (CagAJ99) does not carry any of three putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPM-A, TPM-B or TPM-C) predicted by the MOTIF algorithm in CagA proteins. CagA,n is not tyrosine phosphorylated and is inactive in the dephosphorylation of host cell proteins. By site-specific mutagenesis,we introduced a TPM-C into CagA,. by replacing a single lysine with a tyrosine. This slight modification resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of CagAJ99 and host cell protein dephosphorylation. In contrast, the removal of the indigenous TPM-C from CagAP12 did not abolish its tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that further phosphorylated sites are present in CagAP12. By generation of hybrid CagA proteins, a phosphorylation of the most N-terminal TPM-A could be excluded. Our data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation at TPM-C is sufficient, but not exclusive,to activate translocated CagA. Activated CagAPtr might either convert into a phosphatase itself or activate a cellular phosphatase to dephosphorylate cellular phosphoproteins and modulate cellular signalling cascades of the host.

  20. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion.

  1. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  3. Thailand Consensus on Helicobacter pylori Treatment 2015.

    PubMed

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Mairiang, Pisaln; Praisontarangkul, Ong-Ard; Ovartlarnporn, Buncha; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Pisespongsa, Pises; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Sony, Ravin; Sirinthornpunya, Siam; Chaiyamahapurk, Orawan; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Sansak, Inchaya; Harnsomboon, Piyathida; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chuenrattanakul, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is an important aspect of many upper gastrointestinal tract diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The Thailand Consensus on H. pylori treatment 2015 consisted of 22 national experts who took active roles, discussed all important clinical information and investigated clinical aspects in four workshops, focuising on: (1) Diagnosis (2) Treatment (3) Follow-up after eradication and (4) H. pylori infection and special conditions. Experts were invited to participate on the basis of their expertise and contribution to H. pylori works and/or consensus methodology. The results of each workshop were taken to a final consensus vote by all experts. Recommendations were developed from the best evidence and availability to guide clinicians in management of this specific infection associated with variety of clinical outcomes.

  4. TNF-α-inducing protein of Helicobacter pylori induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in gastric cancer cells through activation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guodong; Tang, Na; Wang, Chao; Xiao, Linqiao; Yu, Minjun; Zhao, Lanhua; Cai, Hengling; Han, Liang; Xie, Chengyuan; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-04

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-inducing protein (Tipα) is a newly identified carcinogenic factor secreted by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Although it has been proved that Tipα is a strong inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial process of migration, the exact molecular mechanism is unknown. Current evidence indicates that the oncogenic transcription factor signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) is inappropriately activated in multiple malignancies, including gastric cancer. In this study, we showed that Tipα significantly down-regulated the expression of EMT-related markers E-cadherin as well as up-regulated N-cadherin and vimentin in SGC7901 cells, with typical morphological changes of EMT. Tipα also promoted proliferation and migration of SGC7901 cells. Furthermore, Tipα activated interleukin-6 (IL-6)/STAT3 signaling pathway in SGC7901 cells. The effects of Tipα treatment observed was abolished when we block IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. Altogether, our data demonstrated that Tipα may accelerate tumor aggressiveness in gastric cancer by promoting EMT through activation of IL-6/STAT3 pathway.

  5. In Vitro Activity of 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and Stigmasta-7,22-diene-3β-ol from Impatiens balsamina L. against Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Li, Wan-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wang, Jeh-Jeng; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Liao, Jyun-Ji; Lin, Cheng-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric cancer and gastric adenocarcinoma. WHO classified H. pylori as a group 1 carcinogen in 1994. Impatiens balsamina L. has been used as indigenous medicine in Asia for the treatment of rheumatism, fractures and fingernail inflammation. In this study, we isolated anti-H. pylori compounds from this plant and investigated their anti- and bactericidal activity. Compounds of 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (MeONQ) and stigmasta-7,22-diene-3β-ol (spinasterol) were isolated from the pods and roots/stems/leaves of I. balsamina L., respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) for MeONQ were in the ranges of 0.156–0.625 and 0.313–0.625 μg mL−1, respectively, and in the ranges of 20–80 μg mL−1 both of MICs and MBCs for spinasterol against antibiotic (clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin) resistant H. pylori. Notably, the activity of MeONQ was equivalent to that of amoxicillin (AMX). The bactericidal H. pylori action of MeONQ was dose-dependent. Furthermore, the activity of MeONQ was not influenced by the environmental pH values (4–8) and demonstrated good thermal (121°C for 15 min) stability. MeONQ abounds in the I. balsamina L. pod at the level of 4.39% (w/w db). In conclusion, MeONQ exhibits strong potential to be developed as a candidate agent for the eradication of H. pylori infection. PMID:19773391

  6. Utilization of time-kill kinetic methodologies for assessing the bactericidal activities of ampicillin and bismuth, alone and in combination, against Helicobacter pylori in stationary and logarithmic growth phases.

    PubMed Central

    Coudron, P E; Stratton, C W

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of in vitro susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori is difficult because of the fastidious, slowly growing nature of this microorganism. The high rate of relapse observed clinically and a possible subpopulation of cells that are not actively replicating suggest the potential need for bactericidal therapy in order to eradicate H. pylori. We used modified time-kill kinetic methodology in order to evaluate the bactericidal activities of ampicillin and bismuth, alone and in combination, against three strains of H. pylori in both a stationary (slow) growth phase and a logarithmic (rapid) growth phase. We found that ampicillin produced a decrease in CFU per milliliter (2 to 4 log10 units) for three strains of H. pylori when tested in logarithmic growth phases but was less inhibitory (< 1-log10-unit decrease in CFU per milliliter) when tested in a stationary growth phase. In contrast, bismuth, when tested in a logarithmic growth phase, produced little inhibitory effect, as the CFU for all strains tested increased above the inoculum. However, when tested in a stationary growth phase, bismuth produced a decrease in CFU per milliliter of < 1 to > 3 log10 units). The activities of these two agents when combined mimicked the activity of the most active drug alone for that growth phase. We conclude that the clinical use of ampicillin combined with bismuth has been more effective than that of either agent used alone because ampicillin targets replicating cells, whereas bismuth targets cells that are not actively replicating. PMID:7695331

  7. Lactobacillus pentosus strain LPS16 produces lactic acid, inhibiting multidrug-resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Fang, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Tien, Nai-Yueh; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen. Antibiotic resistance of H. pylori has become a problem increasing the failure of H. pylori eradication. Therefore alternative approaches are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-H. pylori activity of Lactobacillus pentosus strain LPS16 and the mechanism of its killing effect. The anti-H. pylori activity of LPS16 was determined by the disc diffusion test and time killing assay. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was used to analyze the secreted compounds of LPS16. Sixty H. pylori strains isolated from different gastric diseases, having different antibiotic susceptibility were collected to analyze the spectrum of anti-H. pylori activity of LPS16. Adhesion ability of LPS16 to gastric epithelial cell lines was assayed by flow cytometry. The anti-H. pylori activity of LPS16 depended on the secreted component, and lactic acid mediated bactericidal activity against H. pylori. The bactericidal activity did not vary significantly among the strains isolated from different diseases having different antibiotic susceptibility. Moreover, LPS16 can adhere on gastric epithelial cell lines AKG and MKN45. L. pentosus strain LPS16 had the broad-spectrum anti-H. pylori activity, suggesting that it can be used to prevent H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  9. Inhibition of vacuolation toxin activity of Helicobacter pylori by iodine, nitrite and potentiation by sodium chloride, sterigmatocystin and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengjuan; Zhao, Wenyuan; Kudo, Masanobu; Aoki, Kazuo; Misumi, Junichi

    2002-10-01

    The toxin VacA produced by Helicobacter pylori is an important determinant of virulence. VacA causes vacuolation of cultured cells such as HeLa cells. Iodine, nitrite, sodium chloride, thiocyanate and fungus toxin sterigmatocystin are universally present in nature and could possibly be related to carcinogenesis of the stomach. The present study was designed to examine the effects of the above-mentioned compound on VacA-induced vacuolation of HeLa cells, which was quantitated using the neutral red uptake assay. VacA-induced vacuolation was inhibited by BafA1 and NPPB. Formation of large vacuoles was inhibited in the presence of iodine, nitrite, but enhanced by sodium chloride, thiocyanate, fluoride and sterigmatocystin. Our results indicate that VacA toxin may interact with other gastric cancer risk factors present naturally in the environment, and suggest that those compounds may modulate the development of gastric cancer induced by H. pylori.

  10. Motility of Helicobacter pylori Is Coordinately Regulated by the Transcriptional Activator FlgR, an NtrC Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Gunther; Scarlato, Vincenzo

    1999-01-01

    ς54 is the subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase that transcribes from promoters with enhancer elements bound by enhancer-binding proteins. By computer searches of Helicobacter pylori genomic sequences, chromosomal gene disruption, and RNA analyses, we have identified ς54-recognized promoters that regulate transcription of flagellar basal body and hook genes, as well as the enhancer-binding protein FlgR (flagellum regulator), a transactivating protein of the NtrC family. We demonstrate that FlgR is required for bacterial motility and transcription of five promoters for seven basal body and hook genes. In addition, FlgR acts as a repressor of transcription of the ς28-regulated flaA flagellin gene promoter, while changes in DNA topology repress transcription of the ς54-regulated flaB flagellin gene promoter. Our data indicate that regulation of flagellar gene expression in H. pylori shows similarities with that in enterobacteriaceae and Caulobacter. PMID:9882675

  11. Mutations in the nucleotide binding and hydrolysis domains of Helicobacter pylori MutS2 lead to altered biochemical activities and inactivation of its in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Damke, Prashant P; Dhanaraju, Rajkumar; Marsin, Stéphanie; Radicella, J Pablo; Rao, Desirazu N

    2016-02-03

    Helicobacter pylori MutS2 (HpMutS2), an inhibitor of recombination during transformation is a non-specific nuclease with two catalytic sites, both of which are essential for its anti-recombinase activity. Although HpMutS2 belongs to a highly conserved family of ABC transporter ATPases, the role of its ATP binding and hydrolysis activities remains elusive. To explore the putative role of ATP binding and hydrolysis activities of HpMutS2 we specifically generated point mutations in the nucleotide-binding Walker-A (HpMutS2-G338R) and hydrolysis Walker-B (HpMutS2-E413A) domains of the protein. Compared to wild-type protein, HpMutS2-G338R exhibited ~2.5-fold lower affinity for both ATP and ADP while ATP hydrolysis was reduced by ~3-fold. Nucleotide binding efficiencies of HpMutS2-E413A were not significantly altered; however the ATP hydrolysis was reduced by ~10-fold. Although mutations in the Walker-A and Walker-B motifs of HpMutS2 only partially reduced its ability to bind and hydrolyze ATP, we demonstrate that these mutants not only exhibited alterations in the conformation, DNA binding and nuclease activities of the protein but failed to complement the hyper-recombinant phenotype displayed by mutS2-disrupted strain of H. pylori. In addition, we show that the nucleotide cofactor modulates the conformation, DNA binding and nuclease activities of HpMutS2. These data describe a strong crosstalk between the ATPase, DNA binding, and nuclease activities of HpMutS2. Furthermore these data show that both, ATP binding and hydrolysis activities of HpMutS2 are essential for the in vivo anti-recombinase function of the protein.

  12. Bismuth(III) complexes derived from α-amino acids: the impact of hydrolysis and oxido-cluster formation on their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Busse, Madleen; Border, Emily; Junk, Peter C; Ferrero, Richard L; Andrews, Philip C

    2014-12-28

    Eight bismuth(III) complexes derived from a variety of α-amino acids covering a range of physico-chemical properties (L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-proline (Pro), L-methionine (Met), L-cysteine (Cys), D,L-serine (Ser), L-tyrosine (Tyr), l-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu)) have been synthesised, characterised, and evaluated for their activity against Helicobacter pylori. The optimal synthetic procedure utilises [Bi(O(t)Bu)3], giving the complexes [BiL3] (L = Phe 1, Pro 2, Met 3, Ser 5, Tyr 6) and [Bi2L3] (L = Cys 4, Asp 7, Glu 8) cleanly and in good yield. However, the synthesis is sensitive to both temperature and moisture. The solubility and stability of the bismuth(III) complexes was investigated using ESI-MS. Almost all compounds (except for [Bi(Phe)3] and [Bi(Pro)3]) were found to be partially or completely soluble in aqueous solution giving a pH 2.5-5.0, indicating the presence of free α-amino acid and hydrolysis of the bismuth(III) complexes to polynuclear bismuth oxido-clusters. The results of the bactericidal studies against Helicobacter pylori demonstrate that this hydrolysis process impacts significantly on the observed Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) which are increased substantially, often by many orders of magnitude, when the complexes are initially prepared in water rather than DMSO.

  13. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  14. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation.

  15. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  16. The Role of PPARγ in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung Soo; Cho, Young-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that is important in many physiological and pathological processes, such as lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that PPARγ plays an important role in gastric mucosal injury due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). As H. pylori infection is the main etiologic factor in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, understanding of the potential roles of PPARγ in H. pylori infection may lead to the development of a therapeutic target. In this paper, the authors discuss the current knowledge on the role of PPARγ in H. pylori infection and its related gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:22936949

  17. Catalase, a specific antigen in the feces of human subjects infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Wakasugi, Masahiko; Nakaya, Seigo; Kokubo, Naomi; Sato, Masami; Kajiyama, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Ryoki; Hirata, Haruhisa; Ezure, Yohji; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Takashi

    2002-07-01

    Recently, we reported the production of three new monoclonal antibodies with high specificity for a Helicobacter pylori antigen suitable for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to identify the antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies concerning both H. pylori and the feces of human subjects infected with H. pylori. The cellular antigen was purified from an H. pylori cell extract by immunoaffinity column chromatography with the monoclonal antibody as a ligand. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences (eight residues) of the purified antigen and H. pylori catalase were the same. The molecular weights of native and subunit, specific catalase activity, and UV and visible spectra of the purified antigen were in good agreement with those of H. pylori catalase. The human fecal antigens were purified from two fecal samples of two H. pylori-positive subjects by ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-Sephadex C(50) chromatography, and the same immunoaffinity chromatography used for the H. pylori cellular antigen. The fecal antigens had catalase activity. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences (five residues) of the human fecal antigen and H. pylori catalase were the same. The monoclonal antibodies reacted with the native cellular antigen, but did not react with the denatured antigen, human catalase, and bovine catalase. The results show that the target antigen of the monoclonal antibodies is native H. pylori catalase and that the monoclonal antibodies are able to specifically detect the antigen, which exists in an intact form, retaining the catalase activity in human feces.

  18. Helicobacter pylori antibody responses in association with eradication outcome and recurrence: a population-based intervention trial with 7.3-year follow-up in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyi; Zhang, Yang; Su, Huijuan; Li, Zhexuan; Zhang, Lian; Ma, Junling; Liu, Weidong; Zhou, Tong; You, Weicheng; Pan, Kaifeng

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify serum biomarkers that may predict the short or long term outcomes of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment, a follow-up study was performed based on an intervention trial in Linqu County, China. Methods A total of 529 subjects were selected randomly from 1,803 participants to evaluate total anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) and 10 specific antibody levels before and after treatment at 1-, 2- and 7.3-year. The outcomes of anti-H. pylori treatment were also parallelly assessed by13C-urea breath test at 45-d after treatment and 7.3-year at the end of follow-up. Results We found the medians of anti-H. pylori IgG titers were consistently below cut-off value through 7.3 years in eradicated group, however, the medians declined in recurrence group to 1.2 at 1-year after treatment and slightly increased to 2.0 at 7.3-year. While the medians were significantly higher (>3.0 at 2- and 7.3-year) among subjects who failed the eradication or received placebo. For specific antibody responses, baseline seropositivities of FliD and HpaA were reversely associated with eradication failure [for FliD, odds ratio (OR)=0.44, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.27–0.73; for HpaA, OR=0.32, 95% CI: 0.17–0.60]. The subjects with multiple positive specific antibodies at baseline were more likely to be successfully eradicated in a linear fashion (Ptrend=0.006). Conclusions Our study suggested that total anti-H. pylori IgG level may serve as a potential monitor of long-term impact on anti-H. pylori treatment, and priority forH. pylori treatment may be endowed to the subjects with multiple seropositive antibodies at baseline, especially for FliD and HapA. PMID:28536491

  19. Changes in food tolerance and lifestyle after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, S; Berstad, A

    2003-03-01

    It is known that patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) often have an unhealthy lifestyle that results in increased mortality because of smoking-related diseases. No thorough study has been done to see what changes, if any, the patient makes to lifestyle after eradication of Helicobacter pylori. One-hundred-and-eighty-three patients were enrolled in an open-endoscopy setting; 58% had PUD and 42% gastritis and/or duodenitis (G/D). They filled out a lifestyle questionnaire before the start of anti-Helicobacter therapy and again 1 year later. The prevalence of food intolerance decreased from 71% to 44% among patients with PUD (P < 0.0001) and from 76% to 63% among patients with G/D (P = 0.09). Tolerance improved for coffee, orange juice, fried foods, spicy foods and fruits. There was no significant change in smoking or alcohol consumption after eradication. Coffee and tea consumption was unchanged. Milk consumption decreased from 4.2 dL/day to 3.3 (P = 0.01). The number of meals decreased from 3.5/day to 3.4 (P = 0.005) and snacking from 1.3 snacks/day to 1.1 (P = 0.02). Consumption of fruit increased from 4.0 to 4.3 times/week (P = 0.04), but the frequency of meat, fish, vegetables, spicy foods, salty foods, sweets and cakes did not change. The time spent on each meal was unchanged. There was no change in the time spent exercising. There were few significant differences between PUD and G/D patients. Food was better tolerated, but there were no major changes in lifestyle after eradication of H. pylori. Patients therefore do not abuse the privilege of a more tolerant digestion by indulging in a more unhealthy lifestyle.

  20. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase II knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Songhee H; Langford, Melanie L; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Testerman, Traci L; McGee, David J

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial arginases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: H. pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase II, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. pylori has previously been shown to induce the expression of murine gastric arginase II. To test this hypothesis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase II knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase II knockout mice. Moreover, feeding arginase II knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase I activity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. pylori to colonize. In contrast, BEC poorly inhibited H. pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase II; instead, either residual host arginase I or agmatinase is probably responsible. PMID:21876618

  1. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori colonization by an antiulcer agent, sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, A; Piotrowski, J; Yotsumoto, F; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-04-01

    Sulglycotide, a potent antiulcer agent derived from duodenal mucus glycopeptide through sulfation of the carbohydrate moieties, was evaluated with respect to its ability to interfere with H. pylori mucosal attachment. H. pylori cells were incubated with sulglycotide or human gastric mucin and then examined for their inhibitory capacity of H. pylori attachment to erythrocytes. Titration data revealed that the mucin inhibitory activity was confined to its sulfomucin fraction, the titer of which was found to be 16-fold higher than that of intact mucin. The data with sulglycotide showed that the inhibitory titer of this agent against H. pylori attachment was at least 30-fold higher than that of the sulfated gastric mucin fraction. The results point towards the involvement of sulfomucins in the protection of gastric mucosa from H. pylori colonization and demonstrate that sulglycotide, because of structural similarities, is ideally suited to augment the inherent mucosal defenses against this pathogen.

  2. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inverse Association Between Helicobacter pylori Gastritis and Microscopic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is known to be inversely associated with Helicobacter pylori infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that a similar inverse association also applied to microscopic colitis. The associations between microscopic colitis and presence of H. pylori-positive chronic active gastritis (CAG), H. pylori-negative CAG, intestinal metaplasia, or gastric atrophy were expressed as odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to adjust these associations for sex, age, percentage residents per ZIP code with white, black, Hispanic, or Asian ethnicity, percentage with college education, average housing values, annual income, and population size of individual ZIP codes. H. pylori-positive CAG was less common among patients with than without microscopic colitis (odds ratio = 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.70). Intestinal metaplasia also occurred less frequently among patients with than without microscopic colitis (0.75, 0.65-0.86). These inverse associations remained unaffected by adjustments for parameters of ethnicity and socioeconomic status. In contradistinction with H. pylori-positive CAG, H. pylori-negative CAG was more common in patients with than without microscopic colitis (1.54, 1.17-1.97). H. pylori infection and microscopic colitis are inversely associated. This observation is consistent with similar inverse associations found between H. pylori and inflammatory bowel disease. These relationships may provide clues about the yet unknown etiology of microscopic colitis.

  4. Diagnosing Helicobacter pylori in vivo by confocal laser endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiesslich, Ralf; Goetz, Martin; Burg, Juergen; Stolte, Manfred; Siegel, Ekkehard; Maeurer, Markus J; Thomas, Steven; Strand, Dennis; Galle, Peter R; Neurath, Markus F

    2005-06-01

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy enables subsurface microscopic imaging of living tissue during ongoing endoscopy. This case report describes the in vivo detection of Helicobacter pylori by endomicroscopy. Endomicroscopy (Pentax, Tokyo, EC-3870CIFK) was performed by using two different contrast stains: Topical Acriflavine in addition to intravenously applied fluorescein netted the surface and allowed identification of focal accumulation of Helicobacter pylori at the surface and in deeper layer of the gastric epithelium. Biopsies were performed at the antrum and corpus for urease testing and histology. In addition, biopsies were cultured for Helicobacter pylori. Cultured bacteria were re-assessed ex vivo using confocal microscopy with and without acriflavine staining. Helicobacter pylori infection could be detected in a 70-year-old male by endomicroscopy. Accumulated, as well as single bacteria, could be observed and the distinct shape and flagella of Helicobacter pylori could be identified. Helicobacter pylori infection was proved by histology. Furthermore, ex vivo examination of cultures proved the presence of Helicobacter pylori and the active uptake of acriflavine into the bacteria. Endomicroscopy is a new diagnostic approach, which enables the immediate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori in vivo during standard video endoscopy.

  5. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  6. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-01-01

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation. PMID:24587623

  7. Helicobacter pylori invades the gastric mucosa and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Uchida, Keisuke; Takemura, Tamiko; Nagaoka, Sakae; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Ishige, Ikuo; Ishige, Yuki; Ishida, Noriko; Furukawa, Asuka; Muraoka, Hiroe; Ikeda, Satoshi; Sekine, Masaki; Ando, Noboru; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Takashige; Eishi, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been considered to be non-invasive and to rarely infiltrate the gastric mucosa, even though there is an active Th1 immune response in the lamina propria of the H. pylori-infected stomach. To elucidate whether H. pylori invades the lamina propria and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes, we examined H. pylori in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of stomach and gastric lymph nodes obtained from 51 cancer patients using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with a novel anti-H. pylori monoclonal antibody that recognizes lipopolysaccharides. Fresh gastric lymph nodes were used to culture for H. pylori. In 46 patients with H. pylori in the stomach, the bacterium was found in the lymph nodes from 21 patients by culture, 37 patients by PCR, and 29 patients by IHC. H. pylori captured by macrophages was found in the lamina propria of 39 patients. In the lymph nodes, the bacterium was found in many macrophages and a few interdigitating dendritic cells at the paracortical areas. H. pylori was also found in the intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells in 21 patients, but intracytoplasmic invasion into gastric epithelial cells was not identified. When compared to the commercially available anti-H. pylori antibodies, the novel antibody showed the highest sensitivity to detect H. pylori-positive macrophages, whereas no difference was found for H. pylori in the mucous layer. The H. pylori-positive macrophages in the lamina propria correlated with chronic gastritis as well as translocation of such cells to the lymph nodes. These results suggest that H. pylori-induced gastric epithelial damage allows the bacteria to invade the lamina propria and translocate to the gastric lymph nodes, which may chronically stimulate the immune system. The bacteria captured by macrophages, whether remaining alive or not, may contribute to the induction and development of H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis.

  8. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, DFT calculation and biological activities of Fe(III) and Co(II)-omeprazole complexes. Potential application in the Helicobacter pylori eradication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Marcos G.; Vega Hissi, Esteban G.; Rizzi, Alberto C.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Salinas Ibañez, Ángel G.; Vega, Alba E.; Silva, Humberto J.; Mercader, Roberto; Narda, Griselda E.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction between the antiulcer agent omeprazole (OMZ) with Fe(III) and Co(II) ions was studied, observing a high ability to form metal complexes. The isolated microcrystalline solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements, thermal study, FTIR, UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and DFT calculations. The metal-ligand ratio for both complexes was 1:2 determined by elemental and thermal analysis. FTIR spectroscopy showed that OMZ acts as a neutral bidentate ligand through the pyridinic nitrogen of the benzimidazole ring and the oxygen atom of the sulfoxide group, forming a five-membered ring chelate. Electronic, Mössbauer, and EPR spectra together with magnetic measurements indicate a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal ions, where the coordination sphere is completed by two water molecules. SEM and XRPD were used to characterize the morphology and the crystal nature of the complexes. The most favorable conformation for the Fe(III)-OMZ and Co(II)-OMZ complexes was obtained by DFT calculations by using B3LYP/6-31G(d)&LanL2DZ//B3LYP/3-21G(d)&LanL2DZ basis set. Studies of solubility along with the antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori for OMZ and its Co(II) and Fe(III) complexes are also reported. Free OMZ and both metal complexes showed antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Co(II)-OMZ presented a minimal inhibitory concentration ˜32 times lower than that of OMZ and ˜65 lower than Fe(III)-OMZ, revealing its promising potential use for the treatment of gastric pathologies associated with the Gram negative bacteria. The morphological changes observed in the cell membrane of the bacteria after the incubation with the metal-complexes were also analyzed by SEM microscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes was proved by the viability test.

  9. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    PubMed

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (P<0·05), the frequency of episodes 17%, 7% and 27% (n.s.), and the change in total symptoms score before antibiotics treatment was -1·4 ± 1·1, -1·2 ± 1·1, 2·6 ± 1·1 points/four weeks (P<0·05). All milk products decreased Helicobacter activity by 18 to 45% without significant differences between groups. The observed decrease in Hel. pylori activity seems to be not or not only due to probiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  10. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kusters, Johannes G.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection represents a key factor in the etiology of various gastrointestinal diseases, ranging from chronic active gastritis without clinical symptoms to peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is the result of the complex interplay between the host and the bacterium. Host immune gene polymorphisms and gastric acid secretion largely determine the bacterium's ability to colonize a specific gastric niche. Bacterial virulence factors such as the cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island-encoded protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA aid in this colonization of the gastric mucosa and subsequently seem to modulate the host's immune system. This review focuses on the microbiological, clinical, immunological, and biochemical aspects of the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:16847081

  11. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  12. NF-κB activation and potentiation of proinflammatory responses by the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sabine; Kwok, Terry; Hartig, Roland; König, Wolfgang; Backert, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori immunodominant protein, CagA, is associated with severe gastritis and carcinoma. Injection of CagA into gastric epithelial cells by type IV secretion leads to actin-cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell scattering. CagA has been reported to have no role in the induction of transcription factor NF-κB and IL-8, which are crucial determinants for chronic inflammation. Here, we provide several lines of evidence showing that CagA is able to induce IL-8 in a time- and strain-dependent manner. We also show that by exchanging specific cagA genes, high IL-8-inducing H. pylori strains could be converted into low inducing strains and vice versa. Our results suggest that IL-8 release induced by CagA occurs via a Ras→Raf→Mek→Erk→NF-κB signaling pathway in a Shp-2- and c-Met-independent manner. Thus, CagA is a multifunctional protein capable of effecting both actin remodeling and potentiation of chemokine release. PMID:15972330

  13. Structural characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Štefanić, Zoran; Mikleušević, Goran; Luić, Marija; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Leščić Ašler, Ivana

    2017-08-01

    Microaerophilic bacterium Helicobacer pylori is a well known human pathogen involved in the development of many diseases. Due to the evergrowing infection rate and increase of H. pylori antibiotic resistence, it is of utmost importance to find a new way to attack and eradicate H. pylori. The purine metabolism in H. pylori is solely dependant on the salvage pathway and one of the key enzymes in this pathway is purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). In this timely context, we report here the basic biochemical and structural characterization of recombinant PNP from the H. pylori clinical isolate expressed in Escherichia coli. Structure of H. pylori PNP is typical for high molecular mass PNPs. However, its activity towards adenosine is very low, thus resembling more that of low molecular mass PNPs. Understanding the molecular mechanism of this key enzyme may lead to the development of new drug strategies and help in the eradication of H. pylori. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential effects of DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography on the charge status of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yu-Chi; Pan, Timothy; Tzeng, Huey-Fen; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is involved in H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation. HP-NAP is also a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential diagnostic marker for H. pylori-associated diseases. Previously, we purified recombinant HP-NAP by one-step diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) negative mode chromatography by collecting the unbound fraction at pH 8.0 at 4°C. It remains unclear why HP-NAP does not bind to DEAE resins at the pH above its isoelectric point during the purification. To investigate how pH affects the surface net charge of HP-NAP and its binding to DEAE resins during the purification, recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Escherichia coli was subjected to DEAE negative mode chromatography at pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 at 25°C and the surface charge of purified HP-NAP was determined by capillary electrophoresis. A minimal amount of HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 8.5, whereas recombinant HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sephadex resin only at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The purified recombinant HP-NAP obtained from the unbound fractions was not able to bind to DEAE resins at pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the surface charge of the purified HP-NAP was neutral at pH 7.0 to 8.0 and was either neutral or slightly negative at pH 8.5 and 9.0. However, recombinant HP-NAP purified from gel-filtration chromatography was able to bind to DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 7.0 to 9.0 and DEAE Sephadex resin at pH 7.0. At pH 8.5 and 9.0, only the negatively charged species of HP-NAP were found. Thus, recombinant HP-NAP with different charge status can be differentially purified by DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Furthermore, the charge distribution on the surface of HP-NAP, the presence of impure proteins, and the overall net charge of the resins all affect the binding of HP-NAP to DEAE resins during the negative purification.

  15. Differential effects of DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography on the charge status of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Timothy; Tzeng, Huey-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is involved in H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation. HP-NAP is also a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential diagnostic marker for H. pylori-associated diseases. Previously, we purified recombinant HP-NAP by one-step diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) negative mode chromatography by collecting the unbound fraction at pH 8.0 at 4°C. It remains unclear why HP-NAP does not bind to DEAE resins at the pH above its isoelectric point during the purification. To investigate how pH affects the surface net charge of HP-NAP and its binding to DEAE resins during the purification, recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Escherichia coli was subjected to DEAE negative mode chromatography at pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 at 25°C and the surface charge of purified HP-NAP was determined by capillary electrophoresis. A minimal amount of HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 8.5, whereas recombinant HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sephadex resin only at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The purified recombinant HP-NAP obtained from the unbound fractions was not able to bind to DEAE resins at pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the surface charge of the purified HP-NAP was neutral at pH 7.0 to 8.0 and was either neutral or slightly negative at pH 8.5 and 9.0. However, recombinant HP-NAP purified from gel-filtration chromatography was able to bind to DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 7.0 to 9.0 and DEAE Sephadex resin at pH 7.0. At pH 8.5 and 9.0, only the negatively charged species of HP-NAP were found. Thus, recombinant HP-NAP with different charge status can be differentially purified by DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Furthermore, the charge distribution on the surface of HP-NAP, the presence of impure proteins, and the overall net charge of the resins all affect the binding of HP-NAP to DEAE resins during the negative purification. PMID:28328957

  16. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Taha, Mona M; Younis, Nahla N; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Hamouda, Hamdi A; Eldosouky, Mohamed A; Soliman, Hala

    2010-10-01

    Gastritis, an inflammation of gastric mucosa, may be due to many pathological factors and infection, such as with Helicobacter pylori. The use of experimental models of gastritis is important to evaluate the biochemical changes and study chemotherapeutic intervention. In a previous study we demonstrated an acute gastritis model induced by iodoacetamide. Our objective in this study was to evaluate a new gastritis model induced by H. pylori infection in experimental rats in terms of certain biomarkers in serum and mucosal tissues in addition to histopathological examination. Gastritis was induced in 20 albino Wistar rats by H. pylori isolated from antral biopsy taken from a 49-year-old male patient endoscopically diagnosed as having H. pylori infection. Another ten rats were used as controls. Serum gastrin, pepsinogen I activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were measured. Immunostaining for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation were used to further evaluate H. pylori-induced gastritis. Serum gastrin, IL-6, mucosal MPO activity, and PGE(2) demonstrated significant increases joined with a decreased serum pepsinogen I activity (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive reaction for iNOS, nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis models demonstrated massive oxidative stress and pronounced injury in mucosal tissue. Since our model in rats reflected the clinical picture of H. pylori infection, it can be considered as a consistent model to study chemotherapeutic intervention for this type of gastritis.

  17. Helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis in pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shridhar; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Ghoshal, Uday C; Dhingra, Sadhna; Pandey, Rakesh; Singh, Manisha; Ayyagari, Archana; Naik, Sita

    2005-01-01

    Despite a possible role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinoma (GC), its pathogenesis is not clear. There is scanty data on apoptosis in GC in relation to H. pylori and CagA antibody. Therefore, we studied gastric epithelial apoptosis in GC and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) with or without H. pylori infection, and the degree of apoptosis in relation to CagA antibody status. 20 patients each with GC and NUD were investigated for H. pylori using rapid urease test (RUT), IgG anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA antibodies, histology of endoscopically normal-looking mucosa for H. pylori, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and apoptosis using TUNEL assay. Positivity to one tissue-based (RUT or histology) and one serology based (anti-H. pylori or CagA IgG) test was taken as diagnostic of active H. pylori infection, and negative result in both tissue-based tests suggested its absence. Patients with GC more often had anti-H. pylori IgG (16 of 20 vs. 8 of 20; p=0.02) and a trend towards higher apoptotic index (AI) (48.6 [19.2 to 71.7] vs. 41.4 [11.7 to 63.6]; p=0.06) than NUD. AI was higher in GC (66.7 [57.5 to 71.7] vs. 32.6 [19.2 to 39.8]; p<0.0001) and NUD (58.6 [50.7 to 63.6] vs. 24.4 [11.7 to 32.2]; p<0.0001) infected with H. pylori than in those without infection. AI was also higher in GC than in NUD with H. pylori infection (66.7 [57.5 to 71.7] vs. 58.6 [50.7 to 63.6]; p=0.01). Four of the 20 patients with GC and none with NUD had IM (p=ns). There was no difference in AI in relation to CagA antibody. AI positively correlated with patients' age in presence of H. pylori infection (correlation coefficient=0.5, p=0.03) but not in its absence. Exaggerated apoptosis may play a role in H. pylori-mediated gastric diseases including carcinogenesis. AI increases with aging in patients infected with H. pylori.

  18. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infection by lactobacilli in a gnotobiotic murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, A M; Aiba, Y; Takagi, A; Kamiya, S; Miwa, T; Koga, Y

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium which causes gastric inflammatory diseases. Oral inoculation of H pylori usually results in only a temporary colonisation without a successful infection in the stomach of conventional mice in which lactobacilli are the predominant indigenous bacteria. AIM: To determine whether lactobacilli exert an inhibitory effect on colonisation by H pylori in the stomach. METHODS: The effects of H pylori on attachment to murine and human gastric epithelial cells and the H pylori mediated release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by these cells were examined in vitro. Lactobacillus salivarius infected gnotobiotic BALB/c mice and control germ free mice were inoculated orally with H pylori to examine whether L salivarius can inhibit colonisation by H pylori. RESULTS: L salivarius inhibited both the attachment and IL-8 release in vitro. H pylori could not colonise the stomach of L salivarius infected gnotobiotic BALB/c mice, but colonised in large numbers and subsequently caused active gastritis in germ free mice. In addition, L salivarius given after H pylori implantation could eliminate colonisation by H pylori. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest the possibility of lactobacilli being used as probiotic agents against H pylori. Images PMID:9274471

  19. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression in human gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori involves TLR2/TLR9 and c-Src-dependent nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya Jen; Wu, Ming Shiang; Lin, Jaw Town; Sheu, Bor Shyang; Muta, Tatsushi; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2004-12-01

    Gastric epithelial cells were incubated with a panel of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori, including nonulcer dyspepsia with gastritis (HS, n = 20), gastric ulcer (HU, n = 20), duodenal ulcer (HD, n = 21), and gastric cancer (HC, n = 20). HC strains induced a higher cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression than those from HS, HD, and HU. The bacterial virulence factors and the host cellular pathways were investigated. Virulence genes of iceA, vacA, babA2, cagA 3' repeat region, and hrgA failed to show any association with the disease status and COX-2 expression. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed HC strains not affecting the methylation status of COX-2 promoter. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, NF-interleukin 6, and cAMP response element were found to be involved in COX-2 induction. We explored a novel NF-kappaB activation pathway. The mutants of TLR2 and TLR9, but not TLR4, inhibited H. pylori-induced COX-2 promoter activity, and neutralizing antibodies for TLR2 and TLR9 abolished H. pylori-induced COX-2 expression. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), and Src inhibitors inhibited COX-2 induction. The dominant-negative mutants of NIK and various IkappaB kinase complexes, including IKKbeta (Y188F), IKKbeta (Y199F), and IKKbeta (FF), inhibited the COX-2 promoter activity. Phosphorylation of GST-IKKbeta (132-206) at Tyr188 and Tyr199 by c-Src was found after H. pylori infection. In summary, H. pylori induces COX-2 expression via activations of NF-kappaB, NF-interleukin 6, the cAMP response element. In NF-kappaB activation, H. pylori acts through TLR2/TLR9 to activate both the cascade of PI-PLCgamma/PKCalpha/c-Src/IKKalpha/beta and the cascade of NIK/IKKalpha/beta, resulting in the IkappaBalpha degradation and the expression of COX-2 gene. The COX-2 overexpression may contribute to the carcinogenesis in patients colonized with these strains.

  20. H. pylori Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pill, liquid or pudding that contains tagged carbon molecules. If you have an H. pylori infection, carbon ... uses a special device to detect the carbon molecules. Acid-suppressing drugs known as proton pump inhibitors ( ...

  1. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... special substance that has urea. Urea is a waste product the body produces as it breaks down protein. The urea used in the test has been made harmlessly radioactive. If H. pylori are present, the bacteria convert ...

  2. Effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba Extract Against Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hoon; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori and the effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extract on the expression of cytokines in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Cultured human adenocarcinoma gastric cells (AGS) were infected by H. pylori in RPMI 1640 media. Cell growth was measured by trypan blue assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate effect of extract containing Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on the expression of inflammatory factors and the inhibition on cell growth. Furthermore, we compared the inhibitory effects with various combinations of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole, and ECQ. The urease test with Christensen's Urea Agar was performed to identify the urease activity of H. pylori and the effect ECQ has on urease activity. When the cells were exposed to H. pylori, the trypan blue assay revealed a decrease in the rate of cell growth. Western blot analysis showed that H. pylori-infected cells had increased levels of degraded IκB-α and inflammatory factors. Pretreatment with ECQ inhibited interleukin expression induced by H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of ECQ and antibiotics inhibited cytokine expression more effectively than other treatments. H. pylori displayed significant urease activity. ECQ did not significantly inhibit urease activity. These data suggest that H. pylori infection has cytotoxic effects against AGS cells, and ECQ may inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines in H. pylori-infected AGS cells.

  3. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori in reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M; Bryan, R; Burnham, W R; Kamm, M A

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major pathophysiological abnormalities in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is thought to involve transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations. One component of the neural mechanism controlling the LOS appears to be a reflex are whose afferent limb originates in the gastric fundus. As inflammation is known to be associated with neural activation an investigation was made to determine whether gastric infection with H pylori is altered in prevalence or distribution in patients with reflux disease. METHODS: Five groups of subjects referred for endoscopy-group 1: 25 controls (asymptomatic individuals with anaemia and normal endoscopy); group 2: 36 subjects with erosive oesophagitis alone (Savary-Millar grades I-III); group 3: 16 subjects with duodenal ulcer alone; group 4: 15 subjects with oesophagitis with duodenal ulcer; group 5: 16 subjects with Barrett's oesophagus. No patients were receiving acid suppressants or antibiotics. An antral biopsy specimen was taken for a rapid urease test, and two biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, fundus, and oesophagus (inflamed and non-inflamed) for histological evidence of inflammation and presence of H pylori using a Giemsa stain. RESULTS: Nine (36%) controls had H pylori. Patients with duodenal ulcer alone had a significantly higher incidence of colonisation by H pylori than other groups (duodenal ulcer 15 (94%); oesophagitis 13 (36%); oesophagitis+duodenal ulcer 6 (40%); Barrett's oesophagus 4 (25%)). H pylori was not more common in oesophagitis. When H pylori colonised the gastric antrum it was usually found in the gastric fundus. There was no difference in anatomical distribution of H pylori in the different patient groups. In Barrett's oesophagus H pylori was found in two of 16 in the metaplastic epithelium. CONCLUSION: H pylori is not more common and its distribution does not differ in those with oesophagitis compared with control subjects, and is therefore unlikely

  4. Rate and extent of Helicobacter pylori phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the gastric epithelium and plays a causative role in the development of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Phagocytosis is an element of innate defense used by macrophages and neutrophils to engulf microorganisms. We and others have shown that strains of H. pylori that contain the cag pathogenicity island actively retard their entry into phagocytes. Consequently, there is a lag of several minutes between bacterial binding and the onset of engulfment, and relative to other particles and microbes, the rate of internalization is slow. Herein, we describe in detail the use of synchronized phagocytosis and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy to quantify the rate and extent of H. pylori phagocytosis. This method is appropriate for primary phagocytes as well as transformed cell lines. More importantly, the effects of opsonins, virulence factors, and other agents on infection can be measured independent of bacterial viability or intracellular locale.

  5. Bioactivity and immunological evaluation of LPS from different serotypes of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilli, Davoud; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Hosseini, Ahmad Zavaran

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and a co-factor in development of gastric malignancies. LPS are among toxic substances produced by H. pylori exhibiting low endotoxic activity compared to typical bacterial LPS. The aim of this study was to investigate bioactivity of LPS produced by different serotypes of Helicobacter pylori compared to Escherichia coli and Brucella abortus LPS. Materials and Methods Bacterial LPS was extracted by the hot phenol-water method. Biological activities of LPS were determined via the limulus lysate assay, pyrogenic assay, and blood pressure and PBMC induction test in rabbits. Results Biological activity of O2 serotype LPS of H. pylori was less than the biological activity of other H. pylori serotypes. Conclusion Our data supported the hypothesis that the unique bacterial LPS of the O2 serotype must be included in the formulation of a multivalent H. pylori vaccine. PMID:23825732

  6. Gastroprotective agents in mucosal defense against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Murty, V L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1994-09-01

    1. Convincing evidence now exists that infection with H. pylori plays a major role in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Having a niche bordering two major perimeters of mucosal defenses, the bacterium apparently exerts its detrimental effect on the mucus layer as well as the gastric epithelium. Therefore, gastroprotective agents capable of counteracting these detrimental effects of H. pylori are gaining importance in the treatment of gastric disease. 2. The colonization of gastric mucosa by H. pylori involves specific glycolipid receptors bearing acidic substituents, a process inhibited by gastric sulfomucins. Two antiulcer agents bearing sulfated sugar groups have been demonstrated to possess the ability to interfere with H. pylori colonization process. These are sucralfate and sulglycotide. The two agents are also potent inhibitors of H. pylori glycosulfatase activity directed against indigenous mucosal defenses. 3. A variety of extracellular enzymes such as proteases, lipases and phospholipases, elaborated by H. pylori cause the weakening of the integrity of gastric mucus coat and render the underlying epithelium vulnerable to noxious luminal contents. Among the most potent agents capable of countering the proteolytic activity of H. pylori are nitecapone, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, while ebrotidine and sulglycotide were found to be most effective inhibitors of H. pylori lipolytic activities. 4. The gastric epithelial integrity is compromized by the H. pylori cell-wall lipopolysaccharide untoward effect on the epithelial surface receptors. The interference of the lipopolysaccharide with the laminin receptor was found to be most efficiently countered by ebrotidine, sulglycotide and sucralfate, whereas sulglycotide is the most potent in the reversal of the inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide on mucin receptor binding.

  7. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  8. Multiplex PCR for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric biopsies with lower inflammatory score.

    PubMed

    Fadilah, Najmiyatul; Hanafiah, Alfizah; Razlan, Hamizah; Wong, Zin Qin; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Rahman, Md Mostafizur

    2016-10-01

    No gold standard has yet been established for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) was developed in this study for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of H. pylori from gastric biopsies. H. pylori infections were determined by in-house rapid urease test (iRUT), culture, histology and multiplex PCR. A total of 140 (60.9%) from 230 patients were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori were detected in 9.6% (22/230), 17% (39/230), 12.6% (29/230) and 60% (138/230) of biopsy specimens by culture, iRUT, histology and mPCR, respectively. mPCR identified H. pylori infection in 100% of biopsies with positive histology and culture. All biopsies with positive iRUT yielded positive PCR except two cases. mPCR also detected H. pylori in additional 116, 101 and 109 biopsies that were negative by culture, iRUT and histology, respectively. Positive samples by mPCR showed lower average in H. pylori density, activity and inflammation scores. The Indians showed the highest prevalence of H. pylori infection compared to the Chinese and the Malays. In addition, Chinese patients with older age were significantly infected compared to other ethnicities. PCR was able to detect the highest numbers of positive cases although the lowest average scores were recorded in the activity, inflammatory and H. pylori density.

  9. Helicobacter pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Garofano, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2012-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori has a well-demonstrated role in several gastroduodenal diseases, including peptic ulcer disease, chronic active gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. In addition, more recently, several studies have focused on the possible causal role of H. pylori in various extragastric disorders, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, skin, and autoimmune conditions. The current status of the research on the pathogenesis, clinical and therapeutic aspects of H. pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults and children will be addressed in this narrative review.

  10. Structure, function and localization of Helicobacter pylori urease.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B. E.; Phadnis, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of most cases of gastritis. Once acquired, H. pylori establishes chronic persistent infection; it is this long-term infection that, is a subset of patients, leads to gastric or duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer or gastric MALT lymphoma. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which is essential to survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A significant fraction of urease is associated with the surface of H. pylori both in vivo and in vitro. Surface-associated urease is essential for H. pylori to resist exposure to acid in the presence of urea. The mechanism whereby urease becomes associated with the surface of H. pylori is unique. This process, which we term "altruistic autolysis," involves release of urease (and other cytoplasmic proteins) by genetically programmed autolysis with subsequent adsorption of the released urease onto the surface of neighboring intact bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of essential communal behavior in pathogenic bacteria; such behavior is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:10378351

  11. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2010-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication has been shown to have a prophylactic effect against gastric cancer. According to several international guidelines, the first-line therapy for treating H. pylori infection consists of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or ranitidine bismuth citrate, with any two antibiotics among amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole, given for 7-14 days. However, even with these recommended regimens, H. pylori eradication failure is still seen in more than 20% of patients. The failure rate for first-line therapy may be higher in actual clinical practice, owing to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. The recommended second-line therapy is a quadruple regimen composed of tetracycline, metronidazole, a bismuth salt and a PPI. The combination of PPI-amoxicillin-levofloxacin is a good option as second-line therapy. In the case of failure of second-line therapy, the patients should be evaluated using a case-by-case approach. European guidelines recommend culture before the selection of a third-line treatment based on the microbial antibiotic sensitivity. H. pylori isolates after two eradication failures are often resistant to both metronidazole and clarithromycin. The alternative candidates for third-line therapy are quinolones, tetracycline, rifabutin and furazolidone; high-dose PPI/amoxicillin therapy might also be promising.

  13. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world’s population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  14. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  15. Does Helicobacter pylori infection increase gastric sensitivity in functional dyspepsia?

    PubMed Central

    Mearin, F; de Ribot, X; Balboa, A; Salas, A; Varas, M J; Cucala, M; Bartolomé, R; Armengol, J R; Malagelada, J R

    1995-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia is debated. It is known that a substantial fraction of dyspeptic patients manifest a low discomfort threshold to gastric distension. This study investigated the symptomatic pattern in 27 H pylori positive and 23 H pylori negative patients with chronic functional dyspepsia, and potential relations between infection and gastric hyperalgesia. Specific symptoms (pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating/fullness, early satiety) were scored from 0 to 3 for severity and frequency (global symptom scores: 0-15). The mechanical and perceptive responses to gastric accommodation were evaluated with an electronic barostat that produced graded isobaric distensions from 0 to 20 mm Hg in 2 mm Hg steps up to 600 ml. Gastric compliance (volume/pressure relation) and perception (rating scale: 0-10) were quantified. Standard gastrointestinal manometry and recorded phasic pressure activity at eight separate sites during fasting and postprandially were also assessed. H pylori positive and H pylori negative patients manifested similar severity and frequency of specific symptoms and global symptom scores (mean (SEM)) (severity: 9.5 (2.0) v 9.0 (2.1); frequency: 10.8 (2.0) v 9.7 (2.2)). No differences were seen either in gastric compliance (53 (4) ml/mm Hg v 43 (3) ml/mm Hg) or in gastric perception of distension (slope: 0.50 (0.05) v 0.53 (0.06)). Postprandial antral motility was significantly decreased in H pylori positive patients (two hours motility index: 10.4 (0.6) v 12.6 (0.5); p < 0.05). It is concluded that H pylori infected patients with functional dyspepsia present no distinctive symptoms by comparison with H pylori negative counterparts and H pylori infection is associated with diminished postprandial antral motility but it does not increase perception of gastric distension. PMID:7672680

  16. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world's population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  17. Structural Studies of FlaA1 from Helicobacter Pylori Reveal the Mechanism for Inverting 4,6-dehydratase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama,N.; Creuzenet, C.; Miller, W.; Demendi, M.; Anderson, E.; Harauz, G.; Lam, J.; Berghuis, A.

    2006-01-01

    FlaA1 from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is an enzyme involved in saccharide biosynthesis that has been shown to be essential for pathogenicity. Here we present five crystal structures of FlaA1 in the presence of substrate, inhibitors, and bound cofactor, with resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 1.9 {angstrom}. These structures reveal that the enzyme is a novel member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Additional electron microscopy studies show the enzyme to possess a hexameric doughnut-shaped quaternary structure. NMR analyses of 'real time' enzyme-substrate reactions indicate that FlaA1 is a UDP-GlcNAc-inverting 4,6-dehydratase, suggesting that the enzyme catalyzes the first step in the biosynthetic pathway of a pseudaminic acid derivative, which is implicated in protein glycosylation. Guided by evidence from site-directed mutagenesis and computational simulations, a three-step reaction mechanism is proposed that involves Lys-133 functioning as both a catalytic acid and base.

  18. Bacteriology of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Owen, R J

    1995-09-01

    The discovery and first isolation of H. pylori in pure culture from gastric biopsies in 1982 provided the basis for a completely new area of microbiology. Since then, H. pylori has been an intensively pursued topic world-wide, and extensive data have been acquired on all aspects of its basic microbiology, both at the conventional phenotypic level and at the molecular level. H. pylori is a remarkable microorganism because of its ability to readily colonize a major proportion of human population worldwide and to persist successfully for long periods (probably decades) in a hostile environment. At the same time it interacts with the host immune system in such a way as to permit long-term survival. Blaser (1993) proposed a model in which both host and parasite adapt to down regulate inflammatory phenomena to promote survival. Urease production by H. pylori (an important factor in that process) is one of its most distinct features with a key role in its success as an infective agent. Another less obvious yet highly significant feature of H. pylori is the ability to achieve a high degree of interstrain diversity in genomic DNA nucleotide sequences, while maintaining overall genetic homology and phenotypic homogeneity amongst strains. The selective advantage this diversity provides the bacterium is not understood. A key objective of future microbiological studies should be to understand the population genetic structure of H. pylori. Most species of bacteria are clonal in natural population structure, yet all genomic data suggest the contrary is true for H. pylori. Furthermore, it is not clear if all strains of H. pylori are equally pathogenic, and that some subsets may possess additional pathogenicity factors that are responsible for the development of different disease pathologies. A phylogenetic framework of the genetic relationships of the clones within H. pylori would enable an examination of the total genetic diversity, with respect to ethnic or geographical

  19. Macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in Helicobacter pylori isolates: an experience at a tertiary care centre in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rajper, Sana; Khan, Erum; Ahmad, Zubair; Alam, Syed Muhammad Zaheer; Akbar, Adil; Hasan, Rumina

    2012-11-01

    To assess fluoroquinolone and clarithromycin susceptibility pattern along with the types of genomic mutations involved in the resistance of Helicobacter pylori isolates. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 2009 to July 2010, and comprised 162 gastric biopsy samples which were tested with GenoTypeHelicoDR (Hain Lifescience GmbH, Germany), a reverse hybridisation multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) line probe assay (LiPA). Also, 23S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) gene was analysed with three-point mutations at A2146G, A2146C and A2147G for clarithromycin, and gyrA gene was analyzed at two codon positions 87 and 91 for fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analyses. Clarithromycin resistance was seen in 60 (37.0%) of the isolates mainly involving mutation at A2147G (85%) followed by A2146G (n=35; 21.6%) and A2146C (n=19; 11.6%). Fluoroquinolone resistance was noted in 101(62.3%) isolates, while gyrA mutations at codon 87 was seen in 64 (39.6%) and at codon 91 in 66 (40.6%). Isolates showing combined resistance to both antibiotics were 44 (26.9%). High rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones was seen despite the fact that the drug was not part of the first-line anti-helicobacter therapy. There was moderate increase of clarithromycin resistance beyond the cutoff rates where empirical use of this antibiotic is abandoned. The findings warrant the need for pre-treatment susceptibility testing in Helicobacter pylori infections, especially in Pakistan where burden of disease is high and very limited data is available, to improve patient care by providing targeted therapy.

  20. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in older people

    PubMed Central

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection as the major cause of gastroduodenal disorders three decades ago, H. pylori has been the focus of active research and debate in the scientific community. Its linkage to several diseases, such as peptic ulcer disease, gastritis and gastric malignancy is incontestable. In particular, it has been noticed that, as the aged population is increasing worldwide, older people are at increased risk of developing several gastroduodenal diseases and related complications. At the same time, gastric cancer is definitely more frequent in elderly than in adult and young people. In addition, it has been showed that peptic ulcer and related complications occur much more commonly in aged individuals than in young people, resulting in a significantly higher mortality. Although this infection plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal disorders affecting all age groups and in particular older people, only a few studies have been published regarding the latter. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and therapy of H. pylori infection in elderly people. PMID:24914358

  2. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Oladejo O; Rotimi, Olorunda; Okeke, Iruka

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and disease association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dyspeptic patients in southwest Nigeria. Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-lfe, Nigeria. Consecutive dyspeptic patients for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from January 1996 to March 1997 were investigated for H. pylori in gastric biopsy by histopathology and culture. Patients without gastroduodenal ulcerations or neoplastic lesions constituted the nonulcer dyspeptic (NUD) group. 138 (92 males, 46 females) patients aged 4.5-85 years [mean (7) = 45+/-SD 17.8 years] who had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were analyzed for presence of H. pylori. Eighty-three had histopathology alone, while 55 others had both histology and culture. Endoscopic diagnosis included duodenal ulcer (DU) (n=35, 23%); gastric ulcer (n=4, 3%); gastric cancer (n=14, 9%); NUD, including gastritis (n=49, 32%); duodenitis (n=47, 31%); and normal (n=16, 11%). Overall, H. pylori was positive in 107 of 138 (77.5%) patients. There was a significant association of H. pylori with DU and NUD (p<0.000). Three-quarters of cases of normal endoscopy harbored H. pylori. The finding of 80% and 85% H. pylori in gastritis and duodenitis, respectively, was of interest. These findings suggest that DU and NUD were the main clinical expressions of H. pylori infection in southwest Nigerian dyspeptic patients similar to what is found in developed nations. Of note is the high incidence of H. pylori in endoscopically normal patients.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  4. Individual and combined effects of foods on Helicobacter pylori growth.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Salm, Nina; Hampton, Mark B; Wallace, Alison J

    2010-08-01

    Eradication of H. pylori can reduce the risk of non-cardia gastric cancer developing in infected humans. Thus, the consumption of foods that inhibit the growth of these bacteria may provide an alternative to current therapies that include antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and/or bismuth salts. This study describes a simple broth dilution assay developed to screen a range of foods for their individual and combined effects on H. pylori growth. It was found that foods with measurable anti-H. pylori activity have an effect greater in combination than the sum of foods tested singly, and that this was most noticeable with a combination of broccoli sprouts and blackcurrant oil. The results suggest that food synergy should be considered in any nutraceutical approach to H. pylori infection.

  5. Present and past Helicobacter pylori infection in Mexican school children.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Eugenia; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Mera, Robertino; Vilchis, Jenny; Moran, Segundo; Rivera, Octavio; Coria, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo; Duque, Ximena

    2014-02-01

    In developing countries, more than 50% of children have serological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, serological tests for H. pylori did not differentiate between active and past infection. The objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of active and past H. pylori infection utilizing functional urea breath test (UBT) and serological tests and evaluate factors associated with the infection. A total of 675 school children, 6-13 years of age, participated. UBT was performed to detect active H. pylori infection. Blood samples were obtained to determine iron status and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to the H. pylori whole-cell and to Cag A antigens by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Weight, height, and sociodemographic characteristics were recorded. A total of 37.9% (95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 34.2-41.6) of school children had active or past H. pylori infection; of them, 73.8% (CI95% 68.4-79.2) were carrying CagA-positive strain, 26.5% (CI95% 23.2-29.8) had active infection, and 11.4% (95%CI: 9.0-13.8) had evidence of past H. pylori infection. School children with iron deficiency and low height for age had higher risk of H. pylori infection: [OR to active or past infection was 2.30 (CI 95% 1.01-5.23) and to active infection it was 2.64 (CI 95% 1.09-6.44)] compared to school children with normal iron status and height for age or with normal iron status but low height for age or with iron deficiency and normal height for age. The estimated prevalence of infection depends of the test utilized. Frequency of H. pylori infection and carrying CagA-positive strains was high in this population. Malnutrition was associated with active H. pylori infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Free-living amoebae promote growth and survival of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Wreiber, Karin; von Euler, Ann; Engstrand, Lars; Linder, Ewert

    2002-01-01

    Transmission routes of Helicobacter pylori remain poorly understood. The finding of bacterial DNA in water suggests the involvement of environmental factors. Here we report successful co-cultivation of H. pylori with Acanthamoeba castellanii, which circumvents the requirement of this bacterium for precise microaerobic conditions and a large supply of nutrients in order to grow. H. pylori was able to propagate and remain viable for several weeks in the presence of amoebae under experimental conditions. Intact, metabolically active bacteria could be demonstrated in vacuoles. The putative dependence of H. pylori on free-living amoebae in nature could be important with respect to transmission and prevalence, as shown for some other pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Acid-Induced Activation of the Urease Promoters Is Mediated Directly by the ArsRS Two-Component System of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pflock, Michael; Kennard, Simone; Delany, Isabel; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-containing enzyme urease is an essential colonization factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori which enables the bacteria to survive the low-pH conditions of the stomach. Transcription of the urease genes is positively controlled in response to increasing concentrations of nickel ions and acidic pH. Here we demonstrate that acid-induced transcription of the urease genes is mediated directly by the ArsRS two-component system. Footprint analyses identify binding sites of the phosphorylated ArsR response regulator within the ureA and ureI promoters. Furthermore, deletion of a distal upstream ArsR binding site of the ureA promoter demonstrates its role in acid-dependent activation of the promoter. In addition, acid-induced transcription of the ureA gene is unaltered in a nikR mutant, providing evidence that pH-responsive regulation and nickel-responsive regulation of the ureA promoter are mediated by independent mechanisms involving the ArsR response regulator and the NikR protein. PMID:16177315

  8. The antimicrobial effects and metabolomic footprinting of carboxyl-capped bismuth nanoparticles against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nazari, P; Dowlatabadi-Bazaz, R; Mofid, M R; Pourmand, M R; Daryani, N E; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Shahverdi, A R

    2014-01-01

    Organic salts of bismuth are currently used as antimicrobial agents against Helicobacter pylori. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of elemental bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) using a serial agar dilution method for the first time against different clinical isolates and a standard strain of H. pylori. The Bi NPs were biologically prepared and purified by a recently described method and subjected to further characterization by infrared spectroscopy and anti-H. pylori evaluation. Infrared spectroscopy results showed the presence of carboxyl functional groups on the surface of biogenic Bi NPs. These biogenic nanoparticles showed good antibacterial activity against all tested H. pylori strains. The resulting MICs varied between 60 and 100 μg/ml for clinical isolates of H. pylori and H. pylori (ATCC 26695). The antibacterial effect of bismuth ions was also tested against all test strains. The antimicrobial effect of Bi ions was lower than antimicrobial effect of bismuth in the form of elemental NPs. The effect of Bi NPs on metabolomic footprinting of H. pylori was further evaluated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Exposure of H. pylori to an inhibitory concentration of Bi NPs (100 μg/ml) led to release of some metabolites such as acetate, formic acid, glutamate, valine, glycine, and uracil from bacteria into their supernatant. These findings confirm that these nanoparticles interfere with Krebs cycle, nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism and shows anti-H. pylori activity.

  9. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Rachel; Al-Khtheeri, Huda; Weerasekera, Deepaka; Fernando, Neluka; Vaira, Dino; Holton, John; Basset, Christelle

    2005-12-21

    To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H. pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H. pylori to stomach sections. Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H. pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H. pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric, borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H. pylori strains to the stomach sections. Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H. pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H. pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment.

  10. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    O’Mahony, Rachel; Al-Khtheeri, Huda; Weerasekera, Deepaka; Fernando, Neluka; Vaira, Dino; Holton, John; Basset, Christelle

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). METHODS: Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H pylori to stomach sections. RESULTS: Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric, borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H pylori strains to the stomach sections. CONCLUSION: Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment. PMID:16437723

  11. From inflammation to gastric cancer: Role of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial disease and a leading cause of mortality and the risk factors for this include environmental factors and factors that influence host-pathogen interaction and complex interplay between these factors. Gastric adenocarcinomas are of two types, namely intestinal and diffuse type, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been suspected of being causally linked to the initiation of chronic active gastritis, which leads to adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type. Even though most individuals with H. pylori infection do not show any clinical symptoms, long-term infection leads to inflammation of gastric epithelium and approximately 10% of infected patients develop peptic ulcers and 1–3% of patients develop gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the several mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, CagA and peptidoglycan of H. pylori, which enter the infected gastric epithelial cells play an important role by triggering oncogenic pathways. Inflammation induced by H. pylori in gastric epithelium, which involves the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2 pathway and IL-1β, is also an important factor that triggers chronic active gastritis and adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection induced oxidative stress and dysregulated E-cadherin/β-catenin/p120 interactions and function also play a critical role in tumorigenesis. Environmental and dietary factors, in particular salt intake, are known to modify the pathogenesis induced by H. pylori. Gastric cancer induced by H. pylori appears to involve several mechanisms, making this mode of tumorigenesis a highly complicated process. Nevertheless, there are many events in this tumorigenesis that remain to be clarified and investigated. PMID:28356927

  12. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  13. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of a complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data have indicated that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect the risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness show the sophisticated relationship between H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori's activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Halitosis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Wenhuan; Li, Juan; Xu, Liming; Zhu, Jianhong; Hu, Kewei; Sui, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianzong; Xu, Lingling; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Halitosis is used to describe any disagreeable odor of expired air regardless of its origin. Numerous trials published have investigated the relation between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and halitosis, and even some regimes of H pylori eradication have been prescribed to those patients with halitosis in the clinic. We conducted a meta-analysis to define the correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis. Objectives: To evaluate whether there is a real correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis, and whether H pylori eradication therapy will help relieve halitosis. Methods: We searched several electronic databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Wanfangdata) up to December 2015. Studies published in English and Chinese were considered in this review. After a final set of studies was identified, the list of references reported in the included reports was reviewed to identify additional studies. Screening of titles and abstracts, data extraction and quality assessment was undertaken independently and in duplicate. All analyses were done using Review Manager 5.2 software. Results: A total of 115 articles were identified, 21 of which met the inclusion criteria and presented data that could be used in the analysis. The results showed that the OR of H pylori infection in the stomach between halitosis-positive patients and halitosis-negative patients was 4.03 (95% CI: 1.41–11.50; P = 0.009). The OR of halitosis between H pylori-positive patients and H pylori-negative patients was 2.85 (95% CI: 1.40–5.83; P = 0.004); The RR of halitosis after successful H pylori eradication in those H pylori-infected halitosis-positive patients was 0.17 (95% CI: 0.08–0.39; P <0.0001), compared with those patients without successful H pylori eradication. And the RR of halitosis before successful H pylori eradication therapy was 4.78 (95% CI: 1.45–15.80; P = 0.01), compared with after successful H

  15. Infection with Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Sharon; de Jong, Bouke C.; Solnick, Jay V.; la Luz Sanchez, Maria de; Yang, Shufang; Lin, Philana Ling; Hansen, Lori M.; Talat, Najeeha; Hill, Philip C.; Hussain, Rabia; Adegbola, Richard A.; Flynn, JoAnne; Canfield, Don; Parsonnet, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-γ and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29%) meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI), 45 (46%) were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-γ responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA), and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36–0.83, p = 0.005), though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63–2.9] p = 0.44). Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12–0.80], p = 0.04). Conclusions/Significance H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all 'H. pylori infection' was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections.

  18. Free recombination within Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suerbaum, Sebastian; Smith, John Maynard; Bapumia, Khairun; Morelli, Giovanna; Smith, Noel H.; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Dyrek, Isabelle; Achtman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Sequences of three gene fragments (flaA, flaB, and vacA) from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in Germany, Canada, and South Africa were analyzed for diversity and for linkage equilibrium by using the Homoplasy Test and compatibility matrices. Horizontal genetic exchange in H. pylori is so frequent that different loci and polymorphisms within each locus are all at linkage equilibrium. These results indicate that H. pylori is panmictic. Comparisons with sequences from Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Drosophila melanogaster showed that recombination in H. pylori was much more frequent than in other species. In contrast, when multiple family members infected with H. pylori were investigated, some strains were indistinguishable at all three loci. Thus, H. pylori is clonal over short time periods after natural transmission. PMID:9770535

  19. Influence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization on Histological Grading of Chronic Gastritis in Korean Patients with Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joongwon; Kim, Mi Kyung; Park, Sill Moo

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: We conducted an analysis of correlation between histological grading of chronic gastritis and the presence of H. pylori infection to investigate if H. pylori influences histological severity of chronic gastritis in Korean patients with peptic ulcers. Methods: Gastroscopic antral biopsy specimens and peripheral venous blood were taken from 80 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers. H. pylori was identified microscopically in sections with Giemsa staining and quantitative grading of cultured H. pylori was reported on a scale 0 to 3. The histopathological features of biopsy specimens were reported according to the Sydney classification of chronic gastritis. Serum gastritis and pepsinogen concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: H. pylori was identified in 62.5% (20 of 32 GU, 30 of 48 DU) of the study group. Gastric clonization rate of H. pylori did not increased with age. Forty of 50 biopsy specimens with H. pylori and also 23 of 30 biopsy specimens without H. pylori showed active chronic gastritis. There was no significant correlation overall between the presence of H. pylori and histological grading of chronic gastritis, including activity, and also no association was found between the quantitative grading of H. pylori and the histological grading of chronic gastritis. With and without H. pylori, a mean of serum gastritis concentration (79.4±43.0 pg/ml and 80.2±31.9 pg/ml) showed no significant difference, but a mean of serum pepsinogen concentration (87.7±41.6 ng/ml and 119±34.4 ng/ml) showed significant difference between the populations with and without H. pylori (p=0.001) Conclusions: The influence of H. pylori on histological grading of chronic gastritis in Korean is less than that in prior studies of Western countries, and further investigation of pathogenesis of H. pylori in chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration is necessary. PMID:7495770

  20. Synthesis and bioevaluation of novel 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives that inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced pathogenesis in human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Shiang; Liu, Ju-Fang; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Chia-Der; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Sing, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Yu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and even gastric malignancy. H. pylori's antibiotic resistance is the major obstacle preventing its eradication. A series of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-H. pylori activity. The compound, 2-fluorophenyl-5-methyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazole (FMTMB), was determined as the most potent in the inhibition of H. pylori growth and pathogenesis of host cells. An in vitro H. pylori infection model revealed that FMTMB inhibited H. pylori adhesion and invasion of gastric epithelial cells. Results from this study provide evidence that FMTMB is a potent therapeutic agent that exhibits both anti-H. pylori growth properties and anti-H. pylori-induced pathogenesis of cells.

  1. Characteristics and interactions of Helicobacter pylori and H. pylori-infected human gastroduodenal epithelium in peptic ulcer: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongyuan; Li, Qian; Liu, Xiaolian; Li, Yingchao

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been presumed to be an initiating factor in a previously recognized chain of events, starting with active chronic gastritis and leading to atrophy of the mucosal membrane, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia (intraepithelial neoplasia), and finally culminating in gastric carcinoma. Adherence of H. pylori to the gastroduodenal epithelium is believed to be an important step in the induction of active chronic inflammation of the mucosal layer. However, it is not clear how the pathogen chronically colonizes the gastroduodenal epithelium. In this study, 30 biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive peptic ulcer (15 for gastric ulcer, 15 for duodenal ulcer) patients were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to observe the structural adherence of H. pylori to gastroduodenal epithelium while ten healthy postulants were served as controls. We also investigated the interaction between H. pylori and gastroduodenal epithelial cells. Morphological appearances of both the pathogen and the cells as well as features of colonization, attachment, and internalization were observed. H. pylori exhibited both spiral and coccoid forms. Cytoplasmic vacuolar degeneration played by the vacuolating toxin (VacA) was apparent in gastroduodenal epithelial cells. Specially, a number of tumor cells were found in H. pylori-positive gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) mucosa under TEM which provided an ultrastructural evidence of IM carrying a particularly high risk for the development of gastric cancer.

  2. Structural modifications of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: an idea for how to live in peace.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina

    2014-08-07

    In this review, we discuss the findings and concepts underlying the "persistence mechanisms" of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a spiral-shaped, Gram-negative rod bacterium that was discovered as a gastric pathogen by Marshall and Warren in 1984. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of nearly half of the human population. Infections appear in early childhood and, if not treated, persist for life. The presence or absence of symptoms and their severity depend on multiple bacterial components, host susceptibility and environmental factors, which allow H. pylori to switch between pathogenicity and commensalism. Many studies have shown that H. pylori components may facilitate the colonization process and the immune response of the host during the course of H. pylori infection. These H. pylori-driven interactions might result from positive or negative modulation. Among the negative immunomodulators, a prominent position is occupied by a vacuolating toxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein. However, in light of the recent studies that are presented in this review, it is necessary to enrich this panel with H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Together with CagA and VacA, LPS suppresses the elimination of H. pylori bacteria from the gastric mucosa by interfering with the activity of innate and adaptive immune cells, diminishing the inflammatory response, and affecting the adaptive T lymphocyte response, thus facilitating the development of chronic infections. The complex strategy of H. pylori bacteria for survival in the gastric mucosa of the host involves both structural modifications of LPS lipid A to diminish its endotoxic properties and the expression and variation of Lewis determinants, arranged in O-specific chains of H. pylori LPS. By mimicking host components, this phenomenon leaves these bacteria "invisible" to immune cells. Together, these mechanisms allow H. pylori to survive and live for many years within their hosts.

  3. Structural modifications of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: An idea for how to live in peace

    PubMed Central

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the findings and concepts underlying the “persistence mechanisms” of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a spiral-shaped, Gram-negative rod bacterium that was discovered as a gastric pathogen by Marshall and Warren in 1984. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of nearly half of the human population. Infections appear in early childhood and, if not treated, persist for life. The presence or absence of symptoms and their severity depend on multiple bacterial components, host susceptibility and environmental factors, which allow H. pylori to switch between pathogenicity and commensalism. Many studies have shown that H. pylori components may facilitate the colonization process and the immune response of the host during the course of H. pylori infection. These H. pylori-driven interactions might result from positive or negative modulation. Among the negative immunomodulators, a prominent position is occupied by a vacuolating toxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein. However, in light of the recent studies that are presented in this review, it is necessary to enrich this panel with H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Together with CagA and VacA, LPS suppresses the elimination of H. pylori bacteria from the gastric mucosa by interfering with the activity of innate and adaptive immune cells, diminishing the inflammatory response, and affecting the adaptive T lymphocyte response, thus facilitating the development of chronic infections. The complex strategy of H. pylori bacteria for survival in the gastric mucosa of the host involves both structural modifications of LPS lipid A to diminish its endotoxic properties and the expression and variation of Lewis determinants, arranged in O-specific chains of H. pylori LPS. By mimicking host components, this phenomenon leaves these bacteria “invisible” to immune cells. Together, these mechanisms allow H. pylori to survive and live for many years within their hosts. PMID:25110419

  4. Helicobacter Pylory infection in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poyrazoglu, Omer Bilgehan; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Gultepe, Bilge Sumbul

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common esophageal diseases in the developing world, but the relationship between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and Helicobacter pylori infection remains a neglected topic. The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A second purpose was to determine the incidence and factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection following esophagectomy. METHOD: The microorganism was identified by testing the gastric biopsy materials from 95 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients (66 females; 39 were esophagectomized) for urease activity in a medium containing urea and a power of hydrogen detection reagent and comparing the results with those from a healthy population. Differences in patient characteristics were assessed with chi-square tests and t-tests for categorical and continuous factors, respectively. RESULTS: The patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma had a significantly lower prevalence of Helicobacter pylori compared with the healthy population (p<0.001). The naive and esophagectomized patients, in contrast, showed no significant differences in Helicobacter pylori infection (p>0.005). Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma showed a significant association between leukocytosis and hypoglobulinemia and the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection (p=0.023 and p=0.045, respectively). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that Helicobacter pylori is not an etiological factor in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We found a statistically significant negative correlation between esophageal squamous cell cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection. These findings may guide new strategies for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma therapy. PMID:28355360

  5. Helicobacter pylori Antigens Inducing Early Immune Response in Infants.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Eun A; Jun, Jin Su; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae Young; Woo, Hyang Ok; Youn, Hee Shang; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Park, Jin Sik; Baik, Seung Chul; Lee, Woo Kon; Cho, Myung Je; Rhee, Kwang Ho

    2017-07-01

    To identify the Helicobacter pylori antigens operating during early infection in sera from infected infants using proteomics and immunoblot analysis. Two-dimensional (2D) large and small gel electrophoresis was performed using H. pylori strain 51. We performed 2D immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody immunoblotting using small gels on sera collected at the Gyeongsang National University Hospital from 4-11-month-old infants confirmed with H. pylori infection by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoblot spots appearing to represent early infection markers in infant sera were compared to those of the large 2D gel for H. pylori strain 51. Corresponding spots were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The peptide fingerprints obtained were searched in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. Eight infant patients were confirmed with H. pylori infection based on urease tests, histopathologic examinations, and pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. One infant showed a 2D IgM immunoblot pattern that seemed to represent early infection. Immunoblot spots were compared with those from whole-cell extracts of H. pylori strain 51 and 18 spots were excised, digested in gel, and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. Of the 10 peptide fingerprints obtained, the H. pylori proteins flagellin A (FlaA), urease β subunit (UreB), pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), and translation elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts) were identified and appeared to be active during the early infection periods. These results might aid identification of serological markers for the serodiagnosis of early H. pylori infection in infants. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  6. New Diagnostic Strategies for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Benjamin D.; Gilger, Mark A.; Czinn, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common chronic bacterial infection that is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastroduodenal disease in children. H pylori is also associated with extragastric manifestations, including growth reduction, iron-deficiency anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Current guidelines recommend endoscopy with biopsy for the definitive demonstration of H pylori infection. In contrast to serology, the fecal antigen test and the urea breath test provide reliable, sensitive, and specific results for detecting active H pylori infection in children before and after treatment. The first-line treatment option for pediatric patients is triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and 2 antibiotics, which include amoxicillin and clarithromycin or metronidazole. Decreasing eradication rates and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of H pylori have led to the use of other treatments, such as sequential therapy or triple therapy with newer antibiotics, particularly in geographic areas with high rates of antibiotic resistance. Patients should be tested after treatment to confirm eradication, as the absence of symptoms does not necessarily mean that H pylori is no longer present. This clinical roundtable monograph provides an overview of H pylori infection, as well as expert insight into the diagnosis and management of H pylori infection in children. PMID:26491414

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease: the importance of smoking and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Pillay, K V K; Htun, M; Naing, N N; Norsa'adah, B

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its associated factors among patients with peptic ulcer disease in Taiping Hospital. Consecutive peptic ulcer disease patients who had undergone esophagogastro-duodenoscopy were included. The H. pylori status was assessed by the rapid urease test. We excluded those who had active bleeding, a perforated peptic ulcer, severe vomiting, a history of gastric surgery, peptic ulcer disease or renal or liver diseases, carcinoma of the stomach, and recent use of antibiotics or proton pump inhibitors. Socio-demography, H. pylori status, medication history and other relevant clinical data were collected from case notes. A total of 416 subjects were selected, 49.7% were positive and 50.3% were negative for H. pylori infection. There were significant associations between H. pylori and age, ethnicity, smoking status and NSAID usage. However, there were no significant relationships between H. pylori status and gender or type of peptic ulcer. Multiple logistic regression showed that other ethnicities than Malays and smokers had a higher risk of H. pylori. Our prevalence rate was low and the identified risk factors were consistent with previous studies. Ethnic differences may be related to genetic and sociocultural behaviors. Quitting smoking may benefit peptic ulcer patients with H. pylori infection.

  8. Early apoptosis of monocytes induced by Helicobacter pylori infection through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Huilin; Chen, Xingxing; Li, Jiaojiao; Li, Boqing

    2017-08-01

    Only a small percentage of people infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) will develop overt chronic gastric diseases. To understand the pathological mechanism, the action of H. pylori on monocyte apoptosis was detected. H. pylori co-culturing with peripheral blood monocytes, THP-1 or U937 cells result in early apoptosis at 6, 12, and 24 h after infection. The phosphorylated Bad and JNK were increased, and Bcl-2 was declined at 6, 12, and 24 h in peripheral blood monocytes after H. pylori infection. The phosphorylated Akt was augmented at 6 and 12 h post-infection. A slow apoptotic response was induced by H. pylori via Bad and Bcl-2 regulators, activated caspase-8 and caspase-9, and JNK at 24 h in THP-1 cells. Meanwhile, only Bad and JNK were involved in regulating U937 cells apoptosis at 24 h after infection. These results supported a novel mechanism of H. pylori escaping from monocytes by upregulation of early apoptosis and inhibition of late apoptosis. The differences among the three cells may reveal why H. pylori-derived disease occurs in relatively few people and provide a pathological mechanism whereby a treatment for H. pylori-derived disease may be developed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Campylobacter pylori. The organism and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Evans, D G; Evans, D J

    1989-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori causes type B gastritis and C. pylori infection has been associated with duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, non-ulcer dyspepsia, and gastric cancer. Although we have been able to culture C. pylori for only about 5 years, what we now know about this organism can explain many mysteries surrounding peptic ulcer disease. Whenever one investigates a population of ulcer patients for the presence of any accepted potentially important pathogenetic factors, one finds that the population of patients with duodenal ulcer disease differs (statistically) from those without duodenal ulcer disease, but that to a large degree they also overlap. None of the traditional factors can be considered essential and characteristic of chronic duodenal ulcer. The exception is the presence of a C. pylori infection, the presence of which is almost invariable. Several properties of C. pylori have been identified that might be virulence factors, including (a) provoking a marked acute and chronic inflammatory response, (b) rapid motility through gastric mucus, (c) urease activity, (d) a fibrillar adhesin(s), (e) several putative exotoxins, and (f) microinvasion. We can now add to the old dictum "no acid-no ulcer," "no C. pylori-no ulcer" at least as far as chronic duodenal ulcer disease in adults is concerned.

  10. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  11. Changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in patients with peptic ulcer and gastritis following eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Chika; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Moritani, Isao; Tanaka, Junichiro; Oya, Yumi; Inoue, Hidekazu; Tameda, Masahiko; Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Masaaki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Kojiro

    2016-10-04

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and eradication therapy have been known to influence gastric ghrelin and leptin secretion, which may lead to weight gain. However, the exact relationship between plasma ghrelin/leptin levels and H. pylori infection has remained controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in H. pylori-positive and -negative patients, to compare the two levels of the hormones before and after H. pylori eradication, and to examine the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and active ghrelin or leptin levels, as well as that between atrophic pattern and active ghrelin or leptin levels. Seventy-two H. pylori-positive patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 46 diagnosed as having peptic ulcer and 26 as atrophic gastritis, were enrolled. Control samples were obtained from 15 healthy H. pylori-negative volunteers. The extent of atrophic change of the gastric mucosa was assessed endoscopically. Body weight was measured and blood was collected before and 12 weeks after H. pylori eradication therapy. Blood samples were taken between 8 and 10 AM after an overnight fast. Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly lower in H. pylori-positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients. In particular, plasma active ghrelin levels were significantly lower in patients with gastritis compared with patients with peptic ulcer. Plasma ghrelin levels decreased after H. pylori eradication in both peptic ulcer and gastritis patients, while plasma leptin levels increased only in peptic ulcer patients. Plasma leptin levels and BMI were positively correlated, and active ghrelin levels and atrophic pattern were weakly negatively correlated in peptic ulcer patients. H. pylori infection and eradication therapy may affect circulating ghrelin/leptin levels. This finding suggests a relationship between gastric mucosal injury induced by H. pylori infection and changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels.

  12. Potent and selective inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori glutamate racemase (MurI): pyridodiazepine amines.

    PubMed

    Geng, Bolin; Basarab, Gregory; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Hill, Pamela; Kiely, Andrew; Loch, James; MacPherson, Lawrence; Morningstar, Marshall; Mullen, George; Osimboni, Ekundayo; Satz, Alexander; Eyermann, Charles; Lundqvist, Tomas

    2009-02-01

    An SAR study of an HTS screening hit generated a series of pyridodiazepine amines as potent inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori glutamate racemase (MurI) showing highly selective anti-H. pylori activity, marked improved solubility, and reduced plasma protein binding. X-ray co-crystal E-I structures were obtained. These uncompetitive inhibitors bind at the MurI dimer interface.

  13. NikR mediates nickel-responsive transcriptional induction of urease expression in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Poppelaars, Sophie W; Davies, Beverly J; Stoof, Jeroen; Bereswill, Stefan; Kist, Manfred; Penn, Charles W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2002-06-01

    The important human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires the abundant expression and activity of its urease enzyme for colonization of the gastric mucosa. The transcription, expression, and activity of H. pylori urease were previously demonstrated to be induced by nickel supplementation of growth media. Here it is demonstrated that the HP1338 protein, an ortholog of the Escherichia coli nickel regulatory protein NikR, mediates nickel-responsive induction of urease expression in H. pylori. Mutation of the HP1338 gene (nikR) of H. pylori strain 26695 resulted in significant growth inhibition of the nikR mutant in the presence of supplementation with NiCl(2) at > or =100 microM, whereas the wild-type strain tolerated more than 10-fold-higher levels of NiCl(2). Mutation of nikR did not affect urease subunit expression or urease enzyme activity in unsupplemented growth media. However, the nickel-induced increase in urease subunit expression and urease enzyme activity observed in wild-type H. pylori was absent in the H. pylori nikR mutant. A similar lack of nickel responsiveness was observed upon removal of a 19-bp palindromic sequence in the ureA promoter, as demonstrated by using a genomic ureA::lacZ reporter gene fusion. In conclusion, the H. pylori NikR protein and a 19-bp operator sequence in the ureA promoter are both essential for nickel-responsive induction of urease expression in H. pylori.

  14. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  15. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  16. Combating Helicobacter pylori infections with mucoadhesive nanoparticles loaded with Garcinia mangostana extract.

    PubMed

    Pan-in, Porntip; Tachapruetinun, Amornset; Chaichanawongsaroj, Nuntaree; Banlunara, Wijit; Suksamrarn, Sunit; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2014-03-01

    To combat the resistance of Helicobacter pylori to antibiotics through the use of Garcinia mangostana extract (GME) in the form that can be localized at stomach mucosa. GME and its major active component, α-mangostin, are encapsulated into the moderately acid stable mucoadhesive nanocarriers, and tested for anti-H. pylori and antiadhesion activities in vitro and their ability to eradicate H. pylori in infected mice. The two in vitro activities are observed and are enhanced when the materials are encapsulated into nanocarriers. Preliminary in vivo tests revealed the ability to combat H. pylori in mice following oral administration of the encapsulated GME, but not the unencapsulated GME. Nanoencapsulated GME is a potential anti-H. pylori agent.

  17. Efficacy of Probiotic Supplementation Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Lü, Muhan; Yu, Shan; Deng, Jiaqi; Yan, Qiong; Yang, Chun; Xia, Guodong; Zhou, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapies have shown efficacies below 80% in several studies, and their use has been accompanied by antibiotic-related side effects. Some recent studies have reported that supplementing standard therapies with probiotics can improve the efficacy and tolerability of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. To assess the effects of probiotic supplementation on the eradication rates and therapy-related adverse event rates of anti-Helicobacter pylori regimens. We searched PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials and the Chinese Biomedical Database for eligible randomized controlled trials published through July, 2015. Review Manager 5.3 was used for all statistical analyses. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving a total of 2306 patients were included in our analysis. Intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis performed using a fixed-effects model (test for heterogeneity I2 = 45%) showed that the pooled relative risk (RR) of eradication was significantly higher in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group [RR 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.20, P<0.00001]. The incidence of total antibiotic-related side effects was lower in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group, and the pooled RR (studies n = 9) was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.54-0.94, P = 0.02), as determined using a random-effects model (heterogeneity test I2 = 59%). Certain adverse events, such as nausea and vomiting (RR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.95, P = 0.03), diarrhea (RR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31-0.84, P = 0.008) and constipation (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.28-0.80, P = 0.005), were reported at lower rates in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group. Subgroup analysis showed that eradication rates were significantly improved in both adults (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.19, P<0.00001) and children (RR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05-1.47, P = 0.01) in the probiotic supplementation group and that no

  18. Efficacy of Probiotic Supplementation Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiaqi; Yan, Qiong; Yang, Chun; Xia, Guodong; Zhou, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapies have shown efficacies below 80% in several studies, and their use has been accompanied by antibiotic-related side effects. Some recent studies have reported that supplementing standard therapies with probiotics can improve the efficacy and tolerability of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Objective To assess the effects of probiotic supplementation on the eradication rates and therapy-related adverse event rates of anti-Helicobacter pylori regimens. Methods We searched PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials and the Chinese Biomedical Database for eligible randomized controlled trials published through July, 2015. Review Manager 5.3 was used for all statistical analyses. Results Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving a total of 2306 patients were included in our analysis. Intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis performed using a fixed-effects model (test for heterogeneity I2 = 45%) showed that the pooled relative risk (RR) of eradication was significantly higher in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group [RR 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–1.20, P<0.00001]. The incidence of total antibiotic-related side effects was lower in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group, and the pooled RR (studies n = 9) was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.54–0.94, P = 0.02), as determined using a random-effects model (heterogeneity test I2 = 59%). Certain adverse events, such as nausea and vomiting (RR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.35–0.95, P = 0.03), diarrhea (RR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31–0.84, P = 0.008) and constipation (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.28–0.80, P = 0.005), were reported at lower rates in the probiotic supplementation group than in the control group. Subgroup analysis showed that eradication rates were significantly improved in both adults (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.19, P<0.00001) and children (RR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05–1.47, P = 0.01) in

  19. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas: A review.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-07-14

    Since Isaacson and Wright first reported on the extra-nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the stomach in 1983, following studies have clarified many aspects of this disease. We now know that the stomach is the most affected organ by this disease, and approximately 90% of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are related to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This implies that approximately 10% of gastric MALT lymphomas occur independent of H. pylori infection. The pathogenesis of these H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphomas remains unclear. To date, there have been several speculations. One possibility is that genetic alterations result in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Among these alterations, t(11;18)(q21;q21) is more frequently observed in H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphomas, and such translocation results in the synthesis of fusion protein API2-MALT1, which causes canonical and noncanonical NF-κB activation. Another possibility is infection with bacteria other than H. pylori. This could explain why H. pylori eradication therapy can cure some proportions of H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma patients, although the bacteria responsible for MALT lymphomagenesis are yet to be defined. Recent advances in endoscopy suggest magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging as a useful tool for both detecting gastric MALT lymphoma lesions and judging the response to treatment. A certain proportion of H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma patients respond to eradication therapy; hence, H. pylori eradication therapy could be considered as a first-line treatment for gastric MALT lymphomas regardless of their H. pylori infection status.

  20. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and poor growth. There is evidence of the role of H. pylori in childhood iron deficiency anemia, but the results are not conclusive. The possibility of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, as well as childhood asthma, remains a controversial question. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. PMID:21049552

  1. Geranylgeranylacetone selectively binds to the HSP70 of Helicobacter pylori and alters its coccoid morphology

    PubMed Central

    Grave, Ewa; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Soh; Tamura, Arisa; Ohtaki-Mizoguchi, Takako; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujiwara, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Nobuaki; Okamoto, Tomoya; Otaka, Michiro; Itoh, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) is used to treat patients suffering from peptic ulcers and gastritis. We examined the effect of GGA on Helicobacter pylori, which is a causative factor of gastrointestinal diseases. Previously, we have reported that GGA binds specifically to the molecular chaperone HSP70. In this paper, we report that GGA bounds to H. pylori HSP70 (product of the DnaK gene) with 26-times higher affinity than to human HSP70, and induced large conformational changes as observed from surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism. Binding of GGA suppressed the activity of the H. pylori chaperone. GGA also altered several characteristics of H. pylori cells. GGA-treated cells elicited enhanced interleukin-8 production by gastric cancer cell lines and potentiated susceptibility to complement as compared to untreated cells. GGA also caused morphological alterations in H. pylori as reflected in fewer coccoid-like cells, suggesting that GGA converts H. pylori to an actively dividing, spiral state (vegetative form) from a non-growing, coccoid state. This morphological conversion by GGA resulted in accelerated growth of H. pylori. These results suggest a model in which GGA sensitizes H. pylori to antibiotic treatment by converting the cells to an actively growing state. PMID:26345206

  2. Geranylgeranylacetone selectively binds to the HSP70 of Helicobacter pylori and alters its coccoid morphology.

    PubMed

    Grave, Ewa; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Soh; Tamura, Arisa; Ohtaki-Mizoguchi, Takako; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujiwara, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Nobuaki; Okamoto, Tomoya; Otaka, Michiro; Itoh, Hideaki

    2015-09-08

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) is used to treat patients suffering from peptic ulcers and gastritis. We examined the effect of GGA on Helicobacter pylori, which is a causative factor of gastrointestinal diseases. Previously, we have reported that GGA binds specifically to the molecular chaperone HSP70. In this paper, we report that GGA bounds to H. pylori HSP70 (product of the DnaK gene) with 26-times higher affinity than to human HSP70, and induced large conformational changes as observed from surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism. Binding of GGA suppressed the activity of the H. pylori chaperone. GGA also altered several characteristics of H. pylori cells. GGA-treated cells elicited enhanced interleukin-8 production by gastric cancer cell lines and potentiated susceptibility to complement as compared to untreated cells. GGA also caused morphological alterations in H. pylori as reflected in fewer coccoid-like cells, suggesting that GGA converts H. pylori to an actively dividing, spiral state (vegetative form) from a non-growing, coccoid state. This morphological conversion by GGA resulted in accelerated growth of H. pylori. These results suggest a model in which GGA sensitizes H. pylori to antibiotic treatment by converting the cells to an actively growing state.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and food products: a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen causing gastritis and chronic superficial infection (CSG). It colonizes the stomach of more than 50% of humans and causes disease. This microorganism is associated with the gastric antral epithelium in patients with active chronic gastritis, peptic (gastric) or duodenal ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma H. pylori is present in feces, sewage, and water but is killed by routine chlorination. Therefore, in developing countries, consumption of sewage-contaminated drinking water and vegetables may pose a risk; properly cooking foods and chlorinating water reduces the risk of transmitting H. pylori to humans. In South America the consumption of raw vegetables fertilized with human feces has been found to be a risk factor for infection, and consumption of water from a municipal supply has been suggested as a risk factor for children. Epidemiological studies have found that H. pylori organisms colonize the stomach and duodenum of humans and many animal species and family clusters; it is believed to be orally transmitted person to person. This transmission is the major, if not exclusive, source of infection.H. pylori has been detected in the mouth from dental plaque. Recent observations in persons infected with H. pylori caused to vomit or have diarrhea showed that an actively unwell person with these symptoms could spread H. pylori in the immediate vicinity by aerosol, splashing of vomitus, infected vomitus, and infected diarrhea. In summary, H. pylori is usually spread by the fecal-oral route but possibly also by the oral-oral route and the spread of contaminated secretions. Thus, in developing countries, individuals catch H. pylori at a very young age from other persons (children) in their environment. In developed countries, H. pylori is more difficult to acquire and is usually transmitted from one family member to another, possibly by the fecal-oral route, or by the oral-oral route, e.g., kissing, vomitus. On occasion

  4. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOPIC Peptic Ulcers Stool Tests Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Stool Test: Giardia Antigen Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Helicobacter pylori X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI) Ugh! Ulcers Ulcers Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  6. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  7. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Waste Pickers: A Case Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in waste pickers had not been previously studied. This study aims to determine the association of H. pylori seropositivity and waste picking activity; and to determine socio-demographic, clinical, work, and behavioral characteristics associated with H. pylori seropositivity in waste pickers. Methods Through a case-control study design, we examined 90 waste pickers and 90 age- and gender-matched control subjects for the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, clinical, work and behavioral characteristics of the waste pickers were also investigated. Results Antibodies to H. pylori were found in 60 (66.7%) of the 90 waste pickers and in 51 (56.7%) of the 90 controls (P = 0.16). Stratification by age showed that waste pickers aged 14 -30 years old had significantly higher frequency of H. pylori infection than controls of the same age group (56.5% versus 35.6%, respectively; P = 0.04). The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was not influenced by gender, age, educational level, socioeconomic status, residence, or housing conditions of waste pickers. The presence of underlying diseases and the frequency of gastritis were similar among H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative waste pickers. Logistic regression analysis showed that the duration (years) in the waste picking activity was positively associated with H. pylori exposure (OR = 2.76; 95% CI: 1.22 - 6.25; P = 0.01). In contrast, consumption of alcohol was negatively associated with H. pylori exposure (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.09 - 0.78; P = 0.01). Other work or behavioral characteristics of waste pickers including washing hands before eating, eating from the garbage, animal contacts, consumption of unpasteurized milk, unwashed raw vegetables, fruits, or untreated water, and contact with soil were not associated with H. pylori exposure. Conclusions This is the

  8. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  9. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Gastric atrophy and Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    PubMed

    Boukthir, S; Mrad, S Mazigh; Kalach, N; Sammoud, A

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of gastric atrophy (GA) in Tunisia (a high prevalence region for Helicobacter pylori), and describe its histological, clinical and endoscopic features in children. 345 children, 151 male and 194 female, mean age 8.6 +/- 3.7 years, underwent upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy with gastric biopsies for recurrent abdominal pain (n=232, 67.2%), vomiting (n=72, 20%) associated with or without upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n=59, 17.1%) and miscellaneous causes (n=53, 15.4 %). Biopsies performed both in the gastric antrum (n=2) and corpus (n=2) were analysed for histological assessment according to the updated Sydney classification system and bacterial culture. A positive result was recorded where histology and/or culture were positive, confirming the presence of H. pylori infection (H. pylori +ve). A negative result was recorded when both tests were concomitantly negative (H. pylori -ve). 9.3% (32/345) of the total population, and 14.5% (32/221) of chronic gastritis patients exhibited GA, M/F: 16/16, mean age (SD) 9.4 (3.4) years. Amongst the 32 children with GA, 30 (93.7%) were H. pylori +ve and 2 (6.3%) were H. pylori -ve. GA was localised in the antrum (n=26, 81.2%), the fundus (n=2, 6.3%) and was also seen in both (n=4, 12.5%). GA was categorised as mild, grade 1 (n=18, 56.3%); moderate, grade 2 (n=13, 46.6%); and severe, grade 3 (n=1, 3.1%). GA was associated with mild active gastritis in 18 cases (56.3%). The prevalence of moderate or severe antral GA was detected in 9/26 (34.6%) of H. pylori +ve vs. any of H. pylori -ve (p=0.4), whereas GA in the corpus was detected in 1/2 (50%) vs. none, respectively. None exhibited intestinal metaplasia. There were no clinical features specific to this pathology. UGI endoscopy in GA patients showed nodular gastritis (n=17, 53.1%), congestive gastritis (n=9, 28.1%), and normal tissue (n=6, 18.8%). GA was significantly associated with H. pylori infection (p<0.0001) and nodular gastritis (p<0

  11. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  12. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Study of Helicobacter pylori Urease.

    PubMed

    Minkara, Mona S; Ucisik, Melek N; Weaver, Michael N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-05-13

    Helicobacter pylori have been implicated in an array of gastrointestinal disorders including, but not limited to, gastric and duodenal ulcers and adenocarcinoma. This bacterium utilizes an enzyme, urease, to produce copious amounts of ammonia through urea hydrolysis in order to survive the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on the H. pylori urease enzyme have been employed in order to study structural features of this enzyme that may shed light on the hydrolysis mechanism. A total of 400 ns of MD simulation time were collected and analyzed in this study. A wide-open flap state previously observed in MD simulations on Klebsiella aerogenes [Roberts et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2012, 134, 9934] urease has been identified in the H. pylori enzyme that has yet to be experimentally observed. Critical distances between residues on the flap, contact points in the closed state, and the separation between the active site Ni(2+) ions and the critical histidine α322 residue were used to characterize flap motion. An additional flap in the active site was elaborated upon that we postulate may serve as an exit conduit for hydrolysis products. Finally we discuss the internal hollow cavity and present analysis of the distribution of sodium ions over the course of the simulation.

  14. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    PubMed

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-15

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of cinnamaldehyde in Helicobacter pylori induced gastric inflammation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Shaharyar, Saeeda; Refaat, Alaa; Usmanghani, Khan; Saiki, Ikuo; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia is widely employed for gastrointestinal complaints such as dyspepsia, flatulence, diarrhea, and vomiting. Studies report cinnamaldehyde (CM) as a major active constituent of cinnamon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CM on Helicobacter (H.) pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells in order to validate cinnamon traditional use in gastrointestinal (GI)-related disorders. AGS/MKN-45 cells and H. pylori (193C) were employed for co-culture experiments. Anti-H. pylori cytotoxic and anti-adhesion activity of CM were determined. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, real time polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunoblotting were used to measure the effect on interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion/expression. The effect on activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was determined by immunoblot analysis. The non-cytotoxic CM (≤125 µM) was also non-bactericidal at the given time, suggesting the effect in H. pylori/cell co-culture system was not due to alteration in H. pylori viability or the toxicity to the cells. Also, CM did not show any anti-adhesion effect against H. pylori/cell co-culture. However, pre-incubation of the cells with CM significantly inhibited the IL-8 secretion/expression from H. pylori-infected cells (p<0.01). In addition, CM suppressed H. pylori-induced NF-κB activation and prevented degradation of inhibitor (I)-κB This study provides evidence that the anti-inflammatory effect of C. cassia on H. pylori-infected gastric cells is due to blockage of the NF-κB pathway by cinnamaldehyde. This agent can be considered as a potential candidate for in vivo and clinical studies against various H. pylori related gastric pathogenic processes.

  16. [Alzheimer's disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a possible link?].

    PubMed

    Roubaud Baudron, Claire; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Salles, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with Aß peptide and Tau protein deposits, but the initial process inducing the disease and ultimately neurodegeneration has not yet been elucidated. An infectious hypothesis is suggested by the alteration of the blood-brain barrier and the activation of neuroinflammation in the brain, which could play a role, especially in the decrease of Aß peptide clearance. Several viral or bacterial agents have been incriminated, including Helicobacter pylori. Infection by H. pylori is acquired during childhood and often lifetime persisting, inducing a chronic gastric inflammation, which remains asymptomatic in approximately 80% of cases. However H. pylori infection can induce systemic inflammation and increase homocysteine levels, contributing to worsen AD lesions. Association between H. pylori and AD is suggested by 1) epidemiologic studies, which show higher AD prevalence and more pronounced cognitive impairment in infected than in non-infected subjects; 2) experimental studies in murine models: a) in a first study we evaluated the impact of H. pylori infection on the brain of non-AD predisposed C57BL/6J mice. After an 18-month infection, H. pylori induced a significant gastric inflammation but no brain Aβ deposit nor increased neuroinflammation was observed in their brain; b) we currently study the impact of Helicobacter species infection on behavior and cerebral lesions of AD transgenic (APPswe/PS1dE9) mice and their wild type littermate. The results of these studies do not allow to conclude a significant association between AD and H. pylory infection but may contribute to a better understanding of the role of brain neuroinflammation in AD.

  17. Interleukin-17C in Human Helicobacter pylori Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Cruz, Modesto; Uchida, Tomohisa; Uotani, Takahiro; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines (IL-17A to IL-17F) is involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is recognized as being involved in the pathophysiology of Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, the role of other IL-17 cytokine family members remains unclear. Microarray analysis of IL-17 family cytokines was performed in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsy specimens. IL-17C mRNA was upregulated approximately 4.5-fold in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in infected and uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from Bhutan and from the Dominican Republic. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-17C expression in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens was predominantly localized to epithelial and chromogranin A-positive endocrine cells. IL-17C mRNA levels were also significantly greater among cagA-positive than cagA-negative H. pylori infections (P = 0.012). In vitro studies confirmed an increase in IL-17C mRNA and protein levels in cells infected with cagA-positive infections compared to cells infected with either cagA-negative or cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant. Chemical inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), mitogen-activated protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK), and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibited induction of IL-17C proteins in infected cells, whereas p38 inhibition had no effect on IL-17C protein secretion. In conclusion, H. pylori infection was associated with a significant increase in IL-17C expression in human gastric mucosa. The role of IL-17C in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-induced diseases remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  19. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Xiyun; Nadolny, Christina; Dong, Xiaoqun; Huang, Lina; Yuan, Kexin; Tian, Wenjing; Jia, Yunhe

    2014-02-20

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the status of H. pylori infection. Indirect ELISA method was used for detection of NapA antibody titer in the serum of H. pylori infected individuals. Unconditional logistic regressions were adopted to analyze the variables and determine the association of NapA and gastric cancer. The results of study indicated serum H. pylori NapA antibody level were associated with a reduced risk for development of gastric cancer. It may be used in conjugation with other indicators for gastric cancer detection.

  20. Emerging Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Histopathologic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mohamed H; Elhawari, Soha A; Yousef, Salem; Radwan, Mohamed I; Abdel-Aziz, Hesham R

    2016-02-01

    There is growing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that emphasizes the efficacy of probiotics in the management of Helicobacter (H) pylori infection; it increased the eradication rate, improved patient clinical manifestations and lowered treatment associated side effects. In this review we documented the potential ability of probiotics to ameliorate H. pylori induced histological features. We searched the available literature for full length articles focusing the role of probiotics on H. pylori induced gastritis from histologic perspectives. Probiotics lowered H. pylori density at the luminal side of epithelium, improved histological inflammatory and activity scores both in the gastric corpus and antrum. This effect persists for long period of time after discontinuation of probiotic supplementation and this is probably through an immune mechanism. The current evidence support the promising role of probiotics in improving H. pylori induced histopathological features both in gastric antrum and corpus and for long periods of time. Because increased density of H. pylori on the gastric mucosa is linked to more severe gastritis and increased incidence of peptic ulcers, we can infer that a reduction of the density might help to decrease the risk of developing pathologies, probably the progression toward atrophic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. These effects together with improving the H. pylori eradication rates and amelioration of treatment related side effects might open the door for probiotics to be added to H. pylori eradication regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Role of Toll-like receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sinéad M

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. Although infection induces an immune response that contributes to chronic gastric inflammation, the response is not sufficient to eliminate the bacterium. H. pylori infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is linked to the severity of the host inflammatory response. Gastric epithelial cells represent the first line of innate immune defence against H. pylori, and respond to infection by initiating numerous cell signalling cascades, resulting in cytokine induction and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the gastric mucosa. Pathogen recognition receptors of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family mediate many of these cell signalling events. This review discusses recent findings on the role of various TLRs in the recognition of H. pylori in distinct cell types, describes the TLRs responsible for the recognition of individual H. pylori components and outlines the influence of innate immune activation on the subsequent development of the adaptive immune response. The mechanistic identification of host mediators of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis has the potential to reveal drug targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention or prevention of H. pylori-associated disease by means of vaccines or immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25133016

  2. Helicobacter pylori Induction of the Gastrin Promoter Through GC-Rich DNA Elements

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tamara P.; Gray, Brian M.; Eaton, Kathyrn A.; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection has been linked to the development of chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori- infected patients and animal models develop hypergastrinemia, chronic gastritis, and gastric atrophy. Since gastrin is an important regulator of gastric acid secretion and cell growth, H. pylori regulation of this hormone has been implicated in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin gene expression in mice and the effect of human isolates of the bacteria on gastrin transcription in a cell line. In addition to an increase in gastrin mRNA in H. pylori-infected mice, we found that the bacteria induced the endogenous human gastrin gene through MAP kinase-dependent signaling but not NFκB-dependent signaling. Moreover, activation of gastrin through MAPK signaling did not require CagA or VacA virulence factors. In transfection studies, we demonstrated that H. pylori-induction of the gastrin promoter thorough a GC-rich motif was mediated by inducible binding of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors. In conclusion, co-culturing live H. pylori bacteria with human cells is sufficient to induce gastrin gene expression. PMID:21083750

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection can affect energy modulating hormones and body weight in germ free mice

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Yalda; Seow, Shih Wee; Amoyo, Arlaine Anne; Chiow, Kher Hsin; Tan, Tuan Lin; Wong, Whye Yen; Poh, Qian Hui; Sentosa, Ignatius Mario Doli; Bunte, Ralph M.; Pettersson, Sven; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, is an invariably commensal resident of the gut microbiome associated with gastric ulcer in adults. In addition, these patients also suffered from a low grade inflammation that activates the immune system and thus increased shunting of energy to host defense mechanisms. To assess whether a H. pylori infection could affect growth in early life, we determined the expression levels of selected metabolic gut hormones in germ free (GF) and specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice with and without the presence of H. pylori. Despite H. pylori-infected (SPFH) mice display alteration in host metabolism (elevated levels of leptin, insulin and peptide YY) compared to non-infected SPF mice, their growth curves remained the same. SPFH mice also displayed increased level of eotaxin-1. Interestingly, GF mice infected with H. pylori (GFH) also displayed increased levels of ghrelin and PYY. However, in contrast to SPFH mice, GFH showed reduced weight gain and malnutrition. These preliminary findings show that exposure to H. pylori alters host metabolism early in life; but the commensal microbiota in SPF mice can attenuate the growth retarding effect from H. pylori observed in GF mice. Further investigations of possible additional side effects of H. pylori are highly warranted. PMID:25736205

  4. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Tang, Fu-Ai; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep’s blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present study included periods before and after the advent of the EPIs, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), reserpine and pantoprazole), and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined accordingly. In the same way, the effects of 5 proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), used in treatment of H. pylori infection, on MICs of antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: Four strains of MDR H. pylori were induced successfully, and the antibiotic susceptibilities of MDR strains were partly restored by CCCP and pantoprazole, but there was little effect of reserpine. Rabeprazole was the most effective of the 5 PPIs which could decrease the MICs of antibiotics for MDR H. pylori significantly. CONCLUSION: In vitro, some EPIs can strengthen the activities of different antibiotics which are the putative substrates of the efflux pump system in H. pylori. PMID:20222174

  5. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    PubMed

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    PubMed

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  8. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  9. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  10. Helicobacter pylori inhibits the cleavage of TRAF1 via a CagA-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiu-Kun; Yuan, Sheng-Ling; Wang, Yan-Chun; Tao, Hao-Xia; Jiang, Wei; Guan, Zhang-Yan; Cao, Cheng; Liu, Chun-Jie

    2016-12-28

    To study the impact on cleavage of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) regulated by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Cleavage of TRAF1 was detected by western blotting in the human gastric cancer cell line AGS following treatment with an apoptosis inducer. Cleavage of TRAF1 mediated by caspase was examined in vitro using specific caspase inhibitors. The effect of the COOH-terminal TRAF1 fragment on gastric cell apoptosis during H. pylori infection was measured using flow cytometry. The impact of H. pylori infection on TRAF1 cleavage was detected in the presence of apoptosis inducer. The roles of H. pylori virulence factors that may regulate TRAF1 cleavage were analyzed using isogenic cagA-, vacA- and cagE-null mutants. TRAF1 was found to be cleaved in AGS cells treated with the apoptosis inducer, and caspase-8 was the major caspase involved in the cleavage of TRAF1. The COOH-terminal TRAF1 fragment significantly induced cell apoptosis (P < 0.05) as well as promoted H. pylori-induced cell apoptosis (P < 0.05). H. pylori infection was found to significantly inhibit the cleavage of TRAF1 and to inhibit the activation of caspase-8 in the presence of the apoptosis inducer at specific infection times and different cell/bacteria ratios. We also found that the effects of cagE- and cagA-null mutants on the inhibition of TRAF1 cleavage and activation of caspase-8 were significantly attenuated, compared with wild-type H. pylori, in the presence of the apoptosis inducer, showing that the virulence factor CagA was mainly involved in the inhibition of TRAF1 cleavage. H. pylori infection significantly inhibits the cleavage of TRAF1 via a CagA-dependent mechanism, which would increase the relative amounts of full-length TRAF1 and exert an antiapoptotic effect on H. pylori-infected cells.

  11. Frequency of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Bagheri, Nader; Zamanzad, Behnam; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been related to specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), cagA gene, oipA and babA2 gene are important virulence factor involving gastric diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between virulence factors of H. pylori and histopathological findings. Gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 436 dyspeptic patients. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, virulence factors and for histopathological assessment. The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence factors of H. pylori using specific primers. vacA genotypes in patients infected with H. pylori were associated with cagA, iceA1 and iceA2. In the patients with H. pylori infection there was a significant relationship between cagA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and chronic inflammation (P = 0.013) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.034). Neutrophil infiltration was found to be more severe in the s1 group than in the s2 group (P = 0.042). Also was a significant relationship between oipA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.018). No significant relationships were observed between other vacA genotypes and histopathological parameters. H. pylori strains showing cagA, vacA s1 and oipA positivity are associated with more severe gastritis in some histological features but virulence factors of H. pylori do not appear to determine the overall pattern of gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Annexin A4: A novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori infection using proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ling; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lee, Po-Huang; Chang, King-Jen; Lai, Yo-Ping; Wang, Jin-Town; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2008-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori was reported to be an important risk factor for the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Here, we used a proteomic approach to find differentially expressed proteins between the normal and tumor tissue of gastric cancer patients infected with H. pylori. In our results, we found annexin A4 was over-expressed in patients infected with H. pylori and was found in tumor cells, and over-expressed in gastric cancer SCM-1 cells after H. pylori infection. Ca(2+ ) can be induced by H. pylori and interact with annexin A4 Ca(2+) binding site to block the calmodulin-activated chloride conductance activation; therefore, it produces a new environment that benefits the malignant existence of H. pylori and raises the risk for gastric cancer. We also found interleuken-8 (IL-8) expression levels were increased in H. pylori infected SCM-1 cells. Combined with previous reports and our results, we summarize that the over-expression of annexin A4 in SCM-1 cells with H. pylori infection may subsequently induce IL-8 which can further cause tumor angiogenesis. In this paper, we show that annexin A4 is a potential novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with H. pylori infection, and our results may provide a new insight in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. [Animal models for the study of Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Walencka, Maria; Mikołajczyk-Chmiela, Magdalena

    2014-05-15

    The Gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori is widely recognized as a major etiologic agent responsible for chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcers, the development of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Still, little is known about the natural history of H. pylori infection, since patients usually after many years of not suffering from symptoms of the infection are simply asymptomatic. Since the research investigators carried out on human models has many limitations, there is an urgent need for the development of an animal model optimal and suitable for the monitoring of H. pylori infections. This review summarizes the recent findings on the suitability of animal models used in H. pylori research. Several animal models are useful for the assessment of pathological, microbiological and immunological consequences of infection, which makes it possible to monitor the natural history of H. pylori infection. Preclinical investigations on animal models are an essential stage of research which enrich the knowledge on treatment and prevention strategies.

  14. Recurrence of chronic urticaria caused by reinfection by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Bruscky, Dayanne Mota V; Bruscky, Dayanne Melo V; da Rocha, Luiz Alexandre R; Costa, Aldo José F

    2013-06-01

    To describe a case of chronic urticaria in a female adolescent associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, confirmed in two different occasions, with improvement of urticaria after the antibacterial treatment. A 13-year-old female patient sought medical care with chronic urticaria and epigastric pain unresponsive to medical treatment. Laboratorial tests for further investigation were normal except for the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy showing moderate chronic active gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori. After specific and appropriate treatment, the patient had remission of the symptoms. A new upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to control the treatment after nine months was normal. After five years, the patient returned with recurrence of urticaria and epigastric pain. She was taking antihistamines, without any improvement. It was again submitted to screening protocol for chronic urticaria with normal results. She was submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which showed positive urease test. The patient started a new treatment for Helicobacter pylori with disappearance of chronic urticaria and epigastric pain within seven days. The reported case suggests a causal relationship between the positive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic urticaria, showing the remission of symptoms after the institution of effective therapy for this agent. Chronic urticaria is a disease of complex etiology, and although controversial, there is growing evidence of Helicobacter pylori involvement with extraintestinal diseases, including chronic urticaria.

  15. Drug therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A

    1990-12-01

    Antibacterial chemotherapy against Helicobacter pylori is currently being assessed by open or randomized controlled clinical studies for its efficacy in eradicating this bacterium from the stomach of patients with gastritis or gastroduodenal ulcer. Whereas there is presently no "optimal" agent and treatment scheme, the combination of some antibiotics (metronidazole, tinidazole, amoxicillin) with bismuth salts proves definitely superior in vivo to either of these agents administered alone. Several reasons have been proposed, to explain the clinical failure after treatment: insufficient concentration of active drugs in gastric mucus, instability of some agents at an acidic pH, inappropriate formulation of drug, insufficient duration of treatment, and variable compliance of patients. Recently, it has appeared from several clinical trials that H. pylori may rapidly acquire resistance to some antibiotics, and that this event might also account for clinical failure. A critical review of the literature on H. pylori treatment indicates that association of bismuth and antibiotics or of antibiotics alone both may efficiently reduce the risk of emergence of resistance and improve the therapeutic outcome. Guidelines of treatment are suggested in order to avoid the future misuse of antibiotics that would increase selection of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori and negatively affect the ecology of the gastric microflora. Likewise, an accurate definition of a subset of patients with H. pylori who really will require treatment needs to be rapidly established.

  16. Helicobacter pylori does not use spermidine synthase to produce spermidine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Au, Shannon Wing Ngor

    2017-08-26

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary pathogen associated to gastritis and gastric cancer. Growth of H. pylori depends on the availability of spermidine in vivo. Interestingly, the genome of H. pylori contains an incomplete set of genes for the classical pathway of spermidine biosynthesis. It is thus not clear whether some other genes remained in the pathway would have any functions in spermidine biosynthesis. Here, we study spermidine synthase, which is responsible for the final catalytic process in the classical route. Protein sequence alignment reveals that H. pylori SpeE (HpSpeE) lacks key residues for substrate binding. By using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that purified recombinant HpSpeE does not interact with the putative substrates putrescine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine, and the product spermidine. High performance liquid chromatography analysis further demonstrates that HpSpeE has no detectable in vitro enzymatic activity. Additionally, intracellular spermidine level in speE-null mutant strain is comparable to that in the wild type strain. Collectively, our results suggest that HpSpeE is functionally distinct from spermidine production. H. pylori may instead employ the alternative pathway for spermidine synthesis which is dominantly exploited by other human gut microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Healing of protein losing hypertrophic gastropathy by eradication of Helicobacter pylori--is Helicobacter pylori a pathogenic factor in Ménétrier's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bayerdörffer, E; Ritter, M M; Hatz, R; Brooks, W; Ruckdeschel, G; Stolte, M

    1994-01-01

    Hypertrophic gastropathy--that is, Ménétrier's disease--was found, in a retrospective analysis, to be associated with Helicobacter pylori in more than 90% of patients. It is proposed that hypertrophic gastropathy represents a special form of H pylori gastritis in these patients. A case is described of a 28 year old woman with Ménétrier's disease associated with proved protein loss from the stomach. Treatment with cimetidine for more than three years had little benefit when colonisation by H pylori was detected. Density of H pylori colonisation and activity of gastritis, which was also present in the first biopsy specimens taken five years ago, were more pronounced in the body than in the antrum, which is in agreement with the characteristics of H pylori gastritis found in other cases with Ménétrier's disease. A 14 day antibacterial treatment course with 750 mg amoxicillin three times a day combined with 40 mg omeprazole three times a day was started in April 1991. This resulted in eradication of H pylori and the return to normal of giant folds and the mucosal histology. Serum protein concentrations returned to normal within six weeks and remained normal at two endoscopies during a two year follow up. This case report suggests that a subgroup of the patients with Ménétrier's disease may be healed by the eradication of H pylori. PMID:8200570

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: long-term results of bacterium eradication and association with bacterium virulence profiles.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Luppi, Mario; Zucchini, Patrizia; Morselli, Monica; Potenza, Leonardo; Forghieri, Fabio; Volzone, Francesco; Jovic, Gordana; Leonardi, Giovanna; Donelli, Amedea; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori may lead to improvement of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), although its efficacy over time is uncertain. We report the results of H pylori screening and eradication in 75 consecutive adult patients with ITP. We also used molecular methods to investigate lymphocyte clonality and H pylori genotypes in the gastric biopsies from 10 H pylori-positive patients with ITP and 19 H pylori-positive patients without ITP with chronic gastritis. Active H pylori infection was documented in 38 (51%) patients and successfully eradicated in 34 (89%) patients. After a median follow-up of 60 months, a persistent platelet response in 23 (68%) of patients with eradicated infection was observed; 1 relapse occurred. No differences in mucosal B- or T-cell clonalities were observed between patients with ITP and control participants. Of note, the frequency of the H pylori cagA gene (P = .02) and the frequency of concomitant H pylori cagA, vacAs1, and iceA genes (triple-positive strains; P = .015) resulted statistically higher in patients with ITP than in control participants. All asymptomatic H pylori-positive patients with ITP were suffering from chronic gastritis. Our data suggest a sustained platelet recovery in a proportion of patients with ITP by H pylori eradication alone. Overrepresentation of specific H pylori genotypes in ITP suggests a possible role for bacterium-related factors in the disease pathogenesis.

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Samples of Gastric Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Leda