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Sample records for anti-hiv antibodies b12

  1. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission.

  2. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  3. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  4. Transgenic Production of an Anti HIV Antibody in the Barley Endosperm.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Goetz; Floss, Doreen M; Arcalis, Elsa; Sack, Markus; Melnik, Stanislav; Altmann, Friedrich; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen; Stoger, Eva; Conrad, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Barley is an attractive vehicle for producing recombinant protein, since it is a readily transformable diploid crop species in which doubled haploids can be routinely generated. High amounts of protein are naturally accumulated in the grain, but optimal endosperm-specific promoters have yet to be perfected. Here, the oat GLOBULIN1 promoter was combined with the legumin B4 (LeB4) signal peptide and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SE)KDEL. Transgenic barley grain accumulated up to 1.2 g/kg dry weight of recombinant protein (GFP), deposited in small roundish compartments assumed to be ER-derived protein bodies. The molecular farming potential of the system was tested by generating doubled haploid transgenic lines engineered to synthesize the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody 2G12 with up to 160 μg recombinant protein per g grain. The recombinant protein was deposited at the periphery of protein bodies in the form of a mixture of various N-glycans (notably those lacking terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues), consistent with their vacuolar localization. Inspection of protein-A purified antibodies using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that their equilibrium and kinetic rate constants were comparable to those associated with recombinant 2G12 synthesized in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  5. Transgenic Production of an Anti HIV Antibody in the Barley Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Goetz; Floss, Doreen M.; Arcalis, Elsa; Sack, Markus; Melnik, Stanislav; Altmann, Friedrich; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen; Stoger, Eva; Conrad, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Barley is an attractive vehicle for producing recombinant protein, since it is a readily transformable diploid crop species in which doubled haploids can be routinely generated. High amounts of protein are naturally accumulated in the grain, but optimal endosperm-specific promoters have yet to be perfected. Here, the oat GLOBULIN1 promoter was combined with the legumin B4 (LeB4) signal peptide and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SE)KDEL. Transgenic barley grain accumulated up to 1.2 g/kg dry weight of recombinant protein (GFP), deposited in small roundish compartments assumed to be ER-derived protein bodies. The molecular farming potential of the system was tested by generating doubled haploid transgenic lines engineered to synthesize the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody 2G12 with up to 160 μg recombinant protein per g grain. The recombinant protein was deposited at the periphery of protein bodies in the form of a mixture of various N-glycans (notably those lacking terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues), consistent with their vacuolar localization. Inspection of protein-A purified antibodies using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that their equilibrium and kinetic rate constants were comparable to those associated with recombinant 2G12 synthesized in Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:26461955

  6. Transgenic Production of an Anti HIV Antibody in the Barley Endosperm.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Goetz; Floss, Doreen M; Arcalis, Elsa; Sack, Markus; Melnik, Stanislav; Altmann, Friedrich; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen; Stoger, Eva; Conrad, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Barley is an attractive vehicle for producing recombinant protein, since it is a readily transformable diploid crop species in which doubled haploids can be routinely generated. High amounts of protein are naturally accumulated in the grain, but optimal endosperm-specific promoters have yet to be perfected. Here, the oat GLOBULIN1 promoter was combined with the legumin B4 (LeB4) signal peptide and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SE)KDEL. Transgenic barley grain accumulated up to 1.2 g/kg dry weight of recombinant protein (GFP), deposited in small roundish compartments assumed to be ER-derived protein bodies. The molecular farming potential of the system was tested by generating doubled haploid transgenic lines engineered to synthesize the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody 2G12 with up to 160 μg recombinant protein per g grain. The recombinant protein was deposited at the periphery of protein bodies in the form of a mixture of various N-glycans (notably those lacking terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues), consistent with their vacuolar localization. Inspection of protein-A purified antibodies using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that their equilibrium and kinetic rate constants were comparable to those associated with recombinant 2G12 synthesized in Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:26461955

  7. Computational analysis of anti-HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues.

    PubMed

    West, Anthony P; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2013-06-25

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody's neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti-HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data.

  8. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses.

  9. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N.; Abrams, William R.; Montagna, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. Methods We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. Results The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. Conclusion The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for

  10. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:22730083

  11. Detection of anti-HIV-1 IgG antibodies in whole saliva by GACELISA and Western blot assays.

    PubMed

    Matee, M I; Lyamuya, E F; Simon, E; Mbena, E C; Kagoma, C; Samaranayake, L P; Scheutz, F

    1996-05-01

    The present study, based on 158 HIV seropositives and 167 HIV seronegatives, demonstrates that saliva collected with the Omni-SAL device and tested with GACELISA (an IgG antibody capture ELISA) is an effective non-invasive alternative to serum for anti-HIV IgG antibody screening. The study also shows that a conventional serum Western blot kit can be used, with slight modifications, for confirmatory testing of saliva specimens. Collecting saliva with the Omni-SAL device had a very good acceptance rate among Tanzanian subjects, and although this diagnostic method is not yet known by the general public, 65% of the study participants preferred to give saliva instead of blood for HIV testing.

  12. Assessment of Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Oral and Nasal Compartments of Volunteers From 3 Different Populations.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Philip J; Langat, Robert; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Farah, Bashir; Ouattara, Gina; Park, Harriet; Coutinho, Helen; Laufer, Dagna; Fast, Pat; Verlinde, Carl; Bizimana, Jean; Umviligihozo, Gisele; Nyombayire, Julien; Ingabire, Rosine; Kuldanek, Kristin; Cox, Josephine; McMorrow, Martin; Fidler, Sarah; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Anzala, Omu

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility of collecting standardized nasal and salivary samples at centers in Nairobi (Kenya), Kigali (Rwanda), and London (United Kingdom) using different collection devices and media (synthetic absorptive matrices versus flocked swabs, and Salimetrics oral swabs versus whole oral fluid collection). We detected anti-Gag (p24) and envelope (gp140) antibodies in both nasal fluid and salivary collections from all HIV-infected individuals, and cross-reactive anti-p24 antibodies were detected in 10% of HIV-uninfected individuals enrolled at one site. Collections from the nasal turbinates were comparable with samples collected deeper in the nasopharyngeal tract, and the yield of anti-p24 IgA in the whole oral fluid samples was higher than in samples collected from the parotid gland. We noted a trend toward reduced levels of anti-HIV antibody in the volunteers receiving anti-retroviral therapy. Levels of antibodies were stable over multiple collection visits. Overall, this study shows that nasal and salivary samples can be collected in a standardized manner over repeated visits in both low- and high-resource settings. These methods may be used in support for future HIV vaccine clinical trials. PMID:27243901

  13. Array-in-well platform-based multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies, and Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Saviranta, Petri; Hattara, Liisa; Vuorinen, Tytti; Hytönen, Jukka; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-02-01

    Multiplex assays detecting sets of related clinical analytes simultaneously can save considerable amount of time and resources. Array-in-well (AIW) is a powerful platform for the multiplex detection of different analytes where microarrays can be printed at the bottom of microtiter wells, thus combining the potential of microarrays with the ease of handling microtiter wells. We have developed a single-step AIW assay for the simultaneous screening of HIV, Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (causing syphilis) and Hepatitis B virus infections targeting the specific detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), respectively, using two different fluorescent label technologies i.e. DyLight 633 and europium nanoparticle. Double-antigen assay formats were used for anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibody detection that can simultaneously detect both IgG and IgM, and thus reduce the window period of detection. AIW assay was evaluated with well characterized serum/plasma samples (n=111), and the qualitative results were in near complete agreement with those of the reference assays. The AIW assay exhibited 100% sensitivities for all three analytes, and 100% specificities for anti-HIV antibodies and HBsAg, and 98.6% specificity for treponemal antibodies. The limit of detection of HBsAg in AIW assay was 0.18 ng/ml. This high performing AIW assay has the potential to be used as a multiplex screening test for these three infections.

  14. [Screening tests combined with p24 antigen and anti-HIV antibodies in early detection of HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Laperche, S; Maniez-Montreuil, M; Couroucé, A M

    2000-06-01

    The five available p24 Ag/anti-HIV combined tests were compared to the six third-generation anti-HIV assays mainly used in blood transfusion centers. Among 70 selected HIV-1 positive samples (12 samples from early infected blood donors and 58 from ten commercial panels), 59 were positive with at least one assay. False negative results were observed for zero to six samples with p24 Ag/Ab assays versus seven to 19 with antibody (Ab) tests. In five cases, one or more combined assays gave a positive signal later than the most sensitive Ab screening test. One sample with a high p24 Ag titer was missed by one combined test. The mean time delay between the most sensitive test and the second one was 0.3 to 2 days. The p24 Ag limit of detection was investigated with seven dilutions of the HIV Ag reference. The threshold of the p24 Ag detection was found to be between 65 and 250 pg/mL of HIV Ag. For four of the five combined assays, p24 Ag detectability was assessed with dilutions of infected culture cell supernatants from 13 HIV-1 different genotype strains exhibiting HIV Ag titers from 300 to 450 pg/mL. One of the four combined assays gave negative results but close to the cut-off for three supernatant dilutions (1 B, 1 F, 1 HIV-1/O) and one missed the HIV-1/O dilution. The p24 Ag/Ab combined assays permit an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than third generation assays even if the yield in terms of reduction of the window period is moderate. They are less sensitive than p24 Ag screening assays for the detection of this marker. Consequently, the p24 Ag/Ab assays have not been used for the diagnosis of a primary infection instead of p24 Ag screening tests. They must be considered only as good tools for the detection of HIV infection.

  15. Overcoming the Constraints of Anti-HIV/CD89 Bispecific Antibodies That Limit Viral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mark; Posner, Marshall R.

    2016-01-01

    Innovative strategies are necessary to maximize the clinical application of HIV neutralizing antibodies. To this end, bispecific constructs of human antibody F240, reactive with well-conserved gp41 epitope and antibody 14A8, reactive with the IgA receptor (CD89) on effector cells, were constructed. A F240 × 14A8 bispecific single chain variable region (scFv) molecule was constructed by linking two scFvs using a conventional GGGGS linker. Despite immunoreactivity with HIV gp41 and neutrophils, this bispecific scFv failed to inhibit HIV infection. This is in sharp contrast to viral inhibition using a chemical conjugate of the Fab of these two antibodies. Therefore, we constructed two novel Fab-like bispecific antibody molecules centered on fusion of the IgG1 CH1 domain or CH1-hinge domain to the C-terminus of F240scFv and fusion of the kappa chain CL domain to the C-terminus of 14A8scFv. Both Bi-Fab antibodies showed significant ADCVI activity for multiple clade B and clade C isolates by arming the neutrophils to inhibit HIV infection. The approach presented in this study is unique for HIV immunotherapy in that the impetus of neutralization is to arm and mobilize PMN to destroy HIV and HIV infected cells. PMID:27419146

  16. Overcoming the Constraints of Anti-HIV/CD89 Bispecific Antibodies That Limit Viral Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaocong; Duval, Mark; Gawron, Melissa; Posner, Marshall R; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Innovative strategies are necessary to maximize the clinical application of HIV neutralizing antibodies. To this end, bispecific constructs of human antibody F240, reactive with well-conserved gp41 epitope and antibody 14A8, reactive with the IgA receptor (CD89) on effector cells, were constructed. A F240 × 14A8 bispecific single chain variable region (scFv) molecule was constructed by linking two scFvs using a conventional GGGGS linker. Despite immunoreactivity with HIV gp41 and neutrophils, this bispecific scFv failed to inhibit HIV infection. This is in sharp contrast to viral inhibition using a chemical conjugate of the Fab of these two antibodies. Therefore, we constructed two novel Fab-like bispecific antibody molecules centered on fusion of the IgG1 CH1 domain or CH1-hinge domain to the C-terminus of F240scFv and fusion of the kappa chain CL domain to the C-terminus of 14A8scFv. Both Bi-Fab antibodies showed significant ADCVI activity for multiple clade B and clade C isolates by arming the neutrophils to inhibit HIV infection. The approach presented in this study is unique for HIV immunotherapy in that the impetus of neutralization is to arm and mobilize PMN to destroy HIV and HIV infected cells. PMID:27419146

  17. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  18. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-01

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors. PMID:27610569

  19. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-01

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors.

  20. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille M.; Park, Seo Young

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection. PMID:26596954

  1. Autoreactivity and Exceptional CDR Plasticity (but Not Unusual Polyspecificity) Hinder Elicitation of the Anti-HIV Antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Finton, Kathryn A. K.; Larimore, Kevin; Larman, H. Benjamin; Friend, Della; Correnti, Colin; Rupert, Peter B.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Strong, Roland K.

    2013-01-01

    The broadly-neutralizing anti-HIV antibody 4E10 recognizes an epitope in the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV envelope protein gp41. Previous attempts to elicit 4E10 by vaccination with envelope-derived or reverse-engineered immunogens have failed. It was presumed that the ontogeny of 4E10-equivalent responses was blocked by inherent autoreactivity and exceptional polyreactivity. We generated 4E10 heavy-chain knock-in mice, which displayed significant B cell dysregulation, consistent with recognition of autoantigen/s by 4E10 and the presumption that tolerance mechanisms may hinder the elicitation of 4E10 or 4E10-equivalent responses. Previously proposed candidate 4E10 autoantigens include the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and a nuclear splicing factor, 3B3. However, using carefully-controlled assays, 4E10 bound only weakly to cardiolipin-containing liposomes, but also bound negatively-charged, non-cardiolipin-containing liposomes comparably poorly. 4E10/liposome binding was predominantly mediated by electrostatic interactions rather than presumed hydrophobic interactions. The crystal structure of 4E10 free of bound ligands showed a dramatic restructuring of the combining site, occluding the HIV epitope binding site and revealing profound flexibility, but creating an electropositive pocket consistent with non-specific binding of phospholipid headgroups. These results strongly suggested that antigens other than cardiolipin mediate 4E10 autoreactivity. Using a synthetic peptide library spanning the human proteome, we determined that 4E10 displays limited and focused, but unexceptional, polyspecificity. We also identified a novel autoepitope shared by three ER-resident inositol trisphosphate receptors, validated through binding studies and immunohistochemistry. Tissue staining with 4E10 demonstrated reactivity consistent with the type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor as the most likely candidate autoantigen, but is inconsistent with splicing factor 3B3

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency with intrinsic factor antibodies in an infant with poor growth and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Kathleen; Chowdhury, Dhiman; Penney, Lynette; Rashid, Mohsin

    2014-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is very rare in infants and may lead to serious hematological and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The present article describes a case involving a seven-month-old boy with severe vitamin B12 deficiency, likely caused by juvenile pernicious anemia, an entity rarely described. The child presented with feeding intolerance, poor growth and developmental delay. He was noted to have macrocytic anemia, a markedly low serum vitamin B12 level, and elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels. Antibodies to intrinsic factor were positive. The mother was healthy, with normal vitamin B12 status. Therapy with vitamin B12 supplements led to excellent recovery of symptoms. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in children presenting with failure to thrive, especially when compounded with neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment is essential to avoid serious complications. PMID:24596481

  3. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response.

  4. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis of Epitope Binding by Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Forms of the Anti-HIV-1 Antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Rujas, Edurne; Gulzar, Naveed; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Scott, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 4E10 antibody recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 Env glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit, exhibiting one of the broadest neutralizing activities known to date. The neutralizing activity of 4E10 requires solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues at the apex of the complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3 loop, but the molecular basis for this requirement has not been clarified. Here, we report the cocrystal structures and the energetic parameters of binding of a peptide bearing the 4E10-epitope sequence (4E10ep) to nonneutralizing versions of the 4E10 Fab. Nonneutralizing Fabs were obtained by shortening and decreasing the hydrophobicity of the CDR-H3 loop (termed ΔLoop) or by substituting the two tryptophan residues of the CDR-H3 apex with Asp residues (termed WDWD), which also decreases hydrophobicity but preserves the length of the loop. The analysis was complemented by the first crystal structure of the 4E10 Fab in its ligand-free state. Collectively, the data ruled out major conformational changes of CDR-H3 at any stage during the binding process (equilibrium or transition state). Although these mutations did not impact the affinity of wild-type Fab for the 4E10ep in solution, the two nonneutralizing versions of 4E10 were deficient in binding to MPER inserted in the plasma membrane (mimicking the environment faced by the antibody in vivo). The conclusions of our structure-function analysis strengthen the idea that to exert effective neutralization, the hydrophobic apex of the solvent-exposed CDR-H3 loop must recognize an antigenic structure more complex than just the linear α-helical epitope and likely constrained by the viral membrane lipids. IMPORTANCE The broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 4E10 antibody blocks infection caused by nearly all viral strains and isolates examined thus far. However, 4E10 (or 4E10-like) antibodies are rarely found in HIV-1-infected individuals or elicited through vaccination

  5. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  6. Assembling different antennas of the gp120 high mannose-type glycans on gold nanoparticles provides superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 than the individual antennas.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2015-03-20

    In order to re-build Man9GlcNAc2 clusters of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein, ∼2 nm gold glyconanoparticles (GNPs) were coated with the synthetic partial structures of Man9, the tetramannoside Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3Manα1- and the pentamannoside Manα1-2Manα1-3[Manα1-2Manα1-6]Manα1-. Their interactions with the anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors and saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR spectroscopy. A synergistic effect of the tetra- and pentamannosides multimerized on a same GNP was observed. The assembly of these antennas of the gp120 high-mannose type glycan on GNPs provided superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 with respect to GNPs carrying only the individual oligomannosides. The results presented in this work provide new molecular information on the interactions between clusters of oligomannosides and 2G12 that could help in the design of a carbohydrate-based vaccine against HIV.

  7. Inhibition of in vivo HIV infection in humanized mice by gene therapy of human hematopoietic stem cells with a lentiviral vector encoding a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Aviva; Zheng, Jian Hua; Chen, Ken; Dutta, Monica; Chen, Cindy; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Follenzi, Antonia; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Due to the inherent immune evasion properties of the HIV envelope, broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies capable of suppressing HIV infection are rarely produced by infected individuals. We examined the feasibility of utilizing genetic engineering to circumvent the restricted capacity of individuals to endogenously produce broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies. We constructed a single lentiviral vector that encoded the heavy and light chains of 2G12, a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV human antibody, and that efficiently transduced and directed primary human B cells to secrete 2G12. To evaluate the capacity of this approach to provide protection from in vivo HIV infection, we used the humanized NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mouse model, which becomes populated with human B cells, T cells, and macrophages after transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (hu-HSC) and develops in vivo infection after inoculation with HIV. The plasma of the irradiated NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mice transplanted with hu-HSC transduced with the 2G12-encoding lentivirus contained 2G12 antibody, likely secreted by progeny human lymphoid and/or myeloid cells. After intraperitoneal inoculation with high-titer HIV-1(JR-CSF), mice engrafted with 2G12-transduced hu-HSC displayed marked inhibition of in vivo HIV infection as manifested by a profound 70-fold reduction in plasma HIV RNA levels and an almost 200-fold reduction in HIV-infected human cell numbers in mouse spleens, compared to control hu-HSC-transplanted NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mice inoculated with equivalent high-titer HIV-1(JR-CSF). These results support the potential efficacy of this new gene therapy approach of using lentiviral vectors encoding a mixture of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies for the treatment of HIV infection, particularly infection with multiple-drug-resistant isolates.

  8. Fc-glycosylation influences Fcγ receptor binding and cell-mediated anti-HIV activity of monoclonal antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Gach, Johannes S; Landucci, Gary; Jez, Jakub; Strasser, Richard; Kunert, Renate; Steinkellner, Herta

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between the Fc segment of IgG and FcγRs on a variety of cells are likely to play an important role in the anti-HIV activity of Abs. Because the nature of the glycan structure on the Fc domain is a critical determinant of Fc-FcγR binding, proper Fc glycosylation may contribute to Ab-mediated protection. We have generated five different glycoforms of the broadly HIV-1-neutralizing mAb 2G12 in wild-type and glycoengineered plants and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Plant-derived 2G12 exhibited highly homogeneous glycosylation profiles with a single dominant N-glycan species. Using flow cytometry with FcγR-expressing cell lines, all 2G12 glycoforms demonstrated similar binding to FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIb. In contrast, two glycoforms derived from glycoengineered plants that lack plant-specific xylose and core α1,3-fucose, and instead carry human-like glycosylation with great uniformity, showed significantly enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa compared with Chinese hamster ovary or wild-type plant-derived 2G12. Using surface plasmon resonance, we show that binding of 2G12 to FcγRIIIa is markedly affected by core fucose, irrespective of its plant-specific α1,3 or mammalian-type α1,6 linkage. Consistent with this finding, 2G12 glycoforms lacking core fucose (and xylose) mediated higher antiviral activity against HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus as measured by Ab-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that specific alterations of Fc glycosylation can improve antiviral activity. Such alterations may result in better immunotherapeutic reagents. Moreover, biasing vaccine-induced immune responses toward optimal Fc glycosylation patterns could result in improved vaccine efficacy. PMID:21041724

  9. Evaluation of serum vitamin B12 levels and its correlation with anti-thyroperoxidase antibody in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaya Kumari, S; Bantwal, Ganapathy; Devanath, Anitha; Aiyyar, Vageesh; Patil, Madhuri

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported in patients with Autoimmune thyroid disorders. However there is limited data on exact prevalence of low B12 and its correlation with anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO) levels in these patients. The aim of our study was to estimate serum vitamin B12 levels in autoimmune thyroid disorders and to correlate B12 levels with anti-TPO. 350 patients were selected by convenient sampling. Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid parameters were estimated using fully automated chemiluminescence method on Access 2. Results of our study shows that using the manufacturer's cut-off of 145 pg/mL, the prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 was found to be 45.50 %. Higher prevalence (55 %) was seen based on the published cut-off of 200 pg/mL The study however did not demonstrate any significant correlation between vitamin B12 levels and anti-TPO (r = -0.11 and p value of 0.30). PMID:25883432

  10. A mechanism by which binding of the broadly neutralizing antibody b12 unfolds the inner domain α1 helix in an engineered HIV-1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Emileh, Ali; Abrams, Cameron F.

    2010-01-01

    Using all-atom simulations, we examine the role of the I109C/Q428C disulfide “stitch” in altering the conformational distribution of engineered HIV-1 gp120 core relevant for binding of the broadly neutralizing recombinant antibody b12. In particular, we propose that the I109C/Q428C stitch results in a conformational distribution favoring an unfolded inner-domain α1-helix upon binding of b12. Using Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD), we show that folded α1 in the b12-bound conformation of gp120 is stable both with and without the stitch, but that with folded α1, the stitch requires an orientation of the β20/β21 sheet that is sterically incompatible with b12 binding. Forcing β20/β21 into the orientation displayed by the b12-bound conformation after folding α1 with the stitch intact results in partial unfolding of α1, whereas without the stitch, β20/β21 reorientation does not affect the conformation of α1. These findings collectively support the hypothesis that the disulfide stitch shifts the conformational distribution of α1 to the unfolded state, meaning an unfolded α1 is not a strict requirement of the b12-bound conformational ensemble of gp120's lacking the I109C/Q428C stitch. PMID:21117239

  11. Design of an Escherichia coli Expressed HIV-1 gp120 Fragment Immunogen That Binds to b12 and Induces Broad and Potent Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Singh, Pranveer; Rathore, Ujjwal; Purwar, Mansi; Wagner, Denise; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Phogat, Sanjay; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2013-01-01

    b12, one of the few broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, binds to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on the gp120 subunit of HIV-1 Env. Two small fragments of HIV-1 gp120, b121a and b122a, which display about 70% of the b12 epitope and include solubility-enhancing mutations, were designed. Bacterially expressed b121a/b122a were partially folded and could bind b12 but not the CD4bs-directed non-neutralizing antibody b6. Sera from rabbits primed with b121a or b122a protein fragments and boosted with full-length gp120 showed broad neutralizing activity in a TZM-bl assay against a 16-virus panel that included nine Tier 2 and 3 viruses as well as in a five-virus panel previously designed to screen for broad neutralization. Using a mean IC50 cut-off of 50, sera from control rabbits immunized with gp120 alone neutralized only one virus of the 14 non-Tier 1 viruses tested (7%), whereas sera from b121a- and b122a-immunized rabbits neutralized seven (50%) and twelve (86%) viruses, respectively. Serum depletion studies confirmed that neutralization was gp120-directed and that sera from animals immunized with gp120 contained lower amounts of CD4bs-directed antibodies than corresponding sera from animals immunized with b121a/b122a. Competition binding assays with b12 also showed that b121a/2a sera contained significantly higher amounts of antibodies directed toward the CD4 binding site than the gp120 sera. The data demonstrate that it is possible to elicit broadly neutralizing sera against HIV-1 in small animals. PMID:23430741

  12. [Development of anti-HIV agents based on chemical biology].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), which involves a combinational use of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and HIV protease inhibitors, has brought us a great success in the clinical treatment of AIDS patients. However, HAART has several serious clinical problems. These drawbacks encouraged us to find novel drugs and increase repertoires of anti-HIV agents with various action mechanisms. The recent disclosing of the dynamic supramolecular mechanism in HIV-entry has provided potentials to find a new type of drugs. To date, we have synthesized HIV-entry inhibitors, especially coreceptor CXCR4 antagonists. In addition, CD4 mimics in consideration of synergic effects with other entry inhibitors or neutralizing antibodies have been developed. The development of the above anti-HIV agents is based on the concept of reverse chemical genomics, in which target molecules are fixed. On the other hand, based on the concept of forward chemical genomics, in which active compounds are searched according to the screening of random libraries, effective peptide leads such as integrase inhibitors derived from fragment peptides of HIV-1 Vpr have been discovered. As such, from a point of view on chemical biology, anti-HIV leads have been found utilizing reverse and forward chemical genomics. Furthermore, antibody-based therapy or AIDS vaccine is still thought to be a promising treatment. Thus, peptidic antigen molecules based on artificial remodeling of the dynamic structures of a surface protein gp41 in HIV fusion have been developed. The present chemical biology approaches would be essential for discovery of anti-HIV agents in consideration of cocktail therapy of AIDS.

  13. STRUCTURE OF A HIGH-AFFINITY “MIMOTOPE” PEPTIDE BOUND TO HIV-1-NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODY b12 EXPLAINS ITS INABILITY TO ELICIT gp120 CROSS-REACTIVE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Montero, Marinieve; Menendez, Alfredo; van Houten, Nienke E.; Irving, Melita B.; Pantophlet, Ralph; Zwick, Michael B.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Scott, Jamie K.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary HIV-1 isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N-terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Å resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining complementary experimental approaches in analyzing

  14. MABGEL 1: First Phase 1 Trial of the Anti-HIV-1 Monoclonal Antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 as a Vaginal Microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Georgina C.; Wiggins, Rebecca C.; Woodhall, Sarah C.; Bland, J. Martin; Taylor, Carol R.; Jespers, Vicky; Vcelar, Brigitta A.; Lacey, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which potently neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates are potential microbicide candidates. To date, topical application of mAbs in humans and their stability in vaginal secretions has not been studied. Objectives To assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of the mAbs 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 when applied vaginally in women. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial. Methods Twenty-eight healthy, sexually abstinent women administered 2.5 g of gel daily for 12 days containing either 10 or 20 mg/g of each mAb (MABGEL) or placebo. Main clinical evaluations and sampling occurred at baseline, 1, 8, and 24 hours post-1st dose and 12 and 36 hours post-12th dose. Results After adjustment for dilution factors, median levels of 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 in vaginal secretions at 1 hour post high-dose MABGEL were 7.74, 5.28 and 7.48 mg/ml respectively. Levels of 2F5 and 4E10 declined exponentially thereafter with similar estimated half-lives (4.6 and 4.3 hours). In contrast, 2G12 levels declined more rapidly in the first 8 hours, with an estimated half-life of 1.4 hours during this period. There was no evidence of systemic absorption. There were no significant differences in local or systemic adverse event rates or vaginal flora changes (by qPCR) between active and placebo gel arms. Whilst at least 1 adverse event was recorded in 96% of participants, 95% were mild and none were serious. Conclusions Vaginal application of 50 mg of each mAb daily was safe over a 12 day period. Median mAb concentrations detected at 8 hours post dose were potentially sufficient to block HIV transmission.2G12 exhibited more rapid elimination from the human vagina than 4E10 and 2F5, likely due to poor stability of 2G12 in acidic human vaginal secretions. Further research is needed to develop mAb-based vaginal microbicides and delivery systems. Trial Registration ISRCTN 64808733 UK CRN Portfolio 6470 PMID:25546420

  15. Naturally derived anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Asres, Kaleab; Seyoum, Ameha; Veeresham, Ciddi; Bucar, Franz; Gibbons, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The urgent need for new anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is a global concern. In addition to obvious economical and commercial hurdles, HIV/AIDS patients are faced with multifarious difficulties associated with the currently approved anti-HIV drugs. Adverse effects, the emergence of drug resistance and the narrow spectrum of activity have limited the therapeutic usefulness of the various reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors that are currently available on the market. This has driven many scientists to look for new anti-retrovirals with better efficacy, safety and affordability. As has always been the case in the search for cures, natural sources offer great promise. Several natural products, mostly of plant origin have been shown to possess promising activities that could assist in the prevention and/or amelioration of the disease. Many of these anti-HIV agents have other medicinal values as well, which afford them further prospective as novel leads for the development of new drugs that can deal with both the virus and the various disorders that characterize HIV/AIDS. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HIV natural products. In the review anti-HIV agents have been classified according to their chemical classes rather than their target in the HIV replicative cycle, which is the most frequently encountered approach. Perusal of the literature revealed that most of these promising naturally derived anti-HIV compounds are flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polysaccharides or proteins. It is our strong conviction that the results and experiences with many of the anti-HIV natural products will inspire and motivate even more researchers to look for new leads from plants and other natural sources. PMID:16161055

  16. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  17. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Vitamin B-12

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vitamin B-12 Vitamin B-12 What is vitamin B-12? Vitamin B-12 is an important nutrient that is found naturally ... shellfish, meat, eggs, dairy products, and fortified foods. Vitamin B-12 helps make red blood cells and ...

  19. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jianhui; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Qingqing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12 (b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4bs epitopes.

  20. [Evaluation of the analytic performance of blood collection tubes (BD Vacutainer SST) for the screening of anti-HIV, anti-HTLV, anti-HCV, anti-HBc, anti-CMV antibodies, and of HBs, P24 HIV antigens, and of alanine aminotransferase].

    PubMed

    Gobin, E; Desruelle, J M; Vigier, J P

    2001-02-01

    The Laboratory of Viral Diseases Immunology (Laboratoire d'Immunologie des Maladies Virales) of the Northern Region Blood Bank (Etablissement Français du Sang Nord de France) performs between 180.000 and 200.000 viral blood qualifications per year. The use of a serum gel separator evacuated tube should contribute to improve the quality of the pre-analytical phase. However, it must not impact negatively the analytical performances. We evaluated such tube within our specific environment and with the various reagents used in routine. The open study compared the BD Vacutainer plain tube (7 mL, non siliconised) with the BD Vacutainer SST tube (6 mL siliconised with serum gel separator) against the anti-HIV, anti-HTLV, anti-HCV, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-CMV antibodies, the HBs, HIV P24 antigen and the alanine aminotransferase. The study objectives were to find potential gel interference; to verify the diagnostic sensitivity, reagents specificity, and reproducibility. The results analysis show: equivalent performances with the anti-HIV Ab (Anti HIV 1/2 recombinant--Biotest et Genscreen HIV 1/2--Sanofi), anti HIV WB Ab (New Lav Blot 1--Sanofi), anti-HBs Ab (Enzygnost anti-HBs micro--Behring), anti-HBc Ab (HBc Elisa Test System--Ortho), anti-CMV Ab (Enzygnost anti-CMV IgG + M--Behring) kits; lower performances with: The Vironostika HIV Uni Form II plus 0--Organon kit with a -3.5% signal decrease around the ratio R = 2.7 for positive anti-HIV Ab. The Elisa test System 3 Ag HBs-Ortho kit with an increase of the mean ratio of the negative Ag HBs samples; better performances with: the Vironostika HIV 1 Antigen--Organon kit with a +10% signal increase around the threshold ratio R = 1 for positive Ag HIV samples. This deserves further study to verify that the specificity is maintained. The HTLV Type 1 et 2 EIA--Ortho kit with +8% signal increase around the ratio R = 2 for positive anti-HTLV Ab samples without change of the specificity. The Ortho HCV 3.0 Elisa Test System and

  1. Vitamin B12

    MedlinePlus

    ... body to absorb vitamin B12 from food. First, hydrochloric acid in the stomach separates vitamin B12 from ... Many older adults, who do not have enough hydrochloric acid in their stomach to absorb the vitamin ...

  2. Potential anti-HIV agents from marine resources: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-11-29

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy.

  3. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  4. [Advances in the study on anti-HIV lignan compounds].

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Gao, Li; Guo, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Lignan compounds have a variety of pharmacological activities. The mechanism of anti-HIV lignans is through affecting a particular aspect of HIV replication cycle, thus inhibiting viral replication and infection. Lignan is divided into four categories based on different anti-HIV detection methods. In this paper, we summarize the advance in the study on anti-HIV lignan compounds in last two decades.

  5. [Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)].

    PubMed

    Guilland, Jean-Claude; Aimone-Gastin, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    The term "vitamin B12" refers to four cobalamins (Cbl), including methyl-Cbl and adenosyl-Cbl, the two enzyme co-factors of methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Vitamin B12 deficiency produces clinical disorders that include mainly megaloblastic anaemia, peripheral and central neurological manifestations. The clinical significance of low blood B12 concentrations in the absence of manifestations of deficiency is a matter of debate. The biochemical diagnosis of the subclinical and clinical deficiency of vitamin B12 has been enriched by several parameters, including serum methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, and holo-transcobalamine, which have been evaluated over the past two decades. PMID:24298826

  6. Vitamin B-12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B-12 is a cofactor for 2 enzymes. In the cytoplasm, methionine synthase requires vitamin B-12 in the form of methylcobalamin and catalyzes the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate.This enzyme links the methylation pathway through ...

  7. Vitamin B12

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken along with other B vitamins, such as niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and magnesium. A prescription form ... and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, ...

  8. Vitamin B12 level

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause malabsorption (for example, celiac disease and Crohn disease ) Lack of intrinsic factor , a protein that helps the intestine absorb vitamin B12 Above normal heat production (for example, with ...

  9. Anti-HIV activity of Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sabde, Sudeep; Bodiwala, Hardik S; Karmase, Aniket; Deshpande, Preeti J; Kaur, Amandeep; Ahmed, Nafees; Chauthe, Siddheshwar K; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G; Phadke, Rasika U; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients face great socio-economic difficulties in obtaining treatment. There is an urgent need for new, safe, and cheap anti-HIV agents. Traditional medicinal plants are a valuable source of novel anti-HIV agents and may offer alternatives to expensive medicines in future. Various medicinal plants or plant-derived natural products have shown strong anti-HIV activity and are under various stages of clinical development in different parts of the world. The present study was directed towards assessment of anti-HIV activity of various extracts prepared from Indian medicinal plants. The plants were chosen on the basis of similarity of chemical constituents with reported anti-HIV compounds or on the basis of their traditional usage as immunomodulators. Different extracts were prepared by Soxhlet extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning. Ninety-two extracts were prepared from 23 plants. Anti-HIV activity was measured in a human CD4+ T-cell line, CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Nine extracts of 8 different plants significantly reduced viral production in CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Aegle marmelos, Argemone mexicana, Asparagus racemosus, Coleus forskohlii, and Rubia cordifolia demonstrated promising anti-HIV potential and were investigated for their active principles. PMID:21365365

  10. GACPAT HIV 1 + 2: a simple, inexpensive assay to screen for, and discriminate between, anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2.

    PubMed

    Parry, J V; Connell, J A; Reinbott, P; Garcia, A B; Avillez, F; Mortimer, P P

    1995-01-01

    A simple and cheap assay suitable for screening for anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2 and discriminating between them was evaluated. In it specimens are incubated in U-bottomed microplate wells coated with anti-human IgG for 30 min at room temperature. After washing, 100 microliters of a 1 in 50 dilution of HIV 1-coated gelatin particles (Serodia-HIV 1/2, Fujirebio) are added. Settling patterns are read on the second day: A positive reaction is indicated by adherence of the particles and a negative by a button. The HIV 1 particles are then washed away and HIV 2 particles added. Anti-HIV 2 reaction patterns are read on the third day. To assess the performance of the modified "GACPAT HIV 1 + 2" assay a panel of 1,621 serum/plasma specimens was used. It comprised validated anti-HIV 1 positive (n = 220), anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 214), dual anti-HIV 1/anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 11), and anti-HIV negative (n = 1,176) serum/plasma specimens. All 434 specimens that contained anti-HIV 1 or anti-HIV 2 reacted positively with the homologous particles. The 11 dually positive specimens reacted positively with both HIV 1 and HIV 2 particles. Five (2.3%) anti-HIV 1 and five (2.3%) anti-HIV 2 positive specimens gave positive reactions with both particle types, but none of the five cross-reactive anti-HIV 2 specimens were dually reactive when the order of particle addition was reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. An alternative approach to confirming anti-HIV reactivity: a multi-country collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, J.

    1992-01-01

    The confirmation of positive screening assay reactions for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) by Western blot is expensive and often gives indeterminate results. We therefore carried out a collaborative study to investigate the confirmation of screening assay reactions using a second screening assay. For this purpose, seven laboratories prospectively tested sequential specimens, using at least one additional screening assay, until about 50 confirmed anti-HIV-1-positive specimens had been identified in each test centre. The reactions of 16 assays were analysed in pairs (assay A and assay B), using assay B on specimens reactive in assay A: A+/B+ reactions were considered positive and A-, negative anti-HIV results. These outcomes were compared with those obtained using confirmatory Western blot. In all, 7950 specimens were tested, and 359 were reported as positive by the laboratories. Within the test centres, eight screening assay pairings gave rise to no false-positive or false-negative results, and these combinations were at least as accurate as a single screening assay followed by Western blot. From 6.3% to 8.3% of the Western blot results were indeterminate. The number of specimens examined was too small to justify recommending for general use named pairs of screening assays; the choice of these would, in any case, depend on local conditions. However, individual laboratory managers may wish to investigate the large potential savings to be made by confirming HIV infection using a second screening assay on initially reactive specimens. If the more sensitive screening assay is used first, the sensitivity of this approach may be improved by further investigation of specimens that react as A+B-. PMID:1486672

  12. Selective vitamin B12 malabsorption in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Khakee, Sam; Stachewitsch, Andrew; Katz, Max

    1974-01-01

    Two siblings with megaloblastic anemia responsive to parenteral vitamin B12 were studied to elucidate the cause of the B12 deficiency. Gastric juice from both contained acid and functional intrinsic factor. Serum contained transcobalamin II and lacked antibodies to intrinsic factor. Schilling tests showed vitamin B12 malabsorption uncorrected by hog intrinsic factor or pancreatic extract. Other parameters of small intestinal function were normal. Proteinuria was initially present in both but cleared in one following treatment with B12. These patients with “familial selective vitamin B12 malabsorption” are the first reported from Canada. Only 37 cases have been reported in the world literature to date. PMID:4817548

  13. Targeting anti-HIV drugs to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavitha S; Ghorpade, Anuja; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral drugs over the past couple of decades has been commendable due to the identification of several new targets within the overall Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication cycle. However, complete control over HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is yet to be achieved. This is because the current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. This occurs because most anti-HIV drugs do not accumulate in certain cellular and anatomical reservoirs including the Central Nervous System (CNS). Insufficient delivery of anti-HIV drugs to the CNS is attributed to their low permeability across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Hence, low and sustained viral replication within the CNS continues even during prolonged antiretroviral drug therapy. Therefore, developing novel approaches that are targeted at enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required. In this review, we discussed the potential of nanocarriers and the role of cell-penetrating peptides in enhancing drug delivery to the CNS. Such drug delivery approaches could also lead to higher drug delivery to other cellular and anatomical reservoirs where the virus harbor than with conventional treatment, thus providing an effective therapy to eliminate the virus completely from the body. PMID:19566446

  14. Liposomes as nanocarriers for anti-HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shruti; Venkatesan, Natarajan; Betageri, Guru V

    2013-10-01

    Globally, in the last three decades of medical research, the use of liposomes as carrier for anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is gaining prominence. These potential anti-HIV nanocarriers are concentric lipid bilayers which can be fabricated to protect molecules and to target the drugs to specific sites, which is the reason behind their popularity in the antiretroviral drug delivery. The development of an effective drug delivery system such as liposomes presents an opportunity to circumvent the many challenges associated with antiretroviral drug therapy. The physiochemical properties of liposomes such as size, charge, and lipid composition significantly affect the liposomal efficiency. These nanocarriers offer advantages such as drug loading both in aqueous region and within the bilayer of the vesicles, act as solubilizing agents, protect drug from degradation in the body, allow modification of the pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution patterns of the drug, provide drug targeting, and have low immunogenicity, biocompatibility, and cell specificity. Different types of liposome-based delivery systems, such as cationic, anionic, sterically stabilized, and immunoliposomes, have been studied for the anti-HIV/AIDS drug delivery. Liposomes, however, face challenges with regard to their use in antiretroviral drug delivery such as limited hydrophilic drug-loading capacity, issues related to physical and biologic stability, poor scale-up, cost, short shelf life, and toxicity. Numerous patented strategies have been granted in the USA and around the world related to these anti-HIV nanocarriers. In the present article, we have discussed the general physiological aspects of the HIV infection, relevance of the nanocarrier, liposomes, in the treatment of this disease and some recently awarded US patents and patent applications of these liposomal delivery systems for anti-HIV drugs.

  15. Particle agglutination test "Serodia HIV-1/2" as a novel anti-HIV-1/2 screening test: comparative study on 3311 serum samples.

    PubMed

    Poljak, M; Zener, N; Seme, K; Kristancic, L

    1997-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays are most widely used screening tests for antibodies to human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). Nevertheless, the need of simpler, noninstrumented tests is evident in many parts of the world, where laboratory facilities and trained personnel are limited, and HIV incidence is high. A recently developed variant of gelatin-particle agglutination tests, Serodia HIV-1/2 (Fujirebio Inc., Tokyo, Japan), is one of such simple and noninstrumented tests. To evaluate its utility, 3311 serum samples (281 anti-HIV-1 positive, 8 anti-HIV-2 positive and 3022 anti-HIV-1/2 negative) obtained from 2632 individuals from Slovenia, other parts of former Yugoslavia and Senegal were investigated. No false-negative results and only one false-positive result were obtained during the procedures, giving overall sensitivity and specificity of the particle agglutination test of 100% and 99.97%, respectively. We have concluded that Serodia HIV-1/2 test is highly specific and sensitive for detection of anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies, suitable for small blood banks and for epidemiological surveys.

  16. B12 in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M Reese; Black, Maureen M

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is necessary for development of the fetus and child. Pregnant women who are vegetarian or vegan, have Crohn's or celiac disease, or have undergone gastric bypass surgery are at increased risk of B12 deficiency. Low serum levels of B12 have been linked to negative impacts in cognitive, motor, and growth outcomes. Low cobalamin levels also may be related to depression in adults. Some studies indicate that B12 supplementation may improve outcomes in children, although more research is needed in this area. Overall, the mechanisms of B12 action in development remain unclear. Further studies in this area to elucidate the pathways of cobalamin influence on development, as well as to prevent B12 deficiency in pregnant women and children are indicated.

  17. Synthetic galactomannans with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Bai, Shiming; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Han, Shuqin; Yoshida, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Ring-opening polymerization of a new 1,6-anhydro disaccharide monomer, 1, 6-anhydro-2, 3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-(2', 3', 4', 6'-tetra-O-benzyl-α-d-galactopyranosyl)-α-d-mannopyranose, was carried out using PF5 as a catalyst under high vacuum at -60°C to give galactose branched mannopyranan (synthetic galactomannan), 4-O-α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-d-mannopyranan, after debenzylation with Na in liquid NH3. The ring-opening copolymerization with 1, 6-anhydro-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranose in various feeds was also performed to give synthetic galactomannans with various proportions of galactose branches. After sulfation, sulfated synthetic galactomannans were found to have anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity as high and low as those of standard curdlan and dextran sulfates, respectively, which are potent anti-HIV sulfated polysaccharides with low cytotoxicity. The anti-HIV mechanism of sulfated synthetic galactomannans used by poly-l-lysine as a model peptide of the HIV surface protein was estimated by using SPR, DSL, and zeta potential measurements, revealing the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged amino groups.

  18. Synthetic galactomannans with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Bai, Shiming; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Han, Shuqin; Yoshida, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Ring-opening polymerization of a new 1,6-anhydro disaccharide monomer, 1, 6-anhydro-2, 3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-(2', 3', 4', 6'-tetra-O-benzyl-α-d-galactopyranosyl)-α-d-mannopyranose, was carried out using PF5 as a catalyst under high vacuum at -60°C to give galactose branched mannopyranan (synthetic galactomannan), 4-O-α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-d-mannopyranan, after debenzylation with Na in liquid NH3. The ring-opening copolymerization with 1, 6-anhydro-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranose in various feeds was also performed to give synthetic galactomannans with various proportions of galactose branches. After sulfation, sulfated synthetic galactomannans were found to have anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity as high and low as those of standard curdlan and dextran sulfates, respectively, which are potent anti-HIV sulfated polysaccharides with low cytotoxicity. The anti-HIV mechanism of sulfated synthetic galactomannans used by poly-l-lysine as a model peptide of the HIV surface protein was estimated by using SPR, DSL, and zeta potential measurements, revealing the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged amino groups. PMID:26076622

  19. Bioavailability of vitamin B12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in people of all ages who consume a low intake of animal-source foods, including populations in developing countries. It is also prevalent among the elderly, even in wealthier countries, due to their malabsorption of B12 from food. Several methods have been applied t...

  20. Marine natural products with anti-HIV activities in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Liu, Juan; Yang, Bin; Lin, Xiuping; Yang, Xian-Wen; Liu, Yonghong

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms have been proven to be excellent sources of biologically active compounds against HIV. This review gives an overview of 132 natural products from marine sources obtained during the last decade (2002-2011), which exhibit anti-HIV activity toward different biological targets. Sponges contribute more than half of all anti-HIV natural products from marine organisms, mainly as alkaloids and cyclic depsipeptides. In addition, some macromolecules are considered as potential anti-HIV agents, including lectins from algae and marine invertebrates, as well as sulfated polysaccharides from algae. In the reviewed marine natural products, many active ingredients act as HIV entry inhibitors, one class of new anti-HIV agents, and may be regarded as potential candidates for the development of novel anti-HIV agents. The other features of development in the marine original anti-HIV natural products in this ten years are also discussed.

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish tapeworm, or other problems ... may no longer be needed after Crohn disease, celiac disease, or alcohol use is properly treated. Your provider ...

  2. Quinobene, a new potent anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Gruszecka-Kowalik, E; Haugwitz, R D; Zalkow, L H

    1992-09-30

    A simple synthesis of the sulfonated azo dye Quinobene (3) and its derivatives, as well as the results of their evaluation in anti-HIV screening have been described. Thus, reacting the diazonium salt of 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid yielded the readily isolable title compound. The lithium and tetramethylammonium salts of Quinobene and its complexes with Cu(II), Zn(II), Mg(II) were also prepared. In vitro tests showed considerable activity of these compounds against HIV-1.

  3. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed. PMID:15980096

  4. Anti HIV-1 flavonoid glycosides from Ochna integerrima.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Vichai; Ningnuek, Niwat; Pohmakotr, Manat; Yoosook, Chalobon; Napaswad, Chanita; Kasisit, Jitra; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2007-06-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the anti-HIV-1 active EtOAc extract from leaves and twigs of Ochna integerrima led to the isolation of five new flavonoid glycosides 1 - 5, five known flavonoids 6 - 10, and two known flavonoid glycosides 11 and 12. Structures were determined based on spectroscopic analyses. 6- gamma, gamma-Dimethylallyldihydrokaempferol 7- O- beta-D-glucoside (1), 6-gamma, gamma-dimethylallylquercetin 7- O- beta- D-glucoside (3), 6-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)taxifolin 7- O- beta-D-glucoside (4), 6-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)quercetin 7- O-beta-D-glucoside (5), and 6-gamma, gamma-dimethylallyltaxifolin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside (11) showed anti-HIV-1 activities in the syncytium assay using the (Delta Tat/rev)MC99 virus and the 1A2 cell line system with EC(50) values ranging from 14.0 - 102.4 microg/mL. Furthermore, ochnaflavone 7''-O-methyl ether (7) and 2'', 3''-dihydroochnaflavone 7''-O-methyl ether (8) were very active; they exerted activities in the syncytium assay with EC(50) values of 2.0 and 0.9 microg/mL, respectively, and likewise inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with IC(50) values of 2.0 and 2.4 microg/mL, respectively.

  5. Nanomedicine in the development of anti-HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José; Nunes, Rute; Rodrigues, Francisca; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Prevention plays an invaluable role in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The use of microbicides is considered an interesting potential approach for topical pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV sexual transmission. The prospects of having an effective product available are expected to be fulfilled in the near future as driven by recent and forthcoming results of clinical trials. Different dosage forms and delivery strategies have been proposed and tested for multiple microbicide drug candidates presently at different stages of the development pipeline. One particularly interesting approach comprises the application of nanomedicine principles to the development of novel anti-HIV microbicides, but its implications to efficacy and safety are not yet fully understood. Nanotechnology-based systems, either presenting inherent anti-HIV activity or acting as drug nanocarriers, may significantly influence features such as drug solubility, stability of active payloads, drug release, interactions between active moieties and virus/cells, intracellular drug delivery, drug targeting, safety, antiviral activity, mucoadhesive behavior, drug distribution and tissue penetration, and pharmacokinetics. The present manuscript provides a comprehensive and holistic overview of these topics as relevant to the development of vaginal and rectal microbicides. In particular, recent advances pertaining inherently active microbicide nanosystems and microbicide drug nanocarriers are discussed.

  6. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  7. Comparison of three quantification methods for the TZM-bl pseudovirus assay for screening of anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Xing, Liying; Wang, Shunyi; Hu, Qin; Li, Jingtao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The TZM-bl pseudovirus assay is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies and small molecular inhibitors in HIV-1 research. Here, to determine the optimal measurement method for screening anti-HIV-1 inhibitors, we compared three measurement methods based on firefly luciferase and β-galactosidase activities. The 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the pseudoviruses were determined using the luciferase, β-galactosidase colorimetric, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining assays. Three commercial reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (azidothymidine, nevirapine, and lamivudine) were tested as reference drugs to compare the reproducibility, linear correlation, and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values determined using these methods. In the TCID50 assay, the sensitivity of β-galactosidase colorimetric assay was almost 562 times lower than that of the other two methods. Reproducible dose-response curves were obtained for the inhibitors with all methods; the IC50 values of the inhibitors were not significantly different. Linear regression analysis showed linear correlation between methods. Compared to the β-galactosidase colorimetric assay, the other two methods have the advantage of high sensitivity and are less affected by interference. In conclusion, the luciferase and X-gal staining assays, which can be applied either alone or combined, are recommended for anti-HIV-1 inhibitor screening. PMID:27016178

  8. Holotranscobalamins in B12 and non B12 requiring prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Baker, H; de Angelis, B; Khalil, M; Frank, O; Baker, E R

    1996-04-01

    Transcobalamins, vitamin B12 binding proteins, deliver B12 to cell surface receptors which then permit B12 to cross cell membranes for metabolic use. There is little documentation concerning B12 binding proteins in bacteria and protists. We found that prokaryotes and eukaryotes requiring B12, as well as those protists synthesizing B12, also produce several transcobalamins for functionally transporting B12 similar to humans.

  9. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies. PMID:25333699

  10. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  11. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive brief, about 2 sec, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. PMID:22226641

  12. Investigating the psychosocial impact of anti-HIV combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Solts, B; Burns, J

    2002-12-01

    Developments in anti-HIV medication have meant that people with HIV/AIDS are now living longer, with some authors arguing that HIV should now be defined as a manageable rather than terminal illness. However uncertainty about the long-term efficacy of such treatments remains. This research aimed to examine the psychosocial impact of the new treatments and to explore whether, and in what ways, they affect psychological wellbeing. Clients were also asked about their use of services and whether they thought services should be changing in response to new pharmacological treatments. A semi-structured interview schedule was developed to elicit the views of six service users. From multiple readings of the qualitative data generated, prominent themes were identified suggesting that participants had ambivalent feelings about taking antiretroviral combination therapy and that being well with HIV raised a number of difficult issues. Four main themes were revealed: (1) disruptions in daily living: antiretrovirals as intrusions to life, (2) the tablets as a visible marker for HIV infection, (3) tempered optimism and increasing horizons, (4) an uncertain and fragile future: life without benefits and services. The results were discussed in terms of limitations of the current study and suggestions for further research.

  13. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  14. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised.

  15. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised. PMID:17959839

  16. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  17. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  18. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  19. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  20. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  1. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  2. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  4. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  5. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  6. Anti-HIV screening for cell-penetrating peptides using chloroquine and identification of anti-HIV peptides derived from matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Ohashi, Nami; Nomura, Wataru; Komoriya, Mao; Hashimoto, Chie; Yamamoto, Naoki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2015-08-01

    Previously, compounds which inhibit the HIV-1 replication cycle were found in overlapping peptide libraries covering the whole sequence of an HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein constructed with the addition of an octa-arginyl group. The two top lead compounds are sequential fragments MA-8L and MA-9L. In the present study, the addition of chloroquine in cell-based anti-HIV assays was proven to be an efficient method with which to find anti-HIV compounds among several peptides conjugated by cell-penetrating signals such as an octa-arginyl group: the conjugation of an octa-arginyl group to individual peptides contained in whole proteins in combination with the addition of chloroquine in cells is a useful assay method to search active peptides. To find more potent fragment peptides, individual peptides between MA-8L and MA-9L, having the same peptide chain length but with sequences shifted by one amino acid residue, were synthesized in this paper and their anti-HIV activity was evaluated with an anti-HIV assay using chloroquine. As a result, the peptides in the C-terminal side of the series, which are relatively close to MA-9L, showed more potent inhibitory activity against both X4-HIV-1 and R5-HIV-1 than the peptides in the N-terminal side.

  7. The EGG 57-CO B-12 absorption test, in the evaluation of patients with low serum B-12

    SciTech Connect

    Sinow, R.M.; Carmel, R.; Siegel, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The Schilling Test (ST) is the standard test for diagnosing vitamin B-12 malabsorption (MA). However, patients with subtle gastric dysfunction may have normal ST, but impaired absorption of B-12 given with food. The authors have adapted an Egg B-12 Absorption Test (EBAT) in which 57-Co cyanocobalamin (57-Co B-12) is mixed with scrambled egg to evaluate this phenomenon in patients with low serum B-12, normal ST and possible subtle MA. Lyophilized egg yolk is reconstituted and mixed with 57-Co- B-12 of equal dose to that of ST. The authors studied 46 individuals: 13 controls, 5 patients with known pernicious anemia (PA), in addition to 28 patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST. ST/EBAT ratios were calculated. Twenty-eight test patients excreted 13.3% on ST and 3.5% on EBAT. Mean ST/EBAT ratio was 8.2 (1.4-35.9). Five had EBAT results in the PA range (<1%) and ST/EBAT ratios (14.4-35.9) that were significantly elevated. This group is also evaluated with pepsinogen I/II ratios, gastric analysis, deoxyuridine suppression tests, anti intrinsic factor, and antiparietal cell antibodies. The authors' results indicate that the EBAT can differentiate between PA and non PA patients, and that some patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST may, in fact, have subtle MA. The EBAT, combined with ST/EBAT ratio, may provide a means for identifying this group of patients.

  8. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  9. Preparation and characterization of anti-HIV nanodrug targeted to microfold cell of gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Ding, Hong; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea D; Atluri, Venkata; Yndart, Adriana; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Batrakova, Elena; Agudelo, Marisela; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) still remains one of the leading life-threatening diseases in the world. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced disease morbidity and mortality. However, most of the drugs have variable penetrance into viral reservoir sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Being the largest lymphoid organ, GALT plays a key role in early HIV infection and host–pathogen interaction. Many different treatment options have been proposed to eradicate the virus from GALT. However, it becomes difficult to deliver traditional drugs to the GALT because of its complex physiology. In this regard, we developed a polymer-based Pluronic nanocarrier containing anti-HIV drug called efavirenz (EFV) targeting Microfold cells (M-cells) in the GALT. M-cells are specialized epithelial cells that are predominantly present in the GALT. In this work, we have exploited this paracellular transport property of M-cells for targeted delivery of Pluronic nanocarrier tagged EFV, bioconjugated with anti-M-cell-specific antibodies to the GALT (nanodrug). Preliminary characterization showed that the nanodrug (EFV-F12-COOH) is of 140 nm size with 0.3 polydispersion index, and the zeta potential of the particles was −19.38±2.2 mV. Further, drug dissolution study has shown a significantly improved sustained release over free drugs. Binding potential of nanodrug with M-cell was also confirmed with fluorescence microscopy and in vitro uptake and release studies. The anti-HIV activity of the nanodrug was also significantly higher compared to that of free drug. This novel formulation was able to show sustained release of EFV and inhibit the HIV-1 infection in the GALT compared to the free drug. The present study has potential for our in vivo targeted nanodrug delivery system by combining traditional enteric-coated capsule technique via oral administration. PMID:26425084

  10. Preparation and characterization of anti-HIV nanodrug targeted to microfold cell of gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Roy, Upal; Ding, Hong; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea D; Atluri, Venkata; Yndart, Adriana; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Batrakova, Elena; Agudelo, Marisela; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) still remains one of the leading life-threatening diseases in the world. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced disease morbidity and mortality. However, most of the drugs have variable penetrance into viral reservoir sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Being the largest lymphoid organ, GALT plays a key role in early HIV infection and host-pathogen interaction. Many different treatment options have been proposed to eradicate the virus from GALT. However, it becomes difficult to deliver traditional drugs to the GALT because of its complex physiology. In this regard, we developed a polymer-based Pluronic nanocarrier containing anti-HIV drug called efavirenz (EFV) targeting Microfold cells (M-cells) in the GALT. M-cells are specialized epithelial cells that are predominantly present in the GALT. In this work, we have exploited this paracellular transport property of M-cells for targeted delivery of Pluronic nanocarrier tagged EFV, bioconjugated with anti-M-cell-specific antibodies to the GALT (nanodrug). Preliminary characterization showed that the nanodrug (EFV-F12-COOH) is of 140 nm size with 0.3 polydispersion index, and the zeta potential of the particles was -19.38±2.2 mV. Further, drug dissolution study has shown a significantly improved sustained release over free drugs. Binding potential of nanodrug with M-cell was also confirmed with fluorescence microscopy and in vitro uptake and release studies. The anti-HIV activity of the nanodrug was also significantly higher compared to that of free drug. This novel formulation was able to show sustained release of EFV and inhibit the HIV-1 infection in the GALT compared to the free drug. The present study has potential for our in vivo targeted nanodrug delivery system by combining traditional enteric-coated capsule technique via oral administration.

  11. Clinical chemistry of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Davis, R E

    1985-01-01

    This monograph on the clinical chemistry of vitamin B12 reviews the literature on daily requirements, methods for measurement, the effects of drugs on vitamin B12 metabolism absorption, pregnancy, clinical conditions associated with vitamin B12 deficiency, errors of metabolism, and reactions to vitamin therapy. Although only very small quantities of vitamin B12 are required to satisfy the daily requirement, a sufficient supply is stored in the liver to meet normal requirements for at least a 3-year period. A number of drugs are known to affect the absorption of vitamin B12, including neomycin, potassium chloride, p-aminosalicylic acid, and colchicine. Significantly reduced serum concentrations of vitamin B12 have been noted in users of oral contraceptives (OCs), although concentrations still remain within the limits of normal. It appears that the vitamin B12 level in OC users reestablishes itself at a different and somewhat lower level. Vitamin B12 binding protein appears to remain unchanged. A vitamin B12 deficiency is unusual in pregnant women who consume a normal, varied diet. On the other hand, lactating women whose diets are low in animal protein and dairy products may have problems providing enough vitamin B12 to meet their own and their infant's needs; supplementary oral vitamins should be considered.

  12. A rationally engineered anti-HIV peptide fusion inhibitor with greatly reduced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Frances; Schmidt, Kerstin; Zahn, Roland C; Richter, Cornelia; Radeke, Heinfried H; Schmitz, Jörn E; von Laer, Dorothee; Egerer, Lisa

    2013-02-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 (HR2) region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very efficient HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. We previously developed innovative gene therapeutic approaches aiming at the direct in vivo production of C peptides from genetically modified host cells and found that T cells expressing membrane-anchored or secreted C peptides are protected from HIV-1 infection. However, an unwanted immune response against such antiviral peptides may significantly impair clinical efficacy and pose safety risks to patients. To overcome this problem, we engineered a novel C peptide, V2o, with greatly reduced immunogenicity and excellent antiviral activity. V2o is based on the chimeric C peptide C46-EHO, which is derived from the HR2 regions of HIV-2(EHO) and HIV-1(HxB2) and has broad anti-HIV and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus activity. Antibody and major histocompatibility complex class I epitopes within the C46-EHO peptide sequence were identified by in silico and in vitro analyses. Using rational design, we removed these epitopes by amino acid substitutions and thus minimized antigenicity and immunogenicity considerably. At the same time, the antiviral activity of the deimmunized peptide V2o was preserved or even enhanced compared to that of the parental C46-EHO peptide. Thus, V2o is an ideal candidate, especially for those novel therapeutic approaches for HIV infection that involve direct in vivo production of antiviral C peptides. PMID:23147734

  13. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds.

  14. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  15. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a tripodal receptor that recognizes mannose oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Carrero, Paula; Casanova, Elena; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Madrona, Andrés; Quesada, Ernesto; Peréz-Pérez, María Jesús; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María José; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp120 of the HIV-1 viral envelope has a high content in mannose residues, particularly α-1,2-mannose oligomers. Compounds that interact with these high-mannose type glycans may disturb the interaction between gp120 and its (co)receptors and are considered potential anti-HIV agents. Previously, we demonstrated that a tripodal receptor (1), with a central scaffold of 1,3,5-triethylbenzene substituted with three 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoyl groups, selectively recognizes α-1,2-mannose polysaccharides. Here we present additional studies to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity and the mechanism of antiviral activity of this compound. Our studies indicate that 1 shows anti-HIV-1 activity in the low micromolar range and has pronounced gp120 binding and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory capacity. However, gp120 binding rather than integrase inhibition seems to be the primary mechanism of antiviral activity of 1. PMID:26540494

  16. Novel anti-HIV peptides containing multiple copies of artificially designed heptad repeat motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Weiguo; Qi Zhi; Pan Chungen; Xue Na; Debnath, Asim K.; Qie Jiankun; Jiang Shibo Liu Keliang

    2008-10-03

    The peptidic anti-HIV drug T20 (Fuzeon) and its analog C34 share a common heptad repeat (HR) sequence, but they have different functional domains, i.e., pocket- and lipid-binding domains (PBD and LBD, respectively). We hypothesize that novel anti-HIV peptides may be designed by using artificial sequences containing multiple copies of HR motifs plus zero, one or two functional domains. Surprisingly, we found that the peptides containing only the non-natural HR sequences could significantly inhibit HIV-1 infection, while addition of PBD and/or LBD to the peptides resulted in significant improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. These results suggest that these artificial HR sequences, which may serve as structural domains, could be used as templates for the design of novel antiviral peptides against HIV and other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  17. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:26472515

  18. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  19. [Therapy of hyperhomocysteinemia with vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Blazícek, P; Sebeková, K; Valachovicová, M

    2002-11-01

    Prevalence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in vegetarians and vegans is a consequence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical study of homocysteine reduction by vitamin B12 consisted of subjective healthy adults on alternative nutrition (n = 9) with vitamin B12 deficiency and with mild hyperhomocysteinemia. Vitamin B12 treatment was implemented by 5 intramuscular cyanocobalamin injections of a total content of 2200 micrograms during two weeks. Homocysteine level was significantly reduced (from 22 mumol/l to 11.7 mumol/l; individual reduction 29-55%). Vitamin B12 concentration in blood was significantly increased (from 152 pmol/l to 277 pmol/l; individual % of increase 63-150). The results show a high effect of vitamin B12 treatment in homocysteine value reduction of subjects on alternative nutrition.

  20. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IgA antibody in breast milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Duprat, C; Mohammed, Z; Datta, P; Stackiw, W; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K; Holmes, K K; Plummer, F A; Embree, J E

    1994-07-01

    Breast-feeding plays a potentially significant role in mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The additional transmission risk attributable to breast-feeding and the factors that enhance or inhibit transmission are presently unknown. One mechanism by which breast milk might inhibit HIV-1 transmission is the presence of specific antibodies directed against HIV-1 in breast milk of seropositive mothers. In this study serum and breast milk samples from women in Nairobi, Kenya, were tested to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 IgA antibodies. A Western blot test developed in our laboratory was used to detect anti-HIV-1 immunoglobulin A in serum and anti-HIV-1 secretory IgA (sIgA) in breast milk. Ninety-four percent of 63 HIV-1 seropositive women had anti-HIV-1 IgA in serum and 59% had anti-HIV-1 sIgA in their breast milk. No significant associations with maternal characteristics or serum anti-HIV-1 IgA or IgG banding patterns and the presence of anti-HIV-1 sIgA in breast milk were found. No protective effect of anti-HIV-1 sIgA was seen regarding mother to child transmission; however, further studies are necessary to determine the effect of these antibodies in maternal sera or in breast milk on the efficacy of HIV-1 transmission.

  2. Serum vitamin B12 in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, D. M.; Beckett, A. Gordon; Maxwell, Patricia

    1962-01-01

    The serum vitamin B12 level was abnormally high in 14 out of 32 cases of renal failure. This was probably due to impaired excretion of the vitamin, but the results of measurements of the rate of excretion of radioactive vitamin B12 did not provide unequivocal evidence on this point; other possible explanations are discussed. Renal failure must be added to the causes of high serum B12 levels. PMID:13933867

  3. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency: the great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Dobrozsi, Sarah; Flood, Veronica H; Panepinto, Julie; Scott, J Paul; Brandow, Amanda

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare in children, with nonspecific symptoms including failure to thrive, vomiting, anorexia, and neurologic changes with or without hematologic disturbances. The neuropathy can be severe and irreversible. We report four cases of children with B12 deficiency secondary to adult type pernicious anemia, a presumed transport protein abnormality, and a metabolic defect. All demonstrated neurologic compromise that improved after initiation of B12 therapy. Hematologic manifestations may be preceded by constitutional, gastrointestinal, or neurologic changes, and must raise concern for B12 deficiency. Therapy should be initiated promptly in this setting to prevent irreversible neuropathy. PMID:24115632

  5. Synthesis and Anti-HIV Activity of Novel 4'-Trifluoromethylated 5'-Deoxycarbocyclic Nucleoside Phosphonic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jee, Jun-Pil; Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthetic route to novel 4'-trifluoromethylated 5'-deoxycarbocyclic nucleoside phosphonic acids was described from α-trifluoromethyl-α,β-unsaturated ester. Coupling of purine nucleosidic bases with cyclopentanol using a Mitsunobu reaction gave the nucleoside intermediates which were further phosphonated and hydrolyzed to reach desired nucleoside analogs. Synthesized nucleoside analogs were tested for anti-HIV activity as well as cytotoxicity. Adenine analog 22 shows significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 = 8.3 μM) up to 100 μM.

  6. [Investigation of HHV-8 prevalence in anti-HIV-1 positive patients in Istanbul, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Karlı, Bahar; Onel, Mustafa; Eraksoy, Haluk; Ağaçfidan, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infections are associated with Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), Multiple Castleman disease and primary effusion lymphoma, and particularly important in HIV/AIDS and transplantation patients. The aim of this prospective study was to detect HHV-8 prevalence in HIV-1-infected patients,in a Turkish population. A total of 85 anti-HIV-1 positive patients (53 male, 32 female; age range: 1-70 years) diagnosed at Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Department were included in the study. In 45 (53%) of the patients HIV-RNA was detectable and viral loads were between 20-10.000.000 copies/ml. HHV-8-specific IgG antibodies were screened by using a commercial ELISA kit (Advanced Biotechnologies Inc, USA), and the presence of HHV-8 nucleic acids were investigated by PCR (Roche Diagnostics, Germany) in the blood samples obtained from patients. HHV-8 IgG was detected in 28.2% (24/85) of the anti-HIV-1 positive patients, and HHV-8 DNA was detected in 3.5% (3/85). One of the three HHV-8 DNA positive cases was seropositive as well. Twenty-five percent of the seropositive patients were female (6/24) and 75% were male (18/24). Of three HHV-8 DNA positive cases, two were male and one was female. The distribution of HHV-8 seropositivity rates according to the age groups were as follows; 1/3 for 1-10 years, 1/2 for 11-20 years, 3/8 for 21-30 years, 7/27 for 31-40 years, 9/30 for 41-50 years, 1/9 for 51-60 years, and 2/6 for 61-70 years. The highest seropositivity rate was detected in 41-50 age group (9/24, 37.5%), followed by 31-40 age group (7/24, 29.2%), presenting statistically significant differences between the other age groups (p< 0.05). HHV-8 DNA was detected in only 1 (4.2%) out of 24 IgG seropositive patients. HIV viral loads of the two HHV-8 seronegative patients whose HHV-8 DNA levels of < 500 copy/ml, were < 20 copy/ml and 1250 copy/ml, respectively. HIV-RNA load of the other patient with HHV-8 IgG positivity and 2240

  7. Reversible myelopathy with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Senol, M G; Sonmez, G; Ozdag, F; Saracoglu, M

    2008-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes haematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological diseases. Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord, characterised by degeneration of the lateral and posterior columns, is often found due to vitamin B12 deficiency. We report SCD occurring in a 57-year-old man who presented with a 2.5-month history of gradually progressing tingling in the fingers and toes and neck ache. Laboratory data revealed vitamin B12 deficiency and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spinal cord demonstrated abnormal hyperintense signal changes on T2-weighted imaging of the posterior columns. In our case, follow-up MR imaging findings correlated well with clinical outcome after treatment with vitamin B12 supplements. Neurological symptoms in vitamin B12 deficiency are frequent. Early spinal MR imaging assists in the early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  8. Introduction of germline residues improves the stability of anti-HIV mAb 2G12-IgM

    PubMed Central

    Chromikova, Veronika; Mader, Alexander; Hofbauer, Stefan; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias; Gach, Johannes S.; Bauernfried, Stefan; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Forthal, Donald N.; Mach, Lukas; Obinger, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins M (IgMs) are gaining increasing attention as biopharmaceuticals since their multivalent mode of binding can give rise to high avidity. Furthermore, IgMs are potent activators of the complement system. However, they are frequently difficult to express recombinantly and can suffer from low conformational stability. Here, the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 was class-switched to IgM and then further engineered by introduction of 17 germline residues. The impact of these changes on the structure and conformational stability of the antibody was then assessed using a range of biophysical techniques. We also investigated the effects of the class switch and germline substitutions on the ligand-binding properties of 2G12 and its capacity for HIV-1 neutralization. Our results demonstrate that the introduced germline residues improve the conformational and thermal stability of 2G12-IgM without altering its overall shape and ligand-binding properties. Interestingly, the engineered protein was found to exhibit much lower neutralization potency than its wild-type counterpart, indicating that potent antigen recognition is not solely responsible for IgM-mediated HIV-1 inactivation. PMID:25748881

  9. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids. PMID:25176328

  10. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  11. Plant-derived triterpenoids and analogues as antitumor and anti-HIV agents†

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Reen-Yen; Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the antitumor and anti-HIV activities of naturally occurring triterpenoids, including the lupane, ursane, oleanane, lanostane, dammarane, and miscellaneous scaffolds. Structure–activity relationships of selected natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives are also discussed. PMID:19779642

  12. Assay for vitamin B12 absorption and method of making labeled vitamin B12

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Peter J.; Dueker, Stephen; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Roth, John; Carkeet, Colleen; Buchholz,; Bruce A.

    2012-06-19

    The invention provides methods for labeling vitamin B12 with .sup.14C, .sup.13C, tritium, and deuterium. When radioisotopes are used, the invention provides for methods of labeling B12 with high specific activity. The invention also provides labeled vitamin B12 compositions made in accordance with the invention.

  13. Crystal structure of a 3B3 variant - A broadly neutralizing HIV-1 scFv antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K. Reed; Walsh, Scott T.R.

    2009-12-10

    We present the crystal structure determination of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 single-chain variable fragment antibody variant, 3B3, at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. This 3B3 variant was derived from the b12 antibody, using phage display and site-directed mutagenesis of the variable heavy chain (V{sub H}) complementary-determining regions (CDRs). 3B3 exhibits enhanced binding affinity and neutralization activity against several cross-clade primary isolates of HIV-1 by interaction with the recessed CD4-binding site on the gp120 envelope protein. Comparison with the structures of the unbound and bound forms of b12, the 3B3 structure closely resembles these structures with minimal differences with two notable exceptions. First, there is a reorientation of the CDR-H3 of the V{sub H} domain where the primary sequences evolved from b12 to 3B3. The structural changes in CDR-H3 of 3B3, in light of the b12-gp120 complex structure, allow for positioning an additional Trp side chain in the binding interface with gp120. Finally, the second region of structural change involves two peptide bond flips in CDR-L3 of the variable light (VL) domain triggered by a point mutation in CDR-H3 of Q100eY resulting in changes in the intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterning between the VL and VH domains. Thus, the enhanced binding affinities and neutralization capabilities of 3B3 relative to b12 probably result from higher hydrophobic driving potential by burying more aromatic residues at the 3B3-gp120 interface and by indirect stabilization of intramolecular contacts of the core framework residues between the VL and VH domains possibly through more favorable entropic effect through the expulsion of water.

  14. [Psychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report].

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Mary, S; Brazo, P; Dollfus, S

    2003-01-01

    Psychiatric manifestations are frequently associated with pernicious anemia including depression, mania, psychosis, dementia. We report a case of a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency, who has presented severe depression with delusion and Capgras' syndrome, delusion with lability of mood and hypomania successively, during a period of two Months. Case report - Mme V., a 64-Year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of confusion. She had no history of psychiatric problems. She had history of diabetes, hypertension and femoral prosthesis. The red blood count revealed a normocytosis with anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl). At admission she was uncooperative, disoriented in time and presented memory and attention impairment and sleep disorders. She seemed sad and older than her real age. Facial expression and spontaneous movements were reduced, her speech and movements were very slow. She had depressed mood, guilt complex, incurability and devaluation impressions. She had a Capgras' syndrome and delusion of persecution. Her neurologic examination, cerebral scanner and EEG were postponed because of uncooperation. Further investigations confirmed anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl) and revealed vitamin B12 deficiency (52 pmol/l) and normal folate level. Antibodies to parietal cells were positive in the serum and antibodies to intrinsic factor were negative. An iron deficiency was associated (serum iron=7 micromol/l; serum ferritin concentration=24 mg/l; serum transferrin concentration=3,16 g/l). This association explained normocytocis anemia. Thyroid function, hepatic and renal tests, glycemia, TP, TCA, VS, VDRL-TPHA were normal. Vitamin B12 replacement therapy was started with hydroxycobalamin 1 000 ng/day im for 10 days and iron replacement therapy. Her mental state improved dramatically within a few days. After one week of treatment the only remaining symptoms were lability of mood, delusion of persecution, Capgras' syndrome but disappeared totally 9 days after the

  15. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions.

  16. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:27633104

  17. The Low-Cost Compound Lignosulfonic Acid (LA) Exhibits Broad-Spectrum Anti-HIV and Anti-HSV Activity and Has Potential for Microbicidal Applications

    PubMed Central

    D’huys, Thomas; Petrova, Mariya I.; Lebeer, Sarah; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; Schols, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lignosulfonic acid (LA), a low-cost lignin-derived polyanionic macromolecule, was extensively studied for its anti-HIV and anti-HSV activity in various cellular assays, its mechanism of viral inhibition and safety profile as potential microbicide. Results LA demonstrated potent inhibitory activity of HIV replication against a wide range of R5 and X4 HIV strains and prevented the uptake of HIV by bystander CD4+ T cells from persistently infected T cells in vitro (IC50: 0.07 – 0.34 μM). LA also inhibited HSV-2 replication in vitro in different cell types (IC50: 0.42 – 1.1 μM) and in rodents in vivo. Furthermore, LA neutralized the HIV-1 and HSV-2 DC-SIGN-mediated viral transfer to CD4+ T cells (IC50: ∼1 μM). In addition, dual HIV-1/HSV-2 infection in T cells was potently blocked by LA (IC50: 0.71 μM). No antiviral activity was observed against the non-enveloped viruses Coxsackie type B4 and Reovirus type 1. LA is defined as a HIV entry inhibitor since it interfered with gp120 binding to the cell surface of T cells. Pretreatment of PBMCs with LA neither increased expression levels of cellular activation markers (CD69, CD25 and HLA-DR), nor enhanced HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, we found that LA had non-antagonistic effects with acyclovir, PRO2000 or LabyA1 (combination index (CI): 0.46 – 1.03) in its anti-HSV-2 activity and synergized with tenofovir (CI: 0.59) in its anti-HIV-1 activity. To identify mechanisms of LA resistance, we generated in vitro a mutant HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus, which acquired seven mutations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: S160N, V170N, Q280H and R389T in gp120 and K77Q, N113D and H132Y in gp41. Additionally, HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus showed cross-resistance with feglymycin, enfuvirtide, PRO2000 and mAb b12, four well-described HIV binding/fusion inhibitors. Importantly, LA did not affect the growth of vaginal Lactobacilli strains. Conclusion Overall, these data highlight LA as a potential and unique low

  18. Short communication: Anti-HIV-1 envelope immunoglobulin Gs in blood and cervicovaginal samples of Beninese commercial sex workers.

    PubMed

    Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Alary, Michel; Guédou, Fernand; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Poudrier, Johanne; Finzi, Andrés; Roger, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of the immune correlates of protection against HIV infection is crucial for the development of preventive strategies. This study examined HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins, specifically immunoglobulin G (IgG), in systemic and mucosal compartments of female Beninese commercial sex workers (CSWs). Samples of 23 HIV-1-positive and 20 highly exposed HIV-1-seronegative (HESN) CSWs were studied. HIV-1 Env-specific IgG detection in sera and cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from the study population was done by cell-based ELISA. The HIV neutralizing activity was evaluated with a neutralization assay. The HIV-1-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response of the cohort was measured with a FACS-based assay evaluating the ADCC-mediated elimination of gp120-coated target cells. No anti-HIV-1 Env-specific IgG neutralizing or ADCC activities were detected in samples from HESN CSWs. Samples from HIV-1-infected CSWs presented ADCC activity in both sera and CVLs. Anti-Env IgG from sera and CVLs from HIV-1-infected CSWs preferentially recognized Env in its CD4-bound conformation. HIV-1-infected CSWs have ADCC-mediating IgG that preferentially recognizes Env in its CD4-bound conformation at the mucosal site.

  19. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Elafin Is More Potent than Its Precursor's, Trappin-2, in Genital Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drannik, Anna G.; Nag, Kakon; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Henrick, Bethany M.; Jain, Sumiti; Ball, T. Blake; Plummer, Francis A.; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) is a natural source of anti-HIV-1 factors; however, molecular characterization of the anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that CVLs from HIV-1-resistant (HIV-R) compared to HIV-1-susceptible (HIV-S) commercial sex workers (CSWs) contain significantly larger amounts of serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr) and its processed form, elafin (E). We assessed anti-HIV-1 activity of CVLs of CSWs and recombinant E and Tr on genital epithelial cells (ECs) that possess (TZM-bl) or lack (HEC-1A) canonical HIV-1 receptors. Our results showed that immunodepletion of 30% of Tr/E from CVL accounted for up to 60% of total anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL. Knockdown of endogenous Tr/E in HEC-1A cells resulted in significantly increased shedding of infectious R5 and X4 HIV-1. Pretreatment of R5, but not X4 HIV-1, with either Tr or E led to inhibition of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. Interestingly, when either HIV-1 or cells lacking canonical HIV-1 receptors were pretreated with Tr or E, HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis were significantly reduced, and decreased attachment was not associated with altered expression of syndecan-1 or CXCR4. Determination of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of Tr and E anti-HIV-1 activity indicated that E is ∼130 times more potent than its precursor, Tr, despite their equipotent antiprotease activities. This study provides the first experimental evidence that (i) Tr and E are among the principal anti-HIV-1 molecules of CVL; (ii) Tr and E affect cell attachment and transcytosis of HIV-1; (iii) E is more efficient than Tr regarding anti-HIV-1 activity; and (iv) the anti-HIV-1 effect of Tr and E is contextual. PMID:22345469

  20. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell–cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  1. From docking false-positive to active anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Bailey, Christopher M; Domaoal, Robert A; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2007-11-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70 000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area postprocessing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Although known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential "near-miss" with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to efficiently evolve a false positive into a true active. PMID:17918923

  2. Dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2005-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA segments that serve as ligand-responsive genetic control elements. They modulate the expression of certain genes in response to changing concentrations of metabolites. In this paper, we study the dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch in E. coli—perhaps the most widely studied and best known of all riboswitches—through a mathematical model of its regulatory pathway. To carry this out, we simulate dynamic experiments in which the bacterial B12 uptake capacity is measured after being depleted of this vitamin for a long time. The results of these simulations compare favourably with reported experimental data. The model also predicts that an overshoot of intracellular B12 should be observed if the replenishment experiments were to be carried out for longer times. This behaviour is discussed in terms of a possible evolutionary advantage for E. coli, together with the fact that regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels is almost equivalent dynamically.

  3. Synthesis of the anti-HIV agent (-)-hyperolactone C by using oxonium ylide formation-rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, David M; Man, Stanislav

    2011-08-22

    Starting from readily available (S)-styrene oxide an asymmetric synthesis is described of the naturally occurring anti-HIV spirolactone (-)-hyperolactone C, which possesses adjacent fully substituted stereocenters. The key step involves a stereocontrolled Rh(II) -catalysed oxonium ylide formation-[2,3] sigmatropic rearrangement of an α-diazo-β-ketoester bearing allylic ether functionality. From the resulting furanone, an acid-catalysed lactonisation and dehydrogenation gives the natural product. PMID:21766363

  4. Flueggether A and Virosinine A, Anti-HIV Alkaloids from Flueggea virosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhu, Kong-Kai; Han, Ying-Shan; Luo, Cheng; Wainberg, Mark A; Yue, Jian-Min

    2015-12-18

    Two new alkaloids, flueggether A (1) and virosinine A (2), were isolated from a Chinese medicinal plant, Flueggea virosa. Their structures were assigned via spectroscopic methods with the absolute configurations of 1 and 2 being established by X-ray diffraction analysis and calculated electronic circular dichroism data, respectively. Compound 1 represents the first example with an ether bridge of Securinega alkaloid oligomers, and 2 bears a new heterocyclic backbone. Both alkaloids showed mild in vitro anti-HIV activity.

  5. Development of an implantable infusion pump for sustained anti-HIV drug administration.

    PubMed

    Baert, Lieven; Schueller, Laurent; Tardy, Yanik; Macbride, Doug; Klooster, Gerben van't; Borghys, Herman; Clessens, Ellen; Van Den Mooter, Guy; Van Gyseghem, Elke; Van Remoortere, Pieter; Wigerinck, Piet; Rosier, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Factors such as insufficient drug potency, non-compliance and restricted tissue penetration contribute to incomplete suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the difficulty to control this infection. Infusion via standard catheters can be a source of infection, which is potentially life threatening in these patients. We developed an implantable infusion pump, allowing to accommodate large volumes (16-50mL) of high viscous solutions (up to 23.96mPas at 39 degrees C) of anti-HIV agents and providing sustained release of medication: a standard Codman 3000 pump, which was initially developed to release aqueous solutions ( approximately 0.7mPas) into the spinal cord such as for pain medication, was transformed for release of viscous solutions up to 40mPas by adapting the diameter of the capillary flow restrictor, the capillary length and way of catheterisation--by placing the indwelling catheter in the vena cava. A pilot study of the pump implanted in 2 dogs showed continuous steady-state release of the protease inhibitor darunavir (25mg/dog/day administered for 25 days), thereby achieving plasma concentration levels of approximately 40ng/mL. Steady-state plasma levels were reproducible after monthly refill of the pumps. In conclusion, the implantable adapted Codman 3000 constant-flow infusion pump customized to anti-HIV therapy allows sustained release of anti-HIV medication and may represent an opportunity to reduce the pill burden and complexity of dosing schemes associated with common anti-HIV therapy.

  6. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Phan, Tran B; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-10-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. In this study, the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides were determined. Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZM-bl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Antiviral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the antibacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe(2+), the ability of Fe(2+) and other cations to reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds was determined. Real-time PCR was also employed to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Four compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations against HIV-1 of 1-7 μM were identified. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether the target for virus replication was TZM-bl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe(2+), but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, the inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. In conclusion, salicylidene acylhydrazides were identified with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the micromolar range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  7. Characterization of permeability, stability and anti-HIV-1 activity of decitabine and gemcitabine divalerate prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Clouser, Christine L; Bonnac, Laurent; Mansky, Louis M; Patterson, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 25 drugs have been approved for the treatment of HIV-1 replication. All but one of these drugs is delivered as an oral medication. Previous studies have demonstrated that two drugs, decitabine and gemcitabine, have potent anti-HIV-1 activities and can work together in synergy to reduce HIV-1 infectivity via lethal mutagenesis. For their current indications, decitabine and gemcitabine are delivered intravenously. Methods As an initial step towards the clinical translation of these drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, we synthesized decitabine and gemcitabine prodrugs in order to increase drug permeability, which has generally been shown to correlate with increased bioavailability in vivo. In the present study we investigated the permeability, stability and anti-HIV-1 activity of decitabine and gemcitabine prodrugs and selected the divalerate esters of each as candidates for further investigation. Results Our results provide the first demonstration of divalerate prodrugs of decitabine and gemcitabine that are readily permeable, stable and possess anti-HIV-1 activity. Conclusions These observations predict improved oral availability of decitabine and gemcitabine, and warrant further study of their ability to reduce HIV-1 infectivity in vivo. PMID:23994876

  8. Predicting anti-HIV activity of TIBO derivatives: a computational approach using a novel topological descriptor.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Satish; Madan, Anil Kumar

    2002-08-01

    A novel highly discriminating adjacency-cum-distance-based topological descriptor, termed the adjacent eccentric distance sum index, has been conceptualized and its discriminating power investigated with regard to the anti-HIV activity of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-imidazo-[4,5,1- jk] [1,4] benzodiazepin-2 (1 H)-one (TIBO) derivatives. The discriminating power of the adjacent eccentric distance sum index was compared with that of the eccentric connectivity index - another adjacency-cum-distance-based topological descriptor. The values of the eccentric connectivity index and the adjacent eccentric distance sum index of each of 121 analogues comprising the data set were computed and active ranges were identified. Subsequently, a biological activity was assigned to each analogue involved in the data set and this was then compared with the reported anti-HIV activity. Excellent correlations were observed between anti-HIV activity and both the topological descriptors. Although the overall accuracy of prediction was found to be approximately 84% in case of the eccentric connectivity index and approximately 86% in case of adjacent eccentric distance sum index, the predictability using the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in the active range itself was >92%. The proposed index offers a vast potential for structure-activity/property studies.

  9. Identification of anti-HIV and anti-reverse transcriptase activity from Tetracera scandens.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok Sang; Park, Jung Ae; Kim, Joo-Hwan; You, Ji Chang

    2012-03-01

    We report here that an ethanol extract of Tetracera scandens, a Vietnamese medicinal plant, has anti-HIV activity and possesses strong inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RTase). Using a MT-4 cell-based assay, we found that the T. scandens extract inhibited effectively HIV virus replication with an IC(50) value in the range of 2.0-2.5 μg/ml while the cellular toxicity value (CC50) was more than 40-50 μg/ml concentration, thus yielding a minimum specificity index of 20-fold. Moreover, the anti-HIV efficacy of the T. scandens extract was determined to be due, in part, to its potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 RTase activity in vitro. The inhibitory activity against the RTase was further confirmed by probing viral cDNA production, an intermediate of viral reverse transcription, in virus-infected cells using quantitative DNA-PCR analysis. Thus, these results suggest that T. scandens can be a useful source for the isolation and development of new anti- HIV-1 inhibitor(s). [BMB reports 2012; 45(3): 165-170]. PMID:22449703

  10. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  11. [Vegetarians are at high risk of vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Javid, Parva; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Since vegetarians have a lower intake of vitamin B12 (B12) than non-vegetarians, they are at increased risk of developing B12 deficiency. The less animal products the food contains the worse the B12 status. However, even lacto-ovo-vegetarians run the risk of becoming deficient in B12. Vegetarians are recommended regularly to take supplements of B12, and they should be informed of the lacking content of B12 of plant products and the hazards of B12 deficiency. Furthermore, vegetarians should routinely be checked for possible B12 deficiency.

  12. Folate, vitamin B12 and human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared func...

  13. Vitamin B12 and brain development.

    PubMed

    Stollhoff, K; Schulte, F J

    1987-03-01

    This is a report of a 1 1/2-year-old male with megaloblastic anaemia and a progressive neurological disorder clinically resembling leucodystrophy. The child was exclusively breast fed and his mother had been a strict vegetarian for more than 4 years before the child was born. After Vitamin B12 therapy the anaemia disappeared and the neurological condition dramatically improved.

  14. Folate and B12 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collin, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms postulated to link folate and B12 metabolism with cancer, including genome-wide hypomethylation, gene-specific promoter hypermethylation, and DNA uracil misincorporation, have been observed in prostate tumor cells. However, epidemiological studies of prostate cancer risk, based on dietary intakes and blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 and on folate-pathway gene variants, have generated contradictory findings. In a meta-analysis, circulating concentrations of B12 (seven studies, OR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.01, 1.19; P = 0.002) and (in cohort studies) folate (five studies, OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.00, 1.40; P = 0.02) were positively associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Homocysteine was not associated with risk of prostate cancer (four studies, OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.69, 1.19; P = 0.5). In a meta-analysis of folate-pathway polymorphisms, MTR 2756A > G (eight studies, OR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.00, 1.12; P = 0.06) and SHMT1 1420C > T (two studies, OR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.22; P = 0.05) were positively associated with prostate cancer risk. There were no effects due to any other polymorphisms, including MTHFR 677C > T (12 studies, OR = 1.04; 95% CI 0.97, 1.12; P = 0.3). The positive association of circulating B12 with an increased risk of prostate cancer could be explained by reverse causality. However, given current controversies over mandatory B12 fortification, further research to eliminate a causal role of B12 in prostate cancer initiation and/or progression is required. Meta-analysis does not entirely rule out a positive association of circulating folate with increased prostate cancer risk. As with B12, even a weak positive association would be a significant public health issue, given the high prevalence of prostate cancer and concerns about the potential harms versus benefits of mandatory folic acid fortification.

  15. False-normal vitamin B12 results in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P; Narayanan, S; Cook, P

    2015-12-01

    Pernicious anaemia is a common autoimmune disorder with a prevalence of approximately 4% amongst Europeans. If untreated, it can result in permanent neurological disability or death. Central to the diagnosis is establishing the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Concern has been raised recently regarding false-normal results obtained with competitive-binding vitamin B12 assays performed on automated biochemistry platforms in patients with pernicious anaemia due to the presence of interfering anti-intrinsic factor antibodies in the patient sample. We report a case in which diagnosis of pernicious anaemia was delayed due to false-normal vitamin B12 results. Questioning the results in light of high pre-test probability, and knowledge of the role of functional markers of vitamin B12 deficiency enabled the correct diagnosis to be made so that effective treatment could be initiated. It is crucial that those who frequently request vitamin B12 are aware of the potential problems with the available assays and how these problems can be addressed. We suggest that all patients with normal vitamin B12 levels where there is a high clinical suspicion for deficiency such as a macrocytic anaemia, neurological symptoms or megaloblastic bone marrow should have a functional assay of vitamin B12 (plasma homocysteine or methylmalonic acid) checked to further investigate for vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26277634

  16. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  17. Nutritional vitamin-B12 deficiency. Possible contributory role of subtle vitamin-B12 malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Carmel, R

    1978-05-01

    Dietary deficiency of vitamin B-12 has been reported, yet most people ingesting vitamin-B12-deficient diets even for many years appear to achieve a balance that does not lead to overt signs and symptoms of deficiency. I present the case of a vegan of 25 years' duration who developed severe neurologic abnormalities due to vitamin-B12 deficiency. His diet provided 1.2 microgram of vitamin B12 daily at most. Despite normal Schilling test findings, he absorbed subnormal amounts of vitamin B12 given with ovalbumin. This poor absorption appeared to be related to his gastritis, achlorhydria, and subnormal intrinsic-factor secretion. Probably, vitamin-B12 deficiency in this patient resulted from both dietary restriction and the subtle malabsorption, neither of which would have sufficed alone to produce the clinical problem. Possibly such malabsorption may also be present in many of those vegans developing overt vitamin-B12 deficiency in whom Schilling test findings have been normal.

  18. Proteomics of vitamin B12 processing.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; DiBello, Patricia M; Jacobsen, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    The causes of cobalamin (B12, Cbl) deficiency are multifactorial. Whether nutritional due to poor dietary intake, or functional due to impairments in absorption or intracellular processing and trafficking events, the major symptoms of Cbl deficiency include megaloblastic anemia, neurological deterioration and in extreme cases, failure to thrive and death. The common biomarkers of Cbl deficiency (hyperhomocysteinemia and methylmalonic acidemia) are extremely valuable diagnostic indicators of the condition, but little is known about the changes that occur at the protein level. A mechanistic explanation bridging the physiological changes associated with functional B12 deficiency with its intracellular processers and carriers is lacking. In this article, we will cover the effects of B12 deficiency in a cblC-disrupted background (also referred to as MMACHC) as a model of functional Cbl deficiency. As will be shown, major protein changes involve the cytoskeleton, the neurological system as well as signaling and detoxification pathways. Supplementation of cultured MMACHC-mutant cells with hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) failed to restore these variants to the normal phenotype, suggesting that a defective Cbl processing pathway produces irreversible changes at the protein level.

  19. Proteomics of vitamin B12 processing.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; DiBello, Patricia M; Jacobsen, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    The causes of cobalamin (B12, Cbl) deficiency are multifactorial. Whether nutritional due to poor dietary intake, or functional due to impairments in absorption or intracellular processing and trafficking events, the major symptoms of Cbl deficiency include megaloblastic anemia, neurological deterioration and in extreme cases, failure to thrive and death. The common biomarkers of Cbl deficiency (hyperhomocysteinemia and methylmalonic acidemia) are extremely valuable diagnostic indicators of the condition, but little is known about the changes that occur at the protein level. A mechanistic explanation bridging the physiological changes associated with functional B12 deficiency with its intracellular processers and carriers is lacking. In this article, we will cover the effects of B12 deficiency in a cblC-disrupted background (also referred to as MMACHC) as a model of functional Cbl deficiency. As will be shown, major protein changes involve the cytoskeleton, the neurological system as well as signaling and detoxification pathways. Supplementation of cultured MMACHC-mutant cells with hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) failed to restore these variants to the normal phenotype, suggesting that a defective Cbl processing pathway produces irreversible changes at the protein level. PMID:23241609

  20. Vitamin B-12 radioassay in the diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    It became apparent in 1978 that some radioassays for Vitamin B-12 were falsely normal. This investigation was performed to assure the accuracy of our assay. False normal B-12 levels may result in permanent damage or delay in relieving distressful symptoms. False low levels result in no permanent sequalae. ''Normal'' values should be set with these consequences in mind. The authors reviewed clinical charts on patients with <300 pg/m1 serum B-12 in 1000 consecutive determinations and all patients newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. Simu1TRAC Radioassay, Becton Dickinson Co., modified by correction for serum nonspecific binding is used. ''Normal'' values (234-1000 pg/m1) are based on 47 outpatients. 176 of the 1000 assays resulted in levels <300 pg/m1. 87 were from other location with no clinical information. 89 assays on Marshfield Clinic patients included 2 duplicates. 45 patients were newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. 12 were diagnosed elsewhere and on therapy. 32 had assays <234 pg/m1. 1 with normal B-12 is ''possibly deficient'', a Schilling test is scheduled. The authors conclude that their B-12 assay has correctly identified 32 clinically accepted B-12 deficient patients. 1 possibly deficient patient was normal. 25 of 42 patients with levels below normal are deficient. The false positive rate is felt acceptable in view of the false negative rate and the consequences of the respective errors.

  1. Design, synthesis and anti-HIV activity of novel quinoxaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Patel, Saloni B; Patel, Bhumika D; Pannecouque, Christophe; Bhatt, Hardik G

    2016-07-19

    In order to design novel anti-HIV agents, pharmacophore modelling, virtual screening, 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies were performed. Pharmacophore model was generated using 17 structurally diverse molecules using DISCOtech followed by refinement with GASP module of Sybyl X. The best model containing four features; two donor sites, one acceptor atom and one hydrophobic region; was used as a query for virtual screening in NCI database and 6 compounds with Qfit value ≥98 were retrieved. The quinoxaline ring which is the bio-isostere of pteridine ring, retrieved as a hit in virtual screening, was selected as a core moiety. 3D-QSAR was carried on thirty five 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide derivatives. Contour map analysis of best CoMFA and CoMSIA model suggested incorporation of hydrophobic, bulky and electronegative groups to increase potency of the designed compounds. 50 quinoxaline derivatives with different substitutions were designed on basis of both ligand based drug design approaches and were mapped on the best pharmacophore model. From this, best 32 quinoxaline derivatives were docked onto the active site of integrase enzyme and in-silico ADMET properties were also predicted. From this data, synthesis of top 7 quinoxaline derivatives was carried out and were characterized using Mass, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Purity of compounds were checked using HPLC. These derivatives were evaluated for anti-HIV activity on III-B strain of HIV-1 and cytotoxicity studies were performed on VERO cell line. Two quinoxaline derivatives (7d and 7e) showed good results, which can be further explored to develop novel anti-HIV agents.

  2. Design, synthesis and anti-HIV activity of novel quinoxaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Patel, Saloni B; Patel, Bhumika D; Pannecouque, Christophe; Bhatt, Hardik G

    2016-07-19

    In order to design novel anti-HIV agents, pharmacophore modelling, virtual screening, 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies were performed. Pharmacophore model was generated using 17 structurally diverse molecules using DISCOtech followed by refinement with GASP module of Sybyl X. The best model containing four features; two donor sites, one acceptor atom and one hydrophobic region; was used as a query for virtual screening in NCI database and 6 compounds with Qfit value ≥98 were retrieved. The quinoxaline ring which is the bio-isostere of pteridine ring, retrieved as a hit in virtual screening, was selected as a core moiety. 3D-QSAR was carried on thirty five 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide derivatives. Contour map analysis of best CoMFA and CoMSIA model suggested incorporation of hydrophobic, bulky and electronegative groups to increase potency of the designed compounds. 50 quinoxaline derivatives with different substitutions were designed on basis of both ligand based drug design approaches and were mapped on the best pharmacophore model. From this, best 32 quinoxaline derivatives were docked onto the active site of integrase enzyme and in-silico ADMET properties were also predicted. From this data, synthesis of top 7 quinoxaline derivatives was carried out and were characterized using Mass, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Purity of compounds were checked using HPLC. These derivatives were evaluated for anti-HIV activity on III-B strain of HIV-1 and cytotoxicity studies were performed on VERO cell line. Two quinoxaline derivatives (7d and 7e) showed good results, which can be further explored to develop novel anti-HIV agents. PMID:27105027

  3. Synthesis and bioevaluation of substituted chalcones, coumaranones and other flavonoids as anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Cole, Amy L; Hossain, Sandra; Cole, Alex M; Phanstiel, Otto

    2016-06-15

    A series of chalcone, flavone, coumaranone and other flavonoid compounds were screened for their anti HIV-1 activity in two cell culture models using TZM-bl and PM1 cells. Within the systems evaluated, the most promising compounds contained either an α- or β-hydroxy-carbonyl motif within their structure (e.g., 8 and 9). Efficacious substituents were identified and used to design new HIV inhibitors with increased potency and lower cytotoxicity. Of the scaffolds evaluated, specific chalcones were found to provide the best balance between anti-HIV potency and low host cell toxicity. Chalcone 8l was shown to inhibit different clinical isolates of HIV in a dose-dependent manner (e.g., IC50 typically⩽5μM). Inhibition of HIV infection experiments using TZM-bl cells demonstrated that chalcone 8l and flavonol 9c had IC50 values of 4.7μM and 10.4μM, respectively. These insights were used to design new chalcones 8o and 8p. Rewardingly, chalcones 8o and 8p (at 10μM) each gave >92% inhibition of viral propagation without impacting PM1 host cell viability. Inhibition of viral propagation significantly increased (60-90%) when PM1 cells were pre-incubated with chalcone 8o, but not with the related flavonol 9c. These results suggested that chalcone 8o may be of value as both a HIV prophylactic and therapy. In summary, O-benzyl-substituted chalcones were identified as promising anti-HIV agents for future investigation. PMID:27161874

  4. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  9. Henrin A: A New Anti-HIV Ent-Kaurane Diterpene from Pteris henryi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan-Fei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jing-Jie; Song, Xun; Ku, Chuen-Fai; Zou, Juan; Li, Ji-Xin; Rong, Li-Jun; Pan, Lu-Tai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2015-11-24

    Henrin A (1), a new ent-kaurane diterpene, was isolated from the leaves of Pteris henryi. The chemical structure was elucidated by analysis of the spectroscopic data including one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, and was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The compound was evaluated for its biological activities against a panel of cancer cell lines, dental bacterial biofilm formation, and HIV. It displayed anti-HIV potential with an IC50 value of 9.1 µM (SI = 12.2).

  10. Henrin A: A New Anti-HIV Ent-Kaurane Diterpene from Pteris henryi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan-Fei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jing-Jie; Song, Xun; Ku, Chuen-Fai; Zou, Juan; Li, Ji-Xin; Rong, Li-Jun; Pan, Lu-Tai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Henrin A (1), a new ent-kaurane diterpene, was isolated from the leaves of Pteris henryi. The chemical structure was elucidated by analysis of the spectroscopic data including one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, and was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The compound was evaluated for its biological activities against a panel of cancer cell lines, dental bacterial biofilm formation, and HIV. It displayed anti-HIV potential with an IC50 value of 9.1 µM (SI = 12.2). PMID:26610490

  11. Synthesis of 9-substituted derivatives of berberine as anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Bodiwala, Hardik S; Sabde, Sudeep; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-04-01

    Naturally occurring protoberberine alkaloids, berberine and berberrubine along with 9-substituted derivatives of berberine were assessed for the anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. Berberine was found to be the most active compound with an EC(50) of 0.13 μM against HIV-1 NL4.3 virus in CEM-GFP cell lines. Berberrubine and two other compounds were found to be less active than berberine, at the same time they were less toxic than berberine. Enzyme based assay suggested that the anti-HIV activity of berberine and its analogs might be due to RTase inhibitory activity and some additional mechanisms.

  12. Unciaphenol, an Oxygenated Analogue of the Bergman Cyclization Product of Uncialamycin Exhibits Anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Bottriell, Helen; Davies, Julian; Tietjen, Ian; Brockman, Mark A; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    Unciaphenol (2), an oxygenated analogue of the Bergman cyclization product of the enediyne uncialamycin (1), has been isolated along with 1 from cultures of the actinomycete Streptomyces uncialis. It is proposed that the C-22 OH substituent in 2 might arise from the attack of a nucleophilic oxygen species on the p-benzyne diradical intermediate IA in the Bergman cyclization of 1. 2 shows in vitro anti-HIV activity against viral strains that are resistant to clinically utilized anti-retroviral therapies.

  13. Synthesis of optically pure dioxolane nucleosides and their anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Siddigui, M.A.; Evans, C.; Jin, H.L.; Tse, A.; Brown, W.; Nguyen-Ba, N.; Mansour, T.S.; Cameron, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The clinical candidate 3TC, 1, possessing non-natural absolute stereochemistry is a potent and non-toxic inhibitor of a key enzyme, reverse transcriptase, involved in the replicative cycle of the HIV. Selective inhibition of both HIV and HBV is seen. In view of the authors` interest in finding correlation between stereochemistry and antiviral activity, several enantiomerically pure dioxolane nucleosides, 2, were synthesized and assayed. The discussion will focus on (a) the synthesis of optically pure dioxolane sugars from L-ascorbic acid, (b) enzymatic resolution of purine dioxolane nucleosides, (c) anti HIV-1 activity in MT-4 cells.

  14. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  15. Core-structure-inspired asymmetric addition reactions: enantioselective synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Ma, Jun-An

    2015-11-01

    Dihydrobenzoxazinones and dihydroquinazolinones are the core units present in many anti-HIV agents, such as Efavirenz, DPC 961, DPC 963, and DPC 083. All these molecules contain a trifluoromethyl moiety at the quaternary stereogenic carbon center with S configuration. The enantioselective addition of carbon nucleophiles to ketones or cyclic ketimines could serve as a key step to access these molecules. This tutorial review provides an overview of significant advances in the synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents and relative analogues, with an emphasis on asymmetric addition reactions for the establishment of the CF3-containing quaternary carbon centers.

  16. Coating flow of non-Newtonian anti-HIV microbicide vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su Chan; Szeri, Andrew; Verguet, Stéphane; Katz, David; Weiss, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates is of importance for the drug delivery functions of vehicles for anti-HIV topical microbicides. These are intended to inhibit transmission into vulnerable mucosa, e.g. in the vagina. First generation prototype microbicides have gel vehicles, which spread after insertion and coat luminal surfaces. Effectiveness derives from potency of the active ingredients and completeness and durability of coating. Delivery vehicle rheology, luminal biomechanical properties and the force due to gravity influence the coating mechanics. We develop a framework for understanding the relative importance of boundary squeezing and body forces on the extent and speed of the coating that results. In the case of a shear-thinning fluid, the Carreau number also plays a role. Numerical solutions are developed for a range of conditions and materials. Results are interpreted with respect to tradeoffs between wall elasticity, longitudinal forces, bolus viscosity and bolus volume. These provide initial insights of practical value for formulators of non-Newtonian gel delivery vehicles for anti-HIV microbicidal formulations.

  17. Anti-HIV activity of fucoidans from three brown seaweed species.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Thanh Thi Thu; Ly, Bui Minh; Van, Tran Thi Thanh; Quang, Ngo Van; Tu, Ho Cam; Zheng, Yue; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Mi, Bilan; Ai, Usov

    2015-01-22

    Fucoidans are sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine brown algae. In the current work the anti-HIV activity of three fucoidans, extracted from three brown seaweeds Sargassum mcclurei, Sargassum polycystum and Turbinara ornata and collected from Nha Trang bay, Vietnam was investigated. Fucoidans extracted from the three species displayed similar antiviral activities with a mean IC50 ranging from 0.33 to 0.7 μg/ml while displaying no cell toxicity. Our results showed that the anti-HIV activity of fucoidans is not primarily linked to the sulfate content and the appropriate position of sulfate groups in the fucoidan backbones was also not associated with the antiviral activity. Fucoidans inhibited HIV-1 infection when they were pre-incubated with the virus but not with the cells, and not after infection, blocking the early steps of HIV entry into target cells. These data contribute to a better understanding of the influence of fucoidans structural characteristics on their biological activity.

  18. Double Variational Binding—(SMILES) Conformational Analysis by Docking Mechanisms for Anti-HIV Pyrimidine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Dudaș, Nicoleta A.; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Variational quantitative binding–conformational analysis for a series of anti-HIV pyrimidine-based ligands is advanced at the individual molecular level. This was achieved by employing ligand-receptor docking algorithms for each molecule in the 1,3-disubstituted uracil derivative series that was studied. Such computational algorithms were employed for analyzing both genuine molecular cases and their simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) transformations, which were created via the controlled breaking of chemical bonds, so as to generate the longest SMILES molecular chain (LoSMoC) and Branching SMILES (BraS) conformations. The study identified the most active anti-HIV molecules, and analyzed their special and relevant bonding fragments (chemical alerts), and the recorded energetic and geometric docking results (i.e., binding and affinity energies, and the surface area and volume of bonding, respectively). Clear computational evidence was also produced concerning the ligand-receptor pocket binding efficacies of the LoSMoc and BraS conformation types, thus confirming their earlier presence (as suggested by variational quantitative structure-activity relationship, variational-QSAR) as active intermediates for the molecule-to-cell transduction process. PMID:26295229

  19. Sulfated Polysaccharides in Marine Sponges: Extraction Methods and Anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Ana I. S.; Nicolai, Marisa; Humanes, Madalena; Goncalves, Joao

    2011-01-01

    The extraction, fractionation and HIV-1 inhibition potential of polysaccharides extracted from three species of marine sponges, Erylus discophorus, Cliona celata and Stelletta sp., collected in the Northeastern Atlantic, is presented in this work. The anti-HIV activity of 23 polysaccharide pellets and three crude extracts was tested. Crude extracts prepared from Erylus discophorus specimens were all highly active against HIV-1 (90 to 95% inhibition). Cliona celata pellets showed low polysaccharide content (bellow 38.5%) and almost no anti-HIV activity (<10% inhibition). Stelletta sp. pellets, although quite rich in polysaccharide (up to 97.3%), showed only modest bioactivity (<36% HIV-1 inhibition). Erylus discophorus pellets were among the richest in terms of polysaccharide content (up to 98%) and the most active against HIV-1 (up to 95% inhibition). Chromatographic fractionation of the polysaccharide pellet obtained from a specimen of Erylus discophorus (B161) yielded only modestly active fractions. However, we could infer that the active molecule is most probably a high molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide (>2000 kDa), whose mechanism is possibly preventing viral attachment and entry (fusion inhibitor). PMID:21339952

  20. Synthesis of zidovudine derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Palaniappan; Long, Jing; Swetha, Raparla; Shruthi, Vaidyanathan; Wang, Rui-Rui; Preethi, Srinivasan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2009-02-01

    Twelve novel zidovudine derivatives were prepared by modifying 5 '-hydroxyl group of sugar moiety (1-8) and 5-methyl group of thymidine nucleus (9-12) and characterized spectrally. The compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV-1, antitubercular and antibacterial activities. Compound (3-azido-tetrahydro-5- (3,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2,4-dioxopyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl 7-(4-(2-phenylacetoyloxy)-3,5- dimethylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-(2-phenylacetoyloxyamino)-1-cyclopropyl-6,8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate (5) was found to be the most potent anti-HIV-1 agent with EC(50) of 0.0012 microM against HIV-1(IIIB) and CC(50) of 34.05 microM against MT-4 with selectivity index of 28,375. Compound 5 inhibited Mycobacterium tuberculosis with MIC of 1.72 microM and inhibited four pathogenic bacteria with MIC of less than 1 microM. PMID:19219739

  1. Ferrocene analogues of sandwich B12·Cr·B12: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Longjiu

    2013-01-14

    The bowl B(12) cluster was previously reported to be analogous to benzene and predicted to be one of the best candidates to be new inorganic ligands. The structural stability and electronic properties of a new sandwich compound Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) have been investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the sandwich Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) is a stable complex with large binding energy (-5.93 eV) and HOMO-LUMO gap (2.37 eV), as well as Fe(C(5)H(5))(2) and Cr(C(6)H(6))(2), following the 18-electron principle. The detailed molecular orbitals and aromaticity analyses indicate that the sandwich compound Cr(B(12))(2) (D(3d)) is electronically very stable. The natural bond orbital analysis suggests that spd-π interaction plays an important role in the sandwich compounds. PMID:23320677

  2. Cytotoxic, antitopoisomerase IIα, and anti-HIV-1 activities of triterpenoids isolated from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    PubMed

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Akkarawongsapat, Radeekorn; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2013-04-26

    Eight new cycloartane triterpenoids (1-8), named carinatins A-H, and the known compounds secaubryolide (9) and dikamaliartane D (10) were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic methods. Cytotoxic, antitopoisomerase IIα, and anti-HIV-1 activities of compounds 1-7, 9, and 10 were investigated.

  3. Enhanced neutralization of HIV by antibodies displayed on the S-layer of Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher J; Nomellini, John F; Horwitz, Marc S; Smit, John; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2011-12-01

    Innovative methods of prevention are needed to stop the more than two million new HIV-1 infections annually, particularly in women. Local application of anti-HIV antibodies has been shown to be effective at preventing infection in nonhuman primates; however, the concentrations needed are cost prohibitive. Display of antibodies on a particulate platform will likely prolong effectiveness of these anti-HIV agents and lower the cost of goods. Here, we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and its highly expressed surface-layer (S-layer) protein can provide this antibody display platform. Caulobacters displaying protein G, alone or with CD4 codisplay, successfully captured HIV-1-specific antibodies and demonstrated functional neutralization. Compared to soluble antibodies, a neutralizing anti-HIV antibody displayed on Caulobacter was as effective or more effective at neutralizing diverse HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, when an antibody reactive with an epitope induced by CD4 binding (CD4i) was codisplayed with CD4, there was significant enhancement in HIV-1 neutralization. These results suggest that caulobacters displaying anti-HIV antibodies offer a distinct improvement in the use of antibodies as microbicides. Furthermore, these reagents can specifically evaluate anti-HIV antibodies in concert with other HIV-1 blocking agents to assess the most suitable tools for conversion to scFvs, allowing for direct display within the S-layer protein and further reducing cost of goods. In summary, C. crescentus, which can be easily produced and chemically stabilized at low cost, is well suited for engineering as an effective platform, offering an inexpensive way to produce and deliver HIV-1-specific microbicides.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B 12..

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12.. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B 12.. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and....1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88CoN14O14P, CAS Reg. No. 68-0919... exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may be used in infant formula in...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aromatic compound clusters of the B12 all-boron benzene: B12Au- and B12(BO)-.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-28

    We report a photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory study of the B12Au(-) and B13O(-) clusters and their neutrals, which are shown to be six π electron aromatic compounds between the quasi-planar all-boron B12 benzene-analogue and a monovalent Au or BO ligand. Electron affinities of B12Au and B13O are measured to be 3.48 ± 0.04 and 3.90 ± 0.04 eV, respectively. Structural searches are performed for B12Au(-) and B13O(-), which are compared with the isovalent B12H(-) cluster. The global minima of B12Au(-) and B13O(-) both feature an almost intact B12 cluster with the Au and BO ligands bonded to its periphery, respectively. For B12Au(-), a low-lying isomer is also identified, which is only 0.4 kcal mol(-1) above the global minimum, in agreement with the experimental observation of a weakly populated isomer in the cluster beam of B12Au(-). These aromatic compound clusters provide new examples for the Au/H isolobal analogy and the boronyl (BO) chemistry. PMID:23666408

  10. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  16. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  17. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Bopp-Kistler, I; Rüegger-Frey, B; Grob, D; Six, P

    1999-11-01

    Cobalamin deficiency increases with advancing age. The cut-off point of serum concentration should be raised, because many elderly people with "normal" serum vitamin B12 concentrations are metabolically deficient in cobalamin. The measurement of the metabolites homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid is recommended. Cobalamin deficiency may result in a variety of atypical symptoms. Hematological changes typical of megaloblastic anemia are absent in a majority of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Generally underlying pernicious anemia is not the main cause of cobalamin deficiency in the elderly. Protein-bound cobalamin malabsorption due to atrophic gastritis with hypo- or achlorhydria is a common cause of cobalamin deficiency in elderly people. An important manifestation of cobalamin deficiency is cognitive impairment. Much controversy exists on the subject of the association of dementia of the Alzheimer type with cobalamin deficiency. In several studies dementia has been related to low serum cobalamin levels. Physicians should be liberal of cobalamin therapy. The window of opportunity for effective intervention may be as short as one year from the onset of medical symptoms. At last a compilation of recommendations is given.

  18. Radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanchi, X.; Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.

    2000-03-01

    Research on the radiolysis of vitamins is of considerable interest since these compounds are important nutritional constituents in foods and in dietetic supplements. In spite of these considerations there are few data and very often difficult to compare for the radiolytic behavior of vitamins. In this work we focused our attention on to the study of the radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12) in solid state and in aqueous solutions. The procedure was followed by HPLC and UV-spectroscopy. The results obtained in aqueous solutions showed a dependence of the decomposition as a linear function of the dose. The G of decomposition for a 1×10 -5 M solution was 3.3. In the solid state the vitamin was very stable towards the irradiation in the conditions used in this study with a G=2.1×10 -3. A study made with Serratia marcescens as a microbiological contaminant showed that at the sterilization dose there is a destruction of the vitamin in aqueous solution. In the solid state the degree of decomposition was 7%.

  19. Design, Synthesis and antiHIV activity of Novel Isatine-Sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Selvam, P; Murugesh, N; Chandramohan, M; Debyser, Z; Witvrouw, M

    2008-11-01

    A series of novel isatine-sulphonamide derivatives have been synthesized by combining isatin derivatives with sulphonamides. The structure of the synthesized compounds were elucidated by spectral analysis (IR, NMR and Mass). Investigation of anti-HIV activity was done against HIV-1(IIIB) in MT-4 cells and HIV integrase inhibitory activity. 4-(1-acetyl-5-methyl-2-oxoindolin-3-ylideneamino)-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide (SPIII-5ME-AC) inhibits the HIV Integrase enzymatic activity as both over all and strand transfer reaction and 4-(1-benzoyl-5-chloro-2-oxoindolin-3-ylideneamino)-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzene sulfonamide (SPIII-5Cl-BZ) exhibits 36 percent maximum protection against HIV-1 at sub toxic concentration.

  20. Design, Synthesis and antiHIV activity of Novel Isatine-Sulphonamides

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, P.; Murugesh, N.; Chandramohan, M.; Debyser, Z.; Witvrouw, M.

    2008-01-01

    A series of novel isatine-sulphonamide derivatives have been synthesized by combining isatin derivatives with sulphonamides. The structure of the synthesized compounds were elucidated by spectral analysis (IR, NMR and Mass). Investigation of anti-HIV activity was done against HIV-1(IIIB) in MT-4 cells and HIV integrase inhibitory activity. 4-(1-acetyl-5-methyl-2-oxoindolin-3-ylideneamino)-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide (SPIII-5ME-AC) inhibits the HIV Integrase enzymatic activity as both over all and strand transfer reaction and 4-(1-benzoyl-5-chloro-2-oxoindolin-3-ylideneamino)-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzene sulfonamide (SPIII-5Cl-BZ) exhibits 36 percent maximum protection against HIV-1 at sub toxic concentration. PMID:21369440

  1. Anti-HIV drugs: 25 compounds approved within 25 years after the discovery of HIV.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2009-04-01

    In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir and emtricitabine); nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir); non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz and etravirine); protease inhibitors (PIs: saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, fosamprenavir, tipranavir and darunavir); cell entry inhibitors [fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide) and co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc)]; and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir). These compounds should be used in drug combination regimens to achieve the highest possible benefit, tolerability and compliance and to diminish the risk of resistance development.

  2. Ligand-Based Virtual Screening in a Search for Novel Anti-HIV-1 Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Kurczyk, Agata; Warszycki, Dawid; Musiol, Robert; Kafel, Rafał; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-10-26

    In a search for new anti-HIV-1 chemotypes, we developed a multistep ligand-based virtual screening (VS) protocol combining machine learning (ML) methods with the privileged structures (PS) concept. In its learning step, the VS protocol was based on HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors fetched from the ChEMBL database. The performances of various ML methods and PS weighting scheme were evaluated and applied as VS filtering criteria. Finally, a database of 1.5 million commercially available compounds was virtually screened using a multistep ligand-based cascade, and 13 selected unique structures were tested by measuring the inhibition of HIV replication in infected cells. This approach resulted in the discovery of two novel chemotypes with moderate antiretroviral activity, that, together with their topological diversity, make them good candidates as lead structures for future optimization.

  3. A new sulfated beta-galactan from clams with anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Amornrut, C; Toida, T; Imanari, T; Woo, E R; Park, H; Linhardt, R; Wu, S J; Kim, Y S

    1999-09-15

    A new polysaccharide composed of galactan sulfate with a beta-(1-->3)-glycosidic linkage has been isolated from the marine clam species Meretrix petechialis. The polysaccharide was homogeneous in its composition containing D-galactose. The glycosidic linkage was examined by 2D DQF-COSY and 2D NOESY spectroscopy. The coupling constant of anomeric proton was 7.8 Hz, suggesting a beta-galacto configuration. The downfield shift of H-2 of galactose residue demonstrated the presence of 2-O-sulfonate group. TQF-COSY confirmed that the C-6 position was substituted with a sulfonate group. The anti-HIV activity of the polysaccharides has been evaluated by the inhibition of syncytia formation. The fusion index and percentage fusion inhibition of sulfated galactan were 0.34 and 56% at 200 micrograms/mL.

  4. Electrochemical impediometric detection of anti-HIV drug taking gold nanorods as a sensing interface.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singh, Gajendra; Pundir, C S

    2015-04-15

    In present work, gold nanorods were used for amplification of electrochemical sensing of anti-HIV replication drug i.e. deferiprone. Gold nanorods (nano Au) deposited onto pencil graphite electrode (PGE) has been utilized for covalent immobilization of horse radish peroxidase (HRP), via glutaraldehyde (Glu), for deferiprone detection using impedimetric technique. Gold nanorods (nano Au) prepared were characterized by TEM and XRD. The resulting nano Au sensor exhibited a good response to deferiprone with a wide linear range (0.005-1000µM) and a low detection limit 0.005µM. The biosensor also showed a short response time (within 15s). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high reproducibility, good storage stability and anti-interference ability. The applicability of the nano Au sensor is to determine deferiprone level in spiked urine and serum samples. PMID:25437372

  5. Electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of anti-HIV active aminophenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyl', O. K.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Maier, G. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Raichenok, T. F.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the absorption and fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quantum yields of sulphone-containing anti-HIV active o-aminophenol molecules in an inert solvent, hexane, and in a polar solvent, acetonitrile. We have studied IR Fourier-transform spectra and examined structural features of o-aminophenols with different substituents in solutions and crystals. Functional groups of molecules that are involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds have been revealed. Proton acceptor properties of o-aminophenol molecules have been theoretically evaluated using the method of molecular electrostatic potential. Using quantum chemistry methods, we have calculated and interpreted absorption and fluorescence spectra of o-aminophenols. Calculation data are compared with experimental results. We have determined the main channels and mechanisms of photophysical relaxation processes in o-aminophenols.

  6. 2-Aminothiazolones as Anti-HIV Agents That Act as gp120-CD4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tiberi, Marika; Tintori, Cristina; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Fazi, Roberta; Zamperini, Claudio; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Franchi, Luigi; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Botta, Lorenzo; Sampaolo, Michela; Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of 2-aminothiazolones along with their biological properties as novel anti-HIV agents. Such compounds have proven to act through the inhibition of the gp120-CD4 protein-protein interaction that occurs at the very early stage of the HIV-1 entry process. No cytotoxicity was found for these compounds, and broad antiviral activities against laboratory strains and pseudotyped viruses were documented. Docking simulations have also been applied to predict the mechanism, at the molecular level, by which the inhibitors were able to interact within the Phe43 cavity of HIV-1 gp120. Furthermore, a preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) evaluation was performed. Overall, this study led the basis for the development of more potent HIV entry inhibitors. PMID:24614386

  7. Thermotoga lettingae Can Salvage Cobinamide To Synthesize Vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Nicholas C.; Secinaro, Michael A.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that the Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquisition of genes from two distantly related lineages, Archaea and Firmicutes (K. S. Swithers et al., Genome Biol. Evol. 4:730–739, 2012). Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that the cobinamide salvage gene cluster was present in the Thermotogales' most recent common ancestor. We also predicted that Thermotoga lettingae could not synthesize B12 de novo but could use the cobinamide salvage pathway to synthesize B12. In this study, these hypotheses were tested, and we found that Tt. lettingae did not synthesize B12 de novo but salvaged cobinamide. The growth rate of Tt. lettingae increased with the addition of B12 or cobinamide to its medium. It synthesized B12 when the medium was supplemented with cobinamide, and no B12 was detected in cells grown on cobinamide-deficient medium. Upstream of the cobinamide salvage genes is a putative B12 riboswitch. In other organisms, B12 riboswitches allow for higher transcriptional activity in the absence of B12. When Tt. lettingae was grown with no B12, the salvage genes were upregulated compared to cells grown with B12 or cobinamide. Another gene cluster with a putative B12 riboswitch upstream is the btuFCD ABC transporter, and it showed a transcription pattern similar to that of the cobinamide salvage genes. The BtuF proteins from species that can and cannot salvage cobinamides were shown in vitro to bind both B12 and cobinamide. These results suggest that Thermotogales species can use the BtuFCD transporter to import both B12 and cobinamide, even if they cannot salvage cobinamide. PMID:24014541

  8. Flazinamide, a novel {beta}-carboline compound with anti-HIV actions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunhua; Tang Jianguo; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Dong Zejun; Du Li; Shen Xu; Liu Jikai; Zheng Yongtang . E-mail: zhengyt@mail.kiz.ac.cn

    2007-04-20

    A {beta}-carboline compound, flazin isolated from Suillus granulatus has been shown weak anti-HIV-1 activity. Based on the structure of flazin, flazinamide [1-(5'- hydromethyl-2'-furyl)-{beta}-carboline-3-carboxamide] was synthesized and its anti-HIV activities were evaluated in the present study. The cytotoxicity of flazinamide was about 4.1-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide potently reduced syncytium formation induced by HIV-1IIIB with EC50 value of 0.38 {mu}M, the EC50 of flazinamide was about 6.2-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide also inhibited HIV-2ROD and HIV-2CBL-20 infection with EC50 values of 0.57 and 0.89 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide reduced p24 antigen expression in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 and in clinical isolated strain HIV-1KM018 infected PBMC, with EC50 values of 1.45 and 0.77 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide did not suppress HIV-1 replication in chronically infected H9 cells. Flazinamide blocked the fusion between normal cells and HIV-1 or HIV-2 chronically infected cells. It weakly inhibited activities of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease or integrase at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the conversion of the carboxyl group in 3 position of flazin markedly enhanced the anti-viral activity (TI value increased from 12.1 to 312.2) and flazinamide might interfere in the early stage of HIV life cycle.

  9. In vitro testing of African traditional medicines for cytotoxic, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Gqaleni, Nceba; Ngcobo, Mlungisi; Parboosing, Raveen; Naidoo, Anneta

    2012-01-01

    African Traditional Medicines (ATMs) serve as a major source of primary healthcare for African people. The reasons for their use range from easy access, affordability, beliefs in traditional systems and long term safety. ATMs have been used to treat individuals infected with HIV and therefore need scientific validation; a view supported by Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs). This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities of traditional multiple herbal preparations from local THPs. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene, Product Blue, SPNa and SDKc ATM were supplied by local THPs. Changes in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) & glutathione (GSH) over 24 hours were measured using luminometry. Changes in 12 cytokines were assayed using an ELISA-based absorbance assay. Protective effects against HIV killing of MT-4 cells were tested using the XTT assay and antiviral activity was measured using an HIV-1 viral load assay. Cyclosporine and AZT were used as positive controls. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene and SDKc induced a dose dependent toxicity on treated PBMCs by reducing ATP and GSH at high doses (p< 0.001). These medicinal preparations, along with SPNa, showed immunomodulatory activity by significantly (p< 0.001) changing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Product Blue stimulated the levels of ATP and GSH in treated PBMCs at all doses however this product did not show any immunomodulatory activity on cytokine secretion when compared to control cells. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene showed promising anti-HIV activity relative to AZT (p< 0.01). This study has shown that some of these traditional medicinal preparations have at least one or all the properties of immunostimulation, immunomodulation or antiretroviral effects. The mechanism of action of the shown activities should further be investigated.

  10. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy. PMID:26800572

  11. Neuro-regression in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sanwar; Nathani, Shweta

    2009-01-01

    Neuroregression in infants has varied aetiology and vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the uncommon causes. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency is encountered in malnourished infants or in offspring of strict vegan mothers. We present two cases, both infants of 10 and 8 months of age, whose mothers had vitamin B12 deficiency. On admission, the patients were apathic, hypotonic and lethargic. Serum vitamin B12 levels were below normal limits. On cranial MRI, T2-weighted images revealed frontoparietal cortical atrophy. Both the infants responded to vitamin B12 treatment.

  12. Localised Skin Hyperpigmentation as a Presenting Symptom of Vitamin B12 Deficiency Complicating Chronic Atrophic Gastritis.

    PubMed

    El-Shafie, Kawther; Samir, Nafisa; Lakhtakia, Ritu; Davidson, Robin; Al-Waili, Ahmed; Al-Mamary, Muna; Al-Shafee, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in developing countries and should be suspected in patients with unexplained anaemia or neurological symptoms. Dermatological manifestations associated with this deficiency include skin hyper- or hypopigmentation, angular stomatitis and hair changes. We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in November 2013 with localised hyperpigmentation of the palmar and dorsal aspects of both hands of two months' duration. Other symptoms included numbness of the hands, anorexia, weight loss, dizziness, fatigability and a sore mouth and tongue. There was no evidence of hypocortisolaemia and a literature search revealed a possible B12 deficiency. The patient had low serum B12 levels and megaloblastic anaemia. An intrinsic factor antibody test was negative. A gastric biopsy revealed chronic gastritis. After B12 supplementation, the patient's symptoms resolved. Family physicians should familiarise themselves with atypical presentations of B12 deficiency. Many symptoms of this deficiency are reversible if detected and treated early. PMID:26357561

  13. A vitamin B12 transporter in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Krishnamoorthy; Venclovas, Česlovas; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; McKinney, John D.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12-dependent enzymes function in core biochemical pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate pathogen whose metabolism in vivo is poorly understood. Although M. tuberculosis can access vitamin B12 in vitro, it is uncertain whether the organism is able to scavenge B12 during host infection. This question is crucial to predictions of metabolic function, but its resolution is complicated by the absence in the M. tuberculosis genome of a direct homologue of BtuFCD, the only bacterial B12 transport system described to date. We applied genome-wide transposon mutagenesis to identify M. tuberculosis mutants defective in their ability to use exogenous B12. A small proportion of these mapped to Rv1314c, identifying the putative PduO-type ATP : co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase as essential for B12 assimilation. Most notably, however, insertions in Rv1819c dominated the mutant pool, revealing an unexpected function in B12 acquisition for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type protein previously investigated as the mycobacterial BacA homologue. Moreover, targeted deletion of Rv1819c eliminated the ability of M. tuberculosis to transport B12 and related corrinoids in vitro. Our results establish an alternative to the canonical BtuCD-type system for B12 uptake in M. tuberculosis, and elucidate a role in B12 metabolism for an ABC protein implicated in chronic mycobacterial infection. PMID:23407640

  14. Vitamin B12 assays compared by use of patients sera with low vitamin B12 content

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, B.L.; Pearce, L.C.

    1985-05-01

    The authors compared four radioisotope dilution (RD) methods and a microbiological assay for measuring concentrations of vitamin B12 in a selected panel of serum samples from patients known to be deficient in the vitamin. Low (less than 100 ng/L) and borderline (100-180 ng/L) results were similar between methods, but use of the manufacturers recommended ranges for borderline results would have changed the diagnostic classifications for 22 of 38 samples. Results of all the RD methods inter-correlated well, but less so with the microbiological assay. Borderline, nondiagnostic results were common to all methods, and no apparent advantage was gained from using the microbiological assay.

  15. L-selectin and P-selectin are novel biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation for preclinical mucosal safety assessment of anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Maohua; He, Benxia; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Li, Liangzhu; Han, Chen; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Huimin

    2012-06-01

    A major obstacle thwarting preclinical development of microbicides is the lack of a validated biomarker of cervicovaginal inflammation. Therefore, the present study aims to identify novel noninvasive soluble markers in a murine model for assessment of microbicide mucosal safety. By performing cytokine antibody array analysis, we identified two adhesion molecules, L-selectin and P-selectin, which significantly increased when mucosal inflammation was triggered by nonoxynol-9 (N9), an anti-HIV-1 microbicide candidate that failed clinical trials, in a refined murine model of agent-induced cervicovaginal inflammation. We found that patterns of detection of L-selectin and P-selectin were obviously different from those of the two previously defined biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The levels of these two soluble selectins correlated better than those of MCP-1 and IL-6 with the duration and severity of mucosal inflammation triggered by N9 and two approved proinflammatory compounds, benzalkonium chloride (BZK) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), but not by two nonproinflammatory compounds, carboxymethyl celluose (CMC; microbicide excipients) and tenofovir (TFV; microbicide candidate). These data indicated that L-selectin and P-selectin can serve as additional novel cervicovaginal inflammation biomarkers for preclinical mucosal safety evaluation of candidate microbicides for the prevention of infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens. PMID:22391529

  16. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Karli, R; Gül, A; Uğur, B

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between otoacoustic emission (OAE) values and cochlear function in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss. Two groups were studied: Group 1: patients with vitamin B12 deficiency; Group 2: a matched control group of patients with normal vitamin B12 levels. There was no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss in either group. Transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAEs) and spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) were recorded. A comparative analysis of the studied parameters revealed that results at TEOAE 1000, SOAEs 1500 and SOAEs 4000 Hz were somewhat lower in the vitamin B12 deficient group compared with the control group. According to our findings, there was a significant association between vitamin B12 deficiency and cochlear dysfunction. We recommend that routine vitamin B12 serum levels be determined when evaluating patients for symptomatic hearing loss.

  17. Congenital B12 deficiency following maternal gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Celiker, M Y; Chawla, A

    2009-09-01

    Here we present a case of severe B12 deficiency in an exclusively breastfed infant, born to a mother who had undergone gastric bypass 6 years earlier. At 4 months of age, the infant presented with pancytopenia and developmental delay. Our evaluation revealed physical and neurological developmental delay, pancytopenia with macrocytosis, with head imaging showing cortical and subcortical atrophy. Serum studies showed low B12, normal folate and iron. Treatment with parenteral B12 led to the resolution of the pancytopenia, steady weight gain and improved neurological status. The child is currently 16 months old with normal anthropometric and hematological parameters and normal B12 levels on a regular diet. Gross motor and speech developments are significantly delayed. This case illustrates that maternal B12 deficiency following gastric bypass surgery may lead to severe B12 deficiency with long-term neurological sequelae in their infants. Screening and prompt treatment of these deficiencies both during pregnancy and during infancy are important.

  18. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups. PMID:24803097

  19. Vitamin B12 deficiency after irradiation for bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kinn, A.C.; Lantz, B.

    1984-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 10 of 41 patients who underwent radiotherapy before cystectomy with Bricker urinary diversion for carcinoma of the bladder. Of 13 patients given full irradiation because of inoperable bladder cancer 5 had malabsorption of vitamin B12. Serum folic acid was normal in these patients, indicating predominantly ileal irradiation sequelae. Routine evaluation of serum vitamin B12 after radiotherapy is recommended so that appropriate medication can be given, if possible before neurological symptoms appear.

  20. Vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast fed infant.

    PubMed

    McPhee, A J; Davidson, G P; Leahy, M; Beare, T

    1988-08-01

    We report the case of a 5 month old breast fed infant who presented with a history of vomiting, pallor, and failure to thrive. Investigations showed severe nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency with a megaloblastic pancytopenia. This deficiency was due to low vitamin B12 concentrations in the maternal breast milk, and subsequent investigations showed maternal pernicious anaemia. Treatment of the infant with vitamin B12 resulted in a rapid clinical and haematological improvement. This case represents an unusual presentation of pernicious anaemia.

  1. Vitamin B12 Deficiency due to Chlorofluorocarbon: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Hemlata; Chaudhary, Rekha

    2010-01-01

    Background. Vitamin B12 is vital for optimal functioning of various organ systems but more importantly the central nervous system and the hematological system. Deficiency of vitamin B12 clinically manifests as excessive daytime fatigue, memory difficulties, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and optic neuropathy. In occupational medicine, vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported with exposure to nitrous oxide in health care workers. However, not much is known about exposure to Freons in other industries and vitamin B12 deficiency. Aim. We are reporting a case of vitamin B12 deficiency in the setting of exposure to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. Case Report. A 55-year-old male refrigerator mechanic experienced recurrent visual symptoms, which included diplopia and blurring. A complete workup was done and was significant of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, his B12 levels were refractory to supplementation. Appropriate precautions at workplace improved patient's symptoms and were associated with significant improvement in B12 levels. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of vitamin B12 deficiency (that remains refractory to supplementation) in the setting of exposure to Freon gases. PMID:21461374

  2. [Treatable Dementia due to Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin deficiency is one of the major causes of treatable dementia. Specifically, patients suffering from dementia frequentry display low serum levels of vitamin B(12). There is a close metabolic interaction between folate and vitamin B(12). Folate deficiency causes various neuropsychiatric symptoms, which resemble those observed in vitamin B(12) deficiency. This review summarizes, the basic pathophysiology of vitamin B(12) and folate deficiency, its clinical diagnosis, associated neuropsychiatric symptoms such as subacute combined degeneration and dementia, and epidemiological studies of cognitive decline and brain atrophy.

  3. Unusual neurological presentations of vitamin B(12) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T-B; Cho, J-W; Jeon, B S

    2004-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) deficiency (B(12)D) has a wide variety of neurological symptoms and signs. However, cerebellar dysfunction and cranial neuropathies other than optic neuropathy have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe two cases of unusual neurological manifestations of B(12)D. One patient showed prominent hoarseness with vocal cord paralysis, myelopathy, and peripheral neuropathy. The other had gait disturbance, lateral gaze limitation and cerebellar dysfunction in addition to the typical manifestations of subacute combined degeneration. Vitamin B(12) deficiency can rarely affect cerebellum and cranial nerves other than optic nerve.

  4. [HPLC enantioseparation, absolute configuration determination and anti-HIV-1 activity of (±)-F18 enantiomers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei-lei; Xue, Hai; Li, Li; Lu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Zhi-wei; Lu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    Racemic (±)-F18 (10-chloromethyl-11-demethyl-12-oxo-calanolide A), an analog of nature product (+)-calanolide A, is a new anti-HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcript inhibitor (NNRTI). A successful enantioseparation of (±)-F18 offering (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 was achieved by a chiral stationary phase prepared HPLC. Their absolute configurations were determined by measurement of their electronic circular dichroisms combined with modem quantum-chemical calculations. Further investigation revealed that (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 shared a similar anti-HIV activities, however, (R)-F18 was more potent than (S)-F18 against wild-type virus, K101E mutation and P225H mutation pseudoviruses. PMID:26521445

  5. Aaptamine derivatives with antifungal and anti-HIV-1 activities from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Bing; Yang, Fan; Sun, Fan; Li, Jing; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Gan, Jian-Hong; Hu, Wen-Zhen; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Five new alkaloids of aaptamine family, compounds (1-5) and three known derivatives (6-8), have been isolated from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, as well as by comparison with the literature data. Compounds 1-2 are characterized with triazapyrene lactam skeleton, whereas compounds 4-5 share an imidazole-fused aaptamine moiety. These compounds were evaluated in antifungal and anti-HIV-1 assays. Compounds 3, 7, and 8 showed antifungal activity against six fungi, with MIC values in the range of 4 to 64 μg/mL. Compounds 7-8 exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity, with inhibitory rates of 88.0% and 72.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM.

  6. A new vinyl selenone-based domino approach to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles endowed with anti-HIV RT activity.

    PubMed

    Palomba, M; Rossi, L; Sancineto, L; Tramontano, E; Corona, A; Bagnoli, L; Santi, C; Pannecouque, C; Tabarrini, O; Marini, F

    2016-02-14

    Herein, we disclose a general and flexible access to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles by a domino Michael/intramolecular nucleophilic substitution pathway with variously substituted vinyl selenones and enolizable oxindoles in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The spirocyclopropyl oxindole being a privileged scaffold, some of the synthesized compounds were selected for biological evaluation. Compound showed selective anti-HIV-1 activity thanks to its ability to inhibit the reverse transcriptase.

  7. Development of water-soluble polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers as novel and highly potent topical anti-HIV-2 microbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briz, Verónica; Sepúlveda-Crespo, Daniel; Diniz, Ana Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Rodes, Berta; de La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Taveira, Nuno; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    The development of topical microbicide formulations for vaginal delivery to prevent HIV-2 sexual transmission is urgently needed. Second- and third-generation polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers with a silicon atom core and 16 sulfonate (G2-S16), napthylsulfonate (G2-NS16) and sulphate (G3-Sh16) end-groups have shown potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. However, their antiviral activity against HIV-2 and mode of action have not been probed. Cytotoxicity, anti-HIV-2, anti-sperm and antimicrobial activities of dendrimers were determined. Analysis of combined effects of triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir was performed by using CalcuSyn software. We also assessed the mode of antiviral action on the inhibition of HIV-2 infection through a panel of different in vitro antiviral assays: attachment, internalization in PBMCs, inactivation and cell-based fusion. Vaginal irritation and histological analysis in female BALB/c mice were evaluated. Our results suggest that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 exert anti-HIV-2 activity at an early stage of viral replication inactivating the virus, inhibiting cell-to-cell HIV-2 transmission, and blocking the binding of gp120 to CD4, and the HIV-2 entry. Triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir increased the anti-HIV-2 activity, consistent with synergistic interactions (CIwt: 0.33-0.66). No vaginal irritation was detected in BALB/c mice after two consecutive applications for 2 days with 3% G2-S16. Our results have clearly shown that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 have high potency against HIV-2 infection. The modes of action confirm their multifactorial and non-specific ability, suggesting that these dendrimers deserve further studies as potential candidate microbicides to prevent vaginal/rectal HIV-1/HIV-2 transmission in humans.

  8. Evaluation of Atazanavir and Darunavir Interactions with Lipids for Developing pH-responsive Anti-HIV Drug Combination Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jinghua; Freeling, Jennifer P.; Koehn, Josefin; Shu, Cuiling; Ho, Rodney J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated two HIV protease inhibitors, atazanavir and darunavir, for pH-dependent solubility, lipid binding, and drug release from lipid nanoparticles. Both atazanavir and darunavir incorporated into lipid nanoparticles composed of pegylated and non-pegylated phospholipids with nearly 100% efficiency, but only atazanavir lipid nanoparticles formed stable lipid-drug particles and exhibited pH-dependent drug release. Darunavir lipid nanoparticles were unstable and formed mixed micelles at low drug-lipid concentrations, and thus are not suitable for lipid-drug particle development. When atazanavir lipid nanoparticles were prepared with ritonavir, a metabolic and cellular membrane exporter inhibitor, and tenofovir, an HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, stable, scalable, and reproducible anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles were produced. Drug incorporation efficiencies of 85.5 ± 8.2, 85.1 ± 7.1, and 6.1 ± 0.8 % for atazanavir, ritonavir, and tenofovir, respectively, were achieved. Preliminary primate pharmacokinetic studies with these pH-responsive anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles administered subcutaneously produced detectable plasma concentrations that lasted for 7 days for all three drugs. These anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles could be developed as a long-acting targeted antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24948204

  9. The utility of self-emulsifying oil formulation to improve the poor solubility of the anti HIV drug CSIC

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CSIC (5-chloro-3-phenylsulfonylindole-2-carboxamide), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) has not been advanced as a therapeutic anti-HIV candidate drug due to its low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. Objective The objective of this work was to formulate CSIC into self-emulsifying oil formulations for the purpose of improving its aqueous solubility and evaluating in vitro antiretroviral activity. Methods CSIC self-emulsifying oil formulations (SEFs) were formulated and evaluated for droplet size, zeta potential, polydispersity index (PDI), viscosity, emulsification time, stability and bioactivity. Results Results showed significantly improved solubility of CSIC in the SEFs.The concentration of co-surfactant affected the droplet size, zeta potential and polydispersity index. In vitro bioactivity studies showed that the CSIC SEFs retained full anti-HIV activity. Conclusion The in vitro data from this first attempt to formulate CSIC SEFs suggest that improvement on the aqueous solubility of CSIC through this delivery system may accentuate its antiretroviral effectiveness in vivo via bioavailability enhancement. The formulation is therefore intended as an oral anti-HIV agent for prophylactic and therapeutic uses. PMID:23721408

  10. Further Studies on the Binding of Vitamin B12 to the Cell Wall of a B12-Requiring Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takashi

    1972-01-01

    The vitamin B12-binding property of Lactobacillus leichmannii ATCC 7830 has been studied. The organism could bind 0.52 μg of B12 per mg of cells. With regard to the cellular site for B12 accumulation, three-quarters of the B12 bound to the cell was found in the crude cell wall fraction, and the remaining one-quarter was found in the particulate (ribosome) fraction. After receiving enzymatic treatments with ribonuclease, lipase, and trypsin, the wall fraction retained three-fifths of the initial B12. The possibility of cross-contamination of the wall and particulate fractions was excluded by measuring the contents of ribonucleic acid and hexosamines in each fraction. The B12-binding activity of the wall was destroyed by pretreatment of the wall with pepsin, Pronase, or trypsin. However, once bound to the wall, the B12 was not released by the same treatments. These facts suggest that B12 is bound to a polypeptide in the wall on which these enzymes act and that, once bound, B12 somehow inhibits the enzymatic actions as described earlier with L. delbrueckii no. 1. A B12-polypeptide complex was isolated by treatment with 0.2 n HCl from walls to which B12 had been bound. The complex was then purified. The complex moves as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular weight was estimated around 21,500 with microheterogeneity on a Sephadex G-75 column. The mode of B12 binding was found to be similar to that of L. delbrueckii. Images PMID:4550659

  11. Hooked to vitamin B12 since 1955: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gräsbeck, Ralph

    2013-05-01

    In our pioneering work in 1956, two binders of vitamin B12 (B12) alias cobalamin (Cbl) were identified in gastric juice, S with slow electrophoretic mobility, a 70 kD protein with intrinsic factor (IF) activity and another rapid (R), not IF active but probable digestion product. Numerous sources contained a protein immunologically identical to R (haptocorrin, Hc). Another IF-active component (I) was found. Isoelectric focusing showed that S, I and R were assemblies of "isoproteins" with different pI's due to varying glycosidation. Isolation of S, I and R in microquantities was achieved in 1962 using a series of ion exchange chromatographies and gel filtration. Ponderable products were obtained in 1965-1966. The B12-IF complex was a dimer, contained 13% carbohydrate and showed a different absorption spectrum than B12. Using the Schilling test, B12 absorption was shown to require Ca(++), bound in vitro to the ileal receptor and IF, but most of Ca(++) could be removed with sialidase. The receptor-substrate complex contained Ca(++) and carbohydrate. The purified receptor was shown to contain two main subunits. The Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome was discovered 1958-1960; it is caused by mutations in either of two genes, cubilin or amnionless, which form the multiligand receptor cubam. Testicular biopsies during and after B12-treated deficiency showed remarkable improvement after therapy. Studies of the turnover of radioactive B12 revealed biliary and fecal excretion, enterohepatic circulation and allowed calculation of biological half-life and daily need. The B12 coenzymes largely behaved like B12. To study whether radiocobalt in B12 was representative of the rest of the B12 molecule, (32)P and (57)Co labeled hydroxocobalamins were biosynthesized and shown to behave identically when given simultaneously to rats. The complex metabolism of B12 explains the pathogenesis of B12 deficiencies. Some of its mechanisms are not restricted to B12, e.g. the endocytosis of B12-IF

  12. A modified ELISA and western blot accurately determine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies in oral fluids obtained with a special collecting device.

    PubMed

    Emmons, W W; Paparello, S F; Decker, C F; Sheffield, J M; Lowe-Bey, F H

    1995-06-01

    Serum and saliva from 195 known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 198 military personnel undergoing annual HIV serologic testing were evaluated in a prospective, blinded fashion for anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Oral specimens, collected with a device designed to concentrate oral mucosal transudate from whole saliva, were tested by a modified ELISA and by Western blot. Serum was tested in a standard manner. All 195 HIV-1-seropositive subjects had detectable anti-HIV-1 antibodies in their saliva by ELISA; 190 saliva samples were positive by Western blot and 5 were indeterminate. None of the 198 military personnel were positive by ELISA of serum or oral fluid. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for ELISA of saliva were each 100%. The serologic testing of oral mucosal transudate appears to be a simple, safe, sensitive, and specific method for detecting anti-HIV-1 antibodies.

  13. Neutralizing Antibodies Inhibit HIV-1 Infection of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by an FcγRIIa Independent Mechanism and Do Not Diminish Cytokines Production

    PubMed Central

    Lederle, Alexandre; Su, Bin; Holl, Vincent; Penichon, Julien; Schmidt, Sylvie; Decoville, Thomas; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) expressing FcγRIIa are antigen-presenting cells able to link innate and adaptive immunity and producing various cytokines and chemokines. Although highly restricted, they are able to replicate HIV-1. We determined the activity of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies (NNIAb) on the infection of primary pDC by HIV-1 primary isolates and analyzed cytokines and chemokines production. Neutralization assay was performed with primary pDC in the presence of serial antibodies (Ab) concentrations. In parallel, we measured the release of cytokines and chemokines by ELISA and CBA Flex assay. We found that NAb, but not NNIAb, inhibit HIV-1 replication in pDC. This inhibitory activity was lower than that detected for myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) infection and independent of FcγRIIa expressed on pDC. Despite the complete protection, IFN-α production was detected in the supernatant of pDC treated with NAb VRC01, 4E10, PGT121, 10-1074, 10E8, or polyclonal IgG44 but not with NAb b12. Production of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by pDC was also maintained in the presence of 4E10, b12 and VRC01. These findings suggest that pDC can be protected from HIV-1 infection by both NAb and IFN-α release triggered by the innate immune response during infection. PMID:25132382

  14. Coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide gel: boundary dilution and yield stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Tasoglu, Savas; Park, Su Chan; Katz, David F.

    2010-11-01

    A recent study has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when topically applied, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [1]. However, the gel for this drug, and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general, have not been designed using an understanding of how gel spreading govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model spreading of microbicide gels [2]. Here, we extend our initial analysis: we incorporate a yield stress, and we model the effects of gel dilution due to contact with vaginal fluid produced at the gel-tissue interface. Our model developed in [2] is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to characterize dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain. The association between local dilution of gel and rheological properties is obtained experimentally. To model the common yield stress property of gels, we proceed by scaling analysis first. This establishes the conditions for validity of lubrication theory of a shear thinning yield stress fluid. This involves further development of the model in [2], incorporating a biviscosity model.[4pt] [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.[0pt] [2] Szeri, et al., Phy. of Fluids, 2008.

  15. Deformation density components analysis of fullerene-based anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Fakhraee, Sara; Souri, Maryam

    2014-11-01

    Deformation density analysis is performed on fullerene-based anti-HIV agents to investigate the influence of charge redistribution on the capability of binding to HIV enzymes. Two types of HIV inhibitors including malonic acid- and amino acid-type C60 derivatives are considered to study. Total deformation density and its components including orbital relaxation and kinetic energy pressure are obtained for C60 derivatives. The deformation natural orbitals for each component of deformation density are assessed and their amounts of charge displacement are quantified to evaluate the binding affinity of HIV inhibitors. The results show that the orbital relaxation plays a more prominent role in deformation of electron density of studied compounds. Among the considered drugs, the amino acid-type derivatives, N-(carboxymethyl)-2,5-dicarboxylic fulleropyrrolidines, show the most charge displacement. Moreover, the investigation into the deformation density of amino acid-type functional groups on C60 reveals that the connection of functional groups to the 5,6-ring junction results more displaced charge than the connection to the 6,6-ring junction.

  16. Glycosystems in nanotechnology: Gold glyconanoparticles as carrier for anti-HIV prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Calvo, Javier; Yuste, Eloisa; Penadés, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the treatment of HIV infection is based on the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. Notwithstanding HAART has shown different drawbacks like toxic side effects and the emergence of viral multidrug resistance. Nanotechnology offers new tools to improve HIV drug treatment and prevention. In this scenario, gold nanoparticles are an interesting chemical tool to design and prepare smart and efficient drug-delivery systems. Here we describe the preparation and antiviral activity of carbohydrate-coated gold nanoparticles loaded with anti-HIV prodrug candidates. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors abacavir and lamivudine have been converted to the corresponding thiol-ending ester derivatives and then conjugated to ~3 nm glucose-coated gold nanoparticles by means of "thiol-for-thiol" ligand place exchange reactions. The drugs-containing glyconanoparticles were characterized and the pH-mediated release of the drug from the nanoparticle has been determined. The antiviral activity was tested by evaluating the replication of NL4-3 HIV in TZM-bl infected cells. The proof-of-principle presented in this work aims to introduce gold glyconanoparticles as a new multifunctional drug-delivery system in the therapy against HIV.

  17. Glycosystems in nanotechnology: Gold glyconanoparticles as carrier for anti-HIV prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Calvo, Javier; Yuste, Eloisa; Penadés, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the treatment of HIV infection is based on the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. Notwithstanding HAART has shown different drawbacks like toxic side effects and the emergence of viral multidrug resistance. Nanotechnology offers new tools to improve HIV drug treatment and prevention. In this scenario, gold nanoparticles are an interesting chemical tool to design and prepare smart and efficient drug-delivery systems. Here we describe the preparation and antiviral activity of carbohydrate-coated gold nanoparticles loaded with anti-HIV prodrug candidates. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors abacavir and lamivudine have been converted to the corresponding thiol-ending ester derivatives and then conjugated to ~3 nm glucose-coated gold nanoparticles by means of "thiol-for-thiol" ligand place exchange reactions. The drugs-containing glyconanoparticles were characterized and the pH-mediated release of the drug from the nanoparticle has been determined. The antiviral activity was tested by evaluating the replication of NL4-3 HIV in TZM-bl infected cells. The proof-of-principle presented in this work aims to introduce gold glyconanoparticles as a new multifunctional drug-delivery system in the therapy against HIV. PMID:24991287

  18. Glycosylated enfuvirtide: a long-lasting glycopeptide with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuihong; Chang, Xuesong; Wang, Yan; Gao, George F; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying; Li, Xuebing

    2015-02-12

    Many peptide-based therapeutics have short circulatory half-lives. We report here that the pharmacokinetics of an anti-HIV peptide drug enfuvirtide (ENF) can be dramatically improved by a chemical glycosylation approach. A set of glycosylated ENFs with varying glycosylation sites and glycan structures were synthesized. Among these, a sialic acid-introduced peptide (SL-ENF) demonstrated a 15-fold extended half-life in rats relative to ENF (T1/2: 23.1 vs 1.5 h), and its antiviral potency was comparable to that of ENF (EC50: 2 vs 3 nM). SL-ENF bound to a functional fragment of the HIV fusogenic protein gp41 and formed complexes with high affinity and α-helicity, revealing the mechanism behind its potent antiviral activity. Because it is widely accepted in biology that glycosylation protects proteins from denaturation and proteases, our approach may be useful for the development of novel protein and peptide drugs with enhanced pharmaceutical properties.

  19. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  20. Preventing sexual transmission of HIV: anti-HIV bioregulatory and homeostatic components of commercial sexual lubricants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D; Lee, H; Poast, J; Cloyd, M W; Baron, S

    2004-01-01

    Certain safe over-the-counter (OTC) sexual lubricants such as Astroglide, KY Liquid, Replens, Vagisil, ViAmor, and Wet Stuff inhibit both cell-free HIV and the production of HIV by infected leukocytes in vitro even in the presence of seminal fluid. To identify which components of the lubricants were active against HIV, we tested five components (glycerin, methylparaben, propylparaben, polyquaternium-32, and propylene glycol). The paraben preservatives and propylene glycol in the lubricants did not inhibit HIV, while the common natural homeostatic metabolite, glycerin, and the thickener polyquaternium-32 did strongly inactivate infectious HIV and HIV-infected leukocytes. Activity against HIV and HIV-infected cells by glycerin was stable through 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Glycerin and polyquaternium-32 were active at minimum concentrations of approximately 2% and 0.01%, respectively--well within the highest FDA safety guidelines. Both active components disrupted infected leukocytes within 5 minutes which resulted in inhibition of infectious HIV production by infected leukocytes of greater than 25 to 100-fold. These components do not disrupt vaginal epithelial cells in vivo. These components also rapidly inactivate cell-free HIV by 10- to 30-fold. Thus, we may conclude that the active components of the OTC lubricants are glycerin and polyquaternium-32. Using these components, OTC sexual lubricants could be reformulated to optimize their anti-HIV activity. Furthermore, clinical trials of these lubricants and components seem to be indicated because of their FDA safety level, wide availability, and low cost.

  1. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ∼66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to α3,α6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  2. Transient swelling behavior and drug delivery from a dissolving film deploying anti-HIV microbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Despite more than two decades of HIV vaccine research, there is still no efficacious HIV vaccine. Very recently, a research group has shown that a microbicide gel formulation of antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, significantly inhibits HIV transmission to women [1]. However, there is a widespread agreement that more effective and diverse drug delivery vehicles must be developed. In this setting, there is now great interest in developing different delivery vehicles such as vaginal rings, gels, and films. Here, we develop a model for transient fluid uptake and swelling behavior, and subsequent dissolution and drug deployment from a film containing anti-HIV microbicide. In the model, the polymer structural relaxation via water uptake is assumed to follow first order kinetics. In the case of a film loaded with an osmotically active solute, the kinetic equation is modified to account for the osmotic effect. The transport rate of solvent and solute within the matrix is characterized by a diffusion equation. After the matrix is relaxed to a specified concentration of solvent, lubrication theory and convective-diffusive transport are employed for flow of the liquefied matrix and drug dispersion respectively. [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.

  3. Effects of dilution on elastohydrodynamic coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew; Park, Su Chan; Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.

    2009-11-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates characterizes the drug delivery of anti-HIV topical microbicides carried in gel vehicles. These gels are under development to prevent HIV transmission into vulnerable vaginal mucosa during intercourse. Their effectiveness depends on completeness and durability of coating, as well as on the active ingredients. Here we investigate the influence of dilution by vaginal fluid on the coating flows that serve to protect the user. The effects of dilution by vaginal fluid simulant are assessed through rheological experiments at variable dilution of the gel vehicle. This involves determination of the way parameters in a Carreau model of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. The changes in coating are determined from a computational model, based on dilution rheology measured in the laboratory. The elastohydrodynamic lubrication model of Szeri, et al. Physics of Fluids (2008) is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to handle dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain.

  4. Preventing sexual transmission of HIV: anti-HIV bioregulatory and homeostatic components of commercial sexual lubricants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D; Lee, H; Poast, J; Cloyd, M W; Baron, S

    2004-01-01

    Certain safe over-the-counter (OTC) sexual lubricants such as Astroglide, KY Liquid, Replens, Vagisil, ViAmor, and Wet Stuff inhibit both cell-free HIV and the production of HIV by infected leukocytes in vitro even in the presence of seminal fluid. To identify which components of the lubricants were active against HIV, we tested five components (glycerin, methylparaben, propylparaben, polyquaternium-32, and propylene glycol). The paraben preservatives and propylene glycol in the lubricants did not inhibit HIV, while the common natural homeostatic metabolite, glycerin, and the thickener polyquaternium-32 did strongly inactivate infectious HIV and HIV-infected leukocytes. Activity against HIV and HIV-infected cells by glycerin was stable through 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Glycerin and polyquaternium-32 were active at minimum concentrations of approximately 2% and 0.01%, respectively--well within the highest FDA safety guidelines. Both active components disrupted infected leukocytes within 5 minutes which resulted in inhibition of infectious HIV production by infected leukocytes of greater than 25 to 100-fold. These components do not disrupt vaginal epithelial cells in vivo. These components also rapidly inactivate cell-free HIV by 10- to 30-fold. Thus, we may conclude that the active components of the OTC lubricants are glycerin and polyquaternium-32. Using these components, OTC sexual lubricants could be reformulated to optimize their anti-HIV activity. Furthermore, clinical trials of these lubricants and components seem to be indicated because of their FDA safety level, wide availability, and low cost. PMID:15786693

  5. Vegan diet, subnormal vitamin B-12 status and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kam S; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Celermajer, David S

    2014-08-19

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases.

  6. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  7. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  8. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  9. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  10. Nature and nurture in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zschocke, J; Schindler, S; Hoffmann, G F; Albani, M

    2002-07-01

    We report on a child in whom severe nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency was exacerbated by a genetic impairment of the folate cycle, causing reduced CSF concentrations of the methyl group donor 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Some patients with vitamin B12 deficiency may benefit from high dose folic acid supplementation, even if plasma concentrations are high.

  11. Vitamin B12 deficiency: issues in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Meiner, Sue E

    2004-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a relatively common occurrence with potentially devastating consequences. The wide range of etiologies and symptoms makes it imperative for the nurse to use a comprehensive approach to assessing and managing the patient with vitamin B12 deficiency.

  12. Vegan diet, subnormal vitamin B-12 status and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kam S; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Celermajer, David S

    2014-08-01

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases. PMID:25195560

  13. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  14. Brain damage in infancy and dietary vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wighton, M C; Manson, J I; Speed, I; Robertson, E; Chapman, E

    1979-07-14

    A case of the exclusively breast-fed infant of a vegetarian mother is reported. Neurological deterioration commenced between three and six months of age, and progressed to a comatose premoribund state by the age of nine months. Investigations revealed a mild nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in the mother, and a very severe nutritional B12 deficiency in the infant, with severe megaloblastic anaemia. Treatment of the infant with vitamin B12 resulted in a rapid clinical and haematological improvement, but neurological recovery was incomplete. Evidence is presented that dietary B12 deficiency was the sole cause of the infant's deterioration, and the literature relating to the condition is reviewed. It is recommended that all strict vegetarians (vegans), especially women in the child-bearing age group, take vitamin B12 supplements.

  15. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency.

  16. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in hospitalized young children.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Feyzullah; Yildirmak, Yildiz; Kutluk, Gunsel; Erdem, Ela

    2007-01-01

    The authors sought to determine prevalence, social, economic, and dietary patterns of young children (n = 20) identified as having vitamin B12 deficiency anemia after admission to their hospital in the last 3 years. The diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency was based on symptoms and clinical findings, findings on peripheral blood films and bone marrow aspirates, and serum levels of vitamin B12. The children had been exclusively breast-fed without any animal food supplementation. Serum vitamin B12 levels were also measured in the sera of mothers and found to be low. The authors concluded that vitamin B12 deficiency might be an important health problem among children of mothers who do not consume animal foods adequately.

  17. Helicobacter pylori associated vitamin B12 deficiency, pernicious anaemia and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gowdappa, H Basavana; Mahesh, M; Murthy, K V K S N; Narahari, M G

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with weakness in the lower limbs, numbness in hands and feet over past 6 months. Examination revealed a combination of absent ankle jerk, extensor plantar response and reduced sensations in a glove and stocking distribution. MRI of the spinal cord was distinctive of subacute combined degeneration (SACD) of the spinal cord. Serum vitamin B12 was low and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive. A biopsy of the stomach revealed intense inflammatory infiltrates in lamina propria with grade III Helicobacter pylori infection. Other work-up for the cause of vitamin B12 deficiency was unremarkable. H pylori infection triggers autoantibodies by a mechanism of molecular mimicry. This case report highlights H pylori as a causative agent in vitamin B12 deficiency and culminating in SACD of the spinal cord. H pylori treatment reverses the underlying pathogenesis and corrects vitamin B12 deficient state in selected individuals. PMID:24081591

  18. Helicobacter pylori associated vitamin B12 deficiency, pernicious anaemia and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gowdappa, H Basavana; Mahesh, M; Murthy, K V K S N; Narahari, M G

    2013-09-30

    A 23-year-old man presented with weakness in the lower limbs, numbness in hands and feet over past 6 months. Examination revealed a combination of absent ankle jerk, extensor plantar response and reduced sensations in a glove and stocking distribution. MRI of the spinal cord was distinctive of subacute combined degeneration (SACD) of the spinal cord. Serum vitamin B12 was low and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive. A biopsy of the stomach revealed intense inflammatory infiltrates in lamina propria with grade III Helicobacter pylori infection. Other work-up for the cause of vitamin B12 deficiency was unremarkable. H pylori infection triggers autoantibodies by a mechanism of molecular mimicry. This case report highlights H pylori as a causative agent in vitamin B12 deficiency and culminating in SACD of the spinal cord. H pylori treatment reverses the underlying pathogenesis and corrects vitamin B12 deficient state in selected individuals.

  19. Characterisation of vitamin B12 immunoaffinity columns and method development for determination of vitamin B12 in a range of foods, juices and pharmaceutical products using immunoaffinity clean-up and high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Marley, E C; Mackay, E; Young, G

    2009-03-01

    New rapid and simpler procedures, using immunoaffinity columns, have been developed for the determination of vitamin B12 in a range of samples including three different US National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) Reference Materials, infant formula, powdered energy drinks and bars, wheat breakfast cereal, carbonated soft drinks, fruit juices and vitamin B12 tablets. The procedures involved extraction of vitamin B12 using water or sodium acetate buffer and enzyme digestion (using pepsin or alpha-amylase, or both) if necessary. The extract was clarified and passed through "EASI-EXTRACT Vitamin B12", an immunoaffinity column containing monoclonal antibody with high affinity and specificity to vitamin B12. Subsequently, the vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column was washed with 10 ml water and the vitamin B12 was released from the column with 3 ml methanol. Following evaporation, the samples were reconstituted in mobile phase and analysed by HPLC-UV at 361 nm on an ACE 3AQ analytical column using a gradient elution consisting of 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid in water and acetonitrile. Analysis of three types of NIST Standard Reference Materials in triplicate demonstrated the results of the immunoaffinity column method were comparable to microbiological assay results. Method repeatability was determined for all samples analysed and ranged between 0.8 and 10%, demonstrating the method was repeatable with complex matrices (NIST 2383) containing low levels of vitamin B12 (0.44 microg per 100 g), as well as simpler matrices, such as vitamin tablets containing high levels (2000 microg per 0.849 g) of vitamin B12. PMID:19680900

  20. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology. PMID:26884697

  1. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology.

  2. Characterization of vitamin B12 in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kumudha, Anantharajappa; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of nature's complex metabolite which is industrially produced using certain bacteria. Algae could be an alternative source of vitamin B12 and in this study, vitamin B12 from a halotolerant green alga, Dunaliella salina V-101 was purified and characterized. The extract of Dunaliella was purified by passing through Amberlite XAD-2 and EASI-extract vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column. The total vitamin B12 content in purified sample fractions was 42 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as determined by the chemiluminescence method which was almost close to 49 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as estimated by microbiological method. Further quantification of total vitamin B12 using gold nanoparticle (AUNPs) based aptamer showed 40 ± 0.8/100 g dry weight. There was a good correlation among all the methods of quantification. Adenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 which is a cofactor for methylmalonyl CoA mutase was identified by HPLC. Upon quantification, Dunaliella was found to contain 34 ± 4 μg of adenosylcobalamin for 100 g dry biomass. Authenticity of adenosylcobalmin was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), selected ion recording (SIR) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) studies. PMID:26788012

  3. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  4. Characterization of vitamin B12 in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kumudha, Anantharajappa; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of nature's complex metabolite which is industrially produced using certain bacteria. Algae could be an alternative source of vitamin B12 and in this study, vitamin B12 from a halotolerant green alga, Dunaliella salina V-101 was purified and characterized. The extract of Dunaliella was purified by passing through Amberlite XAD-2 and EASI-extract vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column. The total vitamin B12 content in purified sample fractions was 42 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as determined by the chemiluminescence method which was almost close to 49 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as estimated by microbiological method. Further quantification of total vitamin B12 using gold nanoparticle (AUNPs) based aptamer showed 40 ± 0.8/100 g dry weight. There was a good correlation among all the methods of quantification. Adenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 which is a cofactor for methylmalonyl CoA mutase was identified by HPLC. Upon quantification, Dunaliella was found to contain 34 ± 4 μg of adenosylcobalamin for 100 g dry biomass. Authenticity of adenosylcobalmin was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), selected ion recording (SIR) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) studies.

  5. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  6. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (<5 μm) phytoplankton varied independently of B12 concentrations. These observations were corroborated by field-based nutrient amendment experiments, in which B12 additions stimulated growth of large phytoplankton taxa 6-fold over unamended controls. In contrast, small taxa (<5 μm) were largely unaffected. This study provides the first evidence of vitamin B12's influence on phytoplankton field population dynamics based on direct chemical measurements of cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  7. Considering the case for vitamin B12 fortification of flour.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H; Rosenberg, Irwin H; Oakley, Godfrey P; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2010-03-01

    Reasons to fortify flour with vitamin B12 are considered, including the high prevalence of depletion and deficiency of this vitamin that occurs in persons of all ages in resource-poor countries and in the elderly in wealthier countries, and the adverse functional consequences of poor vitamin B12 status. From a global perspective, the main cause of inadequate intake and status is a low intake of animal-source foods; even lacto-ovo vegetarians have lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations than omnivores, and for various reasons many populations have limited consumption of animal-source foods. Infants are vitamin B12-depleted from early infancy if their mothers' vitamin B12 status and intake are poor during pregnancy and lactation. Even in the United States, more than 20% of the elderly have serum vitamin B12 concentrations that indicate depletion, and an additional 6% have deficiency, primarily due to gastric atrophy, which impairs the absorption of the vitamin from food but usually not from supplements or fortified foods. Although the evidence is limited, it shows that fortified flour, consumed as bread, can improve vitamin B12 status. Where vitamin B12 fortification is implemented, the recommendation is to add 20 microg/kg flour, assuming consumption of 75 to 100 g flour per day, to provide 75% to 100% of the Estimated Average Requirement; the amount of the vitamin that can be added is limited by its cost. The effectiveness of this level of addition for improving vitamin B12 status in programs needs to be determined and monitored. In addition, further research should evaluate the bioavailability of the vitamin from fortified flour by elderly people with food cobalamin malabsorption and gastric atrophy.

  8. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period.

  9. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period. PMID:19852900

  10. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  11. Syndecan-Fc Hybrid Molecule as a Potent In Vitro Microbicidal Anti-HIV-1 Agent▿

    PubMed Central

    Bobardt, Michael D.; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; de Witte, Lot; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of a vaccine, there is an urgent need for the development of safe and effective topical microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we proposed to develop a novel class of microbicides using syndecan as the antiviral agent. Specifically, we generated a soluble syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule by fusing the ectodomain of syndecan-1 to the Fc domain of a human IgG. We then tested the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule for various in vitro microbicidal anti-HIV-1 properties. Remarkably, the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule possesses multiple attractive microbicidal properties: (i) it blocks HIV-1 infection of primary targets including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC); (ii) it exhibits a broad range of antiviral activity against primary HIV-1 isolates, multidrug resistant HIV-1 isolates, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV); (iii) it prevents transmigration of HIV-1 through human primary genital epithelial cells; (iv) it prevents HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells to CD4+ T cells; (v) it is potent when added 2 h prior to addition of HIV-1 to target cells; (vi) it is potent at a low pH; (vii) it blocks HIV-1 infectivity when diluted in genital fluids; and (viii) it prevents herpes simplex virus infection. The heparan sulfate chains of the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule are absolutely required for HIV-1 neutralization. Several lines of evidence suggest that the highly conserved Arg298 in the V3 region of gp120 serves as the locus for the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule neutralization. In conclusion, this study suggests that the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule represents the prototype of a new generation of microbicidal agents that may have promise for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:20439611

  12. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-08-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  13. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kutta, Roger J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Johannissen, Linus O; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S; Jones, Alex R

    2015-08-12

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  14. Vitamin B12 absorption capacity in healthy children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.; Krasilnikoff, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    B12 absorption was investigated in 47 healthy children aged 7 months to 15.8 years (median 4.9 years). The patients had either recovered from giardiasis, the post-gastroenteritis syndrome, or had celiac disease in remission (treated with a gluten-free diet). The B12 absorption was measured by a double-isotope technique using /sup 57/CoB12 and /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/, the latter being the inabsorbable marker. The radiation dose was minimal. The results were presented as fractional absorption of B12 (FAB12). Within the different age groups, the absorption test was performed by means of the following oral amounts of B12: 0- less than 1 year, 0.5 microgram; 1-3 years: 1.7 micrograms, 4-6 years, 2.5 micrograms; 7-10 years; 3.3 micrograms; and 11-15 years, 4.5 micrograms. When using these oral amounts of B12, the medians (and ranges) of FAB12 were found to be: 1-3 years (n = 18), 37% (16-80%); 4-6 years (n = 10), 27% (19-40%); 7-10 years (n = 9), 32% (21-44%); and 11-15 years (n = 8), 27% (19-59%). The FAB12 in two children aged 7 and 11 months was 31% and 32%, respectively. These results may be interpretated as reference values for B12 absorption in children. Further absorption tests were performed in seven children representing the four age groups from 1 to 15 years. When a high oral amount of B12 was given (i.e., three times the saturation dose), the FAB12 ranged from 0 to 20% (median 9%), whereas a low amount (i.e., one-ninth of the saturation dose) produced fractional absorptions from 65 to 82% (median 74%).

  15. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  16. A rare case of vitamin B12 deficiency with ascites.

    PubMed

    Rajsekhar, Putta; Reddy, Mugannagari Maheshwar; Vaddera, Sameeraja; Rajini, G; Tikeli, Vinil

    2014-07-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widespread than assumed in population. At risk are older people, pregnant women, vegans, patients with renal and intestinal diseases. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. In the population, the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in younger people is 5% to 7% which is less compared to elderly people. In developing countries, deficiency is much more common, starting in early life and persisting across the life span. Here, we present a 16-year-old female patient presenting with ascites since 2 months who was subsequently investigated and diagnosed to have nutritional megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency after exclusion of other infective, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inspite, patient was treated with antitubercular drugs but she did not respond. After supplementation of Vitamin B12, ascites responded well. Inadequate intake due to low consumption of animal source foods is the main cause of low serum vitamin B12 in younger adults and likely the main cause in poor population worldwide.

  17. Cross-reactive lysis of human targets infected with prototypic and clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains by murine anti-HIV-1 IIIB env-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chada, S; DeJesus, C E; Townsend, K; Lee, W T; Laube, L; Jolly, D J; Chang, S M; Warner, J F

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of murine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB env cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to recognize and lyse HIV-1-infected cells, we have constructed a human cell line (Hu/Dd) expressing both the CD4 receptor and the murine H-2Dd major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein. This cell line can be productively infected with HIV-1 and can also function as a target for murine CD8+, class I MHC-restricted CTL directed against the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 IIIB. The ability of BALB/c anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL to specifically recognize and lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with divergent HIV-1 strains was tested by using both prototypic and clinical HIV-1 strains. CTL generated by immunization of mice with syngeneic cells expressing either the native or V3 loop-deleted (delta V3) envelope glycoprotein from HIV-1 IIIB were able to recognize and specifically lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with the HIV-1 prototypic isolates IIIB, MN, WMJ II, SF2, and CC as well as several HIV-1 clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that CTL determinants for HIV-1 env exist outside the hypervariable V3 region, anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL appear to recognize common determinants on diverse HIV-1 strains, and classification of HIV-1 strains based on neutralizing antibody reactivities does not appear to correspond to CTL recognition and lysis. The results suggest that the cell-mediated components of the immune system may have a broader recognition of divergent HIV-1 strains than do the humoral components. Images PMID:8497058

  18. Evaluation of PD 404,182 as an Anti-HIV and Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun-Emanuelli, Ana M.; Bobardt, Michael; Moncla, Bernard; Mankowski, Marie K.; Ptak, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    PD 404,182 (PD) is a synthetic compound that was found to compromise HIV integrity via interaction with a nonenvelope protein viral structural component (A. M. Chamoun et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 56:672–681, 2012). The present study evaluates the potential of PD as an anti-HIV microbicide and establishes PD's virucidal activity toward another pathogen, herpes simplex virus (HSV). We show that the anti-HIV-1 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PD, when diluted in seminal plasma, is ∼1 μM, similar to the IC50 determined in cell culture growth medium, and that PD retains full anti-HIV-1 activity after incubation in cervical fluid at 37°C for at least 24 h. In addition, PD is nontoxic toward vaginal commensal Lactobacillus species (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50], >300 μM), freshly activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CC50, ∼200 μM), and primary CD4+ T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (CC50, >300 μM). PD also exhibited high stability in pH-adjusted Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline with little to no activity loss after 8 weeks at pH 4 and 42°C, indicating suitability for formulation for transportation and storage in developing countries. Finally, for the first time, we show that PD inactivates herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 at submicromolar concentrations. Due to the prevalence of HSV infection, the ability of PD to inactivate HSV may provide an additional incentive for use as a microbicide. The ability of PD to inactivate both HIV-1 and HSV, combined with its low toxicity and high stability, warrants additional studies for the evaluation of PD's microbicidal candidacy in animals and humans. PMID:24217696

  19. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  20. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  1. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; LeBlanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  2. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  3. Natural Products as Anti-HIV Agents and Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND): A Brief Overview.

    PubMed

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao V; Atluri, Venkata S; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Garcia, Gabriella; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2015-01-01

    As the threat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) persists to rise, effective drug treatments are required to treat the infected people. Even though combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) provides stable viral suppression, it is not devoid of undesirable side effects, especially in persons undergoing long-term treatment. The present therapy finds its limitations in the emergence of multidrug resistance and accordingly finding new drugs and novel targets is the need of the hour to treat the infected persons and further to attack HIV reservoirs in the body like brain, lymph nodes to achieve the ultimate goal of complete eradication of HIV and AIDS. Natural products such as plant-originated compounds and plant extracts have enormous potential to become drug leads with anti-HIV and neuroprotective activity. Accordingly, many research groups are exploring the biodiversity of the plant kingdom to find new and better anti-HIV drugs with novel mechanisms of action and for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The basic challenge that still persists is to develop viral replication-targeted therapy using novel anti-HIV compounds with new mode of action, accepted toxicity and less resistance profile. Against this backdrop, the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested the need to evaluate ethno-medicines for the management of HIV/AIDS. Consequently, there is need to evaluate traditional medicine, particularly medicinal plants and other natural products that may yield effective and affordable therapeutic agents. Although there are a good number of reports on traditional uses of plants to treat various diseases, knowledge of herbal remedies used to manage HIV/AIDS and HAND are scanty, vague and not well documented. In this review, plant substances showing a promising action that is anti-HIV and HAND will be explored along with what they interact. Since some plant substances are also known to modulate several cellular

  4. Natural Products as Anti-HIV Agents and Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND): A Brief Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao V.; Atluri, Venkata S.; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Garcia, Gabriella; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    As the threat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) persists to rise, effective drug treatments are required to treat the infected people. Even though combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) provides stable viral suppression, it is not devoid of undesirable side effects, especially in persons undergoing long-term treatment. The present therapy finds its limitations in the emergence of multidrug resistance and accordingly finding new drugs and novel targets is the need of the hour to treat the infected persons and further to attack HIV reservoirs in the body like brain, lymph nodes to achieve the ultimate goal of complete eradication of HIV and AIDS. Natural products such as plant-originated compounds and plant extracts have enormous potential to become drug leads with anti-HIV and neuroprotective activity. Accordingly, many research groups are exploring the biodiversity of the plant kingdom to find new and better anti-HIV drugs with novel mechanisms of action and for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The basic challenge that still persists is to develop viral replication-targeted therapy using novel anti-HIV compounds with new mode of action, accepted toxicity and less resistance profile. Against this backdrop, the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested the need to evaluate ethno-medicines for the management of HIV/AIDS. Consequently, there is need to evaluate traditional medicine, particularly medicinal plants and other natural products that may yield effective and affordable therapeutic agents. Although there are a good number of reports on traditional uses of plants to treat various diseases, knowledge of herbal remedies used to manage HIV/AIDS and HAND are scanty, vague and not well documented. In this review, plant substances showing a promising action that is anti-HIV and HAND will be explored along with what they interact. Since some plant substances are also known to modulate several cellular

  5. Stabilization of HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 under Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Li, Rebecca L; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-16

    Alloys of metal dodecaborides-YB12 with HfB12-were prepared via arc-melting in order to stabilize the metastable HfB12 high-pressure phase under ambient pressure. Previously, HfB12 had been synthesized only under high-pressure (6.5 GPa). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to confirm the purity and phase composition of the prepared samples. The solubility limit for HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 (cubic UB12 structure type) was determined to be ∼35 at. % Hf by PXRD and EDS analysis. The value of the cubic unit cell parameter (a) changed from 7.505 Å (pure YB12) to 7.454 Å across the solid solution range. Vickers hardness increased from 40.9 ± 1.6 GPa for pure YB12 to 45.0 ± 1.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N for the Y1-xHfxB12 solid solution composition with ∼28 at. % Hf, suggesting both solid solution hardening and extrinsic hardening due to the formation of secondary phases of hafnium. PMID:27115173

  6. Causes of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H

    2008-06-01

    This review describes current knowledge of the main causes of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. The most common explanations for poor vitamin B12 status are a low dietary intake of the vitamin (i.e., a low intake of animal-source foods) and malabsorption. Although it has long been known that strict vegetarians (vegans) are at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, evidence now indicates that low intakes of animal-source foods, such as occur in some lacto-ovo vegetarians and many less-industrialized countries, cause vitamin B12 depletion. Malabsorption of the vitamin is most commonly observed as food-bound cobalamin malabsorption due to gastric atrophy in the elderly, and probably as a result of Helicobacter pylori infection. There is growing evidence that gene polymorphisms in transcobalamins affect plasma vitamin B12 concentrations. The primary cause of folate deficiency is low intake of sources rich in the vitamin, such as legumes and green leafy vegetables, and the consumption of these foods may explain why folate status can be adequate in relatively poor populations. Other situations in which the risk of folate deficiency increases include lactation and alcoholism.

  7. Neurological consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Christel; Faesch, Sabine; Anthoine-Milhomme, Marie-Constance; Fulla, Yvonne; Dulac, Olivier; Chéron, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    In developed countries, the vitamin B12 deficiency usually occurs in children exclusively breast-fed, whose mothers are vegetarians, causing low stores of vitamin B12. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency appear during the second trimester of life and include failure to thrive, lethargy, hypotonia, and arrest or regression of developmental skills. A megaloblastic anemia can be present. One half of the infants exhibit abnormal movements before the start of treatment with intramuscular cobalamin, which disappear 1 or 2 days after. More rarely, movement disorders appear a few days after treatment, whereas neurological symptoms are improving. These abnormal movements can last for 2 to 6 weeks. If not treated, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause lasting neurodisability. Therefore, efforts should be directed to preventing deficiency in pregnant and breast-feeding women on vegan diets and their infants by giving them vitamin B12 supplements. When preventive supplementation has failed, one should recognize and treat quickly an infant presenting with failure to thrive and delayed development.

  8. Involuntary movements due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron; Moloi, M W

    2014-12-01

    Deficiency of vitamin B12 produces protean effects on the nervous system, most commonly neuropathy, myelopathy, cognitive and behavioural symptoms, and optic atrophy. Involuntary movements comprise a relatively rare manifestation of this readily treatable disorder. Both adults and infants deficient in vitamin B12 may present with chorea, tremor, myoclonus, Parkinsonism, dystonia, or a combination of these, which may precede diagnosis or become apparent only a few days after parenteral replacement therapy has begun. The pathogenesis of these movement disorders shows interesting parallels to certain neurodegenerative conditions. The clinical syndrome responds well to vitamin B12 supplementation in most cases, and an early diagnosis is essential to reverse the haematological and neurological dysfunction characteristic of this disorder. In this article, we elucidate the association of vitamin B12 deficiency with movement disorders in adults and in infants, discuss the pathogenesis of this association, review previously reported cases, and present a young adult male with severe generalized chorea that showed a salutary response to vitamin B12 supplementation. PMID:24852503

  9. Deficiency or dementia? Exploring B12 deficiency after urostomy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle; Bryan, Sandra; Dukes, Suzie

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can be misdiagnosed as a variety of other illnesses, and if left untreated can lead to irreversible damage to the brain and nervous system. This article discusses the case of a 70-year-old female with a urostomy, well known to the stoma care department, who shortly after a routine parastomal hernia repair developed severe confusion, immobility and was unable to communicate. Subsequent investigations ruled out a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and a diagnosis of rapidly progressing vascular dementia was made. An incidental finding of a low vitamin B12 level was identified and treatment commenced. She was transferred to a community hospital and her family were told to 'prepare for the worst'. It was, in fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency that was causing her symptoms of vascular dementia, and once treatment was established she underwent a 'miraculous' improvement, returning to normal life. This article discusses vitamin B12 deficiency and why patients with a urostomy are at risk of developing it; highlights the key role of the stoma care nurse and his or her knowledge of the patient; explores the importance of testing vitamin B12 levels in this group of patients; and discusses key learning and recommendations for practice.

  10. Isolation and analysis of vitamin B12 from plant samples.

    PubMed

    Nakos, M; Pepelanova, I; Beutel, S; Krings, U; Berger, R G; Scheper, T

    2017-02-01

    Based on increased demands of strict vegetarians, an investigation of vitamin B12 content in plant sources, was carried out. The vitamin B12 concentration was determined by RP-HPLC with UV detection, after prior matrix isolation by immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC). Vitamin B12 was extracted in the presence of sodium cyanide, to transform all forms of cobalamin into cyanocobalamin. Diode array detector was used to monitor vitamin B12, after its chromatographic separation under gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid 0.025% (w/v). The method demonstrated excellent linearity with a limit of detection 0.004μg/ml. The method precision was evaluated for plant samples and it was below 0.7% (n=6). Significant amounts of vitamin B12 in plants were detected in Hippophae rhamnoides (37μg/100g dry weight), in Elymus (26μg/100g dry weight) and in Inula helenium (11μg/100g dry weight). PMID:27596424

  11. Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfers Involving Tetrahydrofolate and B12

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the reaction mechanism of enzymes that use B12 and tetrahydrofolate (THF) to catalyze methyl group transfers. It also covers the related reactions that use B12 and tetrahydromethanopterin (THMPT), which is a THF analog used by archaea. In the past decade, our understanding of the mechanisms of these enzymes has increased greatly because the crystal structures for three classes of B12-dependent methyltransferases have become available and because biophysical and kinetic studies have elucidated the intermediates involved in catalysis. These steps include binding of the cofactors and substrates, activation of the methyl donors and acceptors, the methyl transfer reaction itself, and product dissociation. Activation of the methyl donor in one class of methyltransferases is achieved by an unexpected proton transfer mechanism. The cobalt (Co) ion within the B12 macrocycle must be in the Co(I) oxidation state to serve as a nucleophile in the methyl transfer reaction. Recent studies have uncovered important principles that control how this highly reducing active state of B12 is generated and maintained. PMID:18804699

  12. Altertoxins with potent anti-HIV activity from Alternaria tenuissima QUE1Se, a fungal endophyte of Quercus emoryi.

    PubMed

    Bashyal, Bharat P; Wellensiek, Brian P; Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Faeth, Stanley H; Ahmad, Nafees; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2014-11-01

    Screening of a small library of natural product extracts derived from endophytic fungi of the Sonoran desert plants in a cell-based anti-HIV assay involving T-cells infected with the HIV-1 virus identified the EtOAc extract of a fermentation broth of Alternaria tenuissima QUE1Se inhabiting the stem tissue of Quercus emoryi as a promising candidate for further investigation. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation and identification of two new metabolites, altertoxins V (1) and VI (2) together with the known compounds, altertoxins I (3), II (4), and III (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by detailed spectroscopic analysis and those of 3-5 were established by comparison with reported data. When tested in our cell-based assay at concentrations insignificantly toxic to T-cells, altertoxins V (1), I (3), II (4), and III (5) completely inhibited replication of the HIV-1 virus at concentrations of 0.50, 2.20, 0.30, and 1.50 μM, respectively. Our findings suggest that the epoxyperylene structural scaffold in altertoxins may be manipulated to produce potent anti-HIV therapeutics.

  13. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  14. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Xiao-Liang; SONG, Jia-Hao; PANG, Wei; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  15. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, M.; Sayedipour, S.; Pourazar, A.; Shanehsazzadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments. PMID:26339261

  16. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments. PMID:26339261

  17. Sampling of Glycan-Bound Conformers by the Anti-HIV Lectin Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin in the Absence of Sugar.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Marta G; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Trigo-Mourino, Pablo; Mazur, Adam; Griesinger, Christian; Gronenborn, Angela M; Lee, Donghan

    2015-05-26

    Lectins from different sources have been shown to interfere with HIV infection by binding to the sugars of viral-envelope glycoproteins. Three-dimensional atomic structures of a number of HIV-inactivating lectins have been determined, both as free proteins and in glycan-bound forms. However, details on the mechanism of recognition and binding to sugars are elusive. Herein we focus on the anti-HIV lectin OAA from Oscillatoria agardhii: We show that in the absence of sugars in solution, both the sugar-free and sugar-bound protein conformations that were observed in the X-ray crystal structures exist as conformational substates. Our results suggest that glycan recognition occurs by conformational selection within the ground state; this model differs from the popular "excited-state" model. Our findings provide further insight into molecular recognition of the major receptor on the HIV virus by OAA. These details can potentially be used for the optimization and/or development of preventive anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:25873445

  18. Serum vitamin B12 and blood cell values in vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Dong, A; Scott, S C

    1982-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12 and complete blood count values were determined for 83 volunteer subjects from an American vegetarian society conference (USA). Among subjects who did not supplement their diets with vitamin B12 or multiple vitamin tablets, 92% of the vegans (total vegetarians), 64% of the lactovegetarians, 47% of the lacto-ovovegetarians and 20% of the semivegetarians had serum vitamin B12 levels less than 200 pg/ml (normal = 200-900 pg/ml). However, their complete blood count values did not deviate greatly from those found for nonvegetarians, even though some had been vegans or lactovegetarians for over 10 years. Macrocytosis among the vegetarians was minimal; none had mean corpuscular volume greater than 103 fl.

  19. Oral contraceptives: effect of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Women who use oral contraceptives have impaired folate metabolism as shown by slightly but significantly lower levels of folate in the serum and the erythrocytes and an increased urinary excretion of formiminoglutamic acid. The vitamin B12 level in their serum is also significantly lower than that of control groups. However, there is no evidence of tissue depletion of vitamin B12 associated with the use of oral contraceptives. The causes and clinical significance of the impairment of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism in these women is discussed in this review of the literature. Clinicians are advised to ensure that women who shop taking "the pill" because they wish to conceive have adequate folate stores before becoming pregnant. PMID:7037144

  20. Nitrous oxide misuse and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Massey, Thomas H; Pickersgill, Trevor T; J Peall, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented to hospital with a 5-week history of ascending limb paraesthesiae and balance difficulties. He had no medical or travel history of note, but admitted habitual nitrous oxide (N2O) inhalation. Neurological examination revealed a sensory ataxia with pseudoathetosis in the upper limbs and reduced vibration sensation to the hips bilaterally. Significant investigation results included a low serum vitamin B12 concentration, mild macrocytosis and raised serum homocysteine concentration. T2 MRI of the spinal cord demonstrated increased signal extending from C1 to T11 in keeping with a longitudinal myelitis. The patient was diagnosed with a myeloneuropathy secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting from heavy N2O inhalation. He was treated with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections and received regular physiotherapy. At discharge, he was able to mobilise short distances with the aid of a zimmer frame, and was independently mobile 8 weeks later. PMID:27247211

  1. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Flores, Geane L; de Almeida, Adilson J; Miguel, Juliana C; Cruz, Helena M; Portilho, Moyra M; Scalioni, Letícia de P; Marques, Vanessa A; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2016-03-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) METHODS: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) RESULTS: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  2. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Geane L.; de Almeida, Adilson J.; Miguel, Juliana C.; Cruz, Helena M.; Portilho, Moyra M.; de P. Scalioni, Letícia; Marques, Vanessa A.; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Melo Villar, Livia

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) Methods: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) Results: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) Conclusion: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  3. [The management of dialysis patients seropositive for HBsAg, anti-HCV, or anti-HIV antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2012-01-01

    Infections by hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus are still common among patients on maintenance dialysis in Western countries. The natural history of HBV and HCV in the dialysis population remains unclear; however, there is good evidence showing an adverse impact of an anti-HCV seropositive status on survival in dialysis patients. A recent meta-analysis of observational studies (n=7, 11,589 unique patients) reported that anti-HCV-positive patients on dialysis had a higher mortality rate than those who were anti-HCV negative (adjusted hazard ratio=1.35, 95% confidence interval, 1.13; 1.59, p<0.001). This was in part attributed to a higher frequency of chronic hepatitis C and its attending complications (cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma). In addition, HCV appeared to have a negative influence on quality of life. Recent clinical guidelines by the KDIGO Study Group have not suggested the isolation of anti-HCV-positive patients on maintenance dialysis. Standard precautions and specific procedures against the transmission of blood-borne agents have been recommended to control HCV infection within dialysis units. Isolation by dialysis machines, staff and rooms has been strongly recommended to control HBV. Vaccination is an important tool against transmission of HBV infection among patients on maintenance dialysis; however, the immune response towards the hepatitis B vaccine in uremic patients remains unsatisfactory. Monotherapy with lamivudine is currently used for dialysis patients with hepatitis B whereas combination antiviral therapy (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin) is the standard of care for hepatitis C in the dialysis population, even if various side effects have been observed.

  4. Vitamin B12 deficit and development of geriatric syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Chaparro, José Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency or cyanocobalamin is a common condition in the elderly. It is repeatedly overlooked due to multiple clinical manifestations that can affect the blood, neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems, skin and mucous membranes. The various presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency are related to the development of geriatric syndromes like frailty, falls, cognitive impairment, and geriatric nutritional syndromes like protein-energy malnutrition and failure to thrive, in addition to enhancing aging anorexia and cachexia. Therefore, interventions must be developed to include their screening and diagnosis to make early and appropriate treatment to prevent its complications before they become irreversible.

  5. Involuntary movements misdiagnosed as seizure during vitamin B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Carman, Kursat Bora; Belgemen, Tugba; Yis, Uluc

    2013-11-01

    Seizures and epilepsy are a common problem in childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events are conditions that can mimic seizure and frequent in early childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events can be due to physiological or exaggerated physiological responses, parasomnias, movement disorders, behavioral or psychiatric disturbances, or to hemodynamic, respiratory, or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of failure to thrive and developmental regression, involuntary movements, and anemia. Involuntary movements rarely may appear a few days after the initiation of vitamin B12 treatments and might be misdiagnosed as seizure. Here, we report 2 patients who presented with involuntary movements with his video image.

  6. Melting of B12P2 boron subphosphide under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Mukhanov, Vladimir A.; Sokolov, Petr S.; Le Godec, Yann; Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Konôpková, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    Melting of boron subphosphide (B12P2) to 26 GPa has been studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and by quenching and electrical resistance measurements in a toroid-type high pressure apparatus. B12P2 melts congruently, and the melting curve has a positive slope of 23(6) K/GPa. No solid-state phase transition was observed up to the melting in the whole pressure range under study.

  7. TOXOPLASMA AND VIRAL ANTIBODIES AMONG HIV PATIENTS AND INMATES IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Sari, Yulia; Haryati, Sri; Raharjo, Irvan; Prasetyo, Afiono Agung

    2015-11-01

    In Indonesia, Toxoplasma and its associations with blood-borne viruses have been poorly studied. In order to study the association between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and blood-borne viral antibodies, blood samples from 497 participants (375 inmates from four prisons in Central Java, Indonesia and 122 HIV patients at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Clinic in Surakarta, Indonesia) were tested for serological markers of Toxoplasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-1/2). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM positivity rates were 41.6% and 3.6%, respectively. One point two percent of participants was positive for both anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Sixteen point five percent, 11.3%, 2.6% and 2.8% of participants were positive for anti- Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HCV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgM combined with anti-HIV antibodes and anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with both anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, respectively. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM seropositivity was associated with anti-HIV (aOR = 4.3; 95% CI: 1.112-16.204, p = 0.034). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were associated with anti-HCV (aOR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.749-4.538, p < 0.001) and history of injection drug use (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.905-5.093, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we recommend patients with HIV, HCV infection and injection drug users should be screened for Toxoplasma infection in Indonesia. PMID:26867355

  8. TOXOPLASMA AND VIRAL ANTIBODIES AMONG HIV PATIENTS AND INMATES IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Sari, Yulia; Haryati, Sri; Raharjo, Irvan; Prasetyo, Afiono Agung

    2015-11-01

    In Indonesia, Toxoplasma and its associations with blood-borne viruses have been poorly studied. In order to study the association between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and blood-borne viral antibodies, blood samples from 497 participants (375 inmates from four prisons in Central Java, Indonesia and 122 HIV patients at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Clinic in Surakarta, Indonesia) were tested for serological markers of Toxoplasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-1/2). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM positivity rates were 41.6% and 3.6%, respectively. One point two percent of participants was positive for both anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Sixteen point five percent, 11.3%, 2.6% and 2.8% of participants were positive for anti- Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HCV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgM combined with anti-HIV antibodes and anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with both anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, respectively. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM seropositivity was associated with anti-HIV (aOR = 4.3; 95% CI: 1.112-16.204, p = 0.034). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were associated with anti-HCV (aOR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.749-4.538, p < 0.001) and history of injection drug use (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.905-5.093, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we recommend patients with HIV, HCV infection and injection drug users should be screened for Toxoplasma infection in Indonesia.

  9. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression. PMID:26264192

  10. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days. PMID:23834987

  11. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Amrita B; Han, Andrew W; Mehta, Angad P; Mok, Kenny C; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P; Taga, Michiko E

    2015-08-25

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism.

  12. Vitamin-B12 deficiency following therapy in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, L.C.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Vitamin-B12 deficiency results from inadequate absorption of the vitamin by the distal ileum and depletion of available stores. Both radiotherapy and intestinal resection can contribute to development of this condition. The significance of this problem in gynecologic oncology is discussed and two patients are described.

  13. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kutta, Roger J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Johannissen, Linus O; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S; Jones, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression. PMID:26264192

  14. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days.

  15. "Who's to Blame?": An Activity to Stimulate Reflection about Anti-HIV Stigma in an Undergraduate Course on the HIV Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beshers, Sarah C.

    2007-01-01

    A classroom-based activity was created to help undergraduate students in a course about the HIV epidemic explore and better understand the nature and scope of anti-HIV stigma. The activity asks students to assess the extent of their sympathy for several people living with HIV disease when given only a brief statement about how each person became…

  16. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5)% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3)%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice or 6% vinegar induced

  17. A Randomized Trial to Assess Anti-HIV Activity in Female Genital Tract Secretions and Soluble Mucosal Immunity Following Application of 1% Tenofovir Gel

    PubMed Central

    Torres, N. Merna; Fazzari, Melissa J.; Cho, Sylvia; Kalyoussef, Sabah; Shust, Gail; Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Chen, Jianmeng; Cohen, Hillel W.; Diament, Erin C.; Lee, Anna C.; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Hendrix, Craig W.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical and early phase clinical microbicide studies have not consistently predicted the outcome of efficacy trials. To address this gap, candidate biomarkers of microbicide pharmacodynamics and safety were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir gel, the first microbicide to demonstrate significant protection against HIV acquisition. Methods 30 women were randomized to apply a single daily dose of tenofovir or placebo gel for 14 consecutive days. Anti-HIV activity was measured in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) on Days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 by luciferase assay as a surrogate marker of pharmacodynamics. Endogenous activity against E. coli and HSV-2 and concentrations of immune mediators were quantified in CVL as candidate biomarkers of safety. Tenofovir levels were measured in CVL and blood. Results A significant increase in anti-HIV activity was detected in CVL from women who applied tenofovir gel compared to their endogenous anti-HIV activity in genital tract secretions on Day 0 and compared to activity in CVL from women in the placebo group. The activity correlated significantly with CVL concentration of tenofovir (r = 0.6, p<0.001) and fit a sigmoid Emax pharmacodynamic model. Anti-HIV activity in CVL from women who applied tenofovir persisted when virus was introduced in semen, whereas endogenous anti-HIV activity decreased. Tenofovir did not trigger an inflammatory response or induce sustained loss in endogenous antimicrobial activity or immune mediators. Conclusions Tenofovir gel had no deleterious impact on soluble mucosal immunity. The increased anti-HIV activity in CVL, which persisted in the presence of semen and correlated with tenofovir concentration, is consistent with the efficacy observed in a recent clinical trial. These results promote quantified CVL anti-HIV activity as a surrogate of tissue pharmacodynamics and as a potential biomarker of adherence to product. This simple, feasible and inexpensive bioassay

  18. Folate–vitamin B-12 interaction in relation to cognitive impairment, anemia, and biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports on pernicious anemia treatment suggested that high folic acid intake adversely influences the natural history of vitamin B-12 deficiency, which affects many elderly individuals. However, experimental investigation of this hypothesis is unethical, and the few existing observational d...

  19. Screening of anti-HIV-1 inophyllums by HPLC-DAD of Calophyllum inophyllum leaf extracts from French Polynesia Islands.

    PubMed

    Laure, Frédéric; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Butaud, Jean-François; Bianchini, Jean-Pierre; Gaydou, Emile M

    2008-08-22

    Various pyranocoumarins, calophyllolide, inophyllums B, C, G(1), G(2) and P, from Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae) leaves of French Polynesia (Austral, Marquesas, Society and Tuamotu archipelagos) have been determined in 136 leaf extracts using a high pressure liquid chromatography-UV-diode array detection (HPLC-UV-DAD) technique. Results show a wide range in chemical composition within trees growing on eighteen islands. The use of multivariate statistical analyses (PCA) shows geographical distribution of inophyllums and indicate those rich in HIV-1 active (+)-inophyllums. Inophyllum B and P contents (0.0-39.0 and 0.0-21.8 mg kg(-1), respectively) confirm the chemodiversity of this species within the large area of French Polynesia. The study suggests the presence of interesting chemotypes which could be used as plant source for anti-HIV-1 drugs. PMID:18706320

  20. Aspernigrins with anti-HIV-1 activities from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Fang, Wei; Tan, Suiyi; Lin, Xiuping; Xun, Tianrong; Yang, Bingjie; Liu, Shuwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-15

    Two new 2-benzylpyridin-4-one containing metabolites, aspernigrins C (3) and D (4), together with six known compounds (1, 2, and 5-8), were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30. The structures of the new compounds were determined by NMR, MS, and optical rotation analyses. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities against infection with HIV-1 SF162 in TZM-bl cells. Malformin C (5) showed the strongest anti-HIV-1 activity with IC50 of 1.4±0.06μM (selectivity index, 11.4), meanwhile aspernigrin C (3) also exhibited potent activity with IC50 of 4.7±0.4μM (selectivity index, 7.5).

  1. Pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the improved solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puneet; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-03-18

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been devastating with nearly 7400 new infections every day. Although, the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made a tremendous contribution in reducing the morbidity and mortality in developed countries, the situation in developing countries is still grim with millions of people being infected by this disease. The new advancements in the field of nanotechnology based drug delivery systems hold promise to improve the situation. These nanoscale systems have been successfully employed in other diseases such as cancer, and therefore, we now have a better understanding of the practicalities and technicalities associated with their clinical development. Nanotechnology based approaches offer some unique opportunities specifically for the improvement of water solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of antiretroviral drugs. This review presents discussion on the contribution of pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the delivery anti-HIV drugs.

  2. A New Neolignan, and the Cytotoxic and Anti-HIV-1 Activities of Constituents from the Roots of Dasymaschalon sootepense.

    PubMed

    Hongthong, Sakchai; Kuhakarn, Chutima; Jaipetch, Thaworn; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Limthongkul, Jitra; Nuntasaen, Narong; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2016-06-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation from the ethyl acetate extract of Dasymaschalon sootepense roots led to the isolation of twelve compounds including a new dihydrobenzo-furan neolignan, (+)-(2S,3S)-2,3-dihydro-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-methylbenzofuran-5-carbaldehyde (5), and eleven known compounds (1-4, and 6-12). The chemical structures and stereochemistry of all the isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques. The known compounds 4 and 6 have been fully characterized spectroscopically, including their absolute configurations. Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) activities of compounds 1-3, 5 and 8-12 were determined. Among compounds screened, compounds 2, 3 and 10 displayed weak cytotoxic activity with ED50 values ranging from 9.6-47.5 μM and only compound 2 was found weakly active against HIV-1 RT with an IC50 value of 323.2 μM. PMID:27534123

  3. Voltammetric detection of anti-HIV replication drug based on novel nanocomposite gold-nanoparticle-CaCO3 hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singh, Gajendra; Pundir, C S

    2015-05-01

    A novel bionanocomposite, horse radish peroxidase- gold-nanoparticle-Calcium carbonate (HRP-AuNPs-CaCO3), hybrid material was encapsulated by silica sol on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The fabricated modified electrode was used as a novel voltammetric sensor for electrochemical sensing of anti-HIV replication drug i.e. deferiprone. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results obtained from the voltammetric measurements show that HRP-AuNPs-CaCO3 modified GCE offers a selective and sensitive electrochemical sensor for the determination of deferiprone. Under experimental conditions, the proposed voltammetric sensor has a linear response range from 0.01 to 10,000 μM with a detection limit of 0.01 μM. Furthermore, the fabricated sensor was successfully applied to determine deferiprone level in spiked urine and serum samples. PMID:25416586

  4. Synthesis and in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of a series of N-arylsulfonyl-3-propionylindoles.

    PubMed

    Che, Zhiping; Tian, Yuee; Hu, Zhenjie; Chen, Yingwu; Liu, Shengming; Chen, Genqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen N-arylsulfonyl-3-propionylindoles (3a-o) were prepared and preliminarily evaluated as in vitro inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Three compounds 3c, 3g and 3i exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with effective concentration (EC(50)) values of 0.8, 4.0 and 1.2 μg/mL, and therapeutic index (TI) values of 11.7, 16.6 and 84.1, respectively. N-(m-Nitro)phenylsulfonyl-3-propionyl-6-methylindole (3i) exhibited the most promising and best activity against HIV-1 replication. The cytotoxicity of these compounds was assessed as well. PMID:27124676

  5. Inculcating safe sex attitudes in South African adolescents: a directive for the government's anti-HIV/AIDS policy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Jayesh

    2010-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS in the world. Much blame for this has been laid on the apathy of the South African government and the cultural traits of South Africans. AIDS prevention research calls for early childhood education to raise awareness of the causes, dangers, and prevention of HIV/AIDS. This study involved surveys among a select sample of South African adolescents to determine their sexual attitudes before and after a cognitive-behavioral intervention. Overall, the results did not make a significant difference in their attitudes, suggesting pre-adolescent sex education might prove to be a more useful tool in anti-HIV/AIDS education. Risky sexual behavior, under the influence of alcohol, also serves as a warning to educate young consumers of alcohol.

  6. Expression, purification and identification of CtCVNH, a novel anti-HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) protein from Ceratopteris thalictroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junbo; Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting

    2013-04-08

    CVN (cyanovirin-N) is an anti-HIV protein. CVNH (cyanovirin-N homology) represents its homology. In a previous study, we first reported the full-length sequences of the CVNH gene cloned from Ceratopteris thalictroides. Based on the finding, the coding sequence of CtCVNH was optimized in the study, and then a pET prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. The purification and identification of CtCVNH protein were investigated, as well. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that a 31 kDa protein was overexpressed and mainly accumulated in the soluble fraction. Only a single protein was obtained after the Ni- nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) affinity chromatography. The purified protein was identified to be the recombinant CtCVNH by both Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

  7. A model of transluminal flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle: Combined elastic squeezing and gravitational sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Park, Su Chan; Verguet, Stéphane; Weiss, Aaron; Katz, David F.

    2008-08-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates is of importance in a number of biomedical problems: From lubrication of the eye surface by the tear film, to lubrication of joints by synovial fluid, to lubrication between the pleural surfaces that protect the lungs and other organs. Such flows are also important for the drug delivery functions of vehicles for anti-HIV topical microbicides. These are intended to inhibit transmission into vulnerable mucosa, e.g., in the vagina. First generation prototype microbicides have gel vehicles, which spread after insertion and coat luminal surfaces. Effectiveness derives from potency of the active ingredients and completeness and durability of coating. Delivery vehicle rheology, luminal biomechanical properties, and the force due to gravity influence the coating mechanics. We develop a framework for understanding the relative importance of boundary squeezing and body forces on the extent and speed of the coating that results. A single dimensionless number, independent of viscosity, characterizes the relative influences of squeezing and gravitational acceleration on the shape of spreading in the Newtonian case. A second scale, involving viscosity, determines the spreading rate. In the case of a shear-thinning fluid, the Carreau number also plays a role. Numerical solutions were developed for a range of the dimensionless parameter and compared well with asymptotic theory in the limited case where such results can be obtained. Results were interpreted with respect to trade-offs between wall elasticity, longitudinal forces, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume. These provide initial insights of practical value for formulators of gel delivery vehicles for anti-HIV microbicidal formulations.

  8. Mapping the Vif-A3G interaction using peptide arrays: a basis for anti-HIV lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Viard, Mathias; Jacobs, Amy; Miller, Abigail; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeeseong; Blumenthal, Robert; Kotler, Moshe; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-06-15

    Human apolipoprotein-B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts retroviruses, endogenous retro-elements and DNA viruses. A3G plays a key role in the anti-HIV-1 innate cellular immunity. The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G mainly by leading A3G towards the proteosomal machinery and by direct inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Both activities involve direct interaction between Vif and A3G. Disrupting the interaction between A3G and Vif may rescue A3G antiviral activity and inhibit HIV-1 propagation. Here, mapping the interaction sites between A3G and Vif by peptide array screening revealed distinct regions in Vif important for A3G binding, including the N-terminal domain (NTD), C-terminal domain (CTD) and residues 83-99. The Vif-binding sites in A3G included 12 different peptides that showed strong binding to either full-length Vif, Vif CTD or both. Sequence similarity was found between Vif-binding peptides from the A3G CTD and NTD. A3G peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to counteract Vif action. A3G 211-225 inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell culture and impaired Vif dependent A3G degradation. In vivo co-localization of full-length Vif with A3G 211-225 was demonstrated by use of FRET. This peptide has the potential to serve as an anti-HIV-1 lead compound. Our results suggest a complex interaction between Vif and A3G that is mediated by discontinuous binding regions with different affinities.

  9. CCL20/MIP3a is a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Molecule of the Human Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mimi; Shen, Zheng; Schaefer, Todd M.; Fahey, John V.; Gupta, Phalguni; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Problem CCL20/MIP3α is a chemokine for immature dendritic cells as well as an antibacterial against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The role of CCL20/MIP3α as an antiviral is unknown. In this study, we have examined the production of CCL20/MIP3α by epithelial cells from the upper female reproductive tract as well as its activity as an antiviral molecule. Method of study Primary uterine and Fallopian tube epithelial cells were treated with Poly(I:C) and CCL20/MIP3α mRNA and protein was measured by Real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Anti-HIV activity was determined using an indicator cell line TZM-bl and quantified by using a luminometer. Results Primary uterine and Fallopian tube epithelial cells produce CCL20/MIP3α constitutively and the production is enhanced following stimulation with viral double-stranded RNA mimic Poly(I:C). Recombinant CCL20/MIP3α was able to inhibit both T-cell-tropic X4/IIIB and macrophage-tropic R5/BaL HIV-1 when virus was directly incubated with CCL20/MIP3α but not when CCL20/MIP3α was added to cells either prior to infection or post-infection. This suggests that the mechanism of inhibition is likely to be a direct interaction between HIV-1 and CCL20/MIP3α. Conclusion This study demonstrates that CCL20/MIP3α is an important endogenous anti-HIV-1 microbicide of the female reproductive tract. PMID:19527233

  10. Dietary Sources of Vitamin B-12 and Their Association with Vitamin B-12 Status Markers in Healthy Older Adults in the B-PROOF Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin B-12 concentrations are frequently observed among older adults. Malabsorption is hypothesized to be an important cause of vitamin B-12 inadequacy, but serum vitamin B-12 may also be differently affected by vitamin B-12 intake depending on food source. We examined associations between dietary sources of vitamin B-12 (meat, fish and shellfish, eggs, dairy) and serum vitamin B-12, using cross-sectional data of 600 Dutch community-dwelling adults (≥65 years). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Vitamin B-12 concentrations were measured in serum. Associations were studied over tertiles of vitamin B-12 intake using P for trend, by calculating prevalence ratios (PRs), and splines. Whereas men had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intakes than women (median (25th–75th percentile): 4.18 (3.29–5.38) versus 3.47 (2.64–4.40) μg/day), serum vitamin B-12 did not differ between the two sexes (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 275 ± 104 pmol/L versus 290 ± 113 pmol/L). Higher intakes of dairy, meat, and fish and shellfish were significantly associated with higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations, where meat and dairy—predominantly milk were the most potent sources. Egg intake did not significantly contribute to higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Thus, dairy and meat were the most important contributors to serum vitamin B-12, followed by fish and shellfish. PMID:26389945

  11. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  13. Forms of vitamin B12 in radioisotope dilution assays.

    PubMed Central

    Begley, J A; Hall, C A

    1981-01-01

    Since the presence of analogues of vitamin B12 (B12, cobalamin, Cbl) has been postulated as the basis for the high values obtained by some radioisotope dilution assays (RIDA) of serum Cbl we examined serum for analogues. None could be demonstrated in the extracts of serum prepared for RIDA as sought by both direct and indirect techniques. The natural forms of serum Cbl were converted to cyanocobalamin (CN Cbl) by this process of extraction which included cyanide (CN). The correctly performed RIDA for Cbl based on R binder gave higher values than a RIDA based on intrinsic factor or than by bioassay. By exclusion, the difference appeared to be due to unidentified factors rather than the presence of analogues. Images PMID:7019262

  14. Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum as a Low-Cost, Large-Scale Source of Antibodies with Broad Neutralizing Activity for HIV-1 Envelope with Potential Use in Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J.; Wheatley, Adam K.; Jacobson, Jonathan C.; Alexander, Marina R.; Rawlin, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 105. While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:22664963

  15. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum as a low-cost, large-scale source of antibodies with broad neutralizing activity for HIV-1 envelope with potential use in microbicides.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J; Wheatley, Adam K; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Alexander, Marina R; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-08-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 10(5). While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:22664963

  16. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  17. Neutron study of B 12 coenzyme at 15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquiere, J. P.

    1992-06-01

    This high resolution and low temperature study, at 15 K, of the vitamin B 12 coenzyme ( C72H100N18O17PCo) was undertaken to confirm and clarify the water networks identified at 279 K by Savage [1]. Details of the data collection and refinement of the low temperature structure are described, a comparison of the coenzyme molecule structures at 15 and 279 K is made, and that of solvent structures outlined.

  18. Structural Insights on the Role of Antibodies in HIV-1 Vaccine and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Scharf, Louise; Scheid, Johannes F.; Klein, Florian; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite 30 years of effort, there is no effective vaccine for HIV-1. However, antibodies can prevent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and macaques when passively transferred. New single-cell-based methods have uncovered many broad and potent donor-derived antibodies, and structural studies have revealed the molecular bases for their activities. The new data suggest why such antibodies are difficult to elicit and inform HIV-1 vaccine development efforts. In addition to protecting against infection, the newly identified antibodies can suppress active infections in mice and macaques, suggesting they could be valuable additions to anti-HIV-1 therapies and to strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:24529371

  19. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of icosahedral boron subcarbides (B12C3, B13C2), subnitride B12N2, and suboxide B12O2 from data of SCC-DFTB calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyashin, A. N.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2011-08-01

    The structural, elastic, and electronic properties of a series of icosahedral phases, such as boron subcarbides B12C3 and B13C2, subnitride B12N2, and suboxide B12O2, have been studied in the framework of the SCC-DFTB method. It has been found that the B12C2 and B13C2 phases manifest metal-like properties, while B12C3 and B12O2 are semiconductors. The estimates have shown that the insertion of 2 p atoms (C, N, or O) into intericosahedral pores of elemental boron can cause both a decrease in its elastic modulus (an increase in the compressibility of B12N2) and a sharp increase in the modulus B (in subcarbides B12C3 and B12BCC). On the other hand, the insertion of 2 p atoms into α-B12 will favor an increase in its hardness (suboxide B12O2 will have a maximum hardness).

  20. Vitamin B12 Status in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I.; Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Study Design Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 yrs) and categorized as elevated (Hi-B12) or within reference range (RR-B12) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index Z scores, pulmonary function, energy, dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. Results 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years participated. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/ml, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intake were both high representing 376% and 667% Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the RR-B12 group (1000 vs. 583% RDA, p<0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased risk for Hi-B12, while higher FEV1 decreased risk (Pseudo-R2=0.18, P<0.001). Conclusions Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and FEV1. PMID:24445504

  1. [Stability of folic acid and vitamin B12 in TPN].

    PubMed

    Almodóvar, M J; Hernández Jaras, M V; León-Sanz, M; Ortuño, B; Estenoz, J; Negro Vega, E; Marfagón, N; Herreros de Tejada, A

    1991-01-01

    The stability of folic acid (FA) in mixtures of Total Parenteral Nutrition has been and is a controversial subject, with discussion concerning the influence of factors such as temperature, light and storage time. As regards the stability of the vitamin B12, there are few studies in scientific literature. For all those reasons, we consider it necessary to make a proper study to evaluate the influence of different factors in the stability of both vitamins. The study was made on 3 liter TPN bags of the EVA type, the composition of which was as follows: AA (85g), glucosa (225g), fat (50g), Na (86mEq), K (60 mEq), Ca (15 mEq), Cl (90 mEq), P (17 mmol) acetate (149 mEq) and 10 ml of MVI-12 which contain 400 micrograms of PA and 5 micrograms of Vitamin B 12. Consideration was also given to the stability of these two vitamins in the same diet, to which were added 10 ml of a commercial preparation of oligo-elements. Six TPN bags were prepared (without oligo-elements); two of them were kept in a fridge and protected from the light, two were kept at room temperature and protected from the light and the other two at room temperature without protection from the light. Samples were taken from all the bags immediately after their preparation and after 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. The same process was carried with other TPN bags which did contain oligo-elements. The method for determining FA and Vitamin B12 was by radioassay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1764534

  2. [Rare Case of Strongyloides stercoralis with Vitamin B12 Deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kadılar, Özlem; Bozkurt, Berna; Karakeçe, Engin; Kaya, Tezcan; Çiftçi, İhsan Hakkı; Tamer, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Strongyloidiyasis is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, and mostly soil transmitted nematode disease that is seen as sporadic cases in Turkey. As may be asymptomatic in healthy individuals, it may even cause death in immunosuppressive people. We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient, 29 years old young male was admitted to our institution with diarrhea who has got vitamin B12 deficiency and eosinophilia. The case represents an extremely rare and in our knowledge, it is the first case in Sakarya. PMID:26470934

  3. Effect of a Klamath algae product ("AFA-B12") on blood levels of vitamin B12 and homocysteine in vegan subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Luciana; Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Serena; Bonetto, Chiara; Pagliarani, Silvia; Benedetti, Yanina; Rocchi, Marco; Canestrari, Franco

    2009-03-01

    Vitamin B12 is a critical nutrient that is often inadequate in a plant-based (vegan) diet, thus the inclusion of a reliable vitamin B12 source in a vegan diet is recommended as essential. Unfortunately, many natural sources of vitamin B12 have been proven to contain biologically inactive vitamin B12 analogues, inadequate for human supplementation. The aim of this non-randomized open trial was to determine whether supplementation with a natural Klamath algae-based product ("AFA-B12", Aphanizomenon flos-aquae algae plus a proprietary mix of enzymes) could favorably affect the vitamin B12 status of a group of 15 vegan subjects. By assessing blood concentration of vitamin B12, folate, and more importantly homocysteine (Hcy, a reliable marker in vegans of their B12 absorption), the vitamin B12 status of the participants at the end of the 3-month intervention period, while receiving the Klamath-algae supplement (T2), was compared with their vitamin B12 status at the end of the 3-month control period (T1), when they were not receiving any supplement, having stopped taking their usual vitamin B12 supplement at the beginning of the study (T0). Compared to the control period, in the intervention period participants improved their vitamin B12 status, significantly reducing Hcy blood concentration (p=0.003). In conclusion, the Klamath algae product AFA-B12 appears to be, in a preliminary study, an adequate and reliable source of vitamin B12 in humans.

  4. Anti-HIV Drug-Combination Nanoparticles Enhance Plasma Drug Exposure Duration as Well as Triple-Drug Combination Levels in Cells Within Lymph Nodes and Blood in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Freeling, Jennifer P.; Koehn, Josefin; Shu, Cuiling; Sun, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HIV patients on combination oral drug therapy experience insufficient drug levels in lymph nodes, which is linked to viral persistence. Following success in enhancing lymph node drug levels and extending plasma residence time of indinavir formulated in lipid nanoparticles, we developed multidrug anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles (anti-HIV LNPs) containing lopinavir (LPV), ritonavir (RTV), and tenofovir (PMPA). These anti-HIV LNPs were prepared, characterized, scaled up, and evaluated in primates with a focus on plasma time course and intracellular drug exposure in blood and lymph nodes. Four macaques were subcutaneously administered anti-HIV LNPs and free drug suspension in a crossover study. The time course of the plasma drug concentration as well as intracellular drug concentrations in blood and inguinal lymph nodes were analyzed to compare the effects of LNP formulation. Anti-HIV LNPs incorporated LPV and RTV with high efficiency and entrapped a reproducible fraction of hydrophilic PMPA. In primates, anti-HIV LNPs produced over 50-fold higher intracellular concentrations of LPV and RTV in lymph nodes compared to free drug. Plasma and intracellular drug levels in blood were enhanced and sustained up to 7 days, beyond that achievable by their free drug counterpart. Thus, multiple antiretroviral agents can be simultaneously incorporated into anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles to enhance intracellular drug concentrations in blood and lymph nodes, where viral replication persists. As these anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles also prolonged plasma drug exposure, they hold promise as a long-acting dosage form for HIV patients in addressing residual virus in cells and tissue. PMID:25402233

  5. Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection: multicenter evaluation of a newly developed anti-HIV 1 and 2 enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, G; Avillez, F; Lourenco, M H; D'Agostino, F; Cambie, G; Piot, P; Vercauteren, G; Michl, U; Melchior, W; Bayer, H

    1994-01-01

    A new anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (anti-HIV 1 and 2) test is described. It uses recombinant p24 and peptides covering gp32, gp41, and gp120 to identify HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. This test has been shown to be specific (99.5%) and sensitive (99.8%). In this respect, the assay was equal or superior to anti-HIV 1 and 2 tests run as references. The test was able to discriminate sera from patients with HIV infections from those from uninfected individuals with excellence; it also exerted high intra- and interassay precisions. The "modular" concept of the test allows the use of single components (gp32 or gp41) to separate between HIV-2 and HIV-1 infections, respectively. PMID:8150950

  6. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of a series of 1-alkoxy-5-alkyl-6-(arylthio)uracils.

    PubMed

    Kim, D K; Gam, J; Kim, Y W; Lim, J; Kim, H T; Kim, K H

    1997-07-18

    A series of 1-alkoxy-5-alkyl-6-(arylthio)uracils was synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 replication. Treatment of 2-alkyl-3,3-bis(methylthio)acryloyl chlorides (5a-e) with AgOCN in benzene followed by reaction of the resulting isocyanates 6a-e with an appropriate alkoxyamine gave N-alkoxy-N'-((2-alkyl-3,3-bis(methylthio)acryloyl)ureas (10a-z) in good to excellent yields. Cyclization of 10a-z in AcOH containing a catalytic amount of p-TsOH produced 1-alkoxy-5-alkyl-6-(methylthio)uracils (11a-z). Oxidation of 11a-z with 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid in CH2Cl2 resulted in high yields of 1-alkoxy-5-alkyl-6-(methylsulfonyl)uracils (12a-x and 12z) and 1-(benzyloxy)-6-(methylsulfinyl)thymine (12y), which were subsequently reacted with an appropriate arenethiol in ethanolic NaOH solution to afford 1-alkoxy-5-alkyl-6-(arylthio)uracils (14-49). Substitution at the 3- and 5-positions of the C-6-(phenylthio) ring by two methyl groups significantly increased its original anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50: 6-((3,5-dimethylphenyl)thio)-5-isopropyl-1-propoxyuracil (18), 0.064 microM; 6-((3,5-dimethylphenyl)thio)-1-(3-hydroxypropoxy)-5-isopropyluracil++ + (23), 0.19 microM). Among the various alkoxy substituents at the N-1, the propoxy group was the most beneficial for improving the anti-HIV-1 activity. The 1-propoxy derivative 18 proved to be the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 replication, followed by the 1-(3-hydroxypropoxy) derivative 23. Introduction of an isopropyl group at C-5 of the uracil base also remarkably enhanced the activity. When compound 18 was incubated with a rat liver homogenate preparation, no metabolite was observed, thus confirming the metabolic stability of the N-O bond in these 1-alkoxyuracils.

  7. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  8. Synthetic peptides from a conserved region of gp120 induce broadly reactive anti-HIV responses.

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, W J; Williams, W M; Whalley, A S; Ryskamp, T; Newman, R; Kang, C Y; Chamat, S; Köhler, H; Kieber-Emmons, T

    1992-01-01

    In our efforts to identify products that might be used for active immunotherapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we have studied synthetic peptides derived from the CD4 attachment site of gp120. Two peptides have emerged with particularly interesting properties. The first (B138) is linear and spans the envelope residues 421-438; the second (1005/45) encompasses amino acids 418-445 and is cyclized by way of a disulphide bond joining its terminal cysteines. Both species have been shown to inhibit syncytial formation in a conventional bioassay, B138 being the most efficient. Both peptides elicit high titres of anti-peptide antibodies in immunized mice, rabbits and goats, with titres exceeding 1:10(5) in many cases. A substantial portion of this response is directed against gp120 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by flow cytometry has demonstrated that the antisera are broadly reactive with multiple diverse strains of HIV. The anti-gp120 activity of the anti-peptide antiserum was further confirmed by radioimmuno-precipitation (RIP) assays. Furthermore, RIP analysis and inhibition experiments in a GD4-gp120 binding assay have revealed that anti-peptide sera contain antibodies directed against the CD4 attachment site on gp120 and interfere with this receptor-ligand interaction. Images Figure 4 PMID:1592430

  9. Anti-AIDS agents 86. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of 2',3'-seco-3'-nor DCP and DCK analogues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Cheng, Ming; Liu, Fa-Qiang; Xia, Peng; Qian, Keduo; Yu, Donglei; Xia, Yi; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Chen, Chin-Ho; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-10-01

    In a continuing study of novel anti-HIV agents with drug-like structures and properties, 30 1'-O-, 1'-S-, 4'-O- and 4'-substituted-2',3'-seco-3'-nor DCP and DCK analogues (8-37) were designed and synthesized. All newly synthesized seco-compounds were screened against HIV-1(NL4-3) and a multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR) strain in the TZM-bl cell line, using seco-DCK (7) and 2-ethyl-DCP (4) as controls. Several compounds (14, 18, 19, 22-24, and 32) exhibited potent anti-HIV activity with EC(50) values ranging from 0.93 to 1.93 μM and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 20 to 39. 1'-O-Isopropoxy-2',3'-seco-3'-nor-DCP (12) showed the greatest potency among the newly synthesized compounds with EC(50) values of 0.47 and 0.88 μM, and TI of 96 and 51, respectively, against HIV-1(NL4-3) and RTMDR strains. The seco-compounds exhibited better chemical stability in acidic conditions compared with DCP and DCK compounds. Overall, the results suggested that seco-DCP analogues with simplified structures may be more favorable for development as novel anti-HIV candidates.

  10. Host Anti-antibody Responses Following Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Delivery of Antibodies Against HIV and SIV in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Pedreño-López, Sònia; Rakasz, Eva G; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    Long-term delivery of antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody are a serious concern that could significantly limit the applicability of this approach. Here, we describe the dynamics and characteristics of the anti-antibody responses in monkeys that received either rhesus anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antibodies (4L6 or 5L7) in prevention trials or a combination of rhesusized human anti-HIV antibodies (1NC9/8ANC195/3BNC117 or 10-1074/10E8/3BNC117) in therapy trials, all employing AAV1 delivery of IgG1. Eight out of eight monkeys that received the anti-HIV antibodies made persisting antibody responses to all three antibodies in the mix. Six out of six uninfected monkeys that received the anti-SIV antibody 4L6 and three out of six of those receiving anti-SIV antibody 5L7 also generated anti-antibodies. Both heavy and light chains were targeted, predominantly or exclusively to variable regions, and reactivity to complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 peptide could be demonstrated. There was a highly significant correlation of the magnitude of anti-antibody responses with the degree of sequence divergence of the delivered antibody from germline. Our results suggest the need for effective strategies to counteract the problem of antibody responses to AAV-delivered antibodies.

  11. Multiple Roles of ATP:Cob(I)alamin Adenosyltransferases in the Conversion of B12 to Coenzyme B12

    PubMed Central

    Mera, Paola E.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Our mechanistic understanding of the conversion of vitamin B12 into coenzyme B12 (a.k.a. adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) has been substantially advanced in recent years. Insights into the multiple roles played by ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ACA) enzymes have emerged through the crystallographic, spectroscopic, biochemical, and mutational analyses of wild-type and variant proteins. ACA enzymes circumvent the thermodynamic barrier posed by the very low redox potential associated with the reduction of cob(II)alamin to cob(I)alamin by generating a unique four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate that is readily converted to cob(I)alamin by physiological reductants. ACA enzymes not only synthesize AdoCbl, they deliver it to the enzymes that use it, and, in some cases, enzymes whose function is needed to maintain the fidelity of the AdoCbl delivery process have been identified. Advances in our understanding of ACA enzyme function have provided valuable insights into the role of specific residues, and into why substitutions of these residues have profound negative effects on human health. From an applied science standpoint, a better understanding of the adenosylation reaction may lead to more efficient ways of synthesizing AdoCbl. PMID:20677021

  12. Predicting anti-HIV-1 activity of 6-arylbenzonitriles: computational approach using superaugmented eccentric connectivity topochemical indices.

    PubMed

    Dureja, Harish; Gupta, Sunil; Madan, A K

    2008-02-01

    Highly discriminating adjacency-cum-distance based topochemical indices termed as superaugmented eccentric connectivity topochemical indices for quantitative structure-activity and structure-property relationships (QSAR/QSPR) have been conceptualized in the present study. These indices were found to exhibit high sensitivity towards the presence and relative position of heteroatom(s), exceptionally high discriminating power and negligible degeneracy for all possible structures of five vertices containing one heteroatom. Utility of these indices was investigated for development of models for prediction of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 activity using a data set comprising 81 differently substituted 6-arylbenzonitriles. The values of the superaugmented eccentric connectivity topochemical indices of all the analogues comprising the data set were computed using an in-house computer program. The resultant data was analyzed and suitable models were developed after identification of the active ranges. Subsequently, a biological activity was assigned to each analogue using these models which was then compared with the reported anti-HIV-1 activity. The accuracy of prediction was found to be approximately 81% for all the three topochemical models. High sensitivity towards presence and relative position of heteroatom(s), exceptionally high discriminating power amalgamated with low degeneracy offer proposed topochemical indices vast potential for isomer discrimination, similarity/dissimilarity, drug design, quantitative structure-activity/structure-property relationships, lead optimization and combinatorial library design.

  13. Anti-HIV-1 protease- and HIV-1 integrase activities of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Itharat, Arunporn; Rattanasuwan, Pranee

    2006-04-21

    Ethanolic- and water extracts from five species of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen were tested for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) and HIV-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). The result revealed that the ethanolic (EtOH) extract of Smilax corbularia exhibited anti-HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 1.9 microg/ml, followed by the water extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.5 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.7 microg/ml), the water extract of Smilax corbularia (IC50 = 5.4 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 6.7 microg/ml) and the water extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 8.5 microg/ml). The extracts of Pygmaeopremna herbacea and Dioscorea membranacea were apparently inactive (IC50 > 100 microg/ml). Interestingly, only the EtOH extract of Dioscorea membranacea showed appreciable activity (IC50 = 48 microg/ml) against HIV-1 PR, while the other extracts possessed mild activity. This result strongly supported the basis for the use of Smilax corbularia and Dioscorea membranacea for AIDS treatment by Thai traditional doctors. PMID:16406414

  14. Activation of the human nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR by the reverse transcriptase-targeted anti-HIV drug PNU-142721

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yuan; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2012-10-09

    The human pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. PXR responds to a structurally diverse variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, and coordinates the expression of genes central to the metabolism and excretion of potentially harmful chemicals, including human therapeutics. The reverse transcriptase inhibitor PNU-142721 has been designed to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although this compound has anti-HIV activity, it was established using cell-based assays that PNU-142721 is an efficacious PXR agonist. We present here the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the human PXR ligand-binding domain in complex with PNU-142721. PXR employs one hydrogen bond and fourteen van der Waals contacts to interact with the ligand, but allows two loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket to remain disordered in the structure. These observations highlight the role structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous responses to xenobiotics. The crystal structure also explains why PNU-173575, a thiomethyl metabolite of PNU-142721, exhibits enhanced PXR activation relative to the unmodified compound and why PNU-142721 can also activate rat PXR. Taken together, the results presented here elucidate the structural basis for PXR activation by PNU-142721 and related chemicals.

  15. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    PubMed

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  16. The role of Vitamin B12 in the critically ill--a review.

    PubMed

    Romain, M; Sviri, S; Linton, D M; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin B12 is an essential micronutrient, as humans have no capacity to produce the vitamin and it needs to be ingested from animal proteins. The ingested Vitamin B12 undergoes a complex process of absorption and assimilation. Vitamin B12 is essential for cellular function. Deficiency affects 15% of patients older than 65 and results in haematological and neurological disorders. Low levels of Vitamin B12 may also be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. High levels of Vitamin B12 are associated with inflammation and represent a poor outlook for critically ill patients. Treatment of Vitamin B12 deficiency is simple, but may be lifelong. PMID:27456173

  17. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Loukili, Noureddine Henoun; Noel, Esther; Kaltenbach, Georges; Abdelgheni, Maher Ben; Perrin, Anne Elisabeth; Noblet-Dick, Marie; Maloisel, Frédéric; Schlienger, Jean-Louis; Blicklé, Jean-Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    VITAMIN B12 OR COBALAMIN DEFICIENCY occurs frequently (> 20%) among elderly people, but it is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; they are also potentially serious, particularly from a neuropsychiatric and hematological perspective. Causes of the deficiency include, most frequently, food-cobalamin malabsorption syndrome (> 60% of all cases), pernicious anemia (15%–20% of all cases), insufficent dietary intake and malabsorption. Food-cobalamin malabsorption, which has only recently been identified as a significant cause of cobalamin deficiency among elderly people, is characterized by the inability to release cobalamin from food or a deficiency of intestinal cobalamin transport proteins or both. We review the epidemiology and causes of cobalamin deficiency in elderly people, with an emphasis on food-cobalamin malabsorption syndrome. We also review diagnostic and management strategies for cobalamin deficiency. PMID:15289425

  18. Vitamin B12 as a modulator of gut microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Taga, Michiko E; Goodman, Andrew L

    2014-11-01

    The microbial mechanisms and key metabolites that shape the composition of the human gut microbiota are largely unknown, impeding efforts to manipulate dysbiotic microbial communities toward stability and health. Vitamins, which by definition are not synthesized in sufficient quantities by the host and can mediate fundamental biological processes in microbes, represent an attractive target for reshaping microbial communities. Here, we discuss how vitamin B12 (cobalamin) impacts diverse host-microbe symbioses. Although cobalamin is synthesized by some human gut microbes, it is a precious resource in the gut and is likely not provisioned to the host in significant quantities. However, this vitamin may make an unrecognized contribution in shaping the structure and function of human gut microbial communities. PMID:25440056

  19. Rationally designed anti-HIV peptides containing multifunctional domains as molecule probes for studying the mechanisms of action of the first and second generation HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Shi, Weiguo; Xue, Na; Pan, Chungen; Jing, Weiguo; Liu, Keliang; Jiang, Shibo

    2008-10-31

    We have previously shown that the first generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) fusion inhibitor T20 (Fuzeon) contains a critical lipid-binding domain (LBD), whereas C34, another anti-HIV peptide derived from the gp41 C-terminal heptad repeat, consists of an important pocket-binding domain (PBD), and both share a common 4-3 heptad repeat (HR) sequence (Liu, S., Jing, W., Cheung, B., Lu, H., Sun, J., Yan, X., Niu, J., Farmar, J., Wu, S., and Jiang, S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9612-9620). T1249, the second generation HIV fusion inhibitor, has both LBD and PBD but a different HR sequence, suggesting that these three anti-HIV peptides may have distinct mechanisms of action. Here we rationally designed a set of peptides that contain multiple copies of a predicted HR sequence (5HR) or the HR sequence plus either LBD (4HR-LBD) or PBD (PBD-4HR) or both (PBD-3HR-LBD), and we compared their anti-HIV-1 activity and biophysical properties. We found that the peptide 5HR exhibited low-to-moderate inhibitory activity on HIV-1-mediated cell-cell fusion, whereas addition of LBD and/or PBD to the HR sequence resulted in a significant increase of the anti-HIV-1 activity. The peptides containing PBD, including PBD-4HR and PBD-3HR-LBD, could form a stable six-helix bundle with the N-peptide N46 and effectively blocked the gp41 core formation, whereas the peptides containing LBD, e.g. 4HR-LBD and PBD-3HR-LBD, could interact with the lipid vehicles. These results suggest that the HR sequence in these anti-HIV peptides acts as a structure domain and is responsible for its interaction with the HR sequence in N-terminal heptad repeat, whereas PBD and LBD are critical for interactions with their corresponding targets. T20, C34, and T1249 may function like 4HR-LBD, PBD-4HR, and PBD-3HR-LBD, respectively, to interact with different target sites for inhibiting HIV fusion and entry. Therefore, this study provides important information for understanding the mechanisms of action of the

  20. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W; Blom, Henk J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders.

  1. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W; Blom, Henk J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  2. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C.; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W.; Blom, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  3. New developments in ELISA verification of anti-HIV screening of blood donors.

    PubMed

    Hellings, J A; Theunissen, H; Keur, W; Siebelink-Liauw, A

    1987-08-01

    First generation ELISA screening assays for antibodies to HTLV-III (HIV) generated between 0.1 and 1.0% false positive results. Western blot analysis in specialized reference centers is almost uniformly used as a method to confirm the specificity of the ELISA results. Yet, the high cost, time delay and lack of standardization in these systems cause a growing demand for tests that can be performed on site and that can at least reduce the number of sera that have to be sent to reference centers. Such tests thus should primarily be aimed at the detection of false positive results. Ancillary to the Vironostika anti-HTLV-III screening test, we developed a set of reagents (VERIFY) which can be used for the verification of initially or repeatedly positive screening results. The test employs a reagent specifically blocking true HTLV-III-anti HTLV-III reactions, a reagent blocking HLA-anti HLA reactions and a control reagent. Use of this test may reduce the number of sera found false positive by reference methods by more than 90%. The introduction of improved versions and second generation screening assays obviously will reduce the number of false positive results. Yet the significant results of this verification assay and the ease with which it can be integrated in the screening procedures will make it a valuable tool in the blood bank screening program.

  4. Vitamin B12 is the active corrinoid produced in cultivated white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang-Chul; Cho, Kai Yip; Pang, Gerald

    2009-07-22

    Analysis of vitamin B(12) in freshly harvested white button mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus ) from five farms was performed by affinity chromatography and HPLC-ESI-MS techniques. The vitamin B(12) concentrations obtained varied from farm to farm, with higher concentrations of vitamin B(12) detected in outer peel than in cap, stalk, or flesh, suggesting that the vitamin B(12) is probably bacteria-derived. High concentrations of vitamin B(12) were also detected in the flush mushrooms including cups and flats. HPLC and mass spectrometry showed vitamin B(12) retention time and mass spectra identical to those of the standard vitamin B(12) and those of food products including beef, beef liver, salmon, egg, and milk but not of the pseudovitamin B(12), an inactive corrinoid in humans. The results suggest that the consumer may benefit from the consumption of mushroom to increase intake of this vitamin in the diet.

  5. Vitamin B12 is the active corrinoid produced in cultivated white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang-Chul; Cho, Kai Yip; Pang, Gerald

    2009-07-22

    Analysis of vitamin B(12) in freshly harvested white button mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus ) from five farms was performed by affinity chromatography and HPLC-ESI-MS techniques. The vitamin B(12) concentrations obtained varied from farm to farm, with higher concentrations of vitamin B(12) detected in outer peel than in cap, stalk, or flesh, suggesting that the vitamin B(12) is probably bacteria-derived. High concentrations of vitamin B(12) were also detected in the flush mushrooms including cups and flats. HPLC and mass spectrometry showed vitamin B(12) retention time and mass spectra identical to those of the standard vitamin B(12) and those of food products including beef, beef liver, salmon, egg, and milk but not of the pseudovitamin B(12), an inactive corrinoid in humans. The results suggest that the consumer may benefit from the consumption of mushroom to increase intake of this vitamin in the diet. PMID:19552428

  6. Vitamin B-12 Supplementation during Pregnancy and Early Lactation Increases Maternal, Breast Milk, and Infant Measures of Vitamin B-12 Status12

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Samuel, Tinu; Rajendran, Ramya; Muthayya, Sumithra; Finkelstein, Julia L.; Lukose, Ammu; Fawzi, Wafaie; Allen, Lindsay H.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Kurpad, Anura V.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women in resource-poor areas are at risk of multiple micronutrient deficiencies, and indicators of low vitamin B-12 status have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including anemia, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation. To evaluate whether daily oral vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy increases maternal and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status, we performed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pregnant women <14 wk of gestation in Bangalore, India, were randomly assigned to receive daily oral supplementation with vitamin B-12 (50 μg) or placebo through 6 wk postpartum. All women were administered iron and folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy. One hundred eighty-three women were randomly assigned to receive vitamin B-12 and 183 to receive placebo. Compared with placebo recipients, vitamin B-12–supplemented women had significantly higher plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations at both the second (median vitamin B-12 concentration: 216 vs. 111 pmol/L, P < 0.001) and third (median: 184 vs. 105 pmol/L, P < 0.001) trimesters. At 6 wk postpartum, median breast milk vitamin B-12 concentration was 136 pmol/L in vitamin B-12–supplemented women vs. 87 pmol/L in the placebo group (P < 0.0005). Among vitamin B-12–supplemented women, the incidence of delivering an infant with intrauterine growth retardation was 33 of 131 (25%) vs. 43 of 125 (34%) in those administered placebo (P = 0.11). In a subset of infants tested at 6 wk of age, median plasma vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L in those born to supplemented women vs. 139 pmol/L in the placebo group (P = 0.01). Infant plasma methylmalonic acid and homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in the vitamin B-12 group as well. Oral supplementation of urban Indian women with vitamin B-12 throughout pregnancy and early lactation significantly increases vitamin B-12 status of mothers and infants. It is important to determine whether there are

  7. Vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy and early lactation increases maternal, breast milk, and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Samuel, Tinu; Rajendran, Ramya; Muthayya, Sumithra; Finkelstein, Julia L; Lukose, Ammu; Fawzi, Wafaie; Allen, Lindsay H; Bosch, Ronald J; Kurpad, Anura V

    2014-05-01

    Pregnant women in resource-poor areas are at risk of multiple micronutrient deficiencies, and indicators of low vitamin B-12 status have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including anemia, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation. To evaluate whether daily oral vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy increases maternal and infant measures of vitamin B-12 status, we performed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pregnant women <14 wk of gestation in Bangalore, India, were randomly assigned to receive daily oral supplementation with vitamin B-12 (50 μg) or placebo through 6 wk postpartum. All women were administered iron and folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy. One hundred eighty-three women were randomly assigned to receive vitamin B-12 and 183 to receive placebo. Compared with placebo recipients, vitamin B-12-supplemented women had significantly higher plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations at both the second (median vitamin B-12 concentration: 216 vs. 111 pmol/L, P < 0.001) and third (median: 184 vs. 105 pmol/L, P < 0.001) trimesters. At 6 wk postpartum, median breast milk vitamin B-12 concentration was 136 pmol/L in vitamin B-12-supplemented women vs. 87 pmol/L in the placebo group (P < 0.0005). Among vitamin B-12-supplemented women, the incidence of delivering an infant with intrauterine growth retardation was 33 of 131 (25%) vs. 43 of 125 (34%) in those administered placebo (P = 0.11). In a subset of infants tested at 6 wk of age, median plasma vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L in those born to supplemented women vs. 139 pmol/L in the placebo group (P = 0.01). Infant plasma methylmalonic acid and homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in the vitamin B-12 group as well. Oral supplementation of urban Indian women with vitamin B-12 throughout pregnancy and early lactation significantly increases vitamin B-12 status of mothers and infants. It is important to determine whether there are

  8. 12 CFR 261b.12 - Procedures for inspection and obtaining copies of transcriptions and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... available to the public upon request under the provisions of 12 CFR part 261 (Rules Regarding Availability... of transcriptions and minutes. 261b.12 Section 261b.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... § 261b.12 Procedures for inspection and obtaining copies of transcriptions and minutes. (a) Any...

  9. VITAMIN B-12 SUPPLEMENTATION OF DEFICIENT LACTATING GUATEMALAN WOMEN IMPROVES MATERNAL BUT NOT INFANT STATUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency is common in mothers and infants where maternal intake of animals source foods is low. The first six months post-partum is a critical period of neurological development requiring vitamin B-12. A pilot study was designed to determine the dose of B-12 to the mothers that would ...

  10. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods. PMID:23782218

  11. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods.

  12. Structural basis for mammalian vitamin B12 transport by transcobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Wuerges, Jochen; Garau, Gianpiero; Geremia, Silvano; Fedosov, Sergey N.; Petersen, Torben E.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) serves for two essential cofactors in mammals. The pathway for its intestinal absorption, plasma transport, and cellular uptake uses cell surface receptors and three Cbl-transporting proteins, haptocorrin, intrinsic factor, and transcobalamin (TC). We present the structure determination of a member of the mammalian Cbl-transporter family. The crystal structures of recombinant human and bovine holo-TCs reveal a two-domain architecture, with an N-terminal α6-α6 barrel and a smaller C-terminal domain. One Cbl molecule in base-on conformation is buried inside the domain interface. Structural data combined with previous binding assays indicate a domain motion in the first step of Cbl binding. In a second step, the weakly coordinated ligand H2O at the upper axial side of added H2O-Cbl is displaced by a histidine residue of the α6-α6 barrel. Analysis of amino acid conservation on TC’s surface in orthologous proteins suggests the location of the TC-receptor-recognition site in an extended region on the α6-α6 barrel. The TC structure allows for the mapping of sites of amino acid variation due to polymorphisms of the human TC gene. Structural information is used to predict the overall fold of haptocorrin and intrinsic factor and permits a rational approach to the design of new Cbl-based bioconjugates for diagnostic or therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:16537422

  13. Vitamin B-12 supplementation of rural Mexican women changes biochemical B-12 status indicators but does not affect hematology or a bone turnover marker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on the high prevalence of low serum vitamin B-12 concentrations and low dietary intake of the vitamin in Latin American studies including research in Mexico, it appears that vitamin B-12 deficiency is common. Whether this is associated with adverse effects on human function is unknown. To eval...

  14. Enhancing the vitamin B12 production and growth of Propionibacterium freudenreichii in tofu wastewater via a light-induced vitamin B12 riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Zhu, Xuan; Shen, Yubiao; Yao, Huanghong; Wang, Peiheng; Ye, Kun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch is a crucial factor that regulates gene transcription to mediate the growth of and vitamin B12 synthesis by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In this study, the effect of various wavelengths of light on the growth rate and vitamin B12 synthesis was studied. Red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were selected, and a dark condition was used as the control. The microorganism growth rate was measured using a spectrophotometer and plate counting, while the vitamin B12 content was determined using an HPLC-based method. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) values indicated that P. freudenreichii grew better under the continuous and discontinuous blue light conditions. Moreover, under the blue light condition, P. freudenreichii tended to have a higher growth rate (0.332 h(-1)) and vitamin B12 synthesis (ca. 10 μg/mL) in tofu wastewater than in dark conditions. HPLC analysis also showed that more methylcobalamin was produced under the blue light conditions than in the other conditions. The cbiB gene transcription results showed that blue light induced the synthesis of this vitamin B12 synthesis enzyme. Moreover, the results of inhibiting the expression of green fluorescent protein indicated that blue light removed the inhibition by the vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch. This method can be used to reduce fermentation time and produce more vitamin B12 in tofu wastewater. PMID:26373724

  15. Enhancing the vitamin B12 production and growth of Propionibacterium freudenreichii in tofu wastewater via a light-induced vitamin B12 riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Zhu, Xuan; Shen, Yubiao; Yao, Huanghong; Wang, Peiheng; Ye, Kun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch is a crucial factor that regulates gene transcription to mediate the growth of and vitamin B12 synthesis by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In this study, the effect of various wavelengths of light on the growth rate and vitamin B12 synthesis was studied. Red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were selected, and a dark condition was used as the control. The microorganism growth rate was measured using a spectrophotometer and plate counting, while the vitamin B12 content was determined using an HPLC-based method. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) values indicated that P. freudenreichii grew better under the continuous and discontinuous blue light conditions. Moreover, under the blue light condition, P. freudenreichii tended to have a higher growth rate (0.332 h(-1)) and vitamin B12 synthesis (ca. 10 μg/mL) in tofu wastewater than in dark conditions. HPLC analysis also showed that more methylcobalamin was produced under the blue light conditions than in the other conditions. The cbiB gene transcription results showed that blue light induced the synthesis of this vitamin B12 synthesis enzyme. Moreover, the results of inhibiting the expression of green fluorescent protein indicated that blue light removed the inhibition by the vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch. This method can be used to reduce fermentation time and produce more vitamin B12 in tofu wastewater.

  16. Structural Determinants for the Selective Anti-HIV-1 Activity of the All-β Alternative Conformer of XCL1

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo, Christina; Fox, Jamie C.; Miao, Huiyi; Volkman, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 replication is regulated in vivo by a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. XCL1/lymphotactin, a unique metamorphic chemokine, was recently identified as a broad-spectrum endogenous HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entry via direct interaction with the gp120 envelope glycoprotein. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 requires access to the alternative all-β conformation, which interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not with the specific XCL1 receptor, XCR1. To investigate the structural determinants of the HIV-inhibitory function of XCL1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of a stabilized all-β variant, XCL1 W55D. Individual alanine substitutions of two basic residues within the 40s' loop, K42 and R43, abrogated the ability of XCL1 to bind to the viral envelope and block HIV-1 infection; moreover, a loss of HIV-inhibitory function, albeit less marked, was seen upon individual mutation of three additional basic residues: R18, R35, and K46. In contrast, mutation of K42 to arginine did not cause any loss of function, suggesting that the interaction with gp120 is primarily electrostatic in nature. Strikingly, four of these five residues cluster to form a large (∼350 Å2) positively charged surface in the all-β XCL1 conformation, whereas they are dissociated in the classic chemokine fold, which is inactive against HIV-1, providing a structural basis for the selective antiviral activity of the alternatively folded XCL1. Furthermore, we observed that changes to the N-terminal domain, which is proximal to the cluster of putative HIV-1 gp120-interacting residues, also affect the antiviral activity of XCL1. Interestingly, the complement of residues involved in HIV-1 blockade is partially overlapping, but distinct from those involved in the GAG-binding function of XCL1. These data identify key structural determinants of anti-HIV activity in XCL1, providing new templates for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. IMPORTANCE The host

  17. The effects of inhomogeneous boundary dilution on the coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Peters, Jennifer J.; Park, Su Chan; Verguet, Stéphane; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2011-09-01

    A recent study in South Africa has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when topically applied, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [Karim et al., Science 329, 1168 (2010)]. However, the gel for this drug and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general have not been designed using an understanding of how gel spreading and retention in the vagina govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model spreading of microbicide gels [Szeri et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 083101 (2008)]. This should incorporate the full rheological behavior of a gel, including how rheological properties change due to contact with, and dilution by, ambient vaginal fluids. Here, we extend our initial analysis, incorporating the effects of gel dilution due to contact with vaginal fluid produced at the gel-tissue interface. Our original model is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to characterize water transport into the gel and, thus, local gel dilution. The problem is solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain. The association between local dilution of gel and rheological properties is obtained experimentally, delineating the way constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. Results show that dilution accelerates the coating flow by creating a slippery region near the vaginal wall akin to a dilution boundary layer, especially if the boundary flux exceeds a certain value. On the other hand, if the diffusion coefficient of boundary fluid is increased, the slippery region diminishes in extent and the overall rate of gel spreading decreases.

  18. Characterization of the phenotypic and lymphokine profile associated with strong CD8+ anti-HIV-1 suppressor activity (CASA)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, J; Zaunders, J J; Carr, A; Guillemin, G; Cooper, D A

    2002-01-01

    A panel of 22 CD8+ T cell lines, with a broad range of CD8+ anti-HIV-1 suppressor activity (CASA) were generated from a single patient with HIV-1 infection. CD8+ T cell lines with either strong or weak CASA were examined and compared for cell surface and intracellular markers, constitutive chemokine and lymphokine mRNA levels and inducible lymphokine expression. Strong CASA significantly correlated with CD8+ T cell lines that highly coexpressed the molecule CD28+ (r = 0·52, P = 0·01) and Ki67+ (r = 0·88, P = 0·02), with strong CASA CD8+ T cell lines demonstrating significantly higher (P < 0·05) expression of CD8+CD28+ and CD8+Ki67+ compared to those with weak activity. No such correlations or findings were observed for the markers CD38, HLA-DR, CD57 or perforin. The Th1 cytokines were expressed at greater levels than the Th2 cytokines, with strong CASA significantly associated with an increased inducible level of IL-2 production (P = 0·05). Constitutive RANTES, IP-10 and I-309 mRNA expression were significantly (P < 0·05) elevated in CD8+ T cell lines exhibiting strong CASA compared to those with weak CASA. There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression of the lymphokines IL-2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, or chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and Ltn. Strong CASA was therefore associated with rapidly replicating CD8+ T cells of the phenotype CD8+CD28+Ki67+ that expressed greater levels of IL-2 and the ligands RANTES and I-309. PMID:11882045

  19. Dynamic features of apo and bound HIV-Nef protein reveal the anti-HIV dimerization inhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moonsamy, Suri; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    The first account on the dynamic features of Nef or negative factor, a small myristoylated protein located in the cytoplasm believes to increase HIV-1 viral titer level, is reported herein. Due to its major role in HIV-1 pathogenicity, Nef protein is considered an emerging target in anti-HIV drug design and discovery process. In this study, comparative long-range all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed for apo and bound protein to unveil molecular mechanism of HIV-Nef dimerization and inhibition. Results clearly revealed that B9, a newly discovered Nef inhibitor, binds at the dimeric interface of Nef protein and caused significant separation between orthogonally opposed residues, namely Asp108, Leu112 and Gln104. Large differences in magnitudes were observed in the radius of gyration (∼1.5 Å), per-residue fluctuation (∼2 Å), C-alpha deviations (∼2 Å) which confirm a comparatively more flexible nature of apo conformation due to rapid dimeric association. Compared to the bound conformer, a more globally correlated motion in case of apo structure of HIV-Nef confirms the process of dimeric association. This clearly highlights the process of inhibition as a result of ligand binding. The difference in principal component analysis (PCA) scatter plot and per-residue mobility plot across first two normal modes further justifies the same findings. The in-depth dynamic analyses of Nef protein presented in this report would serve crucial in understanding its function and inhibition mechanisms. Information on inhibitor binding mode would also assist in designing of potential inhibitors against this important HIV target. PMID:26355431

  20. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  1. Association Between Serum B12 and Serum Homocysteine Levels in Diabetic Patients on Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nitin; Shah, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and metformin both can lower serum B12 (s.B12). Raised serum Homocysteine (s.Hcy) is considered as an early marker of B12 deficiency. Aim The study aimed to check whether homocysteine levels are more sensitive indicator of s. B12 deficiency or not among diabetics using metformin. Materials and Methods Mean s.B12 and s.Hcy levels of 30 cases (diabetics on metformin <5years) were compared with 30 diabetic controls not on metformin and 31 nondiabetic controls and statistically analysed by ANOVA and post-hoc tests. Results No significant differences in either s.B12 mean or s.Hcy mean were found between cases and diabetic controls. s.B12 mean did not differ significantly but s.Hcy mean was significantly higher among nondiabetics as compared to diabetic control. s. B12 level of Nondiabetic group was in borderline category while mean s. B12 levels of cases and diabetic control groups was in normal category but nearer to the lower cut off. Mean s.Hcy values in all the groups were high. Pearson correlation showed strong association between s.B12 and s.Hcy in all the groups. Additionally equation based on linear regression was derived to calculate either of the s.B12 or s.Hcy. On Receiver Operative Characteristic (ROC) curve, area under curve value was 0.842 for the value of s.Hcy. Conclusion In this study neither metformin nor T2DM could be identified as a cause for s.B12 lowering and raised s.Hcy in the scenario of low normal levels of s.B12 (<300pmol/L). If B12 deficiency recognized early using s. Hcy, consequences due to B12 deficiency can be prevented or delayed among nondiabetics as well as among diabetics and metformin users. PMID:27190787

  2. Vitamin B12 and folate levels in long-term vegans.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sella, P; Rakover, Y; Ratner, D

    1990-06-01

    Serum vitamin B12, serum folate and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels were examined among 36 strict vegans of 5-35 years' duration. Vitamin B12 levels among the vegans were generally lower than in a control population. Most of the vegans had vitamin B12 values less than 200 pg/ml. RBC folate levels were normal but serum folate levels among the vegans were higher than among the controls. None of the vegans had any hematologic evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency, however four of them had neurologic complaints. Long-standing vegans should be monitored for vitamin B12 levels.

  3. Vitamin B12 supplementation during pregnancy and postpartum improves B12 status of both mothers and infants but vaccine response in mothers only: a randomized clinical trial in Bangladesh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose Poor vitamin B12 (B12) status is associated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy and infancy. Little is known about effects of B12 supplementation on immune function. The present study aimed to evaluate effects of pre- and postnatal B12 supplementation on biomarkers of B12 status and vaccine-s...

  4. Antibody proteolysis: a common picture emerging from plants

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Marcello; Lombardi, Raffaele; Lonoce, Chiara; Di Carli, Mariasole; Marusic, Carla; Morea, Veronica; Di Micco, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    We have recently characterized the degradation profiles of 2 human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, the tumor-targeting mAb H10 and the anti-HIV mAb 2G12. Both mAbs were produced in plants either as stable transgenics or using a transient expression system based on leaf agroinfiltration. The purified antibodies were separated by 1DE and protein bands were characterized by N-terminal sequencing. The proteolytic cleavage sites identified in the heavy chain (HC) of both antibodies were localized in 3 inter-domain regions, suggesting that the number of proteolytic cleavage events taking place in plants is limited. One of the cleavage sites, close to the hinge region, was common to both antibodies. PMID:26186119

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the institutionalized elderly: A regional study.

    PubMed

    Wong, C W; Ip, C Y; Leung, C P; Leung, C S; Cheng, J N; Siu, C Y

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age and is suggested to be even higher in the elderly living in institutions. This retrospective study evaluated the vitamin B12 and folate status of 1996 institutionalized elderly residents aged over 65years. Among them, 34.9% had vitamin B12 deficiency (serum vitamin B12 <150pmol/L), 11.8% had folate deficiency (serum folate <6.8nmol/L), and 4.9% had both. The majority of vitamin B12 deficient residents (68%) had serum vitamin B12 between 100pmol/L and 149pmol/L. Macrocytosis was found in 24.2% of vitamin B12 deficient residents. A significant increase in macrocytosis was associated with a decrease in serum vitamin B12 below 100pmol/L. Macrocytosis was most common in those with vitamin B12 ≦69pmol/L (50.9%). Overall, vitamin B12 deficiency is common in the institutionalized elderly, however macrocytosis cannot predict deficiency. More liberal testing for vitamin B12 status in the institutionalized elderly may be warranted.

  6. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions.

  7. Biochemistry, function, and deficiency of vitamin B12 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a nematode that has been widely used as an animal for investigation of diverse biological phenomena. Vitamin B12 is essential for the growth of this worm, which contains two cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase. A full complement of gene homologs encoding the enzymes associated with the mammalian intercellular metabolic processes of vitamin B12 is identified in the genome of C elegans However, this worm has no orthologs of the vitamin B12-binders that participate in human intestinal absorption and blood circulation. When the worm is treated with a vitamin B12-deficient diet for five generations (15 days), it readily develops vitamin B12 deficiency, which induces worm phenotypes (infertility, delayed growth, and shorter lifespan) that resemble the symptoms of mammalian vitamin B12 deficiency. Such phenotypes associated with vitamin B12 deficiency were readily induced in the worm.

  8. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The postflight photograph shows little change of the exposed surfaces when compared with the prelaunch photograph. Although not noticable in the photograph, a light coating of contamination was seen on all experiment surfaces in this location. The difference in colors of the IDE detectors, located on the right hand mounting plate, is a result of the reflected surroundings and not related to space exposure. A close observation of the detector surfaces reveal that some damage has occured from meteroid and/or debris impacts. One impact crater can be seen, upper right quadrant, on the detector located in the sixth (6th) row down from the top and the fifth (5th) row from the right. Other impacts, smaller in size, show as small white dots on the detector surface. The solar sensor seems to have changed little, if any. However, the color of the solar array baseplate, showing indications of contamination, appears to be darker than the detector mounting plate. The center section cover plate shows little change when compared with the pre-launch photograph. However, during inspection, a light coat of the brown contamination has been observed on all surfaces. The color of the bonding material (RTV) used to secure several thin specimen, sapphire, to individual mounting plates has changed from pink to gold. At one location, that of a single specimen, the bonding material is more gray than gold in color. This has been attributed to the specimen being considerably thicker. The EPDS thermal cover in the right hand side of the tray shows a light coating of brown contamination on the Chemglaze II A-276 white paint.

  9. Antibacterial, anti-HIV-1 protease and cytotoxic activities of aqueous ethanolic extracts from Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Records have shown that Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) is used in traditional medicine systems of several tribes in Tanzania. This study focused on the investigation of antibacterial activity, anti-HIV-1 protease activity, toxicity properties and classes of phytochemicals in extracts from C. adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) to evaluate potential of these extracts for development as herbal remedies. Methods Dried plant material were ground to fine powder and extracted using 80% aqueous ethanol to afford root, leaf and stem bark extracts. The extracts were assayed for anti-HIV-1 protease activities, antibacterial activities using microdilution methods and cytotoxicity using brine shrimps lethality assay. Screening for major phytochemical classes was carried out using standard chemical tests. Results All extracts exhibited antibacterial activity to at least one of the test bacteria with MIC-values ranging from 0.31-5.0 mg/ml. Two extracts, namely, root and stem bark exhibited anti-HIV-1 PR activity with IC50 values of 24.7 and 26.5 μg/ml, respectively. Stem bark and leaf extracts showed mild toxicity with LC50 values of 65.768 μg/ml and 76.965 μg/ml, respectively, whereas roots were relatively non-toxic (LC50 = 110.042 μg/ml). Phytochemical screening of the extracts indicated presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, tannins, glycosides and saponins. Conclusion These results provide promising baseline information for the potential development of C. adenogonium extracts in treatment of bacterial and HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections. PMID:23013240

  10. PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Frank, Ines; Hallor, Magnus; Singer, Rachel; Tharinger, Hugo; Kenney, Jessica; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Salazar, Andres; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Robbiani, Melissa; Derby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239ΔNef (SIVΔNef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of α4β7 and CD169, and induced type I IFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro- and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIVΔNef-infected animals, SIVΔNef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIVΔNef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity. PMID:27603520

  11. PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hallor, Magnus; Singer, Rachel; Tharinger, Hugo; Kenney, Jessica; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Robbiani, Melissa; Derby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239ΔNef (SIVΔNef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of α4β7 and CD169, and induced type I IFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro- and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIVΔNef-infected animals, SIVΔNef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIVΔNef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity. PMID:27603520

  12. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  13. Mechanical and electronic properties of B12-based ternary crystals of orthorhombic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Jijun; Wu, Aimin; Bai, Yizhen; Jiang, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of the experimentally synthesized B12-based ternary crystals (AlMgB14, AlNaB14, AlLiB14, Mg2B14, MgSi2B12, MgC2B12, Li2Si2B12 and Li2C2B12) have been investigated. The theoretical equilibrium lattice constants of these crystals agree with the experimental values. The Vickers hardness (Hv) estimated from the theoretical Young's moduli ranges from 20 to 30 GPa, and the MgC2B12 compound (Hv = 31.4 GPa) is harder than α-boron. Based on the electron density of states and Mulliken population analysis, the origination of hardness and interaction between the interstitial atoms and the B12 framework were discussed. Scaled bond order of the B-B bonds was used to interpret the hardness of these B12-based ternary compounds. The crystal hardness is primarily determined by the B12 icosahedral skeleton, whereas the contributions of metal atoms manifest as the electron transfer from metal to B atoms. We also calculated the ideal tensile strength of AlMgB14 and MgC2B12 and found that the lang001rang and lang010rang directions are their cleavage directions under tensile strains, respectively.

  14. Vitamin B12 transport from food to the body's cells--a sophisticated, multistep pathway.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marianne J; Rasmussen, Mie R; Andersen, Christian B F; Nexø, Ebba; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) (B(12); also known as cobalamin) is a cofactor in many metabolic processes; deficiency of this vitamin is associated with megaloblastic anaemia and various neurological disorders. In contrast to many prokaryotes, humans and other mammals are unable to synthesize B(12). Instead, a sophisticated pathway for specific uptake and transport of this molecule has evolved. Failure in the gastrointestinal part of this pathway is the most common cause of nondietary-induced B(12) deficiency disease. However, although less frequent, defects in cellular processing and further downstream steps in the transport pathway are also known culprits of functional B(12) deficiency. Biochemical and genetic approaches have identified novel proteins in the B(12) transport pathway--now known to involve more than 15 gene products--delineating a coherent pathway for B(12) trafficking from food to the body's cells. Some of these gene products are specifically dedicated to B(12) transport, whereas others embrace additional roles, which explains the heterogeneity in the clinical picture of the many genetic disorders causing B(12) deficiency. This Review describes basic and clinical features of this multistep pathway with emphasis on gastrointestinal transport of B(12) and its importance in clinical medicine.

  15. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Osipiuk, J.; Pinkau, T. )

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70{degrees}C culture at the lethal temperature of 92{degrees}C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88{degrees}C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  16. Vitamin B12-binding proteins of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G M; Shigeura, H T; Liu, L Y

    1985-04-16

    Vitamin B12-binding proteins were detected in the body fluids and/or tissues of horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus), clams and sponges. Among the biological specimens tested the Limulus plasma was especially rich in free B12-binding proteins. Gel filtration experiments revealed that Limulus plasma contains two classes of B12-binding proteins. One class of proteins, molecular weight in excess of 100,000, bind B12 preferentially with affinity constant of 5 X 10(11)M-1. The second type of proteins, molecular weights around 50,000, bind B12 with specificity approaching that of mammalian intrinsic factors. The binding constant of these proteins for B12 is around 10(11)M-1.

  17. 4-Ethylphenyl-Cobalamin Impairs Tissue Uptake of Vitamin B12 and Causes Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Elena; Ruetz, Markus; Birn, Henrik; Kräutler, Bernhard; Nexo, Ebba

    2013-01-01

    Coβ-4-ethylphenyl-cob(III) alamin (EtPhCbl) is an organometallic analogue of vitamin B12 (CNCbl) which binds to transcobalamin (TC), a plasma protein that facilitates the cellular uptake of cobalamin (Cbl). In vitro assays with key enzymes do not convert EtPhCbl to the active coenzyme forms of Cbl suggesting that administration of EtPhCbl may cause cellular Cbl deficiency. Here, we investigate the in vivo effect of EtPhCbl in mice and its ability, if any, to induce Cbl deficiency. We show that EtPhCbl binds to mouse TC and we examined mice that received 3.5 nmol/24h EtPhCbl (n=6), 3.5 nmol/24h CNCbl (n=7) or NaCl (control group) (n=5) through osmotic mini-pumps for four weeks. We analyzed plasma, urine, liver, spleen, submaxillary glands and spinal cord for Cbl and markers of Cbl deficiency including methylmalonic acid (MMA) and homocysteine (tHcy). Plasma MMA (mean±SEM) was elevated in animals treated with EtPhCbl (1.01±0.12 µmol/L) compared to controls (0.30±0.02 µmol/L) and CNCbl (0.29±0.01 µmol/L) treated animals. The same pattern was observed for tHcy. Plasma total Cbl concentration was higher in animals treated with EtPhCbl (128.82±1.87 nmol/L) than in CNCbl treated animals (87.64±0.93 nmol/L). However, the organ levels of total Cbl were significantly lower in animals treated with EtPhCbl compared to CNCbl treated animals or controls, notably in the liver (157.07±8.56 pmol/g vs. 603.85±20.02 pmol/g, and 443.09±12.32 pmol/g, respectively). Differences between the three groups was analysed using one-way ANOVA and, Bonferroni post-hoc test. EtPhCbl was present in all tissues, except the spinal cord, accounting for 35-90% of total Cbl. In conclusion, treatment with EtPhCbl induces biochemical evidence of Cbl deficiency. This may in part be caused by a compromised tissue accumulation of Cbl. PMID:24073261

  18. A combination of molecular dynamics and docking calculations to explore the binding mode of ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound endowed with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Tintori, Cristina; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Massa, Silvio; Ragno, Rino; Esté, José A; Botta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    The HIV-1 entry process is an important target for the design of new pharmaceuticals for the multidrug therapy of AIDS. A lot of polyanionic compounds, such as polysulfonated and polysulfated, are reported in the literature for their ability to block early stages of HIV-1 replication. Several studies have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the anti-HIV-1 activity of sulfated polysaccharides and polyanions in general, including binding to cell surface CD4 and interfering with the gp120-coreceptor interaction. Here, we show molecular modeling investigations on ADS-J1, a polyanionic compound with anti-HIV activity that is able to interfere with gp120-coreceptor interactions. Agreeing with experimental data, computer simulations suggested that the V3 loop of gp120 was the preferential binding site for ADS-J1 onto HIV-1. Moreover, mutations induced by the inhibitor significantly changed the stereoelectronic properties of the gp120 surface, justifying a marked drop in the affinity of ADS-J1 toward an ADS-J1-resistant HIV-1 strain.

  19. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  20. Zirconium phosphatidylcholine-based nanocapsules as an in vivo degradable drug delivery system of MAP30, a momordica anti-HIV protein.

    PubMed

    Caizhen, Guo; Yan, Gao; Ronron, Chang; Lirong, Yang; Panpan, Chu; Xuemei, Hu; Yuanbiao, Qiao; Qingshan, Li

    2015-04-10

    An essential in vivo drug delivery system of a momordica anti-HIV protein, MAP30, was developed through encapsulating in chemically synthesized matrices of zirconium egg- and soy-phosphatidylcholines, abbreviated to Zr/EPC and Zr/SPC, respectively. Matrices were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry studies. Zr/EPC granule at an approximate diameter of 69.43±7.78 nm was a less efficient encapsulator than the granule of Zr/SPC. Interlayer spacing of the matrices encapsulating MAP30 increased from 8.8 and 9.7 Å to 7.4 and 7.9 nm, respectively. In vivo kinetics on degradation and protein release was performed by analyzing the serum sampling of intravenously injected SPF chickens. The first order and biphasic variations were obtained for in vivo kinetics using equilibrium dialysis. Antimicrobial and anti-HIV assays yielded greatly decreased MIC50 and EC50 values of nanoformulated MAP30. An acute toxicity of MAP30 encapsulated in Zr/EPC occurred at a single intravenous dose above 14.24 mg/kg bw in NIH/KM/ICR mice. The folding of MAP30 from Zr/EPC sustained in vivo chickens for more than 8 days in high performance liquid chromatography assays. These matrices could protect MAP30 efficiently with strong structure retention, lowered toxicity and prolonged in vivo life.

  1. Decoding the membrane activity of the cyclotide kalata B1: the importance of phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipids and lipid organization on hemolytic and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Huang, Yen-Hua; Rosengren, K Johan; Franquelim, Henri G; Carvalho, Filomena A; Johnson, Adam; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2011-07-01

    Cyclotides, a large family of cyclic peptides from plants, have a broad range of biological activities, including insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-HIV activities. In all of these activities, cell membranes seem likely to be the primary target for cyclotides. However, the mechanistic role of lipid membranes in the activity of cyclotides remains unclear. To determine the role of lipid organization in the activity of the prototypic cyclotide, kalata B1 (kB1), and synthetic analogs, their bioactivities and affinities for model membranes were evaluated. We found that the bioactivity of kB1 is dependent on the lipid composition of target cell membranes. In particular, the activity of kB1 requires specific interactions with phospholipids containing phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups but is further modulated by nonspecific peptide-lipid hydrophobic interactions, which are favored in raft-like membranes. Negatively charged phospholipids do not favor high kB1 affinity. This lipid selectivity explains trends in antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of kB1; it does not target bacterial cell walls, which are negatively charged and lacking PE-phospholipids but can insert in the membranes of red blood cells, which have a low PE content and raft domains in their outer layer. We further show that the anti-HIV activity of kB1 is the result of its ability to target and disrupt the membranes of HIV particles, which are raft-like membranes very rich in PE-phospholipids.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly: is it worth screening?

    PubMed

    Wong, C W

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common among the elderly. Elderly people are particularly at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency because of the high prevalence of atrophic gastritis-associated food-cobalamin (vitamin B12) malabsorption, and the increasing prevalence of pernicious anaemia with advancing age. The deficiency most often goes unrecognised because the clinical manifestations are highly variable, often subtle and non-specific, but if left undiagnosed the consequences can be serious. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency, however, is not straightforward as laboratory tests have certain limitations. Setting a cut-off level to define serum vitamin B12 deficiency is difficult; though homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are more sensitive for vitamin B12 deficiency, it may give false result in some conditions and the reference intervals are not standardised. At present, there is no consensus or guideline for diagnosis of this deficiency. It is most often based on the clinical symptoms together with laboratory assessment (low serum vitamin B12 level and elevated serum homocysteine or methylmalonic acid level) and the response to treatment to make definitive diagnosis. Treatment and replacement with oral vitamin B12 can be as effective as parenteral administration even in patients with pernicious anaemia. The suggested oral vitamin B12 dose is 1 mg daily for a month, and then maintenance dose of 125 to 250 µg for patients with dietary insufficiency and 1 mg daily for those with pernicious anaemia. Vitamin B12 replacement is safe and without side-effects, but prompt treatment is required to reverse the damage before it becomes extensive or irreversible. At present, there is no recommendation for mass screening for vitamin B12 in the elderly. Nevertheless, the higher prevalence with age, increasing risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly, symptoms being difficult to recognise, and availability of safe treatment options make screening a favourable option. However, the

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly: is it worth screening?

    PubMed

    Wong, C W

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common among the elderly. Elderly people are particularly at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency because of the high prevalence of atrophic gastritis-associated food-cobalamin (vitamin B12) malabsorption, and the increasing prevalence of pernicious anaemia with advancing age. The deficiency most often goes unrecognised because the clinical manifestations are highly variable, often subtle and non-specific, but if left undiagnosed the consequences can be serious. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency, however, is not straightforward as laboratory tests have certain limitations. Setting a cut-off level to define serum vitamin B12 deficiency is difficult; though homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are more sensitive for vitamin B12 deficiency, it may give false result in some conditions and the reference intervals are not standardised. At present, there is no consensus or guideline for diagnosis of this deficiency. It is most often based on the clinical symptoms together with laboratory assessment (low serum vitamin B12 level and elevated serum homocysteine or methylmalonic acid level) and the response to treatment to make definitive diagnosis. Treatment and replacement with oral vitamin B12 can be as effective as parenteral administration even in patients with pernicious anaemia. The suggested oral vitamin B12 dose is 1 mg daily for a month, and then maintenance dose of 125 to 250 µg for patients with dietary insufficiency and 1 mg daily for those with pernicious anaemia. Vitamin B12 replacement is safe and without side-effects, but prompt treatment is required to reverse the damage before it becomes extensive or irreversible. At present, there is no recommendation for mass screening for vitamin B12 in the elderly. Nevertheless, the higher prevalence with age, increasing risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly, symptoms being difficult to recognise, and availability of safe treatment options make screening a favourable option. However, the

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy as a cause of developmental regression.

    PubMed

    Casella, Erasmo Barbante; Valente, Marcelo; de Navarro, Jessie Medeiros; Kok, Fernando

    2005-12-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause serious developmental regression, hypotonia and cerebral atrophy in infants. We report a 6-month-old infant, with insidious developmental regression and brain atrophy showed by CT scan, secondarily to vitamin B12 deficiency. His mother was a strict vegetarian and the patient was exclusively breastfed. The clinical symptoms and the brain CT were normalized after vitamin B12 administration.

  5. Developmental regression as an early manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, P D; Livingston, A; Cavanaugh, R M

    1986-07-01

    Loss of previously attained developmental milestones in an infant is often associated with central nervous system tumor, neuromuscular disease, or an inborn metabolic error. An infant with developmental regression and involuntary movements who was found to be vitamin B12 deficient on the basis of unrecognized maternal vitamin B12 deficiency is described. The infant had a dramatic neurologic recovery after receiving vitamin B12. The case and a review of similar cases is presented.

  6. Effects of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency on brain development in children.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M

    2008-06-01

    Folate deficiency in the periconceptional period contributes to neural tube defects; deficits in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) have negative consequences on the developing brain during infancy; and deficits of both vitamins are associated with a greater risk of depression during adulthood. This review examines two mechanisms linking folate and vitamin B12 deficiency to abnormal behavior and development in infants: disruptions to myelination and inflammatory processes. Future investigations should focus on the relationship between the timing of deficient and marginal vitamin B12 status and outcomes such as infant growth, cognition, social development, and depressive symptoms, along with prevention of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:18709887

  7. [Therapeutic and clinical implications of elevated levels of vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Rochat, M Cosma; Vollenweider, P; Waeber, G

    2012-10-31

    In general practice, vitamin B12 levels are measured when searching an origin for an anemic status (usually megaloblastic anemia), for various neurological disorders (usually polyneuropathy) or for neurocognitive disorders. Although the pathologies associated with vitamin B12 deficiency are well known, hypervitaminemic B12 status is often fortuitous and frequent finding. The aim of this article is to present the disease entities associated with hypervitaminemia B12, the clinical implications of this dysvitaminosis and a practical approach when this laboratory abnormality is found. PMID:23185929

  8. Characterization of vitamin B12 compounds from Korean purple laver (Porphyra sp.) products.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Emi; Yabuta, Yukinori; Kwak, Chung Shil; Enomoto, Toshiki; Watanabe, Fumio

    2009-04-01

    Vitamin B(12) contents of various Korean purple laver products were determined with the microbiological vitamin B(12) assay method. Although a substantial amount (133.8 microg/100 g) of vitamin B(12) was found in dried purple laver, seasoned and toasted laver products contained lesser vitamin B(12) contents (about 51.7 microg/100 g). The decreased vitamin B(12) contents in the seasoned and toasted laver products, however, were not due to loss or destruction of vitamin B(12) during the toasting process. Silica gel 60 thin layer chromatography-bioautogram analysis indicated that all Korean laver products tested contain true vitamin B(12), but not inactive corrinoid compounds. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion experiments indicated that digestion rate of vitamin B(12) from the dried Korean purple laver was estimated to be 50% under pH 2.0 conditions (as a model of normal gastric function). These results suggest that Korean purple laver products would be excellent vitamin B(12) sources for humans, especially vegetarians.

  9. Influence of Co and B12 on the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of varying cobalt (Co) and B12 concentrations to growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium, a major diazotroph in the tropical and subtropical oligotrophic ocean. Here we show that sufficient inorganic Co, 20 pmol L-1, sustains the growth of Trichodesmium either with or without an additional B12 supply. We also found that in these culture conditions, nitrogen levels fixed by Trichodesmium were higher in treatments with insufficient B12 than in treatments with higher B12 availability. Under limited inorganic Co availability, ranging from 0.2 to 2 pmol L-1, Trichodesmium growth was significantly compromised in cultures without B12. In these low Co concentrations, addition of 400 pmol L-1 of B12 supported phytoplankton growth indicating that B12 supply augmented for the low Co concentrations. Our study demonstrates that Trichodesmium has an absolute Co requirement, which is not replaceable with Zn, and that B12 supply alleviates stress in cases where Co is limiting. These results show that the interlocking availabilities of Co and B12 may influence the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium in the ocean. PMID:26150813

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency in children: a treatable cause of neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Singh, Archana; Mittal, Medha; Talukdar, Bibek

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency in children can rarely cause neurologic manifestations. In this series, 14 pediatric cases (median age 11 months) have been described in whom association of vitamin B12 deficiency with developmental delay or regression was observed. Severe to profound delay was present in 8 (57%) patients. All the patients were exclusively or predominantly breast-fed and 10 of 12 mothers had low serum vitamin B12 levels. Three to 6 months after treatment, a mean gain of development quotient of 38.8 points was seen in 7 follow-ups. In settings with a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, this association should be actively searched for.

  11. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency: two cases detected by routine newborn urinary screening.

    PubMed

    Michaud, J L; Lemieux, B; Ogier, H; Lambert, M A

    1992-03-01

    We describe two asymptomatic newborns with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in whom increased urinary methylmalonic acid was detected by routine neonatal screening at 3 weeks of age. Both infants were exclusively breast-fed. One mother suffered from pernicious anaemia, and the other was a strict vegetarian. Both mothers had no clinical or haematological abnormality, aside from a borderline mean corpuscular volume for the vegetarian mother. This report illustrates the early appearance of functional vitamin B12 deficiency in breast-fed infants of vitamin B12-depleted mothers. It also demonstrates that urinary methylmalonic acid measurement is a sensitive indicator of tissue vitamin B12 deficiency.

  12. Methylmalonic Acid and Homocysteine as Indicators of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Pankaj; Edwin, Persis; Popiel, Brenten; Lammersfeld, Carolyn; Gupta, Digant

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Normal or high serum vitamin B-12 levels can sometimes be seen in a B-12 deficient state, and can therefore be misleading. High levels of Methymalonic Acid (MMA) and Homocysteine (HC) have been identified as better indicators of B-12 deficiency than the actual serum B-12 level itself. We evaluated the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency using appropriate cut-off levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC, and determined the relationship between serum levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC in cancer. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using a consecutive case series of 316 cancer patients first seen at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between April 2014 and June 2014. All patients were evaluated at baseline for vitamin B-12 (pg/mL), MMA (nmol/L) and HC (μmol/L) levels. In accordance with previously published research, the following cut-offs were used to define vitamin B-12 deficiency: <300 pg/mL for vitamin B-12, >260 nmol/L for MMA and >12 μmol/L for HC. The relationship between B-12, MMA and HC was evaluated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient and cross-tabulation analysis. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vitamin B-12 using Fedosov quotient as the "gold standard". Results Mean age at presentation was 52.5 years. 134 (42.4%) patients were males while 182 (57.6%) were females. Median vitamin B-12, MMA and HC levels were 582.5 pg/mL, 146.5 nmol/L and 8.4 μmol/L respectively. Of 316 patients, 28 (8.9%) were vitamin B-12 deficient based on vitamin B-12 (<300pg/mL), 34 (10.8%) were deficient based on MMA (>260 nmol/L) while 55 (17.4%) were deficient based on HC (>12 μmol/L). Correlation analysis revealed a significant weak negative correlation between vitamin B-12 and MMA (rho = -0.22) as well as B-12 and HC (rho = -0.35). ROC curves suggested MMA to have the best discriminatory power in

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency & levels of metabolites in an apparently normal urban south Indian elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Shobha, Vineeta; Tarey, Subhash D.; Singh, Ramya G.; Shetty, Priya; Unni, Uma S.; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is no published literature on the extent of vitamin B12 deficiency in elderly Indians as determined by plasma vitamin B12 levels and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels. Vitamin B12 deficiency is expected to be higher in elderly Indians due to vegetarianism, varied socio-economic strata and high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. We therefore, studied the dietary habits of south Indian urban elderly population and measured vitamin B12, MMA red cell folate and homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: Healthy elderly urban subjects (175, >60 yr) were recruited. Detailed history, physical examination and neurological assessment were carried out. Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary analysis for daily intake of calories, vitamin B12, folate and detailed psychological assessment for cognitive functions was carried out. Blood samples were analyzed for routine haematology and biochemistry, vitamin B12, red cell folate, MMA and Hcy. Results: The mean age of the study population was 66.3 yr. Median values for daily dietary intake of vitamin B12 and folate were 2.4 and 349.2 μg/day respectively. Sixty two (35%) participants consumed multivitamin supplements. Plasma vitamin B12 level and the dietary intake of vitamin B12 was significantly correlated (P=0.157). Plasma vitamin B12 and Hcy were inversely correlated (P= -0.509). Red cell folate was inversely correlated with Hcy (P= -0.550). Significant negative correlation was observed between plasma vitamin B12 and MMA in the entire study population (P= -0.220). Subjects consuming vitamin supplements (n=62) had significantly higher plasma vitamin B12 levels, lower MMA levels and lower Hcy levels. There was no significant correlation between plasma vitamin B12, MMA, Hcy and red cell folate and any of the 10 cognitive tests including Hindi Mental Status Examination (HMSE). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study is indicative of higher vitamin B12 (2.4 μg/day) intakes in urban south

  14. VITAMIN B12 LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS ON METFORMIN

    PubMed Central

    Akinlade, K.S.; Agbebaku, S.O.; Rahamon, S.K.; Balogun, W.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the clinical benefits of metformin, its associated side effects such as vitamin B12 deficiency are usually overlooked and rarely investigated. Objective: This study was carried out to determine the serum level of vitamin B12 in Nigerian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on metformin. Methods: Serum vitamin B12 level was determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 81 T2DM patients who have been on metformin for 5 years or more. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as serum concentration of <200 pg/dl, borderline deficiency as 200 - 300 pg/dl and >300 pg/dl as normal. Differences in vitamin B12 levels between different groups were assessed using Mann Whitney U test and P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Vitamin B12 deficiency and borderline deficiency were recorded in 8.6% and 26.0% of the patients respectively. Vitamin B12 level was significantly lower in patients who have been on metformin for ≥10 years compared with patients with <10 years history of metformin use. Similarly, patients who were on metformin at a dose of >1000 mg/day had significantly lower vitamin B12 level when compared with patients on ≤1000 mg/day. Conclusion: Low serum vitamin B12 level is associated with longer duration and higher dose of metformin use. Therefore, routine determination of vitamin B12 level in patients with T2DM on high dose of metformin and those with prolonged use of metformin might help in identifying patients that would benefit from vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:27162518

  15. Distributions of dissolved vitamin B 12 and Co in coastal and open-ocean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeca, Caterina; Beck, Aaron J.; Tovar-Sanchez, Antonio; Segovia-Zavala, Jose; Taylor, Gordon T.; Gobler, Christopher J.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2009-11-01

    Distributions of dissolved vitamin B 12 and total dissolved Co were measured to gain an understanding of the cycling of these interdependent micronutrients in six marine settings including; an upwelling location, a semi-enclosed bay, two urban coastal systems, and two open ocean locations. Along the coast of Baja California, Mexico, concentrations of B 12 and dissolved Co varied from 0.2 to 11 pM and 180 to 990 pM, respectively. At a nearby upwelling station, vitamin B 12 and Co concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 7.0 pM and 22 to 145 pM, and concentrations did not correlate with upwelling intensity. Concentrations of B 12 were highest within Todos Santos Bay, a semi-enclosed bay off the coast of Baja California, Mexico, during a dinoflagellate bloom, ranging from 2 to 61 pM, while Co concentrations varied between 61 and 194 pM. In the anthropogenically impacted Long Island Sound, NY, U.S.A., B 12 levels were between 0.1 and 23 pM and Co concentrations varied from 60 to 1900 pM. However, anthropogenic inputs were not evident in B 12 levels in the San Pedro Basin, located outside Los Angeles, Ca, U.S.A., where concentrations of B 12 were 0.2-1.8 pM, approximating observed open ocean B 12 concentrations. In the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean, B 12 levels were 0.4-4 pM and 0.2-2 pM, respectively. Total Co concentrations in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic tended to be low; measuring 26-59 pM and 15-80 pM, respectively. These low Co concentrations may limit B 12 synthesis and its availability to B 12-requiring phytoplankton because the total dissolved Co pool is not necessarily entirely bioavailable.

  16. Vitamin B(12) Immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010: Effects of High Excess Concentration of Serum Vitamin B(12) in CKD Patients on Parenteral Administration.

    PubMed

    Basu, Surupa; Chaudhuri, Subimal

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) being water soluble is excreted in the urine when administered in excess. The probability of finding an abnormally excess serum concentration would be almost surreal. We report a peculiar clinical situation that may impact the vitamin B(12) immunoassay on the Roche Elecsys 2010 due to excess analyte concentration. In separate episodes (Feb and June 2010), the Biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary-care hospital, Kolkata, India, encountered two critically ill patients with background chronic kidney disease (CKD), low urine output, and on cyanocoabalamin supplementation, who had serum vitamin B(12) concentrations far exceeding expected values; even post dialysis. The B(12) assays (pmol/l) were performed using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010, the assay validity confirmed by concomitant quality control runs. The immunoassays failed to deliver results, flagged with "signal level below limit". Biotin therapy was ruled out as a possible interferent. In the first episode, re-assay of a repeat draw yielded same outcome; outsourcing on Immulite provided concentration of >738 pmol/l. Serial dilution gave result of >29520 pmol/l on Elecsys 2010. In the second, we gained from past experience. Vitamin B(12) concentration >59040 pmol/l was conveyed to the treating nephrologist the very day. The B(12) immunoassay on the Elecsys 2010 employs sequential incubation steps for competitive binding that is compromised in the event of abnormally excess B(12) concentration in patient sera akin to the prozone effect. This knowledge may be beneficial while assaying sera of CKD patients to avoid financial loss due unnecessary repeats and delay in turnaround time. PMID:23024480

  17. A cost-effective sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 antibody using magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers as capture probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Gan, Ning; Li, Tianhua; Hu, Futao; Li, Xing; Wang, Lihong; Zheng, Lei

    2014-04-15

    In this report, a rapid and cost-effective sandwich electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was constructed for the ultrasensitive detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody (anti-HIV-1) using magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) as capture probes by combining surface and epitope imprinting techniques and antigen conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP-HIV-1) as labels. First, 3-aminobenzeneboronic acid (APBA) was used as the functional monomer and cross-linking reagent, which was polymerized on the surface of silicate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs) in the presence of human immunoglobulin G (HIgG), as the template exhibiting the same Fc region but different Fab region to anti-HIV-1 after the addition of the initiator, ammonium persulfate. This process resulted in grafting a hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on the Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs. Thus, MMIPs, which could be reused after eluting the template, were used to recognize and enrich ultra-trace levels of anti-HIV-1. Subsequently, a novel sandwich ECL immunosensor was formed through the immunoreaction between MMIPs conjugated with varied concentrations of anti-HIV-1 and HRP-HIV-1. By the catalysis of HRP immobilized onto HRP-HIV-1 on the ECL system of Luminol-H2O2, a linear response range of the anti-HIV-1 dilution ratio (standard positive serum) was achieved from 1:20,000 to 1:50, with a detection limit of 1:60,000 (S/N=3). The developed method provides a low-cost, simple, and sensitive way for the early diagnosis of HIV infected patients.

  18. A cost-effective sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 antibody using magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers as capture probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Gan, Ning; Li, Tianhua; Hu, Futao; Li, Xing; Wang, Lihong; Zheng, Lei

    2014-04-15

    In this report, a rapid and cost-effective sandwich electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was constructed for the ultrasensitive detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody (anti-HIV-1) using magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) as capture probes by combining surface and epitope imprinting techniques and antigen conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP-HIV-1) as labels. First, 3-aminobenzeneboronic acid (APBA) was used as the functional monomer and cross-linking reagent, which was polymerized on the surface of silicate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs) in the presence of human immunoglobulin G (HIgG), as the template exhibiting the same Fc region but different Fab region to anti-HIV-1 after the addition of the initiator, ammonium persulfate. This process resulted in grafting a hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on the Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs. Thus, MMIPs, which could be reused after eluting the template, were used to recognize and enrich ultra-trace levels of anti-HIV-1. Subsequently, a novel sandwich ECL immunosensor was formed through the immunoreaction between MMIPs conjugated with varied concentrations of anti-HIV-1 and HRP-HIV-1. By the catalysis of HRP immobilized onto HRP-HIV-1 on the ECL system of Luminol-H2O2, a linear response range of the anti-HIV-1 dilution ratio (standard positive serum) was achieved from 1:20,000 to 1:50, with a detection limit of 1:60,000 (S/N=3). The developed method provides a low-cost, simple, and sensitive way for the early diagnosis of HIV infected patients. PMID:24280050

  19. Interventions with vitamins B6, B12 and C in pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water-soluble vitamins B6, B12 and C play important roles in maternal health as well as fetal development and physiology during gestation. This systematic review evaluates the risks and benefits of interventions with vitamins B6, B12 and C during pregnancy on maternal, neonatal and child health ...

  20. Prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency among patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aryn B; Pawlak, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the non-specificity of symptoms and possibly severe consequences of untreated vitamin B-12 deficiency, screening is important for at-risk patients to ensure the prompt delivery of treatment. In this review, studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction are evaluated to determine whether regular vitamin B-12 screening is necessary. A literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. Only original studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction that reported their findings as percentages of the sample were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 7091 manuscripts generated, 6 were included in this review. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism was reported as 10, 18.6, and 40.5% in three separate studies. The prevalence of deficiency in autoimmune thyroid disease was reported as 6.3, 28, and 55.5% in three studies. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease are reflective of the nutrition status of the population. Autoimmune thyroid disease is also associated with the autoimmune disorders pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis which may lead to malabsorption of vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 screening is recommended upon initial diagnosis with autoimmune thyroid disease and then periodically thereafter. There is not enough evidence to recommend regular screening for patients with hypothyroidism unless the underlying cause is autoimmune thyroid disease.

  1. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... report or any portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of...

  2. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... report or any portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of...

  3. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good... portion thereof may be prepared by any similar process which, in the opinion of the Commission,...

  4. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options. PMID:27602354

  5. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Requirements as to paper, printing and language. (a) Registration statements and reports shall be filed on good.... (d) The body of all printed registration statements and reports and all notes to financial...

  6. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in a breastfed infant following maternal gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Grange, D K; Finlay, J L

    1994-01-01

    Breastfed infants of women who have had gastric or intestinal bypass procedures may develop nutritional deficiencies. We describe a 10-month-old exclusively breastfed white male infant who presented with vomiting, failure to thrive, and megaloblastic anemia. He was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency. His mother had undergone a gastric bypass procedure for morbid obesity 2 years prior to her pregnancy with this child. She had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency, with an abnormal Schilling test that corrected with the addition of intrinsic factor. Therefore, we believe that the mother's gastric bypass had caused a decrease in available intrinsic factor, resulting in subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency and decreased breast milk B12. Although she was asymptomatic, her breastfed infant developed symptomatic B12 deficiency. This is the first reported case of a maternal gastric bypass resulting in vitamin B12 deficiency in an infant. These mothers should receive vitamin supplements, including vitamin B12, during and after pregnancy, and may require parenterally administered vitamin B12.

  7. Prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency among patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aryn B; Pawlak, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the non-specificity of symptoms and possibly severe consequences of untreated vitamin B-12 deficiency, screening is important for at-risk patients to ensure the prompt delivery of treatment. In this review, studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction are evaluated to determine whether regular vitamin B-12 screening is necessary. A literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. Only original studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction that reported their findings as percentages of the sample were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 7091 manuscripts generated, 6 were included in this review. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism was reported as 10, 18.6, and 40.5% in three separate studies. The prevalence of deficiency in autoimmune thyroid disease was reported as 6.3, 28, and 55.5% in three studies. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease are reflective of the nutrition status of the population. Autoimmune thyroid disease is also associated with the autoimmune disorders pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis which may lead to malabsorption of vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 screening is recommended upon initial diagnosis with autoimmune thyroid disease and then periodically thereafter. There is not enough evidence to recommend regular screening for patients with hypothyroidism unless the underlying cause is autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:27222404

  8. Folate and vitamin B12 status in Latin America and the Caribbean: An update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The current magnitude of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean is uncertain. Objective: To summarize data on plasma or serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations in Latin America and the Caribbean reported since 1990, a period that covers the era before an...

  9. Loss of vitamin B(12) in fish (round herring) meats during various cooking treatments.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Michiko; Kanosue, Fuki; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The loss of vitamin B(12) in round herring meats during various cooking treatments was evaluated. Although amounts of vitamin B(12) were three times greater in the viscera (37.5 ± 10.6 µg/100 g fresh weight) than in the meats, about 73% of total vitamin B(12) found in the whole fish body (except for head and bones) were recovered in the meats (5.1 ± 1.0 µg of vitamin B(12)). The vitamin B(12) contents of the round herring's meats were significantly decreased up to ~62% during cooking by grilling, boiling, frying, steaming, and microwaving. There was, however, no loss of vitamin B(12) during vacuum-packed pouch cooking. Model experiment using hydroxocobalamin suggest that loss of vitamin B(12) is dependent on the degree of temperature and time used in conventional cooking, and is further affected by the concomitant ingredients of food. Retention of vitamin B(12) was not dependent on vacuum or temperature (or both) used in the vacuum-packed pouch cooking.

  10. Serum Vitamin B12 and thyroid hormone levels in Saudi patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khamis, Fahd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients with MS were recruited for this study after Institutional Review Board approval. All patients signed a written informed consent form and donated a single blood sample. Plasma Vitamin B12 levels, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) hormone levels were measured. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results: Analysis of Vitamin B12 levels in 110 patients with MS revealed that 65% had normal levels of Vitamin B12 (200–900 pg/ml), 30% had low levels of Vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml), and 5% high levels of Vitamin B12 (higher than 900 pg/ml). Further analysis of patients with low levels of Vitamin B12 revealed that this cohort exhibited a significantly high number of patients with low levels of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) (P < 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones. This opens the possibility that the use of therapies that increase triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels might be beneficial to patients with MS.

  11. Serum Vitamin B12 and thyroid hormone levels in Saudi patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khamis, Fahd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients with MS were recruited for this study after Institutional Review Board approval. All patients signed a written informed consent form and donated a single blood sample. Plasma Vitamin B12 levels, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) hormone levels were measured. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results: Analysis of Vitamin B12 levels in 110 patients with MS revealed that 65% had normal levels of Vitamin B12 (200–900 pg/ml), 30% had low levels of Vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml), and 5% high levels of Vitamin B12 (higher than 900 pg/ml). Further analysis of patients with low levels of Vitamin B12 revealed that this cohort exhibited a significantly high number of patients with low levels of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) (P < 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones. This opens the possibility that the use of therapies that increase triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels might be beneficial to patients with MS. PMID:27625581

  12. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options.

  13. An all-purpose building block: B12N12 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. L.; He, T.; Yang, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We have theoretically shown that the boron nitride fullerene cage B12N12 is an all-purpose building block for fabricating multifarious BN nanotubes. Firstly, we investigated the stability and structural of the boron nitride fullerene cage B12N12 and the polymerized derivatives obtained from it. Interestingly we found out that two B12N12 cages can spontaneously form one BN nanotube with two closed ends through the structural transformation when one cage meets another. These results indicated that the fullerene B12N12 can be polymerized to build various remarkable polymers through the spontaneous structural transformation when they are together, which all have planer or tridimensional shapes with a hollow tubular structure, even at the juncture of the coalesced B12N12. Simultaneously, after the structure optimization, the quadrangles at the juncture of the coalesced B12N12 disappear to form a perfect surface only composed of hexagons. Then, we calculated the energy of all the considered nanostructures. The polymerization of the fullerene B12N12 is exothermic and thus can form very stable derivative polymers. These theoretical conclusions stimulate us to use the fullerene B12N12 as an all-purpose building block to construct various BN nanostructures for purpose of fundamental research and potential applications.

  14. Oral Vitamin B12 Replacement for the Treatment of Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine Qiu Hua; Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with pernicious anemia are treated with lifelong intramuscular (IM) vitamin B12 replacement. As early as the 1950s, there were studies suggesting that oral vitamin B12 replacement may provide adequate absorption. Nevertheless, oral vitamin B12 replacement in patients with pernicious anemia remains uncommon in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 for the treatment of pernicious anemia, the recommended dosage, and the required frequency of laboratory test and clinical monitoring. Relevant articles were identified by PubMed search from January 1, 1980 to March 31, 2016 and through hand search of relevant reference articles. Two randomized controlled trials, three prospective papers, one systematic review, and three clinical reviews fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found that oral vitamin B12 replacement at 1000 μg daily was adequate to replace vitamin B12 levels in patients with pernicious anemia. We conclude that oral vitamin B12 is an effective alternative to vitamin B12 IM injections. Patients should be offered this alternative after an informed discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of both treatment options. PMID:27602354

  15. 17 CFR 270.8b-12 - Requirements as to paper, printing and language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and reports shall be in the English language. If any exhibit or other paper or document filed with a... English language. (f) Where a registration statement or report is distributed through an electronic medium..., printing and language. 270.8b-12 Section 270.8b-12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...

  16. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND Few accurate data exist on the concentration of vitamin B12 in human milk. Binding of the vitamin to haptocorrin (HC) can interfere with the assay if not removed by pretreatment, and very low values can occur in women with poor B12 status. This study evaluated two competitive enzyme bind...

  17. Serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in Korean patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, Y K; Hann, S K

    1999-06-01

    The association of vitiligo and pernicious anemia has been previously documented. The low levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 were thought to be related to vitiligo. To date, there have been very few reports about the serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in patients with vitiligo. Using radioimmunoassay, we measured the serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 in 100 Korean patients with vitiligo. The mean serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 were 6.31 +/- 2.82 ng/ml and 630.25 +/- 230.94 pg/ml, respectively, in patients with vitiligo. These levels showed no significant difference compared to the normal control group, suggesting that folic acid and vitamin B12 do not appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

  18. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome: a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sumant; Jha, Sneh Kumar; Pandey, Suchit; Shukla, Rakesh

    2015-10-16

    We report a case of bilateral useless hand syndrome, a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A 38-year-old man, a strict vegetarian and a teacher by occupation, presented with acute onset clumsiness of both hands while performing fine movements. Detailed history-taking, examination of the patient and relevant investigations (complete blood count, serum vitamin B12 and MRI of the cervical spinal cord) were carried out. Laboratory analysis was suggestive of vitamin B12 deficiency and MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the posterior columns of the cervical cord. The patient was diagnosed as a case of non-compressive cervical myelopathy predominantly involving the posterior column due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome can be a rare presenting feature of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  19. Serum vitamin B12 levels in young vegans who eat brown rice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H

    1995-12-01

    A nutritional analysis was conducted on the dietary intake of a group of 6 vegan children aged 7 to 14 who had been living on a vegan diet including brown rice for from 4 to 10 years, and on that of an age-matched control group. In addition, their serum vitamin B12 levels and other data (red blood cell count, hematocrit, hemoglobin, etc.) were determined in the laboratory. In vegans' diets, 2-4 g of nori (dried laver), which contained B12, were consumed daily. Not a single case of symptoms due to B12 deficiency was found. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to any of the examination data, including B12 levels (p < 0.05). Therefore, consumption of nori may keep vegans from suffering B12 deficiency.

  20. An appraisal of the value of vitamin B12 in the prevention of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Lacey, C. L.; Homick, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin B12 given by intramuscular injection can significantly reduce the occurrence of motion sickness in susceptible individuals (Banks, 1980). Since it is known that B12 influences the metabolism of histidine and choline, dietary precursors to neurotransmitters with established roles in motion sickness, an experimental evaluation has been undertaken of the efficacy of B12 in the prevention of motion sickness induced by controlled coriolis simulation. Subjects executed standardized head movements at successively higher rpm until a malaise III endpoint was reached. Following two baseline tests with this motion stressor, subjects received a B12 injection, a second injection two weeks later, and a final motion sickness test three weeks later. No significant differences in the susceptibility to motion sickness were noted after B12.

  1. Delayed auditory conduction in diabetes: is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, Sri Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Summary The present study aims to evaluate the functional integrity of the auditory pathway in patients with diabetes taking metformin. A further aim is to assess its association with vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls were enrolled. Stimulus-related potentials and vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in all the subjects. The diabetics showed deficient vitamin B12 levels and delayed wave III latency and III–V interpeak latency in the right ear and delayed Na and Pa wave latencies in the left ear compared with the controls. The dose and duration of metformin showed no association with the stimulus-related potentials. Therefore, although vitamin B12 levels were deficient and auditory conduction impairment was present in the diabetics on metformin, this impairment cannot be attributed to the vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:27358222

  2. Biochemical impedance on intracellular functions of vitamin B12 in chronic toxigenic mold exposures.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ebere C; Kanu, Ijeoma

    2007-10-12

    A majority of patients with neurological disorders with chronic exposures to toxigenic molds and mycotoxins has vitamin B12 deficiency that is unrelated to dietary insufficiency. Vitamin B12 is a source of coenzymes, and participates in intracellular recycling of methionine, and in methionine synthase reactions. The biochemical processes that lead to B12 depletion and deficiency are not fully understood. This paper examines and assesses various most likely biochemical reasons that could impede upon the normal intracellular functions of vitamin B12 that lead to neurological manifestations. By biochemical implications and derivations, it is most likely that mycotoxins interrupt the structure and function of vitamin B12 through reactive interference with the normal One-Carbon metabolism leading to the observed clinical neurological manifestations such as nerve damage and, demyelination, degeneration of PNS leading to paralysis, progressive peripheral neuropathy, and spinal degeneration.

  3. Study on methane fermentation and production of vitamin B12 from alcohol waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenya; Quan, Taisheng; Li, Pomin; Zhang, Yansheng; Sugiura, Norio; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    We studied biogas fermentation from alcohol waste fluid to evaluate the anaerobic digestion process and the production of vitamin B12 as a byproduct. Anaerobic digestion using acclimated methanogens was performed using the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and fixed-bed reactor packed with rock wool as carrier material at 55 degrees C. We also studied the effects of metal ions added to the culture broth on methane and vitamin B12 formation. Vitamin B12 production was 2.92 mg/L in the broth of the fixed-bed reactor, twice that of the CSTR. The optimum concentrations of trace metal ions added to the culture liquid for methane and vitamin B12 production were 1.0 and 8 mL/L for the CSTR and fixed-bed reactor, respectively. Furthermore, an effective method for extracting and purifying vitamin B12 from digested fluid was developed.

  4. Vitamin B-12 treatment of asymptomatic, deficient, elderly Chileans improves conductivity in myelinated periphreal nerves, but high serum folate impairs vitamin B-12 status response assessed by the combined indicator of..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2005 the National Feeding Program for the Elderly (PACAM) in Chile has provided a B12 fortified milk drink (1.7 µg B12/d) which is insufficient to ensure B12 adequacy in many individuals. The objective was to evaluate effects of adding 1 mg B12/d to PACAM vs 1 mg B12/d as a pill with PACAM on ...

  5. Promising Antibody Testing Strategies for Early Infant HIV Infection Diagnosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xueli; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jianfeng; Sun, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Background In China, 1.1% of people living with HIV were transmitted vertically, causing a heavy burden on families and society. Early infant diagnosis (EID) is critical for improving neonatal survival. The purpose of this study is to suggest improvement in antibody testing strategies with dried blood spots (DBSs) for EID in China through analysis of anti-HIV seroreversion of infants. Methods A total of 280 infants born to HIV infected mothers in four diverse provinces of China where multiple subtypes coexist were enrolled. The status of the infants' infection was determined by HIV antibody enzyme immunoassay and Western blot analysis at ≥18 months of age or by convincing clinical and epidemiologic data for deceased infants. A total of 1028 DBSs were collected during follow-up, which were tested to obtain anti-HIV signal to cut-off ratio (S/CO) data. Results For uninfected infants, anti-HIV S/CO decreased with age. Seropositivity percentage declined most rapidly at 6 months to 9 months of age and 98.7% children seroreverted by 12 months of age. For most infected infants, minimum S/CO values were obtained at ≤6 months of age. Antibody negative predictive value was 100% at ≥6 months of age. An S/CO increase ≥1.86 after three months follow-up can determine HIV infection. S/CO threshold of 3.17 can differentiate infected from uninfected infants for exposed kids at 9 months or older with sensitivity as 100% and specificity ≥94.2%. Significance Suggestions obtained through studying seroreversion data of Chinese HIV-exposed infants help improve antibody strategies for HIV EID in China. The infection can be determined as early as 3 months of age and excluded as early as 6 months of age. PMID:24971594

  6. Is it time for vitamin B-12 fortification? What are the questions?1234

    PubMed Central

    Green, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of folic acid fortification of flour 10 y ago, an initiative to consider fortifying flour with vitamin B-12 has gained momentum in the United States. The impetus for this move stems from several considerations, including some evidence that a proportion of neural tube defect pregnancies may be the result of vitamin B-12 rather than folate deficiency. However, no interventional trials have taken place to show the efficacy of vitamin B-12 supplementation or fortification in the primary prevention or recurrence of neural tube defect pregnancies, as was the case with folic acid. Other reasons put forward for the institution of vitamin B-12 fortification include the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in certain demographic groups, including the elderly and the young in some countries. Much of this deficiency, however, is subclinical and not associated with manifest morbidity. Moreover, individuals affected by the most severe cases of vitamin B-12 deficiency that are associated with morbidity would not benefit from the concentrations of vitamin B-12 fortification that are practical or that are being considered, because such individuals suffer from malabsorption of vitamin B-12 rather than from an inadequacy of intake of the vitamin. In addition to the well-recognized complications of vitamin B-12 deficiency, such as macrocytic anemia and neurological complications affecting sensory and motor function, more subtle effects have also been described, including osteopenia, neurocognitive impairment, and increased vascular disease risk associated with elevated homocysteine. This analysis focuses on the research questions that are pertinent to the consideration of whether or not to introduce mandatory vitamin B-12 fortification in the United States. PMID:19141694

  7. Efficacy and safety of fortification and supplementation with vitamin B12: biochemical and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-06-01

    Long known as an uncommon but serious medical disorder requiring medical management, vitamin B12 deficiency is now seen to be common worldwide, but it is in a quite different form than traditionally envisioned. Most of the newly recognized deficiency is subclinical in nature, its health impact and natural history are uncertain, and its prevalence has been greatly inflated by also including persons with "low-normal" vitamin B12 levels, few of whom are deficient. The spread of folic acid fortification has also introduced concerns about folate's potentially adverse neurologic consequences in persons with undetected vitamin B12 deficiency. Fortification with vitamin B12 may prove more complicated than fortification with folic acid, however, because the bioavailability of vitamin B12 is limited. Bioavailability for those who need the vitamin B12 the most is especially poor, because they often have malabsorption affecting either classical intrinsic factor-mediated absorption or food-vitamin B12 absorption. Moreover, new evidence shows that many elderly persons respond poorly to daily oral doses under 500 microg (1 microg = 0.74 nmol), even if they do not have classical malabsorption, which suggests that proposed fortification with 1 to 10 microg may be ineffective. Those least in need of vitamin B12 usually have normal absorption and are thus at greatest risk for whatever unknown adverse effects of high-dose fortification might emerge, such as the effects of excess accumulation of cyanocobalamin. Studies are needed to define the still unproven health benefits of vitamin B12 fortification, the optimal levels of fortification, the stability of such fortification, interactions with other nutrients, and any possible adverse effects on healthy persons. The answers will permit formulation of appropriately informed decisions about mandatory fortification or (because fortification may prove a poor choice) about targeted supplementation in subpopulations with special needs for

  8. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  9. Vitamin B12 intake and status in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Tinu Mary; Duggan, Christopher; Thomas, Tinku; Bosch, Ronald; Rajendran, Ramya; Virtanen, Suvi M; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the vitamin B12 status of South Indian women in early pregnancy and its relationship with sociodemographic, anthropometry and dietary intake. Methods Cross-sectional study among 366 pregnant urban South Indian women ≤14 weeks of gestation with outcome variables defined as low vitamin B12 blood concentration (<150 pmol/L) and impaired vitamin B12 status [low vitamin B12 plus elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) >0.26 μmol/L)]. Results Low plasma vitamin B12 concentration was observed in 51.1% of the women, while 42.4% had impaired B12 status. Elevated MMA, elevated homocysteine ( >10 μmol/L) and low erythrocyte folate (<283 nmol/L) was observed among 75.8%, 43.3% and 22.2% of women, respectively. The median (25th, 75th percentile) dietary intake of vitamin B12 was 1.25 (0.86, 1.96) μg/day. Lower maternal body weight was associated with higher vitamin B12 concentration [prevalence ratios (PR) (95% CI) 0.57 (0.39, 0.84)). The predictors of impaired vitamin B12 status were non-use of yoghurt [PR (95%CI) 1.63 (1.03, 2.58)], non-use of fish [PR (95% CI) 1.32 (1.01, 1.71)] and primiparity [PR (95% CI) 1.41 (1.05, 1.90)]. Conclusion A high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women was related to primiparity and to a low consumption of yoghurt and fish. PMID:23344013

  10. The Folate-Vitamin B12 Interaction, Low Hemoglobin, and the Mortality Risk from Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Min, Jin-Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2016-03-21

    Abnormal hemoglobin levels are a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the mechanism underlying these associations is elusive, inadequate micronutrients, particularly folate and vitamin B12, may increase the risk for anemia, cognitive impairment, and AD. In this study, we investigated whether the nutritional status of folate and vitamin B12 is involved in the association between low hemoglobin levels and the risk of AD mortality. Data were obtained from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the NHANES (1999-2006) Linked Mortality File. A total of 4,688 participants aged ≥60 years with available baseline data were included in this study. We categorized three groups based on the quartiles of folate and vitamin B12 as follows: Group I (low folate and vitamin B12); Group II (high folate and low vitamin B12 or low folate and high vitamin B12); and Group III (high folate and vitamin B12). Of 4,688 participants, 49 subjects died due to AD. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, education, smoking history, body mass index, the presence of diabetes or hypertension, and dietary intake of iron, significant increases in the AD mortality were observed in Quartile1 for hemoglobin (HR: 8.4, 95% CI: 1.4-50.8), and the overall risk of AD mortality was significantly reduced with increases in the quartile of hemoglobin (p for trend = 0.0200), in subjects with low levels of both folate and vitamin B12 at baseline. This association did not exist in subjects with at least one high level of folate and vitamin B12. Our finding shows the relationship between folate and vitamin B12 levels with respect to the association between hemoglobin levels and AD mortality. PMID:27003215

  11. Is it time for vitamin B-12 fortification? What are the questions?

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of folic acid fortification of flour 10 y ago, an initiative to consider fortifying flour with vitamin B-12 has gained momentum in the United States. The impetus for this move stems from several considerations, including some evidence that a proportion of neural tube defect pregnancies may be the result of vitamin B-12 rather than folate deficiency. However, no interventional trials have taken place to show the efficacy of vitamin B-12 supplementation or fortification in the primary prevention or recurrence of neural tube defect pregnancies, as was the case with folic acid. Other reasons put forward for the institution of vitamin B-12 fortification include the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in certain demographic groups, including the elderly and the young in some countries. Much of this deficiency, however, is subclinical and not associated with manifest morbidity. Moreover, individuals affected by the most severe cases of vitamin B-12 deficiency that are associated with morbidity would not benefit from the concentrations of vitamin B-12 fortification that are practical or that are being considered, because such individuals suffer from malabsorption of vitamin B-12 rather than from an inadequacy of intake of the vitamin. In addition to the well-recognized complications of vitamin B-12 deficiency, such as macrocytic anemia and neurological complications affecting sensory and motor function, more subtle effects have also been described, including osteopenia, neurocognitive impairment, and increased vascular disease risk associated with elevated homocysteine. This analysis focuses on the research questions that are pertinent to the consideration of whether or not to introduce mandatory vitamin B-12 fortification in the United States.

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency in resettled Bhutanese refugees--United States, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    2011-03-25

    Since 2008, approximately 30,000 Bhutanese refugees have been resettled in the United States. Routine medical examinations of refugees after arrival in resettlement states indicated hematologic and neurologic disorders caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. These cases were reported by examining physicians and state health departments to CDC, which initiated an investigation. This report summarizes the results of that investigation. Sera from overseas medical examinations, postarrival examinations in three state health departments (Minnesota, Utah, and Texas), and medical records and interviews at a health clinic in St. Paul, Minnesota, were evaluated. Vitamin B12 deficiency, defined as serum vitamin B12 concentration <203 pg/mL, was found in 64% (63 of 99) of overseas specimens, 27% (17 of 64) of postarrival medical screenings, and 32% (19 of 60) of Bhutanese refugees screened for vitamin B12 deficiency at the St. Paul clinic. Although the deficiencies might be multifactorial, the main cause is thought to be the diet consumed by these refugees for nearly two decades in Nepal, which lacked meat, eggs, and dairy products, the major dietary sources of vitamin B12. Additionally, infection with Helicobacter pylori might play a role. Clinicians should be aware of the risk for vitamin B12 deficiency in Bhutanese refugees. All Bhutanese refugees should be given nutrition advice and should receive supplemental vitamin B12 upon arrival in the United States. In addition, refugees with clinical manifestations suggestive of deficiency should be tested for adequate serum vitamin B12 concentrations and, if found to have a B12 deficiency, screened for underlying causes, treated with parenteral vitamin B12 or high-dose oral supplements, and evaluated for response to therapy. PMID:21430638

  13. Immunization for HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in Human Ig Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    Dosenovic, Pia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Escolano, Amelia; Jardine, Joseph; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; McGuire, Andrew T; Kulp, Daniel W; Oliveira, Thiago; Scharf, Louise; Pietzsch, John; Gray, Matthew D; Cupo, Albert; van Gils, Marit J; Yao, Kai-Hui; Liu, Cassie; Gazumyan, Anna; Seaman, Michael S; Björkman, Pamela J; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-06-18

    A subset of individuals infected with HIV-1 develops broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that can prevent infection, but it has not yet been possible to elicit these antibodies by immunization. To systematically explore how immunization might be tailored to produce them, we generated mice expressing the predicted germline or mature heavy chains of a potent bNAb to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). Immunogens specifically designed to activate B cells bearing germline antibodies are required to initiate immune responses, but they do not elicit bNAbs. In contrast, native-like Env trimers fail to activate B cells expressing germline antibodies but elicit bNAbs by selecting for a restricted group of light chains bearing specific somatic mutations that enhance neutralizing activity. The data suggest that vaccination to elicit anti-HIV-1 antibodies will require immunization with a succession of related immunogens.

  14. Anti-AIDS agents 85. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 1R,2R-dicamphanoyl-3,3-dimethyldihydropyrano-[2,3-c]xanthen-7(1H)-one (DCX) derivatives as novel anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 1R,2R-dicamphanoyl-3,3-dimethydihydropyrano[2,3-c]xanthen-7(1H)-one (DCX) derivatives were designed and synthesized as novel anti-HIV agents against both wild-type and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 (RTMDR-1) strains. Twenty-four DCX analogs (6-29) were synthesized and evaluated against the non-drug-resistant HIV-1 NL4-3 strain, and selected analogs were also screened for their ability to inhibit the RTMDR-1 strain. Compared with the control 2-ethyl-3′,4′-di-O-(-)-camphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (2-EDCP, 2), one of the best anti-HIV coumarin derivatives in our prior study, three DCX compounds (7, 12, and 22) showed better activity against both HIV strains with an EC50 range of 0.062 – 0.081 μM, and five additional compounds (8, 11, 16, 18, and 21) exhibited comparable anti-HIV potency. Six DCX analogs (7, 11-12, 18, and 21-22) also showed enhanced selectivity index (SI) values in comparison to the control. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) information suggested that the extended conjugated system of the pyranoxanthone skeleton facilitates the interaction of the small DCX molecule within the viral binding pocket, consequently leading to enhanced anti-HIV activity and selectivity. Compared to DCP compounds, DCX analogs are a more promising new class of anti-HIV agents. PMID:22063755

  15. Molecular and cellular effects of vitamin B12 in brain, myocardium and liver through its role as co-factor of methionine synthase.

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-Louis; Caillerez-Fofou, Maatem; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyuefang; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Freund, Jean-Noel; Dulluc, Isabelle; Adjalla, Charles; Maury, Florence; Merle, Carole; Nicolas, Jean-Pierre; Namour, Fares; Daval, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, cbl) is a cofactor of methionine synthase (MTR) in the synthesis of methionine, the precursor of the universal methyl donor S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is involved in epigenomic regulatory mechanisms. We have established a neuronal cell model with stable expression of a transcobalamin-oleosin chimer and subsequent decreased cellular availability of vitamin B12, which produces reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis and accelerated differentiation through PP2A, NGF and TACE pathways. Anti-transcobalamin antibody or impaired transcobalamin receptor expression produce also impaired proliferation in other cells. Consistently, the transcription, protein expression and activity of MTR are increased in proliferating cells of skin and intestinal epitheliums, in rat intestine crypts and in proliferating CaCo2 cells, while MTR activity correlates with DNA methylation in rat intestine villi. Exposure to nitrous oxide in animal models identified impairment of MTR reaction as the most important metabolic cause of neurological manifestations of B12 deficiency. Early vitamin B12 and folate deprivation during gestation and lactation of a 'dam-progeny' rat model developed in our laboratory is associated with long-lasting disabilities of behavior and memory capacities, with persisting hallmarks related to increased apoptosis, impaired neurogenesis and altered plasticity. We found also an epigenomic deregulation of energy metabolism and fatty acids beta-oxidation in myocardium and liver, through imbalanced methylation/acetylation of PGC-1alpha and decreased expression of SIRT1. These nutrigenomic effects display similarities with the molecular mechanisms of fetal programming. Beside deficiency, B12 loading increases the expression of MTR through internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) and down-regulates MDR-1 gene expression. In conclusion, vitamin B12 influences cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in brain. Vitamin B12 and folate combined

  16. Anti-AIDS agents 87. New bio-isosteric dicamphanoyl-dihydropyranochromone (DCP) and dicamphanoyl-khellactone (DCK) analogues with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Shan; Xu, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Ming; Chen, Ying; Xia, Peng; Qian, Keduo; Xia, Yi; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Chen, Chin-Ho; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2011-10-01

    Six 3'R,4'R-di-O-(S)-camphanoyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) and two 3'R,4'R-di-O-(S)-camphanoyl-(+)-cis-khellactone (DCK) derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for inhibition of HIV-1(NL4-3) replication in TZM-bl cells. 2-Ethyl-2'-monomethyl-1'-oxa- and -1'-thia-DCP (5a, 6a), as well as 2-ethyl-1'-thia-DCP (7a) exhibited potent anti-HIV activity with EC(50) values of 30, 38 and 54 nM and therapeutic indexes of 152.6, 48.0 and 100.0, respectively, which were better than or comparable to those of the lead compound 2-ethyl-DCP in the same assay. 4-Methyl-1'-thia-DCK (8a) also showed significant inhibitory activity with an EC(50) of 128 nM and TI of 237.9.

  17. Suramin analogues with a 2-phenylbenzimidazole moiety as partial structure; potential anti HIV- and angiostatic drugs, 2: Sulfanilic acid-, benzenedisulfonic acid-, and naphthalenetrisulfonic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Kreimeyer, A; Müller, G; Kassack, M; Nickel, P; Gagliardi, A R

    1998-03-01

    The synthesis of suramin analogues bearing a 2-phenyl-benzimidazole moiety is described. Aminoarene sulfonic acids 2a-e are acylated with 3,4-dinitrobenzoyl chloride 3 yielding the amides 4a-e which are hydrogenated to the corresponding diamines 5a-e. These are treated with 3-nitrobenzaldehyde, yielding the azomethines 7a-e and their isomers 8a-e and 9a-e. Key step in the synthesis of the target compounds 12a-e is the oxidation of the azomethines with oxygen to the benzimidazoles 10a-e. These are hydrogenated to the amines 11a-e reacting with phosgene to yield the symmetric ureas 12a-e. Results of the anti-HIV, cytostatic, and antiangiogenic screening are presented.

  18. LC-MS/MS structural characterization of stress degradation products including the development of a stability indicating assay of Darunavir: An anti-HIV drug.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Ramachandra, B; Sravan, B; Khalid, Sara

    2014-02-01

    Darunavir, an anti-HIV drug was subjected to forced degradation under acid, base, thermal and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation and photolysis as prescribed by ICH guidelines. Four major degradation products were formed under acid and base hydrolysis, while stable under neutral and thermal hydrolysis, oxidative and photolysis. The drug and its degradation products were separated on Hiber, LiChrospher® 60, RP-select B, C8 column (250mm×4.6mm i.d., 5μm) using 10mM ammonium acetate: acetonitrile (52:48, v/v) as mobile phase in an isocratic elution mode by LC. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and fragmentation pathways were proposed. The proposed structures of degradation products were confirmed by HRMS and the LC method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, recovery, LOD and LOQ. PMID:24252722

  19. Vitamin B12 Synthesis and Salvage Pathways Were Acquired by Horizontal Gene Transfer to the Thermotogales

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Kristen S.; Petrus, Amanda K.; Secinaro, Michael A.; Nesbø, Camilla L.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Noll, Kenneth M.; Butzin, Nicholas C.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of genome sequences of Thermotogales species from across the order allows an examination of the evolutionary origins of phenotypic characteristics in this lineage. Several studies have shown that the Thermotogales have acquired large numbers of genes from distantly related lineages, particularly Firmicutes and Archaea. Here, we report the finding that some Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquiring the requisite genes from these distant lineages. Thermosipho species, uniquely among the Thermotogales, contain genes that encode the means to synthesize vitamin B12 de novo from glutamate. These genes are split into two gene clusters: the corrinoid synthesis gene cluster, that is unique to the Thermosipho and the cobinamide salvage gene cluster. The corrinoid synthesis cluster was acquired from the Firmicutes lineage, whereas the salvage pathway is an amalgam of bacteria- and archaea-derived proteins. The cobinamide salvage gene cluster has a patchy distribution among Thermotogales species, and ancestral state reconstruction suggests that this pathway was present in the common Thermotogales ancestor. We show that Thermosipho africanus can grow in the absence of vitamin B12, so its de novo pathway is functional. We detected vitamin B12 in the extracts of T. africanus cells to verify the synthetic pathway. Genes in T. africanus with apparent B12 riboswitches were found to be down-regulated in the presence of vitamin B12 consistent with their roles in B12 synthesis and cobinamide salvage. PMID:22798452

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Glutathione Status in Type 2 Diabetics with Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Karamshetty, Varun; Acharya, Jhankar D.; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Goel, Pranay

    2016-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamin B12 and glutathione (GSH) are associated with a number of diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus. We tested newly diagnosed Indian diabetic patients for correlation between their vitamin B12 and GSH, and found it to be weak. Here we seek to examine the theoretical dependence of GSH on vitamin B12 with a mathematical model of 1-carbon metabolism due to Reed and co-workers. We study the methionine cycle of the Reed-Nijhout model by developing a simple “stylized model” that captures its essential topology and whose kinetics are analytically tractable. The analysis shows—somewhat counter-intuitively—that the flux responsible for the homeostasis of homocysteine is, in fact, peripheral to the methionine cycle. Elevation of homocysteine arises from reduced activity of methionine synthase, a vitamin B12-dependent enzyme, however, this does not increase GSH biosynthesis. The model suggests that the lack of vitamin B12–GSH correlation is explained by suppression of activity in the trans-sulfuration pathway that limits the synthesis of cysteine and GSH from homocysteine. We hypothesize this “cysteine-block” is an essential consequence of vitamin B12 deficiency. It can be clinically relevant to appreciate that these secondary effects of vitamin B12 deficiency could be central to its pathophysiology. PMID:27047940

  1. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities. PMID:26861098

  2. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements.

  3. Neurology of Nutritional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Infants: Case Series From India and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Sukhjot; Mehra, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    We studied 27 infants aged 6 to 27 months with vitamin B12 deficiency also known as "infantile tremor syndrome" in India. All were exclusively breast-fed by vegetarian mothers. Developmental delay or regression, pallor, skin hyperpigmentation, and sparse brown hair were present in all. Majority were hypotonic and involuntary movements were encountered in 18. Anemia and macrocytosis was found in 83% and 71% infants, respectively. Low serum vitamin B12 was present in 12 of 21 infants. Seven of the 9 infants with normal serum vitamin B12 had received vitamin B12 before referral. Twelve mothers had low serum vitamin B12. Cerebral atrophy was present in all the 9 infants who underwent neuroimaging. Treatment with vitamin B12 resulted in dramatic improvement in general activity and appetite within 48 to 72 hours followed by return of lost milestones. Tremors resolved in all by 3 to 4 weeks. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of neurologic dysfunction in infants.

  4. An appraisal of the value of vitamin B 12 in the prevention of motion sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Randall L.; Lacey, Carol L.; Homick, Jerry L.

    Unpublished reports have suggested that hydroxycobalamin (B 12, i.m.) prevents motion sickness. Some biomedical evidence supports this contention in that B 12 influences the metabolism of histidine and choline; dietary precursors to neurotransmitters with established roles in motion sickness. Susceptibility to motion sickness was evaluated after B 12 (1000 μg, i.m.). Subjects initially completed vestibular function and motion sickness susceptibility tests to establish normal vestibular function. The experimental motion stressor was a modified coriolis sickness susceptibility test. Subjects executed standardized head movements at successively higher RPM until a malaise III endpoint was reached. Following two baseline tests with this motion stressor, subjects received a B 12 injection, a second injection two weeks later, and a final motion sickness test three weeks later. No significant differences in susceptibility were noted after B 12. Hematological parameters revealed no B 12 deficiency before injection. The possibility that patients with B 12 deficiencies are more susceptible to motion sickness cannot be ruled out.

  5. Vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine and urinary methylmalonic acid levels in infants.

    PubMed

    Karademir, F; Suleymanoglu, S; Ersen, A; Aydinoz, S; Gultepe, M; Meral, C; Ozkaya, H; Gocmen, I

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12 and folate, and their functional markers, plasma homocysteine and urinary methylmalonate (uMMA) were measured in 204 healthy, term infants at birth, and at 2 and 6 months. Compared with infants receiving formula food, those fed mother's milk had lower vitamin B12 and folate at 2 and 6 months. In infants receiving mother's milk, vitamin B12 levels were similar at birth (238 pg/ml) and 2 months (243 pg/ml), whereas with formula milk the level was significantly higher at 2 months (558 pg/ml) than at birth (257 pg/ml). Vitamin B12 was negatively correlated with homocysteine at birth and 6 months. The level of uMMA (mmol/mol creatinine) was higher at 2 (mother's milk, 25.5; formula, 23.97) and 6 months (19.77; 15) than at birth (11.97; 10.88), and was not correlated with vitamin B12 levels. Homocysteine may be a reliable marker of vitamin B12 status in neonates and infants; however, uMMA is not suitable as a marker of vitamin B12 status.

  6. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities.

  7. Intestinal synthesis and absorption of vitamin B-12 in channel catfish

    SciTech Connect

    Limsuwan, T.; Lovell, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    A feeding experiment conducted in a controlled environment and using a vitamin B12-deficient, but otherwise nutritionally complete, purified diet revealed that intestinal microorganisms in channel catfish synthesized approximately 1.4 ng of vitamin B12 per gram of bodyweight per day. Removal of cobalt from the diet or supplementation with an antibiotic (succinylsulfathiazole) significantly reduced the rate of intestinal synthesis and liver stores of vitamin B12. Radiolabeled vitamin B12 in the blood, liver, kidneys, and spleen of fish fed 60Co in the diet indicated that the intestinally synthesized vitamin was absorbed by the fish. The primary route of absorption was directly from the digestive tract into the blood because coprophagy was prevented in the rearing aquariums and the amount of vitamin B12 dissolved in the aquarium water was too low for gill absorption. Dietary supplementation of vitamin B12 was not necessary for normal growth and erythrocyte formation in channel catfish in a 24-week feeding period. A longer period, however, may have caused a vitamin deficiency since liver-stored vitamin B 12 decreased between the 2nd and 24th weeks.

  8. Vitamin B(12) deficiency stimulates osteoclastogenesis via increased homocysteine and methylmalonic acid.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Bart L T; Lute, Carolien; Blom, Henk J; Bravenboer, Nathalie; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A; Müller, Michael; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2009-05-01

    The risk of nutrient deficiencies increases with age in our modern Western society, and vitamin B(12) deficiency is especially prevalent in the elderly and causes increased homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels. These three factors have been recognized as risk factors for reduced bone mineral density and increased fracture risk, though mechanistic evidence is still lacking. In the present study, we investigated the influence of B(12), Hcy, and MMA on differentiation and activity of bone cells. B(12) deficiency did not affect the onset of osteoblast differentiation, maturation, matrix mineralization, or adipocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). B(12) deficiency caused an increase in the secretion of Hcy and MMA into the culture medium by osteoblasts, but Hcy and MMA appeared to have no effect on hMSC osteoblast differentiation. We further studied the effect of B(12), Hcy, and MMA on the formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts from mouse bone marrow. We observed that B(12) did not show an effect on osteoclastogenesis. However, Hcy as well as MMA were found to induce osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. On the basis of these results, we conclude that B(12) deficiency may lead to decreased bone mass by increased osteoclast formation due to increased MMA and Hcy levels.

  9. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  10. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui-Guang; Huang, Philip L.; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao; Chen, Hao-Chia; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul L.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Lee-Huang, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  11. Unraveling Vitamin B12-Responsive Gene Regulation in Algae1[W

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, Katherine E.; Scaife, Mark A.; Sasso, Severin; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian; Purton, Saul; Smith, Alison G.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae play a vital role in primary productivity and biogeochemical cycling in both marine and freshwater systems across the globe. However, the growth of these cosmopolitan organisms depends on the bioavailability of nutrients such as vitamins. Approximately one-half of all microalgal species requires vitamin B12 as a growth supplement. The major determinant of algal B12 requirements is defined by the isoform of methionine synthase possessed by an alga, such that the presence of the B12-independent methionine synthase (METE) enables growth without this vitamin. Moreover, the widespread but phylogenetically unrelated distribution of B12 auxotrophy across the algal lineages suggests that the METE gene has been lost multiple times in evolution. Given that METE expression is repressed by the presence of B12, prolonged repression by a reliable source of the vitamin could lead to the accumulation of mutations and eventually gene loss. Here, we probe METE gene regulation by B12 and methionine/folate cycle metabolites in both marine and freshwater microalgal species. In addition, we identify a B12-responsive element of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii METE using a reporter gene approach. We show that complete repression of the reporter occurs via a region spanning −574 to −90 bp upstream of the METE start codon. A proteomics study reveals that two other genes (S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase2) involved in the methionine-folate cycle are also repressed by B12 in C. reinhardtii. The strong repressible nature and high sensitivity of the B12-responsive element has promising biotechnological applications as a cost-effective regulatory gene expression tool. PMID:24627342

  12. The effects of exercise training and acute exercise duration on plasma folate and vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Nam; Hwang, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Energy production and the rebuilding and repair of muscle tissue by physical activity require folate and vitamin B12 as a cofactor. Thus, this study investigated the effects of regular moderate exercise training and durations of acute aerobic exercise on plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations in moderate exercise trained rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Fifty rats underwent non-exercise training (NT, n = 25) and regular exercise training (ET, n = 25) for 5 weeks. The ET group performed moderate exercise on a treadmill for 30 min/day, 5 days/week. At the end of week 5, each group was subdivided into 4 groups: non-exercise and 3 exercise groups. The non-exercise group (E0) was sacrificed without exercising and the 3 exercise groups were sacrificed immediately after exercising on a treadmill for 0.5 h (E0.5), 1 h (E1), and 2 h (E2). Blood samples were collected and plasma folate and vitamin B12 were analyzed. RESULTS After exercise training, plasma folate level was significantly lower and vitamin B12 concentration was significantly higher in the ET group compared with the NT group (P < 0.05). No significant associations were observed between plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations. In both the NT and ET groups, plasma folate and vitamin B12 were not significantly changed by increasing duration of aerobic exercise. Plasma folate concentration of E0.5 was significantly lower in the ET group compared with that in the NT group. Significantly higher vitamin B12 concentrations were observed in the E0 and E0.5 groups of the ET group compared to those of the NT group. CONCLUSION Regular moderate exercise training decreased plasma folate and increased plasma vitamin B12 levels. However, no significant changes in plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were observed by increasing duration of acute aerobic exercise. PMID:27087899

  13. Therapeutic role of Vitamin B12 in patients of chronic tinnitus: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charu; Kawatra, Rahul; Gupta, Jaya; Awasthi, Vishnu; Dungana, Homnath

    2016-01-01

    True tinnitus is a phantom auditory perception arising from a source or trigger in the cochlea, brainstem, or at higher centers and has no detectable acoustic generator. The most accepted is the famous neurophysiologic model of Jastreboff, which stresses that tinnitus, is a subcortical perception and results from the processing of weak neural activity in the periphery. The aim of this study is to determine the role of Vitamin B12 in treatment of chronic tinnitus. In this randomized, double-blind pilot study, total 40 patients were enrolled, of which 20 in Group A (cases) received intramuscular therapy of 1 ml Vitamin B12 (2500 mcg) weekly for a period of 6 weeks and Group B (20) patients received placebo isotonic saline 01 ml intramuscular. The patients were subjected to Vitamin B12 assay and audiometry pre- and post-therapy. Of the total patients of tinnitus, 17 were Vitamin B12 deficient that is 42.5% showed deficiency when the normal levels were considered to be 250 pg/ml. A paired t-test showed that in Group A, patients with Vitamin B12 deficiency showed significant improvement in mean tinnitus severity index score and visual analog scale (VAS) after Vitamin B12 therapy. This pilot study highlights the significant prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in North Indian population and improvement in tinnitus severity scores and VAS in cobalamin-deficient patients receiving intramuscular Vitamin B12 weekly for 6 weeks further provides a link between cobalamin deficiency and tinnitus thereby suggestive of a therapeutic role of B12 in cobalamin-deficient patients of tinnitus. PMID:26960786

  14. STM investigations of Au(1 1 1) electrodes coated with vitamin B 12 derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőcs, E.; Durrer, L.; Luginbühl, R.; Simic, N.; Viana, A. S.; Abrantes, L. M.; Keese, R.; Siegenthaler, H.

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin B 12 derivatives immobilized at flame-annealed Au(1 1 1) electrode surfaces have been investigated in close correlation with their structural properties and spatial arrangement at the electrode substrate by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in air and in aqueous 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution. The investigated compounds were symmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10B 12) and nonsymmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10) dialkyl disulfide derivatives of vitamin B 12, attached to the electrode surfaces by the S-Au bond. The ex situ and in situ STM experiments show the formation of a surface layer, whose packing density and structure is presumably controlled by the spatial arrangement of the large cobyrinate head groups. In presence of the symmetrical B 12 compound, a disordered surface layer is observed. Voltammetric investigations show that, in 0.1 M NaClO 4, this layer becomes unstable at potentials approximately ⩽ -1000 mV vs. MSE and is almost completely removed at more negative potentials. The STM imaging properties of the nonsymmetrical B 12 surface layer show a significant dependence on the tunneling distance. In particular, at small tunneling distances, a highly regular hexagonal surface pattern is observed that suggests strongly the presence of an ordered surface assembly. Modeling of the B 12 head group has been performed to provide information for a structure-related interpretation of the high-resolution STM images. The investigations are first STM results obtained at such B 12 modified electrodes.

  15. Pernicious anemia presenting as catatonia: correlating vitamin B12 levels and catatonic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bram, Damien; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Durand, Jean-Paul; Lefevre, Guillaume; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Vaiva, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia has been associated with various psychiatric manifestations, such as depression, mania and psychosis. Psychiatric symptoms can sometimes occur without hematological and neurological abnormalities and can be prodromal of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case of autoimmune B12 deficiency presenting as catatonia without signs of anemia or macrocytosis, in which a correlation was found between the patient's B12 blood levels and catatonic symptoms over time. This catatonic episode was successfully treated with only lorazepam and adequate doses of cyanocobalamin. PMID:25774050

  16. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study on Icosahedral Boron Arsenide (B12As2)

    SciTech Connect

    J Wu; H Zhu; D Hou; C Ji; C Whiteley; J Edgar; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    The high pressure properties of icosahedral boron arsenide (B12As2) were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at pressures up to 25.5 GPa at room temperature. B12As2 retains its rhombohedral structure; no phase transition was observed in the pressure range. The bulk modulus was determined to be 216 GPa with the pressure derivative 2.2. Anisotropy was observed in the compressibility of B12As2-c-axis was 16.2% more compressible than a-axis. The boron icosahedron plays a dominant role in the compressibility of boron-rich compounds.

  17. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy: three case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J J; Langevin, A M; Zipursky, A

    1989-01-01

    Three cases of vitamin B12 deficiency that occurred during infancy are presented. These cases appeared to be the result of pre-existing maternal deficiency. All three infants demonstrated evidence of neurodevelopmental delay at presentation, and one had sustained loss of milestones and developed involuntary motor movements. Prior to the initiation of therapy, all three infants were anemic: one was thrombocytopenic and one pancytopenic. In all three cases the hematologic and neurologic abnormalities were corrected with vitamin B12 therapy. The literature is reviewed and discussed with respect to the mechanism of the infants' vitamin B12 deficiency and neurodevelopmental manifestations.

  18. Long-term neurologic consequences of nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infants.

    PubMed

    Graham, S M; Arvela, O M; Wise, G A

    1992-11-01

    A review of the clinical findings in six infants with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency seen during the last 10 years was undertaken and an attempt made to obtain long-term neurologic follow-up. There was a consistent clinical pattern in vitamin B12-deficient infants; irritability, anorexia, and failure to thrive were associated with marked developmental regression and poor brain growth. Two of the four patients who qualified for long-term review had a poor intellectual outcome. Although early response to treatment is satisfying, the long-term consequences of nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infants emphasize the need for prevention or early recognition of this syndrome.

  19. Transcobalamins I and II as natural transport proteins of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Hall, C A

    1975-11-01

    There are two conflicting theories of how plasma vitamin B12 (B12) is transported in man: (a) by two distinct transport proteins, transcobalamins I and II (TC I and II), each having a specific role and time of function; and (b) by three active transport proteins, TC I, II, and III, that take up B12 randomly in proportion to the unsaturated amounts of each. To test these theories a man was given 1.12 mug, 229 muCi, of [57Co]B12 mixed with food. Blood samples were taken several times on the 1st day and at lengthening intervals up to day 51. The amount of TC II-B12 was measured in each sample by: gel filtration and by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. Total serum R-B12 was then separated into TC I and TC III by: (a) a single step anion exchange system and (b) isoelectric focusing (IEF). As the B12 was being absorbed, 92-95% of that in venous blood was carried by TC II. Absolute and percentage transport by TC II declined sharply during the first 24 h; between days 7 and 51 20-33% of the label was on TC II, and the rest was carried by R-type binders. Absolute transport by TC I did not reach a maximum until after day 1 and before day 3. Transport by an alpha2 R-type binder, TC III, could not be demonstrated. TC I was isoelectrically heterogenous, with the components focusing between pH 2.9 and 3.35. It was concluded that (a) TC II is the dominant carrier of B12 immediately after absorption; (b) maximum transport by TC I requires the passage of time after absorption; (c) after the absorbed B12 reaches equilibrium with the total body B12, about one fourth of the plasma B12 is carried by TC II and three fourth by TC I; and (d) TC I and TC II are the only functional transport proteins of plasma B12.

  20. Pernicious anemia presenting as catatonia: correlating vitamin B12 levels and catatonic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bram, Damien; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Durand, Jean-Paul; Lefevre, Guillaume; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Vaiva, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia has been associated with various psychiatric manifestations, such as depression, mania and psychosis. Psychiatric symptoms can sometimes occur without hematological and neurological abnormalities and can be prodromal of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case of autoimmune B12 deficiency presenting as catatonia without signs of anemia or macrocytosis, in which a correlation was found between the patient's B12 blood levels and catatonic symptoms over time. This catatonic episode was successfully treated with only lorazepam and adequate doses of cyanocobalamin.

  1. Transcobalamins I and II as natural transport proteins of vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C A

    1975-01-01

    There are two conflicting theories of how plasma vitamin B12 (B12) is transported in man: (a) by two distinct transport proteins, transcobalamins I and II (TC I and II), each having a specific role and time of function; and (b) by three active transport proteins, TC I, II, and III, that take up B12 randomly in proportion to the unsaturated amounts of each. To test these theories a man was given 1.12 mug, 229 muCi, of [57Co]B12 mixed with food. Blood samples were taken several times on the 1st day and at lengthening intervals up to day 51. The amount of TC II-B12 was measured in each sample by: gel filtration and by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. Total serum R-B12 was then separated into TC I and TC III by: (a) a single step anion exchange system and (b) isoelectric focusing (IEF). As the B12 was being absorbed, 92-95% of that in venous blood was carried by TC II. Absolute and percentage transport by TC II declined sharply during the first 24 h; between days 7 and 51 20-33% of the label was on TC II, and the rest was carried by R-type binders. Absolute transport by TC I did not reach a maximum until after day 1 and before day 3. Transport by an alpha2 R-type binder, TC III, could not be demonstrated. TC I was isoelectrically heterogenous, with the components focusing between pH 2.9 and 3.35. It was concluded that (a) TC II is the dominant carrier of B12 immediately after absorption; (b) maximum transport by TC I requires the passage of time after absorption; (c) after the absorbed B12 reaches equilibrium with the total body B12, about one fourth of the plasma B12 is carried by TC II and three fourth by TC I; and (d) TC I and TC II are the only functional transport proteins of plasma B12. PMID:1184739

  2. A comparative study on the B12N12, Al12N12, B12P12 and Al12P12 fullerene-like cages.

    PubMed

    Beheshtian, Javad; Bagheri, Zargham; Kamfiroozi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Ali

    2012-06-01

    The stability, geometry and electronic structure of the title nanoclusters were compared by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Their electrical property analysis showed that the relative magnitude of the HOMO-LUMO gaps (eV) that are average values from the calculated results with five different DFT functionals is as follows: B12N12(7:02)>Al12N12(4.09)>B12P12(3.80)>Al12P12(3.39). Computing the standard enthalpy and the Gibbs free energy of formation, it was found that the B(12)N(12) structure is thermodynamically stable at 298 K and 1 atmosphere of pressure, while the Al(12)N(12) structure may be stable at low temperatures. Due to positive values of change of enthalpy and entropy of formation for both the B(12)P(12) and Al(12)P(12) clusters, it seems that their formation from the consisting atoms is not spontaneous at any temperature.

  3. Cerebral atrophy in a vitamin B12-deficient infant of a vegetarian mother.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Celebi; Akin, Fatih; Caksen, Hüseyin; Böke, Saltuk Buğra; Arslan, Sükrü; Aygün, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    In developed countries, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency usually occurs in children, exclusively breastfed ones whose mothers are vegetarian, causing low body stores of vitamin B12. The haematologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency is pernicious anaemia. It is a megaloblastic anaemia with high mean corpuscular volume and typical morphological features, such as hyperlobulation of the nuclei of the granulocytes. In advanced cases, neutropaenia and thrombocytopaenia can occur, simulating aplastic anaemia or leukaemia. In addition to haematological symptoms, infants may experience weakness, fatigue, failure to thrive, and irritability. Other common findings include pallor, glossitis, vomiting, diarrhoea, and icterus. Neurological symptoms may affect the central nervous system and, in severe cases, rarely cause brain atrophy. Here, we report an interesting case, a 12-month old infant, who was admitted with neurological symptoms and diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:25076673

  4. Neglect-induced pseudo-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Kaizu, Kiyohiko; Matsukawa, Shouhei; Takema-Tochikubo, Yuki; Fujii, Shuichi; Saitoh, Nobuyuki; Mashiko, Kunihiko; Fujino, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Although thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is rare, early diagnosis and treatment are important for decreasing the mortality rate. Acquired vitamin B12 deficiency is frequently overlooked because of its rarity in developed countries, particularly in children and adolescents. The hematological changes in vitamin B12 deficiency present as megaloblastic anemia, increased lactate dehydrogenase, vasoconstriction, increased platelet aggregation, and abnormal activation of the coagulation followed by microangiopathy as well as neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. We report herein the case of a 15-year-old girl who had been neglected, which might have caused pseudo-TTP through malnutrition, particularly vitamin B12 deficiency. When we encounter cases of TTP in children, clinicians must be aware of the possibility of malnutrition, particularly with vitamin B12 deficiency, even in developed countries, and investigate the cause of malnutrition including neglect. PMID:26387768

  5. How Nature Builds the Pigments of Life: The Conquest of Vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Alan R.

    1994-06-01

    In part because humans cannot synthesize vitamin B12 and must obtain it from organisms that produce it and because B12 deficiency leads to pernicious anemia, it has been important to understand how microorganisms build this quite complex substance. As shown here, an interdisciplinary attack was needed, which combined the strengths of genetics, molecular biology, enzymology, chemistry, and spectroscopy. This allowed the step-by-step synthetic pathway of B12 to be elucidated, and this approach has acted as a model for future research on the synthesis of substances in living organisms. One practical outcome of such an approach has been the improved availability of B12 for animal feedstuffs and human health.

  6. New derivatives of vitamin B12 show preferential targeting of tumors.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Robert; Treichler, Hansjörg; Schaefer, Niklaus G; van Staveren, Dave R; Mundwiler, Stefan; Kunze, Susanne; Küenzi, Martin; Alberto, Roger; Nüesch, Jakob; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Schibli, Roger; Schubiger, Pius August

    2008-04-15

    Rapidly growing cells show an increased demand for nutrients and vitamins. The objective of our work is to exploit the supply route of vitamin B12 to deliver new derivatives of this vital vitamin to hyperproliferative cells. To date, radiolabeled ((57)Co and (111)In) vitamin B12 derivatives showed labeling of tumor tissue but also undesired high accumulation of radioactivity in normal tissue. By abolishing the interaction of a tailored vitamin B12 derivative to its transport protein transcobalamin II and therefore interrupting transcobalamin II receptor and megalin mediated uptake in normal tissue, preferential accumulation of a radiolabeled vitamin in cancer tissue could be accomplished. We identified transcobalamin I on tumors as a possible new receptor for this preferential accumulation of vitamin-mediated targeting. The low systemic distribution of radioactivity and the high tumor to blood ratio opens the possibility of a more successful clinical application of vitamin B12 for imaging or therapy.

  7. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha Jm

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild.

  8. Cerebral atrophy in a vitamin B12-deficient infant of a vegetarian mother.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Celebi; Akin, Fatih; Caksen, Hüseyin; Böke, Saltuk Buğra; Arslan, Sükrü; Aygün, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    In developed countries, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency usually occurs in children, exclusively breastfed ones whose mothers are vegetarian, causing low body stores of vitamin B12. The haematologic manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency is pernicious anaemia. It is a megaloblastic anaemia with high mean corpuscular volume and typical morphological features, such as hyperlobulation of the nuclei of the granulocytes. In advanced cases, neutropaenia and thrombocytopaenia can occur, simulating aplastic anaemia or leukaemia. In addition to haematological symptoms, infants may experience weakness, fatigue, failure to thrive, and irritability. Other common findings include pallor, glossitis, vomiting, diarrhoea, and icterus. Neurological symptoms may affect the central nervous system and, in severe cases, rarely cause brain atrophy. Here, we report an interesting case, a 12-month old infant, who was admitted with neurological symptoms and diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency.

  9. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Results: Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Conclusions: Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them. PMID:27570337

  10. Coordination chemistry and biological activity of 5'-OH modified quinoline-B12 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Karel; Brandl, Helmut; Spingler, Bernhard; Zelder, Felix

    2011-10-14

    The consequences of structural modifications at the 5'-OH ribofuranotide moiety of quinoline modified B12 derivatives are discussed in regard of the coordination chemistry, the electrochemical properties and the biological behaviour of the compound.

  11. Vitamin B12 deficiency in persons with intellectual disability in a vegetarian residential care community.

    PubMed

    Morad, Mohammed; Gringols, Mark; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among intellectually disabled persons in a vegetarian remedial community in Israel. In this community, 47 individuals with intellectual disability (ID) live in 7 enlarged families in a kibbutz style agricultural setting. These 47 individuals and 17 of their caregivers were screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. There were 25.5% of the disabled vs. 11.8% of the caregivers found to have levels of vitamin B12 lower than 157 pg/ml. It is concluded that persons with ID in this vegetarian residential care community seemed to be at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  12. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. VIEW FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. VIEW FROM RIGHT SIDE SHOWING GUARD TOWER S83 ON RIDGE BEHIND MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. FRONT ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. FRONT ELEVATION WITH RANGE POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B12 & B13. VIEW FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOUBLE MAGAZINE LOCATED BETWEEN MAGAZINES B-12 & B-13. VIEW FROM LEFT SIDE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on neurodevelopment in infants: current knowledge and possible mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe vitamin B12 deficiency produces a cluster of neurological symptoms in infants, including irritability, failure to thrive, apathy, anorexia, and developmental regression, which respond remarkably rapidly to supplementation. The underlying mechanisms may involve delayed myelination or demyelina...

  16. Rare sensory and autonomic disturbances associated with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Puntambekar, Preeti; Basha, Maysaa M; Zak, Imad T; Madhavan, Ramesh

    2009-12-15

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is an important nutritional disorder causing neurological manifestations of myelopathy, neuropathy and dementia. Sub-acute combined degeneration (SCD) with involvement of the posterior columns in the cervical and thoracic cord is a common presentation of this disorder. In this case report, we describe a 43 year old woman with pernicious anemia and myelopathy with atypical clinical features. The patient presented with motor symptoms, a sensory level and bladder dysfunction. She had severe autonomic disturbances including an episode of unexplained bronchospasm, which has not been previously reported as a manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. We review the literature regarding these rarely reported features of vitamin B12 deficiency, and discuss aspects of management of this reversible condition. We emphasize the importance of awareness of autonomic disturbances in B12 deficient individuals.

  17. Short Communication: Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV-1-Infected Brazilian Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Mariza Gonçalvez; Côrtes, Fernanda Heloise; Guimarães, Monick Lindermeyer; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Bongertz, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tests for the detection of the humoral immune response to HIV-1 have to be standardized and established, demanding regional efforts. For this purpose the neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay for HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells was introduced in Brazil. Twenty plasma samples from HIV-1-infected individuals were assayed: 10 progressors and 10 long-term nonprogressors. These were tested against eight env-pseudotyped viruses (psVs) in the TZM-bl NAb assay and against HIV-1 strain HTLV/IIIB (HIV-1 IIIB) in primary lymphocytes. Forty-four percent of the samples showed neutralizing titers for psVs and 55% for HIV-1 IIIB. Plasma from progressors showed a broader neutralization and a higher potency. The introduction of these reference reagents encourages the participation of Brazil in future comparative assessments of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. PMID:23145941

  18. Defense-in-depth by mucosally administered anti-HIV dimeric IgA2 and systemic IgG1 mAbs: complete protection of rhesus monkeys from mucosal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Sholukh, Anton M; Watkins, Jennifer D; Vyas, Hemant K; Gupta, Sandeep; Lakhashe, Samir K; Thorat, Swati; Zhou, Mingkui; Hemashettar, Girish; Bachler, Barbara C; Forthal, Donald N; Villinger, Francois; Sattentau, Quentin J; Weiss, Robin A; Agatic, Gloria; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Heeney, Jonathan L; Ruprecht, Ruth M

    2015-04-21

    Although IgA is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin in humans, its role in preventing HIV-1 acquisition, which occurs mostly via mucosal routes, remains unclear. In our passive mucosal immunizations of rhesus macaques (RMs), the anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nmAb) HGN194, given either as dimeric IgA1 (dIgA1) or dIgA2 intrarectally (i.r.), protected 83% or 17% of the RMs against i.r. simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge, respectively. Data from the RV144 trial implied that vaccine-induced plasma IgA counteracted the protective effector mechanisms of IgG1 with the same epitope specificity. We thus hypothesized that mucosal dIgA2 might diminish the protection provided by IgG1 mAbs targeting the same epitope. To test our hypothesis, we administered HGN194 IgG1 intravenously (i.v.) either alone or combined with i.r. HGN194 dIgA2. We enrolled SHIV-exposed, persistently aviremic RMs protected by previously administered nmAbs; RM anti-human IgG responses were undetectable. However, low-level SIV Gag-specific proliferative T-cell responses were found. These animals resemble HIV-exposed, uninfected humans, in which local and systemic cellular immune responses have been observed. HGN194 IgG1 and dIgA2 used alone and the combination of the two neutralized the challenge virus equally well in vitro. All RMs given only i.v. HGN194 IgG1 became infected. In contrast, all RMs given HGN194 IgG1+dIgA2 were completely protected against high-dose i.r. SHIV-1157ipEL-p challenge. These data imply that combining suboptimal defenses at the mucosal and systemic levels can completely prevent virus acquisition. Consequently, active vaccination should focus on defense-in-depth, a strategy that seeks to build up defensive fall-back positions well behind the fortified frontline.

  19. Combined indicator of vitamin B 12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A novel approach to determine vitamin B 12 status is to combine four blood markers: total B 12 (B 12 ), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). This combined indicator of B 12 status is expressed as cB 12 = log 10 [(holoTC · B 12 )/ (MMA · Hcy...

  20. Combined indicator of vitamin B12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status, and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We propose a novel approach to diagnose B12 status by combining four blood markers: total B12 (B12), holo-transcobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). Combined B12 status is expressed as cB12=log10[(holoTC•B12)/(MMA•Hcy)]–(reference, age function). Her...

  1. AB156. Homocysteine and vitamin B12: risk factors for erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Mo, Zengnan

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing levels of homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with cardiovascular disease, and erectile dysfunction (ED) has close relation with cardiovascular disease, therefore, high homocysteine may be one of the risk factors of ED. During the metabolism of homocysteine, vitamin B12 plays an important role and could be the main factor in causing erectile dysfunction as well. Purpose To investigate the relationship between Hcy, vitamin B12 and ED in sample. Methods The study included 1,457 men aged 20-69 who participated in a series of physical examination at the Medical Centre in Fangchenggang First People’s Hospital from September 2009 to December 2009. ED was identified by the five-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. All participants were measured for plasma Hcy, vitamin B12, folic acid, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL). Smoking, alcoholic drinking and physical activity were collected by face to face communication. Results A total of 691 (47.4%) men were identified as ED in this study, participants with ED were older or more likely to drink alcohol than the non-ED. It was higher Hcy (P=0.032), vitamin B12 (P=0.008) and fasting plasma glucose (P=0.014) in the participants with ED. There were significant positive correlation between ED status (none, mile, moderate and severe) and Hcy (P=0.024), vitamin B12 (P=0.015) and fasting plasma glucose (P=0.002). Logistic regression analysis showed that age, Hcy and vitamin B12 were the main determinants in ED. Hcy was positively associated with ED in the men more than 45, but vitamin B12 was positively related with ED in the men less than 45. Conclusions Hcy was positively associated with ED in elder, however, vitamin B12 was positively related with ED in younger.

  2. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development. PMID:26109103

  3. Insights into the evolution of vitamin B12 auxotrophy from sequenced algal genomes.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Katherine E; Wheeler, Glen L; Leptos, Kyriacos C; Goldstein, Raymond E; Smith, Alison G

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) is a dietary requirement for humans because it is an essential cofactor for two enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase (METH). Land plants and fungi neither synthesize or require cobalamin because they do not contain methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, and have an alternative B(12)-independent methionine synthase (METE). Within the algal kingdom, approximately half of all microalgal species need the vitamin as a growth supplement, but there is no phylogenetic relationship between these species, suggesting that the auxotrophy arose multiple times through evolution. We set out to determine the underlying cellular mechanisms for this observation by investigating elements of B(12) metabolism in the sequenced genomes of 15 different algal species, with representatives of the red, green, and brown algae, diatoms, and coccolithophores, including both macro- and microalgae, and from marine and freshwater environments. From this analysis, together with growth assays, we found a strong correlation between the absence of a functional METE gene and B(12) auxotrophy. The presence of a METE unitary pseudogene in the B(12)-dependent green algae Volvox carteri and Gonium pectorale, relatives of the B(12)-independent Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, suggest that B(12) dependence evolved recently in these lineages. In both C. reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, growth in the presence of cobalamin leads to repression of METE transcription, providing a mechanism for gene loss. Thus varying environmental conditions are likely to have been the reason for the multiple independent origins of B(12) auxotrophy in these organisms. Because the ultimate source of cobalamin is from prokaryotes, the selective loss of METE in different algal lineages will have had important physiological and ecological consequences for these organisms in terms of their dependence on bacteria. PMID:21551270

  4. Vitamin B12 modulates the transcriptome of the skin microbiota in acne pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dezhi; Shi, Baochen; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Li, Huiying

    2015-06-24

    Various diseases have been linked to the human microbiota, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of the microbiota in disease pathogenesis are often poorly understood. Using acne as a disease model, we aimed to understand the molecular response of the skin microbiota to host metabolite signaling in disease pathogenesis. Metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that the transcriptional profiles of the skin microbiota separated acne patients from healthy individuals. The vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway in the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes was significantly down-regulated in acne patients. We hypothesized that host vitamin B12 modulates the activities of the skin microbiota and contributes to acne pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the skin microbiota in healthy subjects supplemented with vitamin B12. We found that the supplementation repressed the expression of vitamin B12 biosynthesis genes in P. acnes and altered the transcriptome of the skin microbiota. One of the 10 subjects studied developed acne 1 week after vitamin B12 supplementation. To further understand the molecular mechanism, we revealed that vitamin B12 supplementation in P. acnes cultures promoted the production of porphyrins, which have been shown to induce inflammation in acne. Our findings suggest a new bacterial pathogenesis pathway in acne and provide one molecular explanation for the long-standing clinical observation that vitamin B12 supplementation leads to acne development in a subset of individuals. Our study discovered that vitamin B12, an essential nutrient in humans, modulates the transcriptional activities of skin bacteria, and provided evidence that metabolite-mediated interactions between the host and the skin microbiota play essential roles in disease development.

  5. Charles Bonnet syndrome and vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Valérie; Desbordes, Marie; Follet, Mathieu; Haouzir, Sadeq; Guillin, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition associated with complex visual hallucinations occurring in the elderly in patients with visual impairment and normal mental health. Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old woman who has a limited visual acuity with a CBS that we postulated to be in relationship to a vitamin B12 deficiency. This case is the first report of vitamin B12 deficiency-associated CBS.

  6. Hyperhomocysteinemia, deep vein thrombosis and vitamin B12 deficiency in a metformin-treated diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsuan-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Shyong; Wang, Ming-Lun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Shen, Ming-Ching

    2007-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may be induced by long-term use of metformin, which may in turn lead to hyperhomocysteinemia. Thus, hyperhomocysteinemia may increase the risk of vascular thrombosis in diabetic patients, when metformin is used and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation is present. We report a 65-year-old Taiwanese diabetic woman who was treated with metformin for 6 years and who had suffered from swelling of the left lower extremity for 3 months. Ascending venography confirmed the diagnosis of proximal deep vein thrombosis, while hyperhomocysteinemia, megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and a homozygous C677T mutation of the MTHFR gene were also found. She had no identifiable venous thrombotic risk factors other than hyperhomocysteinemia, which seemed to be caused by both MTHFR C677T homozygous mutation and vitamin B12 deficiency. With the substitution of insulin injection for metformin, short-term supplement of vitamin B12, and anticoagulant therapy for the deep vein thrombosis, her anemia and hyperhomocysteinemia recovered rapidly. The deep vein thrombosis also responded well. Our findings highly suggested the role of metformin in causing vitamin B12 deficiency, which may serve as an additional risk factor for venous thrombosis in diabetic patients. Our report also highlights the need to check vitamin B12 levels during metformin treatment. PMID:17908667

  7. Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B-12) status in Seventh-day Adventist ministers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hokin, B D; Butler, T

    1999-09-01

    As part of the Adventist Ministers' Health Study, a series of cross-sectional surveys conducted in 1992, 1994, and 1997, the serum vitamin B-12 status of 340 Australian Seventh-day Adventist ministers was assessed in 1997. The ministers in the study participated voluntarily. Of this group, 245 were either lactoovovegetarians or vegans who were not taking vitamin B-12 supplements. Their mean vitamin B-12 concentration was 199 pmol/L (range: 58-538 pmol/L), 53% of whom had values below the reference range for the method used (171-850 pmol/L) and 73% of whom had values <221 pmol/L, the lower limit recommended by Herbert. Dual-isotope Schillings test results in 36 lactoovovegetarians with abnormally low vitamin B-12 concentrations indicated that dietary deficiency was the cause in 70% of cases. Data from the dietary questionnaires supported dietary deficiency as the cause of low serum vitamin B-12 in this population of lactoovovegetarians and vegans, 56 (23%) of whom consumed sufficient servings of vitamin B-12-containing foods to obtain the minimum daily maintenance allowance of the vitamin (1 microg). PMID:10479234

  8. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions.

  9. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Patil, Pradnya D.; Riley, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Charlene K.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  10. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = −0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = −0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = −0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = −0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet. PMID:26927168

  11. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patil, Pradnya D; Riley, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Charlene K

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  12. Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae Use Different Chemical Variants of Vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, Katherine Emma; Lawrence, Andrew David; Holzer, Andre; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Sasso, Severin; Kräutler, Bernhard; Scanlan, David John; Warren, Martin James; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic microalgae and prokaryotic cyanobacteria are the major components of the phytoplankton. Determining factors that govern growth of these primary producers, and how they interact, is therefore essential to understanding aquatic ecosystem productivity. Over half of microalgal species representing marine and freshwater habitats require for growth the corrinoid cofactor B12, which is synthesized de novo only by certain prokaryotes, including the majority of cyanobacteria. There are several chemical variants of B12, which are not necessarily functionally interchangeable. Cobalamin, the form bioavailable to humans, has as its lower axial ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we show that the abundant marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus synthesizes only pseudocobalamin, in which the lower axial ligand is adenine. Moreover, bioinformatic searches of over 100 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes for B12 biosynthesis genes, including those involved in nucleotide loop assembly, suggest this is the form synthesized by cyanobacteria more broadly. We further demonstrate that pseudocobalamin is several orders of magnitude less bioavailable than cobalamin to several B12-dependent microalgae representing diverse lineages. This indicates that the two major phytoplankton groups use a different B12 currency. However, in an intriguing twist, some microalgal species can use pseudocobalamin if DMB is provided, suggesting that they are able to remodel the cofactor, whereas Synechococcus cannot. This species-specific attribute implicates algal remodelers as novel and keystone players of the B12 cycle, transforming our perception of the dynamics and complexity of the flux of this nutrient in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27040778

  13. Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae Use Different Chemical Variants of Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Katherine Emma; Lawrence, Andrew David; Holzer, Andre; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Sasso, Severin; Kräutler, Bernhard; Scanlan, David John; Warren, Martin James; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-04-25

    Eukaryotic microalgae and prokaryotic cyanobacteria are the major components of the phytoplankton. Determining factors that govern growth of these primary producers, and how they interact, is therefore essential to understanding aquatic ecosystem productivity. Over half of microalgal species representing marine and freshwater habitats require for growth the corrinoid cofactor B12, which is synthesized de novo only by certain prokaryotes, including the majority of cyanobacteria. There are several chemical variants of B12, which are not necessarily functionally interchangeable. Cobalamin, the form bioavailable to humans, has as its lower axial ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we show that the abundant marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus synthesizes only pseudocobalamin, in which the lower axial ligand is adenine. Moreover, bioinformatic searches of over 100 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes for B12 biosynthesis genes, including those involved in nucleotide loop assembly, suggest this is the form synthesized by cyanobacteria more broadly. We further demonstrate that pseudocobalamin is several orders of magnitude less bioavailable than cobalamin to several B12-dependent microalgae representing diverse lineages. This indicates that the two major phytoplankton groups use a different B12 currency. However, in an intriguing twist, some microalgal species can use pseudocobalamin if DMB is provided, suggesting that they are able to remodel the cofactor, whereas Synechococcus cannot. This species-specific attribute implicates algal remodelers as novel and keystone players of the B12 cycle, transforming our perception of the dynamics and complexity of the flux of this nutrient in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27040778

  14. High doses of oral folate and sublingual vitamin B12 in dialysis patients with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra; Sarvari, Gholam-Reza; Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Azarfar, Anoush; Rasouli, Zahra; Moeenolroayaa, Giti; Jahanshahi, Shohre; Farhadi, Simin; Heydari, Zohreh; Sagheb-Taghipoor, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Folic acid and vitamin B12, alone or in combination have been used to reduce homocysteine (Hcy) levels in dialysis patients. Objectives: We aimed to assess the efficacy of high doses of oral folate and vitamin B12 in reducing plasma Hcy levels after a 12-week treatment. Patients and Methods: Thirty-two dialysis patients aged 10-324 months screened for hyperhomocysteinuria. Then cases with hyperhomocysteinemia received oral folate 10 mg/day with sublingual methylcobalamin 1 mg/day for 12 weeks. In pre- and post-intervention phases plasma Hcy concentration, serum folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Changes in plasma Hcy, serum folate, and vitamin B12 concentrations were analyzed by paired t tests, and P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Eighteen (56.2%) patients had hyperhomocysteinuria. Vitamin B12 and folate levels were normal or high in all cases. Two patients were lost due to transplant or irregular drugs consumption. Plasma Hcy levels were reduced in all, and reached normal values in 50%. A statistically significant differences between first Hcy levels with levels after intervention was found (95% CI, 5.1–8.9, P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Oral folate 10 mg/day in combination with sublingual vitamin B12, 1 mg/day can be considered as a favorable treatment for hyperhomocysteinemia in dialysis patients. PMID:27689109

  15. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid levels and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Ali; Gunduz, Kamer; Onur, Ece; Calkan, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine serum vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as MTHFR (C677, A1298C) gene polymorphisms in patients with vitiligo, and to compare the results with healthy controls. Forty patients with vitiligo and 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects were studied. Serum vitamin B12 and folate levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma Hcy levels and MTHFR polymorphisms were determined by chemiluminescence and real time PCR methods, respectively. Mean serum vitamin B12 and Hcy levels were not significantly different while folic acid levels were significantly lower in the control group. There was no significant relationship between disease activity and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocystein levels. No significant difference in C677T gene polymorphism was detected. Heterozygote A1298C gene polymorphism in the patient group was statistically higher than the control group. There was no significant relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine levels. In conclusion, vitamin B12, folate and Hcy levels are not altered in vitiligo and MTHFR gene mutations (C677T and A1298C) do not seem to create susceptibility for vitiligo. PMID:22846211

  16. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-02-26

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤ 250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = -0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = -0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = -0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = -0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet.

  17. Vitamin B12: one carbon metabolism, fetal growth and programming for chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Rush, E C; Katre, P; Yajnik, C S

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together human and animal studies and reviews that examine the possible role of maternal vitamin B12 (B12) on fetal growth and its programming for susceptibility to chronic disease. A selective literature review was undertaken to identify studies and reviews that investigate these issues, particularly in the context of a vegetarian diet that may be low in B12 and protein and high in carbohydrate. Evidence is accumulating that maternal B12 status influences fetal growth and development. Low maternal vitamin B12 status and protein intake are associated with increased risk of neural tube defect, low lean mass and excess adiposity, increased insulin resistance, impaired neurodevelopment and altered risk of cancer in the offspring. Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient associated with one carbon metabolic pathways related to substrate metabolism, synthesis and stability of nucleic acids and methylation of DNA which regulates gene expression. Understanding of factors regulating maternal-fetal one carbon metabolism and its role in fetal programming of non communicable diseases could help design effective interventions, starting with maternal nutrition before conception.

  18. Associations between Vitamin B-12 Status and Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Vegetarians and Omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ming-Yang; Lin, Mon-Chiou; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is considered an oxidative stress and a chronic inflammatory disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between vitamin B-12 status and oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic vegetarians and omnivores. We enrolled 154 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 vegetarians and 100 omnivores). Levels of fasting glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammatory makers were measured. Diabetic vegetarians with higher levels of vitamin B-12 (>250 pmol/L) had significantly lower levels of fasting glucose, HbA1c and higher antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase) than those with lower levels of vitamin B-12 (≤ 250 pmol/L). A significant association was found between vitamin B-12 status and fasting glucose (r = -0.17, p = 0.03), HbA1c (r = -0.33, p = 0.02), oxidative stress (oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, r = -0.19, p = 0.03), and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase, r = 0.28, p = 0.01) in the diabetic vegetarians; vitamin B-12 status was significantly correlated with inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, r = -0.33, p < 0.01) in diabetic omnivores. As a result, we suggest that it is necessary to monitor the levels of vitamin B-12 in patients with diabetes, particularly those adhering to a vegetarian diet. PMID:26927168

  19. Folate and vitamin B12: function and importance in cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Troen, Aron M

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the B vitamins folate and vitamin B12 for healthy neurological development and function is unquestioned. Folate and vitamin B12 are required for biological methylation and DNA synthesis. Vitamin B12 also participates in the mitochondrial catabolism of odd-chain fatty acids and some amino acids. Inborn errors of their metabolism and severe nutritional deficiencies cause serious neurological and hematological pathology. Poor folate and vitamin B12 status short of clinical deficiency is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment, depression, Alzheimer's disease and stroke among older adults and increased risk of neural tube defects among children born to mothers with low folate status. Folate supplementation and food fortification are known to reduce incident neural tube defects, and B vitamin supplementation may have cognitive benefit in older adults. Less is known about folate and vitamin B12 requirements for optimal brain development and long-term cognitive health in newborns, children and adolescents. While increasing suboptimal nutritional status has observed benefits, the long-term effects of high folate intake are uncertain. Several observations of unfavorable health indicators in children and adults exposed to high folic acid intake make it imperative to achieve a more precise definition of folate and B12 requirements for brain development and function.

  20. Metabolic engineering of cobalamin (vitamin B12) production in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Malten, Marco; Barg, Heiko; Bunk, Boyke; Martens, Jan-Henning; Deery, Evelyne; Leech, Helen; Warren, Martin J; Jahn, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) production in Bacillus megaterium has served as a model system for the systematic evaluation of single and multiple directed molecular and genetic optimization strategies. Plasmid and genome-based overexpression of genes involved in vitamin B(12) biosynthesis, including cbiX, sirA, modified hemA, the operons hemAXCDBL and cbiXJCDETLFGAcysG(A)cbiYbtuR, and the regulatory gene fnr, significantly increased cobalamin production. To reduce flux along the heme branch of the tetrapyrrole pathway, an antisense RNA strategy involving silencing of the hemZ gene encoding coproporphyrinogen III oxidase was successfully employed. Feedback inhibition of the initial enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, HemA, by heme was overcome by stabilized enzyme overproduction. Similarly, the removal of the B(12) riboswitch upstream of the cbiXJCDETLFGAcysG(A)cbiYbtuR operon and the recombinant production of three different vitamin B(12) binding proteins (glutamate mutase GlmS, ribonucleotide triphosphate reductase RtpR and methionine synthase MetH) partly abolished B(12)-dependent feedback inhibition. All these strategies increased cobalamin production in B. megaterium. Finally, combinations of these strategies enhanced the overall intracellular vitamin B(12) concentrations but also reduced the volumetric cellular amounts by placing the organism under metabolic stress. PMID:21255303