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Sample records for anti-hiv antibodies b12

  1. Anti-HIV antibodies in the CSF of AIDS patients: a serological and immunoblotting study.

    PubMed Central

    Bukasa, K S; Sindic, C J; Bodeus, M; Burtonboy, G; Laterre, C; Sonnet, J

    1988-01-01

    CSF and serum samples from 16 AIDS patients were tested for the presence of anti-HIV antibodies either by classical serological methods or by an immunoblot technique based on agarose gel isoelectric focusing and transfer of the specific IgG antibodies onto HIV antigens-loaded nitrocellulose sheets. This method enabled the demonstration of an intrathecal synthesis of anti-HIV oligoclonal IgG antibodies, often superimposed on diffuse polyclonal production, in 14 patients. The two negative cases were devoid of neurological signs or symptoms. However, two patients classified in stage II of the disease (asymptomatic infection) displayed an intrathecal synthesis of anti-HIV antibodies. Images PMID:3216207

  2. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  3. [Prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies in patients at the Service of Human Reproduction Biology of the "20th November" National Medical Center].

    PubMed

    Sauceda, L F; Gutiérrez, R; Franco, M; Beltrán, A

    1999-10-01

    At the service of Human Reproduction of the Centro Médico Nacional "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE from January 94 to August 98, at the first visit, were performed routine screening for antibodies anti-HIV for both partners. Of 672 samples 3 (0.44%) were positive for antibodies anti-HIV with ELISA and two confirmed by Western blot analysis.

  4. A SINGLE INJECTION OF ANTI-HIV-1 ANTIBODIES PROTECTS AGAINST REPEATED SHIV CHALLENGES

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C.; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Mascola, John R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling HIV-1 infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 bNAbs can protect mice or macaques against a single high dose challenge with HIV or SIV/HIV chimeric viruses respectively1-8, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Based on the relatively long term protection conferred by Hepatitis A immune globulin, we tested the efficacy of a single injection (20mg/kg) of four anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-10749-12) in blocking repeated weekly low dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared to control animals, which required 2 to 6 challenges (median=3 weeks) for infection, a single bNAb infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weeks. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma neutralizing activity and correspondingly, the longest protection, were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies, 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median=13 and 12.5 weeks respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median=8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the Fc domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered in to populations at high risk for HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  5. Biochemical and functional characterization of anti-HIV antibody-ELP fusion proteins from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen M; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Rademacher, Thomas; Scheller, Jürgen; Stöger, Eva; Fischer, Rainer; Conrad, Udo

    2008-05-01

    The stability and recovery of recombinant proteins expressed in plants are improved by fusion to elastin-like peptides (ELPs). In order to test the suitability of ELP for the production of pharmaceutical proteins, transgenic plants were created that individually expressed the light and heavy chains of the broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) monoclonal antibody 2F5, which is being evaluated as a microbicide component. The antibody chains were expressed both with and without a C-terminal ELP fusion. Crossing these plants in all combinations resulted in transgenic lines producing the full antibody in four formats, with ELP on either the light or heavy chains, on both or on neither. Characterization of the affinity-purified antibodies by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that the kinetic binding parameters were identical to those of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell counterpart lacking ELP. N-Glycan analysis showed that all four derivatives contained predominantly oligo-mannose-type N-glycans and that the ELP fusions had no significant effect on N-glycan structure. It was concluded that ELP fusion to the light chain, heavy chain or both chains of a plant-derived antibody had no adverse affects on protein quality, but had a positive impact on the yield. ELP fusions do not interfere with folding, assembly, trafficking in the secretory pathway or post-translational modification, but enhance stability whilst at the same time simplifying recovery.

  6. Transgenic Production of an Anti HIV Antibody in the Barley Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Goetz; Floss, Doreen M.; Arcalis, Elsa; Sack, Markus; Melnik, Stanislav; Altmann, Friedrich; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen; Stoger, Eva; Conrad, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Barley is an attractive vehicle for producing recombinant protein, since it is a readily transformable diploid crop species in which doubled haploids can be routinely generated. High amounts of protein are naturally accumulated in the grain, but optimal endosperm-specific promoters have yet to be perfected. Here, the oat GLOBULIN1 promoter was combined with the legumin B4 (LeB4) signal peptide and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SE)KDEL. Transgenic barley grain accumulated up to 1.2 g/kg dry weight of recombinant protein (GFP), deposited in small roundish compartments assumed to be ER-derived protein bodies. The molecular farming potential of the system was tested by generating doubled haploid transgenic lines engineered to synthesize the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody 2G12 with up to 160 μg recombinant protein per g grain. The recombinant protein was deposited at the periphery of protein bodies in the form of a mixture of various N-glycans (notably those lacking terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues), consistent with their vacuolar localization. Inspection of protein-A purified antibodies using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that their equilibrium and kinetic rate constants were comparable to those associated with recombinant 2G12 synthesized in Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:26461955

  7. High titer anti-HIV antibody reactivity associated with a paraprotein spike in a homosexual male with AIDS related complex.

    PubMed

    Ng, V L; Hwang, K M; Reyes, G R; Kaplan, L D; Khayam-Bashi, H; Hadley, W K; McGrath, M S

    1988-05-01

    We observed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual male with AIDS related complex (ARC) who had a serum globulin level of 80 g/L. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed a gamma globulin fraction of 40 g/L, of which 50% (20 g/L) was contained within a paraprotein spike, comprised predominantly of IgG kappa. This patient also had high titer anti-HIV antibodies in his serum, which were Western blot reactive at a final dilution of 1:500,000, and recognized gp120env, p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. Because paraproteins in the past have been shown to be directed against specific antigens, we purified this patient's paraprotein using a modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-hydroxylapatite procedure and tested the purified paraprotein for anti-HIV antibody activity. The purified paraprotein retained anti-HIV antibody activity to a final dilution of 1:100,000, and recognized p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. The recognition of both "gag" and "pol" gene products suggested that the purified paraprotein might not be monoclonal in origin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that the purified paraprotein contained at least two immunoglobulin light chain species (Mol wt 30 to 33 Kd). Affinity chromatography of the purified paraprotein using a p24-Sepharose 4B matrix separated the "gag" and "pol" antibody activities. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis of a bone marrow aspirate (which contained 15% plasma cells) failed to reveal a clonal population of immunoglobulin producing cells. We conclude that this patient's paraprotein accounted for most of the anti-HIV activity present in whole serum, and that this paraprotein was not monoclonal in origin.

  8. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses.

  9. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N.; Abrams, William R.; Montagna, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. Methods We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. Results The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. Conclusion The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for

  10. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-{alpha} in patients with acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-α2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive anti-retroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-α2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-α2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-α2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5–10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0–10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-α2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies. PMID:18182457

  11. A Rapid, Self-confirming Assay for HIV: Simultaneous Detection of Anti-HIV Antibodies and Viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyuan; Zhu, Hui; Malamud, Daniel; Barber, Cheryl; Ongagna, Yhombi Yvon Serge; Yasmin, Rubina; Modak, Sayli; Janal, Malvin N; Abrams, William R; Montagna, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic system to simultaneously detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in the same specimen in order to satisfy two important diagnostic criteria, especially within resource-limited settings. First, the system can detect acute HIV infection and allow immediate confirmation of a seropositive screening result by detection of HIV RNA. It also addresses the well-known "seroconversion window" during early HIV infection when antibodies are not yet detectable and viral loads are at their highest. We first developed and optimized two separate manual assays for the detection of host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA and then converted them to the microfluidic system. We optimized a commercially available serologic assay to run within the microfluidic device while we incorporated the isothermal LAMP assay to detect the presence of viral RNA. The microfluidic device and instrumentation were developed to simultaneously perform both assays without any user intervention. The finalized system consists of a disposable injection molded and film-laminated microfluidic CARD disposable device and a portable, software controlled instrument, which together can automatically perform all steps of both assays without any user intervention after the initial loading of samples and reagents. The microfluidic CARD cartridge has multiple microchannels, valves, pumps and reservoirs, which perform the immunoassay, isolates viral RNA for detection by magnetic bead based purification, and Reverse Transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The microfluidic system was able to detect host anti-HIV antibodies and viral RNA in either a blood or saliva sample. The ability to detect antibodies and simultaneously confirm a seropositive HIV-RNA result provides healthcare workers with a complete and accurate appraisal of a patient's infection status in the earliest stages of the disease and represents an important tool for the "Test and Treat" and "Treatment

  12. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-alpha in patients with acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chene, Genevieve; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-alpha2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-alpha2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-alpha2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-alpha2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5-10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0-10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-alpha2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies.

  13. Synergistic neutralization of a chimeric SIV/HIV type 1 virus with combinations of human anti-HIV type 1 envelope monoclonal antibodies or hyperimmune globulins.

    PubMed

    Li, A; Baba, T W; Sodroski, J; Zolla-Pazner, S; Gorny, M K; Robinson, J; Posner, M R; Katinger, H; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Chou, T C; Ruprecht, R M

    1997-05-20

    A panel of 14 human IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for envelope antigens of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), 2 high-titer human anti-HIV-1 immunoglobulin (HIVIG) preparations, and 15 combinations of MAbs or MAb/HIVIG were tested for their ability to neutralize infection of cultured human T cells (MT-2) with a chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-vpu+), which expressed HIV-1 IIIB envelope antigens. Eleven MAbs and both HIVIGs were neutralizing. When used alone, the anti-CD4-binding site MAb b12, the anti-gp41 MAb 2F5, and the anti-gp120 MAb 2G12 were the most potent. When combination regimens involving two MAbs targeting different epitopes were tested, synergy was seen in all paired MAbs, except for one combination that revealed additive effects. The lowest effective antibody concentration for 50% viral neutralization (EC50) and EC90 were achieved with combinations of MAbs b12, 2F5, 2G12, and the anti-V3 MAb 694/98D. Depending on the combination regimen, the concentration of MAbs required to reach 90% virus neutralization was reduced approximately 2- to 25-fold as compared to the dose requirement of individual MAbs to produce the same effect. Synergy of the combination regimens implies that combinations of antibodies may have a role in passive immunoprophylaxis against HIV-1. The ability of SHIV to replicate in rhesus macaques will allow us to test such approaches in vivo.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Peptide Paratope Mimics of the Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody b12.

    PubMed

    Haußner, Christina; Damm, Dominik; Nirschl, Sandra; Rohrhofer, Anette; Schmidt, Barbara; Eichler, Jutta

    2017-04-04

    The broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody b12 recognizes the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and efficiently neutralizes HIV-1 infections in vitro and in vivo. Based on the 3D structure of a b12⋅gp120 complex, we have designed an assembled peptide (b12-M) that presents the parts of the three heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of b12, which contain the contact sites of the antibody for gp120. This b12-mimetic peptide, as well as a truncated peptide presenting only two of the three heavy-chain CDRs of b12, were shown to recognize gp120 in a similar manner to b12, as well as to inhibit HIV-1 infection, demonstrating functional mimicry of b12 by the paratope mimetic peptides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Passive transfer of modest titers of potent and broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies block SHIV infection in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Shingai, Masashi; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Nason, Martha C.; Montefiori, David; Moldt, Brian; Poignard, Pascal; Diskin, Ron; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Cetrulo Lorenzi, Julio Cesar; Gazumyan, Anna; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that effective human vaccines directed against viral pathogens elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The passive transfer of anti–HIV-1 NAbs conferring sterilizing immunity to macaques has been used to determine the plasma neutralization titers, which must be present at the time of exposure, to prevent acquisition of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infections. We administered five recently isolated potent and broadly acting anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus macaques and challenged them intrarectally 24 h later with either of two different R5-tropic SHIVs. By combining the results obtained from 60 challenged animals, we determined that the protective neutralization titer in plasma preventing virus infection in 50% of the exposed monkeys was relatively modest (∼1:100) and potentially achievable by vaccination. PMID:25155019

  17. Anti-Leu3a induces combining site-related anti-idiotypic antibody without inducing anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J P; Buck, D; Berkower, I; Murphy, D; Epstein, S L

    1991-01-01

    Development of a vaccine for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has proven difficult, and so alternative approaches such as idiotypic manipulation have been suggested. As applied to AIDS, this approach could involve immunizing with an anti-CD4 antibody resembling gp120, to induce anti-idiotypic antibodies which would bind to gp120. The CD4 binding site on gp120 is conserved, and so, such an immune response should protect against all variants. Induction of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity has been reported using anti-Leu3a, and this result has led to testing in humans. Negative results obtained by others have been attributed to differences in immunization protocols. Because of the importance of this question, we reinvestigated the potential of anti-Leu3a to induce anti-HIV antibodies, compared with control immunizations with OKT4A (another anti-CD4 antibody) and the irrelevant Ig MOPC-21. Responses to anti-Leu3a showed induction of high-titer anti-idiotypic activity, and included combining-site-related activity. Yet sera showed no binding to gp160 above controls and no detectable neutralizing activity in a sensitive HIV plaque assay, so the anti-idiotypes induced were not internal images of CD4. We conclude that the pronounced anti-HIV responses reported with anti-Leu3a cannot be generalized, and thus that anti-Leu3a does not offer promise as an HIV vaccine. However, these results do not negate the promise of the idiotypic approach, and a vaccine for AIDS based on idiotype manipulation remains a possibility.

  18. Intrinsic-factor Antibody and Absorption of Vitamin B12 in Pernicious Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M. S.; Chanarin, I.

    1971-01-01

    The mean urinary excretion in a vitamin-B12 absorption (Schilling) test in control subjects was 19·2% and in pernicious anaemia when given with additional intrinsic factor was as follows: no intrinsic-factor antibodies demonstrable 19·3%, antibodies in serum only 14·4%, antibodies in gastric juice only 11·1%, and antibodies in both serum and gastric juice 8·4%. It is concluded that intrinsic-factor antibody exerts an adverse effect on vitamin-B12 absorption in most patients with pernicious anaemia. PMID:5539138

  19. Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Rayevskaya, G; Pilipenko, V G; Tkáciková, L; Spivak, N Y; Mikula, I; Chumak, R M

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.

  20. Promise and problems associated with the use of recombinant AAV for the delivery of anti-HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to elicit antibodies with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates have so far proven unsuccessful. Long-term delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with such activity is a creative alternative that circumvents the need for an immune response and has the potential for creating a long-lasting sterilizing barrier against HIV. This approach is made possible by an incredible array of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that have been identified over the last several years. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are ideally suited for long-term delivery for a variety of reasons. The only products made from rAAV are derived from the transgenes that are put into it; as long as those products are not viewed as foreign, expression from muscle tissue may continue for decades. Thus, use of rAAV to achieve long-term delivery of anti-HIV mAbs with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of HIV-1 isolates is emerging as a promising concept for the prevention or treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. Experiments in mice and monkeys that have demonstrated protective efficacy against AIDS virus infection have raised hopes for the promise of this approach. However, all published experiments in monkeys have encountered unwanted immune responses to the AAV-delivered antibody, and these immune responses appear to limit the levels of delivered antibody that can be achieved. In this review, we highlight the promise of rAAV-mediated antibody delivery for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection in humans, but we also discuss the obstacles that will need to be understood and solved in order for the promise of this approach to be realized. PMID:28197421

  1. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  2. Array-in-well platform-based multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies, and Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Saviranta, Petri; Hattara, Liisa; Vuorinen, Tytti; Hytönen, Jukka; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-02-01

    Multiplex assays detecting sets of related clinical analytes simultaneously can save considerable amount of time and resources. Array-in-well (AIW) is a powerful platform for the multiplex detection of different analytes where microarrays can be printed at the bottom of microtiter wells, thus combining the potential of microarrays with the ease of handling microtiter wells. We have developed a single-step AIW assay for the simultaneous screening of HIV, Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (causing syphilis) and Hepatitis B virus infections targeting the specific detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), respectively, using two different fluorescent label technologies i.e. DyLight 633 and europium nanoparticle. Double-antigen assay formats were used for anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibody detection that can simultaneously detect both IgG and IgM, and thus reduce the window period of detection. AIW assay was evaluated with well characterized serum/plasma samples (n=111), and the qualitative results were in near complete agreement with those of the reference assays. The AIW assay exhibited 100% sensitivities for all three analytes, and 100% specificities for anti-HIV antibodies and HBsAg, and 98.6% specificity for treponemal antibodies. The limit of detection of HBsAg in AIW assay was 0.18 ng/ml. This high performing AIW assay has the potential to be used as a multiplex screening test for these three infections.

  3. Expressing anti-HIV VRC01 antibody using the murine IgG1 secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Aw, Rochelle; McKay, Paul F; Shattock, Robin J; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    The use of the recombinant expression platform Pichia pastoris to produce pharmaceutically important proteins has been investigated over the past 30 years. Compared to mammalian cultures, expression in P. pastoris is cheaper and faster, potentially leading to decreased costs and process development times. Product yields depend on a number of factors including the secretion signal chosen for expression, which can influence the host cell response to recombinant protein production. VRC01, a broadly neutralising anti-HIV antibody, was expressed in P. pastoris, using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter for both the heavy and light chains. Titre reached up to 3.05 μg mL(-1) in small scale expression. VRC01 was expressed using both the α-mating factor signal peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the murine IgG1 signal peptide. Surprisingly, using the murine IgG1 signal peptide resulted in higher yield of antibody capable of binding gp140 antigen. Furthermore, we evaluated levels of secretory stress compared to the untransformed wild-type strain and show a reduced level of secretory stress in the murine IgG1 signal peptide strains versus those containing the α-MF signal peptide. As bottlenecks in the secretory pathway are often the limiting factor in protein secretion, reduced levels of secretory stress and the higher yield of functional antibody suggest the murine IgG1 signal peptide may lead to better protein folding and secretion. This work indicates the possibilities for utilising the murine IgG1 signal peptide for a range of antibodies, resulting in high yields and reduced cellular stress.

  4. Overcoming the Constraints of Anti-HIV/CD89 Bispecific Antibodies That Limit Viral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mark; Posner, Marshall R.

    2016-01-01

    Innovative strategies are necessary to maximize the clinical application of HIV neutralizing antibodies. To this end, bispecific constructs of human antibody F240, reactive with well-conserved gp41 epitope and antibody 14A8, reactive with the IgA receptor (CD89) on effector cells, were constructed. A F240 × 14A8 bispecific single chain variable region (scFv) molecule was constructed by linking two scFvs using a conventional GGGGS linker. Despite immunoreactivity with HIV gp41 and neutrophils, this bispecific scFv failed to inhibit HIV infection. This is in sharp contrast to viral inhibition using a chemical conjugate of the Fab of these two antibodies. Therefore, we constructed two novel Fab-like bispecific antibody molecules centered on fusion of the IgG1 CH1 domain or CH1-hinge domain to the C-terminus of F240scFv and fusion of the kappa chain CL domain to the C-terminus of 14A8scFv. Both Bi-Fab antibodies showed significant ADCVI activity for multiple clade B and clade C isolates by arming the neutrophils to inhibit HIV infection. The approach presented in this study is unique for HIV immunotherapy in that the impetus of neutralization is to arm and mobilize PMN to destroy HIV and HIV infected cells. PMID:27419146

  5. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-08

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors.

  6. [Retrospective evaluation of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and syphilis reagin antibody seropositivity in blood donors at the Trabzon Farabi Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Faruk; Cubukçu, Kivanç; Yetişkul, Serpil; Yazici, Yelda; Kaklikkaya, Neşe

    2002-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products is a widely used method for therapy in medicine, however it may result with the transmission of infectious agents from donor to recipient. In order to achieve safe blood transfusions and to minimize post-transfusion infections, several screening tests for infectious agents are routinely done all around the world as well as in our country. In this study, HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and syphilis reagin antibody tests results have been retrospectively evaluated for 33.766 blood donors during January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2000 in Blood Center of Farabi Hospital, Black Sea Technical University. Testing for HBsAg, anti-HIV and anti-HCV has been done by using commercially available micro and/or macro enzyme immunoassays, and syphilis reagin antibody test by latex agglutination (RPR) method. The indeterminate results were confirmed by retesting of sera with microparticle enzyme immunoassay and Western blot methods. As a result, in 1331 (3.94%) subjects HBsAg, in 250 (0.74%) subjects anti-HCV, and in 161 (0.47%) subjects RPR were found positive. Twenty samples which have had the results in gray-zone for anti-HIV, have been found negative with the confirmation tests.

  7. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Scott, Yanille M; Park, Seo Young; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2016-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection.

  8. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille M.; Park, Seo Young

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection. PMID:26596954

  9. Bispecific anti-HIV-1 antibodies with enhanced breadth and potency

    PubMed Central

    Bournazos, Stylianos; Gazumyan, Anna; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) suppress viremia in animal models of HIV-1 and humans. To achieve potent activity without the emergence of viral escape mutants, co-administration of different bNAbs is necessary to target distinct epitopes essential for viral fitness. Here we report the development of bispecific anti-Env neutralizing antibodies (biNAbs) with potent activity. Synergistic activity of biNAbs was achieved by combining an engineered hinge domain of IgG3 to increase Fab domain flexibility necessary for hetero-bivalent binding to the Env trimer, while retaining the functional properties of the IgG1-Fc. Compared to unmodified biNAbs, hinge domain variants exhibited substantially improved neutralization activity, with particular combinations showing evidence of synergistic neutralization potency in vitro and enhanced in vivo therapeutic activity in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These findings suggest innovative strategies for generating biNAbs with enhanced neutralization breadth and potency, representing ideal candidate molecules for the control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27315478

  10. Autoreactivity and Exceptional CDR Plasticity (but Not Unusual Polyspecificity) Hinder Elicitation of the Anti-HIV Antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Finton, Kathryn A. K.; Larimore, Kevin; Larman, H. Benjamin; Friend, Della; Correnti, Colin; Rupert, Peter B.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Strong, Roland K.

    2013-01-01

    The broadly-neutralizing anti-HIV antibody 4E10 recognizes an epitope in the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV envelope protein gp41. Previous attempts to elicit 4E10 by vaccination with envelope-derived or reverse-engineered immunogens have failed. It was presumed that the ontogeny of 4E10-equivalent responses was blocked by inherent autoreactivity and exceptional polyreactivity. We generated 4E10 heavy-chain knock-in mice, which displayed significant B cell dysregulation, consistent with recognition of autoantigen/s by 4E10 and the presumption that tolerance mechanisms may hinder the elicitation of 4E10 or 4E10-equivalent responses. Previously proposed candidate 4E10 autoantigens include the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and a nuclear splicing factor, 3B3. However, using carefully-controlled assays, 4E10 bound only weakly to cardiolipin-containing liposomes, but also bound negatively-charged, non-cardiolipin-containing liposomes comparably poorly. 4E10/liposome binding was predominantly mediated by electrostatic interactions rather than presumed hydrophobic interactions. The crystal structure of 4E10 free of bound ligands showed a dramatic restructuring of the combining site, occluding the HIV epitope binding site and revealing profound flexibility, but creating an electropositive pocket consistent with non-specific binding of phospholipid headgroups. These results strongly suggested that antigens other than cardiolipin mediate 4E10 autoreactivity. Using a synthetic peptide library spanning the human proteome, we determined that 4E10 displays limited and focused, but unexceptional, polyspecificity. We also identified a novel autoepitope shared by three ER-resident inositol trisphosphate receptors, validated through binding studies and immunohistochemistry. Tissue staining with 4E10 demonstrated reactivity consistent with the type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor as the most likely candidate autoantigen, but is inconsistent with splicing factor 3B3

  11. Anti-HIV antibody in saliva: an assessment of the role of the components of saliva, testing methodologies and collection systems.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Nolan, A; Follett, E A; Coote, I; MacFarlane, T W; Kennedy, D H; Connell, A; Parry, J V

    1996-03-01

    The various components of saliva, namely mixed saliva, parotid saliva, submandibular saliva, crevicular fluid and minor (labial) gland secretions, were collected from 63 known HIV antibody seropositive patients. A commercial test system, Wellcozyme HIV 1+2, and an antibody capture ELISA (GACELISA), were compared for sensitivity against all components. Sensitivity of the GACELISA system was 100% in 123 mixed saliva, 121 parotid saliva and 127 labial fluid samples, and 98% in 99 submandibular samples and 127 crevicular fluid samples. Respective figures for Wellcozyme 1+2 were 92%, 55%, 73%, 66% and 63%. Mixed saliva was most easily, conveniently and effectively collected using a plain Salivette. In 241 Salivette samples examined from the 63 patients, GACELISA proved 100% sensitive, and Wellcozyme 95% sensitive. Another form of Salivette impregnated with citric acid was unsuitable for GACELISA and gave a false negative value of 45%. In 197 samples from the gingival margin taken by a dry swab, GACELISA showed a sensitivity of 98% and Wellcozyme 81%. The most sensitive method for demonstrating anti-HIV antibody in saliva is to collect mixed saliva with the plain Salivette system and assay anti-HIV antibody levels by GACELISA.

  12. Latex bead immobilisation in PDMS matrix for the detection of p53 gene point mutation and anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Degiuli, Agnès; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-03-01

    Two diagnostic chemiluminescent biochips were developed for either the detection of p53 gene point mutation or the serological detection of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein. Both biochips were composed of 24 microarrays of latex beads spots (4x4) (150 microm in diameter, 800 microm spacing) entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMS). The latex beads, bearing oligonucleotide sequences or capsid protein, were spotted with a conventional piezoelectric spotter and subsequently transferred at the PDMS interface. The electron microscopy observation of the biochips showed how homogeneous and well distributed the spots could be. Point mutation detection on the codon 273 of the p53 gene was performed on the basis of the melting temperature difference between the perfect match sequence and the one base pair mismatch sequence. The hybridisation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide form the codon 273 including a one base pair mutation in its sequence on a biochip arrayed with non-muted and the muted complementary sequences, enabled a clear discrimination at 56 degrees C between muted and wild sequences. Moreover, the quantitative measurement of the amount of muted sequence in a sample was possible in the range 0.4-4 pmol. Serological measurement of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein on the biochip, prepared with 1-microm-diameter latex beads, enabled the detection of monoclonal antibodies in the range 1.55-775 ng mL(-1). Such a range could be lowered to 0.775 ng mL(-1) when using 50-nm-diameter beads, which generated a higher specific surface. The validation of the biochip for the detection of anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies was performed in human sera from seropositive and seronegative patients. The positivity of the sera was easily discriminated at serum dilutions below 1:1,000.

  13. Improved specificity of in vitro anti-HIV antibody production: implications for diagnosis and timing of transmission in infants born to HIV-seropositive mothers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X P; Paul, M; Tetali, S; Abrams, E; Bamji, M; Gulick, L; Chirmule, N; Oyaizu, N; Bakshi, S; Pahwa, S

    1994-06-01

    In vitro anti-HIV antibody production (IVAP), initially introduced as a method for diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants, has been limited in its application because of poor specificity and sensitivity early in life. The aims of this study were to improve the specificity of the IVAP assay and to evaluate its sensitivity in conjunction with assays of HIV culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and p24 antigen. To prevent false-positive reactions resulting from maternal serum-derived cytophilic anti-HIV IgG, additional preculture and washing steps for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were introduced that resulted in dramatic improvement in specificity of IVAP. The sensitivity of the revised IVAP at age < 3 months in 20 infected infants was, however, only 25%; of 15 infected infants initially negative in IVAP, 13 became positive at a mean estimated age of 4.4 +/- 1.8 months. When correlated with virological assays, a failure to respond in IVAP at age < 1 month was often associated with negative virological identification, whereas a positive IVAP response at age < 3 months was always associated with positive results in all virological assays. Moreover, conversion from negative IVAP to positive responses occurred subsequent to, and not concurrently with, a positive virological identification of infected infants. The revised IVAP methodology renders this assay potentially useful as an additional tool not only for the diagnosis of HIV infection, but for estimating timing of maternal-infant HIV transmission as well.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency with intrinsic factor antibodies in an infant with poor growth and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Kathleen; Chowdhury, Dhiman; Penney, Lynette; Rashid, Mohsin

    2014-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is very rare in infants and may lead to serious hematological and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The present article describes a case involving a seven-month-old boy with severe vitamin B12 deficiency, likely caused by juvenile pernicious anemia, an entity rarely described. The child presented with feeding intolerance, poor growth and developmental delay. He was noted to have macrocytic anemia, a markedly low serum vitamin B12 level, and elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels. Antibodies to intrinsic factor were positive. The mother was healthy, with normal vitamin B12 status. Therapy with vitamin B12 supplements led to excellent recovery of symptoms. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in children presenting with failure to thrive, especially when compounded with neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment is essential to avoid serious complications.

  15. Antibody Conjugation Approach Enhances Breadth and Potency of Neutralization of Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies and CD4-IgG

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilyuk, Julia; Ban, Hitoshi; Uehara, Hisatoshi; Sirk, Shannon J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen; Cuevas, Angelica; Zablowsky, Elise; Oza, Avinash; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 and PG16 effectively neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the neutralization abilities of PG9 and PG16 were further enhanced by bioconjugation with aplaviroc, a small-molecule inhibitor of virus entry into host cells. A novel air-stable diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent that allows for rapid, tyrosine-selective functionalization of proteins and antibodies under mild conditions was used to prepare a series of aplaviroc-conjugated antibodies, including b12, 2G12, PG9, PG16, and CD4-IgG. The conjugated antibodies blocked HIV-1 entry through two mechanisms: by binding to the virus itself and by blocking the CCR5 receptor on host cells. Chemical modification did not significantly alter the potency of the parent antibodies against nonresistant HIV-1 strains. Conjugation did not alter the pharmacokinetics of a model IgG in blood. The PG9-aplaviroc conjugate was tested against a panel of 117 HIV-1 strains and was found to neutralize 100% of the viruses. PG9-aplaviroc conjugate IC50s were lower than those of PG9 in neutralization studies of 36 of the 117 HIV-1 strains. These results support this new approach to bispecific antibodies and offer a potential new strategy for combining HIV-1 therapies. PMID:23427154

  16. Autoimmune anti-HIV-1gp120 antibody with antiidiotype-like activity in sera and immune complexes of HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmune antiidiotype-like antibody (Ab2) directed against anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) was found in high titer in the sera of 10 consecutive homosexual and 11 narcotic addict HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia (HIV-1-ITP) patients, was barely detectable in 10 nonthrombocytopenic HIV-1 sero-positive individuals, and was not detectable in 5 normal subjects by use of a solid-phase RIA. Reactivity of autologous Ab2 for Ab1 was 4-120-fold greater than Ab2 for homologous Ab1. Affinity-purified Ab2 did not block the binding of affinity-purified Ab1 to its HIV-1gp120 epitopes on immunoblot, indicating the absence of "internal image" antiidiotype. Both Ab1 and Ab2 are precipitable from sera with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and present in a macromolecular complex that is excluded by gel filtration on G200 and contains IgG, IgM, C3, and the anti-F(ab')2 antiidiotype-like complex. PEG-precipitable complexes bind to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner. Neither affinity-purified Ab1 nor Ab2 binds to platelets. However, the combination of Ab1 and Ab2 (preincubated for 2 h at 22 degrees C) binds to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner at an optimum ratio range of 10-20:1. Ab2 reactivity correlates with serum PEG-precipitable immune complex level (r = 0.91; P less than 0.001) and with thrombocytopenia (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001). We suggest that the anti-HIV-1gp120 antiidiotype-like complex contributes to the markedly elevated platelet Ig and C3 level of HIV-1-ITP patients and propose that this may contribute to their thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1737832

  17. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell. PMID:20463063

  18. Epitope mapping of ibalizumab, a humanized anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody with anti-HIV-1 activity in infected patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D

    2010-07-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell.

  19. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development.

  20. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life-cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1 infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb), suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection, but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that bNAbs can target CD4+ T cells infected with patient viruses and decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires FcγR engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:27199430

  1. Effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce serum antigastric parietal cell antibody titer in patients with oral mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-10-01

    Patients with serum antigastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity may have vitamin B12 deficiency and some oral symptoms. This study assessed the changes of serum GPCA titer in GPCA-positive patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment. Two hundred and ten GPCA-positive oral mucosal disease patients became oral symptom free (complete response) after 1.0-67.1 months of treatment with regular and continuous intramuscular injection of vitamin B12 once per week. The changes of serum GPCA titers after treatment were evaluated in these 210 patients. We found a significant drop of the GPCA positive rate from 100% to 42.9% in our 210 complete response patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment (p < 0.001). When 210 patients were further divided into seven subgroups according to the low to high serum GPCA titers, we noted that the higher serum GPCA titers decreased to significantly lower levels after treatment in all seven subgroups (all p < 0.001). However, serum GPCA titers increased to significantly higher levels in 46 GPCA-positive control patients receiving only oral administration of two vitamin BC capsules (containing 10 μg of vitamin B12) plus deficient hematinic supplements per day after a follow-up period of 2.7-27 months. A maintenance vitamin B12 treatment once a month could retain the GPCA-negative status in 87% of treated-to GPCA-negative patients compared with those (10%) without further maintenance vitamin B12 treatment. Regular and continuous effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce the relatively higher serum GPCA titers to significantly lower or undetectable levels in GPCA-positive patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P.; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S.; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S.; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L.; Redfield, Robert R.; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response. PMID:26347575

  3. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Comparison of clinical and electrodiagnostic features in B12 deficiency neurological syndromes with and without antiparietal cell antibodies.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J

    2007-02-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the clinical and electrodiagnostic (Edx) features in autoimmune and nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency neurological syndromes. Consecutive patients with vitamin B12 deficiency neurological syndromes were evaluated and blood counts, red blood cell indices, serum chemistry, thyroid function, HIV serology, antiparietal cell antibody (APCA), serum B12, bone marrow and spinal MRI assessed. EDx studies included nerve conduction, tibial somatosensory (SEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) to the tibialis anterior, and visual evoked potential (VEP). The results were compared between APCA positive and negative groups. 57 patients aged 17-80 years (mean 45.3) were studied; 48 were vegetarians. The presenting clinical syndromes were myeloneuropathy in 25, myelopathy in 14, myeloneuroencephalopathy in 13, myeloencephalopathy in four and behavioural abnormality only in one patient. Spinal MRI in 47 patients revealed posterior spinal cord hyperintensity in 21 and cord atrophy in six. Nerve conduction was abnormal in 15%, MEP in 56.6%, SEP in 87.3% and VEP in 63.6% of patients. At 3 months, 31 patients had complete, 11 partial and three poor recovery. APCA was positive in 49% of patients. There was no difference in clinical, MRI or Edx findings or outcome between the APCA positive and negative groups. APCA was positive in 49% of patients with B12 deficiency neurological syndrome but their clinical, MRI and Edx changes were not different from the APCA negative group. Neurological manifestations may be caused by B12 deficiency itself rather than the underlying cause.

  5. First Phase I human clinical trial of a killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine: demonstration of its safety and enhancement of anti-HIV antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsil; Michalski, Chad J; Choo, Seung Ho; Kim, Gyoung Nyoun; Banasikowska, Elizabeth; Lee, Sangkyun; Wu, Kunyu; An, Hwa-Yong; Mills, Anthony; Schneider, Stefan; Bredeek, U Fritz; Coulston, Daniel R; Ding, Shilei; Finzi, Andrés; Tian, Meijuan; Klein, Katja; Arts, Eric J; Mann, Jamie F S; Gao, Yong; Kang, C Yong

    2016-11-28

    Vaccination with inactivated (killed) whole-virus particles has been used to prevent a wide range of viral diseases. However, for an HIV vaccine this approach has been largely negated due to inherent safety concerns, despite the ability of killed whole-virus vaccines to generate a strong, predominantly antibody-mediated immune response in vivo. HIV-1 Clade B NL4-3 was genetically modified by deleting the nef and vpu genes and substituting the coding sequence for the Env signal peptide with that of honeybee melittin signal peptide to produce a less virulent and more replication efficient virus. This genetically modified virus (gmHIV-1NL4-3) was inactivated and formulated as a killed whole-HIV vaccine, and then used for a Phase I human clinical trial (Trial Registration: Clinical Trials NCT01546818). The gmHIV-1NL4-3 was propagated in the A3.01 human T cell line followed by virus purification and inactivation with aldrithiol-2 and γ-irradiation. Thirty-three HIV-1 positive volunteers receiving cART were recruited for this observer-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity. Genetically modified and killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine, SAV001, was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. HIV-1NL4-3-specific PCR showed neither evidence of vaccine virus replication in the vaccine virus-infected human T lymphocytes in vitro nor in the participating volunteers receiving SAV001 vaccine. Furthermore, SAV001 with adjuvant significantly increased the pre-existing antibody response to HIV-1 proteins. Antibodies in the plasma of vaccinees were also found to recognize HIV-1 envelope protein on the surface of infected cells as well as showing an enhancement of broadly neutralizing antibodies inhibiting tier I and II of HIV-1 B, D, and A subtypes. The killed whole-HIV vaccine, SAV001, is safe and triggers anti-HIV immune responses. It remains to be determined through an appropriate trial whether this immune response prevents HIV

  6. Characterization of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing and binding antibodies in chronic HIV-1 subtype C infection

    PubMed Central

    Archary, Derseree; Rong, Rong; Gordon, Michelle L; Boliar, Saikat; Madiga, Maphuti; Gray, Elin S; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Hermanus, Tandile; Goulder, Philip JR; Coovadia, Hoosen M; Werner, Lise; Morris, Lynn; Alter, Galit; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing (nAbs) and high affinity binding antibodies may be critical for an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. We characterized virus-specific nAbs and binding antibody responses over 21 months in eight HIV-1 subtype C chronically infected individuals with heterogeneous rates of disease progression. Autologous nAb titers at study exit were significantly higher compared to contemporaneous responses at study entry (p=0.002) and exit (p=0.01). NAb IC50 titers correlated inversely with V1-V2 length (p=0.04). Significant differences in breadth and potencies were noted against subtype C compared to subtype A (p= 0.03 and p=0.01) or subtype B (p= 0.03; p=0.05) viruses respectively. IgG binding affinity for gp41 was higher than for gp120 (p=0.0002). IgG-FcγR1 affinity was significantly higher than FcγRIIIa (p<0.005) at study entry and FcγRIIb (p<0.05) or FcγRIIIa (p<0.005) at study exit. Evolving IgG binding suggests alteration of immune function mediated by binding antibodies. Evolution of nAbs was a potential marker of HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:22995189

  7. Broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies disrupt a hinge-related function of gp41 at the membrane interface

    PubMed Central

    Song, Likai; Sun, Zhen-Yu J.; Coleman, Kate E.; Zwick, Michael B.; Gach, Johannes S.; Wang, Jia-huai; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Wagner, Gerhard; Kim, Mikyung

    2009-01-01

    A vaccine capable of stimulating protective antiviral antibody responses is needed to curtail the global AIDS epidemic caused by HIV-1. Although rarely elicited during the course of natural infection or upon conventional vaccination, the membrane-proximal ectodomain region (MPER) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein of Mr 41,000 (gp41) envelope protein subunit is the target of 3 such human broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs): 4E10, 2F5, and Z13e1. How these BNAbs bind to their lipid-embedded epitopes and mediate antiviral activity is unclear, but such information might offer important insight into a worldwide health imperative. Here, EPR and NMR techniques were used to define the manner in which these BNAbs differentially recognize viral membrane-encrypted residues configured within the L-shaped helix–hinge–helix MPER segment. Two distinct modes of antibody-mediated interference of viral infection were identified. 2F5, like 4E10, induces large conformational changes in the MPER relative to the membrane. However, although 4E10 straddles the hinge and extracts residues W672 and F673, 2F5 lifts up residues N-terminal to the hinge region, exposing L669 and W670. In contrast, Z13e1 effects little change in membrane orientation or conformation, but rather immobilizes the MPER hinge through extensive rigidifying surface contacts. Thus, BNAbs disrupt HIV-1 MPER fusogenic functions critical for virus entry into human CD4 T cells and macrophages either by preventing hinge motion or by perturbing MPER orientation. HIV-1 MPER features important for targeted vaccine design have been revealed, the implications of which extend to BNAb targets on other viral fusion proteins. PMID:19458040

  8. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  9. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  10. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120-b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Grant, Oliver C; Ito, Keigo; Wallace, Aaron; Wang, Shixia; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance; Lu, Shan; Woods, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2017-02-21

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120-bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120-b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb.

  11. [Sensitivity of screening kits for anti-HIV antibodies. 1999 update. Retrovirus Working Group of the French Society for Blood Transfusion].

    PubMed

    Couroucé, A M

    1999-12-01

    A comparative evaluation of the sensitivity of anti-HIV screening assays has been recently performed with a selected panel of 65 samples which included HIV1 group M (per-seroconversions, seroconversions and seropositives infected with genotypes A, B, C, D, E), HIV1 group O and HIV2. The results obtained with the 21 ELISA HIV1 + HIV2 screening assays are presented. Among these 21 assays, four are combined anti-HIV and p24 Ag assays. All the assays except four fulfilled the criteria defined at the beginning of the study, i.e., positive results on all the seropositives including seroconversions and positive results on at least 50% of the per-seroconversions. The main differences were observed with the ten per-seroconversion samples, the number of positive results on such samples varying from three to ten. The constant improvement of anti-HIV screening tests which leads one to shorten the 'window' period permits and earlier diagnosis of HIV infection and a progressive decrease of the transfusional risk.

  12. Assembling different antennas of the gp120 high mannose-type glycans on gold nanoparticles provides superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 than the individual antennas.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2015-03-20

    In order to re-build Man9GlcNAc2 clusters of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein, ∼2 nm gold glyconanoparticles (GNPs) were coated with the synthetic partial structures of Man9, the tetramannoside Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3Manα1- and the pentamannoside Manα1-2Manα1-3[Manα1-2Manα1-6]Manα1-. Their interactions with the anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors and saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR spectroscopy. A synergistic effect of the tetra- and pentamannosides multimerized on a same GNP was observed. The assembly of these antennas of the gp120 high-mannose type glycan on GNPs provided superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 with respect to GNPs carrying only the individual oligomannosides. The results presented in this work provide new molecular information on the interactions between clusters of oligomannosides and 2G12 that could help in the design of a carbohydrate-based vaccine against HIV.

  13. Polysaccharide mimicry of the epitope of the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody, 2G12, induces enhanced antibody responses to self oligomannose glycans

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, D Cameron; Bonomelli, Camille; Mansab, Fatma; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Doores, Katie J; Wormald, Mark R; Palma, Angelina S; Feizi, Ten; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2010-01-01

    Immunologically, “self” carbohydrates protect the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120, from antibody recognition. However, one broadly neutralizing antibody, 2G12, neutralizes primary viral isolates by direct recognition of Manα1→2Man motifs formed by the host-derived oligomannose glycans of the viral envelope. Immunogens, capable of eliciting antibodies of similar specificity to 2G12, are therefore candidates for HIV/AIDS vaccine development. In this context, it is known that the yeast mannan polysaccharides exhibit significant antigenic mimicry with the glycans of HIV-1. Here, we report that modulation of yeast polysaccharide biosynthesis directly controls the molecular specificity of cross-reactive antibodies to self oligomannose glycans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannans are typically terminated by α1→3-linked mannoses that cap a Manα1→2Man motif that otherwise closely resembles the part of the oligomannose epitope recognized by 2G12. Immunization with S. cerevisiae deficient for the α1→3 mannosyltransferase gene (ΔMnn1), but not with wild-type S. cerevisiae, reproducibly elicited antibodies to the self oligomannose glycans. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of ΔMnn1 immune sera revealed fine carbohydrate specificity to Manα1→2Man units, closely matching that of 2G12. These specificities were further corroborated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with chemically defined glycoforms of gp120. These antibodies exhibited remarkable similarity in the carbohydrate specificity to 2G12 and displayed statistically significant, albeit extremely weak, neutralization of HIV-1 compared to control immune sera. These data confirm the Manα1→2Man motif as the primary carbohydrate neutralization determinant of HIV-1 and show that the genetic modulation of microbial polysaccharides is a route towards immunogens capable of eliciting antibody responses to the glycans of HIV-1. PMID:20181792

  14. Spontaneous secretion of immunoglobulins and anti-HIV-1 antibodies by in vivo activated B lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected subjects: monocyte and natural killer cell requirement for in vitro terminal differentiation into plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anne Marie; Fondere, Jean-Michel; Alix-Panabieres, Catherine; Merle, Corinne; Baillat, Vincent; Huguet, Marie-France; Taïb, Jacques; Ohayon, Viviane; Zembala, Marek; Reynes, Jacques; Vendrell, Jean Pierre

    2002-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1-infected subjects secrete spontaneously in vitro immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies (Ab). Purified B lymphocytes secrete only minute amounts of Ig and anti-HIV-1 Ab compared with unfractionated cells. Monocytes and natural killer cells enhanced both secretions by cell-to-cell contacts, involving adhesion and CD27, CD80 costimulatory molecules and IL-6. Cell interactions prolonged the survival and allowed the terminal maturation of in vivo activated B cells. The secreting cell precursors were highly differentiated B cells expressing a broad diversity of maturation markers (CD27(+), CD38(+), CD20(+/-), CD37(+/-), CD71(+/-), HLA-DQ(+/-), sIg(+/-)) but not sIgD, CD28, or CD40. This phenotype and the cytologic aspect of purified B cells suggest that these cells are early plasma cells originated from germinal center. Ex vivo secreting peripheral B cells had probably gone beyond the CD40/CD40 ligand interaction; then following CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD27 ligand (CD70) interactions in the presence of IL-6, they achieved in vitro their differentiation into plasma cells.

  15. Mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to monoclonal antibody B12 that effectively targets the site of CD4 attachment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; O'Dell, Sijy; Wyatt, Richard T; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R

    2009-11-01

    The region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 that engages its primary cellular receptor CD4 forms a site of vulnerability to neutralizing antibodies. The monoclonal antibody b12 exploits the conservation and accessibility of the CD4-binding site to neutralize many, though not all, HIV-1 isolates. To understand the basis of viral resistance to b12, we used the atomic-level definition of b12-gp120 contact sites to study a panel of diverse circulating viruses. A combination of sequence analysis, computational modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the influence of amino acid variants on binding and neutralization by b12. We found that several substitutions within the dominant b12 contact surface, called the CD4-binding loop, mediated b12 resistance, and that these substitutions resided just proximal to the known CD4 contact surface. Hence, viruses varied in key b12 contact residues that are proximal to, but not part of, the CD4 contact surface. This explained how viral isolates were able to evade b12 neutralization while maintaining functional binding to CD4. In addition, some viruses were resistant to b12 despite minimal sequence variation at b12 contact sites. Such neutralization resistance usually could be reversed by alterations at residues thought to influence the quaternary configuration of the viral envelope spike. To design immunogens that elicit neutralizing antibodies directed to the CD4-binding site, researchers need to address the antigenic variation within this region of gp120 and the restricted access to the CD4-binding site imposed by the native configuration of the trimeric viral envelope spike.

  16. Anti-V3/Glycan and Anti-MPER Neutralizing Antibodies, but Not Anti-V2/Glycan Site Antibodies, Are Strongly Associated with Greater Anti-HIV-1 Neutralization Breadth and Potency

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rajesh Abraham; Moyo, Thandeka; Schomaker, Michael; Abrahams, Fatima; Grau Pujol, Berta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The membrane-proximal external region (MPER), the V2/glycan site (initially defined by PG9 and PG16 antibodies), and the V3/glycans (initially defined by PGT121–128 antibodies) are targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies and potential targets for anti-HIV-1 antibody-based vaccines. Recent evidence shows that antibodies with moderate neutralization breadth are frequently attainable, with 50% of sera from chronically infected individuals neutralizing ≥50% of a large, diverse set of viruses. Nonetheless, there is little systematic information addressing which specificities are preferentially targeted among such commonly found, moderately broadly neutralizing sera. We explored associations between neutralization breadth and potency and the presence of neutralizing antibodies targeting the MPER, V2/glycan site, and V3/glycans in sera from 177 antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected (>1 year) individuals. Recognition of both MPER and V3/glycans was associated with increased breadth and potency. MPER-recognizing sera neutralized 4.62 more panel viruses than MPER-negative sera (95% prediction interval [95% PI], 4.41 to 5.20), and V3/glycan-recognizing sera neutralized 3.24 more panel viruses than V3/glycan-negative sera (95% PI, 3.15 to 3.52). In contrast, V2/glycan site-recognizing sera neutralized only 0.38 more panel viruses (95% PI, 0.20 to 0.45) than V2/glycan site-negative sera and no association between V2/glycan site recognition and breadth or potency was observed. Despite autoreactivity of many neutralizing antibodies recognizing MPER and V3/glycans, antibodies to these sites are major contributors to neutralization breadth and potency in this cohort. It may therefore be appropriate to focus on developing immunogens based upon the MPER and V3/glycans. IMPORTANCE Previous candidate HIV vaccines have failed either to induce wide-coverage neutralizing antibodies or to substantially protect vaccinees. Therefore, current efforts focus on novel approaches

  17. Anti-V3/Glycan and Anti-MPER Neutralizing Antibodies, but Not Anti-V2/Glycan Site Antibodies, Are Strongly Associated with Greater Anti-HIV-1 Neutralization Breadth and Potency.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Rajesh Abraham; Moyo, Thandeka; Schomaker, Michael; Abrahams, Fatima; Grau Pujol, Berta; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2015-05-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER), the V2/glycan site (initially defined by PG9 and PG16 antibodies), and the V3/glycans (initially defined by PGT121-128 antibodies) are targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies and potential targets for anti-HIV-1 antibody-based vaccines. Recent evidence shows that antibodies with moderate neutralization breadth are frequently attainable, with 50% of sera from chronically infected individuals neutralizing ≥ 50% of a large, diverse set of viruses. Nonetheless, there is little systematic information addressing which specificities are preferentially targeted among such commonly found, moderately broadly neutralizing sera. We explored associations between neutralization breadth and potency and the presence of neutralizing antibodies targeting the MPER, V2/glycan site, and V3/glycans in sera from 177 antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected (>1 year) individuals. Recognition of both MPER and V3/glycans was associated with increased breadth and potency. MPER-recognizing sera neutralized 4.62 more panel viruses than MPER-negative sera (95% prediction interval [95% PI], 4.41 to 5.20), and V3/glycan-recognizing sera neutralized 3.24 more panel viruses than V3/glycan-negative sera (95% PI, 3.15 to 3.52). In contrast, V2/glycan site-recognizing sera neutralized only 0.38 more panel viruses (95% PI, 0.20 to 0.45) than V2/glycan site-negative sera and no association between V2/glycan site recognition and breadth or potency was observed. Despite autoreactivity of many neutralizing antibodies recognizing MPER and V3/glycans, antibodies to these sites are major contributors to neutralization breadth and potency in this cohort. It may therefore be appropriate to focus on developing immunogens based upon the MPER and V3/glycans. Previous candidate HIV vaccines have failed either to induce wide-coverage neutralizing antibodies or to substantially protect vaccinees. Therefore, current efforts focus on novel approaches never before

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Robert; Brown, David L

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is typically based on measurement of serum vitamin B12 levels; however, about 50 percent of patients with subclinical disease have normal B12 levels. A more sensitive method of screening for vitamin B12 deficiency is measurement of serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels, which are increased early in vitamin B12 deficiency. Use of the Schilling test for detection of pernicious anemia has been supplanted for the most part by serologic testing for parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies. Contrary to prevailing medical practice, studies show that supplementation with oral vitamin B12 is a safe and effective treatment for the B12 deficiency state. Even when intrinsic factor is not present to aid in the absorption of vitamin B12 (pernicious anemia) or in other diseases that affect the usual absorption sites in the terminal ileum, oral therapy remains effective.

  19. Evaluation of serum vitamin B12 levels and its correlation with anti-thyroperoxidase antibody in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaya Kumari, S; Bantwal, Ganapathy; Devanath, Anitha; Aiyyar, Vageesh; Patil, Madhuri

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported in patients with Autoimmune thyroid disorders. However there is limited data on exact prevalence of low B12 and its correlation with anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO) levels in these patients. The aim of our study was to estimate serum vitamin B12 levels in autoimmune thyroid disorders and to correlate B12 levels with anti-TPO. 350 patients were selected by convenient sampling. Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid parameters were estimated using fully automated chemiluminescence method on Access 2. Results of our study shows that using the manufacturer's cut-off of 145 pg/mL, the prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 was found to be 45.50 %. Higher prevalence (55 %) was seen based on the published cut-off of 200 pg/mL The study however did not demonstrate any significant correlation between vitamin B12 levels and anti-TPO (r = -0.11 and p value of 0.30).

  20. Studies on a radioassay for intrinsic factor antibody: comparison of methods and false positive results due to elevated serum B12 levels.

    PubMed

    Muckerheide, M M; Wolfman, J A; Rohde, D A; McManamy, G E

    1984-09-01

    Availability of a kit method (Corning Immo Phase IFAB) for intrinsic factor antibody (IFAB) has made it possible for a routine radioimmunoassay (RIA) laboratory to test for the antibody, thereby providing another aid in diagnosing pernicious anemia. Comparison of data from a charcoal method with the kit method was favorable, each method detecting 35 (74%) positives and 12 (26%) negatives of 47 pernicious anemia patients. Compared with a charcoal method study the kit method had fewer false positives due to elevated serum B12. False positive results occurred for only 24 hours after a 1-mg injection of B12, and results remained negative the following seven days. The authors' studies supported the manufacturer's statement that results are unreliable when the serum B12 level exceeds 3,500 pg/ml. Clinical experience with the Corning Immo Phase IFAB test and false positive results is summarized.

  1. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  2. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  3. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120–b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120–bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120–b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb. PMID:28102671

  4. Significant association of deficiency of hemoglobin, iron and vitamin B12, high homocysteine level, and gastric parietal cell antibody positivity with atrophic glossitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Lin, Hung-Pin; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2012-07-01

    Atrophic glossitis (AG) is considered to be a marker of nutritional deficiency. In this study, we evaluated whether there was an intimate association of the deficiency of hemoglobin, iron, vitamin B12 or folic acid, high blood homocysteine level, and serum gastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity with AG. The blood hemoglobin, iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine concentrations and the serum GPCA level in 176 AG patients were measured and compared with the corresponding levels in 176 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. We found that 39 (22.2%), 47 (26.7%), 13 (7.4%), and 3 (1.7%) AG patients had deficiencies of Hb (men < 13 g/dl, women < 12 g/dl), iron (<60 μg/dl), vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml), and folic acid (<4 ng/ml), respectively. Moreover, 38 (21.6%) AG patients had abnormally high blood homocysteine level, and 47 (26.7%) AG patients had serum GPCA positivity. AG patients had a significantly higher frequency of Hb, iron, or vitamin B12 deficiency, of abnormally elevated blood homocysteine level, or of serum GPCA positivity than healthy control subjects (all P-values = 0.000). However, no significant difference in frequency of folic acid deficiency was found between AG patients and healthy control subjects. We conclude that there is a significant association of deficiency of hemoglobin, iron and vitamin B12, abnormally high blood homocysteine level, and serum GPCA positivity with AG. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Phenotypical and functional profiles of natural killer cells exhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-mediated CD16 cleavage after anti-HIV antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tang, C-C; Isitman, G; Bruneau, J; Tremblay, C; Bernard, N F; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been linked to protection from HIV infection and slower progression towards AIDS. However, antibody-dependent activation of NK cells results in phenotypical alterations similar to those observed on NK cells from individuals with progressive HIV infection. Activation of NK cells induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated cleavage of cell surface CD16. In the present study we assessed the phenotype and functional profile of NK cells exhibiting post-activation MMP-mediated CD16 cleavage. We found that NK cells achieving the highest levels of activation during stimulation exhibit the most profound decreases in CD16 expression. Further, we observed that educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cells from human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Bw4-carrying donors exhibit larger decreases in CD16 expression post-activation than the KIR3DL1(-) NK cell subset containing cells educated via other inhibitory receptor/ligand combinations and non-educated NK cells. Lastly, we assessed the ex-vivo expression of CD16 on educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cells and the KIR3DL1(-) NK cell subset from HLA-Bw4-carrying HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected donors. Suggestive of in-vivo activation of KIR3DL1(+) NK cells during HIV infection, CD16 expression was higher on KIR3DL1(+) than KIR3DL1(-) NK cells in uninfected donors but similar on both subsets in HIV-infected donors. These results are discussed in the context of how they may assist with understanding HIV disease progression and the design of immunotherapies that utilize antibody-dependent NK cell responses.

  6. Vitamin B-12

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness Food and Nutrition Nutrients and Nutritional Info Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 Food and NutritionNutrients and Nutritional InfoPrevention and Wellness Share Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is an important nutrient for ...

  7. MABGEL 1: First Phase 1 Trial of the Anti-HIV-1 Monoclonal Antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 as a Vaginal Microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Georgina C.; Wiggins, Rebecca C.; Woodhall, Sarah C.; Bland, J. Martin; Taylor, Carol R.; Jespers, Vicky; Vcelar, Brigitta A.; Lacey, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which potently neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates are potential microbicide candidates. To date, topical application of mAbs in humans and their stability in vaginal secretions has not been studied. Objectives To assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of the mAbs 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 when applied vaginally in women. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial. Methods Twenty-eight healthy, sexually abstinent women administered 2.5 g of gel daily for 12 days containing either 10 or 20 mg/g of each mAb (MABGEL) or placebo. Main clinical evaluations and sampling occurred at baseline, 1, 8, and 24 hours post-1st dose and 12 and 36 hours post-12th dose. Results After adjustment for dilution factors, median levels of 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 in vaginal secretions at 1 hour post high-dose MABGEL were 7.74, 5.28 and 7.48 mg/ml respectively. Levels of 2F5 and 4E10 declined exponentially thereafter with similar estimated half-lives (4.6 and 4.3 hours). In contrast, 2G12 levels declined more rapidly in the first 8 hours, with an estimated half-life of 1.4 hours during this period. There was no evidence of systemic absorption. There were no significant differences in local or systemic adverse event rates or vaginal flora changes (by qPCR) between active and placebo gel arms. Whilst at least 1 adverse event was recorded in 96% of participants, 95% were mild and none were serious. Conclusions Vaginal application of 50 mg of each mAb daily was safe over a 12 day period. Median mAb concentrations detected at 8 hours post dose were potentially sufficient to block HIV transmission.2G12 exhibited more rapid elimination from the human vagina than 4E10 and 2F5, likely due to poor stability of 2G12 in acidic human vaginal secretions. Further research is needed to develop mAb-based vaginal microbicides and delivery systems. Trial Registration ISRCTN 64808733 UK CRN Portfolio 6470 PMID:25546420

  8. Naturally derived anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Asres, Kaleab; Seyoum, Ameha; Veeresham, Ciddi; Bucar, Franz; Gibbons, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The urgent need for new anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is a global concern. In addition to obvious economical and commercial hurdles, HIV/AIDS patients are faced with multifarious difficulties associated with the currently approved anti-HIV drugs. Adverse effects, the emergence of drug resistance and the narrow spectrum of activity have limited the therapeutic usefulness of the various reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors that are currently available on the market. This has driven many scientists to look for new anti-retrovirals with better efficacy, safety and affordability. As has always been the case in the search for cures, natural sources offer great promise. Several natural products, mostly of plant origin have been shown to possess promising activities that could assist in the prevention and/or amelioration of the disease. Many of these anti-HIV agents have other medicinal values as well, which afford them further prospective as novel leads for the development of new drugs that can deal with both the virus and the various disorders that characterize HIV/AIDS. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HIV natural products. In the review anti-HIV agents have been classified according to their chemical classes rather than their target in the HIV replicative cycle, which is the most frequently encountered approach. Perusal of the literature revealed that most of these promising naturally derived anti-HIV compounds are flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polysaccharides or proteins. It is our strong conviction that the results and experiences with many of the anti-HIV natural products will inspire and motivate even more researchers to look for new leads from plants and other natural sources.

  9. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jianhui; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Qingqing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12 (b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4bs epitopes.

  10. Rationally designed multitarget anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhan, P; Liu, X

    2013-01-01

    Multitarget-directed ligands (MTDLs), an emerging and appealing drug discovery strategy, utilizing a single chemical entity to inhibit multitargets, was confirmed to be effective in reducing the likelihood of drug resistance, diminishing problems of dosing complexity, drug-drug interactions and toxicities, as well as improving patient compliance. The exploration of MTDL strategy should be valuable in anti-HIV drug discovery. In this article, current knowledge and strategies for the rational design of the multitarget and selective anti-HIV agents are described and a number of illustrative examples are given. Moreover, the challenges, limitations and outlook of such novel drug design strategies are also presented, with a goal to highlight the representative paradigms in the rational design of MTDLs, and to help medicinal chemists discover the next generation of multitarget anti-HIV agents.

  11. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Brito, Alex; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Miller, Joshua W; Molloy, Anne M; Nexo, Ebba; Stabler, Sally; Toh, Ban-Hock; Ueland, Per Magne; Yajnik, Chittaranjan

    2017-06-29

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism causes an intracellular deficiency. Diagnostic biomarkers for B12 status include decreased levels of circulating total B12 and transcobalamin-bound B12, and abnormally increased levels of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid. However, the exact cut-offs to classify clinical and subclinical deficiency remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes and manifestations of B12 deficiency.

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  14. B cells from knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody b12 carry an innocuous B cell receptor responsive to HIV vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B; Doores, Katherine J; Aoki-Ota, Miyo; Le, Khoa; Schief, William R; Wyatt, Richard T; Burton, Dennis R; Nemazee, David

    2013-09-15

    Broadly neutralizing Abs against HIV protect from infection, but their routine elicitation by vaccination has not been achieved. To generate small animal models to test vaccine candidates, we have generated targeted transgenic ("knock-in") mice expressing, in the physiological Ig H and L chain loci, two well-studied broadly neutralizing Abs: 4E10, which interacts with the membrane proximal external region of gp41, and b12, which binds to the CD4 binding site on gp120. 4E10HL mice are described in the companion article (Doyle-Cooper et al., J. Immunol. 191: 3186-3191). In this article, we describe b12 mice. B cells in b12HL mice, in contrast to the case in 4E10 mice, were abundant and essentially monoclonal, retaining the b12 specificity. In cell culture, b12HL B cells responded avidly to HIV envelope gp140 trimers and to BCR ligands. Upon transfer to wild-type recipients, b12HL B cells responded robustly to vaccination with gp140 trimers. Vaccinated b12H mice, although generating abundant precursors and Abs with affinity for Env, were unable to rapidly generate neutralizing Abs, highlighting the importance of developing Ag forms that better focus responses to neutralizing epitopes. The b12HL and b12H mice should be useful in optimizing HIV vaccine candidates to elicit a neutralizing response while avoiding nonprotective specificities.

  15. Vitamin B-12

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin B-12 is a cofactor for 2 enzymes. In the cytoplasm, methionine synthase requires vitamin B-12 in the form of methylcobalamin and catalyzes the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate.This enzyme links the methylation pathway through ...

  16. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Infectivity and Epithelial Cell Transfer by Human Monoclonal IgG and IgA Antibodies Carrying the b12 V Region1

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, Nicholas J.; Palaia, Jana; Hessell, Ann J.; Mehta, Simren; Zhu, Zhiyi; Corthésy, Blaise; Neutra, Marian R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    Both IgG and secretory IgA Abs in mucosal secretions have been implicated in blocking the earliest events in HIV-1 transit across epithelial barriers, although the mechanisms by which this occurs remain largely unknown. In this study, we report the production and characterization of a human rIgA2 mAb that carries the V regions of IgG1 b12, a potent and broadly neutralizing anti-gp120 Ab which has been shown to protect macaques against vaginal simian/HIV challenge. Monomeric, dimeric, polymeric, and secretory IgA2 derivatives of b12 reacted with gp120 and neutralized CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic strains of HIV-1 in vitro. With respect to the protective effects of these Abs at mucosal surfaces, we demonstrated that IgG1 b12 and IgA2 b12 inhibited the transfer of cell-free HIV-1 from ME-180 cells, a human cervical epithelial cell line, as well as Caco-2 cells, a human colonic epithelial cell line, to human PBMCs. Inhibition of viral transfer was due to the ability of b12 to block both viral attachment to and uptake by epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that IgG and IgA MAbs directed against a highly conserved epitope on gp120 can interfere with the earliest steps in HIV-1 transmission across mucosal surfaces, and reveal a possible mechanism by which b12 protects the vaginal mucosal against viral challenge in vivo. PMID:17709529

  18. Vitamin B12

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken along with other B vitamins, such as niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and magnesium. A prescription form ... and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, ...

  19. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... done include: Complete blood count ( CBC ) Reticulocyte count Lactate dehydrogenase ( LDH ) level Vitamin B12 level Methylmalonic acid ( ... Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  20. Evaluation of needle exchange in central London: behaviour change and anti-HIV status over one year.

    PubMed

    Hart, G J; Carvell, A L; Woodward, N; Johnson, A M; Williams, P; Parry, J V

    1989-05-01

    From November 1987 to October 1988, numbers of clients, visits made and syringes dispensed and returned were monitored at the needle exchange of the Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. A sample of clients were interviewed 1 month after entry to the scheme and again 3 months later to evaluate changes in injecting and sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection. Clients were asked to donate saliva for anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody capture radioimmunoassay (GACRIA). The rate of lending and borrowing used injecting equipment fell, both compared with rates prior to entry to the scheme and during the period of study. Frequency of injecting did not increase and there was reduced incidence of abscesses. There was a highly significant correlation between multiple sexual partners and condom use and a reduction in the proportion of clients with multiple partners. On entry to the study, seven out of 121 (6%) clients were anti-HIV positive; after 3 months, a further two clients tested were found to be anti-HIV positive. Anti-HIV positivity prevalence for the year of study was nine out of 121 (7%). The scheme attracts clients, reduces injecting-related risk for HIV infection and has high equipment return rates. Saliva testing is acceptable to clients. Continued monitoring of anti-HIV in saliva is indicated.

  1. Molecular Features of the Broadly Neutralizing Immunoglobulin G1 b12 Required for Recognition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Saphire, Erica O.; Church, Sarah; Wang, Meng; Scott, Jamie K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    IgG1 b12 is a broadly neutralizing antibody against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The epitope recognized by b12 overlaps the CD4 receptor-binding site (CD4bs) on gp120 and has been a target for vaccine design. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) b12 allowed modeling of the b12-gp120 interaction in which the protruding third complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the heavy chain (H3) was crucial for antibody binding. In the present study, extensive mutational analysis of the antigen-binding site of Fab b12 was carried out to investigate the validity of the model and to identify residues important for gp120 recognition and, by inference, key to the anti-HIV-1 activity of IgG1 b12. In all, 50 mutations were tested: 40 in H3, 4 each in H2 and L1, and 2 in L3. The results suggest that the interaction of gp120 with H3 of b12 is crucially dependent not only on a Trp residue at the apex of the H3 loop but also on a number of residues at the base of the loop. The arrangement of these residues, including aromatic side chains and side chains that hydrogen bond across the base of the loop, may rigidify H3 for penetration of the recessed CD4-binding cavity. The results further emphasize the importance to gp120 binding of a Tyr residue at the apex of the H2 loop that forms a second finger-like structure and a number of Arg residues in L1 that form a positively charged, shelf-like structure. In general, the data are consistent with the b12-gp120 interaction model previously proposed. At the gene level, somatic mutation is seen to be crucial for the generation of many of the structural features described. The Fab b12 mutants were also tested against the b12 epitope-mimic peptide B2.1, and the reactivity profile had many similarities but also significant differences from that observed for gp120. The paratope map of b12 may facilitate the design of molecules that are able to elicit b12-like activities. PMID:12719580

  2. Anti-HIV activity of Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sabde, Sudeep; Bodiwala, Hardik S; Karmase, Aniket; Deshpande, Preeti J; Kaur, Amandeep; Ahmed, Nafees; Chauthe, Siddheshwar K; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G; Phadke, Rasika U; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients face great socio-economic difficulties in obtaining treatment. There is an urgent need for new, safe, and cheap anti-HIV agents. Traditional medicinal plants are a valuable source of novel anti-HIV agents and may offer alternatives to expensive medicines in future. Various medicinal plants or plant-derived natural products have shown strong anti-HIV activity and are under various stages of clinical development in different parts of the world. The present study was directed towards assessment of anti-HIV activity of various extracts prepared from Indian medicinal plants. The plants were chosen on the basis of similarity of chemical constituents with reported anti-HIV compounds or on the basis of their traditional usage as immunomodulators. Different extracts were prepared by Soxhlet extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning. Ninety-two extracts were prepared from 23 plants. Anti-HIV activity was measured in a human CD4+ T-cell line, CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Nine extracts of 8 different plants significantly reduced viral production in CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Aegle marmelos, Argemone mexicana, Asparagus racemosus, Coleus forskohlii, and Rubia cordifolia demonstrated promising anti-HIV potential and were investigated for their active principles.

  3. Anti-HIV activity of some synthetic lignanolides and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Rocío; Medarde, Manuel; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Madrigal, Blanca M; Alcamí, José; Muñoz, Eduardo; San Feliciano, Arturo

    2004-09-06

    The evaluation of the anti-HIV-1 activity of synthetic lignanolides and their intermediates is reported. The antiviral activity was studied through luciferase-based assays targeting the HIV-1 promoter activation induced by either, the HIV-1 Tat protein or the cellular transcription factor NF-kappaB, both known as crucial factors in HIV-1 replication. Among the compounds tested, three of them 2, 4 and 13 were further analysed for their anti-HIV-1 activity by recombinant virus assays, showing a suitable profile for development of novel anti-HIV-1 drugs.

  4. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nalla, Arun K.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV. PMID:28536375

  5. False negative results in anti-HIV ELISA due to insufficient antigen coating of microtitre plates.

    PubMed

    Rosenkvist, J; Dybkjaer, E

    1990-10-01

    Since routine ELISA screening of blood donors for anti-HIV antibodies was introduced, much attention has been given to the specificity and the sensitivity of this assay. Most papers deal with false positive reactions while only a few have taken account of false negative results. We have found that insufficient HIV-antigen coating of the microtitre plates can lead to false negative results. It is essential that the producers of the ELISA test kits use control systems which guarantee sufficient antigen coating.

  6. Selective vitamin B12 malabsorption in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Khakee, Sam; Stachewitsch, Andrew; Katz, Max

    1974-01-01

    Two siblings with megaloblastic anemia responsive to parenteral vitamin B12 were studied to elucidate the cause of the B12 deficiency. Gastric juice from both contained acid and functional intrinsic factor. Serum contained transcobalamin II and lacked antibodies to intrinsic factor. Schilling tests showed vitamin B12 malabsorption uncorrected by hog intrinsic factor or pancreatic extract. Other parameters of small intestinal function were normal. Proteinuria was initially present in both but cleared in one following treatment with B12. These patients with “familial selective vitamin B12 malabsorption” are the first reported from Canada. Only 37 cases have been reported in the world literature to date. PMID:4817548

  7. Zinc coupling potentiates anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Tian; Pu, Shao-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2004-11-12

    Baicalin (BA) has been shown with anti-HIV-1 activity. Zinc is a nutrient element. The anti-HIV-1 activity of zinc complex of baicalin (BA-Zn) in vitro was studied and compared with the anti-HIV-1 activities between BA and BA-Zn in the present study. Our results suggested that BA-Zn has lower cytotoxicity and higher anti-HIV-1 activity compared with those of BA in vitro. The CC50s of BA-Zn and BA were 221.52 and 101.73 microM, respectively. The cytotoxicity of BA-Zn was about 1.2-fold lower than that of BA. The BA and BA-Zn inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytium formation, HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 RT production. The EC50s of BA-Zn on inhibiting HIV-1 induced syncytium formation (29.08 microM) and RT production (31.17 microM) were lower than those of BA (43.27 and 47.34 microM, respectively). BA-Zn was more effective than BA in inhibiting the activities of recombinant RT and HIV-1 entry into host cells. Zinc coupling enhanced the anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

  8. Improved assays for DNA-polymerizing enzymes by the use of enzymatically synthesized 5-( sup 125 I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine triphosphate, illustrated by direct quantitation of anti-HIV reverse transcriptase antibody and by serum DNA polymerase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Neumueller, M.K.; Karlstroem, A.R.K.; Kaellander, C.F.G.; Gronowitz, J.S. )

    1990-02-01

    A one-step procedure which uses enzymes in a crude extract of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1-infected cells to synthesize 5-(125I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine triphosphate (( 125I)dUTP) from (125I)dU is described. The design of a one-step procedure for the purification of the product is also presented. The recovery of (125I)dUTP from (125I)dU varied between 50 and 75%, the radiochemical purity of the product was greater than 90%, and both synthesis and purification were completed within 8 h. The sensitivity and specificity of (125I)dUTP as a substrate for both DNA-dependent DNA polymerase (DNAp) and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase, RT) were evaluated and compared to those of (3H)dTTP for the following specimens: purified cloned Klenow fragment, crude extracts of HeLa-, BHK-, and HSV-2-infected BHK cells, purified avian myeloblastosis virus RT, and purified cloned human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RT. The (125I)dUTP was accepted as a substrate equally as well (3H)dTTP by all of the specimens at all of the concentrations tested. When the same amount of radiolabel was used, (125I)dUTP gave a sensitivity 10- to 25-fold higher than that of (3H)dTTP. The gain in sensitivity was due to the higher specific activity and a higher counting efficiency of the 125I-label compound. The use of (125I)dUTP also offered technical advantages over alternative substrates available, such as product separation without acid precipitation and exclusion of the need for scintillation cocktails. The half-life of the nucleic also gives a reasonable shelf-life for use in routine assays. Activity of less than 0.3 pg of HIV RT could be detected when the new substrate was used, and this made it possible to quantitate HIV RT antibodies (abs) in diluted serum samples without purifying the immunoglobulin.

  9. B12 in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M Reese; Black, Maureen M

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is necessary for development of the fetus and child. Pregnant women who are vegetarian or vegan, have Crohn's or celiac disease, or have undergone gastric bypass surgery are at increased risk of B12 deficiency. Low serum levels of B12 have been linked to negative impacts in cognitive, motor, and growth outcomes. Low cobalamin levels also may be related to depression in adults. Some studies indicate that B12 supplementation may improve outcomes in children, although more research is needed in this area. Overall, the mechanisms of B12 action in development remain unclear. Further studies in this area to elucidate the pathways of cobalamin influence on development, as well as to prevent B12 deficiency in pregnant women and children are indicated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioavailability of vitamin B12

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in people of all ages who consume a low intake of animal-source foods, including populations in developing countries. It is also prevalent among the elderly, even in wealthier countries, due to their malabsorption of B12 from food. Several methods have been applied t...

  11. Oral vitamin B12 versus intramuscular vitamin B12 for vitamin B12 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Alaball, Josep; Butler, Christopher; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Goringe, Andrew; Hood, Kerry; McCaddon, Andrew; McDowell, Ian; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin B12 deficiency is common and rises with age. Most people with vitamin B12 deficiency are treated in primary care with intramuscular vitamin B12 which is a considerable source of work for health care professionals. Several case control and case series studies have reported equal efficacy of oral administration of vitamin B12 but it is rarely prescribed in this form, other than in Sweden and Canada. Doctors may not be prescribing oral formulations because they are unaware of this option or have concerns regarding effectiveness. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of oral vitamin B12 versus intramuscular vitamin B12 for vitamin B12 deficiency. Search methods Searches were undertaken of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Lilacs. The bibliographies of all relevant papers identified using this strategy were searched. In addition we contacted authors of relevant identified studies and Vitamin B12 research and pharmaceutical companies to enquire about other published or unpublished studies and ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of oral or intramuscular vitamin B12 to treat vitamin B12 deficiency. Data collection and analysis All abstracts or titles identified by the electronic searches were independently scrutinised by two reviewers. When a difference between reviewers arose, we obtained and reviewed a hard copy of the papers and made decisions by consensus. We obtained a copy of all preselected papers and two researchers independently extracted the data from these studies using piloted data extraction forms. The whole group checked whether inclusion and exclusion criteria were met, and disagreement was decided by consensus. The methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed by two researchers and disagreements were brought back to the whole group and resolved by consensus. Main results Two RCT’s comparing oral with intramuscular administration of vitamin B12 met

  12. Synthetic galactomannans with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Bai, Shiming; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Han, Shuqin; Yoshida, Takashi

    2015-10-05

    Ring-opening polymerization of a new 1,6-anhydro disaccharide monomer, 1, 6-anhydro-2, 3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-(2', 3', 4', 6'-tetra-O-benzyl-α-d-galactopyranosyl)-α-d-mannopyranose, was carried out using PF5 as a catalyst under high vacuum at -60°C to give galactose branched mannopyranan (synthetic galactomannan), 4-O-α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-d-mannopyranan, after debenzylation with Na in liquid NH3. The ring-opening copolymerization with 1, 6-anhydro-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranose in various feeds was also performed to give synthetic galactomannans with various proportions of galactose branches. After sulfation, sulfated synthetic galactomannans were found to have anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity as high and low as those of standard curdlan and dextran sulfates, respectively, which are potent anti-HIV sulfated polysaccharides with low cytotoxicity. The anti-HIV mechanism of sulfated synthetic galactomannans used by poly-l-lysine as a model peptide of the HIV surface protein was estimated by using SPR, DSL, and zeta potential measurements, revealing the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged amino groups.

  13. Anti-HIV diphyllin glycosides from Justicia gendarussa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Liu, Kang-Lun; Wang, Dong-Ying; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van Hung; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-04-01

    In a search for new anti-HIV active leads from over several thousands of plant extracts, we have identified a potent plant lead. The active plant is determined as Justicia gendarussa (Acanthaceae), a medicinal plant that has been used for the treatment of injury, arthritis and rheumatism in Asia including China. Our bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol extract of the stems and barks of the plant led to the isolation of two anti-HIV compounds, justiprocumins A and B. The compounds are identified as new arylnaphthalide lignans (ANL) glycosides. We further determined that the ANL glycosides are the chemical constituents that contribute to the anti-HIV activity of this plant. Justiprocumin B displayed potent activity against a broad spectrum of HIV strains with IC50 values in the range of 15-21 nM (AZT, IC50 77-95 nM). The compound also displayed potent inhibitory activity against the NRTI (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-11617-1) of the analogue (AZT) as well as the NNRTI (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-1N119) of the analogue (nevaripine). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tricyclononene carboxamide derivatives as novel anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming-xin; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Xu-qing; Lu, Hong; Yun, Liu-hong; Jiang, Shibo; Dai, Qiu-yun

    2010-09-01

    By modifying the chemical structure of anti-orthopoxvirus compound ST-246, we designed and synthesized a series of tricyclononene carboxamide derivatives and tested their anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity. We found that benzoimidazol-containing compound 7g was highly effective in inhibiting HIV-1 R5 infection with an IC(50) value of 0.41 microM and a selectivity index of 292, but it exhibited no significant inhibitory activity on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease. CoMFA was used to analyze structure-activity relationships with good predictive power (r(2) = 0.921; q(2) = 0.582). Moreover, the CoMFA model showed that the length of the molecule, the amide, and the amine moieties all played crucial roles in anti-HIV activity. These results suggest that 7g may serve as a lead for the development of novel anti-HIV-1 therapies. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Natural antimicrobial peptides as promising anti-HIV candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains to be one of the major global health problems. It is thus necessary to identify novel therapeutic molecules to combat HIV-1. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been recognized as promising templates for developing topical microbicides. This review systematically discusses over 80 anti-HIV peptides annotated in the antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP). Such peptides have been discovered from bacteria, plants, and animals. Examples include gramicidin and bacteriocins from bacteria, cyclotides from plants, melittins and cecropins from insects, piscidins from fish, ascaphins, caerins, dermaseptins, esculentins, and maximins from amphibians, and cathelicidins and defensins from vertebrates. These peptides appear to work by different mechanisms and could block viral entry in multiple ways. As additional advantages, such anti-HIV peptides may possess other desired features such as antibacterial, antiparasital, spermicidal, and anticancer activity. With continued optimization of peptide stability, production, formulation and delivery methods, it is anticipated that some of these compounds may eventually become new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26834391

  16. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin.

  17. The rate of anti-HIV seropositivity among donated cadavers: experience in a cadaver donation center.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Agthong, Sithiporn

    2002-01-01

    Cadavers are crucial for the medical education provided by medical schools. However, currently, donation is the only way to obtain cadavers for education in Thailand. Moreover, some traditional beliefs result in insufficient numbers of cadavers. Apart from finding donors, the occupational health of the workers in the cadaver donation center and the users, the medical students, residents, and staffs should be addressed. Screening for anti-HIV in donated organs is the current trend in transplantation medicine. Therefore, screening for anti-HIV in donated cadavers is useful. Here, we report the rate of anti-HIV seropositivity in cadavers in a 1-year period in our setting, the largest Thai Red Cross Society hospital. Of the total 84 cadavers received, two cadavers (2.4%) were anti-HIV seropositive. With the increasing rate of anti-HIV, screening for anti-HIV serology in donated cadavers for medical teaching is of great benefit.

  18. Vitamin B12 replacement. To B12 or not to B12?

    PubMed Central

    Delva, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence for an expanded approach to identifying and treating patients with cobalamin deficiency. Controversy surrounds this issue. Some authors claim that seven times more patients are treated than have true deficiency. New diagnostic tests and identification of patients who have neurologic consequences without hematologic abnormalities suggest that some of these patients have a vitamin B12 tissue deficiency. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search of English-language literature from 1990 to 1995 revealed retrospective and prospective studies of diagnostic tests; prospective surveys; a cohort study; and retrospective and prospective case series, some with control groups. No double-blind controlled trials of treatment were found. MAIN FINDINGS: Some patients with neuropsychiatric abnormalities develop a cobalamin tissue deficiency that can be detected by elevated serum homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels despite normal serum vitamin B12 levels without macrocytic anemia. Serum cobalamin testing is neither sensitive nor specific in the low normal range for cobalamin deficiency. Treatment recommendations vary because no controlled trials support any recommendations. Oral cobalamin is an underused alternative to parenteral treatment. CONCLUSION: Until the newer diagnostic tests become widely available, family physicians must continue to take a traditional approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. There is, however, support for a clinical trial of treatment in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:9154363

  19. "Clickable" vitamin B12 derivative.

    PubMed

    Chromiński, Mikołaj; Gryko, Dorota

    2013-04-15

    A "clickable" vitamin B12 derivative possessing the azide functionality at the 5'-position was synthesized by means of a two-step procedure on the gram scale. The reaction of cobalamin with mesyl chloride (MsCl) afforded the 5'-OMs derivative, which was subsequently transformed to the desired 5'-azide, the structure of which was confirmed using X-ray analysis. It proved to be reactive in the azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction to give substituted triazoles in high yields. A study of the reaction conditions and the scope of the process are reported.

  20. Developments of indoles as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Lv, Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS has always been a global health threat and the leading cause of deaths due to the rapid emergence of drug-resistance and unwanted metabolic side effects. Every day in 2007 an estimated 6850 people were newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the past 28 years the rapid worldwide spread of AIDS has prompted an intense research effort to discover compounds that could effectively inhibit HIV. The development of new, selective and safe inhibitors for the treatment of HIV, therefore, still remains a high priority for medical research. To the best of our knowledge, the indole derivatives have been considered as one class of promising HIV-1 inhibitors, such as delavirdine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997 for use in combination with other antiretrovirals in adults with HIV infection. In this review we focus on the synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of indole derivatives, in the meantime, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for some derivatives are also surveyed. It will pave the way for the design of indole derivatives as anti-HIV-1 drugs in the future.

  1. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed.

  2. Cross-neutralizing anti-HIV-1 human single chain variable fragments(scFvs) against CD4 binding site and N332 glycan identified from a recombinant phage library

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Lubina; Kumar, Rajesh; Thiruvengadam, Ramachandran; Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Makhdoomi, Muzamil Ashraf; Kumar, Sanjeev; Aggarwal, Heena; Mohata, Madhav; Hussain, Abdul Wahid; Das, Raksha; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Vajpayee, Madhu; Murugavel, K. G.; Solomon, Suniti; Sinha, Subrata; Luthra, Kalpana

    2017-01-01

    More than 50% of HIV-1 infection globally is caused by subtype_C viruses. Majority of the broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) targeting HIV-1 have been isolated from non-subtype_C infected donors. Mapping the epitope specificities of bnAbs provides useful information for vaccine design. Recombinant antibody technology enables generation of a large repertoire of monoclonals with diverse specificities. We constructed a phage recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) library with a diversity of 7.8 × 108 clones, using a novel strategy of pooling peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of six select HIV-1 chronically infected Indian donors whose plasma antibodies exhibited potent cross neutralization efficiency. The library was panned and screened by phage ELISA using trimeric recombinant proteins to identify viral envelope specific clones. Three scFv monoclonals D11, C11 and 1F6 selected from the library cross neutralized subtypes A, B and C viruses at concentrations ranging from 0.09 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL. The D11 and 1F6 scFvs competed with mAbs b12 and VRC01 demonstrating CD4bs specificity, while C11 demonstrated N332 specificity. This is the first study to identify cross neutralizing scFv monoclonals with CD4bs and N332 glycan specificities from India. Cross neutralizing anti-HIV-1 human scFv monoclonals can be potential candidates for passive immunotherapy and for guiding immunogen design. PMID:28332627

  3. Gastric status and vitamin B12 levels in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    van Oijen, Martijn G H; Sipponen, Pentti; Laheij, Robert J F; Verheugt, Freek W A; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2007-09-01

    Proper absorption of vitamin B12 requires gastric corpus mucosa that functions appropriately and secretes intrinsic factor needed as an essential cofactor for the absorption of dietary vitamin B12 in the small bowel. Here we describe the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency and atrophic corpus gastritis (ACG) in patients with coronary heart disease. Fasting serum was obtained from patients who were admitted for cardiovascular diseases at the Coronary Care Unit in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The status of gastric mucosa was assessed by using the serum levels of pepsinogens I and II, gastrin-17, and Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies and analyzed over vitamin B12 level subgroups. The study population consisted of 376 patients (mean age, 65 years [SD, 13 years], 227 [60%] males). Low vitamin B12 levels (<150 pM) were detected in 28 patients (7%). Of these 28 patients, 5 (18%) had ACG according to the biomarker assays. Altogether, another 140 patients (37%) had vitamin B12 levels between 150 and 250 pM, of whom 10 (7%) had ACG. Of the remaining patients, five (2%) had ACG. Deficiency of vitamin B12 is common among subjects with coronary heart disease. Up to 20% of these deficiencies are related to ACG.

  4. Competitive immunoassay for analysis of vitamin B(12).

    PubMed

    Selva Kumar, L Sagaya; Thakur, M S

    2011-11-15

    In the current work, direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for derivatized vitamin B(12) by generating chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) against derivatized vitamin B(12) and purified using affinity chromatography. Checkerboard assay was performed with vitamin B(12) antibody and vitamin B(12)-alkaline phosphatase conjugate followed by its conjugate characterization using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The limit of detection was 10 ng/ml with a linear working range of 10 to 10,000 ng/ml. The affinity constant (K(a)) of the vitamin B(12) antibody was found to be 4.23×10(8) L/mol. Cross-reactivity with other water-soluble vitamins was found to be less than 0.01% except for analogs of vitamin B(12) that showed 12% to 35%. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were found to be in the ranges from 0.0005% to 1.2% and 0.009% to 1.03%, respectively. The assay was validated with the HPLC method in terms of sensitivity, specificity, precision, and recovery of vitamin B(12) with spiked multivitamin injections, tablets, capsules, and chocolates. The HPLC method had a detection limit of 500 ng/ml with a linear working range of 1000 to 10,000 ng/ml. After extraction of vitamin B(12) using Amberlite XAD, the developed ELISA method correlated well with the established HPLC method with a correlation coefficient of 0.90.

  5. Vitamin B12 and Folate Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Vitamin B12 and Folate Share this page: Was this ... as: Cobalamin; Folic Acid; RBC Folate Formal name: Vitamin B12; Folate Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Methylmalonic ...

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of Trim 37.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Azah A; Tardif, Keith; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-04-01

    Trim 5α was the first member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins that was identified to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. The breadth of antiretroviral activity of TRIM family members is an active area of investigation. In this study, we demonstrate that human Trim 37 possesses anti-HIV-1 activity. This antiretroviral activity and the manner in which it was displayed were implicated by (1) decreased viral replication upon Trim 37 transient overexpression in virus-producing cells, (2) correlation of the reduction of viral infectivity with Trim 37 virion incorporation, (3) increased HIV-1 replication during siRNA depletion of Trim 37 expression, and (4) reduction in viral DNA synthesis upon Trim 37 transient overexpression. Our findings provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of the potent antiviral activity of human Trim 37, and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby Trim 37 interferes with viral DNA synthesis.

  7. The anti-HIV activities of photoactive terthiophenes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Harris, L; Marles, R J; Arnason, J T

    1993-08-01

    Various synthetic analogues of the naturally occurring terthiophene, alpha-terthienyl (alpha T), were evaluated for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds were incubated individually with a known amount of the virus, with or without UVA radiation (long-wavelength ultraviolet) and residual virus was monitored for its ability to produce cytopathic effects in cell culture and the production of virus-specific protein (p24). The basic terthiophene structure was essential for good anti-HIV activity, although various side chains, such as alcohols, bromo, methyl, thiomethyl and trimethylsilyl groups, permitted retention of maximum activity. Under optimum conditions, as little as 12 ng/mL of these compounds (i.e. approximately 3 x 10(-8) M) could inactivate 10(3) infectious virions. None of the compounds however were more active than alpha T itself. In all cases, UVA radiation was essential. Several side chains decreased the antiviral efficacy, and some side chains abrogated the activity.

  8. Vitamin B12 and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 2.9 million serum vitamin B12 tests were performed in 2010 in Ontario at a cost of $40 million. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with a few neurocognitive disorders. Objective To determine the clinical utility of B12 testing in patients with suspected dementia or cognitive decline. Methods Three questions were addressed: Is there an association between vitamin B12 deficiency and the onset of dementia or cognitive decline? Does treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation improve cognitive function in patients with dementia or cognitive decline and vitamin B12 deficiency? What is the effectiveness of oral versus parenteral vitamin B12 supplementation in those with confirmed vitamin B12 deficiency? A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Embase, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, from January 2002 until August 2012. Results Eighteen studies (7 systematic reviews and 11 observational studies) were identified to address the question of the association between B12 and the onset of dementia. Four systematic reviews were identified to address the question of the treatment of B12 on cognitive function. Finally, 3 randomized controlled trials were identified that compared oral B12 to intramuscular B12. Conclusions Based on very low quality evidence, there does appear to be an association between elevated plasma homocysteine levels (a by-product of B vitamins) and the onset of dementia. Based on moderate quality evidence, but with less than optimal duration of follow-up, treatment with B12 supplementation does not appreciably change cognitive function. Based on low to moderate quality of evidence, treatment with vitamin B12 and folate in patients with mild cognitive impairment seems to slow the rate of brain atrophy. Based on moderate quality evidence, oral vitamin B12 is as effective as parenteral vitamin B12 in patients with

  9. International award received recognizing anti-HIV spermicide.

    PubMed

    1998-10-19

    Until recently, the only topical microbicide being considered for protection against sexually transmitted HIV infection contains nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a detergent ingredient widely used for more than 30 years in the form of gels, foams, aerosols, creams, sponges, suppositories, films, and foaming tablets. While N-9 has both spermicidal and antibacterial/antiviral properties against pathogens responsible for STDs, including HIV, recent clinical studies have found it to be ineffective in protecting against HIV and other STDs. Moreover, N-9 disrupts cell membranes, damages cervicovaginal epithelia, and causes an acute tissue inflammatory response, thus enhancing the likelihood of HIV infection. There is therefore an urgent need for new, effective, safe, and easy-to-use microbicides with anti-HIV activity lacking detergent-type membrane toxicity. Dr. Osmond D'Cruz et al. of the Hughes Institute in St. Paul, Minnesota, have developed an anti-HIV spermicide with the potential of becoming the active ingredient in many beneficial products. Its lead compound is 400 times more potent than N-9 against HIV and at least 10 times more potent than N-9 as a spermicide. These dual-function compounds are non-inflammatory by their nature. Hughes et al.'s discovery is expected to enter human clinical trials within 12 months. A clinical paper describing their achievement won the prestigious Prize Paper Award for the Plenary Session of the Conjoint 16th World Congress on Fertility and Sterility at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, held in San Francisco, California, during October 4-9, 1998.

  10. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  11. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any, of...

  12. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any, of...

  13. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any, of...

  14. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any, of...

  15. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2) A...

  16. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2) A...

  17. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2) A...

  18. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2) A...

  19. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  20. 7 CFR 15b.12 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15b.12 Section 15b.12... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment Practices § 15b.12 Discrimination prohibited. (a... discrimination in employment under any program or activity receiving assistance from this Department. (2)...

  1. 45 CFR 5b.12 - Contractors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractors. 5b.12 Section 5b.12 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.12 Contractors. (a) All contracts entered into on or after September 27, 1975 which require a contractor to maintain or on behalf of the Department to...

  2. 34 CFR 5b.12 - Contractors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contractors. 5b.12 Section 5b.12 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.12 Contractors. (a) All contracts entered into on or after September 27, 1975 which require a contractor to maintain or on behalf of...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any, of...

  4. 34 CFR 5b.12 - Contractors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contractors. 5b.12 Section 5b.12 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.12 Contractors. (a) All contracts entered into on or after September 27, 1975 which require a contractor to maintain or on behalf of...

  5. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised.

  6. Laboratory assessment of vitamin B12 status.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Dominic J

    2017-02-01

    The detection and correction of vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency prevents megaloblastic anaemia and potentially irreversible neuropathy and neuropsychiatric changes. B12 status is commonly estimated using the abundance of the vitamin in serum, with ∼148 pmol/L (200 ng/L) typically set as the threshold for diagnosing deficiency. Serum B12 assays measure the sum of haptocorrin-bound and transcobalamin-bound (known as holotranscobalamin) B12 It is only holotranscobalamin that is taken up by cells to meet metabolic demand. Although receiver operator characteristic curves show holotranscobalamin measurement to be a moderately more reliable marker of B12 status than serum B12, both assays have an indeterminate range. Biochemical evidence of metabolic abnormalities consistent with B12 insufficiency is frequently detected despite an apparently sufficient abundance of the vitamin. Laboratory B12 status markers that reflect cellular utilisation rather than abundance are available. Two forms of B12 act as coenzymes for two different reactions. Methionine synthase requires methylcobalamin for the remethylation of methionine from homocysteine. A homocysteine concentration >20 µmol/L may suggest B12 deficiency in folate-replete patients. In the second B12-dependent reaction, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase uses adenosylcobalamin to convert methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA. In B12 deficiency excess methylmalonyl-CoA is hydrolysed to methylmalonic acid. A serum concentration >280 nmol/L may suggest suboptimal status in young patients with normal renal function. No single laboratory marker is suitable for the assessment of B12 status in all patients. Sequential assay selection algorithms or the combination of multiple markers into a single diagnostic indicator are both approaches that can be used to mitigate inherent limitations of each marker when used independently. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  7. The EGG 57-CO B-12 absorption test, in the evaluation of patients with low serum B-12

    SciTech Connect

    Sinow, R.M.; Carmel, R.; Siegel, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The Schilling Test (ST) is the standard test for diagnosing vitamin B-12 malabsorption (MA). However, patients with subtle gastric dysfunction may have normal ST, but impaired absorption of B-12 given with food. The authors have adapted an Egg B-12 Absorption Test (EBAT) in which 57-Co cyanocobalamin (57-Co B-12) is mixed with scrambled egg to evaluate this phenomenon in patients with low serum B-12, normal ST and possible subtle MA. Lyophilized egg yolk is reconstituted and mixed with 57-Co- B-12 of equal dose to that of ST. The authors studied 46 individuals: 13 controls, 5 patients with known pernicious anemia (PA), in addition to 28 patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST. ST/EBAT ratios were calculated. Twenty-eight test patients excreted 13.3% on ST and 3.5% on EBAT. Mean ST/EBAT ratio was 8.2 (1.4-35.9). Five had EBAT results in the PA range (<1%) and ST/EBAT ratios (14.4-35.9) that were significantly elevated. This group is also evaluated with pepsinogen I/II ratios, gastric analysis, deoxyuridine suppression tests, anti intrinsic factor, and antiparietal cell antibodies. The authors' results indicate that the EBAT can differentiate between PA and non PA patients, and that some patients with low serum B-12 levels and normal ST may, in fact, have subtle MA. The EBAT, combined with ST/EBAT ratio, may provide a means for identifying this group of patients.

  8. Anti-HIV-1 activities of extracts and phenolics from Smilax china L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Xin; Qian, Jing-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Four extracts (EtOH, CHCl3, EtOAc, and BuOH) and five phenolics (dihydrokaempferol (1), resveratrol (2), kaempferol-7-O-β-D-glucoside (3), dihydrokaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside (4), oxyresveratrol (5)) from Smilax china L. was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activities and cytotoxicity activities in vitro. All these extracts and phenolics showed lower or no cytotoxicity at a concentration ranged from 0.8 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL, but some showed potential anti-HIV-1 activities, that is, BuOH extract and compound 2 showed higher anti-HIV-1 activities than other extracts and compounds in the tested concentrations. EtOAc extract and compound 1 and 3 showed moderate anti-HIV-1 activities at a concentration higher than 4 μg/mL. In the end, the structure-activity relationship of four extracts and five phenolics was discussed.

  9. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice

    2015-07-13

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3'-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of "no-return" in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST) step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50) improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively) and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively). Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96.

  10. Mechanisms and Modifications of Naturally Occurring Host Defense Peptides for Anti-HIV Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Colleen R.; Wood, Matthew P.; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of HIV infection, heterosexual transmission of HIV remains high, and vaccines to prevent HIV acquisition have been unfruitful. Vaginal microbicides, on the other hand, have demonstrated considerable potential for HIV prevention, and a variety of compounds have been screened for their activity and safety as anti-HIV microbicides. Among these are the naturally occurring host defense peptides, small peptides from diverse lineages with intrinsic antiviral activity. Naturally occurring host defense peptides with anti-HIV activity are promising candidates for vaginal microbicide development. Their structural variance and accompanying mechanistic diversity provide a wide range of inhibitors whose antiviral activity can be exerted at nearly every stage of the HIV lifecycle. Additionally, peptide modification has been explored as a method for improving the anti-HIV activity of host defense peptides. Structure- and sequence-based alterations have achieved varying success in improving the potency and specificity of anti-HIV peptides. Overall, peptides have been discovered or engineered to inhibit HIV with therapeutic indices of >1000, encouraging their advancement toward clinical trials. Here we review the naturally occurring anti-HIV host defense peptides, demonstrating their breadth of mechanistic diversity, and exploring approaches to enhance and optimize their activity in order to expedite their development as safe and effective anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. PMID:22264047

  11. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  12. Vitamin B12 in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Fiona; Samman, Samir

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is essential for DNA synthesis and for cellular energy production.This review aims to outline the metabolism of vitamin B12, and to evaluate the causes and consequences of sub-clinical vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency is common, mainly due to limited dietary intake of animal foods or malabsorption of the vitamin. Vegetarians are at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency as are other groups with low intakes of animal foods or those with restrictive dietary patterns. Malabsorption of vitamin B12 is most commonly seen in the elderly, secondary to gastric achlorhydria. The symptoms of sub-clinical deficiency are subtle and often not recognized. The long-term consequences of sub-clinical deficiency are not fully known but may include adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, vascular, cognitive, bone and eye health. PMID:22254022

  13. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  14. Vitamin B12 in health and disease.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Fiona; Samman, Samir

    2010-03-01

    Vitamin B(12) is essential for DNA synthesis and for cellular energy production.This review aims to outline the metabolism of vitamin B(12), and to evaluate the causes and consequences of sub-clinical vitamin B(12) deficiency. Vitamin B(12) deficiency is common, mainly due to limited dietary intake of animal foods or malabsorption of the vitamin. Vegetarians are at risk of vitamin B(12) deficiency as are other groups with low intakes of animal foods or those with restrictive dietary patterns. Malabsorption of vitamin B(12) is most commonly seen in the elderly, secondary to gastric achlorhydria. The symptoms of sub-clinical deficiency are subtle and often not recognized. The long-term consequences of sub-clinical deficiency are not fully known but may include adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, vascular, cognitive, bone and eye health.

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency causing night sweats.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H U

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common. It is known to cause a wide spectrum of neurological syndromes, including autonomic dysfunction. Three cases are discussed here in which drenching night sweats were thought to be caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. All three responded dramatically to vitamin B12 therapy. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N.; Anaissie, E. J.; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of POEMS should be considered in patients with B12 deficiency unresponsive to therapy. PMID:24349810

  17. Vitamin B12 Deficiency: Recognition and Management.

    PubMed

    Langan, Robert C; Goodbred, Andrew J

    2017-09-15

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia, various neuropsychiatric symptoms, and other clinical manifestations. Screening average-risk adults for vitamin B12 deficiency is not recommended. Screening may be warranted in patients with one or more risk factors, such as gastric or small intestine resections, inflammatory bowel disease, use of metformin for more than four months, use of proton pump inhibitors or histamine H2 blockers for more than 12 months, vegans or strict vegetarians, and adults older than 75 years. Initial laboratory assessment should include a complete blood count and serum vitamin B12 level. Measurement of serum methylmalonic acid should be used to confirm deficiency in asymptomatic high-risk patients with low-normal levels of vitamin B12. Oral administration of high-dose vitamin B12 (1 to 2 mg daily) is as effective as intramuscular administration for correcting anemia and neurologic symptoms. Intramuscular therapy leads to more rapid improvement and should be considered in patients with severe deficiency or severe neurologic symptoms. Absorption rates improve with supplementation; therefore, patients older than 50 years and vegans or strict vegetarians should consume foods fortified with vitamin B12 or take vitamin B12 supplements. Patients who have had bariatric surgery should receive 1 mg of oral vitamin B12 per day indefinitely. Use of vitamin B12 in patients with elevated serum homocysteine levels and cardiovascular disease does not reduce the risk of myocardial infarction or stroke, or alter cognitive decline.

  18. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  19. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  20. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  1. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive brief, about 2 sec, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. PMID:22226641

  2. Differential in vitro anti-HIV activity of natural lignans.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H C; Merz, H; Steffen, R; Müller, W E; Sarin, P S; Trumm, S; Schulz, J; Eich, E

    1990-01-01

    Two naturally occurring lignanolides, isolated from the tropical climbing shrub Ipomoea cairica, (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin, were found to inhibit strongly replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; strain HTLV-III B) in vitro. At a concentration of 0.5 microM, (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin inhibited the expression of HIV-1 proteins p17 and p24 by 80-90% and 60-70%, respectively. The reverse transcriptase activity in the culture fluids was reduced by 80-90% when the cells (HTLV-III B/H9) were cultivated in the presence of 0.5 microM (-)-arctigenin or 1 microM (-)-trachelogenin. At the same concentrations, the formation of syncytia in the HTLV-III B/H9-Jurkat cell system was inhibited by the compounds by more than 80%. A series of other lignan type compounds displayed no anti-HIV activity. Studying the molecular mechanism of action of (-)-arctigenin and (-)-trachelogenin we found that both compounds are efficient inhibitors of the nuclear matrix-associated DNA topoisomerase II activity, particularly of the enzyme from HIV-1-infected cells. Our results suggest that both compounds prevent the increase of topoisomerase II activity, involved in virus replication, after infection of cells with HIV-1.

  3. Combinatorial synthesis of anti-HIV agents--a review.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Nagappa, Ananantha Naik

    2005-08-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has been well recognized as an important tool of drug discovery. An ongoing hand is to integrate the combinatorial approach with fundamentals of medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. The last five years has seen an explosion in the exploration and adoption of combinatorial techniques. Indeed, it is difficult to identify any other topic in chemistry that has ever caught the imagination of chemists with such fervor and with the continuous development of high throughput screening methods. There is a growing need for the synthesis of a large number of molecules. Compound libraries designed to produce specific inhibitors of therapeutic target proteins have generated significant interest in drug discovery research. Combinatorial chemistry provides the opportunity to generate large libraries of compounds for biological testing. A literature search revealed that many lead compounds have indeed been discovered from libraries and this review presents a survey of combinatorial synthesis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, HIV-1 function inhibitors such as adsorption inhibitors, CCR5 antagonists and HIV-1 Tat-tar inhibitors that can be developed as potential anti-HIV drugs.

  4. Lentiviral vector engineering for anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy.

    PubMed

    ter Brake, Olivier; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference or RNAi-based gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection has recently emerged as a highly effective antiviral approach. The lentiviral vector system is a good candidate for the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) in HIV-susceptible cells. However, this strategy can give rise to vector problems because the anti-HIV shRNAs can also target the HIV-based lentiviral vector system. In addition, there may be self-targeting of the shRNA-encoding sequences within the vector RNA genome in the producer cell. The insertion of microRNA (miRNA) cassettes in the vector may introduce Drosha cleavage sites that will also result in the destruction of the vector genome during the production and/or the transduction process. Here, we describe possible solutions to these lentiviral-RNAi problems. We also describe a strategy for multiple shRNA expression to establish a combinatorial RNAi therapy.

  5. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions.

  6. Indications for Vitamin B12 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delva, M. Dianne; Anderson, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective chart audit was undertaken to determine the clinical reasons for vitamin B12 therapy in family practice. Abnormal laboratory tests and symptoms were the most common reasons for initiating therapy. The high proportion of cases with little supporting evidence of B12 deficiency suggests that other factors influence treatment decisions. PMID:20469527

  7. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health123

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:26374177

  8. Synthesis of 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 activity through an efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling approach.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Esther; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; Gago, Federico; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2002-08-29

    Various synthetic studies for the introduction of several functional groups at position 3' ' of the spiro moiety of TSAO derivatives have been explored. Among them, Stille cross-coupling of 3' '-iodo-TSAO derivatives with different stannanes provided an efficient and straightforward route for the direct and selective functionalization of the 3' '-position of the sultone spiro moiety via carbon-carbon bond formation. The compounds synthesized were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 and HIV-2 replication in cell culture. The introduction of a bromine and particularly an iodine at the 3' '-position conferred the highest anti-HIV-1 activity. In contrast, the presence at this position of (un)substituted vinyl, alkynyl, phenyl, or thienyl groups markedly diminished the anti-HIV-1 activity. Surprisingly, several of the 3' '-alkenyl-substituted TSAO derivatives also gained anti-HIV-2 activity at subtoxic concentrations, an observation that is very unusual for NNRTIs and never observed before for TSAO derivatives. Finally, the anti-HIV-1 activity of some of the 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives is discussed in light of our recently proposed molecular model of interaction of TSAO derivatives with the interphase between the two subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  9. Malabsorption of protein bound vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, D W; Sawers, A H; Sharma, R K

    1984-01-01

    Patients with subnormal serum vitamin B12 concentrations were tested for absorption of protein bound vitamin B12 and compared with controls. Absorption of the protein bound vitamin appeared to decrease with increasing age in healthy subjects. Differences between the result of this test and the result of the Schilling test in patients who had undergone gastric surgery were confirmed; such differences were also seen in some patients who had iron deficiency anaemia, an excessive alcohol intake, or folate deficiency. Defective absorption was also found in six patients with an adequate dietary intake of vitamin B12, normal Schilling test results, low serum vitamin concentrations, and tissue changes responding to treatment with vitamin B12. Malabsorption of the vitamin from protein bound sources, which is not detected by the Schilling test, may produce vitamin B12 deficiency of clinical importance. PMID:6421428

  10. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti-gastric ...

  11. 2'-Deoxythymidine adducts from the anti-HIV drug nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Alexandra M M; Wolf, Benjamin; Oliveira, M Conceição; Beland, Frederick A; Marques, M Matilde

    2013-04-26

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) used against HIV-1. Currently, NVP is the most widely used anti-HIV drug in developing countries, both in combination therapy and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Despite its efficacy against HIV, NVP produces a variety of toxic responses, including hepatotoxicity and skin rash. It is also associated with increased incidences of hepatoneoplasias in rodents. In addition, epidemiological data suggest that NNRTI use is a risk factor for non-AIDS-defining cancers in HIV-positive patients. Current evidence supports the involvement of metabolic activation to reactive electrophiles in NVP toxicity. NVP metabolism includes oxidation to 12-hydroxy-NVP; subsequent Phase II sulfonation produces an electrophilic metabolite, 12-sulfoxy-NVP, capable of reacting with DNA to yield covalent adducts. Since 2'-deoxythymidine (dT) adducts from several alkylating agents are regarded as having significant mutagenic/carcinogenic potential, we investigated the formation of NVP-dT adducts under biomimetic conditions. Toward this goal, we initially prepared and characterized synthetic NVP-dT adduct standards using a palladium-mediated Buchwald-Hartwig coupling strategy. The synthetic standards enabled the identification, by LC-ESI-MS, of 12-(2'-deoxythymidin-N3-yl)-nevirapine (N3-NVP-dT) in the enzymatic hydrolysate of salmon testis DNA reacted with 12-mesyloxy-NVP, a synthetic surrogate for 12-sulfoxy-NVP. N3-NVP-dT, a potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA lesion, was also the only dT-specific adduct detected upon reaction of dT with 12-mesyloxy-NVP. Our data suggest that N3-NVP-dT may be formed in vivo and play a role in the hepatotoxicity and/or putative hepatocarcinogenicity of NVP.

  12. Bound vitamin B12 absorption in patients with low serum B12 levels.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Furlong, D; Burrows, B A; Slingerland, D W

    1992-07-01

    In many patients with low serum levels of vitamin B12, the absorption of the free vitamin has been normal. The present study, using a total body counter 57CoB12 absorption method that clearly separated those with intrinsic factor deficiency from controls, found that of 94 patients with low B12 levels and intact stomachs in whom the absorption of free and bound B12 was determined, 44 (47%) had normal absorption of both. However, 20 of the 94 (21%) with normal absorption of free B12 had low absorption of bound B12. The remainder (32%) had low absorption of both free and bound B12. All patients with high serum gastrin levels had low bound B12 absorption, but so did 21% of those patients with normal serum gastrin levels.

  13. Generalised hyperpigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Ghosh, Sumit Kr; Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Das, Shubhabrata; Pradhan, Sourav; Das, Abhishek

    2014-08-01

    In developing countries like India, nutritional deficiencies are prevalent and hyperpigmentation due to protein energy malnutrition, zinc deficiency and pellagra are common. Indian women, especially vegetarian are prone to vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present as anaemia, neurological defect, gastrointestinal symptoms or dementia. Hyperpigmentation as the first presentation of Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare. Our patient, a 45 year-old Hindu vegetarian female presented to us with generalized hyperpigmentation. Examination revealed associated anaemia and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory investigation confirmed vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical features along with hyperpigmentation improved with vitamin B12 supplementation. We report this case to highlight this rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A high index of clinical suspicion is warranted to diagnose the case. Since India is a country with a large number of potential vitamin B12 deficiency cases, the physicians need to be aware of all the varied manifestations of this vitamin deficiency. In case of hyperpigmentation, nutritional aspect must be ruled out as it is reversible. Early replacement therapy may also help to prevent morbidities like dementia and neuropathy.

  14. Assay for vitamin B12 absorption and method of making labeled vitamin B12

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Peter J [Davis, CA; Dueker, Stephen [Davis, CA; Miller, Joshua [Davis, CA; Green, Ralph [Elmacero, CA; Roth, John [Davis, CA; Carkeet, Colleen [Silver Spring, MD; Buchholz,; Bruce, A [Orinda, CA

    2012-06-19

    The invention provides methods for labeling vitamin B12 with .sup.14C, .sup.13C, tritium, and deuterium. When radioisotopes are used, the invention provides for methods of labeling B12 with high specific activity. The invention also provides labeled vitamin B12 compositions made in accordance with the invention.

  15. [Anti-HIV activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal fromula Liangcha].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu-Qing; Li, Lei-Ke; Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Peng, Tao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2010-09-01

    To screen and evaluate the anti-HIV activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha. The anti-HIV-1 activities of extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha were evaluated by cytotoxicity assay,syncytium reduction assay, protection for HIV-1 induced lytic assay, and ELISA assay for HIV-1 p24 antigen expression. The primary mechanisms were investigated by fusion inhibition assay, inhibition of viral replication in HIV-1 chronically infected H9 cell and inhibition assay of HIV-1 RT activity. The extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha exhibited potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity on different HIV-1 strains with EC50 range 12.74 -116.87 microg/mL, but weakly inhibited HIV-2 replication. Meantime, it was not significantly cytotoxic in several T lymphocytes cell lines with CC50 range 564.79 - 1699.22 microg/mL. The activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha, inhibition rate more than 50% at the concentration of 5.3 microg/mL. It also weakly inhibited the cell-to-cell fusion in co-culture with EC50 of 101.94 microg/mL. The extracts from Chinese medicinal formula Liangcha exhibited potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity on different HIV-1 strains in vitro. Its anti-HIV-1 mechanism might be inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and cell entry.

  16. Anti-HIV cyclotides from the Chinese medicinal herb Viola yedoensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Conan K L; Colgrave, Michelle L; Gustafson, Kirk R; Ireland, David C; Goransson, Ulf; Craik, David J

    2008-01-01

    Cyclotides are macrocyclic plant peptides characterized by a knotted arrangement of three disulfide bonds. They display a range of interesting bioactivities, including anti-HIV and insecticidal activities. More than 100 different cyclotides have been isolated from two phylogenetically distant plant families, the Rubiaceae and Violaceae. In this study we have characterized the cyclotides from Viola yedoensis, an important Chinese herb from the Violaceae family that has been reported to contain potential anti-HIV agents. From V. yedoensis five new and three known cyclotides were identified and shown to have anti-HIV activity. The most active of these is cycloviolacin Y5, which is one of the most potent of all cyclotides tested so far using in vitro XTT-based anti-HIV assays. Cycloviolacin Y5 is the most hydrophobic of the cyclotides from V. yedoensis. We show that there is a positive correlation between the hydrophobicity and the anti-HIV activity of the new cyclotides and that this trend tracks with their ability to disrupt membranes, as judged from hemolytic assays on human erythrocytes.

  17. CD25 preselective anti-HIV vectors for improved HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Lawson, Je'tai; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-12-01

    As HIV continues to be a global public health problem with no effective vaccine available, new and innovative therapies, including HIV gene therapies, need to be developed. Due to low transduction efficiencies that lead to low in vivo gene marking, therapeutically relevant efficacy of HIV gene therapy has been difficult to achieve in a clinical setting. Methods to improve the transplantation of enriched populations of anti-HIV vector-transduced cells may greatly increase the in vivo efficacy of HIV gene therapies. Here we describe the development of preselective anti-HIV lentiviral vectors that allow for the purification of vector-transduced cells to achieve an enriched population of HIV-resistant cells. A selectable protein, human CD25, not normally found on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), was incorporated into a triple combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector. Upon purification of cells transduced with the preselective anti-HIV vector, safety was demonstrated in CD34+ HPCs and in HPC-derived macrophages in vitro. Upon challenge with HIV-1, improved efficacy was observed in purified preselective anti-HIV vector-transduced macrophages compared to unpurified cells. These proof-of-concept results highlight the potential use of this method to improve HIV stem cell gene therapy for future clinical applications.

  18. Antibody Gene Transfer for HIV Immunoprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; West, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody gene transfer, which involves the delivery of genes that encode potent, broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies, is a promising new strategy to prevent HIV infection. A satellite symposium at the AIDS Vaccine 2012 conference brought together many of the groups working in this field. PMID:23238748

  19. Preparation and characterization of anti-HIV nanodrug targeted to microfold cell of gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Ding, Hong; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea D; Atluri, Venkata; Yndart, Adriana; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Batrakova, Elena; Agudelo, Marisela; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) still remains one of the leading life-threatening diseases in the world. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced disease morbidity and mortality. However, most of the drugs have variable penetrance into viral reservoir sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Being the largest lymphoid organ, GALT plays a key role in early HIV infection and host–pathogen interaction. Many different treatment options have been proposed to eradicate the virus from GALT. However, it becomes difficult to deliver traditional drugs to the GALT because of its complex physiology. In this regard, we developed a polymer-based Pluronic nanocarrier containing anti-HIV drug called efavirenz (EFV) targeting Microfold cells (M-cells) in the GALT. M-cells are specialized epithelial cells that are predominantly present in the GALT. In this work, we have exploited this paracellular transport property of M-cells for targeted delivery of Pluronic nanocarrier tagged EFV, bioconjugated with anti-M-cell-specific antibodies to the GALT (nanodrug). Preliminary characterization showed that the nanodrug (EFV-F12-COOH) is of 140 nm size with 0.3 polydispersion index, and the zeta potential of the particles was −19.38±2.2 mV. Further, drug dissolution study has shown a significantly improved sustained release over free drugs. Binding potential of nanodrug with M-cell was also confirmed with fluorescence microscopy and in vitro uptake and release studies. The anti-HIV activity of the nanodrug was also significantly higher compared to that of free drug. This novel formulation was able to show sustained release of EFV and inhibit the HIV-1 infection in the GALT compared to the free drug. The present study has potential for our in vivo targeted nanodrug delivery system by combining traditional enteric-coated capsule technique via oral administration. PMID:26425084

  20. Human Antibodies and Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program researchers developed multiple novel human anti-HIV-1 domain antibodies and their fusion proteins with two-domain or single-domain human soluble CD4 that can potentially be used alone or synergistically with other anti-HIV-1 antibodies and antiretroviral drugs as therapeutics and/or preventatives for infection by different HIV-1 strains. These are available for co-development and licensing.

  1. Broad anti-HIV activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue lectin family

    PubMed Central

    Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Noppen, Sam; Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. The founding member OAA and a designed hybrid OAAH (OPA) recognize similar but unique carbohydrate structures of Man-9, compared with other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs). These two newly described CBAs were evaluated for their inactivating properties on HIV replication and transmission and for their potential as microbicides. Methods Various cellular assays were used to determine antiviral activity against wild-type and certain CBA-resistant HIV-1 strains: (i) free HIV virion infection in human T lymphoma cell lines and PBMCs; (ii) syncytium formation assay using persistently HIV-infected T cells and non-infected CD4+ T cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-mediated viral capture; and (iv) transmission to uninfected CD4+ T cells. OAA and OPA were also evaluated for their mitogenic properties and potential synergistic effects using other CBAs. Results OAA and OPA inhibit HIV replication, syncytium formation between HIV-1-infected and uninfected T cells, DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 capture and transmission to CD4+ target T cells, thereby rendering a variety of HIV-1 and HIV-2 clinical isolates non-infectious, independent of their coreceptor use. Both CBAs competitively inhibit the binding of the Manα(1-2)Man-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. The HIV-1 NL4.32G12res, NL4.3MVNres and IIIBGRFTres strains were equally inhibited as the wild-type HIV-1 strains by these CBAs. Combination studies indicate that OAA and OPA act synergistically with Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, 2G12 mAb and griffithsin (GRFT), with the exception of OPA/GRFT. Conclusions OAA and OPA are unique CBAs with broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity; however, further optimization will be necessary for microbicidal application. PMID:24970741

  2. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions.

  3. [Psychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report].

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Mary, S; Brazo, P; Dollfus, S

    2003-01-01

    Psychiatric manifestations are frequently associated with pernicious anemia including depression, mania, psychosis, dementia. We report a case of a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency, who has presented severe depression with delusion and Capgras' syndrome, delusion with lability of mood and hypomania successively, during a period of two Months. Case report - Mme V., a 64-Year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of confusion. She had no history of psychiatric problems. She had history of diabetes, hypertension and femoral prosthesis. The red blood count revealed a normocytosis with anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl). At admission she was uncooperative, disoriented in time and presented memory and attention impairment and sleep disorders. She seemed sad and older than her real age. Facial expression and spontaneous movements were reduced, her speech and movements were very slow. She had depressed mood, guilt complex, incurability and devaluation impressions. She had a Capgras' syndrome and delusion of persecution. Her neurologic examination, cerebral scanner and EEG were postponed because of uncooperation. Further investigations confirmed anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl) and revealed vitamin B12 deficiency (52 pmol/l) and normal folate level. Antibodies to parietal cells were positive in the serum and antibodies to intrinsic factor were negative. An iron deficiency was associated (serum iron=7 micromol/l; serum ferritin concentration=24 mg/l; serum transferrin concentration=3,16 g/l). This association explained normocytocis anemia. Thyroid function, hepatic and renal tests, glycemia, TP, TCA, VS, VDRL-TPHA were normal. Vitamin B12 replacement therapy was started with hydroxycobalamin 1 000 ng/day im for 10 days and iron replacement therapy. Her mental state improved dramatically within a few days. After one week of treatment the only remaining symptoms were lability of mood, delusion of persecution, Capgras' syndrome but disappeared totally 9 days after the

  4. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds.

  5. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  6. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds. PMID:26598461

  7. Thiazoline Peptides and a Tris-Phenethyl Urea from Didemnum molle with Anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Harper, Mary Kay; Pond, Christopher D.; Barrows, Louis R.; Ireland, Chris M.; Wagoner, Ryan M. Van

    2012-01-01

    Summary As part of our screening for anti-HIV agents from marine invertebrates, the MeOH extract of Didemnum molle was tested and showed moderate in vitro anti-HIV activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a large scale extract allowed the identification of two new cyclopeptides, mollamides E and F (1 and 2), and one new tris-phenethyl urea, molleurea A (3). The absolute configurations were established using the advanced Marfey’s method. The three compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity in both an HIV integrase inhibition assay and a cytoprotective cell-based assay. Compound 2 was active in both assays with IC50 values of 39 and 78 µM, respectively. Compound 3 was only active in the cytoprotective cell-based assay with an IC50 value of 60 µM. PMID:22845329

  8. Thiazoline peptides and a tris-phenethyl urea from Didemnum molle with anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Harper, Mary Kay; Pond, Christopher D; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M; Van Wagoner, Ryan M

    2012-08-24

    As part of our screening for anti-HIV agents from marine invertebrates, the MeOH extract of Didemnum molle was tested and showed moderate in vitro anti-HIV activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a large-scale extract allowed the identification of two new cyclopeptides, mollamides E and F (1 and 2), and one new tris-phenethyl urea, molleurea A (3). The absolute configurations were established using the advanced Marfey's method. The three compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity in both an HIV integrase inhibition assay and a cytoprotective cell-based assay. Compound 2 was active in both assays with IC(50) values of 39 and 78 μM, respectively. Compound 3 was active only in the cytoprotective cell-based assay, with an IC(50) value of 60 μM.

  9. Novel anti-HIV peptides containing multiple copies of artificially designed heptad repeat motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Weiguo; Qi Zhi; Pan Chungen; Xue Na; Debnath, Asim K.; Qie Jiankun; Jiang Shibo Liu Keliang

    2008-10-03

    The peptidic anti-HIV drug T20 (Fuzeon) and its analog C34 share a common heptad repeat (HR) sequence, but they have different functional domains, i.e., pocket- and lipid-binding domains (PBD and LBD, respectively). We hypothesize that novel anti-HIV peptides may be designed by using artificial sequences containing multiple copies of HR motifs plus zero, one or two functional domains. Surprisingly, we found that the peptides containing only the non-natural HR sequences could significantly inhibit HIV-1 infection, while addition of PBD and/or LBD to the peptides resulted in significant improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. These results suggest that these artificial HR sequences, which may serve as structural domains, could be used as templates for the design of novel antiviral peptides against HIV and other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  10. Modern approaches to the investigation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patrick C J

    2002-06-01

    The classic workup of a patient for possible PA is revisited in light of the vanishing Schilling test. The vagaries of testing for B12 and blocking antibodies are reexamined. The advantages and disadvantages of newer tests such as MMA and serum gastrin levels are catalogued. At this juncture in the evolution of new test strategies, there is a considerable controversy regarding the significance of high MMA levels in the face of normal B12 levels, particularly in the elderly. Hopefully, this controversy will soon be resolved and the newer crop of tests will be proven and accepted in the workplace. Still, the words of Alexander Pope spring to mind: "Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside."

  11. Stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles for multiple anti-HIV microbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Namita; Oh, Byeongtaek; Lee, Chi H.

    2016-05-01

    This study is aimed to develop and evaluate an advanced intravaginal formulation for the delivery of multiple anti-HIV microbicides. Novel stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles (NPs) which protected the encapsulated drugs from being degraded in acidic pH conditions were made of Eudragit S-100® (ES100®), a pH-sensitive polymer. ES100® NPs were prepared using the quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique and loaded with two microbicides namely Tenofovir (TNF) and Etravirine (ETV). The effects of various fabrication parameters on the formulation properties were evaluated for the optimization of ES100® NPs. The morphology of the ES100® NPs was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of NPs containing microbicides individually or in a combination was assessed using cell viability and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. The cellular uptake rates of the model microbicides by human vaginal epithelial cells, VK2 E6/E7 cells, were evaluated using confocal microscopy and florescence-assisted cell sorting technique. ES100® NPs had a spherical shape, smooth surface, and uniform texture with a little aggregation. The average particle size for NPs loaded with TNF ranged from 125 to 230 nm, whereas those for ETV-loaded NPs ranged from 160 to 280 nm. ES100® NPs had zeta potential in the range of -5 to -10 mV. In-vitro release studies displayed the potential benefits of ES100® NPs in retaining and protecting the loaded microbicides at vaginal pH (acidic), but immediately releasing them as the pH changes to neutral or 7.4 (physiological pH). Cell viability studies demonstrated that ES100® NPs did not exert any cytotoxicity individually or in a combination of both microbicides. TEER measurements confirmed that ES100® NPs loaded with TNF and ETV did not cause any changes in the barrier integrity of VK2 E6/E7 cell monolayer. The cellular uptake study revealed that ES100® NPs were taken by vaginal epithelial cells through the endocytosis

  12. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Eight Monofloral Iranian Honey Types

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z.multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P.sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies. PMID:25333699

  13. Synthesis and Anti-HIV Activity of Novel 4'-Trifluoromethylated 5'-Deoxycarbocyclic Nucleoside Phosphonic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jee, Jun-Pil; Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthetic route to novel 4'-trifluoromethylated 5'-deoxycarbocyclic nucleoside phosphonic acids was described from α-trifluoromethyl-α,β-unsaturated ester. Coupling of purine nucleosidic bases with cyclopentanol using a Mitsunobu reaction gave the nucleoside intermediates which were further phosphonated and hydrolyzed to reach desired nucleoside analogs. Synthesized nucleoside analogs were tested for anti-HIV activity as well as cytotoxicity. Adenine analog 22 shows significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 = 8.3 μM) up to 100 μM.

  14. New anti-HIV aptamers based on tetra-end-linked DNA G-quadruplexes: effect of the base sequence on anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, Valentina; Oliviero, Giorgia; Amato, Jussara; Borbone, Nicola; D'Errico, Stefano; Mayol, Luciano; Piccialli, Vincenzo; Haider, Shozeb; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Balzarini, Jan; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2012-10-04

    This communication reports on the synthesis and biophysical, biological and SAR studies of a small library of new anti-HIV aptamers based on the tetra-end-linked G-quadruplex structure. The new aptamers showed EC(50) values against HIV-1 in the range of 0.04-0.15 μM as well as affinities for the HIV-1 gp120 envelope in the same order of magnitude.

  15. Dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2005-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA segments that serve as ligand-responsive genetic control elements. They modulate the expression of certain genes in response to changing concentrations of metabolites. In this paper, we study the dynamic behaviour of the B12 riboswitch in E. coli—perhaps the most widely studied and best known of all riboswitches—through a mathematical model of its regulatory pathway. To carry this out, we simulate dynamic experiments in which the bacterial B12 uptake capacity is measured after being depleted of this vitamin for a long time. The results of these simulations compare favourably with reported experimental data. The model also predicts that an overshoot of intracellular B12 should be observed if the replenishment experiments were to be carried out for longer times. This behaviour is discussed in terms of a possible evolutionary advantage for E. coli, together with the fact that regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels is almost equivalent dynamically.

  16. Neurologic aspects of cobalamin (B12) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Optimal functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system is dependent on a constant supply of appropriate nutrients. Particularly important for optimal functioning of the nervous system is cobalamin (vitamin B12). Cobalamin deficiency is particularly common in the elderly and after gastric surgery. Many patients with clinically expressed cobalamin deficiency have intrinsic factor-related malabsorption such as that seen in pernicious anemia. The commonly recognized neurological manifestations of cobalamin deficiency include a myelopathy with or without an associated neuropathy. This review deals with neurological aspects of vitamin B12 deficiency and attempts to highlight recent developments. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preventing vitamin B12 deficiency in South Asian women of childbearing age: a randomised controlled trial comparing an oral vitamin B12 supplement with B12 dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Mearns, G J; Koziol-McLain, J; Obolonkin, V; Rush, E C

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness, acceptability and sustainability of interventions to reduce vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in South Asian women before conception. A 6-month randomised controlled trial conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants (62 South Asian women, 18-50 years old) were stratified by dietary practices, then randomised to three treatment groups: B12 Supplement (oral cyanocobalamin 6 μg/day) (n=21), Placebo (n=21), or B12 Dietary Advice (n=20). Primary outcome measures were changes in B12 biomarkers (serum B12 and holotranscobalamin (holoTC)) at 6 months. Dietary B12 intake was estimated from a B12 food-specific frequency questionnaire (B12FFQ). Intention-to-treat analysis was applied using 'last observation carried forward' method. Changes in B12 biomarkers by treatment were compared using analysis of variance. Pearson's correlations tested relationships between dietary B12 intake and B12 biomarkers. At baseline, 48% of women tested as insufficient or deficient in serum B12 (<222 pmol/l) and 51% as insufficient or deficient in holoTC (<45 pmol/l). B12 status was moderately correlated with dietary B12 intake (r=0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.3-0.7)) and 44% of women reported insufficient dietary intake (<2.4 μg/day). B12 Supplement was the only treatment group to record a significant increase in B12 biomarkers over 6 months: serum B12 by 30% (95% CI (11-48%)) and holoTC by 42% (12-72%). The prevalence of B12 insufficiency among Auckland South Asian women is high and moderately correlated with inadequate intake of foods that contain B12. Cyanocobalamin supplementation (6 μg/day) was associated with improved B12 biomarkers, with a potential to improve preconception B12 status in South Asian women.

  18. Anti-HIV activities of natural antioxidant caffeic acid derivatives: toward an antiviral supplementation diet.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Fabrice; Cotelle, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was designed to rapidly control HIV replication. It has had a significant impact on patient health and progression of AIDS in developed countries, but its success has not been complete. HAART strategy still suffers from issues of patient compliance, cost, deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, expansion of novel anti-HIV drugs and targets will be critical in the coming years. In this context, discovering anti-HIV agents from natural sources and particularly from plants, may highlight the principle of a nutritional antioxidant antiretroviral diet. In this paper, we review the putative anti-HIV activity of simple caffeic acid derivatives, together with their antioxidant properties. Toxicity, metabolism and bioavailability, when known, will also be detailed. Well-known caffeic acid derivatives, such as chicoric, rosmarinic and lithospermic acids, may be designed as future leads multi-target anti-HIV compounds and the plants and vegetables containing them as potent nutritional therapeutic supplementation source. They are not expected to replace the actual antiretroviral therapy, but more likely, to complete and perhaps lighten it by adapted diet.

  19. Plant-derived triterpenoids and analogues as antitumor and anti-HIV agents†

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Reen-Yen; Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the antitumor and anti-HIV activities of naturally occurring triterpenoids, including the lupane, ursane, oleanane, lanostane, dammarane, and miscellaneous scaffolds. Structure–activity relationships of selected natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives are also discussed. PMID:19779642

  20. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  1. Prevalence and evaluation of B12 deficiency in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Nabriski, Dan A; Braverman, Lewis E; Shilo, Lotan; Weiss, Eliahu; Reshef, Tamar; Shapiro, Menachem S; Shenkman, Louis

    2006-09-01

    Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) have a higher prevalence of pernicious anemia compared with the general population. Clinical signs of B12 deficiency may be subtle and missed, particularly in patients with known autoimmune disease. We assessed the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with AITD and whether their evaluation may be simplified by measuring fasting gastrin levels. Serum B12 levels was measured in 115 patients with AITD (7 men and 108 women), with a mean age of 47 +/- 15 years. In patients with low serum B12 levels (< or =133 pmol/L), fasting serum gastrin and parietal cell antibodies (PCA) were measured. Thirty-two patients (28%) with AITD had low B12 levels. Fasting serum gastrin was measured in 26 and was higher than normal in 8 patients. PCA were also measured in 27 patients with B12 deficiency and were positive in 8 patients. Five patients with high gastrin levels underwent gastroscopy with biopsy, and atrophic gastritis was diagnosed in all. The prevalence of pernicious anemia as assessed by high serum gastrin levels in patients with low B12 was 31%. Patients with AITD have a high prevalence of B12 deficiency and particularly of pernicious anemia. The evaluation of B12 deficiency can be simplified by measuring fasting serum gastrin and, if elevated, referring the patient for gastroscopy.

  2. Profound Vitamin B12 Deficiency in a 1-Year-Old Child in Botswana: A Call to Initiate Early Empiric Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gajudhur, Juyotee; Slone, Jeremy S; Mehta, Parth S; Mahoney, Donald

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a rare diagnosis in young children. We present the case of a 1-year-old Zimbabwean child with profound anemia. Further testing revealed undetectable levels of vitamin B12 and positive intrinsic factor antibodies that were drawn after the initiation of empiric treatment with parenteral vitamin B12. We report the evaluation and management of vitamin B12 deficiency in a resource-limited setting. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in children presenting with unexplained cytopenias with consideration of empiric treatment with parenteral vitamin B12, as developmental and neurological complications of vitamin B12 deficiency can be devastating and permanent.

  3. Folate, vitamin B12 and human health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared func...

  4. [Folate, vitamin B12 and human health].

    PubMed

    Brito, Alex; Hertrampf, Eva; Olivares, Manuel; Gaitán, Diego; Sánchez, Hugo; Allen, Lindsay H; Uauy, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared functions and intertwined metabolic pathways that define the size of the "methyl donor" pool utilized in multiple metabolic pathways; these include DNA methylation and synthesis of nucleic acids. In Chile, folate deficiency is virtually nonexistent, while vitamin B12 deficiency affects approximately 8.5-51% depending on the cut-off value used to define deficiency. Folate is found naturally mainly in vegetables or added as folic acid to staple foods. Vitamin B12 in its natural form is present only in foods of animal origin, which is why deficit is more common among strict vegetarians and populations with a low intake of animal foods. Poor folate status in vulnerable women of childbearing age increases the risk of neural tube birth defects, so the critical time for the contribution of folic acid is several months before conception since neural tube closure occurs during the first weeks of life. The absorption of vitamin B12 from food is lower in older adults, who are considered to have higher risk of gastric mucosa atrophy, altered production of intrinsic factor and acid secretion. Deficiency of these vitamins is associated with hematological disorders. Vitamin B12 deficiency can also induce clinical and sub-clinical neurological and of other disorders. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on recent advances in the basic and applied knowledge of these vitamins relative to human health.

  5. [Vegetarians are at high risk of vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Javid, Parva; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-04

    Since vegetarians have a lower intake of vitamin B12 (B12) than non-vegetarians, they are at increased risk of developing B12 deficiency. The less animal products the food contains the worse the B12 status. However, even lacto-ovo-vegetarians run the risk of becoming deficient in B12. Vegetarians are recommended regularly to take supplements of B12, and they should be informed of the lacking content of B12 of plant products and the hazards of B12 deficiency. Furthermore, vegetarians should routinely be checked for possible B12 deficiency.

  6. Crystal structure of a 3B3 variant - A broadly neutralizing HIV-1 scFv antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K. Reed; Walsh, Scott T.R.

    2009-12-10

    We present the crystal structure determination of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 single-chain variable fragment antibody variant, 3B3, at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. This 3B3 variant was derived from the b12 antibody, using phage display and site-directed mutagenesis of the variable heavy chain (V{sub H}) complementary-determining regions (CDRs). 3B3 exhibits enhanced binding affinity and neutralization activity against several cross-clade primary isolates of HIV-1 by interaction with the recessed CD4-binding site on the gp120 envelope protein. Comparison with the structures of the unbound and bound forms of b12, the 3B3 structure closely resembles these structures with minimal differences with two notable exceptions. First, there is a reorientation of the CDR-H3 of the V{sub H} domain where the primary sequences evolved from b12 to 3B3. The structural changes in CDR-H3 of 3B3, in light of the b12-gp120 complex structure, allow for positioning an additional Trp side chain in the binding interface with gp120. Finally, the second region of structural change involves two peptide bond flips in CDR-L3 of the variable light (VL) domain triggered by a point mutation in CDR-H3 of Q100eY resulting in changes in the intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterning between the VL and VH domains. Thus, the enhanced binding affinities and neutralization capabilities of 3B3 relative to b12 probably result from higher hydrophobic driving potential by burying more aromatic residues at the 3B3-gp120 interface and by indirect stabilization of intramolecular contacts of the core framework residues between the VL and VH domains possibly through more favorable entropic effect through the expulsion of water.

  7. An Effective Vaccination Approach Augments anti-HIV Systemic and Vaginal Immunity in Mice with Decreased HIV-1 Susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Shi, Guoping; Tang, Haijun; Lewis, Dorothy E; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 preferentially infects activated CD4+ T cells expressing α4β7 integrin and conventional vaccination approaches non-selectively induce immune responses including α4β7high CD4+ T cells, suggesting that current candidate AIDS vaccines may produce more target cells for HIV-1 and paradoxically enhance HIV-1 infection. Thus it remains a challenge to selectively induce robust anti-HIV immunity without the unwanted HIV-1 susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T cells. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that targets ALDH1a2, a retinoic acid producing enzyme in dendritic cells (DCs). Silencing ALDH1a2 in DCs enhanced the maturation and production of proinflammatory cytokines of DCs and promoted Th1/Th2 differentiation while suppressing Treg. ALDH1a2-silenced DCs effectively downregulated the expression of guthoming receptors α4β7 and CCR9 on activated T and B lymphocytes. Consequently, intranasal immunization of a lentiviral vaccine encoding ALDH1a2 shRNA and HIV-1 gp140 redirected gp140-specific mucosal T cell and antibody responses from the gut to the vaginal tract, while dramatically enhancing systemic gp140-specific immune responses. We further demonstrated that silencing ALDH1a2 in human DCs resulted in downregulation of β7 expression on activated autologous CD4+ T cells. Hence this study provides a unique and effective strategy to induce α4β7low anti-HIV immune responses. PMID:23157585

  8. An effective vaccination approach augments anti-HIV systemic and vaginal immunity in mice with decreased HIV-1 susceptible α4β7high CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Shi, Guoping; Tang, Haijun; Lewis, Dorothy E; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 preferentially infects activated CD4(+) T cells expressing α4β7 integrin and conventional vaccination approaches non-selectively induce immune responses including α4β7(high) CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that current candidate AIDS vaccines may produce more target cells for HIV-1 and paradoxically enhance HIV-1 infection. Thus it remains a challenge to selectively induce robust anti-HIV immunity without the unwanted HIV-1 susceptible α4β77(high) CD4(+)+ T cells. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that targets ALDH1a2, a retinoic acid producing enzyme in dendritic cells (DCs). Silencing ALDH1a2 in DCs enhanced the maturation and production of proinflammatory cytokines of DCs and promoted Th1/Th2 differentiation while suppressing Treg. ALDH1a2-silenced DCs effectively downregulated the expression of guthoming receptors α4β77 and CCR9 on activated T and B lymphocytes. Consequently, intranasal immunization of a lentiviral vaccine encoding ALDH1a2 shRNA and HIV-1 gp140 redirected gp140-specific mucosal T cell and antibody responses from the gut to the vaginal tract, while dramatically enhancing systemic gp140-specific immune responses. We further demonstrated that silencing ALDH1a2 in human DCs resulted in downregulation of β7 expression on activated autologous CD4(+) T cells. Hence this study provides a unique and effective strategy to induce α4β7(low) anti-HIV immune responses.

  9. VirB12 is a serological marker of Brucella infection in experimental and natural hosts.

    PubMed

    Rolán, Hortensia G; den Hartigh, Andreas B; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Ficht, Thomas; Adams, L Garry; Tsolis, Renée M

    2008-02-01

    The Brucella species type IV secretion system, encoded by the virB1-12 locus, is required for intracellular replication and persistent infection in vivo. The requirement of VirB proteins for infection suggests that they are expressed in vivo and may therefore represent serological markers of infection. To test this idea, we purified recombinant VirB1, VirB5, VirB11, and VirB12 and tested for their recognition by antibodies in sera from experimentally infected mice and goats by using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody responses to VirB12 but not to VirB1, VirB5, or VirB11 were detected in 20/20 mice experimentally inoculated with Brucella abortus and 12/12 goats experimentally infected with Brucella melitensis. The potential use of VirB12 as a serological tool for the diagnosis of brucellosis was evaluated in the natural bovine host. Serum samples from 145 cattle of known serology (29% negative and 71% positive) were analyzed for the production of antibody responses to VirB12. One hundred two cattle samples (70.3%) were positive for antibodies to VirB12, while 43 samples were negative (29.7%). A positive serological response to VirB12 correlated with positive serology to whole B. abortus antigen in 99% of samples tested. These results show that VirB12 is expressed during infection of both experimental and natural hosts of Brucella species, and they suggest that VirB12 may be a useful serodiagnostic marker for brucellosis.

  10. Vitamin B12, folic acid, and bone.

    PubMed

    Swart, Karin M A; van Schoor, Natasja M; Lips, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency are associated with a higher serum concentration of homocysteine. A high serum homocysteine is a risk factor for fractures. Both vitamins play a role in the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. The pathophysiology from a high serum homocysteine to fractures is not completely clear, but might involve bone mineral density, bone turnover, bone blood flow, DNA methylation, and/or physical function and fall risk. Genetic variation, especially polymorphisms of the gene encoding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase may play a role in homocysteine metabolism and fracture risk. It is uncertain whether supplementation with vitamin B12 and folate can decrease fracture incidence. One double blind clinical trial in post-stroke patients showed that these B vitamins could decrease hip fracture incidence, but the results of further clinical trials should be awaited before a definite conclusion can be drawn.

  11. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  12. Oral vitamin B12 treatment is effective for children with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Aysenur; Reis, Pınar Gökçe; Erduran, Erol

    2014-09-01

    Despite being one of common preventable deficiency disorders, vitamin B12 (vit-B12) deficiency can lead to serious health problems both in children and adult. The familiar treatment through parenteral route for vit-B12 deficiency frequently leads to poor adherence, and adequate response to treatment has lead to interest in oral supplementation. This study investigates the efficacy of oral vit-B12 treatment in children with nutritional vit-B12 deficiency. Forty-seven children (from 1 month to 17 years) with vit-B12 levels below 200 pg/mL were allocated either of two study groups: Group 1 (1-20 months) and Group 2 (6-17 years) which were subdivided according to the duration of treatment (Group 1A&2A: 4 months; Group 1B&2B: 8 months of 1000 μg oral vit-B12, every day for a week, every other day for 2 weeks, 2 days a week for 2 weeks, then once a week). Vit-B12 levels among all groups were significantly restored following high oral vit-B12 doses (P = 0.013, P = 0.001), the regimen being more effective in Group1A and Group1B. Correlation analysis of serum vit-B12 levels and age at the end of treatment revealed a decreasing trend with the increasing patient age (corelation respectively -65.2%, P = 0.08; -35.4%; P = 0.25). Data from this study indicate that oral vit-B12 (1000 μg) for 4 months is effective, giving clinicians more choice, for treatment of children with nutritional vit-B12 deficiency. However, despite this high dose, lower levels were achieved in older children indicating the necessity of dosage adjustment in accordance with body weight. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. Do all the patients with vitamin B12 deficiency have pernicious anemia?

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Y-F; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may result in pernicious anemia (PA). This study evaluated whether all the patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had PA. The blood hemoglobin (Hb), iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine concentrations and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in 90 vitamin B12-deficient patients were measured and compared with the corresponding data in 180 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. PA was defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as having an Hb concentration <13 g/dl for men and <12 g/dl for women, an MCV ≧ 100 fl, a serum vitamin B12 level <200 pg/ml, and serum gastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity. We found that 35 (38.9%) and 20 (22.2%) patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had deficiencies of Hb (men <13 g/dl, women <12 g/dl) and iron (<60 μg/dl), respectively. Moreover, 65 (72.2%) and 37 (41.1%) patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had abnormally high blood homocysteine level (>12.7 μM) and high MCV (≧100 fl), respectively. In addition, 43 (47.8%) vitamin B12-deficient patients with had GPCA positivity. Patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had a significantly higher frequency of Hb or iron deficiency, of abnormally elevated blood homocysteine level or high MCV, and of GPCA positivity than healthy control subjects (all P-values < 0.001). However, only 17 (18.9%) of 90 vitamin B12-deficient patients were diagnosed as having PA by the WHO definition. Only 18.9% of patients with vitamin B12 deficiency are discovered to have PA by the WHO definition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. False-normal vitamin B12 results in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P; Narayanan, S; Cook, P

    2015-12-01

    Pernicious anaemia is a common autoimmune disorder with a prevalence of approximately 4% amongst Europeans. If untreated, it can result in permanent neurological disability or death. Central to the diagnosis is establishing the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Concern has been raised recently regarding false-normal results obtained with competitive-binding vitamin B12 assays performed on automated biochemistry platforms in patients with pernicious anaemia due to the presence of interfering anti-intrinsic factor antibodies in the patient sample. We report a case in which diagnosis of pernicious anaemia was delayed due to false-normal vitamin B12 results. Questioning the results in light of high pre-test probability, and knowledge of the role of functional markers of vitamin B12 deficiency enabled the correct diagnosis to be made so that effective treatment could be initiated. It is crucial that those who frequently request vitamin B12 are aware of the potential problems with the available assays and how these problems can be addressed. We suggest that all patients with normal vitamin B12 levels where there is a high clinical suspicion for deficiency such as a macrocytic anaemia, neurological symptoms or megaloblastic bone marrow should have a functional assay of vitamin B12 (plasma homocysteine or methylmalonic acid) checked to further investigate for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  15. Vitamin B-12 radioassay in the diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    It became apparent in 1978 that some radioassays for Vitamin B-12 were falsely normal. This investigation was performed to assure the accuracy of our assay. False normal B-12 levels may result in permanent damage or delay in relieving distressful symptoms. False low levels result in no permanent sequalae. ''Normal'' values should be set with these consequences in mind. The authors reviewed clinical charts on patients with <300 pg/m1 serum B-12 in 1000 consecutive determinations and all patients newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. Simu1TRAC Radioassay, Becton Dickinson Co., modified by correction for serum nonspecific binding is used. ''Normal'' values (234-1000 pg/m1) are based on 47 outpatients. 176 of the 1000 assays resulted in levels <300 pg/m1. 87 were from other location with no clinical information. 89 assays on Marshfield Clinic patients included 2 duplicates. 45 patients were newly diagnosed B-12 deficient 1/1/83 to 10/14/83. 12 were diagnosed elsewhere and on therapy. 32 had assays <234 pg/m1. 1 with normal B-12 is ''possibly deficient'', a Schilling test is scheduled. The authors conclude that their B-12 assay has correctly identified 32 clinically accepted B-12 deficient patients. 1 possibly deficient patient was normal. 25 of 42 patients with levels below normal are deficient. The false positive rate is felt acceptable in view of the false negative rate and the consequences of the respective errors.

  16. Staging vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) status in vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Herbert, V

    1994-05-01

    When one stops eating vitamin B-12 (cobalamins), one passes through four stages of negative cobalamin balance: serum depletion [low holotranscobalamin II, ie, low vitamin B-12 on transcobalamin II (TCII)], cell depletion (decreasing holohaptocorrin and low red cell vitamin B-12 concentrations), biochemical deficiency (slowed DNA synthesis, elevated serum homocysteine and methylmalonate concentrations), and, finally, clinical deficiency (anemia). Serum vitamin B-12 is on two proteins: the circulating vitamin B-12 delivery protein, TCII, and the circulating vitamin B-12 storage protein, haptocorrin. Because TCII is depleted of vitamin B-12 within days after absorption stops, the best screening test for early negative vitamin B-12 balance is a measurement of vitamin B-12 on TCII (holoTCII). HoloTCII falls below the bottom of its normal range long before total serum vitamin B-12 (which is mainly vitamin B-12 on haptocorrin) falls below the bottom of its normal range.

  17. Rapid Conformational Epitope Mapping of anti-gp120 Antibodies with a Designed Mutant Panel Displayed on Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Fink, Jordi; Kriegsman, Barry; Xin, Yu Hui; Zhu, Hanna; Hanson, Melissa; Irvine, Darrell J.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2013-01-01

    gp120 is a substrate for protein engineering both for HIV immunogen design and as a bait for isolating anti-HIV antibodies from patient samples. In this work we describe the display of a stripped core gp120 on the yeast cell surface. Validation against a panel of neutralizing antibodies confirms that yeast-displayed gp120 presents the CD4 binding site in the correct conformation. We map the epitope of the broadly neutralizing anti-gp120 antibody VRC01 using both a random mutagenesis library and a defined mutant panel, and find the resultant epitope maps are consistent with one another and with the crystallographically identified contact residues. Mapping the VRC01-competitive antibodies b12 and b13 reveals energetic differences in their epitopes that are not obvious from existing crystal structures. These data suggest mutation sets that abrogate binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies with greater specificity than the canonical mutation D368R, useful in rapidly assessing the nature of a vaccine response. PMID:23159556

  18. Preparation of vitamin B-12-free serum for the use in vitamin B-12 radioassays.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, J; van Kapel, J; Abels, J

    1979-07-02

    In radioassays for serum vitamin B-12, the separation of free and bound vitamin is usually made with charcoal absorption. The specificity of this separation depends on the amount of charcoal and the protein content and constitution of the medium. The large difference in protein concentration between the samples for the dilution curve and the serum samples introduces an uncontrolled variable in the test. In order to equalize the experimental circumstances, the standard dilutions were made in serum freed from vitamin B-12 after boiling the serum for 20 min in a 4-fold dilution with glutamic acid buffer at pH 3.3 and subsequent passage over a CH-Sepharose 4-B column complexed with hog intrinsic factor (IF). The vitamin B-12-binding capacity of such an affinity column prepared from 1 g CH-Sepharose and 20 mg IF, suffices for the absorption of vitamin B-12 in 3000 ml serum from which 300 series of vitamin B-12 standard solutions can be made. Our first results with this method confirm that the charcoal absorption radioassay has become more accurate by the use of vitamin B-12-free serum in the standard dilutions.

  19. Anti-HIV-1 activity of elafin is more potent than its precursor's, trappin-2, in genital epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Drannik, Anna G; Nag, Kakon; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Henrick, Bethany M; Jain, Sumiti; Ball, T Blake; Plummer, Francis A; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2012-04-01

    Cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) is a natural source of anti-HIV-1 factors; however, molecular characterization of the anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that CVLs from HIV-1-resistant (HIV-R) compared to HIV-1-susceptible (HIV-S) commercial sex workers (CSWs) contain significantly larger amounts of serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr) and its processed form, elafin (E). We assessed anti-HIV-1 activity of CVLs of CSWs and recombinant E and Tr on genital epithelial cells (ECs) that possess (TZM-bl) or lack (HEC-1A) canonical HIV-1 receptors. Our results showed that immunodepletion of 30% of Tr/E from CVL accounted for up to 60% of total anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL. Knockdown of endogenous Tr/E in HEC-1A cells resulted in significantly increased shedding of infectious R5 and X4 HIV-1. Pretreatment of R5, but not X4 HIV-1, with either Tr or E led to inhibition of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. Interestingly, when either HIV-1 or cells lacking canonical HIV-1 receptors were pretreated with Tr or E, HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis were significantly reduced, and decreased attachment was not associated with altered expression of syndecan-1 or CXCR4. Determination of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of Tr and E anti-HIV-1 activity indicated that E is ∼130 times more potent than its precursor, Tr, despite their equipotent antiprotease activities. This study provides the first experimental evidence that (i) Tr and E are among the principal anti-HIV-1 molecules of CVL; (ii) Tr and E affect cell attachment and transcytosis of HIV-1; (iii) E is more efficient than Tr regarding anti-HIV-1 activity; and (iv) the anti-HIV-1 effect of Tr and E is contextual.

  20. An association between Helicobacter pylori infection and serum vitamin B12 levels in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Shuval-Sudai, Ora; Granot, Esther

    2003-02-01

    To determine whether serum vitamin B12 levels in non-vitamin B12 deficient healthy adults correlate with serological evidence of H. pylori infection. An association between H. pylori infection and vitamin B12 deficiency has been recently reported. 133 adults, presenting to a community based primary care clinic who met the following exclusion criteria; history of H. pylori eradication or antacid use, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, previous gastrointestinal surgery, a vegetarian diet or multivitamin supplementation were studied. Blood was drawn for a complete blood count, serum vitamin B12, gastrin, folic acid and H. pylori IgG antibodies. Subjects with vitamin B12 < or = 145 ng/mL (deficient range) were excluded. Of 133 subjects 96 (72.2%) were seropositive for H. pylori IgG antibodies (HP+). Age of HP(+) subjects did not differ from that of seronegative subjects (HP-); 52.8 +/- 1.6 mean +/- SE versus 49.2 +/- 2.9 ( = NS). Prevalence of HP seropositivity was significantly higher among subjects with borderline (>145-180 pg/mL) or low normal (>180-250 pg/mL) vitamin B12 levels than among those with vitamin B12 > 250 pg/mL; among 25 subjects with vitamin B12 > 145-180 pg/mL 92% were seropositive and among 47 subjects with vitamin B12 > 180-250 pg/mL 89% were seropositive as compared with 31/61 (51%) of subjects with B12 > 250 pg/mL, Fisher exact test < 0.0001. Vitamin B12 levels did not correlate with age (r = -0.07). Gastrin levels (pg/mL) did not differ significantly between groups; 70.2 +/- 5.8 in HP(+) versus 56.0 +/- 12.4 in HP(-). The higher prevalence of H. pylori infection among subjects with serum vitamin B12 levels that are within the lower end of the normal range suggests a causal relationship between H pylori infection and vitamin B12 levels in healthy adults.

  1. [Anti-HIV chemical constituents of aerial parts of Caragana rosea].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-xun; Qi, Jian-bin; Cheng, Ke-jun; Hu, Chang-qi

    2007-02-01

    This study was intended to look for anti-HIV chemical constituents of aerial parts of Caragana rosea Turcz. Column chromatographic technique was used for the isolation and purification of constituents of Caragana rosea under the guide of anti-HIV assay. The structures were established on the basis of physical and chemical properties and spectroscopic data. Five compounds were obtained from the EtOAc fraction of aerial parts of Caragana rosea and identified as myricetin (1), mearnsetin (2), p-hydroxy cinnamic acid (3), cararosinol A (4) and cararosinol B (5). At the same time, one possible transformation route between cararosinol B and kobophenol A, another resveratrol tetramer isolated from this plant previously, was proposed. Compounds 4, 5 are new resveratrol tetramers, compounds 1 -3 were isolated from this plant for the first time. All compounds showed no activities in an in vitro assay against HIV-1.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  3. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery.

  4. Effects of alpha interferon treatment on intrinsic anti-HIV-1 immunity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Deng, Xutao; Liegler, Teri; Guatelli, John C; Salama, Mohamed S; Ghanem, Hussam El-din A; Rauch, Andri; Ledergerber, Bruno; Deeks, Steven G; Günthard, Huldrych F; Wong, Joseph K; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-α) suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro by inducing cell-intrinsic retroviral restriction mechanisms. We investigated the effects of IFN-α/ribavirin (IFN-α/riba) treatment on 34 anti-HIV-1 restriction factors in vivo. Expression of several anti-HIV-1 restriction factors was significantly induced by IFN-α/riba in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected individuals. Fold induction of cumulative restriction factor expression in CD4(+) T cells was significantly correlated with viral load reduction during IFN-α/riba treatment (r(2) = 0.649; P < 0.016). Exogenous IFN-α induces supraphysiologic restriction factor expression associated with a pronounced decrease in HIV-1 viremia.

  5. Development of an implantable infusion pump for sustained anti-HIV drug administration.

    PubMed

    Baert, Lieven; Schueller, Laurent; Tardy, Yanik; Macbride, Doug; Klooster, Gerben van't; Borghys, Herman; Clessens, Ellen; Van Den Mooter, Guy; Van Gyseghem, Elke; Van Remoortere, Pieter; Wigerinck, Piet; Rosier, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Factors such as insufficient drug potency, non-compliance and restricted tissue penetration contribute to incomplete suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the difficulty to control this infection. Infusion via standard catheters can be a source of infection, which is potentially life threatening in these patients. We developed an implantable infusion pump, allowing to accommodate large volumes (16-50mL) of high viscous solutions (up to 23.96mPas at 39 degrees C) of anti-HIV agents and providing sustained release of medication: a standard Codman 3000 pump, which was initially developed to release aqueous solutions ( approximately 0.7mPas) into the spinal cord such as for pain medication, was transformed for release of viscous solutions up to 40mPas by adapting the diameter of the capillary flow restrictor, the capillary length and way of catheterisation--by placing the indwelling catheter in the vena cava. A pilot study of the pump implanted in 2 dogs showed continuous steady-state release of the protease inhibitor darunavir (25mg/dog/day administered for 25 days), thereby achieving plasma concentration levels of approximately 40ng/mL. Steady-state plasma levels were reproducible after monthly refill of the pumps. In conclusion, the implantable adapted Codman 3000 constant-flow infusion pump customized to anti-HIV therapy allows sustained release of anti-HIV medication and may represent an opportunity to reduce the pill burden and complexity of dosing schemes associated with common anti-HIV therapy.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of a New Scorpion Venom Peptide Derivative Kn2-7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoqing; Cao, Luyang; Zhong, Maohua; Zhang, Yan; Han, Chen; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Jingyi; Zhou, Dihan; Shi, Wei; He, Benxia; Liu, Fang; Yu, Jie; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Li, Wenxin; Guo, Deying; Cao, Zhijian; Yan, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years, HIV/AIDS has wreaked havoc in the world. In the absence of an effective vaccine for HIV, development of new anti-HIV agents is urgently needed. We previously identified the antiviral activities of the scorpion-venom-peptide-derived mucroporin-M1 for three RNA viruses (measles viruses, SARS-CoV, and H5N1). In this investigation, a panel of scorpion venom peptides and their derivatives were designed and chosen for assessment of their anti-HIV activities. A new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7 was identified as the most potent anti-HIV-1 peptide by screening assays with an EC50 value of 2.76 µg/ml (1.65 µM) and showed low cytotoxicity to host cells with a selective index (SI) of 13.93. Kn2-7 could inhibit all members of a standard reference panel of HIV-1 subtype B pseudotyped virus (PV) with CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 PV strain. Furthermore, it also inhibited a CXCR4-tropic replication-competent strain of HIV-1 subtype B virus. Binding assay of Kn2-7 to HIV-1 PV by Octet Red system suggested the anti-HIV-1 activity was correlated with a direct interaction between Kn2-7 and HIV-1 envelope. These results demonstrated that peptide Kn2-7 could inhibit HIV-1 by direct interaction with viral particle and may become a promising candidate compound for further development of microbicide against HIV-1. PMID:22536342

  7. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds

    PubMed Central

    Forthal, Donald N.; Phan, Tran B.; Slepenkin, Anatoly V.; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. We determined the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides. Methods Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZMbl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Anti-viral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the anti-bacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe2+, we determined whether Fe2+ and other cations could reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds. We also employed real-time PCR to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results We identified four compounds with 50% HIV-1 inhibitory concentrations of 1 to 7 μM. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether targets for virus replication were TZMbl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe2+, but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. Conclusions We identified salicylidene acylhydrazides with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the μM range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  8. The CD4 molecule, the human immunodeficiency virus and anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Del Guercio, P; Zanetti, M

    1987-01-01

    The CD4 molecule is the cellular receptor for human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). Administration of antibodies to the equivalent molecule in mice (L3T4) induces unresponsiveness to antigens given to or around the same time. Here Paolo del Guercio and Maurizio Zanetti suggest that in AIDS patients anti-idiotypic antibodies elicited to anti-HIV antibodies may bind to CD4 molecules, inducing unresponsiveness to viral and other antigens as anti-L3T4 antibodies do in mice. This possibility may hinder attempts to establish anti-HIV immunity by vaccination.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B 12 test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862....1810 Vitamin B 12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to measure vitamin B12 in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  14. Synthesis and anti-HIV activities of symmetrical dicarboxylate esters of dinucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Hitesh K; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Parang, Keykavous

    2012-09-01

    Three nucleoside analogues, 3'-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (FLT), 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT), and 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC) were conjugated with three different dicarboxylic acids to afford the long chain dicarboxylate esters of nucleosides. In general, dinucleoside ester conjugates of FLT and 3TC with long chain dicarboxylic acids exhibited higher anti-HIV activity than their parent nucleosides. Dodecanoate and tetradecanoate dinucleoside ester derivatives of FLT were found to be the most potent compounds with EC(50) values of 0.8-1.0 nM and 3-4 nM against HIV-1(US/92/727) and HIV-1(IIIB) cells, respectively. The anti-HIV activity of the 3TC conjugates containing long chain dicarboxylate diester (EC(50)=3-60 nM) was improved by 1.5-66 fold when compared to 3TC (EC(50)=90-200 nM). This study reveals that the symmetrical ester conjugation of dicarboxylic acids with a number of nucleosides results in conjugates with improved anti-HIV profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  16. CD8+ cell anti-HIV activity correlates with the clinical state of the infected individual.

    PubMed

    Mackewicz, C E; Ortega, H W; Levy, J A

    1991-04-01

    The extent of antiviral activity exhibited in vitro by CD8+lymphocytes from individuals infected by HIV-1 correlates significantly with their clinical status. CD8+ lymphocytes from asymptomatic subjects were found to inhibit HIV-1 replication by 90% or greater at effector/target (E/T) ratios ranging from as low as 0.05 to 0.25. CD8+ cells from 17 of 19 (89%) of these subjects suppressed replication at an E/T ratio of 0.10 or less. CD8+ lymphocytes from symptomatic patients (non-AIDS) inhibited HIV-1 replication at E/T ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.0, and CD8+ cells from 8 of 13 (62%) required ratios greater than 0.10. As a group, patients with AIDS exhibited the lowest degree of anti-HIV activity with their CD8+ lymphocytes. The effective range of E/T ratios from AIDS patients was 0.10-2.0, and 9 of 10 (90%) required E/T ratios greater than 0.25. This anti-HIV activity exhibited by CD8+ cells also correlated significantly with the subject's peripheral blood CD4+ cell count. The relative extent of CD8+ cell anti-HIV-1 activity was not found dependent on variations in the CD4+ target cells and viruses used. These findings suggest that the decreased CD8+ cell antiviral activity is related to progression to disease in HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Methamphetamine Inhibits Toll-Like Receptor 9-Mediated Anti-HIV Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Ping; Ye, Li; Su, Qi-Jian; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Lin, Xin-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is one of the key sensors that recognize viral infection/replication in the host cells. Studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) dysregulated host cell innate immunity and facilitated HIV infection of macrophages. In this study, we present new evidence that METH suppressed TLR9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. Activation of TLR9 by its agonist CpG-ODN 2216 inhibits HIV replication, which was demonstrated by increased expression of TLR9, interferon (IFN)-α, IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) in macrophages. However, METH treatment of macrophages greatly compromised the TLR9 signaling-mediated anti-HIV effect and inhibited the expression of TLR9 downstream signaling factors. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists (SCH23390) could block METH-mediated inhibition of anti-HIV activity of TLR9 signaling. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the METH action showed that METH treatment selectively down-regulated the expression of TLR9 on macrophages, whereas it had little effect on the expression of other TLRs. Collectively, our results provide further evidence that METH suppresses host cell innate immunity against HIV infection by down-regulating TLR9 expression and its signaling-mediated antiviral effect in macrophages. PMID:23751096

  18. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a tripodal receptor that recognizes mannose oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Carrero, Paula; Casanova, Elena; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Madrona, Andrés; Quesada, Ernesto; Peréz-Pérez, María Jesús; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María José; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp120 of the HIV-1 viral envelope has a high content in mannose residues, particularly α-1,2-mannose oligomers. Compounds that interact with these high-mannose type glycans may disturb the interaction between gp120 and its (co)receptors and are considered potential anti-HIV agents. Previously, we demonstrated that a tripodal receptor (1), with a central scaffold of 1,3,5-triethylbenzene substituted with three 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoyl groups, selectively recognizes α-1,2-mannose polysaccharides. Here we present additional studies to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity and the mechanism of antiviral activity of this compound. Our studies indicate that 1 shows anti-HIV-1 activity in the low micromolar range and has pronounced gp120 binding and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory capacity. However, gp120 binding rather than integrase inhibition seems to be the primary mechanism of antiviral activity of 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Conformational studies of anti-HIV nucleosides: A rationale for the activity of {alpha}-nucleosides

    SciTech Connect

    Jalluri, R.K.; Yuh, Y.H.; Taylor, E.W.

    1993-12-31

    In the authors` computational studies of nucleosides, it has been found that the O-C-N anomeric effect is a major factor underlying the eastern barrier to pseudorotation, which has been measured by experimental methods (NMR). By adding torsional parameters for the O-C-N anomeric effect to the Kollman force field (SYBYL 5.5 implementation), the eastern barrier and compute realistic pseudorotational energy profiles for various nucleoside analogs can be reproduced. Although the contribution of the anomeric effect is partially neutralized in {beta}-nucleosides (since it is most favorable in the sterically hindered western conformations), in {alpha}-nucleosides it produces a distinct conformational minimum that is not sterically hindered, in which the 5`-CH{sub 2}OH is equatorial. This permits an {alpha}-nucleoside to mimic a {beta}-nucleoside only if the latter has an ap conformation of the 5`-CH{sub 2}OH, if one considers the relative orientations of O5` and the base, and the distance between O5` and the base nitrogen bonded to C1` (N1 or N9). This could account for the unexpected anti-HIV activity possessed by some {alpha}-nucleoside analogs (dioxolanes and oxathiolanes). The authors have also calculated pseudorotational energy profiles for various anti-HIV {beta}-nucleosides (like AZT, 3`-FDT, DDT, BCH-189, etc.), as well as inactive analogs, in order to quantitatively assess the role of conformational factors in anti-HIV activity.

  20. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  1. Antivitamins B12--A Structure- and Reactivity-Based Concept.

    PubMed

    Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-08-03

    B12 -antimetabolites are compounds that counteract the physiological effects of vitamin B12 and related natural cobalamins. Presented here is a structure- and reactivity-based concept of the specific 'antivitamins B12 ': it refers to analogues of vitamin B12 that display high structural similarity to the vitamin and are 'locked chemically' to prevent their metabolic conversion into the crucial organometallic B12 -cofactors. Application of antivitamins B12 to healthy laboratory animals is, thus, expected to induce symptoms of B12 -deficiency. Antivitamins B12 may, hence, be helpful in elucidating still largely puzzling pathophysiological phenomena associated with B12 -deficiency, and also in recognizing physiological roles of B12 that probably still remain to be discovered.

  2. Hypervitaminosis B12 in maintenance hemodialysis patients receiving massive supplementation of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Canavese, C; Salomone, M; Thea, A; Pacitti, A; Gaido, M; Calitri, V; Pelizza, D; Canavero, W; Vercellone, A

    1986-11-01

    We have administered routinely a multivitamin preparation containing a megadose of B12 to 106 hemodialysis patients after dialysis treatments. We found that these patients had very high levels of serum vitamin B12 which returned to original values only after a period of three years after stopping the vitamin. Discontinuing therapy had no effect on hemoglobin, mean erythrocyte corpuscular volume, or motor nerve conduction velocity. It is not known whether maintaining a prolonged high level of vitamin B12 is harmful. However, animal and epidemiologic studies have suggested that both cobalamin and cobalt may be potentially toxic. In view of the absence of demonstrable benefit and the possible risk of toxicity, we believe that the use of such megadose vitamin compounds in dialysis patients should be re-evaluated.

  3. Vitamin B12-responsive neuropathies: A case series.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Lawrence R

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathies often accompany vitamin B12 deficiency. Since many neuropathies are linked to oxidative stress and since B12 has both antioxidant and neurotrophic properties, B12 may also be effective treatment in non-deficient subjects. Thus, the characteristics and predictors of B12-responsive neuropathies and their relationship to disorders associated with increased oxidative stress (oxidant risks) were examined. Retrospective review of 78 subjects with neurological abnormalities treated with B12 and evaluated by the measurement of B12 and the B12-dependent metabolites, methylmalonic acid (MMA), and homocysteine. Sixty-five subjects had neurological improvement (83%), including 35 with other known causes of neuropathy. Only two responders had B12-responsive macrocytosis. Pretherapy B12, MMA, and homocysteine values were normal in 72, 33 and 54% of responders, with all three normal in 23%. Moreover, B12 therapy did not significantly decrease elevated MMA and homocysteine levels in 20 and 37%, respectively, of responders tested but did decrease both metabolites in 75% of evaluable non-responders. At least one oxidant risk was present in 41 of the 46 responders with normal B12 levels (89%). Oral therapy was effective, but parenteral B12 improved responses in four subjects. B12-responsive neuropathies are thus (1) common even when confounding disorders are present; (2) dissociated from the presence of hematological abnormalities; (3) dissociated from the presence of B12-responsive metabolical abnormalities; and (4) associated with the presence of oxidant risks when B12 levels are normal. Since no predictors of responses to B12 therapy were identified, empiric trials with parenteral B12 should be considered in appropriate subjects.

  4. Radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanchi, X.; Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.

    2000-03-01

    Research on the radiolysis of vitamins is of considerable interest since these compounds are important nutritional constituents in foods and in dietetic supplements. In spite of these considerations there are few data and very often difficult to compare for the radiolytic behavior of vitamins. In this work we focused our attention on to the study of the radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12) in solid state and in aqueous solutions. The procedure was followed by HPLC and UV-spectroscopy. The results obtained in aqueous solutions showed a dependence of the decomposition as a linear function of the dose. The G of decomposition for a 1×10 -5 M solution was 3.3. In the solid state the vitamin was very stable towards the irradiation in the conditions used in this study with a G=2.1×10 -3. A study made with Serratia marcescens as a microbiological contaminant showed that at the sterilization dose there is a destruction of the vitamin in aqueous solution. In the solid state the degree of decomposition was 7%.

  5. Neurological manifestations of B(12) deficiency with emphasis on its aetiology.

    PubMed

    Divate, Pradeep G; Patanwala, Rashida

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that Pernicious anaemia (PA) is more common in the West. We postulate however that in India PA is probably an important aetiological factor as a cause of Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients having neurological disease. To investigate the aetiological factors resulting in Vitamin B12 (Vit B12) deficiency in patients with subacute combined degeneration (SACD) and other neurological manifestations. We undertook a prospective study of 50 patients, all clinically suspected to have Vit B12 deficiency; they were investigated clinically, haematologically, biochemically and radiologically. There was a dominance of males (41 of 50) with the majority in the age group of more than 40 years of age. There was no correlation between the socio-economic and dietary status on the one hand and the clinical manifestation on the other. Anti intrinsic factor antibodies (AIFAB) were positive in 19 of 50 patients (38%) and anti parietal cell antibodies (APCAB) were positive in 28 of 50 (56%) patients. We conclude that Pernicious anaemia is an important cause of various neurological manifestations including SACD in the Vitamin B12 deficient population in the age group of more than 40 years, irrespective of the socio-economic and dietary status in the Indian subcontinent. It is supported by the presence of AIFAB or APCAB in this group.

  6. Immunity in the Vagina (Part II): Anti-HIV Activity and Antiviral Content of Human Vaginal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mickey V.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Rossoll, Richard M.; Wira, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Whether the concentrations of antiviral proteins, and anti-HIV activity, within human vaginal secretions changes across the menstrual cycle is unknown. Method of Study Using a menstrual cup, vaginal secretions from premenopausal women were recovered at the proliferative (d6–8), mid-cycle (d13–15) and secretory (d21–23) stages of the menstrual cycle. Antiviral protein concentration was determined by ELISA, and anti-HIV activity assessed using the TZM-bl reporter cell line. Results CCL20, RANTES, elafin, HBD2, SDF-1α and IL-8 levels were detectable in the secretions. Vaginal secretions had anti-HIV activity against specific clade B strains of HIV, with significant inhibition of IIIB and increased infectivity of transmitted/founder CH077.t. No significant differences in either antiviral protein concentration or anti-HIV activity with respect to menstrual cycle stage were measured, but marked differences were observed in both parameters over the course of the cycle between different women, and in consecutive cycles from the same woman. Conclusion The vagina contains a complement of antiviral proteins. The variation in anti-HIV activity demonstrates that immune protection in the vagina is not constant. Intra- and inter-individual variations suggest that factors in addition to sex hormones influence antiviral protection. Lastly, the menstrual cup is a new model for recovering undiluted vaginal secretions from women throughout their reproductive life. PMID:24806967

  7. Antibody engineering for increased potency, breadth and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Scharf, Louise; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent developments in HIV-1 antibody engineering and discusses the effects of increased polyreactivity on serum half-lives of engineered antibodies. Recent findings Recent studies have uncovered a wealth of information about the relationship between the sequences and efficacies of anti-HIV-1 antibodies through a combination of bioinformatics, structural characterization and in vivo studies. This knowledge has stimulated efforts to enhance antibody breadth and potency for therapeutic use. Although some engineered antibodies have shown increased polyreactivity and short half-lives, promising efforts are circumventing these problems. Summary Antibodies are desirable as therapeutics due to their ability to recognize targets with both specificity and high affinity. Furthermore, the ability of antibodies to stimulate Fc-mediated effector functions can increase their utility. Thus, mAbs have become central to strategies for the treatment of various diseases. Using both targeted and library-based approaches, antibodies can be engineered to improve their therapeutic properties. This article will discuss recent antibody engineering efforts to improve the breadth and potency of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. The polyreactivity of engineered HIV-1 bNAbs and the effect on serum half-life will be explored along with strategies to overcome problems introduced by engineering antibodies. Finally, advances in creating bispecific anti-HIV-1 reagents are discussed. PMID:25760931

  8. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B12. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B 12..

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12.. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1945 Vitamin B 12.. (a) Vitamin B12, also known as cyanocobalamin (C63H88Co... is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Vitamin B12 also may...

  12. Orthostatic hypotension as a manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ganjehei, Leila; Massumi, Ali; Razavi, Mehdi; Wilson, James M

    2012-01-01

    A 90-year-old woman with orthostatic hypotension and near-syncope was found to have a low-normal level of vitamin B(12) and no other medical findings that could explain her orthostasis. Her symptoms responded to vitamin B(12) replacement therapy. This case shows that vitamin B(12) deficiency can induce orthostatic hypotension and syncope that are correctable by vitamin B(12) replacement.

  13. [Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case illustrating diagnostic pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, M; Franques, J; Faivre, A; Koric, L; Chiche, L; Attarian, S; Pouget, J

    2010-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a longstanding public health problem which affects more than 20% of the elderly population. Among multiple causes of vitamin B12 deficiency, Biermer's disease is currently mentioned in about 25% of the cases. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman, taking folate substitution therapy who, over 2 years, progressively developed spinal combined sclerosis, subacute dementia and severe neuropathy leading to a bedridden state. The initial assessment revealed normocytic anemia, without vitamin B12 deficiency and without increased plasma level of biological markers. The plasma folate level was high. Vitamin B12 assay was repeated leading to the diagnosis of deficiency associated with the presence of intrinsic factor antibodies. This observation illustrates the broad spectrum of clinical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency. In the present case, the lack of sensitivity of biological markers delayed diagnosis and had a dramatic impact on outcome. This case highlights the importance of promoting factors such as isolated folate substitution in B12 deficient patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and bioevaluation of substituted chalcones, coumaranones and other flavonoids as anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Cole, Amy L; Hossain, Sandra; Cole, Alex M; Phanstiel, Otto

    2016-06-15

    A series of chalcone, flavone, coumaranone and other flavonoid compounds were screened for their anti HIV-1 activity in two cell culture models using TZM-bl and PM1 cells. Within the systems evaluated, the most promising compounds contained either an α- or β-hydroxy-carbonyl motif within their structure (e.g., 8 and 9). Efficacious substituents were identified and used to design new HIV inhibitors with increased potency and lower cytotoxicity. Of the scaffolds evaluated, specific chalcones were found to provide the best balance between anti-HIV potency and low host cell toxicity. Chalcone 8l was shown to inhibit different clinical isolates of HIV in a dose-dependent manner (e.g., IC50 typically⩽5μM). Inhibition of HIV infection experiments using TZM-bl cells demonstrated that chalcone 8l and flavonol 9c had IC50 values of 4.7μM and 10.4μM, respectively. These insights were used to design new chalcones 8o and 8p. Rewardingly, chalcones 8o and 8p (at 10μM) each gave >92% inhibition of viral propagation without impacting PM1 host cell viability. Inhibition of viral propagation significantly increased (60-90%) when PM1 cells were pre-incubated with chalcone 8o, but not with the related flavonol 9c. These results suggested that chalcone 8o may be of value as both a HIV prophylactic and therapy. In summary, O-benzyl-substituted chalcones were identified as promising anti-HIV agents for future investigation.

  15. Hydroxytyrosol: a new class of microbicide displaying broad anti-HIV-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Luis M.; Beltrán, Manuela; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; García-Pérez, Javier; de la Torre, Humberto E.; González, Nuria; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; Auñón, David; Capa, Laura; Gómez-Acebo, Eduardo; Alcamí, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity and activity against HIV of 5-hydroxytyrosol as a potential microbicide. Design: The anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenolic compound, was tested against wild-type HIV-1 and viral clones resistant to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. In addition to its activity against founder viruses, different viral subtypes and potential synergy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and emtricitabine was also tested. 5-Hydroxytyrosol toxicity was evaluated in vivo in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Methods: We have cloned pol gene from drug-resistant HIV-1 isolated from infected patients and env gene from Fiebeg III/IV patients or A, C, D, E, F and G subtypes in the NL4.3-Ren backbone. 5-Hydroxytyrosol anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated in infections of MT-2, U87-CCR5 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin + interleukin-2 with viruses obtained through 293T transfections. Inhibitory concentration 50% and cytotoxic concentration 50% were calculated. Synergy was analysed according to Chou and Talalay method. In-vivo toxicity was evaluated for 14 days in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Results: 5-Hydroxytyrosol inhibited HIV-1 infections of recombinant or wild-type viruses in all the target cells tested. Moreover, 5-hydroxytyrosol showed similar inhibitory concentration 50% values for infections with NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and INIs resistant viruses; founder viruses and all the subtypes tested. Combination of 5-hydroxytyrosol with tenofovir was found to be synergistic, whereas it was additive with lamivudine and emtricitabine. In-vivo toxicity of 5-hydroxytyrosol was very low even at the highest tested doses. Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytyrosol displayed a broad anti-HIV-1 activity in different cells systems in the absent of in-vivo toxicity, therefore supporting its

  16. Peltophorum africanum, a traditional South African medicinal plant, contains an anti HIV-1 constituent, betulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Theo, Andros; Masebe, Tracy; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Wada, Shoko; Obi, Chikwelu Larry; Bessong, Pascal Obong; Usuzawa, Motoki; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Hattori, Toshio

    2009-02-01

    The biodiversity of medicinal plants in South Africa makes them rich sources of leading compounds for the development of novel drugs. Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae) is a deciduous tree widespread in South Africa. The stem bark has been traditionally employed to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throat, wounds, human immunodeficiency virus/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), venereal diseases and infertility. To evaluate these ethnobotanical clues and isolate lead compounds, butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the stem bark were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 using MAGI CCR5+ cells, which are derived from HeLa cervical cancer cells and express HIV receptor CD4, a chemokine receptor CCR5 and HIV-LTR-beta- galactosidase. Bioassay-guided fractionation using silica gel chromatography was also conducted. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of the stem bark of Peltophorum africanum showed inhibitory activity against HIV-1, CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic viruses. The ethyl acetate and butanol extracts yielded previously reported anti-HIV compounds, (+)-catechin, a flavonoid, and bergenin, a C-galloylglycoside, respectively. Furthermore, we identified betulinic acid from the ethyl acetate fraction for the first time. The fractions, which contained betulinic acid, showed the highest selective index. We therefore describe the presence of betulinic acid, a not well-known anti-HIV compound, in an African medicinal herb, which has been used for therapy, and claim that betulinic acid is the predominant anti-HIV-1 constituent of Peltophorum africanum. These data suggest that betulinic acid and its analogues could be used as potential therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

  17. Designed multiple ligands: an emerging anti-HIV drug discovery paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the effect of AIDS single-target chemotherapy is severely compromised by the quick emergence of resistant HIV strains. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) combines HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors with protease inhibitors or integrase inhibitors, and successfully suppresses HIV viral load to an undetectable level, dramatically improving the life quality of AIDS patients. However, the benefits of this approach are often compromised by poor patient compliance. Recently, there has been a move toward multicomponent drugs whereby two or more agents are coformulated in a single tablet to make dosing regimes simpler and thereby to improve patient compliance, but there are significant risks involved in the development of multicomponent drugs. Designed multiple ligands (DMLs) therapy as an emerging anti-HIV drug discovery paradigm, using a single entity to inhibit multitargets could yield improved patient compliance, thus reducing the likelihood of drug resistance. The exploration of such multifunctional ligands has proven valuable for anti-HIV leads discovery. However, presently many multifunctional scaffolds were first discovered by serendipity or screening; rational design by combining existing monofunctional scaffolds remains an enormous challenge. A key issue in the design of multiple ligands is attaining a balanced activity at each target of interest while simultaneously achieving a wider selectivity and a suitable pharmacokinetic profile. This review of literature examples introduce numerous attractive lead compounds, capable of interfering with different stages of HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis, which reveals trends and insights that might provide valuable clues for novel anti-HIV drug design and help medicinal chemists discover the next generation of multiple ligands.

  18. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Zárate, Rafael; Ravelo, Ángel G.; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The existence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viruses in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment urgently requires the characterization and development of new antiretroviral drugs designed to inhibit resistant viruses and to complement the existing antiretroviral strategies against AIDS. We assayed several natural or semi-synthetic lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in permissive cells. We observed that the 30-oxo-calenduladiol triterpene, compound 1, specifically impaired R5-tropic HIV-1 envelope-mediated viral infection and cell fusion in permissive cells, without affecting X4-tropic virus. This lupane derivative competed for the binding of a specific anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody or the natural CCL5 chemokine to the CCR5 viral coreceptor with high affinity. 30-Oxo-calenduladiol seems not to interact with the CD4 antigen, the main HIV receptor, or the CXCR4 viral coreceptor. Our results suggest that compound 1 is a specific CCR5 antagonist, because it binds to the CCR5 receptor without triggering cell signaling or receptor internalization, and inhibits RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)-mediated CCR5 internalization, intracellular calcium mobilization, and cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, compound 1 appeared not to interact with β-chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, or CCR4. Thereby, the 30-oxo-calenduladiol-associated anti-HIV-1 activity against R5-tropic virus appears to rely on the selective occupancy of the CCR5 receptor to inhibit CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection. Therefore, it is plausible that the chemical structure of 30-oxo-calenduladiol or other related dihydroxylated lupane-type triterpenes could represent a good model to develop more potent anti-HIV-1 molecules to inhibit viral infection by interfering with early fusion and entry steps in the HIV life cycle. PMID:19386595

  19. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin B 12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B 12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  4. Degradation of vitamin B12 in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keiko; Shimodaira, Michiko; Chida, Seiko; Yamada, Noriko; Matsushima, Norio; Fukuda, Morimichi; Yamada, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Beverages and solid dietary supplements rich in various added vitamins and minerals have recently become available. It seems reasonable to consider that the intake of these foods is convenient for easy ingestion of nutrients, but problems caused by blending different nutrients in high concentrations have arisen. We focused on vitamin B12 (B12) among vitamins and determined the B12 contents of beverages and solid dietary supplements purchased from a retail shop. The B12 contents of three of five beverages were less than stated on the labels. On the other hand, certain beverages unexpectedly contained much more B12 than stated on the labels. In these beverages the amount of B12 decreased rapidly with time, whereas B12 content was lower than stated on the label in only one of four solid dietary supplements. The content of B12 was affected by storage time, light exposure, temperature and vitamin C. From experimental analysis with a competitive binding assay method employing a ACS Chemiluminescent B12 kit, examining differential binding by intrinsic factors and spectral analysis of B12, it was determined that some of the B12 might have been converted into B12 analogues or small degradation products by multinutrient interaction during storage.

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency and the dexamethasone suppression test.

    PubMed

    James, S P; Golden, R N; Sack, D A

    1986-09-01

    The authors describe dexamethasone nonsuppression in a depressed patient with a vitamin B12 deficiency. After B12 replacement there was no change in the patient's clinical state. However, the dexamethasone suppression test normalized. Thus, dexamethasone nonsuppression in this patient seemed to be more closely related to vitamin B12 deficiency than to affective state.

  6. A potent novel anti-HIV protein from the cultured cyanobacterium Scytonema varium.

    PubMed

    Bokesch, Heidi R; O'Keefe, Barry R; McKee, Tawnya C; Pannell, Lewis K; Patterson, Gregory M L; Gardella, Roberta S; Sowder, Raymond C; Turpin, Jim; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W; Boyd, Michael R

    2003-03-11

    A new anti-HIV protein, scytovirin, was isolated from aqueous extracts of the cultured cyanobacterium Scytonema varium. The protein displayed potent anticytopathic activity against laboratory strains and primary isolates of HIV-1 with EC50 values ranging from 0.3 to 22 nM. Scytovirin binds to viral coat proteins gp120, gp160, and gp41 but not to cellular receptor CD4 or other tested proteins. This unique protein consists of a single 95-amino acid chain with significant internal sequence duplication and 10 cysteines forming five intrachain disulfide bonds.

  7. Henrin A: A New Anti-HIV Ent-Kaurane Diterpene from Pteris henryi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan-Fei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jing-Jie; Song, Xun; Ku, Chuen-Fai; Zou, Juan; Li, Ji-Xin; Rong, Li-Jun; Pan, Lu-Tai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Henrin A (1), a new ent-kaurane diterpene, was isolated from the leaves of Pteris henryi. The chemical structure was elucidated by analysis of the spectroscopic data including one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, and was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The compound was evaluated for its biological activities against a panel of cancer cell lines, dental bacterial biofilm formation, and HIV. It displayed anti-HIV potential with an IC50 value of 9.1 µM (SI = 12.2). PMID:26610490

  8. QSAR study and VolSurf characterization of anti-HIV quinolone library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipponi, Enrica; Cruciani, Gabriele; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2001-03-01

    Antiviral quinolones are promising compounds in the search for new therapeutically effective agents for the treatment of AIDS. To rationalize the SAR for this new interesting class of anti-HIV derivatives, we performed a 3D-QSAR study on a library of 101 6-fluoro and 6-desfluoroquinolones, taken either from the literature or synthesized by us. The chemometric procedure involved a fully semiempirical minimization of the molecular structures by the AMSOL program, which takes into account the solvatation effect, and their 3D characterization by the VolSurf/GRID program. The QSAR analysis, based on PCA and PLS methods, shows the key structural features responsible for the antiviral activity.

  9. HIV Integrase Inhibitors with Nucleobase Scaffolds: Discovery of a Highly Potent anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Ptak, Roger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    HIV integrase is essential for HIV replication. However, there are currently no integrase inhibitors in clinical use for AIDS. We have discovered a conceptually new β-diketo acid that is a powerful inhibitor of both the 3′-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 integrase. The in vitro anti-HIV data of this inhibitor were remarkable as exemplified by its highly potent antiviral therapeutic efficacy against HIVTEKI and HIV-1NL4-3 replication in PBMC (TI >4,000 and >10,000, respectively). PMID:16420027

  10. Ethnopharmacology in overdrive: the remarkable anti-HIV activity of Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Lubbe, Andrea; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; van der Kooy, Frank

    2012-06-14

    Artemisia annua contains the well-known antimalarial compound artemisinin, which forms the backbone of the global malaria treatment regime. In African countries a tea infusion prepared from Artemisia annua has been used for the treatment of malaria only for the past 10-20 years. Several informal claims in Africa exist that the Artemisia annua tea infusions are also able to inhibit HIV. Since HIV is a relatively newly emerged disease, the claims, if substantiated, could provide a very good example of "ethnopharmacology in overdrive". The objective of this study was to provide quantitative scientific evidence that the Artemisia annua tea infusion exhibits anti-HIV activity through in vitro studies. A second objective was to determine if artemisinin plays a direct or indirect (synergistic) role in any observed activity. This was done by the inclusion of a chemically closely related species, Artemisia afra, known not to contain any artemisinin in our studies. Validated cellular systems were used to test Artemisia annua tea samples for anti-HIV activity. Two independent tests with different formats (an infection format and a co-cultivation format) were used. Samples were also tested for cellular toxicity against the human cells used in the assays. The Artemisia annua tea infusion was found to be highly active with IC(50) values as low as 2.0 μg/mL. Moreover we found that artemisinin was inactive at 25 μg/mL and that a chemically related species Artemisia afra (not containing artemisinin) showed a similar level of activity. This indicates that the role of artemisinin, directly or indirectly (synergism), in the observed activity is rather limited. Additionally, no cellular toxicity was seen for the tea infusion at the highest concentrations tested. This study provides the first in vitro evidence of anti-HIV activity of the Artemisia annua tea infusion. We also report for the first time on the anti-HIV activity of Artemisia afra although this was not an objective of this

  11. Synthesis of optically pure dioxolane nucleosides and their anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Siddigui, M.A.; Evans, C.; Jin, H.L.; Tse, A.; Brown, W.; Nguyen-Ba, N.; Mansour, T.S.; Cameron, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The clinical candidate 3TC, 1, possessing non-natural absolute stereochemistry is a potent and non-toxic inhibitor of a key enzyme, reverse transcriptase, involved in the replicative cycle of the HIV. Selective inhibition of both HIV and HBV is seen. In view of the authors` interest in finding correlation between stereochemistry and antiviral activity, several enantiomerically pure dioxolane nucleosides, 2, were synthesized and assayed. The discussion will focus on (a) the synthesis of optically pure dioxolane sugars from L-ascorbic acid, (b) enzymatic resolution of purine dioxolane nucleosides, (c) anti HIV-1 activity in MT-4 cells.

  12. Selective Malabsorption of Vitamin B12 and Vitamin B12-Intrinsic Factor With Megaloblastic Anemia in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Joseph C.

    1985-01-01

    The first case of megaloblastic anemia due to selective malabsorption of vitamin B12 and vitamin B12-intrinsic factor is described in an otherwise normal female adult, in whom pernicious anemia had previously been diagnosed. PMID:4057272

  13. Cognitive impairment and vitamin B12: a review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eileen; Mander, Alastair; Ames, David; Carne, Ross; Sanders, Kerrie; Watters, David

    2012-04-01

    This review examines the associations between low vitamin B12 levels, neurodegenerative disease, and cognitive impairment. The potential impact of comorbidities and medications associated with vitamin B12 derangements were also investigated. In addition, we reviewed the evidence as to whether vitamin B12 therapy is efficacious for cognitive impairment and dementia. A systematic literature search identified 43 studies investigating the association of vitamin B12 and cognitive impairment or dementia. Seventeen studies reported on the efficacy of vitamin B12 therapy for these conditions. Vitamin B12 levels in the subclinical low-normal range (<250 ρmol/L) are associated with Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Vegetarianism and metformin use contribute to depressed vitamin B12 levels and may independently increase the risk for cognitive impairment. Vitamin B12 deficiency (<150 ρmol/L) is associated with cognitive impairment. Vitamin B12 supplements administered orally or parenterally at high dose (1 mg daily) were effective in correcting biochemical deficiency, but improved cognition only in patients with pre-existing vitamin B12 deficiency (serum vitamin B12 levels <150 ρmol/L or serum homocysteine levels >19.9 μmol/L). Low serum vitamin B12 levels are associated with neurodegenerative disease and cognitive impairment. There is a small subset of dementias that are reversible with vitamin B12 therapy and this treatment is inexpensive and safe. Vitamin B12 therapy does not improve cognition in patients without pre-existing deficiency. There is a need for large, well-resourced clinical trials to close the gaps in our current understanding of the nature of the associations of vitamin B12 insufficiency and neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Thermotoga lettingae Can Salvage Cobinamide To Synthesize Vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Nicholas C.; Secinaro, Michael A.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that the Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquisition of genes from two distantly related lineages, Archaea and Firmicutes (K. S. Swithers et al., Genome Biol. Evol. 4:730–739, 2012). Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that the cobinamide salvage gene cluster was present in the Thermotogales' most recent common ancestor. We also predicted that Thermotoga lettingae could not synthesize B12 de novo but could use the cobinamide salvage pathway to synthesize B12. In this study, these hypotheses were tested, and we found that Tt. lettingae did not synthesize B12 de novo but salvaged cobinamide. The growth rate of Tt. lettingae increased with the addition of B12 or cobinamide to its medium. It synthesized B12 when the medium was supplemented with cobinamide, and no B12 was detected in cells grown on cobinamide-deficient medium. Upstream of the cobinamide salvage genes is a putative B12 riboswitch. In other organisms, B12 riboswitches allow for higher transcriptional activity in the absence of B12. When Tt. lettingae was grown with no B12, the salvage genes were upregulated compared to cells grown with B12 or cobinamide. Another gene cluster with a putative B12 riboswitch upstream is the btuFCD ABC transporter, and it showed a transcription pattern similar to that of the cobinamide salvage genes. The BtuF proteins from species that can and cannot salvage cobinamides were shown in vitro to bind both B12 and cobinamide. These results suggest that Thermotogales species can use the BtuFCD transporter to import both B12 and cobinamide, even if they cannot salvage cobinamide. PMID:24014541

  15. Thermotoga lettingae can salvage cobinamide to synthesize vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Butzin, Nicholas C; Secinaro, Michael A; Swithers, Kristen S; Gogarten, J Peter; Noll, Kenneth M

    2013-11-01

    We recently reported that the Thermotogales acquired the ability to synthesize vitamin B12 by acquisition of genes from two distantly related lineages, Archaea and Firmicutes (K. S. Swithers et al., Genome Biol. Evol. 4:730-739, 2012). Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that the cobinamide salvage gene cluster was present in the Thermotogales' most recent common ancestor. We also predicted that Thermotoga lettingae could not synthesize B12 de novo but could use the cobinamide salvage pathway to synthesize B12. In this study, these hypotheses were tested, and we found that Tt. lettingae did not synthesize B12 de novo but salvaged cobinamide. The growth rate of Tt. lettingae increased with the addition of B12 or cobinamide to its medium. It synthesized B12 when the medium was supplemented with cobinamide, and no B12 was detected in cells grown on cobinamide-deficient medium. Upstream of the cobinamide salvage genes is a putative B12 riboswitch. In other organisms, B12 riboswitches allow for higher transcriptional activity in the absence of B12. When Tt. lettingae was grown with no B12, the salvage genes were upregulated compared to cells grown with B12 or cobinamide. Another gene cluster with a putative B12 riboswitch upstream is the btuFCD ABC transporter, and it showed a transcription pattern similar to that of the cobinamide salvage genes. The BtuF proteins from species that can and cannot salvage cobinamides were shown in vitro to bind both B12 and cobinamide. These results suggest that Thermotogales species can use the BtuFCD transporter to import both B12 and cobinamide, even if they cannot salvage cobinamide.

  16. Notable Difference in anti-HIV Activity of Integrase Inhibitors as a Consequence of Geometric and Enantiomeric Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Nishonov, Malik; Nair, Vasu

    2013-01-01

    While some examples are known of integrase inhibitors that exhibit potent anti-HIV activity, there are very few cases reported of integrase inhibitors that show significant differences in anti-HIV activity that result from distinctions in cis-and trans-configurations as well as enantiomeric stereostructure. We describe here the design and synthesis of two enantiomeric trans-hydroxycyclopentyl carboxamides which exhibit notable difference in anti-HIV activity. This difference is explained through their binding interactions within the active site of the HIV-1 integrase intasome. The more active enantiomer 3 (EC50 25 nM) was relatively stable in human liver microsomes. Kinetic data revealed that its impact on key cytochrome P450 isozymes, as either an inhibitor or an activator, was minor, suggesting a favorable CYP profile. PMID:23746474

  17. Free and Total Vitamin B12 in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Honor M.; Gould, C. E. G.; Thomas, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    Free and total vitamin B12 levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were bioassayed, since there were no available data on the relationship between free and total vitamin B12 in CSF or between free vitamin in serum and CSF vitamin B12. The subjects were 43 neurological patients. Serum levels were normal in 40 of 43 patients. Values for free and total vitamin B12 in CSF were the same in 42 of 43 patients. Mean CSF vitamin B12 was 21 μμg./ml. In 17 cases CSF vitamin B12 equalled free vitamin B12 level in serum, in 16 cases CSF vitamin B12 was lower than the free level in serum, and in 10 cases CSF vitamin B12 was higher than the free vitamin level in serum. There was no apparent diagnostic correlation. The findings suggest that vitamin B12 is not bound in CSF and that there is some selective control of passage of vitamin B12 across the blood-CSF barrier. PMID:14032478

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency as a worldwide problem.

    PubMed

    Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia throughout the world and especially in persons of European or African descent. Dietary deficiency of vitamin B12 due to vegetarianism is increasing and causes hyperhomocysteinemia. The breast-fed infant of a vitamin B12-deficient mother is at risk for severe developmental abnormalities, growth failure, and anemia. Elevated methylmalonic acid and/or total homocysteine are sensitive indicators of vitamin B12-deficient diets and correlate with clinical abnormalities. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency is a severe problem in the Indian subcontinent, Mexico, Central and South America, and selected areas in Africa. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency is not prevalent in Asia, except in vegetarians. Areas for research include intermittent vitamin B12 supplement dosing and better measurements of the bioavailability of B12 in fermented vegetarian foods and algae.

  19. Electron densities of three B12 vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mebs, Stefan; Henn, Julian; Dittrich, Birger; Paulmann, Carsten; Luger, Peter

    2009-07-23

    The electron densities of the three natural B(12)-vitamins, two of them being essential cofactors for animal life, were determined in a procedure combining high-order X-ray data collection at low to very low temperatures with high-level density functional calculations. In a series of extensive experimental attempts, a high-order data set of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) could be collected to a resolution of sin theta/lambda = 1.00 A(-1) at 25 K. This modification contains only minor disorder at the solvent bulk. For methylcobalamin (MeCbl), only a severely disordered modification was found (sin theta/lambda = 1.00 A(-1), 100 K, measured with synchrotron radiation). The already published data set of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) (sin theta/lambda = 1.25 A(-1), 100 K) was reintegrated to guarantee similar treatment of the three compounds and cut to sin theta/lambda = 1.11 A(-1) to obtain a higher degree of completeness and redundancy. On the basis of these accurate experimental geometries of AdoCbl, MeCbl, and CNCbl, state-of-the-art density functional calculations, single-point calculations, and geometry optimizations were performed on model compounds at the BP86/TZVP level of theory to evaluate the electronic differences of the three compounds. AdoCbl and MeCbl are known to undergo different reaction paths in the body. Thus, the focus was directed toward the characterization of the dative Co-C(ax) and Co-N(ax) bonds, which were quantifed by topological parameters, including energy densities; the source function including local source; and the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D), respectively. The source function reveals the existence of delocalized interactions between the corrin macrocycle and the axial ligands. The ELI-D indicates unsaturated Co-C(ax) bonding basins for the two biochemically active cofactors, but not for CNCbl, where a population of 2.2e is found. This may be related to significant pi-backbonding, which is supported by the delocalization index, delta

  20. Core-structure-inspired asymmetric addition reactions: enantioselective synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Ma, Jun-An

    2015-11-07

    Dihydrobenzoxazinones and dihydroquinazolinones are the core units present in many anti-HIV agents, such as Efavirenz, DPC 961, DPC 963, and DPC 083. All these molecules contain a trifluoromethyl moiety at the quaternary stereogenic carbon center with S configuration. The enantioselective addition of carbon nucleophiles to ketones or cyclic ketimines could serve as a key step to access these molecules. This tutorial review provides an overview of significant advances in the synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents and relative analogues, with an emphasis on asymmetric addition reactions for the establishment of the CF3-containing quaternary carbon centers.

  1. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant cyanovirin-N for vaginal anti-HIV microbicide development.

    PubMed

    Colleluori, Diana M; Tien, Deborah; Kang, Feirong; Pagliei, Tara; Kuss, Ryan; McCormick, Timothy; Watson, Karen; McFadden, Karyn; Chaiken, Irwin; Buckheit, Robert W; Romano, Joseph W

    2005-02-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is a prokaryotic protein under development as a topical anti-HIV microbicide, an urgent and necessary approach to prevent HIV transmission in at-risk populations worldwide. We have expressed recombinant CV-N as inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. A purification scheme has been developed that exploits the physicochemical properties of this protein, in particular its stability in a harsh inclusion body purification scheme. Under the conditions developed, this system yields 140 mg of highly purified CV-N per liter of high-density cell culture, which represents a 14-fold increase over the best recombinant CV-N yield reported to date. This purification scheme results in monomeric CV-N as analyzed by SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing, and reverse phase- and size exclusion-HPLC. This recombinantly expressed and refolded CV-N binds to gp120 with nanomolar affinity and retains its potent anti-HIV activities in cell-based assays. The expression and purification system described herein provides a better means for the mass production of CV-N for further microbicide development.

  2. Double Variational Binding—(SMILES) Conformational Analysis by Docking Mechanisms for Anti-HIV Pyrimidine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Dudaș, Nicoleta A.; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Variational quantitative binding–conformational analysis for a series of anti-HIV pyrimidine-based ligands is advanced at the individual molecular level. This was achieved by employing ligand-receptor docking algorithms for each molecule in the 1,3-disubstituted uracil derivative series that was studied. Such computational algorithms were employed for analyzing both genuine molecular cases and their simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) transformations, which were created via the controlled breaking of chemical bonds, so as to generate the longest SMILES molecular chain (LoSMoC) and Branching SMILES (BraS) conformations. The study identified the most active anti-HIV molecules, and analyzed their special and relevant bonding fragments (chemical alerts), and the recorded energetic and geometric docking results (i.e., binding and affinity energies, and the surface area and volume of bonding, respectively). Clear computational evidence was also produced concerning the ligand-receptor pocket binding efficacies of the LoSMoc and BraS conformation types, thus confirming their earlier presence (as suggested by variational quantitative structure-activity relationship, variational-QSAR) as active intermediates for the molecule-to-cell transduction process. PMID:26295229

  3. Combinatorial anti-HIV gene therapy: using a multipronged approach to reach beyond HAART.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C W; Younan, P; Jerome, K R; Kiem, H-P

    2013-07-01

    The 'Berlin Patient', who maintains suppressed levels of HIV viremia in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, continues to be a standard bearer in HIV eradication research. However, the unique circumstances surrounding his functional cure are not applicable to most HIV(+) patients. To achieve a functional or sterilizing cure in a greater number of infected individuals worldwide, combinatorial treatments, targeting multiple stages of the viral life cycle, will be essential. Several anti-HIV gene therapy approaches have been explored recently, including disruption of the C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) coreceptor loci in CD4(+) T cells and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. However, less is known about the efficacy of these strategies in patients and more relevant HIV model systems such as non-human primates (NHPs). Combinatorial approaches, including genetic disruption of integrated provirus, functional enhancement of endogenous restriction factors and/or the use of pharmacological adjuvants, could amplify the anti-HIV effects of CCR5/CXCR4 gene disruption. Importantly, delivering gene disruption molecules to genetic sites of interest will likely require optimization on a cell type-by-cell type basis. In this review, we highlight the most promising gene therapy approaches to combat HIV infection, methods to deliver these therapies to hematopoietic cells and emphasize the need to target viral replication pre- and post-entry to mount a suitably robust defense against spreading infection.

  4. Anti-Tat and anti-HIV activities of trimers of n-alkylglycines.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Moure, Alejandra; Masip, Isabel; Messeguer, Angel; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2006-02-28

    Transcription of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is activated by viral Tat protein which regulates HIV-LTR transcription and elongation. In the present report, the evaluation of the anti-Tat activity of a combinatorial library composed of 5120 N-trialkylglycines is reported. The antiviral activity was studied through luciferase-based assays targeting the HIV-1 promoter activation induced by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We identified five peptoids with specific anti-HIV-1 Tat activity; none of these peptoids affected the binding of HIV-1 Tat protein to the viral TAR RNA. Using a recombinant-virus assay in which luciferase activity correlates with the rate of HIV-1 transcription we have detected that one of the five selected peptoids, NC37-37-15C, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1-LTR transcription in both primary T lymphocytes and transformed cell lines. The inhibitory effect of NC37-37-15C, which is additive with azidothymidine (AZT), correlates with its ability to inhibit CTD phosphorylation and shows a suitable profile for development of novel anti-HIV-1 drugs. Likewise, the structural simplicity of N-alkylglycine oligomers makes these peptidomimetics amenable to structural manipulation, thus facilitating the optimisation of lead molecules for drug-like properties.

  5. From Docking False-Positive to Active Anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T.; Guimarães, Cristiano R. W.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70,000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and MM-GB/SA post-processing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Though known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential “near-miss” with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to evolve efficiently a false positive into a true active. In addition, the need for adequate structure validation was confirmed by the apparent misrepresentation of a purchased compound elsewhere as the present oxadiazole core compound, 16. PMID:17918923

  6. Anti-HIV activity in vitro of MGN-3, an activated arabinoxylane from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, M

    1998-02-04

    MGN-3 an arabinoxylane from rice bran that has been enzymatically modified with extract from Hyphomycetes mycelia, was tested for anti-HIV activity in vitro. MGN-3 activity against HIV-1 (SF strain) was examined in primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MGN-3 inhibited HIV-1 replication by: (1) inhibition of HIV-1 p24 antigen production in a dose dependent manner--MGN-3 concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 micrograms/ml showed 18.3, 42.8, 59, and 75% reduction in p24 antigen, respectively; and (2) inhibition of syncytia formation maximized (75%) at concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml. Further studies showed that ingestion of MGN-3 at concentration of 15 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant increase in T and B cell mitogen response at 2 months after treatment: 146% for PHA, 140% for Con A, and 136.6% for PWM mitogen. We conclude that MGN-3 possesses potent anti-HIV activity and in the absence of any notable side effects, MGN-3 shows promise as an agent for treating patients with AIDS.

  7. Food-bound B12 absorption and serum total homocysteine in patients with low serum B12 levels.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Slingerland, D W; Hall, C A; Chu, R C

    1998-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether measurements of serum total homocysteine (Hcys) and bound B12 absorption are useful in determining which patients with low- or low-normal levels of serum B12 are B12 deficient. In 40 patients with low or borderline serum levels of B12, food-bound B12 absorptions were determined using a body counter in an iron room, and were related to serum total Hcys levels. Food-bound B12 absorption was decreased in 16 patients and in an additional four, absorption of the free vitamin was also decreased. Homocysteine levels were elevated in four of the 16; in three of the four who had both decreased bound and free B12 absorptions, Hcys was elevated. If elevation of the Hcys level indicates tissue deficiency of B12, the 75% incidence of normal levels of Hcys in these patients with low food-bound B12 absorptions suggests the existence of a cohort of patients who may be at risk to develop, but have not yet developed, B12 deficiency. Only long term follow-up will reveal how many ultimately will become B12 deficient.

  8. Vitamin B12 assays compared by use of patients sera with low vitamin B12 content

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, B.L.; Pearce, L.C.

    1985-05-01

    The authors compared four radioisotope dilution (RD) methods and a microbiological assay for measuring concentrations of vitamin B12 in a selected panel of serum samples from patients known to be deficient in the vitamin. Low (less than 100 ng/L) and borderline (100-180 ng/L) results were similar between methods, but use of the manufacturers recommended ranges for borderline results would have changed the diagnostic classifications for 22 of 38 samples. Results of all the RD methods inter-correlated well, but less so with the microbiological assay. Borderline, nondiagnostic results were common to all methods, and no apparent advantage was gained from using the microbiological assay.

  9. A vitamin B12 transporter in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Krishnamoorthy; Venclovas, Česlovas; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; McKinney, John D.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12-dependent enzymes function in core biochemical pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate pathogen whose metabolism in vivo is poorly understood. Although M. tuberculosis can access vitamin B12 in vitro, it is uncertain whether the organism is able to scavenge B12 during host infection. This question is crucial to predictions of metabolic function, but its resolution is complicated by the absence in the M. tuberculosis genome of a direct homologue of BtuFCD, the only bacterial B12 transport system described to date. We applied genome-wide transposon mutagenesis to identify M. tuberculosis mutants defective in their ability to use exogenous B12. A small proportion of these mapped to Rv1314c, identifying the putative PduO-type ATP : co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase as essential for B12 assimilation. Most notably, however, insertions in Rv1819c dominated the mutant pool, revealing an unexpected function in B12 acquisition for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type protein previously investigated as the mycobacterial BacA homologue. Moreover, targeted deletion of Rv1819c eliminated the ability of M. tuberculosis to transport B12 and related corrinoids in vitro. Our results establish an alternative to the canonical BtuCD-type system for B12 uptake in M. tuberculosis, and elucidate a role in B12 metabolism for an ABC protein implicated in chronic mycobacterial infection. PMID:23407640

  10. Prevalence of vitamin B(12) depletion and deficiency in Liechtenstein.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Victoria; Stanga, Zeno; Zerlauth, Manfred; Bernasconi, Luca; Risch, Martin; Huber, Andreas; Risch, Lorenz

    2014-02-01

    Data about vitamin B(12) (B(12)) deficiency in the general population are scarce. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of B(12) deficiency in the general population of the Principality of Liechtenstein, as well as to identify sub-populations potentially at high risk. Retrospective study. Ambulatory setting, population of the Principality of Liechtenstein. Seven thousand four hundred and twenty-four patients seeking medical attention whose serum samples were referred for routine work-up in an ambulatory setting were consecutively enrolled. Serum total B(12) was determined in all patients in this cohort. In addition, for a subgroup of 1328 patients, serum holotranscobalamin was also measured. Prevalence of B(12) deficiency was calculated. Further, multivariate logistical regression models were applied to identify covariates independently associated with B(12) deficiency and depletion. Nearly 8% of the general population was suffering from either B(12) depletion or deficiency. The ratio between B(12) depletion and deficiency was 2:1 for all age ranges. Pathological changes were detected predominantly in older people. Female gender was a significant predictor of B(12) depletion. In the cohort, nearly 40% exhibited either depletion or deficiency of B(12). B(12) depletion and deficiency are common in Liechtenstein, a Central European country. The measurement of biochemical markers represents a cost-efficient and valid assessment of the B(12) state. When a deficiency of B(12) is diagnosed at an early stage, many cases can be treated or prevented, with beneficial effects on individual outcomes and subsequent potential reductions in health-care costs.

  11. B12 deficiency leading to marked poikilocytosis versus true schistocytosis, a pernicious problem.

    PubMed

    Hall, James A; Mason, James; Choi, Julia; Holguin, Mark

    2017-06-20

    Severe vitamin B12 deficiency is caused most commonly by autoimmune atrophic gastritis leading to loss of intrinsic factor. Vitamin B12 deficiency leading to megaloblastic anemia and demyelinating central nervous system disease is well known; however, a rare presentation of B12 deficiency described as pseudothrombotic microangiopathy is not well known. This complication presents with signs of mechanical hemolysis, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), thrombocytopenia, and a low reticulocyte count, which can be incorrectly diagnosed as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and managed incorrectly. Decreased reticulocyte count and an LDH >2500IU/L is more commonly seen in B12 deficiency. However, recognizing the differences in marked poikilocytosis can be challenging, as seen with megaloblastic changes and true schistocytosis. To illustrate the challenge in differentiating between megaloblastic changes and true schistocytosis, we present the case of a 27-year-old woman who presented to her physician for symptomatic anemia and complaints of nausea, vomiting, and loose stool. She had a hemoglobin of 5.1g/dL, platelet count of 39×10(9)/L, LDH of 9915IU/L, haptoglobin below assay limit, and a reticulocyte count of 2.5%. Peripheral smear showed macrocytic anemia, rare hypersegmented neutrophils, and schistocytes. Vitamin B12 level was less than 50pg/mL, methylmalonic acid was 0.33μmol/L, anti-parietal cell antibody was >1:640, and intrinsic factor blocking antibody was positive-confirming the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. While hospitalized, she was treated with vitamin B12 1000μg intramuscular injections daily and thereafter continued with monthly injections, which ultimately resolved her severe macrocytic anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of Immunoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Ryan B.; Summa, Christopher M.; Corti, Miriam; Pincus, Seth H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous studies have identified the two target epitopes most effective for the delivery of cytotoxic immunoconjugates the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the hairpin loop of gp41. Here we construct and test tetravalent double variable domain immunoglobulin molecules (DVD-Igs) that bind to both epitopes. Methods Synthetic genes that encode DVD-Igs utilizing V-domains derived from human anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 Abs were designed and expressed in 293F cells. A series of constructs tested different inter-V-linker domains and orientations of the two V domains. Antibodies were tested for binding to recombinant Ag and native Env expressed on infected cells, for neutralization of infectious HIV, and for their ability to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates to infected cells. Findings The outer V-domain was the major determinant of binding and functional activity of the DVD-Ig. Function of the inner V-domain and bifunctional binding required at least 15 AA in the inter-V-domain linker. A molecular model showing the spatial orientation of the two epitopes is consistent with this observation. Linkers that incorporated helical domains (A[EAAAK]nA) resulted in more effective DVD-Igs than those based solely on flexible domains ([GGGGS]n). In general, the DVD-Igs outperformed the less effective parental antibody and equaled the activity of the more effective. The ability of the DVD-Igs to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates in the absence of soluble CD4 was improved over that of either parent. Conclusions DVD-Igs can be designed that bind to both gp120 and gp41 on the HIV envelope. DVD-Igs are effective in delivering cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The optimal design of these DVD-Igs, in which both domains are fully functional, has not yet been achieved. PMID:23056448

  13. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups. PMID:24803097

  14. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Karli, R; Gül, A; Uğur, B

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between otoacoustic emission (OAE) values and cochlear function in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss. Two groups were studied: Group 1: patients with vitamin B12 deficiency; Group 2: a matched control group of patients with normal vitamin B12 levels. There was no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss in either group. Transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAEs) and spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) were recorded. A comparative analysis of the studied parameters revealed that results at TEOAE 1000, SOAEs 1500 and SOAEs 4000 Hz were somewhat lower in the vitamin B12 deficient group compared with the control group. According to our findings, there was a significant association between vitamin B12 deficiency and cochlear dysfunction. We recommend that routine vitamin B12 serum levels be determined when evaluating patients for symptomatic hearing loss.

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency after irradiation for bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kinn, A.C.; Lantz, B.

    1984-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 10 of 41 patients who underwent radiotherapy before cystectomy with Bricker urinary diversion for carcinoma of the bladder. Of 13 patients given full irradiation because of inoperable bladder cancer 5 had malabsorption of vitamin B12. Serum folic acid was normal in these patients, indicating predominantly ileal irradiation sequelae. Routine evaluation of serum vitamin B12 after radiotherapy is recommended so that appropriate medication can be given, if possible before neurological symptoms appear.

  16. Interaction between excess folate and low vitamin B12 status.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    Current epidemiological evidence suggests that an imbalance of high folate status and low vitamin B12 status is associated with negative health outcomes in older adults and children. Such an imbalance during pregnancy also predisposes women to diabetes and their offspring to insulin resistance and adiposity and low birthweight. In older adults, vitamin B12 status can remain low despite adequate intake due to age-related decline in vitamin B12 absorption. Pregnant women are exposed to folic acid at varying doses depending on the prenatal care prescribed in different countries. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the interaction between folate and vitamin B12 and the associated health outcomes.

  17. Vitamin B12 Deficiency due to Chlorofluorocarbon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Hemlata; Chaudhary, Rekha

    2010-01-01

    Background. Vitamin B12 is vital for optimal functioning of various organ systems but more importantly the central nervous system and the hematological system. Deficiency of vitamin B12 clinically manifests as excessive daytime fatigue, memory difficulties, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and optic neuropathy. In occupational medicine, vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported with exposure to nitrous oxide in health care workers. However, not much is known about exposure to Freons in other industries and vitamin B12 deficiency. Aim. We are reporting a case of vitamin B12 deficiency in the setting of exposure to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. Case Report. A 55-year-old male refrigerator mechanic experienced recurrent visual symptoms, which included diplopia and blurring. A complete workup was done and was significant of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, his B12 levels were refractory to supplementation. Appropriate precautions at workplace improved patient's symptoms and were associated with significant improvement in B12 levels. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of vitamin B12 deficiency (that remains refractory to supplementation) in the setting of exposure to Freon gases.

  18. Folic acid fortification: why not vitamin B12 also?

    PubMed

    Selhub, Jacob; Paul, Ligi

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid fortification of cereal grains was introduced in many countries to prevent neural tube defect occurrence. The metabolism of folic acid and vitamin B12 intersect during the transfer of the methyl group from 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine catalyzed by B12-dependent methioine synthase. Regeneration of tetrahydrofolate via this reaction makes it available for synthesis of nucleotide precursors. Thus either folate or vitamin B12 deficiency can result in impaired cell division and anemia. Exposure to extra folic acid through fortification may be detrimental to those with vitamin B12 deficiency. Among participants of National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey with low vitamin B12 status, high serum folate (>59 nmol/L) was associated with higher prevalence of anemia and cognitive impairment when compared with normal serum folate. We also observed an increase in the plasma concentrations of total homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA), two functional indicators of vitamin B12 status, with increase in plasma folate under low vitamin B12 status. These data strongly imply that high plasma folate is associated with the exacerbation of both the biochemical and clinical status of vitamin B12 deficiency. Hence any food fortification policy that includes folic acid should also include vitamin B12.

  19. Oral contraceptives can cause falsely low vitamin B(12) levels.

    PubMed

    Gardyn, J; Mittelman, M; Zlotnik, J; Sela, B A; Cohen, A M

    2000-01-01

    Serum vitamin B(12) radioimmunoassays may give falsely low results in patients with folate deficiency, multiple myeloma, megadose of vitamin C and following radioisotope organ scan. We evaluated 10 consecutive healthy women on oral contraceptives (OC) who had falsely low vitamin B(12) levels, as reflected by normal urine methylmalonic acid and plasma homocysteine. After 1-month cessation of OCs, vitamin B(12) returned to the normal range in all women. Transcobalamin I (TCI) blood level was decreased in 60% of patients. OCs may cause temporary low vitamin B(12) blood levels of no clinical significance that can be associated with low TCI levels

  20. Bioavailability of dietary cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Matte, J J; Guay, F; Le Floc'h, N; Girard, C L

    2010-12-01

    The present project aimed to estimate bioavailability of dietary vitamin B(12), for which little information is available in growing pigs. Two approaches, each using 2 quantities of dietary cyanocobalamin, were compared; the first was based on whole body retention for 8 d and the second was based on nycthemeral portal net flux of vitamin B(12). In the first trial, 15 blocks of 3 pigs (31.7 ± 0.5 kg of BW) were formed according to their vitamin B(12) status. Within each block, 1 pig (CONT) was killed and tissues were sampled for vitamin B(12) determination. The remaining 2 piglets were fed 25 (B(12)-25) or 250 (B(12)-250) μg daily of cyanocobalamin for 8 d. Urine was sampled twice daily, and the pigs were killed and sampled as CONT pigs. The total content of vitamin B(12) in the carcass, urine, and intestinal tract was affected by the dietary treatments (P < 0.01) but not in the liver (P > 0.019). The whole body retention of vitamin B(12) was greater (P = 0.02) in B(12)-250 than B(12)-25 pigs, but the corresponding bioavailability was estimated to be 5.3 and 38.2%, respectively. In trial 2, 11 pigs (35.1 ± 4.0 kg of BW and 75.4 ± 5.9 d of age) fed a diet unsupplemented with vitamin B(12) from weaning at 28 d of age were surgically equipped with catheters in the portal vein and carotid artery and an ultrasonic flow probe around the portal vein. Each pig received 3 boluses of 0 (B(12)-0), 25, and 250 μg of dietary vitamin B(12) according to a crossover design. Postprandial nycthemeral arterial plasma concentrations of vitamin B(12) reached minimum values (P < 0.01) between 15 and 18 h postmeal that were 29.6, 15.6, and 10.0% less than the premeal values for B(12)-0, B(12)-25, and B(12)-250 pigs, respectively (linear, P < 0.01). The cumulative net flux of vitamin B(12) for 24 h corresponded to 2.4 and 5.1 µg for B(12)-25 and B(12)-250 treatments, respectively, and the corresponding bioavailability was estimated to be 9.7 and 2.0%, respectively. Although

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and epidermal growth factor: a novel function for vitamin B12?

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua W

    2002-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency was recently shown to be associated with elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and decreased levels of epidermal growth factor in both rats and humans. These findings suggest a novel pathogenetic mechanism underlying the neuropathology of vitamin B12 deficiency. They may also explain putative relationships between vitamin B12 deficiency and certain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and AIDS.

  2. Maternal vitamin B12 deficiency detected in expanded newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Scolamiero, Emanuela; Villani, Guglielmo Rosario Domenico; Ingenito, Laura; Pecce, Rita; Albano, Lucia; Caterino, Marianna; di Girolamo, Maria Grazia; Di Stefano, Cristina; Franzese, Ignazio; Gallo, Giovanna; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2014-12-01

    Besides the inherited form, vitamin B(12) deficiency may be due to diet restrictions or abnormal absorption. The spread of newborn screening programs worldwide has pointed out that non-inherited conditions are mainly secondary to a maternal deficiency. The aim of our work was to study seven cases of acquired vitamin B12 deficiency detected during our newborn screening project. Moreover, we aimed to evaluate vitamin B(12) and related biochemical parameters status on delivering female to verify the consequences on newborns of eventually altered parameters. 35,000 newborns were screened; those showing altered propionyl carnitine (C3) underwent second-tier test for methylmalonic acid (MMA) on dried blood spot (DBS). Subsequently, newborns positive to the presence of MMA on DBS and their respective mothers underwent further tests: serum vitamin B(12), holo-transcobalamin (Holo-TC), folate and homocysteine; newborns were also tested for urinary MMA content. A control study was conducted on 203 females that were tested for the same parameters when admitted to hospital for delivery. Approximately 10% of the examined newborns showed altered C3. Among these, seven cases of acquired vitamin B(12) deficiency were identified (70% of the MMA-positive cases). Moreover, our data show a high frequency of vitamin B(12) deficiency in delivering female (approximately 48% of examined pregnants). We suggest to monitor vitamin B(12) and Holo-TC until delivery and to reconsider the reference interval of vitamin B(12) for a better identification of cases at risk. Finally, newborns from mothers with low or borderline levels of vitamin B(12) should undergo second-tier test for MMA; in the presence of MMA they should be supplemented with vitamin B(12) to prevent adverse effects related to vitamin B(12) deficiency. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Carnitine metabolism in the vitamin B-12-deficient rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, E P; Stabler, S P

    1988-01-01

    In vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) deficiency the metabolism of propionyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA are inhibited secondarily to decreased L-methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity. Production of acylcarnitines provides a mechanism for removing acyl groups and liberating CoA under conditions of impaired acyl-CoA utilization. Carnitine metabolism was studied in the vitamin B-12-deficient rat to define the relationship between alterations in acylcarnitine generation and the development of methylmalonic aciduria. Urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid was increased 200-fold in vitamin B-12-deficient rats as compared with controls. Urinary acylcarnitine excretion was increased in the vitamin B-12-deficient animals by 70%. This increase in urinary acylcarnitine excretion correlated with the degree of metabolic impairment as measured by the urinary methylmalonic acid elimination. Urinary propionylcarnitine excretion averaged 11 nmol/day in control rats and 120 nmol/day in the vitamin B-12-deficient group. The fraction of total carnitine present as short-chain acylcarnitines in the plasma and liver of vitamin B-12-deficient rats was increased as compared with controls. When the rats were fasted for 48 h, relative or absolute increases were seen in the urine, plasma, liver and skeletal-muscle acylcarnitine content of the vitamin B-12-deficient rats as compared with controls. Thus vitamin B-12 deficiency was associated with a redistribution of carnitine towards acylcarnitines. Propionylcarnitine was a significant constituent of the acylcarnitine pool in the vitamin B-12-deficient animals. The changes in carnitine metabolism were consistent with the changes in CoA metabolism known to occur with vitamin B-12 deficiency. The vitamin B-12-deficient rat provides a model system for studying carnitine metabolism in the methylmalonic acidurias. PMID:3196310

  4. Identification of anti-HIV active dicaffeoylquinic- and tricaffeoylquinic acids in Helichrysum populifolium by NMR-based metabolomic guided fractionation.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Heino Martin; Senejoux, François; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; Maharaj, Vinesh Jaichand; Meyer, Jacobus Johannes Marion

    2015-06-01

    South Africa being home to more than 35% of the world's Helichrysum species (c.a. 244) of which many are used in traditional medicine, is seen potentially as a significant resource in the search of new anti-HIV chemical entities. It was established that five of the 30 Helichrysum species selected for this study had significant anti-HIV activity ranging between 12 and 21 μg/mL (IC50) by using an in-house developed DeCIPhR method on a full virus model. Subsequent toxicity tests also revealed little or no toxicity for these active extracts. With the use of NMR-based metabolomics, the search for common chemical characteristics within the plant extract was conducted, which resulted in specific chemical shift areas identified that could be linked to the anti-HIV activity of the extracts. The NMR chemical shifts associated with the activity were identified to be 2.56-3.08 ppm, 5.24-6.28 ppm, 6.44-7.04 ppm and 7.24-8.04 ppm. This activity profile was then used to guide the fractionation process by narrowing down and focusing the fractionation and purification processes to speed up the putative identification of five compounds with anti-HIV activity in the most active species, Helichrysum populifolium. The anti-HIV compounds identified for the first time from H. populifolium were three dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, i.e. 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid as well as two tricaffeoylquinic acid derivatives i.e. 1,3,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and either 5-malonyl-1,3,4-tricaffeoylquinic or 3-malonyl-1,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid, with the latter being identified for the first time in the genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of LIAISON® XL system for HBsAg, and anti-HCV and anti-HIV/Ag p24.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Manco, Maria Teresa; Belvisi, Luisa; Cagnin, Debora; Cerulli, Teresa; Paganini, Alessia; Arpino, Olivia; Cianflone, Annalisa; Agrappi, Carlo; Mirri, Paola; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the data obtained using the new LIAISON® XL chemiluminescence system to search for HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV1-2/p24 Ag with those obtained using the VITROS system currently adopted by the Microbiology Unit of the Hospital of Legnano. Routine samples of patients who were referred by practitioners for the determination of HBsAg (1,000 samples) and/or anti-HCV (1,002 samples) and/or anti-HIV1-2 (995 samples) were simultaneously analyzed using both systems. The concordant positive and discordant samples were re-examined for confirmation by means of an HBsAg neutralization assay, anti-HCV immunoblot, or anti-HIV1-2 Western blot; HBV-DNA, or HCV-RNA or HIV-RNA was also sought in the discordant samples. Samples of patients known to be positive were tested (100 HBsAg positive, 100 anti-HCV positive, and 100 HIV 1-2 positive) as well throughout treatment, with viremia levels becoming undetectable after treatment. The HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV1-2 concordance between the two systems in routine series was respectively 99.8%, 98.5% and 99.7%, and 100% for all markers in samples known positive. The various molecular biology and confirmatory tests of the discordant samples were all negative (except for one anti-HCV positive sample). Measure of Cohen's kappa coefficient for HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV gave K values of respectively 0.992, 0.946, and 0.980. In conclusion, the performance of the LIAISON® XL system in the routine laboratory determination for all three markers was comparable with that of the VITROS system. J. Med. Virol. 89:489-496, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  7. Newer tetracycline derivatives: synthesis, anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and inhibition of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Senchani, Geetha; Banerjee, Debjani

    2007-04-15

    A series of new tetracycline derivatives has been synthesized by reacting appropriate tetracyclines, formaldehyde and secondary amino (piperazino) function of fluoroquinolones using microwave irradiation with the yield ranging from 41 evaluated for its anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme inhibition studies. Among the synthesized compounds, compound 10 was found to be the most promising compound active against HIV-1 replication with EC(50) of 5.2 microM and was nontoxic to the CEM cells until 200 microM, and MIC of 0.2 microg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with moderate inhibition of both 3'-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 IN.

  8. 2-Aminothiazolones as Anti-HIV Agents That Act as gp120-CD4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tiberi, Marika; Tintori, Cristina; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Fazi, Roberta; Zamperini, Claudio; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Franchi, Luigi; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Botta, Lorenzo; Sampaolo, Michela; Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of 2-aminothiazolones along with their biological properties as novel anti-HIV agents. Such compounds have proven to act through the inhibition of the gp120-CD4 protein-protein interaction that occurs at the very early stage of the HIV-1 entry process. No cytotoxicity was found for these compounds, and broad antiviral activities against laboratory strains and pseudotyped viruses were documented. Docking simulations have also been applied to predict the mechanism, at the molecular level, by which the inhibitors were able to interact within the Phe43 cavity of HIV-1 gp120. Furthermore, a preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) evaluation was performed. Overall, this study led the basis for the development of more potent HIV entry inhibitors. PMID:24614386

  9. Ligand-Based Virtual Screening in a Search for Novel Anti-HIV-1 Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Kurczyk, Agata; Warszycki, Dawid; Musiol, Robert; Kafel, Rafał; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-10-26

    In a search for new anti-HIV-1 chemotypes, we developed a multistep ligand-based virtual screening (VS) protocol combining machine learning (ML) methods with the privileged structures (PS) concept. In its learning step, the VS protocol was based on HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors fetched from the ChEMBL database. The performances of various ML methods and PS weighting scheme were evaluated and applied as VS filtering criteria. Finally, a database of 1.5 million commercially available compounds was virtually screened using a multistep ligand-based cascade, and 13 selected unique structures were tested by measuring the inhibition of HIV replication in infected cells. This approach resulted in the discovery of two novel chemotypes with moderate antiretroviral activity, that, together with their topological diversity, make them good candidates as lead structures for future optimization.

  10. Electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of anti-HIV active aminophenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyl', O. K.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Maier, G. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Raichenok, T. F.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the absorption and fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quantum yields of sulphone-containing anti-HIV active o-aminophenol molecules in an inert solvent, hexane, and in a polar solvent, acetonitrile. We have studied IR Fourier-transform spectra and examined structural features of o-aminophenols with different substituents in solutions and crystals. Functional groups of molecules that are involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds have been revealed. Proton acceptor properties of o-aminophenol molecules have been theoretically evaluated using the method of molecular electrostatic potential. Using quantum chemistry methods, we have calculated and interpreted absorption and fluorescence spectra of o-aminophenols. Calculation data are compared with experimental results. We have determined the main channels and mechanisms of photophysical relaxation processes in o-aminophenols.

  11. Chemoenzymatic Syntheses and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Glucose-Nucleoside Conjugates as Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Tatiana; Fernández, Susana; Sanghvi, Yogesh S.; Detorio, Mervi; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Gotor, Vicente; Ferrero, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiester linked conjugates of various nucleosides such as d4U, d4T, IdUrd, ddI, ddA, virazole, ara-A and ara-C containing a glucosyl moiety have been described. These compounds were designed to act as prodrugs, where the corresponding 5′-monophosphates may be generated intracellularly. The synthesis of the glycoconjugates was achieved in good yields by condensation of a glucosyl phosphoramidite 7 with nucleosides in the presence of an activating agent. It was demonstrated that the glucose-conjugates improve water solubility of the nucleoside analogues, for example up to 31-fold for ara-A conjugate compared to ara-A alone. The new conjugates were tested for their anti-HIV-1 activity in human lymphocytes. These derivatives offer a convenient design for potential prodrug candidates with the possibility to improve the physicochemical properties and therapeutic activity of nucleoside analogues. PMID:21077659

  12. Electrochemical impediometric detection of anti-HIV drug taking gold nanorods as a sensing interface.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singh, Gajendra; Pundir, C S

    2015-04-15

    In present work, gold nanorods were used for amplification of electrochemical sensing of anti-HIV replication drug i.e. deferiprone. Gold nanorods (nano Au) deposited onto pencil graphite electrode (PGE) has been utilized for covalent immobilization of horse radish peroxidase (HRP), via glutaraldehyde (Glu), for deferiprone detection using impedimetric technique. Gold nanorods (nano Au) prepared were characterized by TEM and XRD. The resulting nano Au sensor exhibited a good response to deferiprone with a wide linear range (0.005-1000µM) and a low detection limit 0.005µM. The biosensor also showed a short response time (within 15s). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high reproducibility, good storage stability and anti-interference ability. The applicability of the nano Au sensor is to determine deferiprone level in spiked urine and serum samples.

  13. [Asymmetry in international relations, industrial property rights and anti-HIV medication].

    PubMed

    Costa-Couto, Maria Helena; Nascimento, Alvaro César

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the asymmetry in the international relations as refers to the recognition of industrial property rights in the pharmaceutical industry. It focuses on the impact of such relations upon the access to ARV medication, an issue of worldwide interest due to its connection with the development of the nations. Clashing interests and the position taken by some countries in their patent laws point to a scenario less favorable for the access of peripheral countries to anti-HIV/AIDS medication. On the other hand, it seems that the success of the Brazilian STD/AIDS program in negotiating ARV prices will open new possibilities. The solution may be the internal strengthening of the National States and the active role played by the Agencies of the United Nations System in defense of the collective human interests.

  14. The anti-HIV activity of the phytochemical alpha-terthienyl.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Harris, L; Teeple, A; Towers, G H

    1993-01-01

    The plant trithiophene, alpha-terthienyl (alpha T), was evaluated for activity against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). Antiviral activity specifically required long wavelength light (UVA, 320-400 nm). The compound had little or no activity in visible light or in the dark. The anti-HIV effect was UVA-dose dependent and was proportional to the concentration of alpha T, according to several parameters of virus infectivity and replication. The efficacy was decreased to some extent by the presence of bovine serum in the reactions; but under optimal conditions 0.1 microgram/ml. alpha T (3 x 10(-7) M) could inactivate 10(4)-10(5) infectious particles. In contrast poliovirus and Coxsackievirus infectivity were relatively resistant to alpha T + UVA.

  15. The urinary excretion of assayable vitamin B12 and radioactivity after parenteral 58Co B12 in man

    PubMed Central

    Adams, J. F.

    1961-01-01

    Evidence is presented that after injection of radioactive vitamin B12 in man, there is a close correlation between the amount of radioactivity excreted and the amount of assayable vitamin B12 excreted, and thus that the amount of radioactivity excreted is a true measure of the vitamin B12 excreted. The possible reasons for this occurrence are discussed and it is suggested that in the body vitamin B12 does not exist as such but as an analogue or active derivative. PMID:13681399

  16. Flazinamide, a novel {beta}-carboline compound with anti-HIV actions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunhua; Tang Jianguo; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Dong Zejun; Du Li; Shen Xu; Liu Jikai; Zheng Yongtang . E-mail: zhengyt@mail.kiz.ac.cn

    2007-04-20

    A {beta}-carboline compound, flazin isolated from Suillus granulatus has been shown weak anti-HIV-1 activity. Based on the structure of flazin, flazinamide [1-(5'- hydromethyl-2'-furyl)-{beta}-carboline-3-carboxamide] was synthesized and its anti-HIV activities were evaluated in the present study. The cytotoxicity of flazinamide was about 4.1-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide potently reduced syncytium formation induced by HIV-1IIIB with EC50 value of 0.38 {mu}M, the EC50 of flazinamide was about 6.2-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide also inhibited HIV-2ROD and HIV-2CBL-20 infection with EC50 values of 0.57 and 0.89 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide reduced p24 antigen expression in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 and in clinical isolated strain HIV-1KM018 infected PBMC, with EC50 values of 1.45 and 0.77 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide did not suppress HIV-1 replication in chronically infected H9 cells. Flazinamide blocked the fusion between normal cells and HIV-1 or HIV-2 chronically infected cells. It weakly inhibited activities of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease or integrase at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the conversion of the carboxyl group in 3 position of flazin markedly enhanced the anti-viral activity (TI value increased from 12.1 to 312.2) and flazinamide might interfere in the early stage of HIV life cycle.

  17. Nanoparticles-in-film for the combined vaginal delivery of anti-HIV microbicide drugs.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Reis, Cassilda; Machado, Alexandra; Barreiros, Luísa; Araújo, Francisca; Nunes, Rute; Seabra, Vítor; Ferreira, Domingos; Segundo, Marcela A; Sarmento, Bruno; das Neves, José

    2016-12-10

    Combining two or more antiretroviral drugs in one medical product is an interesting but challenging strategy for developing topical anti-HIV microbicides. We developed a new vaginal delivery system comprising the incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into a polymeric film base - NPs-in-film - and tested its ability to deliver tenofovir (TFV) and efavirenz (EFV). EFV-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs were incorporated alongside free TFV into fast dissolving films during film manufacturing. The delivery system was characterized for physicochemical properties, as well as genital distribution, local and systemic 24h pharmacokinetics (PK), and safety upon intravaginal administration to mice. NPs-in-film presented suitable technological, mechanical and cytotoxicity features for vaginal use. Retention of NPs in vivo was enhanced both in vaginal lavages and tissue when associated to film. PK data evidenced that vaginal drug levels rapidly decreased after administration but NPs-in-film were still able to enhance drug concentrations of EFV. Obtained values for area-under-the-curve for EFV were around one log10 higher than those for the free drugs in aqueous vehicle (phosphate buffered saline). Film alone also contributed to higher and more prolonged local drug levels as compared to the administration of TFV and EFV in aqueous vehicle. Systemic exposure to both drugs was low. NPs-in-film was found to be safe upon once daily vaginal administration to mice, with no significant genital histological changes or major alterations in cytokine/chemokine profiles being observed. Overall, the proposed NPs-in-film system seems to be an interesting delivery platform for developing combination vaginal anti-HIV microbicides.

  18. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy. PMID:26800572

  19. In vitro testing of African traditional medicines for cytotoxic, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Gqaleni, Nceba; Ngcobo, Mlungisi; Parboosing, Raveen; Naidoo, Anneta

    2012-01-01

    African Traditional Medicines (ATMs) serve as a major source of primary healthcare for African people. The reasons for their use range from easy access, affordability, beliefs in traditional systems and long term safety. ATMs have been used to treat individuals infected with HIV and therefore need scientific validation; a view supported by Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs). This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity, immune modulatory and anti-HIV activities of traditional multiple herbal preparations from local THPs. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene, Product Blue, SPNa and SDKc ATM were supplied by local THPs. Changes in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) & glutathione (GSH) over 24 hours were measured using luminometry. Changes in 12 cytokines were assayed using an ELISA-based absorbance assay. Protective effects against HIV killing of MT-4 cells were tested using the XTT assay and antiviral activity was measured using an HIV-1 viral load assay. Cyclosporine and AZT were used as positive controls. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene and SDKc induced a dose dependent toxicity on treated PBMCs by reducing ATP and GSH at high doses (p< 0.001). These medicinal preparations, along with SPNa, showed immunomodulatory activity by significantly (p< 0.001) changing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Product Blue stimulated the levels of ATP and GSH in treated PBMCs at all doses however this product did not show any immunomodulatory activity on cytokine secretion when compared to control cells. Ugambu, Ihashi, Product Nene showed promising anti-HIV activity relative to AZT (p< 0.01). This study has shown that some of these traditional medicinal preparations have at least one or all the properties of immunostimulation, immunomodulation or antiretroviral effects. The mechanism of action of the shown activities should further be investigated.

  20. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy.

  1. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  2. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  3. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  4. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  5. 32 CFR 806b.12 - Requesting the Social Security Number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requesting the Social Security Number. 806b.12... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 806b.12 Requesting the Social Security Number. When asking an individual for his or her Social Security Number, always give a Privacy...

  6. [Pseudothrombotic microangiopathy related to vitamin B(12) deficiency].

    PubMed

    Abourazzak, S; Chaouki, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Hida, M

    2012-06-01

    Vitamin B(12), or cobalamin, deficiency is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; they are also potentially serious. We report a case of pseudothrombotic microangiopathy related to cobalamin deficiency. Vitamin B(12) deficiency, which is more commonly recognized in the context of malnutrition, should be considered in the context of microangiopathy.

  7. Chemistry and bioactivity of an artificial adenosylpeptide B(12) cofactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Oetterli, René M; Brandl, Helmut; Lyatuu, Fredrick E; Buckel, Wolfgang; Zelder, Felix

    2012-09-24

    Artificial influence: We describe a semi-artificial adenosylpeptide B(12) that behaves as a cofactor in B(12)-dependent enzymatic reactions and demonstrate that the peptide backbone influences its chemical properties and modulates its bioactivity in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of the growth of L. delbrueckii is demonstrated, thus providing a potentially powerful approach for the development of antibacterial and antiproliferative compounds.

  8. The relation between vitamin B12 and SYNTAX score.

    PubMed

    Cerit, Levent; Duygu, Hamza; Gulsen, Kamil; Kemal, Hatice; Tosun, Ozgur; Ozcem, Barcin; Cerit, Zeynep; Gunsel, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is required in the metabolism of homocysteine. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease via hyperhomocysteinaemia. However, the association of vitamin B12 and the severity of coronary artery disease has not been studied to date. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the relationship between vitamin B12 and SYNTAX score. Medical records of consecutive patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The study group consisted of 127 patients. Vitamin B12, other biochemical parameters, clinical and echocardiographic parameters, and SYNTAX score were evaluated for all patients. Patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, and history of transient ischaemic attack/stroke and heart failure. The SYNTAX score was significantly higher in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (29.2 ± 4.9 vs. 22.5 ± 4.5, p < 0.05). In our study, we found a significant relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and SYNTAX score, demon-strating the severity and complexity of coronary artery disease.

  9. Vitamin B12 in meat and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Gille, Doreen; Schmid, Alexandra

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin B12 is synthesized exclusively by microorganisms; therefore, humans must absorb it from food. Excellent sources of B12 are foods of ruminant origin, so dairy and meat products play an important role in efforts to meet the official daily B12 intake recommendation of 3.0 μg. Concentrations of the vitamin vary within foods of ruminant origin, with the highest concentrations found in offal such as liver and kidney. In comparison, dairy products have much lower quantities of the vitamin. In bovine milk, the B12 concentration is stable with regard to breed, feed, season, and stage of lactation, but in ruminant meat, the amount of B12 can vary based on the feeding and husbandry of the animal as well as the cut of meat chosen and its preparation. Processing of ruminant food, including thermal treatment, usually diminishes the vitamin B12 concentration. This review summarizes the vitamin B12 content of foods and discusses the impact of food processing on vitamin content. The contribution of ruminant food sources to B12 intake is specifically evaluated, with its bioavailability taken into account. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Causes of Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review describes current knowledge of the main causes of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. The most common explanations for poor B12 status are a low dietary intake of the vitamin (i.e., a low intake of animal-source foods) and malabsorption. Although it has long been known that strict vegetar...

  11. Biochemistry of B12-cofactors in human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kräutler, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin B12, the "antipernicious anaemia factor", is a crystallisable cobalt-complex, which belongs to a group of unique "complete" corrinoids, named cobalamins (Cbl). In humans, instead of the "vitamin", two organometallic B12-forms are coenzymes in two metabolically important enzymes: Methyl-cobalamin, the cofactor of methionine synthase, and coenzyme B12 (adenosyl-cobalamin), the cofactor of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. The cytoplasmatic methionine synthase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from N-methyl-tetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to yield methionine and to liberate tetrahydrofolate. In the mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase a radical process transforms methylmalonyl-CoA (a remains e.g. from uneven numbered fatty acids) into succinyl-CoA, for further metabolic use. In addition, in the human mitochondria an adenosyl-transferase incorporates the organometallic group of coenzyme B12. In all these enzymes, the bound B12-derivatives engage (or are formed) in exceptional organometallic enzymatic reactions. This chapter recapitulates the physiological chemistry of vitamin B12, relevant in the context of the metabolic transformation of B12-derivatives into the relevant coenzyme forms and their use in B12-dependent enzymes.

  12. Physician's management of suspected vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A M

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to audit physician's management of patients with a low serum level of vitamin B12 who were admitted to a university-affiliated teaching hospital during 1 year. Among the 34 patients 13 were proved to have pernicious anemia or vitamin B12 malabsorption, but for 12 of them there were unnecessary delays (several days or weeks) before initiation of investigation and therapy. An additional six patients, who had low serum levels of vitamin B12 and macrocytosis, most likely had true vitamin B12 deficiency, but proper investigation was not done and they did not receive any vitamin B12 or folic acid therapy. In another nine cases unexplained low serum levels of vitamin B12 were not properly investigated, and the patients either did not receive any vitamin B12 therapy or received it without proper documentation of a deficiency. Suggestions for facilitating early detection, investigation and treatment of megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficiency are given. PMID:7459753

  13. Nature and nurture in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zschocke, J; Schindler, S; Hoffmann, G F; Albani, M

    2002-07-01

    We report on a child in whom severe nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency was exacerbated by a genetic impairment of the folate cycle, causing reduced CSF concentrations of the methyl group donor 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Some patients with vitamin B12 deficiency may benefit from high dose folic acid supplementation, even if plasma concentrations are high.

  14. Vegetarian lifestyle and monitoring of vitamin B-12 status.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Geisel, Jürgen

    2002-12-01

    Vegetarians are at risk to develop deficiencies of some essential nutrients, especially vitamin B-12 (cobalamin). Cobalamin occurs in substantial amounts only in foods derived from animals and is essential for one-carbon metabolism and cell division. Low nutritional intake of vitamin B-12 may lead to negative balance and, finally, to functional deficiency when tissue stores of vitamin B-12 are depleted. Early diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency seems to be useful because irreversible neurological damages may be prevented by cobalamin substitution. The search for a specific and sensitive test to diagnose vitamin B-12 deficiency is ongoing. Serum vitamin B-12 measurement is a widely applied standard method. However, the test has poor predictive value. Optimal monitoring of cobalamin status in vegetarians should include the measurement of homocysteine (HCY), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and holotranscobalamin II. Vitamin B-12 deficiency can be divided into four stages. In stages I and II, indicated by a low plasma level of holotranscobalamin II, the plasma and cell stores become depleted. Stage III is characterized by increased levels of HCY and MMA in addition to lowered holotranscobalamin II. In stage IV, clinical signs become recognizable like macroovalocytosis, elevated MCV of erythrocytes or lowered haemoglobin. In our investigations, we have found stage III of vitamin B-12 deficiency in over 60% of vegetarians, thus underlining the importance of cobalamin monitoring in this dietary group.

  15. Vegan diet, subnormal vitamin B-12 status and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kam S; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Celermajer, David S

    2014-08-19

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases.

  16. Vegan Diet, Subnormal Vitamin B-12 Status and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Kam S.; Kwok, Timothy C.Y.; Celermajer, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases. PMID:25195560

  17. 38 CFR 18b.12 - Suspension of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension of rules. 18b.12 Section 18b.12 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 AND PART 18 OF THIS CHAPTER General...

  18. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency.

  19. Vitamin B12 deficiency - A 21st century perspective .

    PubMed

    Shipton, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition which can present with non-specific clinical features, and in severe cases with neurological or haematological abnormalities. Although classically caused by pernicious anaemia, this condition now accounts for a minority of cases and vitamin B12 deficiency occurs most often due to food-bound cobalamin malabsorption. Since missing the diagnosis can result in potentially severe complications, including degeneration of the spinal cord and pancytopaenia, vitamin B12 deficiency must be diagnosed early and managed appropriately. Intramuscular injections have been the mainstay of treatment, but oral replacement therapy can be effective in many cases. There is accumulating evidence that high vitamin B12 levels (values varied from 350-1,200 pmol/l) are associated with haematological and hepatic disorders, in particular with malignancy. This review focuses on the developments in the clinical features and management of vitamin B12 deficiency over the last decade. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  20. The B(12)-binding subunit of glutamate mutase from Clostridium tetanomorphum traps the nucleotide moiety of coenzyme B(12).

    PubMed

    Tollinger, M; Eichmüller, C; Konrat, R; Huhta, M S; Marsh, E N; Kräutler, B

    2001-06-08

    Glutamate mutase from Clostridium tetanomorphum binds coenzyme B(12) in a base-off/His-on form, in which the nitrogenous ligand of the B(12)-nucleotide function is displaced from cobalt by a conserved histidine. The effect of binding the B(12)-nucleotide moiety to MutS, the B(12)-binding subunit of glutamate mutase, was investigated using NMR spectroscopic methods. Binding of the B(12)-nucleotide to MutS was determined to occur with K(d)=5.6(+/-0.7) mM and to be accompanied by a specific conformational change in the protein. The nucleotide binding cleft of the apo-protein, which is formed by a dynamic segment with propensity for partial alpha-helical conformation (the "nascent" alpha-helix), becomes completely structured upon binding of the B(12)-nucleotide, with formation of helix alpha1. In contrast, the segment containing the conserved residues of the B(12)-binding Asp-x-His-x-x-Gly motif remains highly dynamic in the protein/B(12)-nucleotide complex. From relaxation studies, the time constant tau, which characterizes the time scale for the formation of helix alpha1, was estimated to be about 30 micros (15)N and was the same in both, apo-protein and nucleotide-bound protein. Thus, the binding of the B(12)-nucleotide moiety does not significantly alter the kinetics of helix formation, but only shifts the equilibrium towards the structured fold. These results indicate MutS to be structured in such a way, as to be able to trap the nucleotide segment of the base-off form of coenzyme B(12) and provide, accordingly, the first structural clues as to how the process of B(12)-binding occurs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Does an elevated serum vitamin B(12) level mask actual vitamin B(12) deficiency in myeloproliferative disorders?

    PubMed

    Gauchan, Dron; Joshi, Nitin; Gill, Amandeep Singh; Patel, Vishal; Debari, Vincent A; Guron, Gunwant; Maroules, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Elevation of the methylmalonic acid level is a sensitive marker of vitamin B(12) deficiency. Our cross-sectional observational study of 33 patients with myeloproliferative disorders found that 9 patients, 27.27% had occult deficiency despite having normal to elevated serum vitamin B(12) levels. Early detection of vitamin B(12) deficiency by using the methylmalonic acid measurement may prevent significant neurologic and hematologic complications in patients with myeloproliferative disorders. In patients with myeloproliferative disorders, normal to high serum vitamin B(12) concentrations have often been reported. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether normal or elevated serum vitamin B(12) levels in myeloproliferative disorders might actually mask the true underlying vitamin B(12) deficiency in some patients. Thirty-three patients (12 men, 21 women; mean age, 70.55 years [range, 37-90 years]) with polycythemia vera (n = 13), essential thrombocythemia (n = 12), chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 5), and idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) (n = 3) were accrued over a period of 1 year, from March 2009 to February 2010. From all of the subjects, serum vitamin B(12) level, methylmalonic acid level, a basic complete blood cell count panel, and liver and renal function tests were obtained. Normal to elevated serum vitamin B(12) levels were recorded in all the patients. However, elevated serum methylmalonic acid levels were found in 9 (27.27%) patients, with a prevalence of 2 patients with polycythemia vera, 23% in polycythemia vera, 4 patients with essential thrombocythemia, 33.3% in essential thrombocythemia, 1 patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia, 20% in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and 2 patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis, 66.7% in IMF. Our data suggest that 27.27% of the total enrolled patients had occult vitamin B(12) deficiency despite normal to elevated vitamin B(12) levels on regular serum vitamin B(12) testing.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients after enterocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Alison; Whittam, Benjamin; Rink, Richard; Kaefer, Martin; Misseri, Rosalie; King, Shelly; Cain, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Serum B12 deficiency is a known sequlae of enterocystoplasty. The complications of B12 deficiency include megaloblastic anemia, neuropsychiatric disease, and demyelinating diseases such as peripheral neuropathy. Some studies have suggested that underlying disease states may be more important than enteric absorptive capacity in predicting acquired B12 deficiency. A 38% incidence of low or low-normal serum B12 in patients who have undergone enterocystoplasty has previously been reported, and oral B12 supplementation has been demonstrated to be an effective short-term therapy; however, the long-term results remain unclear. This study hypothesized that oral vitamin B12 supplementation in patients with B12 deficiency following enterocystoplasty is an effective long-term treatment. Additionally, it sought to determine if underlying disease state predicts B12 deficiency following enterocystoplasty. Children who underwent enterocystoplasty at the present institution prior to August 2007 were reviewed. Patients with non-ileal augment, insufficient follow-up or hematologic disorders were excluded. Patients with low or low-normal B12 levels were included. Treatment consisted of daily oral therapy of 250 mcg or monthly parenteral therapy of 1000 mcg IM. Separately, the institutional database of 898 patients who underwent enterocystoplasty was searched and patients with at least one post-operative B12 level were highlighted. The indication for enterocystoplasty was classified as neuropathic or non-neuropathic. Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up was 49 months (range 5-85) following initial abnormal B12 level. On the last follow-up, 4/23 (17%) patients had normal serum B12 levels. No patients reported sequelae of long-term B12 deficiency. In the secondary investigation, 113 patients met inclusion criteria. A total of 101 had neuropathic indications for enterocystoplasty, and 12 had non-neuropathic indications. At any time during follow-up, 48/101 (47

  3. Whey protein isolate improves vitamin B12 and folate status in elderly Australians with subclinical deficiency of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Varinderpal S; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Almond, Theodora; Cavuoto, Paul; James-Martin, Genevieve; Fenech, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) contains vitamin B12 and folate. However, the efficacy of WPI as a bioavailable source of these vitamins in the elderly with low vitamin B12 was not previously tested. We investigated the effects of WPI supplementation on vitamin B12 and folate status in blood and measured changes in homocysteine (HCY), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and genome integrity biomarkers in elderly individuals with low vitamin B12 status. The effect of WPI was compared to soy protein isolate (SPI). In this randomized controlled cross-over intervention trial, 56 subclinically vitamin B12 -deficient participants received 50 g WPI or 50 g SPI as a control for 8 wk followed by 16-wk washout phase and then cross-over to alternative supplement for next 8 wk. Consumption of WPI resulted in significant increase in serum active B12 (p < 0.0001) and serum folate (p = 0.0094). MMA, HCY, and nucleoplasmic bridges increased significantly after SPI intake but not after WPI (p = 0.052; p = 0.028; p = 0.0009, respectively). Results indicate that WPI consumption improves active B12 and folate status. Unlike SPI, WPI consumption may prevent increase in MMA, HCY, and genome instability in older Australians with low vitamin B12 status. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  5. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (<5 μm) phytoplankton varied independently of B12 concentrations. These observations were corroborated by field-based nutrient amendment experiments, in which B12 additions stimulated growth of large phytoplankton taxa 6-fold over unamended controls. In contrast, small taxa (<5 μm) were largely unaffected. This study provides the first evidence of vitamin B12's influence on phytoplankton field population dynamics based on direct chemical measurements of cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  6. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Characterization of vitamin B12 in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kumudha, Anantharajappa; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of nature's complex metabolite which is industrially produced using certain bacteria. Algae could be an alternative source of vitamin B12 and in this study, vitamin B12 from a halotolerant green alga, Dunaliella salina V-101 was purified and characterized. The extract of Dunaliella was purified by passing through Amberlite XAD-2 and EASI-extract vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column. The total vitamin B12 content in purified sample fractions was 42 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as determined by the chemiluminescence method which was almost close to 49 ± 2 μg/100 g dry weight as estimated by microbiological method. Further quantification of total vitamin B12 using gold nanoparticle (AUNPs) based aptamer showed 40 ± 0.8/100 g dry weight. There was a good correlation among all the methods of quantification. Adenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 which is a cofactor for methylmalonyl CoA mutase was identified by HPLC. Upon quantification, Dunaliella was found to contain 34 ± 4 μg of adenosylcobalamin for 100 g dry biomass. Authenticity of adenosylcobalmin was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), selected ion recording (SIR) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) studies.

  8. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology.

  9. [The importance of vitamin B12 in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kamrowska, Anna; Kasprzak, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Jarosław; Goch, Aleksander; Kamrowski, Czesław

    2010-03-01

    The article drew attention to the construction of a vitamin B12 deficiency and its importance in the human body. Emphasizes the role of cobalamin as a structural element involved, among others cobamides in such reactions as the synthesis of purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis or choline. Two metabolically active forms of cobalamin: methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin and their importance to the human body were presented. The process of absorption of vitamin B12 and methionine in revealing the importance of the neurological symptoms was described. The chemical importance and cause vitamin B12 deficiency was stressed. The attention was paid upon the role of acid in methylomalon determination of vitamin B12 deficiency in the human body. Disclosure reports analyzed the relationship of vitamin B12 from the emergence of psychotic symptoms. Particular attention is given to teams which binds to the vitamin B12 deficiency--depressive, delusional and manic. Based on case reports were analyzed cases with deficiency symptoms associated with a deficit of vitamin B12. Also points to the possibility of diagnosing cobalamin deficiency even before the onset of clinical symptoms.

  10. Considering the case for vitamin B12 fortification of flour.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H; Rosenberg, Irwin H; Oakley, Godfrey P; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2010-03-01

    Reasons to fortify flour with vitamin B12 are considered, including the high prevalence of depletion and deficiency of this vitamin that occurs in persons of all ages in resource-poor countries and in the elderly in wealthier countries, and the adverse functional consequences of poor vitamin B12 status. From a global perspective, the main cause of inadequate intake and status is a low intake of animal-source foods; even lacto-ovo vegetarians have lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations than omnivores, and for various reasons many populations have limited consumption of animal-source foods. Infants are vitamin B12-depleted from early infancy if their mothers' vitamin B12 status and intake are poor during pregnancy and lactation. Even in the United States, more than 20% of the elderly have serum vitamin B12 concentrations that indicate depletion, and an additional 6% have deficiency, primarily due to gastric atrophy, which impairs the absorption of the vitamin from food but usually not from supplements or fortified foods. Although the evidence is limited, it shows that fortified flour, consumed as bread, can improve vitamin B12 status. Where vitamin B12 fortification is implemented, the recommendation is to add 20 microg/kg flour, assuming consumption of 75 to 100 g flour per day, to provide 75% to 100% of the Estimated Average Requirement; the amount of the vitamin that can be added is limited by its cost. The effectiveness of this level of addition for improving vitamin B12 status in programs needs to be determined and monitored. In addition, further research should evaluate the bioavailability of the vitamin from fortified flour by elderly people with food cobalamin malabsorption and gastric atrophy.

  11. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahin, Cem; Sahan, Murat

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin B12 plays a major role in the maintenance of central and peripheral nervous systems. Vitamin B12 deficiency may affect the spinal cord, brain, optic nerve, and peripheral nerve functions; however, the effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on olfactory function has not been studied, so our study aimed to investigate that. Thirty-nine patients with low vitamin B12 levels and 34 controls were included in the study. All participants had detailed otorhinolaryngological examinations and laboratory tests. The Sniffin' Stick test was used for analysis of olfactory function. The 2 groups were compared for smell test results. Correlations of smell test results with demographic and laboratory data were investigated in the vitamin B12-deficient group. The threshold discrimination identification scores were (mean ± standard deviation) 28.04 ± 5.58 and 35.10 ± 2.84 in the vitamin B12-deficient and control groups, respectively (p < 0.001). In the vitamin B12-deficient group, hyposmia and anosmia were evident in 56.4% and 5.1% of the patients, respectively, but no subjects in the control group had olfactory dysfunction (p < 0.001). Correlation analysis showed that age and odor identification score showed a negative correlation (p < 0.001); however, there was a positive correlation between threshold, discrimination and identification (TDI) score and vitamin B12 levels. In this study, we showed for the first time that olfactory dysfunction may be present in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency. Apart from a negative correlation of age with odor identification score, none of the other parameters studied showed correlations with olfactory dysfunction. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  12. Homocysteine and thiol metabolites in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, L R; Baines, M; Roberts, N B

    2001-01-01

    Homocysteine metabolism is increasingly implicated in a diverse group of clinical disorders, including atheromatous vascular disease. We studied the disposition of homocysteine via the trans-sulphuration pathway, plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and plasma levels of the sulphated hormone dehydro-epiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) in six vitamin B(12)-deficient human subjects before and after 2 weeks of vitamin B(12) repletion, both in the fasting state and following an oral methionine load (0.1 g/kg body weight). Fasting plasma total homocysteine concentrations fell (P=0.03) and total cysteine concentrations rose significantly (P=0.048) after treatment for 2 weeks with vitamin B(12) injections. The magnitude of the mean fall in the fasting concentration of homocysteine (38.8 micromol/l) was similar to the mean rise in cysteine levels (36.0 micromol/l) following vitamin B(12) therapy. Circulating levels of homocysteine were increased at 4 h after a methionine load when compared with fasting levels, both before and after vitamin B(12) repletion (P=0.003 for both). Total cysteinyl-glycine was lower post-methionine than in the fasting state following vitamin B(12) therapy (P=0.007). Fasting plasma GPx fell significantly after 2 weeks of vitamin B(12) therapy (P=0.05). The change in plasma GPx between the fasting state and 4 h after methionine loading was significantly different pre- and post-vitamin B(12) therapy (P=0.05). The present study provides indirect support to the hypothesis that defects in the trans-sulphuration and remethylation of homocysteine produce hyperhomocysteinaemia in vitamin B(12) deficiency in human subjects. Elevated homocysteine levels directly or indirectly may up-regulate GPx. Sulphation status, as measured by plasma DHEAS, was unchanged.

  13. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  14. Regiospecificity of Chlorophenol Reductive Dechlorination by Vitamin B12s

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark H.; Woods, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Vitamin B12, reduced by titanium (III) citrate to vitamin B12s, catalyzes the reductive dechlorination of chlorophenols. Reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol and of all tetrachlorophenol and trichlorophenol isomers was observed. Reaction of various chlorophenols with vitamin B12 favored reductive dechlorination at positions adjacent to another chlorinated carbon, but chlorines ortho to the hydroxyl group of a phenol were particularly resistant to reductive dechlorination, even if they were also ortho to a chlorine. This resulted in a reductive dechlorination pattern favoring removal of para and meta chlorines, which differs substantially from the pattern exhibited by anaerobic microbial consortia. PMID:16349438

  15. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period.

  16. Combinatorial de novo design and application of a biomimetic affinity ligand for the purification of human anti-HIV mAb 4E10 from transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Platis, Dimitris; Maltezos, Anastasios; Ma, Julian K-C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-HIV antibody 4E10 (mAb 4E10) is one of the most broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV, directed against a specific epitope on envelope protein gp41. In the present study, a combinatorial de novo design approach was used for the development of a biomimetic ligand for the affinity purification of mAb 4E10 from tobacco transgenic extract in a single chromatographic step. The biomimetic ligand (4E10lig) was based on a L-Phe/beta-Ala bi-substituted 1,3,5-triazine (Trz) scaffold (beta-Ala-Trz-L-Phe, 4E10lig) which potentially mimics the more pronounced electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of mAb 4E10-binding sequence determined by screening of a random peptide library. This library was comprised of Escherichia coli cells harboring a plasmid (pFlitrx) engineered to express a fusion protein containing random dodecapeptides that were inserted into the active loop of thioredoxin, which itself was inserted into the dispensable region of the flagellin gene. Adsorption equilibrium studies with this biomimetic ligand and mAb 4E10 determined a dissociation constant (K(D)) of 0.41 +/- 0.05 microM. Molecular modeling studies of the biomimetic ligand revealed that it can potentially occupy the same binding site as the natural binding core peptide epitope. The biomimetic affinity adsorbent was exploited in the development of a facile mAb 4E10 purification protocol, affording mAb 4E10 of high purity (approximately 95%) with good overall yield (60-80%). Analysis of the antibody preparation by SDS-PAGE, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and western blot showed that the mAb 4E10 was fully active and free of degraded variants, polyphenols, and alkaloids.

  17. Vitamin B12 supplementation during pregnancy and postpartum improves B12 status of both mothers and infants but vaccine response in mothers only: a randomized clinical trial in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Siddiqua, Towfida J; Ahmad, Shaikh M; Ahsan, Khalid B; Rashid, Mamunur; Roy, Anjan; Rahman, Syed M; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Hampel, Daniela; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Allen, Lindsay H; Raqib, Rubhana

    2016-02-01

    Poor vitamin B12 (B12) status is associated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy and infancy. Little is known about effects of B12 supplementation on immune function. The present study aimed to evaluate effects of pre- and postnatal B12 supplementation on biomarkers of B12 status and vaccine-specific responses in mothers and infants. In a blinded, placebo-controlled trial, Bangladeshi women (n = 68, age 18-35 years, hemoglobin <110 g/L, 11-14 weeks pregnant) were randomized to receive 250 μg/day B12 or a placebo throughout pregnancy and 3-month postpartum along with 60 mg iron + 400 μg folate. Women were immunized with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine at 26- to 28-week gestation. Blood from mothers (baseline, 72-h post-delivery, 3-month postpartum), newborns and infants (3-month) was analyzed for hemoglobin, B12, methylmalonic acid (MMA), total homocysteine (tHcy), ferritin and serum transferrin receptor, C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Vitamin B12 was also assessed in breast milk. H1N1-specific antibodies were determined in plasma and colostrum/breast milk. At baseline, 26% women were B12 deficient (<150 pmol/L), 40% had marginal status (150-220 pmol/L), 43% had elevated MMA (>271 nmol/L), and 31% had elevated tHcy (>10 μmol/L). Supplementation increased B12 in plasma, colostrums and breast milk (p < 0.05) and lowered MMA in neonates, mothers and infants at 3 months (p < 0.05). B12 supplementation significantly increased H1N1-specific IgA responses in plasma and colostrums in mothers and reduced proportion of infants with elevated AGP and CRP compared with placebo. Supplementation with 250 μg/day B12 during pregnancy and lactation substantially improved maternal, infant and breast milk B12 status. Maternal supplementation improved H1N1 vaccine-specific responses in mothers only and may alleviate inflammatory responses in infants.

  18. Characterisation of vitamin B12 immunoaffinity columns and method development for determination of vitamin B12 in a range of foods, juices and pharmaceutical products using immunoaffinity clean-up and high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Marley, E C; Mackay, E; Young, G

    2009-03-01

    New rapid and simpler procedures, using immunoaffinity columns, have been developed for the determination of vitamin B12 in a range of samples including three different US National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) Reference Materials, infant formula, powdered energy drinks and bars, wheat breakfast cereal, carbonated soft drinks, fruit juices and vitamin B12 tablets. The procedures involved extraction of vitamin B12 using water or sodium acetate buffer and enzyme digestion (using pepsin or alpha-amylase, or both) if necessary. The extract was clarified and passed through "EASI-EXTRACT Vitamin B12", an immunoaffinity column containing monoclonal antibody with high affinity and specificity to vitamin B12. Subsequently, the vitamin B12 immunoaffinity column was washed with 10 ml water and the vitamin B12 was released from the column with 3 ml methanol. Following evaporation, the samples were reconstituted in mobile phase and analysed by HPLC-UV at 361 nm on an ACE 3AQ analytical column using a gradient elution consisting of 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid in water and acetonitrile. Analysis of three types of NIST Standard Reference Materials in triplicate demonstrated the results of the immunoaffinity column method were comparable to microbiological assay results. Method repeatability was determined for all samples analysed and ranged between 0.8 and 10%, demonstrating the method was repeatable with complex matrices (NIST 2383) containing low levels of vitamin B12 (0.44 microg per 100 g), as well as simpler matrices, such as vitamin tablets containing high levels (2000 microg per 0.849 g) of vitamin B12.

  19. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-08-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  20. Neuroenhancement with Vitamin B12—Underestimated Neurological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Kisters, Klaus; Schmidt, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is a cofactor of methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine, the precursor of the universal methyl donor S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is involved in different epigenomic regulatory mechanisms and especially in brain development. A Vitamin B12 deficiency expresses itself by a wide variety of neurological manifestations such as paraesthesias, skin numbness, coordination disorders and reduced nerve conduction velocity. In elderly people, a latent Vitamin B12 deficiency can be associated with a progressive brain atrophy. Moderately elevated concentrations of homocysteine (>10 µmol/L) have been associated with an increased risk of dementia, notably Alzheimer’s disease, in many cross-sectional and prospective studies. Raised plasma concentrations of homocysteine is also associated with both regional and whole brain atrophy, not only in Alzheimer’s disease but also in healthy elderly people. Clinician awareness should be raised to accurately diagnose and treat early Vitamin B12 deficiency to prevent irreversible structural brain damage. PMID:24352086

  1. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kutta, Roger J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Johannissen, Linus O; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S; Jones, Alex R

    2015-08-12

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression.

  2. Metformin Use and Vitamin B12 Deficiency: Untangling the Association.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Montes-Villarreal, Juan; Rodríguez-Velver, Karla Victoria; González-Velázquez, Camilo; Salcido-Montenegro, Alejandro; Elizondo-Plazas, Anasofia; González-González, José Gerardo

    2017-08-01

    Current evidence linking vitamin B12 deficiency with metformin use is inconsistent. Hence, there is uncertainty regarding the diagnostic approach in this scenario. Furthermore, this possible association has not been studied in the complete spectrum of patients with diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional, controlled study with the objective of assessing differences in serum vitamin B12 levels among patients with and without diabetes with different metformin-treatment regimens. A total of 150 participants were recruited: patients with diabetes (group 1: metformin alone ≥850mg/day, group 2: patients with type 2 diabetes naive to treatment and group 3: metformin ≥850mg/day, in addition to any other oral glucose lowering agent or insulin, or both) and without diabetes (group 4: polycystic ovary syndrome or group 5: healthy individuals). Serum vitamin B12, folate levels and complete blood counts were obtained for the entire population. Methylmalonic acid and homocysteine were obtained for patients when vitamin B12 levels were found to be borderline or low. When patients with or without diabetes were compared, no significant difference was found in relation to their vitamin B12 levels (517.62 versus 433.83; P = 0.072). No difference in vitamin B12 levels was found among participants with metformin use and metformin naive participants (503.4 versus 462.3; P = 0.380). Irrespective of metformin use, no significant difference in the serum levels of vitamin B12 was observed, both in patients with and without diabetes. In the light of the body of evidence and the results of this study, a universal recommendation for vitamin B12 deficiency screening cannot be made. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency. Important new concepts in recognition.

    PubMed

    Goodman, K I; Salt, W B

    1990-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency develops over a slowly progressive continuum. Early manifestations may be generalized weakness or fatigue, indigestion, diarrhea, or depression. Pernicious anemia is considered the classic cause, but others include malabsorption because of achlorhydria or other gastric dysfunction, fish tapeworm infection, and strict vegetarianism. Iron deficiency often coexists. Because presentation is often atypical, vitamin B12 deficiency is a diagnostic consideration whenever neuropsychiatric signs or symptoms are unexplained.

  4. [Vitamin-B12-dependent methylmalonic acidemia in twins].

    PubMed

    Karsten, J; Hansen, H G; Heuer, R; Wulff, U C; Kneer, J

    1983-05-01

    The tendency towards metabolic acidosis developing during simple infections lead to the detection of hyperglycinemia which was shown to be caused by the rare inborn error of metabolism, which was shown to be a methylmalonic acidemia, in identical twins. Under a protein restricted diet and vitamin-B12-injections once a week, all clinical symptoms disappeared so that vitamin-B12-dependency became evident. Under this therapeutic regimen methylmalonic aciduria was well under control.

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency: Characterization of psychometrics and MRI morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yen-Hsuan; Huang, Ching-Feng; Lo, Chung-Ping; Wang, Tzu-Lan; Tu, Min-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is essential for the integrity of the central nervous system. However, performances in different cognitive domains relevant to vitamin B12 deficiency remain to be detailed. To date, there have been limited studies that examined the relationships between cognitions and structural neuroimaging in a single cohort of low-vitamin B12 status. The present study aimed to depict psychometrics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphometrics among patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, and to examine their inter-relations. We compared 34 consecutive patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level ≤ 250 pg/ml) to 34 demographically matched controls by their cognitive performances and morphometric indices of brain MRI. The correlations between psychometrics and morphometrics were analyzed. The vitamin B12 deficiency group had lower scores than the controls on total scores of Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI) (both P < 0.05), language (P < 0.01), orientation (P < 0.01), and mental manipulation (P < 0.05). The patients also showed a greater frontal horn ratio than the controls (P < 0.05). Bicaudate ratio, fronto-occipital ratio, uncotemporal index, and normalized interuncal distance all showed a strong correlation with the total score of MMSE and CASI (all P < 0.01). Among these psychometric and morphometric indices, pronounced correlations between bicaudate ratio and long-term memory, mental manipulation, orientation, language, and verbal fluency were noted (all P < 0.01). Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with a global cognition decline with language, orientation, and mental manipulation selectively impaired. Preferential atrophy in frontal regions is the main neuroimaging feature. Although the frontal ratio highlights the relevant atrophy among patients, the bicaudate ratio might be the best index on the basis of its strong association with global cognition and related cognitive domains, implying

  6. Sodium superionic conduction in Na2B12H12.

    PubMed

    Udovic, Terrence J; Matsuo, Motoaki; Unemoto, Atsushi; Verdal, Nina; Stavila, Vitalie; Skripov, Alexander V; Rush, John J; Takamura, Hitoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2014-04-11

    Impedance measurements indicate that Na2B12H12 exhibits dramatic Na(+) conductivity (on the order of 0.1 S cm(-1)) above its order-disorder phase-transition at ≈529 K, rivaling that of current, solid-state, ceramic-based, Na-battery electrolytes. Superionicity may be aided by the large size, quasispherical shape, and high rotational mobility of the B12H12(2-) anions.

  7. Vitamin B12 absorption capacity in healthy children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.; Krasilnikoff, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    B12 absorption was investigated in 47 healthy children aged 7 months to 15.8 years (median 4.9 years). The patients had either recovered from giardiasis, the post-gastroenteritis syndrome, or had celiac disease in remission (treated with a gluten-free diet). The B12 absorption was measured by a double-isotope technique using /sup 57/CoB12 and /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/, the latter being the inabsorbable marker. The radiation dose was minimal. The results were presented as fractional absorption of B12 (FAB12). Within the different age groups, the absorption test was performed by means of the following oral amounts of B12: 0- less than 1 year, 0.5 microgram; 1-3 years: 1.7 micrograms, 4-6 years, 2.5 micrograms; 7-10 years; 3.3 micrograms; and 11-15 years, 4.5 micrograms. When using these oral amounts of B12, the medians (and ranges) of FAB12 were found to be: 1-3 years (n = 18), 37% (16-80%); 4-6 years (n = 10), 27% (19-40%); 7-10 years (n = 9), 32% (21-44%); and 11-15 years (n = 8), 27% (19-59%). The FAB12 in two children aged 7 and 11 months was 31% and 32%, respectively. These results may be interpretated as reference values for B12 absorption in children. Further absorption tests were performed in seven children representing the four age groups from 1 to 15 years. When a high oral amount of B12 was given (i.e., three times the saturation dose), the FAB12 ranged from 0 to 20% (median 9%), whereas a low amount (i.e., one-ninth of the saturation dose) produced fractional absorptions from 65 to 82% (median 74%).

  8. Folate–vitamin B-12 interaction in relation to cognitive impairment, anemia, and biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Selhub, Jacob; Morris, Martha Savaria; Jacques, Paul F; Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports on pernicious anemia treatment suggested that high folic acid intake adversely influences the natural history of vitamin B-12 deficiency, which affects many elderly individuals. However, experimental investigation of this hypothesis is unethical, and the few existing observational data are inconclusive. With the use of data from the 1999–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we evaluated the interaction between high serum folate and low vitamin B-12 status [ie, plasma vitamin B-12 < 148 pmol/L or methylmalonic acid (MMA) > 210 nmol/L] with respect to anemia and cognitive impairment. With subjects having both plasma folate ≤ 59 nmol/L and normal vitamin B-12 status as the referent category, odds ratios for the prevalence of anemia compared with normal hemoglobin concentration and impaired compared with unimpaired cognitive function were 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1, 3.7) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.9), respectively, for those with low vitamin B-12 status but normal serum folate and 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3, 10.6) and 5.0 (95% CI: 2.7, 9.5), respectively, for those with low vitamin B-12 status and plasma folate >59 nmol/L. Among subjects with low vitamin B-12 status, mean circulating vitamin B-12 was 228 pmol/L for the normal-folate subgroup and 354 pmol/L for the high-folate subgroup. We subsequently showed increases in circulating homocysteine and MMA concentrations with increasing serum folate among NHANES participants with serum vitamin B-12 < 148 pmol/L, whereas the opposite trends occurred among subjects with serum vitamin B-12 ≥ 148 pmol/L. These interactions, which were not seen in NHANES III before fortification, imply that, in vitamin B-12 deficiency, high folate status is associated with impaired activity of the 2 vitamin B-12–dependent enzymes, methionine synthase and MMA–coenzyme A mutase. PMID:19141696

  9. Density functional theory study of the local molecular properties of acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, M.; Mahani, N. Madadi; Hamadanian, M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on the series of 2-(4-(naphthalen-2-yl)-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylthio)-N-acetamide (TTA) derivatives. The local reactivity of the acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs were studied in terms of Fukui functions in the framework of DFT. The results based on the basis set superposition error (BSSE) corrections showed that the mechanism of bond formation between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine as a biological molecule occurs mainly through nitrogen atoms. The intramolecular interaction energies between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine were calculated and the nature of the intermolecular interaction was revealed by natural bond orbital charge (NBO) analysis. The results suggest that acetamide derivatives with bromophenyl and nitrophenyl substitutions are the most potent as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:24082898

  10. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-01-01

    Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN.

  11. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  12. Vitamin B-12 and Cognition in Children123

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramanan, Sudha; Armata, Ilianna E; Strupp, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for brain development, neural myelination, and cognitive function. Inadequate vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy and early childhood has been associated with adverse child health outcomes, including impaired cognitive development. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and cognition in children. The search strategy resulted in 17 studies: 3 cross-sectional, 1 case–control, and 12 cohort studies, and 1 randomized trial. Cognitive processes assessed included attention, memory, and perception. Developmental outcomes, academic performance, and intelligence quotient were also considered. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 insufficiency and associated risk of adverse cognitive outcomes in children, to our knowledge, no studies to date have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognition in children. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of child cognitive outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:27633104

  13. [Serum homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in venezuelan elderly].

    PubMed

    Meertens, Lesbia; Díaz, Nayka; Solano, Liseti; Baron, Maria Adela; Rodríguez, Adelmo

    2007-03-01

    The anatomical and physiological changes of aging make elderly people a vulnerable group to malnutrition and specific deficiencies of nutrients such as vitamin B12 and folate. This study was aimed to establish relationships among serum vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine concentrations and dietary intake and adequacy. Fifty five male and female elderly (60 and more years), free-living, were assessed. Measurements were: serum vitamin B12 and folate by radioimmunoanalysis (RIA), homocysteine by polarized fluorescence immunoassay, nutrient intake by three 24 hours recalls and food frequency questionnaire. Nutritional status was determined by Body Mass Index (BMI). Serum vitamin B12 and folate were at normal range (423,3+/-227,6 pmol/l and 6,4 +/- 4,5 mg/ml), but 17,5% of elderly had B12 deficiency and 12% had folate deficiency. Serum homocysteine was higher than reference values (15,8+/-4,4 mmol/l), but 47,5% showed concentrations above 15 mmol/L, male population showed higher mean value (p: 0,01). Nutrient intake was inadequate by deficiency. BMI indicated 11,8% of undernutrition, 29,4% of overweight and 20,6% of obesity A negative and inverse correlation between homocysteine and serum folate was found. Results suggest a biochemical deficiency of B12 and folate that is expressed as elevated homocysteine levels. These finding represent a high cardiovascular risk factor for this elderly group.

  14. Anti-HIV seropositivity was related to HBsAg seropositivity among injecting drug users in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Wang, Shu-Chi; Yang, Jeng-Fu; Chang, Ko; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Huang, Jee-Fu; Dai, Chia-Yen; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chuang, Wan-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-02-01

    In Taiwan, the number of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection via drug injection has been increasing since 2003. Due to HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) having similar transmission routes, HBV and HIV infections among injecting drug users (IDUs) has become an important public health issue. The aim of this study was explore the prevalence of HBV infection among IDUs with and without HIV infection, and examine whether HIV infection is associated with HBV infection among IDUs in Southern Taiwan. We enrolled 566 IDUs, including 87 anti-HBV positive IDUs and 479 anti-HBV negative IDUs, and also analyzed the results of liver function tests, HBV DNA, anti-HIV, HIV RNA, and CD4 cell count. The results showed that the prevalence of HBV infection among IDUs was 15.4%. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher among individuals born before 1985 (15.9% vs. 4.0%), but this was not significant. Anti-HIV seropositivity was related to HBsAg seropositivity [odds ratio (OR) = 2.47, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-4.82, p = 0.008). Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were risk factors for abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT; OR = 2.11, 95% confidence interval = 1.005-4.42, p = 0.048 and OR = 1.47, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-2.10, p = 0.04, respectively), and HBsAg was not a factor related to abnormal ALT. In conclusion, the prevalence of HBV infection was similar in the general population and in IDUs, and due to anti-HIV seropositivity being significantly related to HBsAg seropositivity, HBV infection among IDUs is still important. We suggest that for IDUs, HBsAg should be monitored closely.

  15. A new vinyl selenone-based domino approach to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles endowed with anti-HIV RT activity.

    PubMed

    Palomba, M; Rossi, L; Sancineto, L; Tramontano, E; Corona, A; Bagnoli, L; Santi, C; Pannecouque, C; Tabarrini, O; Marini, F

    2016-02-14

    Herein, we disclose a general and flexible access to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles by a domino Michael/intramolecular nucleophilic substitution pathway with variously substituted vinyl selenones and enolizable oxindoles in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The spirocyclopropyl oxindole being a privileged scaffold, some of the synthesized compounds were selected for biological evaluation. Compound showed selective anti-HIV-1 activity thanks to its ability to inhibit the reverse transcriptase.

  16. Development of water-soluble polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers as novel and highly potent topical anti-HIV-2 microbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briz, Verónica; Sepúlveda-Crespo, Daniel; Diniz, Ana Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Rodes, Berta; de La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Taveira, Nuno; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    The development of topical microbicide formulations for vaginal delivery to prevent HIV-2 sexual transmission is urgently needed. Second- and third-generation polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers with a silicon atom core and 16 sulfonate (G2-S16), napthylsulfonate (G2-NS16) and sulphate (G3-Sh16) end-groups have shown potent and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. However, their antiviral activity against HIV-2 and mode of action have not been probed. Cytotoxicity, anti-HIV-2, anti-sperm and antimicrobial activities of dendrimers were determined. Analysis of combined effects of triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir was performed by using CalcuSyn software. We also assessed the mode of antiviral action on the inhibition of HIV-2 infection through a panel of different in vitro antiviral assays: attachment, internalization in PBMCs, inactivation and cell-based fusion. Vaginal irritation and histological analysis in female BALB/c mice were evaluated. Our results suggest that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 exert anti-HIV-2 activity at an early stage of viral replication inactivating the virus, inhibiting cell-to-cell HIV-2 transmission, and blocking the binding of gp120 to CD4, and the HIV-2 entry. Triple combinations with tenofovir and raltegravir increased the anti-HIV-2 activity, consistent with synergistic interactions (CIwt: 0.33-0.66). No vaginal irritation was detected in BALB/c mice after two consecutive applications for 2 days with 3% G2-S16. Our results have clearly shown that G2-S16, G2-NS16 and G3-Sh16 have high potency against HIV-2 infection. The modes of action confirm their multifactorial and non-specific ability, suggesting that these dendrimers deserve further studies as potential candidate microbicides to prevent vaginal/rectal HIV-1/HIV-2 transmission in humans.

  17. Structure and conformational analysis of the anti-HIV AZT 5‧-aminocarbonylphosphonate prodrug using DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamara Molina, A.; Alcolea Palafox, M.

    2011-08-01

    A comprehensive theoretical conformational analysis of the anti-HIV AZT 5'-aminocarbonylphosphonate prodrug was carried out, due to this prodrug has noticeable advantage over approved drugs AZT and Nikavir. The whole conformational parameters ( χ, γ, β, α, δ, ɛ, τ, P, νmax) were analysed as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out by means of B3LYP/6-31G ∗∗ and B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,pd) DFT levels of theory with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 86 stable structures, 6 of which are within a 1 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum and 11 conformers are within a 1 kcal/mol Gibbs energy range. The global minimum with the 6-311++G(3df,pd) basis set corresponds to the calculated values of the exocyclic torsional angles χ = -121.6°, β = 153.0°, γ = -152.0° and α = -74.1°. The results obtained are in accordance to those found in related anti-HIV nucleoside Analogs. Comparisons of the conformers with those determined in the common anti-HIV drug AZT were carried out. Several correlations and general conclusions were emphasized.

  18. Evaluation of Atazanavir and Darunavir Interactions with Lipids for Developing pH-responsive Anti-HIV Drug Combination Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jinghua; Freeling, Jennifer P.; Koehn, Josefin; Shu, Cuiling; Ho, Rodney J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated two HIV protease inhibitors, atazanavir and darunavir, for pH-dependent solubility, lipid binding, and drug release from lipid nanoparticles. Both atazanavir and darunavir incorporated into lipid nanoparticles composed of pegylated and non-pegylated phospholipids with nearly 100% efficiency, but only atazanavir lipid nanoparticles formed stable lipid-drug particles and exhibited pH-dependent drug release. Darunavir lipid nanoparticles were unstable and formed mixed micelles at low drug-lipid concentrations, and thus are not suitable for lipid-drug particle development. When atazanavir lipid nanoparticles were prepared with ritonavir, a metabolic and cellular membrane exporter inhibitor, and tenofovir, an HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, stable, scalable, and reproducible anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles were produced. Drug incorporation efficiencies of 85.5 ± 8.2, 85.1 ± 7.1, and 6.1 ± 0.8 % for atazanavir, ritonavir, and tenofovir, respectively, were achieved. Preliminary primate pharmacokinetic studies with these pH-responsive anti-HIV drug combination lipid nanoparticles administered subcutaneously produced detectable plasma concentrations that lasted for 7 days for all three drugs. These anti-HIV lipid nanoparticles could be developed as a long-acting targeted antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24948204

  19. Anti-HIV-1 potency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system insufficient to fully inhibit viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ebina, Hirotaka; Kanemura, Yuka; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    The range of genome-editing tools has recently been expanded. In particular, an RNA-guided genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated 9 (Cas9) system, has many applications for human diseases. In this study, guide RNA (gRNA) to target gag, pol and a long terminal repeat of HIV-1 was designed and used to generate gRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors. An HIV-1-specific gRNA and Cas9 were stably dually transduced into a highly HIV-1-susceptible human T-cell line and the inhibitory ability of the anti-HIV-1 CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vector assessed. Although clear inhibition of the early phase of HIV-1 infection was observed, as evaluated by a VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 reporter system, the anti-HIV-1 potency in multiple rounds of wild type (WT) viral replication was insufficient, either because of generation of resistant viruses or overcoming of the activity of the WT virus. Thus, there are potential difficulties that must be addressed when considering anti-HIV-1 treatment with the CRISPR/Cas9 system alone.

  20. Stabilization of HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 under Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Li, Rebecca L; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-16

    Alloys of metal dodecaborides-YB12 with HfB12-were prepared via arc-melting in order to stabilize the metastable HfB12 high-pressure phase under ambient pressure. Previously, HfB12 had been synthesized only under high-pressure (6.5 GPa). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to confirm the purity and phase composition of the prepared samples. The solubility limit for HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 (cubic UB12 structure type) was determined to be ∼35 at. % Hf by PXRD and EDS analysis. The value of the cubic unit cell parameter (a) changed from 7.505 Å (pure YB12) to 7.454 Å across the solid solution range. Vickers hardness increased from 40.9 ± 1.6 GPa for pure YB12 to 45.0 ± 1.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N for the Y1-xHfxB12 solid solution composition with ∼28 at. % Hf, suggesting both solid solution hardening and extrinsic hardening due to the formation of secondary phases of hafnium.

  1. Two newborns with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency: challenges in newborn screening for vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C D; Ganesh, J; Ficicioglu, C

    2005-12-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes decreased Methionine Synthase and L-Methylmalonyl-CoA Mutase activity and results in accumulation of Homocysteine, Methylmalonic acid and Propionylcarnitine. Propionylcarnitine is included in tandem mass spectrometry-based newborn screening programs for detection of certain inborn errors of metabolism. We report two asymptomatic newborns with Vitamin B12 deficiency due to maternal deficiencies. One was detected incidentally at 3 weeks of age; the second on supplemental newborn screening based on elevated Propionylcarnitine at 2 days of age. This illustrates the potential for false negative results for Vitamin B12 deficiency screening by acylcarnitine profiling in newborn screening. Homocysteine and Methylmalonic acid may be better markers of Vitamin B12 deficiency. In conclusion, we suggest measuring Methylmalonic acid, Propionylcarnitine and Homocysteine levels in blood spots in expanded newborn screening in order to detect asymptomatic newborns with Vitamin B12 deficiency. Further studies are needed to establish the sensitivity of these three markers in screening for Vitamin B12 deficiency.

  2. Transient swelling behavior and drug delivery from a dissolving film deploying anti-HIV microbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Despite more than two decades of HIV vaccine research, there is still no efficacious HIV vaccine. Very recently, a research group has shown that a microbicide gel formulation of antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, significantly inhibits HIV transmission to women [1]. However, there is a widespread agreement that more effective and diverse drug delivery vehicles must be developed. In this setting, there is now great interest in developing different delivery vehicles such as vaginal rings, gels, and films. Here, we develop a model for transient fluid uptake and swelling behavior, and subsequent dissolution and drug deployment from a film containing anti-HIV microbicide. In the model, the polymer structural relaxation via water uptake is assumed to follow first order kinetics. In the case of a film loaded with an osmotically active solute, the kinetic equation is modified to account for the osmotic effect. The transport rate of solvent and solute within the matrix is characterized by a diffusion equation. After the matrix is relaxed to a specified concentration of solvent, lubrication theory and convective-diffusive transport are employed for flow of the liquefied matrix and drug dispersion respectively. [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.

  3. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  4. Mucosal and systemic anti-HIV immunity controlled by A20 in mouse dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bangxing; Song, Xiao-Tong; Rollins, Lisa; Berry, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2011-02-01

    Both mucosal and systemic immune responses are required for preventing or containing HIV transmission and chronic infection. However, currently described vaccination approaches are largely ineffective in inducing both mucosal and systemic responses. In this study, we found that the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20--an inducible feedback inhibitor of the TNFR, RIG-I, and TLR signaling pathways that broadly controls the maturation, cytokine production, and immunostimulatory potency of DCs--restricted systemically immunized DCs to induce both robust mucosal and systemic HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that A20 regulated DC production of retinoic acid and proinflammatory cytokines, inhibiting the expression of gut-homing receptors on T and B cells. Furthermore, A20-silenced, hyperactivated DCs exhibited an enhanced homing capacity to draining and gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) after systemic administration. Thus, this study provides insights into the role of A20 in innate immunity. This work may allow the development of an efficient HIV vaccination strategy that is capable of inducing both robust systemic and mucosal anti-HIV cellular and humoral responses.

  5. Mucosal and systemic anti-HIV immunity controlled by A20 in mouse dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bangxing; Song, Xiao-Tong; Rollins, Lisa; Berry, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F.; Chen, Si-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Both mucosal and systemic immune responses are required for preventing or containing HIV transmission and chronic infection. However, currently described vaccination approaches are largely ineffective in inducing both mucosal and systemic responses. In this study, we found that the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 — an inducible feedback inhibitor of the TNFR, RIG-I, and TLR signaling pathways that broadly controls the maturation, cytokine production, and immunostimulatory potency of DCs — restricted systemically immunized DCs to induce both robust mucosal and systemic HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that A20 regulated DC production of retinoic acid and proinflammatory cytokines, inhibiting the expression of gut-homing receptors on T and B cells. Furthermore, A20-silenced, hyperactivated DCs exhibited an enhanced homing capacity to draining and gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) after systemic administration. Thus, this study provides insights into the role of A20 in innate immunity. This work may allow the development of an efficient HIV vaccination strategy that is capable of inducing both robust systemic and mucosal anti-HIV cellular and humoral responses. PMID:21206085

  6. Role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in anti-HIV innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller-Trutwin, Michaela; Hosmalin, Anne

    2005-10-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in anti-HIV immunity is mostly represented by the production of type I IFN in response to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. This production is decreased in HIV-1 infected patients at the time of primary infection and during chronic disease in association with progression of disease. Circulating pDC counts are decreased concomitantly with type I IFN, and both factors correlate inversely overall with viral loads and positively with CD4+ T-cell counts. These parameters might be used in clinical immunology to monitor treatment and as predictive factors of immune control of HIV-1 replication to help decide whether to interrupt antiretroviral treatment. They may be related to control of HIV replication as well as to pathogenesis of infection, perhaps in setting the balance between immunity or tolerance to the virus. A better understanding of these parameters is required while attempts to use IFN-alpha or ligands of Toll-like receptors found on pDC are being made.

  7. Coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide gel: boundary dilution and yield stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Tasoglu, Savas; Park, Su Chan; Katz, David F.

    2010-11-01

    A recent study has confirmed, for the first time, that a vaginal gel formulation of the antiretroviral drug Tenofovir, when topically applied, significantly inhibits sexual HIV transmission to women [1]. However, the gel for this drug, and anti-HIV microbicide gels in general, have not been designed using an understanding of how gel spreading govern successful drug delivery. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory can be applied to model spreading of microbicide gels [2]. Here, we extend our initial analysis: we incorporate a yield stress, and we model the effects of gel dilution due to contact with vaginal fluid produced at the gel-tissue interface. Our model developed in [2] is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to characterize dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain. The association between local dilution of gel and rheological properties is obtained experimentally. To model the common yield stress property of gels, we proceed by scaling analysis first. This establishes the conditions for validity of lubrication theory of a shear thinning yield stress fluid. This involves further development of the model in [2], incorporating a biviscosity model.[4pt] [1] Karim, et al., Science, 2010.[0pt] [2] Szeri, et al., Phy. of Fluids, 2008.

  8. Glycosylated enfuvirtide: a long-lasting glycopeptide with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuihong; Chang, Xuesong; Wang, Yan; Gao, George F; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying; Li, Xuebing

    2015-02-12

    Many peptide-based therapeutics have short circulatory half-lives. We report here that the pharmacokinetics of an anti-HIV peptide drug enfuvirtide (ENF) can be dramatically improved by a chemical glycosylation approach. A set of glycosylated ENFs with varying glycosylation sites and glycan structures were synthesized. Among these, a sialic acid-introduced peptide (SL-ENF) demonstrated a 15-fold extended half-life in rats relative to ENF (T1/2: 23.1 vs 1.5 h), and its antiviral potency was comparable to that of ENF (EC50: 2 vs 3 nM). SL-ENF bound to a functional fragment of the HIV fusogenic protein gp41 and formed complexes with high affinity and α-helicity, revealing the mechanism behind its potent antiviral activity. Because it is widely accepted in biology that glycosylation protects proteins from denaturation and proteases, our approach may be useful for the development of novel protein and peptide drugs with enhanced pharmaceutical properties.

  9. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4(+) T cells, and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4(+) T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing.

  10. Novel anti-HIV therapeutics targeting chemokine receptors and actin regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Mark; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Summary The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects helper CD4+ T cells, and causes CD4+ T-cell depletion and immunodeficiency. In the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in antiretroviral therapy, and the disease has become manageable. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is still nowhere in sight, and a cure or a functional cure awaits discovery. Among possible curative therapies, traditional antiretroviral therapy, mostly targeting viral proteins, has been proven ineffective. It is possible that targeting HIV-dependent host cofactors may offer alternatives, both for preventing HIV transmission and for forestalling disease progression. Recently, the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators in blood CD4+ T cells have emerged as major host cofactors that could be targeted. The novel concept that the cortical actin is a barrier to viral entry and early post-entry migration has led to the nascent model of virus-host interaction at the cortical actin layer. Deciphering the cellular regulatory pathways has manifested exciting prospects for future therapeutics. In this review, we describe the study of HIV interactions with actin cytoskeleton. We also examine potential pharmacological targets that emerge from this interaction. In addition, we briefly discuss several actin pathway-based anti-HIV drugs that are currently in development or testing. PMID:24117829

  11. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ∼66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to α3,α6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  12. Novel Fold and Carbohydrate Specificity of the Potent Anti-HIV Cyanobacterial Lectin from Oscillatoria agardhii*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Furey, William; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA) is a recently discovered cyanobacterial lectin that exhibits potent anti-HIV activity. Up to now, only its primary structure and carbohydrate binding data have been available. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAA, we determined the structure of this lectin by x-ray crystallography at 1.2 Å resolution and mapped the specific carbohydrate recognition sites of OAA by NMR spectroscopy. The overall architecture of OAA comprises 10 β-strands that fold into a single, compact, β-barrel-like domain, creating a unique topology compared with all known protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. OAA sugar binding was tested against Man-9 and various disaccharide components of Man-9. Two symmetric carbohydrate-binding sites were located on the protein, and a preference for Manα(1–6)Man-linked sugars was found. Altogether, our structural results explain the antiviral activity OAA and add to the growing body of knowledge about antiviral lectins. PMID:20961847

  13. Effects of dilution on elastohydrodynamic coating flow of an anti-HIV microbicide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeri, Andrew; Park, Su Chan; Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F.

    2009-11-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication over soft substrates characterizes the drug delivery of anti-HIV topical microbicides carried in gel vehicles. These gels are under development to prevent HIV transmission into vulnerable vaginal mucosa during intercourse. Their effectiveness depends on completeness and durability of coating, as well as on the active ingredients. Here we investigate the influence of dilution by vaginal fluid on the coating flows that serve to protect the user. The effects of dilution by vaginal fluid simulant are assessed through rheological experiments at variable dilution of the gel vehicle. This involves determination of the way parameters in a Carreau model of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. The changes in coating are determined from a computational model, based on dilution rheology measured in the laboratory. The elastohydrodynamic lubrication model of Szeri, et al. Physics of Fluids (2008) is supplemented with a convective-diffusive transport equation to handle dilution, and solved using a multi-step scheme in a moving domain.

  14. The anti-HIV activity of ADS-J1 targets the HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Botta, Maurizio; Esté, José A

    2005-12-05

    Recent data suggest that heparin sulfates may bind to a CD4 induced epitope in the HIV-1 gp120 that constitutes the coreceptor binding site. We have studied the mechanism of action of ADS-J1, a non-peptidic compound selected by docking analysis to interact with gp41 and to interfere with the formation of N-36/C-34 complexes in sandwich ELISA experiments. We show that ADS-J1 blocked the binding of wild-type HIV-1 NL4-3 strain to MT-4 cells but not virus-cell binding of a polyanion-resistant virus. However, ADS-J1 blocked the replication of polyanion-resistant, T-20- and C34-resistant HIV-1, suggesting a second mechanism of action. Development of resistance to ADS-J1 on the polyanion-resistant HIV-1 led to mutations in gp120 coreceptor binding site and not in gp41. Time of addition experiments confirmed that ADS-J1, but not polyanions such as dextran sulfate or AR177, worked at a step that mimics the activity of an HIV coreceptor antagonist but prior to gp41-dependent fusion. We conclude that ADS-J1 may bind to the HIV coreceptor binding site as its mechanism of anti-HIV activity.

  15. Preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV microbicide products: New models and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Clark, Meredith R

    2010-12-01

    A safe and effective microbicide product designed to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 rests on a solid foundation provided by the proper selection and preclinical characterization of both its active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and formulation. The evaluation of API and formulation physicochemical properties, drug release, specific antiviral activity, cell and tissue toxicity, organ toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics and efficacy provides information to understand the product, make go/no go decisions in the critical path of product development and complete a regulatory dossier to file an investigational new drug (IND) with the US Food and Drug Administration. Incorporation of new models, assays and biomarkers has expanded our ability to understand the mechanisms of action underlying microbicide toxicity and efficacy, enabling a more rational selection of drug and formulation candidates. This review presents an overview of the models and endpoints used to comprehensively evaluate an anti-HIV microbicide in preclinical development. This article forms part of a special supplement on presentations covering HIV transmission and microbicides, based on the symposium "Trends in Microbicide Formulations", held on 25 and 26 January 2010, Arlington, VA.

  16. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Haye H; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Mean age of the patients was 68±12 years and median serum N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide level was 1801 pg/mL (IQR 705-4335). Thirteen per cent of the patients had an LVEF >45%. Vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level <200 pg/mL), folate deficiency (serum level <4.0 ng/mL) and iron deficiency (serum ferritin level <100 µg/L, or 100-299 µg/L with a transferrin saturation <20%) were present in 5%, 4% and 58% of the patients, respectively. No significant correlation between mean corpuscular volume and vitamin B12, folic acid or ferritin levels was observed. Lower folate levels were associated with an impaired health-related quality of life (p=0.029). During a median follow-up of 2.10 years (1.31-3.60 years), 254 subjects died. In multivariable proportional hazard models, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not associated with prognosis. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency are relatively rare in patients with chronic HF. Since no significant association was observed between mean corpuscular volume and neither vitamin B12 nor folic acid levels, this cellular index should be used with caution in the differential diagnosis of anaemia in patients with chronic HF. In contrast to iron deficiency, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not related to prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of plasmacytoid dendritic cells by an FcγRIIa independent mechanism and do not diminish cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Alexandre; Su, Bin; Holl, Vincent; Penichon, Julien; Schmidt, Sylvie; Decoville, Thomas; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane

    2014-08-18

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) expressing FcγRIIa are antigen-presenting cells able to link innate and adaptive immunity and producing various cytokines and chemokines. Although highly restricted, they are able to replicate HIV-1. We determined the activity of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies (NNIAb) on the infection of primary pDC by HIV-1 primary isolates and analyzed cytokines and chemokines production. Neutralization assay was performed with primary pDC in the presence of serial antibodies (Ab) concentrations. In parallel, we measured the release of cytokines and chemokines by ELISA and CBA Flex assay. We found that NAb, but not NNIAb, inhibit HIV-1 replication in pDC. This inhibitory activity was lower than that detected for myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) infection and independent of FcγRIIa expressed on pDC. Despite the complete protection, IFN-α production was detected in the supernatant of pDC treated with NAb VRC01, 4E10, PGT121, 10-1074, 10E8, or polyclonal IgG44 but not with NAb b12. Production of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by pDC was also maintained in the presence of 4E10, b12 and VRC01. These findings suggest that pDC can be protected from HIV-1 infection by both NAb and IFN-α release triggered by the innate immune response during infection.

  18. Neutralizing Antibodies Inhibit HIV-1 Infection of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by an FcγRIIa Independent Mechanism and Do Not Diminish Cytokines Production

    PubMed Central

    Lederle, Alexandre; Su, Bin; Holl, Vincent; Penichon, Julien; Schmidt, Sylvie; Decoville, Thomas; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) expressing FcγRIIa are antigen-presenting cells able to link innate and adaptive immunity and producing various cytokines and chemokines. Although highly restricted, they are able to replicate HIV-1. We determined the activity of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies (NNIAb) on the infection of primary pDC by HIV-1 primary isolates and analyzed cytokines and chemokines production. Neutralization assay was performed with primary pDC in the presence of serial antibodies (Ab) concentrations. In parallel, we measured the release of cytokines and chemokines by ELISA and CBA Flex assay. We found that NAb, but not NNIAb, inhibit HIV-1 replication in pDC. This inhibitory activity was lower than that detected for myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) infection and independent of FcγRIIa expressed on pDC. Despite the complete protection, IFN-α production was detected in the supernatant of pDC treated with NAb VRC01, 4E10, PGT121, 10-1074, 10E8, or polyclonal IgG44 but not with NAb b12. Production of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by pDC was also maintained in the presence of 4E10, b12 and VRC01. These findings suggest that pDC can be protected from HIV-1 infection by both NAb and IFN-α release triggered by the innate immune response during infection. PMID:25132382

  19. Isolation and analysis of vitamin B12 from plant samples.

    PubMed

    Nakos, M; Pepelanova, I; Beutel, S; Krings, U; Berger, R G; Scheper, T

    2017-02-01

    Based on increased demands of strict vegetarians, an investigation of vitamin B12 content in plant sources, was carried out. The vitamin B12 concentration was determined by RP-HPLC with UV detection, after prior matrix isolation by immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC). Vitamin B12 was extracted in the presence of sodium cyanide, to transform all forms of cobalamin into cyanocobalamin. Diode array detector was used to monitor vitamin B12, after its chromatographic separation under gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid 0.025% (w/v). The method demonstrated excellent linearity with a limit of detection 0.004μg/ml. The method precision was evaluated for plant samples and it was below 0.7% (n=6). Significant amounts of vitamin B12 in plants were detected in Hippophae rhamnoides (37μg/100g dry weight), in Elymus (26μg/100g dry weight) and in Inula helenium (11μg/100g dry weight).

  20. Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfers Involving Tetrahydrofolate and B12

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the reaction mechanism of enzymes that use B12 and tetrahydrofolate (THF) to catalyze methyl group transfers. It also covers the related reactions that use B12 and tetrahydromethanopterin (THMPT), which is a THF analog used by archaea. In the past decade, our understanding of the mechanisms of these enzymes has increased greatly because the crystal structures for three classes of B12-dependent methyltransferases have become available and because biophysical and kinetic studies have elucidated the intermediates involved in catalysis. These steps include binding of the cofactors and substrates, activation of the methyl donors and acceptors, the methyl transfer reaction itself, and product dissociation. Activation of the methyl donor in one class of methyltransferases is achieved by an unexpected proton transfer mechanism. The cobalt (Co) ion within the B12 macrocycle must be in the Co(I) oxidation state to serve as a nucleophile in the methyl transfer reaction. Recent studies have uncovered important principles that control how this highly reducing active state of B12 is generated and maintained. PMID:18804699

  1. Involuntary movements due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron; Moloi, M W

    2014-12-01

    Deficiency of vitamin B12 produces protean effects on the nervous system, most commonly neuropathy, myelopathy, cognitive and behavioural symptoms, and optic atrophy. Involuntary movements comprise a relatively rare manifestation of this readily treatable disorder. Both adults and infants deficient in vitamin B12 may present with chorea, tremor, myoclonus, Parkinsonism, dystonia, or a combination of these, which may precede diagnosis or become apparent only a few days after parenteral replacement therapy has begun. The pathogenesis of these movement disorders shows interesting parallels to certain neurodegenerative conditions. The clinical syndrome responds well to vitamin B12 supplementation in most cases, and an early diagnosis is essential to reverse the haematological and neurological dysfunction characteristic of this disorder. In this article, we elucidate the association of vitamin B12 deficiency with movement disorders in adults and in infants, discuss the pathogenesis of this association, review previously reported cases, and present a young adult male with severe generalized chorea that showed a salutary response to vitamin B12 supplementation.

  2. [Megaloblastic-vitamin B12 deficiency anemia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Mtvarelidze, Z G; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A N; Kvezereli-Kopadze, M A

    2009-05-01

    Megaloblastic anemias are basically caused by vitamin B(12) and/or folic acid deficiency. Childhood vitamin B(12) deficiency is extremely rare. There are congenital and acquired forms of vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemias. The article captures findings of 10 year observation of 3 patients with Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (congenital chronic megaloblastic anemia with proteinuria), in which the diagnosis was established by us in early childhood and due to correct treatment and prevention complete clinical-laboratory remission is kept so far. We have also observed rare case of acquired megaloblastic anemia - 14 years old vegetarian patient, who was diagnosed with vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemia based on history, clinical and para-clinical data. It was caused by strict vegetarianism of the patient. Therefore first of all the diet was corrected. In 5 days of specific treatment with vitamin B(12) "reticulocyte crisis" was manifested (proving the correctness of diagnosis and treatment) and complete clinical-hematological remission was achieved in 2 weeks. The given cases are interesting as megaloblastic anemias in childhood are both rare and difficult to diagnose. In such cases timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention tactics should be based on cause-and-effect relation of disease.

  3. Association between vitamin B12 intake and EURRECA's prioritized biomarkers of vitamin B12 in young populations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Iris; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Doets, Esmée L; Cavelaars, Adrienne E J M; van 't Veer, Pieter; Nissensohn, Mariela; Nissenshohn, Mariela; Benetou, Vassiliki; Hermoso, María; Berti, Cristiana; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Moreno, Luis A

    2013-10-01

    To review evidence on the associations between vitamin B12 intake and its biomarkers, vitamin B12 intake and its functional health outcomes, and vitamin B12 biomarkers and functional health outcomes. A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases, until January 2012, using a standardized strategy developed in the EURRECA network. Relevant articles were screened and sorted based on title and abstract, then based on full text, and finally included if they met inclusion criteria. A total of sixteen articles were included in the review. Articles covered four continents: America (n 4), Europe (n 8), Africa (n 1) and Asia (n 3). Population groups included healthy infants, children and adolescents, and pregnant and lactating women. From the total number of 5815 papers retrieved from the initial search, only sixteen were eligible according to the inclusion criteria: five for infants, five for children and adolescents, and six for pregnant and lactating women. Only one main conclusion could be extracted from this scarce number of references: a positive association between vitamin B12 intake and serum vitamin B12 in the infant group. Other associations were not reported in the eligible papers or the results were not provided in a consistent manner. The low number of papers that could be included in our systematic review is probably due to the attention that is currently given to research on vitamin B12 in elderly people. Our observations in the current systematic review justify the idea of performing well-designed studies on vitamin B12 in young populations.

  4. The distribution of total vitamin B12, holotranscobalamin, and the active vitamin B12 fraction in the first 5 weeks postpartum.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D A A; Pijnenborg, J M A; de Vries, J; van Wijk, E M

    2017-09-04

    Total vitamin B12 levels decrease significantly during pregnancy and recover to normal values within 8-week postpartum. Holotranscobalamin (holoTC) reflects the active part of vitamin B12 and has been shown to remain constant during pregnancy and postpartum. A mechanism of redistribution of vitamin B12 is suggested, with a shift toward holoTC if there is insufficient total vitamin B12 available. Our objective was to examine vitamin B12 deficiency and the active vitamin B12 fraction in postpartum women. Total vitamin B12 and holoTC were measured in 171 women within 48 hours (T0) and at 5 weeks (T5) postpartum. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as total vitamin B12 < 180 pmol/L or holoTC <32 pmol/L. The active vitamin B12 fraction was defined as holoTC/total vitamin B12. Without intervention, vitamin B12 deficiency based on both serum total vitamin B12 and holoTC changed from 75% and 60%, to respectively 10% and 6% at T5. The fraction of active vitamin B12 was significant higher in vitamin B12 deficient women at both time points and across time (P < .0001 and P = .002). A high fraction of active vitamin B12 was only present in women with total vitamin B12 deficiency at T0. At T5, no high vitamin B12 fraction was found. The changes in total vitamin B12 levels seem to be based on a physiological changes rather than vitamin B12 deficiency. The results of this study confirm the hypothesis that a shift toward the metabolic active vitamin B12 (holoTC) occurs in women with insufficient available total vitamin B12. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Infantile tremor syndrome: Role of Vitamin B12 revisited

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Mandliya, Jagdish; Sonker, Pavan; Patil, Vandana; Agrawal, Manish; Pathak, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of Vitamin B12 as an etiological factor in patients of infantile tremor syndrome (ITS). Methods: Twelve consecutive admissions of children diagnosed clinically as ITS were assessed. Assessment was done using a predefined pro forma to document patient demographic factors, general examination, systemic examination as well as relevant hematological and biochemical investigations. Results: Out of the 12 cases of ITS, 6 were males and 6 were females. Two cases had serum B12 levels below reference values, five had levels in low normal range, and remaining five had normal values. Conclusions: Role of Vitamin B12 deficiency as an etiological factor in the patients of ITS is inconclusive. PMID:28217151

  6. Effect of bile on vitamin B12 absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Teo, N H; Scott, J M; Neale, G; Weir, D G

    1980-01-01

    The standard double-isotope Schilling test was used to study vitamin B12 absorption in seven patients with obstructive jaundice and 10 with T-tube bile duct drainage after cholecystectomy and bile duct exploration. In three and five of these patients respectively absorption was impaired. In the second group six patients were restudied after removal of the T tube, and in each case absorption was improved. Similar results were obtained after bile duct ligation in rats. Bile exclusion produced a 50-60% reduction in renal and hepatic uptake of vitamin B12 from the intestinal lumen. The malabsorption was corrected by replacing bile. These studies suggest that bile plays a part in the normal absorption of vitamin B12. PMID:7427470

  7. Methylmalonic acidemia controlled with oral administration of vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, B. A.; Carson, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A 3-month-old male infant had two episodes of fever, projectile vomiting, dehydration, generalized fine tremors and gross metabloic ketoacidosis. Methylmalonic acid was found in high concentration in both serum and urine, although the concentration of serum vitamin B12 was normal. A therapeutic trial of vitamin B12, administered parenterally, reduced greatly the methylmalonic aciduria. The patient has since been given vitamin B12 supplements continuously, initially 1 mg intramuscularly every other day, then 15 mg/d orally, and the protein in his diet was subsequently restricted. The most effected control of the methylmalonic aciduria was achieved with the combined regimen of oral vitamin therapy and dietary protein restriction. His physical and intellectual development have progressed normally and he has survived several acute respiratory tract infections without recurrence of metabolic acidosis. PMID:953884

  8. Oral contraceptives: effect of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Women who use oral contraceptives have impaired folate metabolism as shown by slightly but significantly lower levels of folate in the serum and the erythrocytes and an increased urinary excretion of formiminoglutamic acid. The vitamin B12 level in their serum is also significantly lower than that of control groups. However, there is no evidence of tissue depletion of vitamin B12 associated with the use of oral contraceptives. The causes and clinical significance of the impairment of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism in these women is discussed in this review of the literature. Clinicians are advised to ensure that women who shop taking "the pill" because they wish to conceive have adequate folate stores before becoming pregnant. PMID:7037144

  9. Hematological parameters, ferritin and vitamin B12 in vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Pongstaporn, W; Bunyaratavej, A

    1999-03-01

    Hematological parameters and serum ferritin were compared between 179 vegetarians and 58 control subjects using Hematology analyzer H3 and microparticle enzyme immunoassay, respectively. Serum Vitamin B12 was also compared between 68 vegetarians and 30 control subjects using microparticle enzyme immunoassay. It was found that hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, white blood cells, neutrophils, serum ferritin and serum vitamin B12 in vegetarian were significantly lower than control subjects (P < 0.05). In addition, red cell distribution width and lymphocytes in vegetarians were significantly higher than control subjects (P < 0.05). There were 34 cases of iron deficiency in 179 vegetarians (19.%) which can be classified to iron depletion (4 cases), iron deficient erythropoiesis (12 cases) and iron deficiency anemia (18 cases). Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 27 cases of 68 vegetarians (40%).

  10. Localization of vitamin B12 binding in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Houde, M; Sarhan, F

    1990-03-01

    Different fractionation procedures were used to determine the location of vitamin B12 binding sites in Euglena gracilis. Using uptake measurements, cell fractionation, and light and electron microscopy, the cuticle of the cell was found to be the fraction containing the majority of B12 binding sites. The apparent distribution of vitamin binding sites differed according to the cell lysis method used. The cuticle fraction was responsible for the binding of 80% of the vitamin taken up by the cell during both the rapid and the slow phase of uptake. These results suggest that vitamin B12 binding is regulated, in part, at the cuticle level, and support our previous conclusion that the secondary phase of uptake represents the synthesis of new receptor sites and not the unloading of vitamin inside the cell.

  11. Antiparasitic Effect of Vitamin B12 on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Alejandra B.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Puente, Vanesa; Malchiodi, Emilio L.

    2012-01-01

    A nutritional characteristic of trypanosomatid protozoa is that they need a heme compound as a growth factor. Because of the cytotoxic activity of heme and its structural similarity to cobalamins, we have investigated the in vitro and in vivo effect of vitamin B12 (or cyanocobalamin) on the different forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Cyanocobalamin showed a marked antiparasitic activity against epimastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 2.42 μM), amastigotes (IC50, 10.69 μM), and trypomastigotes (IC50, 9.46 μM). Anti-epimastigote and -trypomastigote values were 1.7 to 4 times lower than those obtained with the reference drug benznidazole (Bnz). We also found that B12 and hemin do not interact with each other in their modes of action. Our results show that B12 increases intracellular oxidative activity and stimulates both superoxide dismutase (50%) and ascorbate peroxidase (20%) activities, while the activity of trypanothione reductase was not modified. In addition, we found that the antioxidants dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid increase the susceptibility of the parasite to the cytotoxic action of B12. We propose that vitamin B12 exerts its growth-inhibitory effect through the generation of reactive oxygen species. In an in vivo assay, a significant reduction in the number of circulating parasites was found in T. cruzi-infected mice treated with cyanocobalamin and ascorbic acid. The reduction of parasitemia in benznidazole-treated mice was improved by the addition of these vitamins. According to our results, a combination of B12 and Bnz should be further investigated due to its potential as a new therapeutic modality for the treatment of Chagas' disease. PMID:22869565

  12. Visualising molecular juggling within a B12-dependent methyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Yan; Ando, Nozomi; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Blasiak, Leah C.; Bender, Güneş; Seravalli, Javier; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of vitamin B12 are used in methyl group transfer in biological processes as diverse as methionine synthesis in humans and CO2 fixation in acetogenic bacteria1–3. This seemingly straightforward reaction requires large, multimodular enzyme complexes that adopt multiple conformations to alternately activate, protect, and perform catalysis on the reactive B12 cofactor. Crystal structures determined thus far have provided structural information for only fragments of these complexes4–12, inspiring speculation regarding the overall protein assembly and conformational movements inherent to activity. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of a complete ~220 kDa complex that contains all enzymes responsible for B12-dependent methyltransfer, namely the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CFeSP) and its methyltransferase (MeTr) from the model acetogen Moorella thermoacetica. These structures provide the first three-dimensional depiction of all protein modules required for the activation, protection, and catalytic steps of B12-dependent methyltransfer. In addition, the structures capture B12 at multiple locations between its “resting” and catalytic positions, allowing visualisation of the dramatic protein rearrangements that enable methyltransfer and identification of the trajectory for B12 movement within the large enzyme scaffold. The structures are also presented alongside in crystallo UV-vis spectroscopic data, which confirm enzymatic activity within crystals and demonstrate the largest known conformational movements of proteins in a crystalline state. Taken together, this work provides a model for the molecular juggling that accompanies turnover and helps explain why such an elaborate protein framework is required for such a simple, yet biologically essential reaction. PMID:22419154

  13. Vitamin B12 deficit and development of geriatric syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Chaparro, José Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency or cyanocobalamin is a common condition in the elderly. It is repeatedly overlooked due to multiple clinical manifestations that can affect the blood, neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems, skin and mucous membranes. The various presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency are related to the development of geriatric syndromes like frailty, falls, cognitive impairment, and geriatric nutritional syndromes like protein-energy malnutrition and failure to thrive, in addition to enhancing aging anorexia and cachexia. Therefore, interventions must be developed to include their screening and diagnosis to make early and appropriate treatment to prevent its complications before they become irreversible.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficit and development of geriatric syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency or cyanocobalamin is a common condition in the elderly. It is repeatedly overlooked due to multiple clinical manifestations that can affect the blood, neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems, skin and mucous membranes. The various presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency are related to the development of geriatric syndromes like frailty, falls, cognitive impairment, and geriatric nutritional syndromes like protein-energy malnutrition and failure to thrive, in addition to enhancing aging anorexia and cachexia. Therefore, interventions must be developed to include their screening and diagnosis to make early and appropriate treatment to prevent its complications before they become irreversible. PMID:24892321

  15. Use of Cheese Whey for Vitamin B12 Production

    PubMed Central

    Berry, E. C.; Bullerman, L. B.

    1966-01-01

    Within the limits of this study, it was found that 5 ppm of cobalt was adequate to give good levels of vitamin B12. The vitamin B12 precursor 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole was found to be adequate at 10 ppm in the absence of aeration. In the presence of aeration, a zero level of precursor was found to be most desirable. The analysis of variance showed aeration to be highly significant, and the aeration and precursor interaction to be significant. No other significant effects were observed. PMID:5970818

  16. Involuntary movements misdiagnosed as seizure during vitamin B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Carman, Kursat Bora; Belgemen, Tugba; Yis, Uluc

    2013-11-01

    Seizures and epilepsy are a common problem in childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events are conditions that can mimic seizure and frequent in early childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events can be due to physiological or exaggerated physiological responses, parasomnias, movement disorders, behavioral or psychiatric disturbances, or to hemodynamic, respiratory, or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of failure to thrive and developmental regression, involuntary movements, and anemia. Involuntary movements rarely may appear a few days after the initiation of vitamin B12 treatments and might be misdiagnosed as seizure. Here, we report 2 patients who presented with involuntary movements with his video image.

  17. Maximal Load of the Vitamin B12 Transport System: A Study on Mice Treated for Four Weeks with High-Dose Vitamin B12 or Cobinamide

    PubMed Central

    Lildballe, Dorte L.; Mutti, Elena; Birn, Henrik; Nexo, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the vitamin B12 (B12) transport system can be used for the cellular delivery of B12-conjugated drugs, also in long-term treatment Whether this strategy will affect the endogenous metabolism of B12 is not known. To study the effect of treatment with excess B12 or an inert derivative, we established a mouse model using implanted osmotic minipumps to deliver saline, cobinamide (Cbi) (4.25 nmol/h), or B12 (1.75 nmol/h) for 27 days (n = 7 in each group). B12 content and markers of B12 metabolism were analysed in plasma, urine, kidney, liver, and salivary glands. Both Cbi and B12 treatment saturated the transcobalamin protein in mouse plasma. Cbi decreased the content of B12 in tissues to 33–50% of the level in control animals but did not influence any of the markers examined. B12 treatment increased the tissue B12 level up to 350%. In addition, the transcript levels for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in kidneys and for transcobalamin and transcobalamin receptor in the salivary glands were reduced. Our study confirms the feasibility of delivering drugs through the B12 transport system but emphasises that B12 status should be monitored because there is a risk of decreasing the transport of endogenous B12. This risk may lead to B12 deficiency during prolonged treatment. PMID:23049711

  18. Maximal load of the vitamin B12 transport system: a study on mice treated for four weeks with high-dose vitamin B12 or cobinamide.

    PubMed

    Lildballe, Dorte L; Mutti, Elena; Birn, Henrik; Nexo, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the vitamin B12 (B12) transport system can be used for the cellular delivery of B12-conjugated drugs, also in long-term treatment Whether this strategy will affect the endogenous metabolism of B12 is not known. To study the effect of treatment with excess B12 or an inert derivative, we established a mouse model using implanted osmotic minipumps to deliver saline, cobinamide (Cbi) (4.25 nmol/h), or B12 (1.75 nmol/h) for 27 days (n = 7 in each group). B12 content and markers of B12 metabolism were analysed in plasma, urine, kidney, liver, and salivary glands. Both Cbi and B12 treatment saturated the transcobalamin protein in mouse plasma. Cbi decreased the content of B12 in tissues to 33-50% of the level in control animals but did not influence any of the markers examined. B12 treatment increased the tissue B12 level up to 350%. In addition, the transcript levels for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in kidneys and for transcobalamin and transcobalamin receptor in the salivary glands were reduced. Our study confirms the feasibility of delivering drugs through the B12 transport system but emphasises that B12 status should be monitored because there is a risk of decreasing the transport of endogenous B12. This risk may lead to B12 deficiency during prolonged treatment.

  19. Antibody-Based Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies Against HIV.

    PubMed

    Fabra-Garcia, Amanda; Beltran, Carolina; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Yuste, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, numerous studies have been carried out demonstrating the role of antibodies in HIV control leading to the development of antibody-based therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the role of antibodies in the prevention and control of HIV infection and the strategies against HIV that have been designed based on this information. Passive transfer of anti-HIV antibodies in animal models has proven the efficacy of certain antibodies in the prevention and treatment of infection. The capacity of antibodies to control the virus was first attributed to their neutralizing capacity. However, we now know that there are other Fc-mediated antibody activities associated with virus protection. When it comes to better understanding protection against HIV, we ought to pay particular attention to mucosal immune responses. The evidence accumulated so far indicates that an effective vaccine against HIV should generate both mucosal IgAs and systemic IgGs. Due to the problematic induction of protective anti-HIV antibodies, several groups have developed alternative approaches based on antibody delivery via gene therapy vectors. Experiments in animal models with these vectors have shown impressive protection levels and this strategy is now being clinically trialed. Taking into account all the information included in this review, it seems evident that anti-HIV-1 antibodies play an important role in virus control and prevention. This review aims to give an overview of the strategies used and the advances in antibody-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  20. Anti-HIV activity of southern African plants: Current developments, phytochemistry and future research.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Gerhard; Marokane, Cynthia K; Street, Renée A

    2017-08-12

    The African continent is home to a large number of higher plant species used over centuries for many applications, which include treating and managing diseases such as HIV. Due to the overwhelming prevalence and incidence rates of HIV, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, it is necessary to develop new and affordable treatments. The article provides an extensive overview of the status on investigation of plants from the southern African region with ethnobotanical use for treating HIV or HIV-related symptoms, or the management of HIV. The review also provide an account of the in vitro assays, anti-viral activity and phytochemistry of these plants. Peer-reviewed articles investigating plants with ethnobotanical information for the treatment or management of HIV or HIV-related symptoms from the southern African region were acquired from Science Direct, PubMed central and Google Scholar. The selection criteria was that (1) plants should have a record of traditional/popular use for infectious or viral diseases, HIV treatment or symptoms similar to HIV infection, (2) if not traditionally/popularly used, plants should be closely related to plants with popular use and HIV activity identified by means of in vitro assays, (3) plants should have been identified scientifically, (4) should be native to southern African region and (5) anti-HIV activity should be within acceptable ranges. Many plants in Africa and specifically the southern African region have been used for the treatment of HIV or HIV related symptoms and have been investigated suing various in vitro techniques. In vitro assays using HIV enzymes such as reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN) and protease (PR), proteins or cell-based assays have been employed to validate the use of these plants with occasional indication of the selectivity index (SI) or therapeutic index (TI), with only one study, that progressed to in vivo testing. The compounds identified from plants from southern Africa is similar to compounds

  1. Precise engineering of dapivirine-loaded nanoparticles for the development of anti-HIV vaginal microbicides.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to provide effective and safe delivery of antiretroviral drugs in the context of prophylactic anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. Dapivirine-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs were produced by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method, optimized for colloidal properties using a 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken experimental design, and characterized for drug loading, production yield, morphology, thermal behavior, drug release, in vitro cellular uptake, cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory potential. Also, drug permeability/membrane retention in well-established HEC-1-A and CaSki cell monolayer models as mediated by NPs was assessed in the absence or presence of mucin. Box-Behnken design allowed optimizing monodisperse 170nm drug-loaded NPs. Drug release experiments showed an initial burst effect up to 4h, followed by sustained 24h release at pH 4.2 and 7.4. NPs were readily taken up by different genital and macrophage cell lines as assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Drug-loaded NPs presented lower or at least similar cytotoxicity as compared to the free drug, with up to around one-log increase in half-maximal cytotoxic concentration values. In all cases, no relevant changes in cell pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production were observed. Dapivirine transport across cell monolayers was significantly decreased when mucin was present at the donor side with either NPs or the free drug, thus evidencing the influence of this natural glycoprotein in membrane permeability. Moreover, drug retention in cell monolayers was significantly higher for NPs in comparison with the free drug. Overall, obtained dapivirine-loaded PLGA NPs possess interesting technological and biological features that may contribute to their use as novel safe and effective vaginal microbicides.

  2. Mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles bearing an anti-HIV drug didanosine for site-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanjay K; Gupta, Yashwant; Jain, Anekant; Saxena, Asheesh R; Khare, Piush; Jain, Aviral

    2008-03-01

    The present investigation was aimed at developing and exploring the use of mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles for the selective delivery of an anti-HIV drug, didanosine, to the target organs. The mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles (MN-G-NPs) were prepared using a two-step desolvation technique and coupled with mannose using the amino group of gelatin present on the surface of nanoparticles. The mannosylation was confirmed using infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MN-G-NPs were characterized for shape, particle size, zeta potential, and percentage drug entrapment. The size of nanoparticles was found to be in range of 248-325 nm, and maximum drug payload was found to be 40.2% to 48.5%. Average size was found to be more, but drug payload was less in the case of MN-G-NPs as compared with unconjugated nanoparticles (G-NPs). The results of the in vitro release profile demonstrated that G-NPs release a comparatively higher percentage of drug than MN-G-NPs. Cellular uptake by MN-G-NPs was 2.7 times more as compared with G-NPs. Fluorescence studies revealed the enhanced uptake of MN-G-NPs in the macrophage tissues when compared with unmodified G-NPs. Intravenous administration of free-drug solution resulted in a high concentration of drug in serum, whereas it was much less in the case of G-NPs. Coupling of the nanoparticles with mannose significantly enhanced the lung, liver, and lymph nodes uptake of drug, which is reflected in the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from these organs following administration of MN-G-NPs in comparison to noncoupled G-NPs or free drug.

  3. Anti-HIV and immunomodulation activities of cacao mass lignin-carbohydrate complex.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kawano, Michiyo; Thet, May Maw; Hashimoto, Ken; Satoh, Kazue; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Haishima, Yuji; Maeda, Yuuichi; Sakurai, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a prominent antiviral and macrophage stimulatory activity of cacao lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) has been reported. However, the solubility and sterility of LCC have not been considered yet. In the present study, complete solubilisation and sterilisation was achieved by autoclaving under mild alkaline conditions and the previously reported biological activities were re-examined. LCCs were obtained by 1% NaOH extraction and acid precipitation, and a repeated extraction-precipitation cycle. Nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine productions were assayed by the Griess method and ELISA, respectively. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide radical-scavenging activity was determined by ESR spectroscopy. Cacao mass LCC showed reproducibly higher anti-HIV activity than cacao husk LCC. Cacao mass LCC, up to 62.5 μg/ml, did not stimulate mouse macrophage-like cells (RAW264.7 and J774.1) to produce NO, nor did it induce iNOS protein, in contrast to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cacao mass LCC and LPS synergistically stimulated iNOS protein expression, suggesting a different point of action. Cacao mass LCC induced tumour necrosis factor-α production markedly less than LPS, and did not induce interleukin-1β, interferon-α or interferon-γ. ESR spectroscopy showed that cacao mass LCC, but not LPS, scavenged NO produced from NOC-7. This study demonstrated several new biological activities of LCCs distinct from LPS and further confirmed the promising antiviral and immunomodulating activities of LCCs.

  4. Comparison of classifier fusion methods for predicting response to anti HIV-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Altmann, André; Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Prosperi, Mattia; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani; Schülter, Eugen; Büch, Joachim; Struck, Daniel; Peres, Yardena; Incardona, Francesca; Sönnerborg, Anders; Kaiser, Rolf; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lengauer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the viral genome for drug resistance mutations is state-of-the-art for guiding treatment selection for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. These mutations alter the structure of viral target proteins and reduce or in the worst case completely inhibit the effect of antiretroviral compounds while maintaining the ability for effective replication. Modern anti-HIV-1 regimens comprise multiple drugs in order to prevent or at least delay the development of resistance mutations. However, commonly used HIV-1 genotype interpretation systems provide only classifications for single drugs. The EuResist initiative has collected data from about 18,500 patients to train three classifiers for predicting response to combination antiretroviral therapy, given the viral genotype and further information. In this work we compare different classifier fusion methods for combining the individual classifiers. The individual classifiers yielded similar performance, and all the combination approaches considered performed equally well. The gain in performance due to combining methods did not reach statistical significance compared to the single best individual classifier on the complete training set. However, on smaller training set sizes (200 to 1,600 instances compared to 2,700) the combination significantly outperformed the individual classifiers (p<0.01; paired one-sided Wilcoxon test). Together with a consistent reduction of the standard deviation compared to the individual prediction engines this shows a more robust behavior of the combined system. Moreover, using the combined system we were able to identify a class of therapy courses that led to a consistent underestimation (about 0.05 AUC) of the system performance. Discovery of these therapy courses is a further hint for the robustness of the combined system. The combined EuResist prediction engine is freely available at http://engine.euresist.org.

  5. Role of nucleoside diphosphate kinase in the activation of anti-HIV nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Sarfati, R; Deville-Bonne, D; Véron, M

    2000-06-01

    Nucleoside analogs are currently used in antiretrovirus therapies. The best known example is AZT one of the first drug to be used for the treatment of AIDS. However, only the triphosphate derivatives of these compounds act as substrates of the viral reverse transcriptase. Since they do not enter cells, nucleoside analogs are administered and phosphorylated by cellular kinases. The last step in this phosphorylation pathway is catalyzed by nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase. The incorporation of the nucleoside triphosphates into nascent viral DNA chain results in termination of the elongation process. We have performed kinetics studies of the phosphorylation reaction by NDP kinase of dideoxynucleoside diphosphates such as 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-azidothymidine diphosphate (AZT-DP) and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine diphosphate (d4T-DP). We show that the catalytic efficiency is strongly decreased and, therefore, that the reaction step catalyzed by NDP kinase constitutes a bottleneck in the processing pathway of anti-HIV compounds. In addition, the affinity of the analogs in the absence of catalysis was determined using a catalytically inactive NDP kinase mutant, showing a reduction of affinity by a factor of 2 to 30, depending on the analog. The structure of NDP kinase provides a structural explanation for these results. Indeed, all nucleoside analogs acting as chain terminators must lack a 3'-OH in the nucleotide deoxyribose. Unfortunately, this same substitution is detrimental for their capacity to be phosphorylated by NDP kinase. This defines the framework for the design of new nucleoside analogs with increased efficiency in antiretroviral therapies.

  6. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Amrita B.; Han, Andrew W.; Mehta, Angad P.; Mok, Kenny C.; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P.; Taga, Michiko E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism. PMID:26246619

  7. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Amrita B; Han, Andrew W; Mehta, Angad P; Mok, Kenny C; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P; Taga, Michiko E

    2015-08-25

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism.

  8. An amphiphilic, catalytically active, vitamin B12 derivative.

    PubMed

    Giedyk, M; Fedosov, S N; Gryko, D

    2014-05-11

    We performed the reaction of vitamin B12 with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal for primary amide activation, and added MeOH as a nucleophile, to afford cobalester, the first amphiphilic cobalamin derivative. The unique combination of redox properties and solubility represents an asset for its use as a catalyst in C-C bond forming reactions.

  9. Considering the case for vitamin B12 fortification of flour

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reasons to fortify flour with vitamin B12 are considered, which include the high prevalence of depletion and deficiency of this vitamin that occurs in persons of all ages in resource-poor countries and in elderly in wealthier countries, as well as the adverse functional consequences of poor vitamin ...

  10. Cyanide-bridged vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mundwiler, Stefan; Spingler, Bernhard; Kurz, Philipp; Kunze, Susanne; Alberto, Roger

    2005-07-04

    cis-[PtCl(OH2)(NH3)2]+, the monoactivated form of cisplatin, reacts with the cyano ligand of cobalt in vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) to form a Co-C[triple chemical bond]N-Pt conjugate (1). Compound 1 is prepared in good yield directly in aqueous solution. The remaining chloride ligand of Pt(II) is labile. It hydrolyzes slowly in aqueous solution and can be exchanged by stronger coordinating ligands, such as 9-methylguanine or 2'-deoxyguanosine, to yield vitamin B12-nucleobase conjugates. X-ray structures of the vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugate 1 as well as of the product with coordinated 9-methylguanine (2) are presented. The coordination geometry at Pt(II) is almost perfectly square-planar. The structure of the cobalamin compound remains essentially unchanged when compared with the original B(12) structure. The guanine moiety of compound 2 binds in a 45 degrees angle to the cisplatin molecule and interacts with neighboring molecules by means of pi stacking and hydrogen bonds.

  11. The photochemical mechanism of a B12-dependent photoreceptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Kutta, Roger J.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Johannissen, Linus O.; Bellina, Bruno; Messiha, Hanan L.; Ortiz-Guerrero, Juan Manuel; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S.; Barran, Perdita; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Jones, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    The coenzyme B12-dependent photoreceptor protein, CarH, is a bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls the biosynthesis of carotenoids in response to light. On binding of coenzyme B12 the monomeric apoprotein forms tetramers in the dark, which bind operator DNA thus blocking transcription. Under illumination the CarH tetramer dissociates, weakening its affinity for DNA and allowing transcription. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we describe the photochemistry in CarH that ultimately triggers tetramer dissociation; it proceeds via a cob(III)alamin intermediate, which then forms a stable adduct with the protein. This pathway is without precedent and our data suggest it is independent of the radical chemistry common to both coenzyme B12 enzymology and its known photochemistry. It provides a mechanistic foundation for the emerging field of B12 photobiology and will serve to inform the development of a new class of optogenetic tool for the control of gene expression. PMID:26264192

  12. Vitamin-B12 deficiency following therapy in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, L.C.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Vitamin-B12 deficiency results from inadequate absorption of the vitamin by the distal ileum and depletion of available stores. Both radiotherapy and intestinal resection can contribute to development of this condition. The significance of this problem in gynecologic oncology is discussed and two patients are described.

  13. Efficacy of oral cobalamin (vitamin B12) therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Fothergill, Helen; Mecili, Mustapha

    2010-02-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is particularly common in the elderly (> 15%). Management of cobalamin deficiency with cobalamin injections is well codified at present, but new routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) are being studied, especially oral cobalamin therapy for food-cobalamin malabsorption. The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of oral cobalamin treatment in elderly patients. To reach this objective, PubMed data were systematically searched for English and French articles published from January 1990 to July 2008. Data from our research group on cobalamin deficiency (Groupe d'Etude des CAREnce vitamine B12 - CARE B12) were also analyzed. Three prospective randomized studies, a systematic review by the Cochrane group and five prospective cohort studies were found and provide evidence that oral cobalamin treatment may adequately treat cobalamin deficiency. The efficacy was particularly highlighted when looking at the marked improvement in serum vitamin B12 levels and hematological parameters, for example hemoglobin level, mean erythrocyte cell volume and reticulocyte count. The effect of oral cobalamin treatment in patients presenting with severe neurological manifestations has not yet been adequately documented. Oral cobalamin treatment avoids the discomfort, inconvenience and cost of monthly injections. Our experience and the present analysis support the use of oral cobalamin therapy in clinical practice.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1945 - Vitamin B12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 184.1945 Section 184.1945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 343, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are...

  15. Monoclonal And Single Domain Antibodies Targeting β-Integrin Subunits Block Sexual Transmission of HIV-1 in in vitro and in vivo Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Guedon, Janet Tai; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to prevention regimens for gel-based anti-HIV-1 microbicides has been a major obstacle to more effective pre-exposure prophylaxis. Concern persists that the antiretroviral drug containing microbicides might promote development of antiretroviral resistance. Methods Using in vitro transwell systems and a humanized mouse model of HIV-1 sexual transmission, we examined, as candidate microbicides, antibodies targeting the heterodimeric leukocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), a non-virally encoded protein acquired by the virus that also plays a critical role cell movement across endothelial and epithelial barriers. LFA-1 specific single domain variable regions from alpaca heavy-chain only antibodies (VHH) were identified and evaluated for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell system. Results Monoclonal antibodies targeting the CD11a and CD18 components of LFA-1 significantly reduced cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell culture system and prevented virus transmission in the humanized mouse model of vaginal transmission. The broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12 was unable to block transmission of cell-free virus. CD11a-specific VHH were isolated and expressed and the purified variable region protein domains reduced in vitro transepithelial transmission with an efficacy comparable to that of the CD11a monoclonal antibody. Conclusions Targeting integrins acquired by HIV-1 during budding and which are critical to interactions between epithelial cells and lymphocytes can reduce viral movement across epithelial barriers and prevent transmission in a humanized mouse model of sexual transmission. VHH capable of being produced by transformed bacteria can significantly reduce transepithelial virus transmission in in vitro model systems. PMID:25828964

  16. Llama antibody fragments recognizing various epitopes of the CD4bs neutralize a broad range of HIV-1 subtypes A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Strokappe, Nika; Szynol, Agnieszka; Aasa-Chapman, Marlèn; Gorlani, Andrea; Forsman Quigley, Anna; Hulsik, David Lutje; Chen, Lei; Weiss, Robin; de Haard, Hans; Verrips, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Many of the neutralising antibodies, isolated to date, display limited activities against the globally most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes A and C. Therefore, those subtypes are considered to be an important target for antibody-based therapy. Variable domains of llama heavy chain antibodies (VHH) have some superior properties compared with classical antibodies. Therefore we describe the application of trimeric forms of envelope proteins (Env), derived from HIV-1 of subtype A and B/C, for a prolonged immunization of two llamas. A panel of VHH, which interfere with CD4 binding to HIV-1 Env were selected with use of panning. The results of binding and competition assays to various Env, including a variant with a stabilized CD4-binding state (gp120(Ds2)), cross-competition experiments, maturation analysis and neutralisation assays, enabled us to classify the selected VHH into three groups. The VHH of group I were efficient mainly against viruses of subtype A, C and B'/C. The VHH of group II resemble the broadly neutralising antibody (bnmAb) b12, neutralizing mainly subtype B and C viruses, however some had a broader neutralisation profile. A representative of the third group, 2E7, had an even higher neutralization breadth, neutralizing 21 out of the 26 tested strains belonging to the A, A/G, B, B/C and C subtypes. To evaluate the contribution of certain amino acids to the potency of the VHH a small set of the mutants were constructed. Surprisingly this yielded one mutant with slightly improved neutralisation potency against 92UG37.A9 (subtype A) and 96ZM651.02 (subtype C). These findings and the well-known stability of VHH indicate the potential application of these VHH as anti-HIV-1 microbicides.

  17. Effect of vitamin B12 treatment on haptocorrin.

    PubMed

    Mørkbak, Anne L; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Lloyd-Wright, Zouë; Sanders, Tom A B; Bleie, Oyvind; Refsum, Helga; Nygaard, Ottar K; Nexø, Ebba

    2006-06-01

    Haptocorrin (HC) carries the major part of circulating cobalamin, but whether HC is altered on treatment with vitamin B12 remains unknown. Our study included 3 populations: a population of vegan men (n = 174; vegan population), of whom 63 were treated daily with 5 mg of oral vitamin B12 for 3 months; a group of patients with a previous methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentration >0.4 micromol/L (n = 140; population with suspected deficiency), of which 69 were treated with weekly vitamin B12 injections (1 mg) for 4 weeks; and a subgroup of participants in a vitamin B intervention study (n = 88; nondeficient population), of whom 45 were treated daily with 0.4 mg of oral vitamin B12 for 3 months. Total HC and holoHC were measured by ELISA. Cobalamin was measured by an intrinsic factor (IF)-based assay. Samples were collected at baseline and 3 months after start of treatment. Compared with baseline results for the 3 study populations, total HC and holoHC increased 30 pmol/L for every 100 pmol/L increase in cobalamin. After treatment with vitamin B12, holoHC (P <0.0001) and total HC (P <0.0001) increased significantly in the vegan population. Only holoHC increased in the population with suspected deficiency (P <0.0001), whereas no alteration was observed in the nondeficient population. The HC concentration is decreased in severely cobalamin-deficient individuals and increases on treatment. The concentration of cobalamin also relates significantly to the HC concentration in nondeficient individuals.

  18. Use of mutated self-cleaving 2A peptides as a molecular rheostat to direct simultaneous formation of membrane and secreted anti-HIV immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kenneth K; Aguilar, Kiefer; Tsai, Jonathan; Galimidi, Rachel; Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2012-01-01

    In nature, B cells produce surface immunoglobulin and secreted antibody from the same immunoglobulin gene via alternative splicing of the pre-messenger RNA. Here we present a novel system for genetically programming B cells to direct the simultaneous formation of membrane-bound and secreted immunoglobulins that we term a "Molecular Rheostat", based on the use of mutated "self-cleaving" 2A peptides. The Molecular Rheostat is designed so that the ratio of secreted to membrane-bound immunoglobulins can be controlled by selecting appropriate mutations in the 2A peptide. Lentiviral transgenesis of Molecular Rheostat constructs into B cell lines enables the simultaneous expression of functional b12-based IgM-like BCRs that signal to the cells and mediate the secretion of b12 IgG broadly neutralizing antibodies that can bind and neutralize HIV-1 pseudovirus. We show that these b12-based Molecular Rheostat constructs promote the maturation of EU12 B cells in an in vitro model of B lymphopoiesis. The Molecular Rheostat offers a novel tool for genetically manipulating B cell specificity for B-cell based gene therapy.

  19. Use of Mutated Self-Cleaving 2A Peptides as a Molecular Rheostat to Direct Simultaneous Formation of Membrane and Secreted Anti-HIV Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kenneth K.; Aguilar, Kiefer; Tsai, Jonathan; Galimidi, Rachel; Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2012-01-01

    In nature, B cells produce surface immunoglobulin and secreted antibody from the same immunoglobulin gene via alternative splicing of the pre-messenger RNA. Here we present a novel system for genetically programming B cells to direct the simultaneous formation of membrane-bound and secreted immunoglobulins that we term a “Molecular Rheostat”, based on the use of mutated “self-cleaving” 2A peptides. The Molecular Rheostat is designed so that the ratio of secreted to membrane-bound immunoglobulins can be controlled by selecting appropriate mutations in the 2A peptide. Lentiviral transgenesis of Molecular Rheostat constructs into B cell lines enables the simultaneous expression of functional b12-based IgM-like BCRs that signal to the cells and mediate the secretion of b12 IgG broadly neutralizing antibodies that can bind and neutralize HIV-1 pseudovirus. We show that these b12-based Molecular Rheostat constructs promote the maturation of EU12 B cells in an in vitro model of B lymphopoiesis. The Molecular Rheostat offers a novel tool for genetically manipulating B cell specificity for B-cell based gene therapy. PMID:23209743

  20. The human serum metabolome of vitamin B-12 deficiency and repletion, and associations with neurological function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We characterize the human serum metabolome in sub-clinical vitamin B-12 (B-12) deficiency and repletion. A pre-post treatment study provided one injection of 10 mg B-12 to 27 community-dwelling elderly Chileans with B-12 deficiency evaluated with serum B-12, plasma homocysteine, methylmalonic acid a...

  1. Plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations in an elderly latino population are predicted by serum gastrin concentrations and crystalline vitamin B-12 intake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alison K; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Haan, Mary N; Allen, Lindsay H

    2003-09-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency increases with age, probably resulting from malabsorption of food-bound B-12 secondary to gastric atrophy. On the basis of this assumption, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends those aged >50 y consume crystalline vitamin B-12. There is limited information on the prevalence of gastric atrophy in the elderly and whether the IOM recommendation would be effective. The objective of this study was to assess predictors of vitamin B-12 status and their interactions in free-living elderly. Individuals (n = 57) with deficient plasma vitamin B-12 (p-B12 < 148 pmol/L) were compared with 68 individuals with marginal p-B12 (148-221 pmol/L) and 52 with normal p-B12 (>221 pmol/L) in a cross-sectional sample (n = 1546) of elderly (>60 y) Latinos in California. Associations were examined among p-B12 and serum gastrin, vitamin B-12 intake from food and crystalline sources, and medications that putatively affect vitamin B-12 absorption. Serum gastrin was elevated, indicating gastric atrophy, in 48% of participants with deficient p-B12, 23% with marginal p-B12 and 21% of normal p-B12 participants, and was a significant predictor of deficient p-B12 and high plasma homocysteine (p-tHcy). Median total vitamin B-12 intake exceeded recommendations and was similar among status groups. Crystalline vitamin B-12 intake in the normal p-B12 group was higher than in the deficient p-B12 group (P < 0.01), and tended to be higher than the marginal group (P = 0.07). When serum gastrin was elevated, p-B12 was predicted by crystalline vitamin B-12, but not by intake of vitamin B-12 from food. Elevated serum gastrin was highly prevalent and predicted vitamin B-12 depletion. Crystalline vitamin B-12 intake predicted p-B12 in individuals with elevated serum gastrin, supporting IOM recommendations to increase consumption of crystalline vitamin B-12.

  2. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; LeBlanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  3. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis of single- and double-chain fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon galactosyl amphiphiles and their anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Faroux-Corlay, B; Clary, L; Gadras, C; Hammache, D; Greiner, J; Santaella, C; Aubertin, A M; Vierling, P; Fantini, J

    2000-07-24

    Galactosylceramide (GalCer) is an alternative receptor allowing HIV-1 entry into CD4(-)/GalCer(+) cells. This glycosphingolipid recognizes the V3 loop of HIV gp120, which plays a key role in the fusion of the HIV envelope and cellular membrane. To inhibit HIV uptake and infection, we designed and synthesized analogs of GalCer. These amphiphiles and bolaamphiphiles consist of single and double hydrocarbon and/or fluorocarbon chain beta-linked to galactose and galactosamine. They derive from serine (GalSer), cysteine (GalCys), and ethanolamine (GalAE). The anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity of these galactolipids were evaluated in vitro on CEM-SS (a CD4(+) cell line), HT-29, a CD4(-) cell line expressing high levels of GalCer receptor, and/or HT29 genetically modified to express CD4. GalSer and GalAE derivatives, tested in aqueous medium or as part of liposome preparation, showed moderate anti-HIV-1 activities (IC50 in the 20-220 microM range), whereas none of the GalCys derivatives was found to be active. Moreover, only some of these anti-HIV active analogs inhibited the binding of [3H]suramin (a polysulfonyl compound which displays a high affinity for the V3 loop) to SPC3, a synthetic peptide which contains the conserved GPGRAF region of the V3 loop. Our results most likely indicate that the neutralization of the virion through masking of this conserved V3 loop region is not the only mechanism involved in the HIV-1 antiviral activity of our GalCer analogs.

  5. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  6. Phase I/II Trial of the Anti-HIV Activity of Mifepristone in HIV-Infected Subjects ACTG 5200

    PubMed Central

    Para, Michael F.; Schouten, Jeff; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Yu, Song; Weiner, David; Tebas, Pablo; White, C. Jo; Reeds, Dominic; Lertora, Juan; Patterson, Kristine B.; Daar, Eric S.; Cavert, Wintson; Brizz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background Mifepristone is a glucocorticoid receptor inhibitor shown in vitro to have anti-HIV activity and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus activity in a macaque model. A phase I/II trial was performed to assess the drug’s safety and anti-HIV activity. Methods A 28-day double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of mifepristone at doses of 75 mg, 150 mg, and 225 mg given daily was conducted in HIV+ persons with CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≥350 cells per cubic millimeter who had no recent antiretroviral therapy. Results Fifty-six male and 1 female subjects with a median entry CD4+ lymphocyte count of 555 cells per cubic millimeter and plasma HIV-1 RNA of 15,623 copies per milliliter were accrued. Forty-five subjects (78.9%) were available for endpoint analysis. In each arm, changes from baseline to day 28 in plasma HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ lymphocyte count were not significantly different from zero (no change). There was no relationship between mifepristone trough concentrations and plasma HIV-1 RNA. Day 28 morning plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in the 150 mg and 225 mg arms compared with placebo, confirming biologic activity, and returned to baseline by day 56. Serum lipids did not change during the trial. Fasting blood sugar was 2.5 mg/dL higher on day 28 in the mifepristone arms, but the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) did not change. Three subjects (7.3%) receiving mifepristone developed a grade 2 rash. Conclusions Mifepristone at doses of 75–225 mg daily was safe and well-tolerated, but did not show significant anti-HIV activity. PMID:20130470

  7. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  8. Folate–vitamin B-12 interaction in relation to cognitive impairment, anemia, and biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous reports on pernicious anemia treatment suggested that high folic acid intake adversely influences the natural history of vitamin B-12 deficiency, which affects many elderly individuals. However, experimental investigation of this hypothesis is unethical, and the few existing observational d...

  9. Natural Products as Anti-HIV Agents and Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND): A Brief Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao V.; Atluri, Venkata S.; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Garcia, Gabriella; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    As the threat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) persists to rise, effective drug treatments are required to treat the infected people. Even though combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) provides stable viral suppression, it is not devoid of undesirable side effects, especially in persons undergoing long-term treatment. The present therapy finds its limitations in the emergence of multidrug resistance and accordingly finding new drugs and novel targets is the need of the hour to treat the infected persons and further to attack HIV reservoirs in the body like brain, lymph nodes to achieve the ultimate goal of complete eradication of HIV and AIDS. Natural products such as plant-originated compounds and plant extracts have enormous potential to become drug leads with anti-HIV and neuroprotective activity. Accordingly, many research groups are exploring the biodiversity of the plant kingdom to find new and better anti-HIV drugs with novel mechanisms of action and for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The basic challenge that still persists is to develop viral replication-targeted therapy using novel anti-HIV compounds with new mode of action, accepted toxicity and less resistance profile. Against this backdrop, the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested the need to evaluate ethno-medicines for the management of HIV/AIDS. Consequently, there is need to evaluate traditional medicine, particularly medicinal plants and other natural products that may yield effective and affordable therapeutic agents. Although there are a good number of reports on traditional uses of plants to treat various diseases, knowledge of herbal remedies used to manage HIV/AIDS and HAND are scanty, vague and not well documented. In this review, plant substances showing a promising action that is anti-HIV and HAND will be explored along with what they interact. Since some plant substances are also known to modulate several cellular

  10. [Synthesis, properties and anti-HIV activity of novel lipophilic 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine conjugates containing functional phosphoric linkages].

    PubMed

    Shastina, N S; Mal'tseva, T Iu; D'iakova, L N; Lobach, O A; Chataeva, M S; Nosik, D N; Shvetz, V I

    2013-01-01

    One of the approaches to enhance bioavailability of nucleoside reverse transcriptase HIV inhibitors consists in design of their prodrugs based on 1,3-diacylglycerols, which may simulate nature lipids metabolic pathways promoting the improvement of drug delivery to the target cells. Glycerolipidic AZT conjugates with different functional phosphoric centers were synthesized by H-phosphonate technique in the present work. Study of prepared prodrugs sensibility to the chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis (in buffer solution and under the influence of pancreatic lipase) and also study of their anti-HIV activity on the T-lymphoid human MT-4 cells in regarding to virus HIV-1(899A) strain were carried out.

  11. Oxidative Stress Markers in Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Rahi, Sushil Kumar

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we report the status of oxidative stress markers in vitamin B12 deficiency and their relation to clinical, laboratory, and neurophysiological findings. Fifty-one subjects with serum vitamin B12 deficiency (<211 pg/ml) were included. Plasma glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured in the patients and 53 controls. These markers were also compared between subacute combined degeneration (SACD) and non-SACD vitamin B12 deficiency patients groups as well as with normal controls. In the patients, GSH, MDA and TAC were correlated with demographic, clinical, hematological, biochemical, nerve conduction study (NCS), visual evoked potential (VEP) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) findings. In the study group, 20 (39.2 %) patients had SACD manifesting with myeloneuropathy, cognitive or behavioral abnormalities, and 31(60.8 %) patients had non-SACD neurological manifestations. The GSH (2.46 ± 0.32 vs. 2.70 ± 0.36 mg/dl; P = 0.002) and TAC (2.13 ± 0.38 vs. 2.33 ± 0.24 nmol Trolox eq/l, P = 0.005) levels were lower, and MDA levels (4.01 ± 0.69 vs. 3.00 ± 0.45 nmol/ml, P < 0.001) were higher in B12 deficiency group compared with controls. Similar trend was found in SACD and non-SACD vitamin B12 deficiency groups. GSH levels correlated with abnormal VEP (r = 0.54; P < 0.01), TAC with female gender (r = 0.43; P = 0.002) and joint position impairment (r = -0.34; P = 0.01), and MDA with LDH (r = 0.41; P = 0.01). Vitamin B12 deficiency was associated with reduction in GSH and TAC and increase in MDA levels which were more marked in SACD compared to non-SACD group.

  12. Brucella melitensis VirB12 recombinant protein is a potential marker for serodiagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mirkalantari, Shiva; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Irajian, Gholam Reza; Amirmozafari, Nour

    2017-03-03

    The numerous drawbacks of current serological tests for diagnosis of brucellosis which mainly results from cross reactivity with LPS from other gram-negative bacteria have generated an increasing interest to find more specific non-LPS antigens. Previous studies had indicated that Brucella VirB12 protein, a cell surface protein and component of type IV secretion system, induces antibody response during animal infection. However, this protein has not yet been tested as a serological diagnostic marker in human brucellosis. Recombinant VirB12 protein was prepared and evaluated the efficacy of it in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for brucellosis with sera collected from different region of Iran and the results were compared with a commercial ELISA kit. Sera from human brucellosis patients strongly reacted to the purified recombinant VirB12. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of recombinant VirB12-based ELISA related to the commercial-ELISA method were 87.8, 94, 90, 80 and 96.6% respectively. We concluded that antigenic VirB12 have a property value that can be considered as a candidate for using in serodiagnostic tests for human brucellosis.

  13. Oral cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) treatment. An update.

    PubMed

    Andrès, E; Dali-Youcef, N; Vogel, T; Serraj, K; Zimmer, J

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate oral cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) therapy in adult and elderly patients, from the perspective of a hematologist. PubMed was systematically searched for English and French articles published from January 1990 to January 2007. Data from our working group, the 'Groupe d'étude des carences en vitamine B(12)des Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg', have also been included. Several prospective studies in well-determined population (n = 4), prospective randomized studies (n = 3) and a systematic review by the Cochrane group (n = 1) provide evidence that oral cobalamin therapy may adequately treat cobalamin deficiency, particularly hematological abnormalities or manifestations. These studies suggest that at least 1000 microg/day of oral cyanocobalmin are needed for pernicious anemia and a mean daily dose of 250 microg for food-cobalamin malabsorption. This present review confirms the previously reported efficacy of oral cobalamin treatment in adult and elderly patients.

  14. The high-pressure compressibility of B12P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Haiyan; Ji, Cheng; Whiteley, C. E.; Edgar, J. H.; Liu, Haozhe; Ma, Yanzhang

    2017-03-01

    In situ high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) to 43.2 GPa. No structural phase transition occurs over this pressure range. The bulk modulus of B12P2 is KOT = 207 ± 7 GPa with pressure derivative of K'OT = 6.6 ± 0.8 . The structure is most compressible along the chain formed by phosphorus and boron atoms in the crystal structure. It is believed that the compressibility of boron-rich compounds at close to ambient pressure is determined by the boron icosahedral structure, while the inclusive atoms (both boron and non-boron) between the icosahedra determine the high-pressure compressibility and structure stability.

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  16. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for B-12 (Boron)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope B-12 (Boron, atomic number Z = 5, mass number A = 12).

  18. Disorders of vitamin B12 metabolism presenting through newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Janice

    2008-12-01

    Elevated propionyl C3 carnitine is the most common abnormality seen in tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening profiles, with an incidence of 0.15% seen in our South Australian newborn screening programme. The most common cause for this result in our population is vitamin B12 deficiency but differential diagnoses include the inherited disorders of propionic and methylmalonic acid metabolism and cobalamin deficiencies. An approach to confirmatory testing and subsequent management of infants with elevated propionic carnitine is presented.

  19. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin B12 among Vegetarians: Status, Assessment and Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Gianluca; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; La Ferrera, Gioacchina Maria Grazia; Buscema, Massimo; Rossetti, Paola; Nigro, Angela; Muscia, Vincenzo; Valenti, Gaetano; Sapia, Fabrizio; Sarpietro, Giuseppe; Zigarelli, Micol; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Cobalamin is an essential molecule for humans. It acts as a cofactor in one-carbon transfers through methylation and molecular rearrangement. These functions take place in fatty acid, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolic pathways. The deficiency of vitamin B12 is clinically manifested in the blood and nervous system where the cobalamin plays a key role in cell replication and in fatty acid metabolism. Hypovitaminosis arises from inadequate absorption, from genetic defects that alter transport through the body, or from inadequate intake as a result of diet. With the growing adoption of vegetarian eating styles in Western countries, there is growing focus on whether diets that exclude animal foods are adequate. Since food availability in these countries is not a problem, and therefore plant foods are sufficiently adequate, the most delicate issue remains the contribution of cobalamin, which is poorly represented in plants. In this review, we will discuss the status of vitamin B12 among vegetarians, the diagnostic markers for the detection of cobalamin deficiency and appropriate sources for sufficient intake, through the description of the features and functions of vitamin B12 and its absorption mechanism. PMID:27916823

  1. Vitamin B12 among Vegetarians: Status, Assessment and Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Gianluca; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; La Ferrera, Gioacchina Maria Grazia; Buscema, Massimo; Rossetti, Paola; Nigro, Angela; Muscia, Vincenzo; Valenti, Gaetano; Sapia, Fabrizio; Sarpietro, Giuseppe; Zigarelli, Micol; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni

    2016-11-29

    Cobalamin is an essential molecule for humans. It acts as a cofactor in one-carbon transfers through methylation and molecular rearrangement. These functions take place in fatty acid, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolic pathways. The deficiency of vitamin B12 is clinically manifested in the blood and nervous system where the cobalamin plays a key role in cell replication and in fatty acid metabolism. Hypovitaminosis arises from inadequate absorption, from genetic defects that alter transport through the body, or from inadequate intake as a result of diet. With the growing adoption of vegetarian eating styles in Western countries, there is growing focus on whether diets that exclude animal foods are adequate. Since food availability in these countries is not a problem, and therefore plant foods are sufficiently adequate, the most delicate issue remains the contribution of cobalamin, which is poorly represented in plants. In this review, we will discuss the status of vitamin B12 among vegetarians, the diagnostic markers for the detection of cobalamin deficiency and appropriate sources for sufficient intake, through the description of the features and functions of vitamin B12 and its absorption mechanism.

  2. A vitamin B-12 supplement of 500 μg/d for eight weeks does not normalize urinary methylmalonic acid or other biomarkers of vitamin B-12 status in elderly people with moderately poor vitamin B-12 status.

    PubMed

    Hill, Marilyn H; Flatley, Janet E; Barker, Margo E; Garner, Clare M; Manning, Nigel J; Olpin, Simon E; Moat, Stuart J; Russell, Jean; Powers, Hilary J

    2013-02-01

    Plasma vitamin B-12 is the most commonly used biomarker of vitamin B-12 status, but the predictive value for low vitamin B-12 status is poor. The urinary methylmalonic acid (uMMA) concentration has potential as a functional biomarker of vitamin B-12 status, but the response to supplemental vitamin B-12 is uncertain. A study was conducted to investigate the responsiveness of uMMA to supplemental vitamin B-12 in comparison with other biomarkers of vitamin B-12 status [plasma vitamin B-12, serum holotranscobalamin (holoTC), plasma MMA] in elderly people with moderately poor vitamin B-12 status. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 8-wk intervention study was carried out using vitamin B-12 supplements (500 μg/d, 100 μg/d, and 10 μg/d cyanocobalamin) in 100 elderly people with a combined plasma vitamin B-12 <250 pmol/L and uMMA ratio (μmol MMA/mmol creatinine) >1.5. All biomarkers had a dose response to supplemental vitamin B-12. Improvements in plasma vitamin B-12 and serum holoTC were achieved at cobalamin supplements of 10 μg/d, but even 500 μg/d for 8 wk did not normalize plasma vitamin B-12 in 8% and serum holoTC in 12% of people. The response in uMMA was comparable with plasma MMA; 15-25% of people still showed evidence of metabolic deficiency after 500 μg/d cobalamin for 8 wk. There was a differential response in urinary and plasma MMA according to smoking behavior; the response was enhanced in ex-smokers compared with never-smokers. uMMA offers an alternative marker of metabolic vitamin-B12 status, obviating the need for blood sampling.

  3. Dietary Sources of Vitamin B-12 and Their Association with Vitamin B-12 Status Markers in Healthy Older Adults in the B-PROOF Study.

    PubMed

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P; Zwaluw, Nikita L van der; Velde, Nathalie van der; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2015-09-14

    Low vitamin B-12 concentrations are frequently observed among older adults. Malabsorption is hypothesized to be an important cause of vitamin B-12 inadequacy, but serum vitamin B-12 may also be differently affected by vitamin B-12 intake depending on food source. We examined associations between dietary sources of vitamin B-12 (meat, fish and shellfish, eggs, dairy) and serum vitamin B-12, using cross-sectional data of 600 Dutch community-dwelling adults (≥65 years). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Vitamin B-12 concentrations were measured in serum. Associations were studied over tertiles of vitamin B-12 intake using P for trend, by calculating prevalence ratios (PRs), and splines. Whereas men had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intakes than women (median (25th-75th percentile): 4.18 (3.29-5.38) versus 3.47 (2.64-4.40) μg/day), serum vitamin B-12 did not differ between the two sexes (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 275 ± 104 pmol/L versus 290 ± 113 pmol/L). Higher intakes of dairy, meat, and fish and shellfish were significantly associated with higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations, where meat and dairy-predominantly milk were the most potent sources. Egg intake did not significantly contribute to higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Thus, dairy and meat were the most important contributors to serum vitamin B-12, followed by fish and shellfish.

  4. Dietary Sources of Vitamin B-12 and Their Association with Vitamin B-12 Status Markers in Healthy Older Adults in the B-PROOF Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin B-12 concentrations are frequently observed among older adults. Malabsorption is hypothesized to be an important cause of vitamin B-12 inadequacy, but serum vitamin B-12 may also be differently affected by vitamin B-12 intake depending on food source. We examined associations between dietary sources of vitamin B-12 (meat, fish and shellfish, eggs, dairy) and serum vitamin B-12, using cross-sectional data of 600 Dutch community-dwelling adults (≥65 years). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Vitamin B-12 concentrations were measured in serum. Associations were studied over tertiles of vitamin B-12 intake using P for trend, by calculating prevalence ratios (PRs), and splines. Whereas men had significantly higher vitamin B-12 intakes than women (median (25th–75th percentile): 4.18 (3.29–5.38) versus 3.47 (2.64–4.40) μg/day), serum vitamin B-12 did not differ between the two sexes (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 275 ± 104 pmol/L versus 290 ± 113 pmol/L). Higher intakes of dairy, meat, and fish and shellfish were significantly associated with higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations, where meat and dairy—predominantly milk were the most potent sources. Egg intake did not significantly contribute to higher serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Thus, dairy and meat were the most important contributors to serum vitamin B-12, followed by fish and shellfish. PMID:26389945

  5. Synthesis, anti-HIV activity, integrase enzyme inhibition and molecular modeling of catechol, hydroquinone and quinol labdane analogs.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohan; Das, Tiyasa; Mishra, Sanjay; Nutan; Pancholi, Boskey; Gupta, Satish K; Bhat, Sujata V

    2014-01-01

    Labdane analogs with o-quinol, catechol and hydroquinone moiety have been synthesized using Diels-Alder reaction of methyl 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylate, 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylic acid and 3,6-dioxocyclohexa-1,4-dienecarboxylic acid with mono terpene 1,3-dienes, namely ocimene and myrcene. The resulting molecules and their derivatives were evaluated for their anti-HIV-1 activity using TZM-bl cell based virus infectivity assay. Two molecules 13 and 18 showed anti-HIV activity with IC50 values 5.0 (TI=11) and 4.6 (TI=46)μM, respectively. The compounds 17, 18 and 20 showed efficacy against HIV-1 integrase activity and showed inhibition with IC50 13.4, 11.1 and 11.5μM, respectively. The HIV-1 integrase inhibition activity of these synthetic molecules was comparable with integric acid, the natural fungal metabolite. Molecular modeling studies for the HIV-1 integrase inhibition of these active synthetic molecules indicated the binding to the active site residues of the enzyme.

  6. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments.

  7. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  8. Discovery of a Potent HIV Integrase Inhibitor That Leads to a Prodrug with Significant anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide research efforts in drug discovery involving HIV integrase have produced only one compound, raltegravir, that has been approved for clinical use in HIV/AIDS. As resistance, toxicity, and drug–drug interactions are recurring issues with all classes of anti-HIV drugs, the discovery of novel integrase inhibitors remains a significant scientific challenge. We have designed a lead HIV-1 strand transfer (ST) inhibitor (IC50 70 nM), strategically assembled on a pyridinone scaffold. A focused structure–activity investigation of this parent compound led to a significantly more potent ST inhibitor, 2 (IC50 6 ± 3 nM). Compound 2 exhibits good stability in pooled human liver microsomes. It also displays a notably favorable profile with respect to key human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes and human UDP glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs). The prodrug of inhibitor 2, i.e., compound 10, was found to possess remarkable anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture (EC50 9 ± 4 nM, CC50 135 ± 7 μM, therapeutic index = 15 000). PMID:22328963

  9. Application of 3D-QSAR techniques in anti-HIV-1 drug design--an overview.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Asim Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Despite the availability of several classes of drugs against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1), this deadly disease showing very little sign of containment, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. More than 20 million people died since the first diagnosis of AIDS more than twenty years ago and almost 40 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS. Structure-based drug design effort was immensely successful in identifying several drugs that are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1. Many applications have been reported on the use of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies to understand the drug-receptor interactions and help in the design of more effective analogs. Extensive application was also reported on the application of 3D-QSAR techniques, such as, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), Comparative Molecular Similarity Analysis (CoMSIA), pharmacophore generation using Catalyst/HypoGen, free-energy binding analysis, GRID/GOLPE, HINT-based techniques, etc. in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery programs in academia and industry. We have attempted to put together a comprehensive overview on the 3D-QSAR applications in anti-HIV-1 drug design reported in the literature during the last decade.

  10. Sampling of Glycan-Bound Conformers by the Anti-HIV Lectin Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin in the Absence of Sugar.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Marta G; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Trigo-Mourino, Pablo; Mazur, Adam; Griesinger, Christian; Gronenborn, Angela M; Lee, Donghan

    2015-05-26

    Lectins from different sources have been shown to interfere with HIV infection by binding to the sugars of viral-envelope glycoproteins. Three-dimensional atomic structures of a number of HIV-inactivating lectins have been determined, both as free proteins and in glycan-bound forms. However, details on the mechanism of recognition and binding to sugars are elusive. Herein we focus on the anti-HIV lectin OAA from Oscillatoria agardhii: We show that in the absence of sugars in solution, both the sugar-free and sugar-bound protein conformations that were observed in the X-ray crystal structures exist as conformational substates. Our results suggest that glycan recognition occurs by conformational selection within the ground state; this model differs from the popular "excited-state" model. Our findings provide further insight into molecular recognition of the major receptor on the HIV virus by OAA. These details can potentially be used for the optimization and/or development of preventive anti-HIV therapeutics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Geane L.; de Almeida, Adilson J.; Miguel, Juliana C.; Cruz, Helena M.; Portilho, Moyra M.; de P. Scalioni, Letícia; Marques, Vanessa A.; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Melo Villar, Livia

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) Methods: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) Results: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) Conclusion: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  12. Forms and Amounts of Vitamin B12 in Infant Formula: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Greibe, Eva; Nexo, Ebba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infant formula is based on cow’s milk and designed to mimic breast milk for substitution. Vitamin B12 (B12) is bound to proteins in both breast milk and cow’s milk, and in milk from both species the vitamin occurs mainly in its natural form such as hydroxo-B12 with little or no synthetic B12 (cyano-B12). Here we test commercially available infant formulas. Methods Eleven commercially available infant formulas were measured for content of B12 and analyzed for the presence of B12-binding proteins and forms of B12 using size exclusion chromatography and HPLC. Results All infant formulas contained B12 by and large in accord with the informations given on the package inserts. None of the formulas contained protein-bound B12, and cyano-B12 accounted for 19–78% of the total amount of B12 present, while hydroxo-B12 constituted more or less the rest. Conclusions This pilot study shows that infant formula differs from breast milk in providing the infant with free B12, rather than protein-bound B12, and by a relative high content of cyano-B12. The consequence of supplying the infant with synthetic cyano-B12 remains to be elucidated. PMID:27851744

  13. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis.

  14. TOXOPLASMA AND VIRAL ANTIBODIES AMONG HIV PATIENTS AND INMATES IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Sari, Yulia; Haryati, Sri; Raharjo, Irvan; Prasetyo, Afiono Agung

    2015-11-01

    In Indonesia, Toxoplasma and its associations with blood-borne viruses have been poorly studied. In order to study the association between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and blood-borne viral antibodies, blood samples from 497 participants (375 inmates from four prisons in Central Java, Indonesia and 122 HIV patients at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Clinic in Surakarta, Indonesia) were tested for serological markers of Toxoplasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-1/2). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM positivity rates were 41.6% and 3.6%, respectively. One point two percent of participants was positive for both anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Sixteen point five percent, 11.3%, 2.6% and 2.8% of participants were positive for anti- Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HCV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgM combined with anti-HIV antibodes and anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with both anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, respectively. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM seropositivity was associated with anti-HIV (aOR = 4.3; 95% CI: 1.112-16.204, p = 0.034). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were associated with anti-HCV (aOR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.749-4.538, p < 0.001) and history of injection drug use (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.905-5.093, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we recommend patients with HIV, HCV infection and injection drug users should be screened for Toxoplasma infection in Indonesia.

  15. Vitamin B12 absorption in some neurological and neuroendocrine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D.; Lascelles, P. T.

    1970-01-01

    An assessment of vitamin B12 absorption in neurological patients has been made by both serum and urine counting of 57Co cyanocobalamin during the conventional Schilling test. Although patients with pernicious anaemia, some with subacute combined degeneration of the cord, have been studied, emphasis in the discussion is placed on the significantly increased excretion of the radioactive vitamin in a group of patients with pituitary insufficiency. Results are also given for epileptic patients who have developed folate deficiency (as assessed by serum folate levels) coincidental with anticonvulsant therapy, as well as for some patients who have had neurological symptoms or signs following partial gastrectomy operations. PMID:5483383

  16. Vitamin B-12 treatment of asymptomatic, deficient, elderly Chileans improves conductivity in myelinated peripheral nerves, but high serum folate impairs vitamin B-12 status response assessed by the combined indicator of vitamin B-12 status.

    PubMed

    Brito, Alex; Verdugo, Renato; Hertrampf, Eva; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Fedosov, Sergey N; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Sanchez, Hugo; Albala, Cecilia; Castillo, Jose L; Matamala, Jose M; Uauy, Ricardo; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether vitamin B-12 supplementation can improve neurophysiologic function in asymptomatic elderly with low vitamin B-12 status or whether folate status affects responses to vitamin B-12 supplementation. We assessed the effects of a single intramuscular injection of 10 mg vitamin B-12 (which also contained 100 mg vitamin B-6 and 100 mg vitamin B-1) on vitamin B-12 status and neurophysiologic function in elderly community-dwelling Chileans with low serum vitamin B-12 concentrations who were consuming bread fortified with folic acid. A pretreatment and posttreatment study was conducted in 51 participants (median ± SD age: 73 ± 3 y; women: 47%) with serum vitamin B-12 concentrations <120 pmol/L at screening. Vitamin B-12 status was defined by combining vitamin B-12, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and holotranscobalamin into one variable [combined indicator of vitamin B-12 status (cB-12)]. The response to treatment was assessed by measuring cB-12 and neurophysiologic variables at baseline and 4 mo after treatment. Treatment increased serum vitamin B-12, holotranscobalamin, and cB-12 (P < 0.001) and reduced plasma tHcy and serum MMA (P < 0.001). Treatment produced consistent improvements in conduction in myelinated peripheral nerves; the sensory latency of both the left and right sural nerves improved on the basis of faster median conduction times of 3.1 and 3.0 ms and 3.3 and 3.4 ms, respectively (P < 0.0001). A total of 10 sensory potentials were newly observed in sural nerves after treatment. Participants with high serum folate at baseline (above the median, ≥33.9 nmol/L) had less improvement in cB-12 (P < 0.001) than did individuals whose serum folate was less than the median concentration (i.e., with a concentration <33.9 nmol/L). Asymptomatic Chilean elderly with poor vitamin B-12 status displayed improved conductivity in myelinated peripheral nerves after vitamin B-12 treatment and an interaction with folate status

  17. Vitamin B12 Status in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I.; Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Study Design Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 yrs) and categorized as elevated (Hi-B12) or within reference range (RR-B12) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index Z scores, pulmonary function, energy, dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. Results 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years participated. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/ml, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intake were both high representing 376% and 667% Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the RR-B12 group (1000 vs. 583% RDA, p<0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased risk for Hi-B12, while higher FEV1 decreased risk (Pseudo-R2=0.18, P<0.001). Conclusions Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and FEV1. PMID:24445504

  18. 29 CFR 780.403 - Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). 780... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) § 780.403 Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). Section 13(b)(12) exempts “any employee employed in * * *.” It is clear from this language that it is...

  19. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-12 - Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... included in income. 1.367(b)-12 Section 1.367(b)-12 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-12....367(b)-12(b) through (e) of this chapter (as in effect prior to January 11, 2001, see 26 CFR part...

  20. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-12 - Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... included in income. 1.367(b)-12 Section 1.367(b)-12 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-12....367(b)-12(b) through (e) of this chapter (as in effect prior to January 11, 2001, see 26 CFR part...

  1. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-12 - Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... included in income. 1.367(b)-12 Section 1.367(b)-12 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 1.367(b)-12 Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income. (a) In general. This...) Applicable rules. See § 7.367(b)-12(b) through (e) of this chapter (as in effect prior to January 11,...

  2. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-12 - Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... included in income. 1.367(b)-12 Section 1.367(b)-12 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 1.367(b)-12 Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income. (a) In general. This...) Applicable rules. See § 7.367(b)-12(b) through (e) of this chapter (as in effect prior to January 11,...

  3. 29 CFR 780.403 - Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). 780... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) § 780.403 Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). Section 13(b)(12) exempts “any employee employed in * * *.” It is clear from this language that it is...

  4. 29 CFR 780.403 - Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). 780... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) § 780.403 Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). Section 13(b)(12) exempts “any employee employed in * * *.” It is clear from this language that it is...

  5. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-12 - Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... included in income. 1.367(b)-12 Section 1.367(b)-12 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 1.367(b)-12 Subsequent treatment of amounts attributed or included in income. (a) In general. This...) Applicable rules. See § 7.367(b)-12(b) through (e) of this chapter (as in effect prior to January 11,...

  6. 29 CFR 780.403 - Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). 780... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) § 780.403 Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). Section 13(b)(12) exempts “any employee employed in * * *.” It is clear from this language that it is...

  7. 29 CFR 780.403 - Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). 780... Requirements Under Section 13(b)(12) § 780.403 Employee basis of exemption under section 13(b)(12). Section 13(b)(12) exempts “any employee employed in * * *.” It is clear from this language that it is...

  8. Vitamin B12 status in pregnant women and their infants in South India.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, J L; Kurpad, A V; Thomas, T; Srinivasan, K; Duggan, C

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency during pregnancy has been associated with increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. However, few studies have investigated the burden and determinants of vitamin B12 status in young infants. This study was conducted to determine the associations between maternal and infant vitamin B12 status. Pregnant women participating in a vitamin B12 supplementation trial in Bangalore, India, were randomized to receive vitamin B12 (50 μg) or placebo supplementation daily during pregnancy through 6 weeks postpartum. All women received 60 mg of iron and 500 μg of folic acid daily during pregnancy, as per standard of care. This prospective analysis was conducted to determine the associations between maternal vitamin B12 biomarkers (that is, plasma vitamin B12, methylmalonic acid (MMA) and tHcy) during each trimester with infant vitamin B12 status (n=77) at 6 weeks of age. At baseline (⩽14 weeks of gestation), 51% of mothers were vitamin B12 deficient (vitamin B12<150 pmol/l) and 43% had impaired vitamin B12 status (vitamin B12<150 pmol/l and MMA>0.26 μmol/l); 44% of infants were vitamin B12 deficient at 6 weeks of age. After adjusting for vitamin B12 supplementation, higher vitamin B12 concentrations in each trimester were associated with increased infant vitamin B12 concentrations and lower risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in infants (P<0.05). After adjusting for vitamin B12 supplementation, infants born to women with vitamin B12 deficiency had a twofold greater risk of vitamin B12 deficiency (P<0.01). Higher maternal folate concentrations also predicted lower risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in infants (P<0.05). Impaired maternal vitamin B12 status, which combined both circulating and functional biomarkers, was the single best predictor of infant vitamin B12 status. Impaired maternal vitamin B12 status throughout pregnancy predicted higher risk of vitamin B12 deficiency in infants, after adjusting for vitamin B12 supplementation. Future

  9. Low-dimensional boron structures based on icosahedron B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, C. B.; Yu, M.; Tandy, P.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2015-10-01

    One-dimensional icosahedral boron chains and two-dimensional icosahedral boron sheets (icosahedral α, δ6, and δ4 sheets) that contain icosahedra B12 as their building units have been predicted in a computer simulation study using a state-of-the-art semi-empirical Hamiltonian. These novel low-dimensional icosahedral structures exhibit interesting bonding and electronic properties. Specifically, the three-center, two-electron bonding between icosahedra B12 of the boron bulk (rhombohedral boron) transforms into a two-center bonding in these new allotropes of boron sheets. In contrast to the previously reported stable buckled α and triangular boron monolayer sheets, these new allotropes of boron sheets form a planar network. Calculations of electronic density of states (DOS) reveal a semiconducting nature for both the icosahedral chain and the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets, as well as a nearly gapless (or metallic-like) feature in the DOS for the icosahedral α sheet. The results for the energy barrier per atom between the icosahedral δ6 and α sheets (0.17 eV), the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets (0.38 eV), and the icosahedral α and δ4 sheets (0.27 eV), as indicated in the respective parentheses, suggest that these new allotropes of boron sheets are relatively stable.

  10. Oral contraceptives and the cobalamin (vitamin B12) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hjelt, K; Brynskov, J; Hippe, E; Lundström, P; Munck, O

    1985-01-01

    The mean concentrations of serum (S)-cobalamin (vitamin B12) and S-unsaturated B12 binding capacity (UBBC) were significantly decreased in 101 women (mean age: 30.4 years) taking oral contraceptives (OC) of the combination type, compared to 113 controls. OC users more frequently showed decreased concentrations of S-cobalamin (less than 200 pmol/l) than did their controls. However, the incidence of particularly low concentrations (less than 150 pmol/l) in OC users was not increased. To study a possible dose-dependent effect, 27 women (mean age: 50.5 years) given high-dose estrogen preparations (1-4 mg estrogen) were compared with 31 controls. The two groups showed no difference with regard to S-cobalamin, but the mean S- and plasma-UBBC levels were significantly decreased in the high-dose estrogen group. 12 OC users with decreased S-cobalamin (less than 200 pmol/l), 9 OC users with normal S-cobalamin and 10 controls were studied more intensively. The mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in those OC users having decreased S-cobalamin. On the contrary, the absorption and excretion of radiolabeled cobalamin and the concentrations of erythrocyte-folate, S-iron and -transferrin did not show any difference between the groups, and all results were normal, by and large. No characteristic changes in plasma volume were found. It is concluded that routine measurement of S-cobalamin in women taking OC is not justified.

  11. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5)% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3)%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice or 6% vinegar induced

  12. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5'-O-Dicarboxylic Fatty Acyl Monoester Derivatives of Anti-HIV Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Bhanu; Agarwal, Hitesh K; Oh, Donghoon; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Tiwari, Rakesh; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-03-19

    A number of 5'-O-dicarboxylic fatty acyl monoester derivatives of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (stavudine, d4T), and 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (alovudine, FLT) were synthesized to improve the lipophilicity and potentially the cellular delivery of parent polar 2', 3'-dideoxynucleoside (ddN) analogues. The compounds were evaluated for their anti-HIV activity. Three different fatty acids with varying chain length of suberic acid (octanedioic acid), sebacic acid (decanedioic acid), and dodecanedioic acid were used for the conjugation with the nucleosides. The compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity. All dicarboxylic ester conjugates of nucleosides exhibited significantly higher anti-HIV activity than that of the corresponding parent nucleoside analogs. Among all the tested conjugates, 5'-O-suberate derivative of AZT (EC50 = 0.10 nM) was found to be the most potent compound and showed 80-fold higher anti-HIV activity than AZT without any significant toxicity (TC50 > 500 nM).

  13. Discovery of novel anti-HIV agents via Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry-based approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Sun, Lin; Zhou, Junsu; Li, Xiao; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, a variety of new synthetic methodologies and concepts have been proposed in the search for new pharmaceutical lead structures and optimization. Notably, the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry approach has drawn great attention and has become a powerful tool for the generation of privileged medicinal skeletons in the discovery of anti-HIV agents. This is due to the high degree of reliability, complete specificity (chemoselectivity and regioselectivity), mild conditions, and the biocompatibility of the reactants. Herein, the authors describe the progress thus far on the discovery of novel anti-HIV agents via the CuAAC click chemistry-based approach. CuAAC click chemistry is a proven protocol for synthesizing triazole products which could serve as basic pharmacophores, act as replacements of traditional scaffold or substituent modification, be a linker of dual-target or dual-site inhibitors and more for the discovery of novel anti-HIV agents. What's more, it also provides convenience and feasibility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry and in situ screening. It is envisioned that click chemistry will draw more attention and make more contributions in anti-HIV drug discovery in the future.

  14. Conformational analysis of the anti-HIV Nikavir prodrug: comparisons with AZT and Thymidine, and establishment of structure-activity relationships/tendencies in other 6'-derivatives.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ahmed A; Tamara Molina, A; Álvarez-Ros, M C; Alcolea Palafox, M

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical conformational analysis of the anti-HIV Nikavir prodrug was carried out; this prodrug has noticeable advantage over the approved drug AZT. The whole conformational parameters (χ, α, β, γ, δ, ϕ, P and νmax) were analysed as well as the NBO natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out by means of DFT/B3LYP and ab initio MP2 methods with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 67 stable structures, 4 of which were within a 1 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum. By MP2 it corresponds to the calculated values of the exocyclic torsional angles χ=-108.0°, β=14.5°, γ=76.7° and ε=71.5°. The results obtained are in accordance to those found in related anti-HIV nucleoside analogues. Comparisons of the conformers with those determined in the common anti-HIV drug AZT were carried out. A detailed analysis of the lowest vibrations (<200 cm(-1)) in the best conformer of Nikavir was carried out. The most stable hydrated cluster of this conformer with 20 explicit water molecules was determined. Calculations in five of its 6'-derivatives were performed to identify structural trends that might correlate with the anti-HIV activity of these compounds. Ten structure-activity relationships/tendencies were established that can help for the design of new drugs. Several recommendations for this design were expressed.

  15. An infant and mother with severe B12 deficiency: vitamin B12 status assessment should be determined in pregnant women with anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sobczyńska-Malefora, A; Ramachandran, R; Cregeen, D; Green, E; Bennett, P; Harrington, D J; Lemonde, H A

    2017-08-01

    The vitamin B12 status of infants depends on maternal B12 status during pregnancy, and during lactation if breastfed. We present a 9-month-old girl who was admitted to the metabolic unit for assessment of developmental delay. She was exclusively breastfed and the introduction of solids at 5 months was unsuccessful. Investigations revealed pancytopenia, undetectable B12 and highly elevated methylmalonic acid and homocysteine. Methylmalonic acid and homocysteine normalised following B12 injections. Marked catch-up of developmental milestones was noted after treatment with B12. Investigations of parents showed normal B12 in the father and combined B12 and iron deficiency in the mother. Maternal B12 deficiency, most likely masked by iron deficiency, led to severe B12 deficiency in the infant. Exclusive breastfeeding and a subsequent failure to wean exacerbated the infant's B12 deficiency leading to developmental delay. This case highlights the need for development of guidelines for better assessment of B12 status during pregnancy.

  16. Access to organometallic arylcobaltcorrins through radical synthesis: 4-ethylphenylcobalamin, a potential "antivitamin B(12)".

    PubMed

    Ruetz, Markus; Gherasim, Carmen; Gruber, Karl; Fedosov, Sergey; Banerjee, Ruma; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2013-02-25

    Locked B(12): 4-Ethylphenylcobalamin, a novel organometallic arylcobalamin, has been synthesized in a radical reaction. This vitamin B(12) antimetabolite features a strong Co-C bond, and represents a "locked" form of vitamin B(12) . It may be used in animal studies to induce functional vitamin B(12) deficiency artificially to help clarify still controversial issues related to the pathophysiology of vitamin B(12) deficiency.

  17. [Macrocytosis, polyneuropathy and posterior column disorders caused by malabsorption of protein-bound vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Mazure, A; Bieger, R; Lambregts, P C; Wiarda, K S

    1990-03-31

    This case report concerns a patient with a vitamin B12 deficiency and a normal Schilling test, who had macrocytosis of many years' duration and finally polyneuropathy. All known causes of a vitamin B12 deficiency were excluded. When the Schilling test was performed with egg consumption, excretion of vitamin B12 was clearly diminished. It appears highly likely that this vitamin B12 deficiency developed as a result of malabsorption of protein-bound vitamin B12.

  18. Effect of vitamin B12-enriched thraustochytrids on the population growth of rotifers.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Yukino, Tsugiyo; Watanabe, Fumio; Miyamoto, Emi; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    2007-01-01

    Newly isolated thraustochytrids showed uptake of vitamin B12 from the culture into the cells. Cultivation of thraustochytrids in a medium containing 1 microg/ml of vitamin B12 greatly increased the contents of vitamin B12 in the cells. Similarly to Schizochytrium limacinum, odd numbered fatty acids decreased in the cells of new isolates cultivated with vitamin B12. Vitamin B12-enriched thraustochytrids, strain mh0186, enhanced the population growth of rotifers fed on the cells as sole feed.

  19. Effect of a Klamath algae product ("AFA-B12") on blood levels of vitamin B12 and homocysteine in vegan subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Luciana; Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Serena; Bonetto, Chiara; Pagliarani, Silvia; Benedetti, Yanina; Rocchi, Marco; Canestrari, Franco

    2009-03-01

    Vitamin B12 is a critical nutrient that is often inadequate in a plant-based (vegan) diet, thus the inclusion of a reliable vitamin B12 source in a vegan diet is recommended as essential. Unfortunately, many natural sources of vitamin B12 have been proven to contain biologically inactive vitamin B12 analogues, inadequate for human supplementation. The aim of this non-randomized open trial was to determine whether supplementation with a natural Klamath algae-based product ("AFA-B12", Aphanizomenon flos-aquae algae plus a proprietary mix of enzymes) could favorably affect the vitamin B12 status of a group of 15 vegan subjects. By assessing blood concentration of vitamin B12, folate, and more importantly homocysteine (Hcy, a reliable marker in vegans of their B12 absorption), the vitamin B12 status of the participants at the end of the 3-month intervention period, while receiving the Klamath-algae supplement (T2), was compared with their vitamin B12 status at the end of the 3-month control period (T1), when they were not receiving any supplement, having stopped taking their usual vitamin B12 supplement at the beginning of the study (T0). Compared to the control period, in the intervention period participants improved their vitamin B12 status, significantly reducing Hcy blood concentration (p=0.003). In conclusion, the Klamath algae product AFA-B12 appears to be, in a preliminary study, an adequate and reliable source of vitamin B12 in humans.

  20. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  1. Aspernigrins with anti-HIV-1 activities from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Fang, Wei; Tan, Suiyi; Lin, Xiuping; Xun, Tianrong; Yang, Bingjie; Liu, Shuwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-15

    Two new 2-benzylpyridin-4-one containing metabolites, aspernigrins C (3) and D (4), together with six known compounds (1, 2, and 5-8), were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus niger SCSIO Jcsw6F30. The structures of the new compounds were determined by NMR, MS, and optical rotation analyses. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities against infection with HIV-1 SF162 in TZM-bl cells. Malformin C (5) showed the strongest anti-HIV-1 activity with IC50 of 1.4±0.06μM (selectivity index, 11.4), meanwhile aspernigrin C (3) also exhibited potent activity with IC50 of 4.7±0.4μM (selectivity index, 7.5).

  2. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rai, Diwakar; Chen, Wenmin; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Hong; Tian, Ye; Liang, Xin; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-10-01

    A series of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives (Ia-Im and IIa-IIe) designed as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was synthesized via an expeditious route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activities in MT-4 cell cultures. All the synthesized compounds were structurally confirmed by spectral analyses. Biological results showed that three analogues displayed moderate inhibitory activity against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 replication with EC(50) values ranging from 16 to 22 μm. Molecular docking of compound Ih with wt HIV-1 RT was performed to understand the binding mode between these inhibitors and the wt HIV-1 RT and to rationalize some SARs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. 5,6-Dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine potentiates the anti-HIV-1 activity of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M; Heineman, Richard H; Beach, Lauren B; Martin, Jessica L; Schnettler, Erica K; Dapp, Michael J; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-11-15

    The nucleoside analog 5,6-dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (KP-1212) has been investigated as a first-in-class lethal mutagen of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Since a prodrug monotherapy did not reduce viral loads in Phase II clinical trials, we tested if ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (RNRIs) combined with KP-1212 would improve antiviral activity. KP-1212 potentiated the activity of gemcitabine and resveratrol and simultaneously increased the viral mutant frequency. G-to-C mutations predominated with the KP-1212-resveratrol combination. These observations represent the first demonstration of a mild anti-HIV-1 mutagen potentiating the antiretroviral activity of RNRIs and encourage the clinical translation of enhanced viral mutagenesis in treating HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the improved solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puneet; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-03-18

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been devastating with nearly 7400 new infections every day. Although, the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made a tremendous contribution in reducing the morbidity and mortality in developed countries, the situation in developing countries is still grim with millions of people being infected by