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Sample records for anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal

  1. Effects of SA237, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, on pre- and postnatal development in cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Ryuichi; Ishihara-Hattori, Kana; Frings, Werner; Amano, Jun; Fuchs, Antje; Chiba, Shuichi

    2017-07-03

    SA237 is a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody in which the constant and variable regions have been engineered for a longer plasma half-life. According to literature, blocking of IL-6 related functions could have an influence on pregnancy sustainment, development of the immune system, and brain growth. SA237 effects on dams, embryo-fetal development, parturition and postnatal development were investigated in an enhanced pre- and postnatal development study, in which SA237 was subcutaneously administered to pregnant cynomolgus monkeys at dose levels of 2 or 50 mg/kg once weekly from gestation day 20 until parturition. Infant development, including immune function and learning ability tests, was comprehensively assessed at multiple examinations until approximately 10 months after birth. SA237 plasma concentrations were almost equivalent between dams and their infants and dropped throughout the postnatal period, pharmacologically relevant exposure was maintained for 147 days after birth at 50 mg/kg. Because the binding of SA237 to IL-6R inhibited IL-6R-mediated clearance of IL-6, serum IL-6 increased in dams and infants. However, there were no SA237-related adverse effects on dams, embryos, fetuses, or infants. SA237 pharmacological effects contributed to the suppression of plasma cell differentiation and antibody production by inhibiting IL-6 signaling, and T cell-dependent antibody reaction was minimally suppressed in infants, but physiological immunoglobulin class switching and general antibody production against a T cell-dependent antigen were maintained. The exposure to SA237 did not adversely affect dams, embryo-fetal development, parturition, and postnatal development, including immune function and neuronal development. Birth Defects Research 109:843-856, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anti-interleukin 6 receptor therapy for hyper-IgD syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musters, Anne; Tak, Paul Peter; Baeten, Dominique L P; Tas, Sander W

    2015-10-29

    Hyper-IgD syndrome (HIDS) is a rare, severe hereditary autoinflammatory disease characterised by periodic fevers, elevated serum IgD levels and a wide range of symptoms. Although a few randomised controlled trials have been performed in this disorder, there are no straightforward treatment protocols and none of the potential therapies are registered for this indication. We report a case of a young woman with severe HIDS who failed numerous therapies. Eventually, rational treatment with a monoclonal anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody was initiated. This therapy resulted in an impressive clinical improvement and reduction in the number of hospital admissions per year. This case report underlines the difficulty of finding a suitable treatment for rare, severe inflammatory diseases. Furthermore, we show that treating patients with targeted therapies may result in clinical benefit for the patient, as well as simultaneously teach us more about the pathophysiology of these rare, relatively understudied diseases.

  3. Tocilizumab: A Novel Humanized Anti-Interleukin 6 Receptor Antibody for the Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Rieke

    2011-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ; RoActemra® or Actemra®) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that acts as an interleukin 6 (IL-6) receptor antagonist. For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), intravenous (IV) TCZ 8 mg/kg every 4 weeks has been approved since 2008 in Japan (where it is also approved for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis and Castleman's disease), and since 2009 in Europe in combination with methotrexate (MTX) for the treatment of moderate to severe active RA in adult patients with inadequate response to, or intolerance of, disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist therapy. It may also be administered as monotherapy in the same dose regimen in patients with methotrexate intolerance or with inadequate response to MTX. Since January 2011 in the United States, the indication for treatment with TCZ for RA patients with an inadequate response to one or more TNF antagonists was extended to patients with moderately to severely active RA, and the recommended starting dose is 4 mg/kg every 4 weeks, with an increase to 8 mg/kg based on clinical response. All of these approvals are based on the effectiveness and safety of the 8 mg/kg dose regimen when administered either as monotherapy or in combination with conventional DMARDs in well-designed clinical studies in adult patients with moderate to severe RA. TCZ at this dose is more effective than placebo, MTX or other DMARDs in reducing disease activity and improving health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). Although there were fewer responses with the 4 mg/kg dose, this dose every 4 weeks was not statistically different to 8 mg/kg when administered in combination with MTX, and this dose is the recommended starting dose in the US. Both doses have also been shown to inhibit structural joint damage in patients with an inadequate response to MTX. Thus, TCZ is an important new treatment option in patients with moderate to severe

  4. Three Cases of Previous Smokers with Rheumatoid Arthritis Who Did Not Respond to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors Were Treated Successfully with an Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of previous smokers who did not respond to TNF inhibitors but who responded successfully to an anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab (TCZ)). Case 1 is a 63-year-old woman whose smoking index was 200 and had been complaining of polyarthralgia since 1996. She started treatment with etanercept due to high disease activity, but her DAS28-CRP was 4.2. She was therefore switched to TCZ, which dramatically improved her symptoms; her DAS28-CRP had decreased to 2.1. Case 2 is a 64-year-old man whose smoking index was 1600 and had been complaining of polyarthralgia since 2006. Because his DAS28-CRP score increased over time to 5.9, etanercept and adalimumab were added sequentially, but he showed no response over the course of two years. The patient was therefore switched to TCZ, which dramatically improved his symptoms: his DAS28-CRP decreased to 2.7. Case 3 is a 48-year-old woman whose smoking index was 560 and had been complaining of pain in both knee joints since 2001. She was treated with adalimumab due to high disease activity but showed no response over the course of 1.5 years. The patient was therefore switched to TCZ, and her DAS28-CRP decreased to 1.8. An IL-6 blockade might be suitable for treating these 3 cases of previous smokers. PMID:25648415

  5. Effects of the anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kawashiri, Shin-ya; Kawakami, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Imazato, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Fujikawa, Keita; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Ida, Hiroaki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the effects of anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), on lipid metabolism. Nineteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), entered in clinical case-control study of SAMURAI trial at Sasebo Chuo Hospital, were examined. Nine patients received TCZ monotherapy at 8 mg/kg intravenously every 4 weeks (TCZ group) and 10 patients received conventional DMARDs (control group). Serum total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), apolipoprotein (Apo) A-1, Apo A-2 and Apo B as well as disease activity score (DAS), C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein were examined at baseline and after 3 months of the treatment. IL-6 inversely was correlated with LDL, Apo A-1 and Apo A-2, and also tended to correlate with Apo B. In TCZ group, serum levels of TC, HDL, LDL, Apo A-1 and Apo A-2 were significantly increased after 3 months treatment with TCZ. There was no significant change in Apo B, the atherogenic index, and TC/HDL by the TCZ treatment. Changes in the DAS28-ESR negatively correlated with those in TC. In one patient, whose serum level of TCZ was not detected after 3 months of the treatment, the absence of the increment in serum levels of Apo A-1 and A-2 in the patient was remarkable. All of the markers did not change during 3 months in control group. These data may raise an important issue to evaluate the impact of these alternations in lipid metabolism for longer periods in RA patients treated with TCZ.

  6. Successful treatment with humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab) in a case of AA amyloidosis complicated by familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Hamanoue, Satoshi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Mise, Koki; Hayami, Noriko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shuichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a well-known cause of secondary AA amyloidosis. Colchicine is generally considered to be the most effective treatment for FMF and FMF-associated amyloidosis, but the management of patients who are refractory to colchicine remains controversial. We encountered a 51-year-old Japanese man with suspected FMF, who had periodic fever with abdominal pain, polyarthritis, and nephropathy (serum creatinine of 1.9 mg/dL and 24-h protein excretion of 3.8 g). FMF was diagnosed by mutation analysis of the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene, which revealed that the patient was compound heterozygous for the marenostrin/pyrin variant E148Q/M694I. AA amyloidosis was diagnosed by renal and gastric biopsy. Colchicine was administered, but his arthritis persisted, and serum creatinine increased to 2.4 mg/dL. Therefore, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab) was administered at a dose of 8 mg/kg on a monthly basis. Both arthritis and abdominal pain subsided rapidly, and C-reactive protein (CRP) decreased from 2.5 to 0.0 mg/dL. After 2 years, his serum creatinine was decreased to 1.5 mg/dL and proteinuria was improved to 0.3 g daily. In addition, repeat gastric biopsy showed a marked decrease of AA amyloidosis. This case suggests that tocilizumab could be a new therapeutic option for patients with FMF-associated AA amyloidosis if colchicine is not effective.

  7. An Approach to Breast Cancer Immunotherapy: The Apoptotic Activity of Recombinant Anti-Interleukin-6 Monoclonal Antibodies in Intact Tumour Microenvironment of Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abou-Shousha, S; Moaaz, M; Sheta, M; Motawea, M A

    2016-06-01

    Current work is one of our comprehensive preclinical studies, a new approach to breast cancer (BC) immunotherapy through induction of tumour cell apoptosis. Tumour growth is not just a result of uncontrolled cell proliferation but also of reduced apoptosis. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with metastatic BC and correlated with poor survival as it promotes growth of tumour-initiating cells during early tumorigenesis protecting these cells from apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the potential of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies to suppress IL-6 proliferative/anti-apoptotic activities in intact tumour microenvironment of BC. Fresh sterile tumour and normal breast tissue specimens were taken from 50 female Egyptian patients with BC undergoing radical mastectomy. A unique tissue culture system designed to provide cells of each intact tumour/normal tissue sample with its proper microenvironment either supplemented or not with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the apoptotic activity of anti-IL-6 as a novel candidate for BC treatment strategy, we compared its effects with those obtained using tumour necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL as an established apoptotic agent. Our results revealed that levels of either anti-IL-6- or TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumour or normal tissue cultures were significantly higher than those in their corresponding untreated ones (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences have been found between apoptosis levels induced by anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and those induced by TRAIL. Recombinant anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies could represent a novel effective element of immunotherapeutic treatment strategy for BC. The selectivity and anti-apoptotic potential of anti-IL-6 is highly hopeful in IL-6- abundant BC tumour microenvironment.

  8. Sirukumab, a human anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody: a randomised, 2-part (proof-of-concept and dose-finding), phase II study in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Sheng, Shihong; Zhuang, Yanli; Hsu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The safety and efficacy of sirukumab, an anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in a 2-part, placebo-controlled phase II study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate therapy. Methods In Part A (proof-of-concept), 36 patients were randomised to placebo or sirukumab 100 mg every 2 weeks (q2w) through week 10, with crossover treatment during weeks 12–22. In Part B (dose finding), 151 patients were randomised to sirukumab (100 mg q2w, 100 mg q4w, 50 mg q4w, or 25 mg q4w) through week 24, or placebo through week 10 with crossover to sirukumab 100 mg q2w (weeks 12–24). The proportion of patients with an American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50) response and the change from baseline in the 28-joint count disease activity score using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) were determined. Safety was evaluated through week 38 in both parts. Results The primary endpoint (ACR50 at week 12 in Part B) was achieved only with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo (26.7% vs 3.3%; p=0.026). Greater improvements in mean DAS28-CRP at week 12 were observed with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo in Parts A (2.1 vs 0.6, p<0.001) and B (2.2 vs 1.1; p<0.001). The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar for sirukumab-treated and placebo-treated patients through week 12 in Part A (70.6% and 63.2%, respectively) and B (67.8% and 66.7%, respectively). Infections were the most common type of AE; one death occurred (Part B, sirukumab 100 mg q2w, brain aneurysm). Conclusions Sirukumab-treated patients experienced improvements in the signs/symptoms of RA. Safety results through 38 weeks were consistent with other IL-6 inhibitors. Trial registration number NCT00718718. PMID:24699939

  9. Anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody therapy favors adrenal androgen secretion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Härle, Peter; Yamana, Seizo; Matsuda, Takemasa; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2006-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were demonstrated to inhibit adrenal steroidogenesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and this was particularly evident in the increase in adrenal androgen levels during anti-TNF therapy. This study investigated the influence on steroidogenesis of an interleukin-6 (IL-6)-neutralizing strategy using IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibodies (referred to as MRA). In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized study over 12 weeks in 29 patients with RA being treated with prednisolone, 13 of whom received placebo and 16 of whom received 8 mg MRA/kg body weight, the effects of MRA on serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), estrone, and 17beta-estradiol, as well as their respective molar ratios, were determined. MRA therapy markedly improved clinical signs of inflammation (the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, swollen joint score, and Disease Activity Score in 28 joints). Serum levels of ACTH and cortisol and the molar ratio of cortisol to ACTH did not change. Although serum levels of DHEA and DHEAS remained stable during therapy, the DHEAS:DHEA molar ratio significantly decreased in treated patients (P = 0.048). Serum levels of ASD as well as the ASD:cortisol and ASD:17OHP molar ratios increased in MRA-treated patients (minimum P < 0.004). Serum levels of estrone and 17beta-estradiol did not change. but the estrone:ASD molar ratio (an indicator of aromatization) decreased during 12 weeks of MRA treatment (P = 0.001). Neutralization of IL-6 increases secretion of biologically active adrenal androgens in relation to that of precursor hormones and estrogens. This is another important indication that proinflammatory cytokines interfere with adrenal androgen steroidogenesis in patients with RA.

  10. Improvement of reduced serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shoko; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) patients during both the active and the remission phases to investigate how the growth cartilage turnover changed under tocilizumab treatment. Specimens were collected from 201 healthy children under 16 years of age with no growth impairment, and paired sera were collected from 11 sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. Disease activity was assessed from white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin, and the COMP concentration was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum COMP concentrations were found independent of age, and the mean value in healthy children was 17.74+/-5.6 U/L. The mean serum COMP in sJIA patients during the active phase was 10.75+/-3.9 U/L, lower than that of healthy children. The mean serum COMP in the remission phase (14.89+/-3.9 U/L) was significantly higher than that in the active period (P<0.05). These results suggested that in sJIA patients, a reduced serum COMP concentration is a useful marker of active disease and growth impairment, and that the growth cartilage turnover suppressed during the active phase is improved in the remission phase under tocilizumab treatment.

  11. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  12. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    PubMed

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  13. Beneficial Effects of Anti-Interleukin-6 Antibodies on Impaired Gastrointestinal Motility, Inflammation and Increased Colonic Permeability in a Murine Model of Sepsis Are Most Pronounced When Administered in a Preventive Setup

    PubMed Central

    Nullens, Sara; Staessens, Michael; Peleman, Cédric; Plaeke, Philip; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Francque, Sven; De Man, Joris G.; De Winter, Benedicte Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives During sepsis, gastrointestinal ileus, mucosal barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation are accepted to be important triggers that can maintain or exacerbate the septic state. In the caecal ligation and puncture animal model of sepsis, we demonstrated that systemic and colonic interleukin-6 levels are significantly increased coinciding with an impaired colonic barrier function. We therefore aimed to study the effect of therapeutic or curative administration of anti-IL6 antibodies on overall GI motility, colonic permeability and translocation of intestinal bacteria in blood and mesenteric lymph nodes in the mouse caecal ligation and puncture model. Methods OF-1 mice were randomized to either the preventive or curative protocol, in which they received 1 mg/kg of antibodies to interleukin-6, or its IgG isotype control solution. They subsequently underwent either the caecal ligation and puncture procedure, or sham-surgery. GI motility was assessed 48h following the procedure, as well as colonic permeability, serum and colon cytokines, colonic tight junction proteins at the mRNA level; cultures of blood and mesenteric lymph nodes were performed. Results Preventive administration of anti-interleukin-6 antibodies successfully counteracted the gastrointestinal motility disturbances and impaired colonic barrier function that could be observed in vehicle-treated septic animals. Serum and colonic levels of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly lower when animals were preventively treated with anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. A repetitive injection 24h later resulted in the most pronounced effects. Curative treatment significantly lowered systemic and colonic inflammation markers while the effects on transit and permeability were unfortunately no longer significant. Conclusions Caecal ligation and puncture resulted in septic ileus with an increased colonic permeability. Antibodies to interleukin-6 were able to ameliorate gastro

  14. Generation of monoclonal antibody targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galyna; Klymenko, Tetyana; Zhyvoloup, Olexandr; Gaman, Nadia; Volkova, Darija; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of FGFR3 signaling has been implicated with human pathologies, including cancer. Activating mutations in FGFR3 gene are frequently detected in bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, and noninvasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas, while the overexpression of the receptor is observed in thyroid lymphoma and bladder cancer. The main aim of this study was to generate hybridoma clones producing antibody that could specifically recognize FGFR3/S249C mutant, but not the wild-type FGFR. To achieve this, we used for immunization bacterially expressed fragment of FGFR3 corresponding to loops II-III of the extracellular domain (GST-His/FGFR3/S249C-LII-III), which possesses oncogenic mutation at Ser249 detected in at least 50% of bladder cancers. Primary ELISA screening allowed us to isolate several hybridoma clones that showed specificity towards FGFR3/S249C, but not FGFR3wt protein. Unfortunately, these clones were not stable during single-cell cloning and expansion and lost the ability to recognize specifically FGFR3/S249C. However, this study allowed us to generate several monoclonal antibodies specific towards both FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C recombinant proteins. Produced hybridomas secreted MAbs that were specific in Western blotting towards bacterially expressed FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C, as well as the full-length receptors ectopically expressed in Sf21 and HEK293 cells. Moreover, transiently expressed wild-type and oncogenic forms of FGFR were efficiently immunoprecipitated with selected antibodies from the lysates of infected Sf21 and transiently transfected HEK293. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR3 in normal and

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  16. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Myeloma: Targeting SLAMF7 and CD38.

    PubMed

    Lonial, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    The recent explosion of immune-based treatments for cancer has significantly impacted remission durations and overall survival for many diseases. Multiple myeloma is no exception to this trend, with several immune-based treatments including checkpoint blockade, cellular therapy, and most advanced now antibody-based treatment coming to fruition. While the use of monoclonal antibodies has been a significant interest in myeloma for some time, identifying the ideal target has been an issue. Given the dependence of plasma cells on interleukin 6 signaling for survival and proliferation, there were several trials testing both single agent and combination therapy effects of anti-interleukin 6 antibodies, which did not demonstrate significant clinical activity; however, more recent antibodies targeting receptors such as CD38 and SLAMF7 (previously known as CS1) are demonstrating significant clinical benefit. In this article, we briefly review the preclinical and clinical data surrounding these 2 important targets and the antibodies that clinically will be used as therapeutic agents in the context of multiple myeloma.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor raised by an autoantiidiotypic protocol and their relationship to monoclonal autoantibodies from Graves' patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.L.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1988-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to the TSH receptor were obtained by an autoantiidiotypic approach in which immunization of BALB/c mice was performed with mixtures of bovine (b) and human (h) TSH. Two of 28 positive wells were selected for cloning and characterization: D2 and 4G11. Their antiidiotypic character was evidenced by TSH-inhibitable binding to affinity-purified polyclonal anti-TSH. The specificity of D2 and 4G11 for the hormone-binding region of the TSH receptor was demonstrated by several findings: 1) they inhibited the binding of (125I)iodo-bTSH to receptor in a dose-dependent manner; 2) their binding to partially purified thyroid plasma membranes could be completely inhibited by bTSH and hTSH; and 3) they inhibited the TSH-dependent growth and adenylate cyclase stimulation in FRTL-5 cells in a dose-dependent manner. By Western blot analysis of bovine thyroid membranes, D2 bound to a polypeptide of 188,000-195,000 mol wt under nonreducing conditions and 54,000-59,000 mol wt after treatment of membranes with beta-mercaptoethanol; the 4G11 epitope was undetectable. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled antibodies to receptor showed that 4G11 bound to a single site with a Kd of 5.7 X 10(-9) M, whereas D2 showed complex binding characterized by high affinity (Kd = 1.74 X 10(-11) M) and low affinity (Kd = 1.3 X 10(-8) M) sites. Binding studies in which D2 and 4G11 competed with each other for the TSH receptor showed mutual but unequal inhibition. The data suggest that portions of the D2 and 4G11 epitopes overlap, but that there is a high affinity binding site(s) for D2 for which 4G11 competes less effectively. The binding of D2 and 4G11 to TSH receptor was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies secreted by Graves' heterohybridomas, showing that D2 and 4G11 share characteristics with autoantibodies of Graves' disease.

  19. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  20. Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Tocilizumab for Severe Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis Refractory to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy: A Multicenter Study of Twenty-Five Patients.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Santos-Gómez, Montserrat; Calvo, Inmaculada; González-Fernández, M Isabel; López-Montesinos, Berta; Mesquida, Marina; Adán, Alfredo; Hernández, María Victoria; Maíz, Olga; Atanes, Antonio; Bravo, Beatriz; Modesto, Consuelo; Díaz-Cordovés, Gisela; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Loricera, Javier; González-Vela, M C; Demetrio-Pablo, Rosalía; Hernández, J L; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ) for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. We conducted a multicenter study of patients with JIA-associated uveitis that was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents. We assessed 25 patients (21 female; 47 affected eyes) with a mean ± SD age of 18.5 ± 8.3 years. Uveitis was bilateral in 22 patients. Cystoid macular edema was present in 9 patients. Ocular sequelae found at initiation of TCZ included cataracts (n = 13), glaucoma (n = 7), synechiae (n = 10), band keratopathy (n = 12), maculopathy (n = 9), and amblyopia (n = 5). Before TCZ, patients had received corticosteroids, conventional immunosuppressive drugs, and biologic agents (median 2 [range 1-5]), including adalimumab (n = 24), etanercept (n = 8), infliximab (n = 7), abatacept (n = 6), rituximab (n = 2), anakinra (n = 1), and golimumab (n = 1). Patients received 8 mg/kg TCZ intravenously every 4 weeks in most cases. TCZ yielded rapid and maintained improvement in all ocular parameters. After 6 months of therapy, 79.2% of patients showed improvement in anterior chamber cell numbers, and 88.2% showed improvement after 1 year. Central macular thickness measured by optical coherence tomography in patients with cystoid macular edema decreased from a mean ± SD of 401.7 ± 86.8 μm to 259.1 ± 39.5 μm after 6 months of TCZ (P = 0.012). The best-corrected visual acuity increased from 0.56 ± 0.35 to 0.64 ± 0.32 (P < 0.01). After a median follow-up of 12 months, visual improvement persisted, and complete remission of uveitis was observed in 19 of 25 patients. Significant reduction in the prednisone dosage was also achieved. The main adverse effects were severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, pneumonia and then autoimmune anemia and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, and viral conjunctivitis and bullous impetigo in 1 patient. TCZ appears to be a useful therapy for severe refractory JIA-associated uveitis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Expression of CR2/EBV receptors on human thymocytes detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Lambris, J D

    1988-08-01

    The biologic effects of the third component of complement, C3, are mediated via receptors which specifically bind the enzymatic degradation products resulting from the cleavage of C3. One of the products, C3d, has been associated with binding to the second complement receptor CR2 (CD21). This receptor, which is identical to the receptor for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), has been primarily found on cells of the B lineage, but not on mature T cells or other cells of erythroid or myeloid lineages. In the present investigation, we report the presence of CR2 on human thymocytes. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis employing monoclonal anti-CR2 antibodies revealed a range of thymocyte reactivity from 15% to 63% in thirteen experiments using cells of different donors. Reactivity was always greater with the monoclonal anti-CR2 (CD21) antibody HB-5 than with two other antibodies which recognize distinct epitopes on the CR2 molecule. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the brightest of the HB-5-stained thymocytes also reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD1 antibody T6 (immature thymocyte marker) while some of the duller HB-5-staining cells reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody Leu-4 (mature thymocyte marker). Immunoprecipitation of CR2 on thymocytes with antibody HB-5 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis revealed a protein of 145 kDa molecular mass which is consistent with the size of CR2 found on B lymphocytes. These findings raise several questions regarding the biologic role of CR2-EBV receptor on cells of the T lineage.

  2. In vivo Therapy with Monoclonal Anti-I-A Antibody Suppresses Immune Responses to Acetylcholine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldor, Matthew K.; Sriram, Subramaniam; McDevitt, Hugh O.; Steinman, Lawrence

    1983-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to I-A gene products of the immune response gene complex attenuates both humoral and cellular responses to acetylcholine receptor and appears to suppress clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. This demonstrates that use of antibodies against immune response gene products that are associated with susceptibility to disease may be feasible for therapy in autoimmune conditions such as myasthenia gravis.

  3. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:28055305

  4. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor.

    PubMed

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Pramanick, Shreya; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-05

    Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery.

  5. Epitope map for a growth hormone receptor agonist monoclonal antibody, MAb 263.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Zheng, Yuan Zhi; Harris, Jonathan M; Brown, Richard; Waters, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 263 is a widely used monoclonal antibody that recognizes the extracellular domain (ECD) of the GH receptor. It has been shown to act as a GH agonist both in vitro and in vivo, and we report here that it must be divalent to exert its effect on the full-length receptor. To understand the mechanism of its agonist action, we have determined the precise epitope for this antibody using a novel random PCR mutagenesis approach together with expression screening in yeast. A library of 5200 clones of rabbit GH receptor ECD mutants were screened both with MAb 263 and with an anticarboxy-tag antibody to verify complete ECD expression. Sequencing for clones that expressed complete ECD but were not MAb 263 positive identified 20 epitope residues distributed in a discontinuous manner throughout the ECD. The major part of the epitope, as revealed after mapping onto the crystal structure model of the ECD molecule, was located on the side and upper portion of domain 1, particularly within the D-E strand disulfide loop 79-96. Molecular dynamics docking of an antibody of the same isotype as MAb 263 was used to dock the bivalent antibody to the 1528-A2 epitope and to visualize the likely consequences of MAb binding. The minimized model enables the antibody to grasp two receptors in a pincer-like movement from opposite sides, facilitating alignment of the receptor dimerization domains in a manner similar to, but not identical with, GH.

  6. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with the mouse interleukin 5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The rat mAbs R52.120 and R52.625 inhibit the action of IL-5 on both IL- 5-sensitive cell lines and freshly isolated splenic B lymphocytes. Neither antibody inhibits the proliferative cell responses promoted by IL-2, IL-3, or IL-4. Purified R52.120+ lymphoid spleen cells contain 15- 20-fold higher numbers of B lymphocytes responding to IL-5 in the form of maturation into antibody-producing cells. By immunofluorescence staining and flow fluorocytometry, the R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies bound to all 12 IL-5-sensitive cell lines tested. Both antibodies react with 2-4% cells in the spleen, 5% lymphoid cells, and 10-15% myeloid cells in the bone marrow, and 10-14% in the peritoneum of C57BL/6, DBA/2, and BALB/c adult mice. No positive cells for either antibody were detected in the thymus and lymph nodes of these mice. Both R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies specifically inhibit the binding of radiolabeled IL-5 to its receptor. Finally, R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies precipitate from 35S-methionine-labeled IL-5-R+ cell lysates three proteins with Mr 46,000, 130,000, and 140,000. Taken together from these results, we conclude that the R52.120 and R52.625 mAbs recognize epitopes on the IL-5-R complex very close or identical to the IL-5 binding sites. PMID:2469765

  8. A monoclonal antibody that blocks poliovirus attachment recognizes the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44.

    PubMed Central

    Shepley, M P; Racaniello, V R

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, AF3, was previously shown to specifically inhibit poliovirus binding to HeLa cells and to detect a 100-kDa glycoprotein only in cell lines and tissues permissive for poliovirus infection. These results suggested that the 100-kDa protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of poliomyelitis and the cellular function of the poliovirus receptor site. To study further the role of the 100-kDa protein in poliovirus attachment, immunoaffinity purification, amino acid sequencing, and cDNA cloning were undertaken. The results demonstrate that antibody AF3 reacts with the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44, a multifunctional cell surface glycoprotein involved in the homing of circulating lymphocytes to lymph nodes and the modulation of lymphocyte adhesion and activation. Antibody AF3 reacts with a subset of CD44 molecules (AF3CD44H), which appears to be a small fraction of the heterogeneously glycosylated CD44 molecules expressed on hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies, previously reported to induce CD44-mediated modulation of lymphocyte activation and adhesion, compete with 125I-AF3 in binding assays, demonstrating functional overlap among the epitopes. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody A3D8, which binds to a greater molecular weight range of CD44 than does AF3, inhibits poliovirus binding to a similar degree. CD44 does not act as a poliovirus receptor, since CD44-expressing mouse L-cell transformants did not bind poliovirus. The poliovirus receptor and AF3CD44H may be noncovalently associated, or they may interact through the cytoskeleton or signal transduction pathways. Images PMID:7508992

  9. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  10. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.O.; Ho, L.; Korn, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor ..beta.. subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor ..beta.. subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity by cross-linking receptor molecules.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R M; Soos, M A; Siddle, K

    1987-12-20

    The effect of monoclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies on the intrinsic kinase activity of solubilized receptor was investigated. Antibodies for six distinct epitopes stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity towards exogenous substrates. This effect of antibodies was seen only within a narrow concentration range and monovalent antibody fragments were ineffective. Evidence was obtained by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation for the formation of antibody-receptor complexes which involved both inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking, although stimulation of autophosphorylation appeared to be preferentially associated with the latter. There was partial additivity between the effects of insulin and antibodies in stimulating autophosphorylation, although the sites of phosphorylation appeared identical on two-dimensional peptide maps. Antibodies for two further epitopes failed to activate receptor kinase, but inhibited its stimulation by insulin. The effects of antibodies on kinase activity paralleled their metabolic effects on adipocytes, except for one antibody which was potently insulin-like in its metabolic effects, but which antagonized insulin stimulation of kinase activity. It is concluded that antibodies activate the receptor by cross-linking subunits rather than by reacting at specific epitopes. The ability of some antibodies to activate receptor may depend on receptor environment as well as the disposition of epitopes.

  12. Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein as the acute-phase reactant to detect systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis disease activity during anti-interleukin-6 blockade therapy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaki; Nakagishi, Yasuo; Inoue, Natsumi; Mizuta, Mao; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-09-01

    To assess the role of leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG) as a biomarker for monitoring systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) disease activity during interleukin (IL)-6 blockade treatment. We serially measured serum LRG levels in four s-JIA patients treated with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab and determined the correlation between clinical symptoms and other inflammatory biomarkers and proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-18, IL-6, neopterin, and tumor necrosis factor-α receptor type I and II. The serum levels of LRG and proinflammatory cytokines were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum LRG levels increased concomitantly with s-JIA disease flare-up and macrophage activation syndrome development. Furthermore, even in the clinically inactive phase, serum LRG levels were well above normal values. There were no correlations between serum LRG levels and indicators of s-JIA disease activity other than aspartate aminotransferase. There were significant positive correlations between serum LRG levels and proinflammatory cytokines. Serum LRG levels might be a unique and potential biomarker of s-JIA disease activity during IL-6 blockade treatment.

  13. Characterization of cell-surface receptors for monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T. )

    1990-10-15

    Monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF) is a lymphokine derived from murine T cell hybridoma. The target tissues are both LPS-stimulated B cells and Con A-stimulated T cells. Since the action of MNSF may be mediated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, we characterized the mode of this binding. The purified MNSF was labeled with {sup 125}I, using the Bolton-Hunter reagent. The labeled MNSF bound specifically to a single class of receptor (300 receptors per cell) on mitogen-stimulated murine B cells or T cells with an affinity of 16 pM at 24{degrees}C, in the presence of sodium azide. Competitive experiments showed that MNSF bound to the specific receptor and that the binding was not shared with IL2, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Various cell types were surveyed for the capacity to specifically bind {sup 125}I-MNSF. {sup 125}I-MNSF bound to MOPC-31C (a murine plasmacytoma line) and to EL4 (a murine T lymphoma line). The presence of specific binding correlates with the capacity of the cells to respond to MNSF. These data support the view that like other polypeptide hormones, the action of MNSF is mediated by specific cell surface membrane receptor protein. Identification of these receptors will provide insight into the apparently diverse activities of MNSF.

  14. Binding and regulation of cellular functions by monoclonal antibodies against human tumor necrosis factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to further characterize the interaction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors with different targets, and to assess their ability to influence TNF effects on U937 and human endothelial cell (HEC) functions. Actions of recombinant TNF-alpha on U937 and HEC were effectively inhibited by Htr-5 and Utr-1, and to a greater extent by a combination of both mAbs. These observations indicate that TNF interaction with antigenically different components of membrane receptors (p55 and p75) represents a crucial step in transduction of signals for TNF toxicity against U937 and TNF activation of HEC functions. PMID:2172437

  15. Aggregation of macrophages and fibroblasts is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the hyaluronate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.J.; Underhill, C.B. ); Tarone, G. )

    1988-10-01

    To examine the role of the hyaluronate receptor in cell to cell adhesion, the authors have employed the K-3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) which specifically binds to the hyaluronate receptor and blocks its ability to interact with hyaluronate. In the first set of experiments, they investigated the spontaneous aggregation of SV-3T3 cells, which involves two distinct mechanisms, one of which is dependent upon the presence of divalent cation and the other is independent. The divalent cation-independent aggregation was found to be completely inhibited by both intact and Fab fragments of the K-3 MAb. In contrast, the K-3 MAb had no effect on the divalent cation-dependent aggregation of cells. In a second set of experiments, we examined alveolar macrophages. The presence of hyaluronate receptors on alveolar macrophages was demonstrated by the fact that detergent extracts of these cells could bind ({sup 3})hyaluronate, and this binding was blocked by the K-3 MAb. Immunoblot analysis of alveolar macrophages showed that the hyaluronate receptor had a M{sub r} of 99,500, which is considerably larger than the 85,000 M{sub r} for that on BHK cells. When hyaluronate was added to suspensions of alveolar macrophages, the cells were induced to aggregate. This effect was inhibited by the K-3 MAb, suggesting that the hyaluronate-induced aggregation was mediated by the receptor.

  16. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  18. Efficient generation of a monoclonal antibody against the human C-type lectin receptor DCIR by targeting murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Heidkamp, Gordon F.; Neubert, Kirsten; Haertel, Eric; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Dudziak, Diana

    2010-01-01

    1. Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) are very important for the generation of long lasting immune responses against pathogens or the induction of anti-tumor responses. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells via monoclonal antibodies specific for DC cell surface receptors such as DEC205 was shown to elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo. Therefore we investigated whether this novel strategy might also be useful for the generation of new monoclonal antibodies against molecules of choice. We show, that by targeting the extracellular domain of the human C-type lectin receptor ClecSF6/DCIR/LLIR (hDCIR) to DEC205 on DCs in vivo, we were able to generate highly specific monoclonal antibodies against hDCIR. PMID:20566350

  19. A Fully Human Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody to the Wnt Receptor RYK

    PubMed Central

    Parish, Clare L.; Takano, Elena A.; Fox, Stephen; Layton, Daniel; Nice, Edouard; Stacker, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    RYK is an unusual member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that is classified as a putative pseudokinase. RYK regulates fundamental biological processes including cell differentiation, migration and target selection, axon outgrowth and pathfinding by transducing signals across the plasma membrane in response to the high affinity binding of Wnt family ligands to its extracellular Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF) domain. Here we report the generation and initial characterization of a fully human inhibitory monoclonal antibody to the human RYK WIF domain. From a naïve human single chain fragment variable (scFv) phage display library, we identified anti-RYK WIF domain–specific scFvs then screened for those that could compete with Wnt3a for binding. Production of a fully human IgG1κ from an inhibitory scFv yielded a monoclonal antibody that inhibits Wnt5a-responsive RYK function in a neurite outgrowth assay. This antibody will have immediate applications for modulating RYK function in a range of settings including development and adult homeostasis, with significant potential for therapeutic use in human pathologies. PMID:24058687

  20. Identification of endogenous opioid receptor components in rat brain using a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Bero, L.A.; Roy, S.; Lee, N.M.

    1988-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody generated against the tertiary structure of a partially purified opioid binding protein was used to probe the structure of the dynorphin and beta-endorphin receptors. The Fab fragment 3B4F11 inhibited completely the binding of 125I-beta-endorphin and (3H)dynorphin to rat brain P2 membranes with IC50 values of 26 ng/ml and 40 ng/ml, respectively. To explore further the interaction of 3B4F11 with the beta-endorphin receptor, the effect of the Fab fragment on 125I-beta-endorphin cross-linking to rat brain membranes was examined. 125I-beta-endorphin was covalently bound to three major species of approximate molecular weights 108,000, 73,000, and 49,000. The delta-selective ligand D-Pen2, D-pen5enkephalin was least effective at inhibiting the cross-linking of beta-endorphin, whereas the micro-selective ligand Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-NMe-Phe-Gly-ol and kappa-selective ligand U50488 inhibited beta-endorphin cross-linking to the 108,000 and 73,000 Da species. Both 3B4F11 and beta-endorphin prevented the covalent binding of 125I-beta-endorphin to all three labeled species. These findings suggest that micro and kappa receptor types might have some structural similarities, whereas the delta receptor type might differ in molecular size. In addition, the micro, kappa, and delta ligands might have different primary sequences, whereas their tertiary structures might share regions of molecular homology with all three receptor constituents labeled by 125I-beta-endorphin. 3B4F11 will be a valuable tool for the purification and isolation of the several components of the beta-endorphin receptor complex.

  1. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing the active conformation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ise, Nobuyuki; Omi, Kazuya; Miwa, Kyoko; Honda, Hideo; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Goishi, Katsutoshi

    2010-04-09

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for its function in cellular growth control. Although many antibodies against EGFR have been developed and used to analyze its regulation and function, it is not yet easy to analyze activated EGFR specifically. Activated EGFR has been mainly detected by its phosphorylation state using anti-phospho-EGFR and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. In the present study, we have established novel monoclonal antibodies which recognize the activated EGFR independently of its phosphorylation. Our antibodies detected active state of EGFR in immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, by recognizing the epitopes which are exposed through the conformational change induced by ligand-binding. Furthermore, we found that our antibodies preferentially detected the conformation of constitutively active EGFR mutants found in lung cancer cell lines. These results indicate that our antibodies may become novel research and diagnostic tools for detecting and analyzing the conformation of active EGFR in various cells and tissues.

  2. Characterization of alpha-conotoxin interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcom, J D; Stiles, B G

    1997-01-01

    The venoms of predatory marine cone snails, Conus species, contain numerous peptides and proteins with remarkably diverse pharmacological properties. One group of peptides are the alpha-conotoxins, which consist of 13-19 amino acids constrained by two disulphide bonds. A biologically active fluorescein derivative of Conus geographus alpha-conotoxin GI (FGI) was used in novel solution-phase-binding assays with purified Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and monoclonal antibodies developed against the toxin. The binding of FGI to nAchR or antibody had apparent dissociation constants of 10-100 nM. Structure-function studies with alpha-conotoxin GI analogues composed of a single disulphide loop revealed that different conformational restraints are necessary for effective toxin interactions with nAchR or antibodies. PMID:9359860

  3. A natural anti-T-cell receptor monoclonal antibody protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Stark-Aroeira, Luiz

    2011-05-01

    The therapeutic potential of natural anti-T-cell receptor (TCR) antibodies is largely unknown. We investigated whether passive administration of C1-19, a novel natural anti-TCRVβ8 monoclonal antibody, could interfere with the development of EAE. Treatment with C1-19 prevented myelin basic protein (MBP)-induced EAE in Vβ8-sufficient B10.PL but not in Vβ8-deficient SJL mice. Furthermore, C1-19 reduced disease severity when administrated shortly after disease onset. These protective effects of C1-19 correlated with a Th2 bias of the cytokine response, in the absence of T-cell deletion or anergy. Together, these findings indicate that natural anti-TCR antibodies could function as therapeutic tools in autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit mammary prolactin receptors. Specific antibodies to the hormone binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, M.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-09-25

    Three monoclonal antibodies (M110, A82, and A917) were obtained by fusing myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with partially purified rabbit mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptors. All 3 antibodies were capable of complete inhibition of SVI-ovine prolactin (oPRL) binding to rabbit mammary PRL receptors in either particulate or soluble form. M110 showed slightly greater potency than oPRL in competing for SVI-oPRL binding. These antibodies also inhibited PRL binding to microsomal fractions from rabbit liver, kidney, adrenal, ovary, and pig mammary gland, although A82 showed poor inhibition in pig mammary gland. There was no cross-reaction of any of the 3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the other species tested: human (T-47D breast cancer cells) and rat (liver, ovary). In order to confirm that these antibodies are specific to the binding domain, antibodies were purified, iodinated, and binding characteristics were investigated. SVI-M110 and SVI-A82 binding was completely inhibited by lactogenic hormones, whereas nonlactogenic hormones did not cross-react. Competition of 125I-M110 by oPRL was comparable to that of SVI-oPRL by unlabeled oPRL, while SVI-A917 binding was only partially competed (30-60%) by lactogenic hormones. Tissue and species specificity of labeled antibody binding paralleled results of binding inhibition experiments using 125I-oPRL. In addition, A82 and A917 completely inhibited 125I-M110 binding. In contrast, 125I-A82 binding was stimulated by A917 and 125I-A917 binding was stimulated by A82.

  5. Monoclonal antibody immunohistochemistry of degenerative and renewal patterns in rabbit olfactory receptor neurons following unilateral olfactory bulbectomy.

    PubMed

    Onoda, N

    1988-09-01

    Degeneration and regeneration of olfactory receptor neurons were studied in adult rabbits by immunohistochemical procedures following unilateral olfactory bulbectomy. Staining patterns of the olfactory receptors of the lesioned side were compared with those of the intact side in the nasal septum at various postoperative periods (12h-6 months) following lesion. Monoclonal antibodies, produced against the rabbit olfactory bulb, were used as histochemical markers. A slight decrease in the number of olfactory receptor neurons occurred at 24 h after lesion. One monoclonal antibody 112D5 stained all receptor neurons including degenerating neurons, but the other 114G12 showed a rapid decrease in immunostaining so that 114G12-positive cells disappeared within 7 days after lesion. 114G12-positive cells reappeared at 4 weeks following lesion. By 3 months, 114G12-positive cells were arranged in a plane at the apical region of the superficial compartment of the receptor cell layer, suggesting a recapitulation of development pattern of the receptor neurons. Thereafter, the number of 114G12-positive cells increased progressively and the staining pattern of the olfactory epithelium was like that of control animals by 6 months. Monoclonal antibody 114G12 is thus the first marker that is not specific to olfactory neurons and can be used to characterize certain embryonic traits during the degeneration and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium in the adult mammal.

  6. A murine monoclonal antibody that binds N-terminal extracellular segment of human protease-activated receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Sangawa, Takeshi; Nogi, Terukazu; Takagi, Junichi

    2008-10-01

    Abstract A monoclonal antibody that recognizes native G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is generally difficult to obtain. Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a GPCR that plays an important role in platelet activation as a low-affinity thrombin receptor. By immunizing peptide corresponding to the N-terminal segment of human PAR4, we obtained a monoclonal antibody that recognizes cell surface expressed PAR4. Epitope mapping using a series of artificial fusion proteins that carry PAR4-derived peptide revealed that the recognition motif is fully contained within the 6-residue portion adjacent to the thrombin cleavage site. The antibody blocked PAR4 peptide cleavage by thrombin, suggesting its utility in the functional study of PAR4 signaling.

  7. The production and characterization of monoclonal anti-bodies directed against the GABA sub a /benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallombardo, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic techniques have indicated that several subunits exist which may combine to form a family a GABA{sub a} receptor subtypes. Further investigations of the localization, structure and function of these receptor subtypes will require the use of subunit specific probes. In order to develop immunochemical markers for the GABA{sub a} subunits mice were immunized with purified receptor and antibody secreting hybridomas were formed. From these hybridomas six monoclonal antibodies were derived. All six monoclonal antibodies recognized the purified receptor in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and immunoblotted to a 50kD protein in the purified preparation. The mAbs A2, B2, E9, and H10 specifically recognized a 50kD protein band from rat brain membranes which was shown by two-dimensional electrophoresis to be the receptor subunit identified by photolabeling. The mAbs D5 and F7 preferentially recognized unique proteins in addition to the 50kD subunit. A procedure was developed for using mAbs B2 and F7 to immunoprecipitate the benzodiazepine binding site from solubilized brain membranes. A competitive binding assay and an analysis of crossreactivity were combined to divide the six monoclonal antibodies into groups recognizing at least four district epitopes. The monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that the 50kD subunit can be phosphorylated and they were used to follow the development of this subunit in the neonatal rat. The antibodies were able to label immunoreactive proteins in rat astrocytes and in three nematode species. These proteins may be structurally related to subunits of the GABA{sub a} or acetylcholine receptor.

  8. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabelled nimotuzumab, a promising monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Barta, Pavel; Laznickova, Alice; Laznicek, Milan; Vera, Denis Rolando Beckford; Beran, Milos

    2013-05-15

    Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies with affinity towards tumour-associated antigens may enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment with targeted radiotherapy. The humanized antibody nimotuzumab represents a promising vector to deliver radioactivity to tumours overexpressing epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (ErbB1). We analysed the effect of radiolabelling nimotuzumab on its uptake in cancer cells and its biodistribution profile in preclinical experiments. Nimotuzumab was labelled with (131) I by oxidative iodination and with (177) Lu using nimotuzumab conjugates with two different chelators (DTPA and DOTA) and two different spacers (p-SCN-Bn and NHS). For the receptor studies, two cell lines (HaCaT and A431) were used. Biodistribution studies were performed in male Wistar rats. The choice of radiolabel and the manner of its attachment to nimotuzumab had little effect on the internalization of the antibody into ErbB1-expressing cell lines. However, the type of radiolabel, the way in which it was attached to nimotuzumab and the radiolabelling procedure, significantly affected the blood clearance, liver uptake and liver persistence of radiolabelled nimotuzumab. (131) I-nimotuzumab had the longest elimination half-life and the lowest radioactivity uptake in the liver. (177) Lu-labelled nimotuzumab exhibited a shorter elimination half-life, high radioactivity and long-term retention in the liver. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L.; Ornitz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  10. Characterization of a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) signaling system has been shown to play important roles in neoplasia. The IGF receptor type 1 (IGF-IR) is overexpressed in many types of solid and hematopoietic malignancies, and there is substantial experimental and clinical evidence that targeting IGF-IR is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. It has been previously reported that a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb), 4G11, blocked IGF-I binding to IGF-IR and downregulated the IGF-IR in MCF-7 cells. We cloned this antibody, constructed a human-mouse chimeric antibody, designated m590, and characterized it. The chimeric IgG1 m590 bound to cell-associated IGF-IR on NWT c43 stably transfected cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as efficiently as the parental murine antibody. Using purified IGF-IR extracellular domains, we found that both the chimeric m590 and the parental 4G11 antibodies bind to conformational epitopes on IGF-IR. Neither of these antibodies bound to the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain. Furthermore, IgG1 m590 blocked the binding of IGF-I and IGF-II to IGF-IR, and inhibited both IGF-I and IGF-II induced phosphorylation of IGF-IR in MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that m590 could be an useful antibody in diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as a research tool.

  11. Characterization of a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) signaling system has been shown to play important roles in neoplasia. The IGF receptor type 1 (IGF-IR) is overexpressed in many types of solid and hematopoietic malignancies, and there is substantial experimental and clinical evidence that targeting IGF-IR is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. It has been previously reported that a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb), 4G11, blocked IGF-I binding to IGF-IR and downregulated the IGF-IR in MCF-7 cells. We cloned this antibody, constructed a human-mouse chimeric antibody, designated m590, and characterized it. The chimeric IgG1 m590 bound to cell-associated IGF-IR on NWT c43 stably transfected cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as efficiently as the parental murine antibody. Using purified IGF-IR extracellular domains, we found that both the chimeric m590 and the parental 4G11 antibodies bind to conformational epitopes on IGF-IR. Neither of these antibodies bound to the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain. Furthermore, IgG1 m590 blocked the binding of IGF-I and IGF-II to IGF-IR, and inhibited both IGF-I and IGF-II induced phosphorylation of IGF-IR in MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that m590 could be an useful antibody in diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as a research tool. PMID:20065647

  12. Assessment of estrogen receptor-monoclonal antibody interaction by high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, D.W.; Wittliff, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    To define the interrelationships between the various isoforms of the estrogen receptors (ER), a monoclonal antibody-horse radish peroxidase conjugate H222 was used as a probe in conjunction with HPIEC (Synchrom AX-1000) and HPSEC (TSK-3000 SW Toyo Soda) columns. ER from breast tumors was assessed using (16..cap alpha..-/sup 125/I)-iodoestradiol-17..beta.. (3nM) +/-200 fold excess estradiol-17..beta.. and excess H222. When ER was analyzed by HPSEC (size and shape), with 400 mM KCl which caused the dissociation of ER into 4S isoforms, a shift in retension time to higher molecular weight species was seen. The H222 appeared to interact with most isoforms of ER. However, when ER was analyzed by HPIEC (surface charge) with H222, a shift in virtually all of the high salt (150mM) isoform to the flow-through was observed with only 46% shift in elution of the low salt (60-70mM) isoforms. H222 did not alter total ER binding capacity. These data suggest that H222 recognized discrete forms of the ER. Therefore, modification in the receptor may have occurred which masks or removes the antigenic determinant limiting the specificity of H222. These results indicate that H222 may be employed as a tool to elucidate the interrelationships between these ER species.

  13. Fc receptor-dependent mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakema, Jantine E; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies like treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have entered the arsenal of modern anticancer drugs. mAbs combine specificity with multiple effector functions that can lead to reduction of tumour burden. Direct mechanisms of action, including induction of apoptosis or growth inhibition, depend on the biology of the target antigen. Fc tails of mAbs have furthermore the potential to initiate complement-dependent lysis as well as immune effector cell-mediated tumour cell killing via binding to Fc receptors. Natural killer cells can induce apoptosis via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), whereas macrophages are able to phagocytose mAb-opsonized tumour cells (antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis; ADCP). Finally, neutrophils can induce non-apoptotic tumour cell death, especially in the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) antitumour mAbs. In spite of promising clinical successes in some malignancies, improvement of mAb immunotherapy is required to achieve overall complete remission in cancer patients. New strategies to enhance Fc receptor-mediated mechanisms of action or to overcome the immunosuppressive microenvironment of the tumour in mAb therapy of cancer are therefore currently being explored and will be addressed in this chapter.

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor: Studies examining synthesis, phosphorylation and degradation of the receptor using an anti-receptor monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, designated PR7212 (IgG1), has been developed with specifically recognizes a cell-surface receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The antibody recognizes an extracellular epitope of the receptor, demonstrated by its ability to bind to intact cells. Using this antibody I have detected three forms of the receptor of 180, 164, and 130 kDa. All three forms were detected by Western blot analysis of human dermal fiberblasts. Immunoprecipitates of {sup 32}P-labeled membrane extracts of human dermal fibroblasts demonstrate that phosphorylation of all three forms of the receptor is stimulated by PDGF. In addition, several smaller molecules were detected, ranging in size from 113 to 49 kDa, which are also phosphorylated in response to PDGF addition. These smaller molecules may be either PDGF receptor kinase substrates or partially degraded receptor. Only the 180 and the 164 kDa forms of the receptor are detectable from immunoprecipitates of soluble extracts of {sup 35}S-metabolically labeled cells. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that the 164 kDa form is a precursor of the 180 kDa molecule.

  15. Ligation of human Fc receptor like-2 by monoclonal antibodies down-regulates B-cell receptor-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ulivieri, Cristina; Amirghofran, Zahra; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling and its regulation through negative and positive regulators are critical for balancing B-cell response and function. Human Fc receptor like-2 (FCRL2), a member of the newly identified FCRL family, could influence B-cell signalling due to possession of both immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibitory motifs (ITAM and ITIM). Since the natural ligand of FCRL2 has not been identified, we generated FCRL2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and employed them to investigate the influence of FCRL2 stimulation on BCR signalling in an FCRL2-expressing B-cell line. Two anti-FCRL2 mAb-producing hybridoma clones (5A7-E7 and 3D8-G8) were selected. None of the mAbs displayed any cross-reactivity with the other members of the FCRL family including recombinant FCRL1, -3, -4 and -5, as tested by FACS and ELISA techniques. Engagement of the FCRL2 by these mAbs resulted in significant inhibition of BCR signalling mediators such as calcium mobilization and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk, p38 and Jnk. These findings indicate that the FCRL2 ITIM motifs are functional and the anti-FCRL2 mAbs may mimic the natural ligand of FCRL2 by induction of inhibitory signals in B cells. PMID:24797767

  16. Anti-IL-6 receptor antibody does not ameliorate radiation pneumonia in mice

    PubMed Central

    OGATA, TOSHIYUKI; YAMAZAKI, HIDEYA; TESHIMA, TERUKI; TSUCHIYA, TAKAHIRO; NISHIMOTO, NORIHIRO; MATSUURA, NARIAKI

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that early administration of monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (IL-6RA) does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a higher dose and longer course of IL-6RA treatment was effective in ameliorating radiation pneumonia. C57Bl/6J mice received thoracic irradiation of 12 Gy, and were intraperitoneally injected with the IL-6RA, namely MR16-1, or with control rat IgG 4 times, once immediately following exposure and then weekly from 1 to 3 weeks after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to analyze the plasma levels of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA). Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and by measuring wet lung weight. We observed marked upregulation of IL-6 in IL-6RA-treated mice compared to the IgG-treated control group, whereas IL-6RA did not increase the production of SAA in the group receiving irradiation. However, radiation pneumonia, as evaluated by H&E staining and lung weight showed no differences between the IL-6RA-treated mice and the controls. Long-term treatment with high-dose IL-6RA does not ameliorate radiation pneumonia. PMID:22984368

  17. Mapping surface structures of the human insulin receptor with monoclonal antibodies: localization of main immunogenic regions to the receptor kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D O; Roth, R A

    1986-03-25

    A panel of 37 monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor has been used to characterize the receptor's major antigenic regions and their relationship to receptor functions. Three antibodies recognized extracellular surface structures, including the insulin binding site and a region not associated with insulin binding. The remaining 34 monoclonal antibodies were directed against the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that four antigenic regions (beta 1, beta 2, beta 3, and beta 4) are found on this domain. Sixteen of the antibodies were found to be directed against beta 1, nine against beta 2, seven against beta 3, and two against beta 4. Antibodies to all four regions inhibited the receptor-associated protein kinase activity to some extent, although antibodies directed against the beta 2 region completely inhibited the kinase activity of the receptor both in the autophosphorylation reaction and in the phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, histone. Antibodies to the beta 2 region also did not recognize autophosphorylated receptor. In addition, antibodies to this same region recognized the receptor for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) as well as the insulin receptor. In contrast, antibodies to other cytoplasmic regions did not recognize the IGF-I receptor as well as the insulin receptor. These results indicate that the major immunogenic regions of the insulin receptor are located on the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit and are associated with the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the receptor. In addition, these results suggest that a portion of the insulin receptor is highly homologous to that of the IGF-I receptor.

  18. A monoclonal antibody to a synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein binds ligands of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Lozzi, L; Petreni, S; Spreafico, A; Neri, P; Bracci, L; Soldani, P

    1989-09-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins share a region of high homology (30-45 for neurotoxins and 190-203 for the glycoprotein) in the regions that are believed to be responsible for binding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Monoclonal antibodies raised to the 190-203 synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein were immobilized on a high performance affinity chromatography column and were able to bind neurotoxins. Toxins were displaced from the affinity column by elution at acidic pH and by affinity competition with acetylcholine at neutral pH. Furthermore, the affinity column proved to be useful for the purification of cholinergic ligands. Overall, these results indicate that the paratope of our monoclonal antibodies could behave as an 'internal image' of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor acetylcholine binding site.

  19. Radiosensitisation of U87MG brain tumours by anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Miqueli, A; Rolff, J; Lemm, M; Fichtner, I; Perez, R; Montero, E

    2009-01-01

    As epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be a radiation response modulator, HER inhibitors are regarded to act as potential radiosensitisers. Our study examined the role of nimotuzumab and cetuximab both, the two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to EGFR, as radiosensitisers in a murine glioma model in vivo. Co-administration of both the antibodies with radiation increased the radiosensitivity of U87MG, resulting in a significant delay of subcutaneous (s.c.) tumour growth. Furthermore, the addition of antibodies to the radiation decreased brain tumour sizes and is inhibited by 40–80% the increased tumour cell invasion provoked by radiotherapy, although promoted tumour cell apoptosis. Whereas nimotuzumab led to a reduction in the size of tumour blood vessels and proliferating cells in s.c. tumours, cetuximab had no significant antiangiogenic nor antiproliferative activity. In contrast, cetuximab induced a more marked inhibition of EGFR downstream signalling compared with nimotuzumab. Moreover, both antibodies reduced the total number of radioresistant CD133+ cancer stem cells (CSCs). These results were encouraging, and showed the superiority of combined treatment of mAbs to EGFR and radiation over each single therapy against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), confirming the role of these drugs as radiosensitisers in human GBM. In addition, we first showed the ability of mAb specifics against EGFR to target radioresistant glioma CSC, supporting the potential use in patients. PMID:19293809

  20. Strategies to overcome resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2014-08-07

    Administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as cetuximab and panitumumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy substantially prolongs survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the efficacy of these mAbs is limited due to genetic variation among patients, in particular K-ras mutations. The discovery of K-ras mutation as a predictor of non-responsiveness to EGFR mAb therapy has caused a major change in the treatment of mCRC. Drugs that inhibit transformation caused by oncogenic alterations of Ras and its downstream components such as BRAF, MEK and AKT seem to be promising cancer therapeutics as single agents or when given with EGFR inhibitors. Although multiple therapeutic strategies to overcome EGFR mAb-resistance are under investigation, our understanding of their mode of action is limited. Rational drug development based on stringent preclinical data, biomarker validation, and proper selection of patients is of paramount importance in the treatment of mCRC. In this review, we will discuss diverse approaches to overcome the problem of resistance to existing anti-EGFR therapies and potential future directions for cancer therapies related to the mutational status of genes associated with EGFR-Ras-ERK and PI3K signalings.

  1. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kajikawa, Masunori; Sugiura, Masahito; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Urano, Sakiko; Karasawa, Chigusa; Usami, Ihomi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Masuda, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    To create a new anti-tumor antibody, we conducted signal sequence trap by retrovirus-meditated expression method and identified coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR) as an appropriate target. We developed monoclonal antibodies against human CXADR and found that one antibody (6G10A) significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous as well as orthotopic xenografts of human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, 6G10A also inhibited other cancer xenografts expressing CXADR, such as pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown and overexpression of CXADR confirmed the dependence of its anti-tumor activity on CXADR expression. Our studies of its action demonstrated that 6G10A exerted its anti-tumor activity primarily through both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, 6G10A reacted with human tumor tissues, such as prostate, lung, and brain, each of which express CXADR. Although we need further evaluation of its reactivity and safety in human tissues, our results show that a novel anti-CXADR antibody may be a feasible candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28074864

  2. Monoclonal antibody production by receptor-mediated electrically induced cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Mathew M. S.; Tsong, Tian Yow; Conrad, Mary K.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Hester, Lynda D.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1984-08-01

    Fusion of myeloma cells and B lymphocytes to form hybridomas which produce monoclonal antibodies has been a major advance1-3, but the poor efficiency and randomness of viral or polyethylene glycol fusion techniques generally gives poor yields of specific, high affinity antibodies. High voltage electrical fields with dielectrophoresis to ensure cell alignment can fuse a limited number of cells under direct microscopic examination4-9, but it is not possible to identify B-cells destined to secrete relevant antibodies. However, B-cells express, on their surface, antigen receptor immunoglobulins of the same antigenic specificity as the secreted antibodies. Binding of antigen to surface immunoglobulins stimulates proliferation and differentiation of B-cells into plasma cells. Here we report the use of the selective, high affinity interaction of antigen with surface immunoglobulins on B-cells to facilitate a close adherence to myeloma cells. The antigen, covalently conjugated to avidin, binds to the surface immunoglobulins on B-cells. This B-cell-antigen-avidin complex binds to biotin covalently attached to the surface of myeloma cells. An intense electric field across a bulk cell suspension then produces selective fusion of cells in contact, that is, of myeloma cells with B-cells which make the appropriate antibody. We have used this technique with several antigens, and all resultant hybridomas secrete appropriate antibodies with very high affinity.

  3. Management of dermatologic toxicities associated with monoclonal antibody epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors: A case review

    PubMed Central

    Leporini, Christian; Saullo, Francesca; Filippelli, Gianfranco; Sorrentino, Antonio; Lucia, Maria; Perri, Gino; Gattuta, Gaetana La; Infusino, Stefania; Toscano, Rosa; Dima, Gianluca; Olivito, Virginia; Paletta, Laura; Bottoni, Ugo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs), cetuximab and panitumumab, represent an effective treatment option for patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC); furthermore, they are relatively devoid of systemic toxicities, which are commonly observed with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, the majority of patients treated with these monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), will experience dermatologic toxicities, most notably the papulopustular skin rash, which can impact quality-of-life and affect adherence to therapy. This paper reviews the most recent practices in the management of skin rash related to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mAbs, cetuximab and panitumumab, in the treatment of mCRC. Materials and Methods: We reviewed relevant literature regarding dermatologic toxicities associated with anti-EGFR mAbs in order to give important indications about prevention and reactive treatment of skin rash. Results: Two case reports were presented to show how skin rash could hamper mAb EGFRIs use in clinical practice, underscoring the need of implementing a comprehensive management strategy of skin toxicity in order to promote patients’ compliance with anti-EGFR therapy and maintain quality-of-life. Based on randomized data, recent guidelines established by the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer Skin Toxicity Study Group suggest that prophylactic use of oral doxycycline or minocycline reduces the risk and severity of skin rash, improving clinical outcomes. Conclusions: At the start of treatment with cetuximab and panitumumab, the proper patient education about the skin rash associated with these mAbs and the implementation of a pre-emptive, comprehensive skin toxicity program significantly contribute to improve adherence to therapy, optimize anti-EGFR therapy and maintain quality-of-life. PMID:24347989

  4. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  5. Topological analysis of the Escherichia coli ferrichrome-iron receptor by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Moeck, G S; Ratcliffe, M J; Coulton, J W

    1995-01-01

    Ferrichrome-iron transport in Escherichia coli is initiated by the outer membrane receptor FhuA. Thirty-five anti-FhuA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were isolated to examine the surface accessibility of FhuA sequences and their contribution to ligand binding. The determinants of 32 of the MAbs were mapped to eight distinct regions in the primary sequence of FhuA by immunoblotting against (i) five internal deletion FhuA proteins and (ii) four FhuA peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Two groups of MAbs bound to FhuA in outer membrane vesicles but not to intact cells, indicating that their determinants, located between residues 1 and 20 and 21 and 59, are exposed to the periplasm. One of the 28 strongly immunoblot-reactive MAbs bound to FhuA on intact cells in flow cytometry, indicating that its determinant, located between amino acids 321 and 381, is cell surface exposed. This MAb and four others which in flow cytometry bound to cells expressing FhuA were tested for the ability to block ligand binding. While no MAb inhibited growth promotion by ferrichrome or cell killing by microcin 25, some prevented killing by colicin M and were partially able to inhibit the inactivation of T5 phage. These data provide evidence for spatially distinct ligand binding sites on FhuA. The lack of surface reactivity of most of the immunoblot-reactive MAbs suggests that the majority of FhuA sequences which lie external to the outer membrane may adopt a tightly ordered organization with little accessible linear sequence. PMID:7592376

  6. Crystal structure of a TSH receptor monoclonal antibody: insight into Graves' disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Hubbard, Paul A; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Murali, Ramachandran; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit is more effective than the holoreceptor in inducing thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAb) that cause Graves' disease. A puzzling phenomenon is that 2 recombinant, eukaryotic forms of A-subunits (residues 22-289), termed active and inactive, are recognized mutually exclusively by pathogenic TSAb and mouse monoclonal antibody 3BD10, respectively. Understanding the structural difference between these TSHR A-subunit forms could provide insight into Graves' disease pathogenesis. The 3-dimensional structure of the active A-subunit (in complex with a human TSAb Fab, M22) is known, but the structural difference with inactive A-subunits is unknown. We solved the 3BD10 Fab 3-dimensional crystal structure. Guided by prior knowledge of a portion of its epitope, 3BD10 docked in silico with the known active TSHR-289 monomeric structure. Because both TSAb and 3BD10 recognize the active TSHR A-subunit monomer, this form of the molecule can be excluded as the basis for the active-inactive dichotomy, suggesting, instead a role for A-subunit quaternary structure. Indeed, in silico analysis revealed that M22, but not 3BD10, bound to a TSHR-289 trimer. In contrast, 3BD10, but not M22, bound to a TSHR-289 dimer. The validity of these models is supported experimentally by the temperature-dependent balance between active and inactive TSHR-289. In summary, we provide evidence for a structural basis to explain the conformational heterogeneity of TSHR A-subunits (TSHR-289). The pathophysiologic importance of these findings is that affinity maturation of pathogenic TSAb in Graves' disease is likely to involve a trimer of the shed TSHR A-subunit.

  7. Development of humanized rabbit monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 with potential antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanlan; Lee, Pierre; Ke, Yaohuang; Zhang, Yongke; Chen, Jungang; Dai, Jihong; Li, Mingzhen; Zhu, Weimin; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2013-07-05

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) plays a critical role in physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis through its receptors especially through VEGFR2. The lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human VEGFR2/mouse Flk-1 is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. In this study, using a unique hybridoma technique, we generated a panel of 30 neutralization anti-VEGFR2 rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs) either blocking VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction or inhibiting VEGF-stimulated VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. Among 18 RabMAbs with human/mouse VEGFR2 cross-reactivity, we humanized one lead candidate RabMAb by Mutational Lineage Guided (MLG) method and further demonstrated its potent inhibition of tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. Our study suggests that RabMAbs are highly relevant for therapeutic applications.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to insulin and to the insulin receptor (anti-ID) modify the morphologies of insulin crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markman, Ofer; Elias, Dana; Addadi, Lia; Cohen, Irun R.; Berkovitch-Yellin, Ziva

    1992-08-01

    Crystallization of bovine and porcine insulin in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) yielded crystals of morphologies which differed from that of insulin crystals grown without the antibodies in solution. The anti-insulin monoclonal antibody ID 7 induced the formation of square plates. The anti-receptor antibodies 312 and A-40 induced deposition of crystals with totally different habit, polar prisms. Four other control mAbs did not have any morphological effect. Systematic work on the growth of crystals of organic and inorganic molecules has shown that morphological modifications, induced when crystals are grown in the presence of selected additives, originate from stereoselective interactions of the additives with the growing crystal faces. The induced morphological modifications can serve as a sensitive tool for the study of these interactions.

  9. Effects of a monoclonal anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody on the avian end-plate.

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, R A; Nelson, D J; Richman, D P

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 370 and 132A on miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) and end-plate currents (EPCs) in the posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of adult chickens were investigated. 2. After incubation of the electrophysiological preparation with mAb 370 (5-50 micrograms/ml), which blocks both agonist (carbamylcholine) and alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) binding and induces a hyperacute form of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), MEPP and EPC amplitudes were irreversibly reduced. 3. This effect was not associated with any significant change in the time constant describing EPC decay (tau EPC), current reversal potential, or the voltage dependence of tau EPC. The tau EPC at -80 mV was 5.9 +/- 0.6 ms before incubation with mAb 370 (50 micrograms/ml) and 6.0 +/- 0.9 ms afterwards. Current reversal potential was -3.9 +/- 0.4 mV before mAb incubation and -4.8 +/- 1.5 mV afterwards. The change in membrane potential required to produce an e-fold change in tau EPC was 128 +/- 2.3 mV before antibody incubation compared to 125 +/- 6.6 mV after incubation. 4. A second anti-AChR mAb, 132A (50 micrograms/ml), which is capable of inducing the classically described form of EAMG without blocking agonist or alpha-BTX binding, or inducing hyperacute EAMG, produced no significant change in MEPP amplitude, EPC amplitude, tau EPC or EPC reversal potentials. 5. The mAb 370 (50 micrograms/ml) induced a partially reversible decrease of the quantal content of the neurally evoked end-plate potential (EPP). This effect was not observed with mAb 132A, (+)tubocurarine (10(-7)-10(-5) g/ml) or an irrelevant anti-oestrogen receptor mAb. 6. These data suggest that the rapid onset of weakness observed in chicken hatchlings after the injection of mAb 370 (Gomez & Richman, 1983) can be attributed to a combined effect of a block of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion channel activity in the postsynaptic membrane and a reduction of

  10. Nimotuzumab, a novel monoclonal antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Masayuki; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer, and several therapeutic agents that target this receptor, including EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies to EGFR, have been developed. Such monoclonal antibodies have shown efficacy in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nimotuzumab (h-R3) is a humanized monoclonal antibody to EGFR, and its effects in combination with radiation have been sufficiently promising to warrant further investigation in several types of cancer. Furthermore, the typical severe dermatologic toxicities associated with other monoclonal antibodies to EGFR have not been observed with nimotuzumab. We here summarize the results of preclinical studies as well as of previous and ongoing clinical trials of nimotuzumab for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:28210119

  11. Monoclonal antibody-induced ErbB3 receptor internalization and degradation inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Belleudi, Francesca; Marra, Emanuele; Mazzetta, Francesca; Fattore, Luigi; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Rita; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2012-04-01

    Members of the ErbB receptor family are targets of a growing numbers of small molecules and monoclonal antibodies inhibitors currently under development for the treatment of cancer. Although historical efforts have been directed against ErbB1 (EGFR) and ErbB2 (HER2/neu), emerging evidences have pointed to ErbB3 as a key node in the activation of proliferation/survival pathways from the ErbB receptor family and have fueled enthusiasm toward the clinical development of anti-ErbB3 agents. In this study, we have evaluated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a set of three recently generated anti-human ErbB3 monoclonals, A2, A3 and A4, in human primary melanoma cells. We show that in melanoma cells expressing ErbB1, ErbB3 and ErbB4 but not ErbB2 receptor ligands activate the PI3K/AKT pathway, and this leads to increased cell proliferation and migration. While antibodies A3 and A4 are able to potently inhibit ligand-induced signaling, proliferation and migration, antibody A2 is unable to exert this effect. In attempt to understand the mechanism of action and the basis of this different behavior, we demonstrate, through a series of combined approaches, that antibody efficacy strongly correlates with antibody-induced receptor internalization, degradation and inhibition of receptor recycling to the cell surface. Finally, fine epitope mapping studies through a peptide array show that inhibiting vs. non-inhibiting antibodies have a dramatically different mode of binding to the to the receptor extracellular domain. Our study confirms the key role of ErbB3 and points to exploitation of novel combination therapies for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  12. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 and Blocking Antireceptor Monoclonal Antibody Bind to the N-Terminal Domain of Cellular Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dveksler, Gabriela S.; Pensiero, Michael N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Basile, Alexis A.; Elia, Patrick E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    1993-03-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody.

  13. Mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 and blocking antireceptor monoclonal antibody bind to the N-terminal domain of cellular receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Dveksler, G S; Pensiero, M N; Dieffenbach, C W; Cardellichio, C B; Basile, A A; Elia, P E; Holmes, K V

    1993-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8383324

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of monoclonal antibodies to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in chick midbrain.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, L W; Lindstrom, J; Tzartos, S; Schmued, L C; O'Leary, D D; Cowan, W M

    1983-01-01

    We used the indirect immunofluorescence method to determine the crossreactivity of a library of 57 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each of the subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAcChoR) isolated from Torpedo and Electrophorus electric organs or from fetal calf and human muscle, with specific neural elements in the midbrain of the chick. Out of 17 mAbs that recognized motor end plates on chick muscle, 14 produced a similar pattern of labeling in the midbrain: the neuronal perikarya and dendrites in the lateral spiriform nucleus (SpL) were intensely labeled, and there was moderate labeling of fibers in certain of the deeper layers of the optic tectum, which disappeared after the SpL was destroyed electrolytically. Two lines of evidence suggest that the mAbs may be crossreacting with nAcChoRs in the midbrain. First, all of the mAbs that stained the SpL also stained neuromuscular junctions in skeletal muscle, whereas none of the 40 mAbs that failed to stain end plates crossreacted with the SpL; second, in vitro immunological studies and blocking experiments on tissue sections (in which unlabeled mAbs were used to block the staining of a directly fluorescein-treated mAb) indicated the presence of mAbs specific for unique antigenic determinants on all four of the subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) from Torpedo nAcChoR in chick midbrain and muscle. On the other hand, the distribution of mAb staining in the optic tectum does not closely parallel that of either acetylcholinesterase staining or of 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin binding; no toxin binding has been observed autoradiographically in the SpL, but the nucleus does contain moderately dense acetylcholinesterase staining. Take together, our observations suggest that there may be a cholinergic input to the SpL and that the projection fibers from the SpL to the optic tectum (which are also stained with an antiserum to [Leu]enkephalin) may contain presynaptic nAcChoRs. It is clear, however

  15. Novel Monoclonal Antibody Directed at the Receptor Binding Site on the Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus Env Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Delos, Sue E.; Accavitti, Mary Ann; White, Judith M.; Hunter, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We report here on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) subgroup A Env that will be useful in functional and structural analysis of RSV Env, as well as in approaches employing the RCAS/Tva system for gene targeting. BALB/c mice were primed and given boosters twice with EnvA-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. Resulting hybridomas were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against RCANBP virions and SU-A-immunoglobulin G immunoadhesin. One highly reactive hybridoma clone, mc8C5, was subcloned and tested in immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation (IP), and Western blotting assays. In all three assays, mc8C5-4 subgroup-specifically recognizes SR-A Env, through the SU domain, expressed from different vectors in both avian and mammalian cells. This multifunctionality is notable for a mouse monoclonal. We furthermore observed a preference for binding to terminally glycosylated Env over core-glycosylated Env precursor in IPs, suggesting that the epitope is at least partially conformational and dependent on glycosylation. Most importantly, we found mc8C5-4 inhibited Env function: in vitro, the monoclonal not only interferes with binding of the EnvA receptor, Tva, but it also blocks the Tva-induced conformational change required for activation of the fusion peptide, without inducing that change itself. Infection of Tva-expressing avian or mammalian cells by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) or EnvA-pseudotyped murine leukemia virus, respectively, is efficiently inhibited by mc8C5-4. The apparent interference of the monoclonal with the EnvA-Tva complex formation suggests that the epitope seen by mc8C5 overlaps with the receptor binding site. This is supported by the observation that mutations of basic residues in hr2 or of the downstream glycosylation site, which both impair Tva-binding to EnvA, have similar effects on the binding of mc8C5. Thus, anti-ASLV-SU-A mc8C5-4 proves to be a unique new immunoreagent that targets

  16. Human monoclonal antibodies to the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibit receptor activation and tumor growth in preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Runnels, Herbert A; Arbuckle, J Alan; Bailey, Karen S; Nicastro, Peter J; Sun, Duo; Pegg, Jodi A; Meyer, Debra M; Evans, Michelle; Bono, Christine P; Lie, Wen-Rong; Moffat, Mark A; Casperson, Gerald F; Lennard, Simon; Elvin, John; Vaughan, Tristan; Smith, Christine E; Morton, Phillip A

    2010-07-01

    The insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1) receptor contributes importantly to transformation and survival of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo, and selective antagonists of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) activity represent an attractive experimental approach for human cancer therapy. Using a phage display library, we identified several high-affinity fully human monoclonal antibodies with inhibitory activity against both human and rodent IGF.1Rs. These candidate therapeutic antibodies recognized several distinct epitopes and effectively blocked ligand-mediated receptor signal transduction and cellular proliferation in vitro. They also induced IGF-1R downregulation and catabolism following antibody-mediated endocytosis. These antibodies exhibited activity against human, primate, and rodent IGF-1Rs, and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of established human tumors in nude mice. These fully human antibodies therefore have the potential to provide an effective anti-tumor biological therapy in the human clinical setting.

  17. Characterization of Inhibitors and Monoclonal Antibodies That Modulate the Interaction between Plasmodium falciparum Adhesin PfRh4 with Its Erythrocyte Receptor Complement Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Harder, Markus J.; Kennedy, Alexander T.; Lin, Clara S.; Weir, Christopher; Cowman, Alan F.; Call, Melissa J.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Tham, Wai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites must invade red blood cells to survive within humans. Entry into red blood cells is governed by interactions between parasite adhesins and red blood cell receptors. Previously we identified that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein-like homologue 4 (PfRh4) binds to complement receptor 1 (CR1) to mediate entry of malaria parasites into human red blood cells. In this report we characterize a collection of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies and CR1 protein fragments that modulate the interaction between PfRh4 and CR1. We identify an anti-PfRh4 monoclonal that blocks PfRh4-CR1 interaction in vitro, inhibits PfRh4 binding to red blood cells, and as a result abolishes the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway in P. falciparum. Epitope mapping of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies identified distinct functional regions within PfRh4 involved in modulating its interaction with CR1. Furthermore, we designed a set of protein fragments based on extensive mutagenesis analyses of the PfRh4 binding site on CR1 and determined their interaction affinities using surface plasmon resonance. These CR1 protein fragments bind tightly to PfRh4 and also function as soluble inhibitors to block PfRh4 binding to red blood cells and to inhibit the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway. Our findings can aid future efforts in designing specific single epitope antibodies to block P. falciparum invasion via complement receptor 1. PMID:26324715

  18. Improved Glucose Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo by an Allosteric Monoclonal Antibody That Increases Insulin Receptor Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, John A.; Bhaskar, Vinay; Goldfine, Ira D.; Bedinger, Daniel H.; Lau, Angela; Michelson, Kristen; Gross, Lisa M.; Maddux, Betty A.; Kuan, Hua F.; Tran, Catarina; Lao, Llewelyn; Handa, Masahisa; Watson, Susan R.; Narasimha, Ajay J.; Zhu, Shirley; Levy, Raphael; Webster, Lynn; Wijesuriya, Sujeewa D.; Liu, Naichi; Wu, Xiaorong; Chemla-Vogel, David; Lee, Steve R.; Wong, Steve; Wilcock, Diane; White, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported studies of XMetA, an agonist antibody to the insulin receptor (INSR). We have now utilized phage display to identify XMetS, a novel monoclonal antibody to the INSR. Biophysical studies demonstrated that XMetS bound to the human and mouse INSR with picomolar affinity. Unlike monoclonal antibody XMetA, XMetS alone had little or no agonist effect on the INSR. However, XMetS was a strong positive allosteric modulator of the INSR that increased the binding affinity for insulin nearly 20-fold. XMetS potentiated insulin-stimulated INSR signaling ∼15-fold or greater including; autophosphorylation of the INSR, phosphorylation of Akt, a major enzyme in the metabolic pathway, and phosphorylation of Erk, a major enzyme in the growth pathway. The enhanced signaling effects of XMetS were more pronounced with Akt than with Erk. In cultured cells, XMetS also enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In contrast to its effects on the INSR, XMetS did not potentiate IGF-1 activation of the IGF-1 receptor. We studied the effect of XMetS treatment in two mouse models of insulin resistance and diabetes. The first was the diet induced obesity mouse, a hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant animal, and the second was the multi-low dose streptozotocin/high-fat diet mouse, an insulinopenic, insulin resistant animal. In both models, XMetS normalized fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In concert with its ability to potentiate insulin action at the INSR, XMetS reduced insulin and C-peptide levels in both mouse models. XMetS improved the response to exogenous insulin without causing hypoglycemia. These data indicate that an allosteric monoclonal antibody can be generated that markedly enhances the binding affinity of insulin to the INSR. These data also suggest that an INSR monoclonal antibody with these characteristics may have the potential to both improve glucose metabolism in insulinopenic type 2 diabetes mellitus and correct compensatory

  19. Internalization and Down-Regulation of the ALK Receptor in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Monoclonal Antibodies Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazot, Pierre; Cazes, Alex; Dingli, Florent; Degoutin, Joffrey; Irinopoulou, Théano; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Lombard, Bérangère; Loew, Damarys; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth Helen; Delattre, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the full length ALK receptor, with two hot spots at positions F1174 and R1275, have been characterized in sporadic cases of neuroblastoma. Here, we report similar basal patterns of ALK phosphorylation between the neuroblastoma IMR-32 cell line, which expresses only the wild-type receptor (ALKWT), and the SH-SY5Y cell line, which exhibits a heterozygous ALK F1174L mutation and expresses both ALKWT and ALKF1174L receptors. We demonstrate that this lack of detectable increased phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells is a result of intracellular retention and proteasomal degradation of the mutated receptor. As a consequence, in SH-SY5Y cells, plasma membrane appears strongly enriched for ALKWT whereas both ALKWT and ALKF1174L were present in intracellular compartments. We further explored ALK receptor trafficking by investigating the effect of agonist and antagonist mAb (monoclonal antibodies) on ALK internalization and down-regulation, either in SH-SY5Y cells or in cells expressing only ALKWT. We observe that treatment with agonist mAbs resulted in ALK internalization and lysosomal targeting for receptor degradation. In contrast, antagonist mAb induced ALK internalization and recycling to the plasma membrane. Importantly, we correlate this differential trafficking of ALK in response to mAb with the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl and ALK ubiquitylation only after agonist stimulation. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms regulating ALK trafficking and degradation, showing that various ALK receptor pools are regulated by proteasome or lysosome pathways according to their intracellular localization. PMID:22479414

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor monoclonal antibodies define the biological action of RU 38486 in intact B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, R G; Robertson, N M; Litwack, G

    1990-12-15

    The mechanism of action of the synthetic glucocorticoid antagonist, RU 38486, has yet to be completely elucidated. Although RU 38486 is a potent antiglucocorticoid in vivo, several studies have indicated that it has some agonist activities in vitro, such as high-affinity steroid binding to the receptor, activation, and DNA binding. Nevertheless, these in vitro postbinding events do not lead to any known gene expression. To understand the action of the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486, we studied glucocorticoid receptor localization on a mouse melanoma cell line (B16C3) by indirect immunofluorescent staining techniques, using monoclonal antibodies to the glucocorticoid receptor. Our data in intact cells suggest that, unlike glucocorticoid agonists such as triamcinolone acetonide, and similar to the glucocorticoid antagonist cortexolone, RU 38486-bound receptors do not translocate to the nucleus and hence do not allow for transcription of glucocorticoid-regulated genes to occur. Passage through the nuclear membrane may be a rate-limiting step in the action of glucocorticoid antagonists, and translocation may in itself be an important regulatory mechanism of steroid hormone action.

  1. A combination of in vitro techniques for efficient discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies against human CXC chemokine receptor-2 (CXCR2)

    PubMed Central

    Boshuizen, Ronald S; Marsden, Catherine; Turkstra, Johan; Rossant, Christine J; Slootstra, Jerry; Copley, Clive; Schwamborn, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of functional monoclonal antibodies against intractable GPCR targets. Results: Identification of structured peptides mimicking the ligand binding site, their use in panning to enrich for a population of binders, and the subsequent challenge of this population with receptor overexpressing cells leads to functional monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion: The combination of techniques provides a successful strategic approach for the development of functional monoclonal antibodies against CXCR2 in a relatively small campaign. Significance: The presented combination of techniques might be applicable for other, notoriously difficult, GPCR targets. Summary: The CXC chemokine receptor-2 (CXCR2) is a member of the large ‘family A’ of G-protein-coupled-receptors and is overexpressed in various types of cancer cells. CXCR2 is activated by binding of a number of ligands, including interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-related protein α (Gro-α). Monoclonal antibodies capable of blocking the ligand-receptor interaction are therefore of therapeutic interest; however, the development of biological active antibodies against highly structured GPCR proteins is challenging. Here we present a combination of techniques that improve the discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies against the native CXCR2 receptor. The IL-8 binding site of CXCR2 was identified by screening peptide libraries with the IL-8 ligand, and then reconstructed as soluble synthetic peptides. These peptides were used as antigens to probe an antibody fragment phage display library to obtain subpopulations binding to the IL-8 binding site of CXCR2. Further enrichment of the phage population was achieved by an additional selection round with CXCR2 overexpressing cells as a different antigen source. The scFvs from the CXCR2 specific phage clones were sequenced and converted into monoclonal antibodies. The obtained antibodies bound specifically to CXCR2 expressing cells and inhibited the IL-8 and Gro

  2. Reevaluation of sst₁ somatostatin receptor expression in human normal and neoplastic tissues using the novel rabbit monoclonal antibody UMB-7.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-05-10

    The somatostatin receptor 1 (sst1) is widely distributed throughout the body and is also present in neoplastic tissues. However, little is known about its precise tissue distribution, regulation and function, which may in part be due to the lack of specific monoclonal anti-sst1 antibodies. We have characterized the novel rabbit monoclonal anti-human sst1 antibody UMB-7 using sst1-expressing cells and human pituitary samples. The antibody was then used for immunohistochemical staining of a large panel of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissues. Western blot analyses of BON-1 cells and human pituitary revealed a broad band migrating at a molecular weight of 45,000-60,000. After enzymatic deglycosylation the size of this band decreased to a molecular weight of 45,000. UMB-7 yielded an efficient immunostaining of distinct cell populations in the human tissue samples with a predominance of plasma membrane staining, which was completely abolished by preadsorption of UMB-7 with its immunizing peptide. The sst1 receptor was detected in anterior pituitary, pancreatic islets, distal tubules, enteric ganglion cells and nerve fibers, chief cells of the gastric mucosa, macrophages and mast cells. In addition, sst1 was observed in pituitary adenomas, gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and pheochromocytoma as well as in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, gastric carcinomas, urinary bladder carcinomas and sarcomas. UMB-7 may prove of great value in the identification of sst1-expressing tumors during routine histopathological examinations. This may open up new routes for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a monoclonal anitbody to immuno-cytochemical analysis of the cellular localization of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dussossoy, D.; Carayon, P.; Feraut, D.

    1996-05-01

    Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) gene, monoclonal antibody (Mab 8D7) was produced against the C-terminal fragment of the receptor. Immunoblot experiments, performed against purified PBR, indicated that the antipeptide antibody recognized, under denaturing conditions, the corresponding amino acid sequence of the PBR. When mitochondrial membranes form PBR transfected yeast or from THP1 and U937 cells were used on immunoblot analysis, a high level of immunoreactivity was observed at 18 kDa, the PBR molecular mass deduced from cDNA, establishing the specificity of the antibody for the receptor. Moreover, binding experiments realized with intact mitochondria demonstrated that the immunogenic sequence was accessible to the antibody indicating that the C-terminal fragment of the PBR faces the cytosol. Using this Mab we developed a technique which allowed precise quantification of PBR density per cell. Furthermore, cellular localization studies by flow cytometric analysis and confocal microscopy on cell lines displaying different levels of PBR showed that Mab 8D7 was entirely colocalized with an antimitochondria Mab. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1c Ameliorates Obesity and Glucose Intolerance via Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Christopher J.; Ahnmark, Andrea; Admyre, Therese; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Irving, Lorraine; Keyes, Feenagh; Patterson, Laurel; Mumphrey, Michael B.; Bjursell, Mikael; Gorman, Tracy; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Buchanan, Andrew; Harrison, Paula; Vaughan, Tristan; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Lindén, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human FGFR1c (R1c mAb) that caused profound body weight and body fat loss in diet-induced obese mice due to decreased food intake (with energy expenditure unaltered), in turn improving glucose control. R1c mAb also caused weight loss in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin receptor-mutant db/db mice, and in mice lacking either the melanocortin 4 receptor or the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. In addition, R1c mAb did not change hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Agrp, Cart, Pomc, Npy, Crh, Mch, or Orexin, suggesting that R1c mAb could cause food intake inhibition and body weight loss via other mechanisms in the brain. Interestingly, peripherally administered R1c mAb accumulated in the median eminence, adjacent arcuate nucleus and in the circumventricular organs where it activated the early response gene c-Fos. As a plausible mechanism and coinciding with the initiation of food intake suppression, R1c mAb induced hypothalamic expression levels of the cytokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and 3 and ERK1/2 and p70 S6 kinase 1 activation. PMID:25427253

  5. Impact on monoclonal antibody production in murine hybridoma cell cultures of adenosine receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Geoffrey F; Kazi, Shahid A; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    The effects of different adenosine receptor antagonists and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer and cell viability of murine hybridoma cells in culture were measured as part of our investigations to discover additives that enhance mAb production. Specific adenosine receptor antagonists and PDE inhibitors were found to enhance or decrease the titer of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) mAbs relative to negative controls, depending on the specific compound and cell line employed. The observed enhancements or decreases in IgG1 mAb titer appeared to be mainly due to an increase or decrease in specific productivity rates (ngmAb/cell), respectively. The different effects of the selective adenosine antagonists suggest that antagonism at the level of the adenosine A2A and A1 or the adenosine A3 receptors result in either enhancement or suppression of IgG1 mAb production by hybridoma cells. Overall, these studies have identified hitherto unknown activities of specific adenosine antagonists and PDE inhibitors which indicate they may have valuable roles as cell culture additives in industrial biomanufacturing processes designed to enhance the yields of mAbs or other recombinant proteins produced by mammalian cell culture procedures.

  6. Epitope mapping of anti-human transferrin monoclonal antibodies: potential uses for transferrin-transferrin receptor interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; García, Darién; Guirola, Osmany; Huerta, Vivian; García, Yanet; Muñoz, Yasmiana

    2008-01-01

    Human transferrin (hTf) is an 80 kDa glycoprotein involved in iron transport from the absorption sites to the sites of storage and utilization. Additionally, transferrin also plays a relevant role as a bacteriostatic agent preventing uncontrolled bacterial growth in the host. In this work we describe a well-characterized Mabs panel in terms of precise epitope localization and estimate affinity for the two major hTf isoforms. We found at least four antigenic regions in the hTf molecule, narrowed down the interacting antigen residues within three of such regions, and located them on a molecular model of hTf. Two of the antigenic regions partially overlap with previously described transferrin-binding sites for both human receptor (antigenic region I: containing amino acid residues from Asp-69 to Asn-76 at the N-lobe) and bacterial receptors from two pathogenic species (antigenic region III: amino acid residues from Leu-665 to Ser-672 at the C-lobe). Hence, such monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) could be used as an additional tool for conformational studies and/or the characterization of the interaction between hTf and both types of receptor molecules.

  7. Cloning, characterization, and modeling of a monoclonal anti-human transferrin antibody that competes with the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Orlandini, M.; Santucci, A.; Tramontano, A.; Neri, P.; Oliviero, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we describe the isolation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against human serum transferrin (Tf) and the cloning and sequencing of its cDNA. The antibody competes with the transferrin receptor (TR) for binding to human Tf and is therefore expected to bind at or very close to a region of interaction between Tf and its receptor. From the deduced amino acid sequence, we constructed a 3-dimensional model of the variable domains of the antibody based on the canonical structure model for the hypervariable loops. The proposed structure of the antibody is a first step toward a more detailed characterization of the antibody-Tf complex and possibly toward a better understanding of the Tf interaction with its receptor. The model might prove useful in guiding site-directed mutagenesis studies, simplifying the experimental elucidation of the antibody structure, and in the use of automatic procedures to dock the interacting molecules as soon as structural information about the structure of the human Tf molecule will be available. PMID:7530542

  8. Monoclonal alloantibodies specific for the constant region of T cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We established three distinct monoclonal antibodies (7C5, 7D1; IgM and 6A4; IgG1) by the fusion of P3U1 and BALB/c (Igh-1a) spleen cells hyperimmunized with T cell blasts from the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) allotype congenic CB-20 (Igh-1b) mice. The 7C5 or 6A4 antibody reacts with the constant region determinants on the antigen-binding molecule (Ct) of the antigen-specific suppressor T cell factor (TsF) or augmenting T cell factor (TaF), respectively. The 7D1 antibody, however, recognizes the shared determinants on the Ct molecules of TsF and TaF. Genetic studies of determinants recognized by these monoclonal antibodies have also suggested that the distinct Ct molecules of TsF and TaF are encoded by two discrete genes linked to the Igh-1b genes, which are located on the right side of the variable genes of Igh on the 12th chromosome. By using the immunoadsorbent columns of 6A4 antibody and anti-I-Ab, TaF, in a manner similar to TsF, was demonstrated to be composed of two chains, i.e., the Ct molecules and the I-A-encoded products. Furthermore, the Ct-bearing molecules were shown to possess the antigen-binding moiety. PMID:6180121

  9. Novel immunohistochemical monoclonal antibody against rat B cell receptor Associated Protein 31 (BAP31).

    PubMed

    Song, Chaojun; Yan, Binyuan; Chen, Lihua; Li, Yongming; Wei, Yuying; Sun, Yuanjie; Yang, Angang; Yang, Kun; Jin, Boquan

    2009-10-01

    BAP31 is an evolutionarily conserved polytopic integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane implicated in regulating the export of selected membrane proteins from the ER to downstream compartments of the secretory pathway. BAP31 interacts with mIgD, cellubrevin, major histocompatibility complex class I, and BCL-2/BCL-X(L) and plays an important role in regulating the egress of these proteins and in apoptosis. Although BAP31 RNA is ubiquitous, the protein's anatomic localization in rat tissues has not been determined. This is partially because production of high affinity antibodies, especially monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for immunohistochemical staining, has lagged. To gain further insight into its possible functions, we generated a novel MAb specific for rat BAP31 in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry and localized BAP31 in some rat tissues. Immunoreactivity of BAP31 was prominent in fundic glands, colon, pancreatic acinuses, and liver but not in skeleton muscle and lung. Thus, successful production of rat BAP31 monoclonal antibodies provides a new powerful tool for investigation of BAP31 function in the rat model.

  10. Identification of the Single Immunodominant Region of the Native Human CC Chemokine Receptor 6 Recognized by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dorgham, Karim; Dejou, Cécile; Piesse, Christophe; Gorochov, Guy; Pène, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play an important role in cell trafficking and recruitment. The CCR6 chemokine receptor, selectively expressed on leukocyte populations, has been shown to play a deleterious role in the pathogenesis of various chronic inflammatory diseases and, as such, may constitute a prime target in the development of immunotherapeutic treatment. However, to date no neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for this chemokine receptor have been reported, whereas information on small molecules capable of interfering with the interaction of CCR6 and its ligands is scant. Here, we report the failure to generate neutralizing mouse mAbs specific for human (hu)CCR6. Immunization of mice with peptides mimicking extracellular domains, potentially involved in CCR6 function, failed to induce Abs reactive with the native receptor. Although the use of NIH-3T3 cells expressing huCCR6 resulted in the isolation of mAbs specific for this receptor, they were not able to block the interaction between huCCR6 and huCCL20. Investigation of the anti-huCCR6 mAbs generated in the present study, as well as those commercially available, show that all mAbs invariably recognize a unique, non-neutralizing, immunodominant region in the first part of its N-terminal domain. Together, these results indicate that the generation of potential neutralizing anti-huCCR6 mAbs in the mouse is unlikely to succeed and that alternative techniques, such as the use of other animal species for immunization, might constitute a better approach to generate such a potentially therapeutic tool for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:27336468

  11. Identification of the Single Immunodominant Region of the Native Human CC Chemokine Receptor 6 Recognized by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Dejou, Cécile; Piesse, Christophe; Gorochov, Guy; Pène, Jérôme; Yssel, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play an important role in cell trafficking and recruitment. The CCR6 chemokine receptor, selectively expressed on leukocyte populations, has been shown to play a deleterious role in the pathogenesis of various chronic inflammatory diseases and, as such, may constitute a prime target in the development of immunotherapeutic treatment. However, to date no neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for this chemokine receptor have been reported, whereas information on small molecules capable of interfering with the interaction of CCR6 and its ligands is scant. Here, we report the failure to generate neutralizing mouse mAbs specific for human (hu)CCR6. Immunization of mice with peptides mimicking extracellular domains, potentially involved in CCR6 function, failed to induce Abs reactive with the native receptor. Although the use of NIH-3T3 cells expressing huCCR6 resulted in the isolation of mAbs specific for this receptor, they were not able to block the interaction between huCCR6 and huCCL20. Investigation of the anti-huCCR6 mAbs generated in the present study, as well as those commercially available, show that all mAbs invariably recognize a unique, non-neutralizing, immunodominant region in the first part of its N-terminal domain. Together, these results indicate that the generation of potential neutralizing anti-huCCR6 mAbs in the mouse is unlikely to succeed and that alternative techniques, such as the use of other animal species for immunization, might constitute a better approach to generate such a potentially therapeutic tool for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  12. Binding-site analysis of opioid receptors using monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Structural relatedness between the variable region of anti-ligand antibodies and opioid binding sites allowed the generation of anti-idiotypic antibodies which recognized opioid receptors. The IgG{sub 3}k antibodies which bound to opioid receptors were obtained when an anti-morphine antiserum was the idiotype. Both antibodies bound to opioid receptors, but only one of these blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone. The antibody which did not inhibit the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone was itself displaced from the receptor by opioid ligands. The unique binding properties displayed by this antibody indicated that anti-idiotypic antibodies are not always a perfect image of the original ligand, and therefore may be more useful than typical ligands as probes for the receptor. An auto-anti-idiotypic technique was successfully used to obtain anti-opioid receptor antibodies. Another IgG{sub 3}k antibody that blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone to rat brain opioid receptors was obtained when a mouse was immunized with naloxone conjugated to bovine serum albumin. These data confirmed that an idiotype-anti-idiotype network which can generate an anti-receptor antibody normally functions when an opioid ligand is introduced into an animal in an immunogenic form.

  13. Photoimmunotherapy: comparative effectiveness of two monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Harada, Toshiko; Nakajima, Takahito; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-05-01

    Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two commonly available anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, for their effectiveness as PIT agents in EGFR positive tumor models. A photosensitizer, IR-700, conjugated to either cetuximab (cet-IR700) or panitumumab (pan-IR700), was evaluated using EGFR-expressing A431 and MDAMB468-luc cells in 2D- and 3D-culture. PIT was conducted with irradiation of NIR light after exposure of the sample or animal to each conjugate. In vivo PIT was performed with fractionated exposure of NIR light after injection of each agent into A431 xenografts or a MDAMB468-luc orthotopic tumor bearing model. Cet-IR700 and pan-IR700 bound with equal affinity to the cells in 2D-culture and penetrated equally into the 3D-spheroid, resulting in identical PIT cytotoxic effects in vitro. In contrast, in vivo anti-tumor effects of PIT with cet-IR700 were inferior to that of pan-IR700. Assessment of the biodistribution showed lower accumulation into the tumors and more rapid hepatic catabolism of cet-IR700 compared to pan-IR700. Although cet-IR700 and pan-IR700 showed identical in vitro characteristics, pan-IR700 showed better therapeutic tumor responses than cet-IR700 in in vivo mice models due to the prolonged retention of the conjugate in the circulation, suggesting that retention in the circulation is advantageous for tumor responses to PIT. These results suggest that the choice of monoclonal antibody in photosensitizer conjugates may influence the effectiveness of PIT.

  14. Photoimmunotherapy: Comparative effectiveness of two monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Harada, Toshiko; Nakajima, Takahito; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-01-01

    Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two commonly available anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, for their effectiveness as PIT agents in EGFR positive tumor models. A photosensitizer, IR-700, conjugated to either cetuximab (cet-IR700) orpanitumumab (pan-IR700), was evaluated using EGFR-expressing A431 and MDAMB468-luc cells in 2D- and 3D-culture. PIT was conducted with irradiation of NIR light after exposure of the sample or animal to each conjugate. In vivo PIT was performed with fractionated exposure of NIR light after injection of each agent into A431 xenografts or a MDAMB468-luc orthotopic tumor bearing model. Cet-IR700 and pan-IR700 bound with equal affinity to the cells in 2D-culture and penetrated equally into the 3D-spheroid, resulting in identical PIT cytotoxic effects in vitro. In contrast, in vivo anti-tumor effects of PIT with cet-IR700 were inferior to that of pan-IR700. Assessment of the biodistribution showed lower accumulation into the tumors and more rapid hepatic catabolism of cet-IR700 compared to pan-IR700. Although cet-IR700 and pan-IR700 showed identical in vitro characteristics, pan-IR700 showed better therapeutic tumor responses than cet-IR700 in in vivo mice models due to the prolonged retention of the conjugate in the circulation, suggesting that retention in the circulation is advantageous for tumor responses to PIT. These results suggest that the choice of monoclonal antibody in photosensitizer conjugates may influence the effectiveness of PIT. PMID:24508062

  15. Modulation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 Receptors by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shcherbatko, Anatoly; Foletti, Davide; Poulsen, Kris; Strop, Pavel; Zhu, Guoyun; Hasa-Moreno, Adela; Melton Witt, Jody; Loo, Carole; Krimm, Stellanie; Pios, Ariel; Yu, Jessica; Brown, Colleen; Lee, John K; Stroud, Robert; Rajpal, Arvind; Shelton, David

    2016-06-03

    Purinergic homomeric P2X3 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors are ligand-gated cation channels activated by ATP. Both receptors are predominantly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons, and an increase in extracellular ATP concentration under pathological conditions, such as tissue damage or visceral distension, induces channel opening, membrane depolarization, and initiation of pain signaling. Hence, these receptors are considered important therapeutic targets for pain management, and development of selective antagonists is currently progressing. To advance the search for novel analgesics, we have generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against human P2X3 (hP2X3). We have found that these antibodies produce distinct functional effects, depending on the homomeric or heteromeric composition of the target, its kinetic state, and the duration of antibody exposure. The most potent antibody, 12D4, showed an estimated IC50 of 16 nm on hP2X3 after short term exposure (up to 18 min), binding to the inactivated state of the channel to inhibit activity. By contrast, with the same short term application, 12D4 potentiated the slow inactivating current mediated by the heteromeric hP2X2/3 channel. Extending the duration of exposure to ∼20 h resulted in a profound inhibition of both homomeric hP2X3 and heteromeric hP2X2/3 receptors, an effect mediated by efficient antibody-induced internalization of the channel from the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of mAb12D4 was assessed in the formalin, complete Freund's adjuvant, and visceral pain models. The efficacy of 12D4 in the visceral hypersensitivity model indicates that antibodies against P2X3 may have therapeutic potential in visceral pain indications.

  16. Potential use of G protein-coupled receptor-blocking monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents for cancers.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is the fastest growing area of pharmaceutical development and has enjoyed significant clinical success since approval of the first mAb drug in1984. However, despite significant effort, there are still no approved therapeutic mAbs directed against the largest and most attractive family of drug targets: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs regulate essentially all cellular processes, including those that are fundamental to cancer pathology, such as proliferation, survival/drug resistance, migration, differentiation, tissue invasion, and angiogenesis. Many different GPCR isoforms are enhanced or dysregulated in multiple tumor types, and several GPCRs have known oncogenic activity. With approximately 350 distinct GPCRs in the genome, these receptors provide a rich landscape for the design of effective, targeted therapies for cancer, a uniquely heterogeneous disease family. While the generation of selective, efficacious mAbs has been problematic for these structurally complex integral membrane proteins, progress in the development of immunotherapeutics has been made by several independent groups. This chapter provides an overview of the roles of GPCRs in cancer and describes the current state of the art of GPCR-targeted mAb drugs.

  17. A phase I clinical trial with monoclonal antibody ch806 targeting transitional state and mutant epidermal growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew M.; Lee, Fook-Thean; Tebbutt, Niall; Herbertson, Rebecca; Gill, Sanjeev S.; Liu, Zhanqi; Skrinos, Effie; Murone, Carmel; Saunder, Timothy H.; Chappell, Bridget; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Poon, Aurora M. T.; Hopkins, Wendie; Smyth, Fiona E.; MacGregor, Duncan; Cher, Lawrence M.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Ritter, Gerd; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Murphy, Roger; Burgess, Antony W.; Hoffman, Eric W.; Johns, Terrance G.; Old, Lloyd J.

    2007-01-01

    An array of cell-surface antigens expressed by human cancers have been identified as targets for antibody-based therapies. The great majority of these antibodies do not have specificity for cancer but recognize antigens expressed on a range of normal cell types (differentiation antigens). Over the past two decades, our group has analyzed thousands of mouse monoclonal antibodies for cancer specificity and identified a battery of antibodies with limited representation on normal human cells. The most tumor-specific of these antibodies is 806, an antibody that detects a unique epitope on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that is exposed only on overexpressed, mutant, or ligand-activated forms of the receptor in cancer. In vitro immunohistochemical specificity analysis shows little or no detectable 806 reactivity with normal tissues, even those with high levels of wild-type (wt)EGFR expression. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that 806 specifically targets a subset of EGFR expressed on tumor cells, and has significant anti-tumor effects on human tumor xenografts, primarily through abrogation of signaling pathways. The present clinical study was designed to examine the in vivo specificity of a chimeric form of mAb 806 (ch806) in a tumor targeting/biodistribution/pharmacokinetic analysis in patients with diverse tumor types. ch806 showed excellent targeting of tumor sites in all patients, no evidence of normal tissue uptake, and no significant toxicity. These in vitro and in vivo characteristics of ch806 distinguish it from all other antibodies targeting EGFR. PMID:17360479

  18. Preparation of monoclonal antibody against celangulin V and immunolocalization of receptor in the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhijun; Xue, Xiaoping; Wu, Wenjun; Zhang, Jiwen; Yang, Runya

    2006-10-04

    The botanical insecticide celangulin V (CA-V) is an insect digestive poison acting on midgut tissue of the target insect larvae. With the aim of localizing the receptor enacted by CA-V, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the compound were developed. A hapten was synthesized by introducing a succinoyl into the CA-V structure and conjugated with three carrier proteins. From mice immunized with one conjugate, three MAbs were obtained with a potential capacity of detecting protein-bound residue forms of CA-V in the biological tissues. The oriental armyworm larvae ingested CA-V were examined by the technique of immuno-electron-microscopy (IEM) using the anti-CA-V MAb as the primary antibody and goat anti-mouse/IgG labeled with colloidal gold as the secondary antibody. Electron micrographs of the armyworm midgut tissues showed that the CA-V was associated with the midgut epithelia of the insects. These results demonstrated the existence of a receptor enacted by CA-V on the midgut cells of the oriental armyworm larvae.

  19. Internalization, Intracellular Trafficking, and Biodistribution of Monoclonal Antibody 806: A Novel Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Antibody12

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rushika M; Zoncu, Roberto; Johns, Terrance G; Pypaert, Marc; Lee, Fook-Thean; Mellman, Ira; Old, Lloyd J; Toomre, Derek K; Scott, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in epithelial tumors is associated with poor prognosis and is the target for a number of cancer therapeutics. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 806 is a novel anti-EGFR antibody with significant therapeutic efficacy in tumor models when used as a single agent, and displays synergistic antitumor activity in combination with other EGFR therapeutics. Unlike other EGFR antibodies, mAb 806 is selective for tumor cells and does not bind to normal tissue, making it an ideal candidate for generation of radioisotope or toxin conjugates. Ideally, antibodies suited to these therapeutic applications must bind to and actively internalize their cognate receptor. We investigated the intracellular trafficking of fluorescently tagged mAb 806 in live cells and analyzed its biodistribution in a tumor xenografted nude mouse model. Following binding to EGFR, mAb 806 was internalized through dynamin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Internalized mAb 806 localized to early endosomes and subsequently trafficked to and accumulation in lysosomal compartments. Furthermore, biodistribution analysis in nude mice showed specific uptake and retention of radiolabeled mAb 806 to human tumor xenografts. These results highlight the potential use of mAb 806 for generation of conjugates suitable for diagnostic and therapeutic use in patients with EGFR-positive malignancies. PMID:18084617

  20. Reassessment of sst(5) somatostatin receptor expression in normal and neoplastic human tissues using the novel rabbit monoclonal antibody UMB-4.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Hunder, Anna; Petrich, Aline; Nagel, Falko; Doll, Christian; Schulz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The frequent overexpression of somatostatin receptors (sst) in neuroendocrine tumors provides the molecular basis for the diagnostic and therapeutic application of stable somatostatin analogs. Whereas octreotide acts mainly via the sst(2) receptor, the novel pan-somatostatin analog pasireotide exhibits particular high affinity for the sst(5) receptor. To determine whether a patient is a candidate for octreotide or pasireotide therapy, it is important to evaluate the somatostatin receptor status. However, so far highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies have been developed for the sst(2) receptor only (clone UMB-1). Here, we have extensively characterized a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody for the human sst(5) receptor (clone UMB-4). In a comparative immunohistochemical study, the expression of sst(5) and sst(2) receptors was assessed using UMB-4 and UMB-1, respectively. Western blot experiments unequivocally demonstrated that UMB-4 selectively detected its cognate sst(5) receptor and did not cross-react with other proteins present in crude tissue homogenates. UMB-4 yielded a highly effective immunostaining of distinct cell populations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissues with a predominance of plasma membrane staining. In the pituitary, sst(5) was present on all growth hormone (GH)- and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-producing cells whereas sst(2) was only observed on a subpopulation of GH-positive cells. Consequently, sst(5) was detectable on the majority of GH and ACTH adenomas. In contrast, sst(2) was only seen on GH but not on ACTH adenomas. The rabbit monoclonal antibodies UMB-4 and UMB-1 will facilitate the assessment of the somatostatin receptor status of human tumors during routine histopathological examinations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Detect CD19-Specific T Cells in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:23469246

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+) tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  3. Humanized anti-interleukin-6-receptor antibody (tocilizumab) monotherapy is more effective in slowing radiographic progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at high baseline risk for structural damage evaluated with levels of biomarkers, radiography, and BMI: data from the SAMURAI study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Jun; Garnero, Patrick; van der Heijde, Désirée; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to assess the ability of tocilizumab monotherapy to reduce progressive structural joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis patients at high risk of progression. This study was a subanalysis from a prospective 1-year, multicenter, X-ray-reader-blinded, randomized controlled trial of tocilizumab [Study of Active Controlled Monotherapy Used for Rheumatoid Arthritis, an IL-6 Inhibitor (SAMURAI) trial]. All patients were categorized into two or three groups according to four independent predictive markers for progressive joint damage [urinary C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide (uCTX-II), urinary pyridinoline/deoxypyridinoline (uPYD/DPD) ratio, body mass index (BMI), and joint-space narrowing (JSN) score at baseline]. One-year progression of joint destruction was assessed in high-risk versus low-risk groups receiving tocilizumab monotherapy and compared with patients receiving conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (n = 157 and 145, respectively). In patients at high risk of progression of erosion as estimated by high uCTX-II, uPYD/DPD, or low BMI, and at high risk of progression of JSN as estimated by low BMI or high JSN score, the 52-week changes in radiological erosion and JSN, respectively, were significantly less in patients treated with tocilizumab monotherapy compared with those receiving DMARDs for each type of risk factor. In patients at low risk, those receiving tocilizumab also progressed less than those on DMARDs, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Tocilizumab monotherapy is more effective in reducing radiological progression in patients presenting with risk factors for rapid progression than in low-risk patients. Patients at high risk for progression may benefit more from tocilizumab treatment.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies and synthetic peptides define the active site of FcepsilonRI and a potential receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rigby, L J; Trist, H; Snider, J; Hulett, M D; Hogarth, P M; Rigby, L J; Epa, V C

    2000-07-01

    Defining the structure of the human high-affinity receptor for IgE, Fc,RI, is crucial to understand the receptor:ligand interaction, and to develop drugs to prevent IgE-dependent allergic diseases. To this end, a series of four anti-FcepsilonRI monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including three new mAbs, 47, 54, and 3B4, were used in conjunction with synthetic FcepsilonRI peptides to define functional regions of the Fc IgE-binding site and identify an antagonist of IgE binding. The spatial orientation of the epitopes detected by these antibodies and their relationship to the IgE-binding region of FcepsilonRI was defined by a homology model based on the closely related FcepsilonRIIa. Using recombinant soluble FcRI-alpha as well as FcepsilonRI-alpha expressed on the cell surface, a series of direct and competitive binding experiments indicated that the mAbs detected nonoverlapping epitopes. One antibody (15-1), previously thought to be located close to the IgE-binding site, was precisely mapped to a single loop within the IgE-binding site by both mutagenesis and overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing the entire extracellular domain. A synthetic peptide epsilonRI-11, containing the amino acids 101-120 and the mAb 15-1 epitope, inhibited IgE binding and may form the basis for the development of a useful receptor-based therapy.

  5. The synergistic effect of humanized monoclonal antibodies targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Ping; Cao, Hongxin; Meng, Long; Hu, Pingping; Ma, Honghai; Du, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    IGF-1R, an important member of the IGF signaling system, is a plasma-membrane-bound receptor composed of two α-subunits and two β-subunits. IGF-1R has been revealed to play a pivotal role in cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and phenotype transformation, resulting uncontrolled tumor-cell growth. During the last decades, IGF-1R monoclonal antibody combined with chemotherapeutic agents as a novel cancer treatment approach has shown synergistic effect in cancer treatment in some preclinical and clinical trials. Prolonged progression-free survival rate, objective response rate and stable disease were shown in some sorts of cancer patients compared to those implemented traditional standard chemotherapy. However, not all related clinical trials demonstrated expected promising outcomes. Most treatment-related adverse events in those studies are mild and manageable. The most frequently happened side effect is hyperglycemia in majorities of combined cancer therapy studies. Herein, we summarized the recent online and published literatures concerning the safety, tolerability, anti-tumor activity and adverse events of this novel strategy. Besides, this work attempts to provide convincible evidence to warrant further investigation to identify prognostic biomarkers on neoplasm.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  8. DNA versus protein immunisation for production of monoclonal antibodies against Choristoneura fumiferana ecdysone receptor (CfEcR).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Hui; Makhmoudova, Amina; Arif, Basil M; Feng, Qili; Retnakaran, Arthur; Palli, Subba Reddy; Krell, Peter J

    2006-04-12

    The full-length ecdysone receptor cDNA of Choristoneura fumiferana (CfEcR-B) was cloned into bacterial expression systems and the recombinant protein was expressed either with a His-tag (His-EcR-B) or glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion (GST-EcR-B). The His-EcR-B was expressed mostly as insoluble aggregates, while the GST-EcR-B was partially soluble and could be purified using affinity chromatography. Mice were then immunised with the purified GST-EcR-B protein. Due to the time-consuming protein expression and purification procedures and the solubility problem of the recombinant protein, we also inserted the full-length CfEcR-B cDNA into the mammalian DNA vaccine expression vector, pVAC1-mcs for DNA immunisation. In vitro expression of CfEcR-B in mammalian cells transfected with the pVAC-EcR-B plasmid was confirmed prior to the delivery of the DNA vaccine into mice. The anti-CfEcR-B MAbs generated from both DNA and protein vaccines were characterised and shown to recognise native CfEcR-B protein induced by 20E in CF-203 insect cells. DNA immunisation was shown to overcome the solubility problem of the bacterial expressed EcR and created a more direct route for monoclonal antibody production for this receptor protein obviating the need for EcR expression and purification to generate the antigen.

  9. IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Hong, Waun Ki

    2002-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck remains a clinical challenge because of the high rate of locoregional disease recurrence. The importance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of many solid tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, is well understood; increased expression is associated with enhanced tumor invasiveness, resistance to chemotherapy, and a lower patient survival rate. Several approaches have been developed to achieve EGFR blockade as an anticancer treatment strategy, including the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody IMC-C225, which competitively binds to the extracellular receptor site and prevents binding by the natural EGFR ligands EGF and transforming growth factor-alpha. Preclinical studies to evaluate IMC-225 in human cancer cell lines in vitro and human tumor xenografts in vivo have shown its potent antitumor activity. Clinical efficacy of IMC-C225 appears to involve multiple mechanisms, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of metastasis, and enhancement of the response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Phase I studies of IMC-C225 combined with chemotherapy or radiation showed promising response rates in patients with recurrent or refractory squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Phase II and III trials to examine the efficacy and safety of these combinations are currently underway. To date, IMC-C225 has been well tolerated, with skin rashes and allergic reactions being the most clinically important adverse events reported. IMC-C225 displays dose-dependent elimination characteristics and a half-life of approximately 7 days. Current recommendations for dosing include a 400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by weekly infusions at 250 mg/m(2). Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  10. IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, R S; Kim, E S; Harari, P M

    2001-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck (H&N) remains a clinical challenge due to its high rate of locoregional disease recurrence. The importance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of many solid tumours (including SCC of the H&N) is well understood; increased expression is associated with enhanced tumour invasion, resistance to chemotherapy and decreased patient survival. Several approaches have been developed to achieve EGFR blockade as an anticancer treatment strategy, including an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb), IMC-C225, which competitively binds to the extracellular receptor site to prevent binding by natural EGFR ligands (EGF and TGF-alpha). Preclinical studies evaluating this chimeric mAb in human cancer cell lines in vitro and human tumour xenografts in vivo have demonstrated its potent antitumour activity. The clinical efficacy of IMC-C225 appears to involve multiple anticancer mechanisms, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis, inhibition of metastasis and its ability to enhance the response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Phase I studies of IMC-C225 combined with chemotherapy or radiation for SCC of the H&N demonstrate excellent response rates in patients with recurrent or refractory disease. Phase II and III trials examining the efficacy and safety of these combinations are currently underway. To date, IMC-C225 has been well-tolerated, with skin rashes and allergic reactions being the most clinically important adverse events reported. IMC-C225 displays dose-dependent elimination characteristics and a half-life of approximately 7 days. Current recommendations for dosing include a 400 mg/m2 loading dose, followed by weekly infusions of 250 mg/m2.

  11. Structural, functional, and tissue distribution analysis of human transferrin receptor-2 by murine monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal antiserum.

    PubMed

    Deaglio, Silvia; Capobianco, Andrea; Calì, Angelita; Bellora, Francesca; Alberti, Federica; Righi, Luisella; Sapino, Anna; Camaschella, Clara; Malavasi, Fabio

    2002-11-15

    Human transferrin receptor-2 (TFR-2) is a protein highly homologous to TFR-1/CD71 and is endowed with the ability to bind transferrin (TF) with low affinity. High levels of TFR-2 mRNA were found in the liver and in erythroid precursors. Mutations affecting the TFR-2 gene led to hemochromatosis type 3, a form of inherited iron overload. Several issues on distribution and function of the receptor were answered by raising a panel of 9 monoclonal antibodies specific for TFR-2 by immunizing mice with murine fibroblasts transfected with the human TFR-2 cDNA. A polyclonal antiserum was also produced in mice immunized with 3 peptides derived from the TFR-2 sequence, exploiting an innovative technique. The specificity of all the reagents produced was confirmed by reactivity with TFR-2(+) target cells and simultaneous negativity with TFR-1(+) cells. Western blot analyses showed a dominant chain of approximately 90 kDa in TFR-2 transfectants and HepG2 cell line. Analysis of distribution in normal tissues and in representative cell lines revealed that TFR-2 displays a restricted expression pattern--it is present at high levels in hepatocytes and in the epithelial cells of the small intestine, including the duodenal crypts. Exposure of human TFR-2(+) cells to TF-bound iron is followed by a significant up-regulation and relocalization of membrane TFR-2. The tissue distribution pattern, the behavior following exposure to iron-loaded TF, and the features of the disease resulting from TFR-2 inactivation support the hypothesis that TFR-2 contributes to body iron sensing.

  12. Effect of the anti-receptor ligand-blocking 225 monoclonal antibody on EGF receptor endocytosis and sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Maria L. . E-mail: maria.jaramillo@nrc.ca; Leon, Zully; Grothe, Suzanne; Paul-Roc, Beatrice; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; O'Connor McCourt, Maureen

    2006-09-10

    The anti-receptor antibody, 225 mAb, is known to block binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the effect of this neutralizing antibody on EGFR endocytosis, trafficking and degradation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that endocytosis of {sup 125}I-225 mAb occurs, albeit with a slower rate than that of EGF. Using pulse chase assays, we show that internalized {sup 125}I-225 mAb is recycled to the surface much more efficiently than internalized {sup 125}I-EGF. Also, we found that internalization of {sup 125}I-225 mAb, in contrast to that of EGF, is independent of receptor tyrosine kinase activity, as evidenced by its insensitivity to AG1478, a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Analysis of the levels of cell surface and total EGFR showed that treatment with 225 mAb results in a 30-40% decrease in surface EGFR and a relatively slow downregulation of total EGFR. Taken together, these data indicate that 225 mAb induces internalization and downregulation of EGFR via a mechanism distinct from that underlying EGF-induced EGFR internalization and downregulation.

  13. Validation of a Flow Cytometry Based Binding Assay for Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cedeño-Arias, Mercedes; Sánchez-Ramírez, Javier; Blanco-Santana, Rancés; Rengifo-Calzado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    An ideal test used to characterize a product must be appropriate for the measurement of product quality, manufacturing consistency, product stability, and comparability studies. Flow cytometry has been successfully applied to the examination of antibodies and receptors on membrane surfaces; however, to date, the analytical validation of cytometry based assays is limited. Here we report on the validation of a flow cytometry-based assay used in the evaluation of nimotuzumab binding to cells over-expressing EGFR on cell surface. The assay was validated by examining, assay robustness, specificity, repeatability and intermediate precision. The assay was highly specific, robust for all studied factors except for cell fixation with 1% paraformaldehyde and met criteria for precision with RSD < 2%. In addition the assay has stability-indicating properties evidenced by the ability to detect changes in mAb degraded samples. Most importantly, the assay demonstrated to be useful for its intended use. PMID:21886904

  14. Generation and characterization of a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific for human fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyuan; Patel, Sima; Corisdeo, Susanne; Liu, Xiangdong; Micolochick, Holly; Xue, Jiyang; Yang, Qifeng; Lei, Ying; Wang, Baiyang; Soltis, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and plays important roles in a variety of biological functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tumorigenesis. The human FGFRs share a high degree of sequence homology between themselves, as well as with their murine homologs. Consequently, it has been suggested that it may be difficult to prepare monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that are specific for the individual receptor types. In this communication, we report on the development and characterization of a panel of anti-human FGFR4 MAbs that were generated in mice using a rapid immunization protocol. Using a modified rapid immunization at multiple sites (RIMMS) protocol with the soluble extracellular domain of human FGFR4 (FGFR4-ECD), the immunized mice developed high levels of polyclonal IgG to the immunogen within 13 days of the first immunization. The lymph node cells isolated from the immunized animals were then fused with mouse myeloma cells for hybridoma generation. Use of an efficient hybridoma cloning protocol in combination with an ELISA screening procedure allowed for early identification of stable hybridomas secreting antihuman FGFR4 IgG. Several identified MAbs specifically reacted with the FGFR4 protein without binding to the other human isoforms (FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3). As evaluated by BIAcore analysis, most anti-FGFR4 MAbs displayed high affinities (8.6 x 10(8) approximately 3.9 x 10(10) M) to FGFR4. Furthermore, these MAbs were able to bind to FGFR4 expressed on human breast tumor cell lines MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-453. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the RIMMS strategy is an effective approach for generating class-switched, high-affinity MAbs in mice to evolutionarily conserved proteins such as human FGFR4. These MAbs may be useful tools for further investigation of the biological functions and pathological roles of human FGFR4.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to human lymphocyte homing receptors define a novel class of adhesion molecules on diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A 90-kD lymphocyte surface glycoprotein, defined by monoclonal antibodies of the Hermes series, is involved in lymphocyte recognition of high endothelial venules (HEV). Lymphocyte gp90Hermes binds in a saturable, reversible fashion to the mucosal vascular addressin (MAd), a tissue-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule for lymphocytes. We and others have recently shown that the Hermes antigen is identical to or includes CD44 (In[Lu]-related p80), human Pgp-1, and extracellular matrix receptor III-molecules reportedly expressed on diverse cell types. Here, we examine the relationship between lymphoid and nonlymphoid Hermes antigens using serologic, biochemical, and, most importantly, functional assays. Consistent with studies using mAbs to CD44 or Pgp-1, mAbs against five different epitopes on lymphocyte gp90Hermes reacted with a wide variety of nonhematolymphoid cells in diverse normal human tissues, including many types of epithelium, mesenchymal elements such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle, and a subset of glia in the central nervous system. To ask whether these non- lymphoid molecules might also be functionally homologous to lymphocyte homing receptors, we assessed their ability to interact with purified MAd using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. The Hermes antigen isolated from both glial cells and fibroblasts--which express a predominant 90-kD form similar in relative molecular mass, isoelectric point, and protease sensitivity to lymphocyte gp90Hermes--was able to bind purified MAd. In contrast, a 140-160-kD form of the Hermes antigen isolated from squamous epithelial cells lacked this capability. Like lymphocyte binding to mucosal HEV, the interaction between glial gp90Hermes and MAd is inhibited by mAb Hermes-3, but not Hermes-1, suggesting that similar molecular domains are involved in the two binding events. The observation that the Hermes/CD44 molecules derived from several nonlymphoid cell types display binding domains homologous to those

  16. Novel therapeutic approach for neurogenic erectile dysfunction: effect of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Li, Huixi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jianwen; Zaid, Uwais; Sanford, Melissa T; Tu, Victor; Wu, Alex; Wang, Lin; Tian, Fei; Kotanides, Helen; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Wang, Guifang; Ning, Hongxiu; Banie, Lia; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Deng, Gary G; Lue, Tom F

    2015-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health issue in aged populations, and neurogenic ED is particularly difficult to treat. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed for treatment of neurogenic ED of peripheral origin. To investigate the therapeutic effects of a neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 monoclonal antibody (TrkA-mAb) on erectile function and sexual behavior in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury (CNI). In one experiment, 84 male rats were randomly assigned to seven groups. The groups underwent either CNI or sham surgery, subsequent injection into the major pelvic ganglion (IMPG) of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), an immunoglobulin G (IgG) control, or TrkA-mAb, and then intracavernosal (IC) injection of either PBS or varying TrkA-mAb concentrations immediately after surgery and then 1 wk later. Erectile function was assessed and histologic/molecular analyses were performed at 6 wk after surgery. In a second experiment, 36 male rats were randomly divided into three groups. The groups underwent CNI or sham surgery and then IC injection of PBS, IgG, or TrkA-mAb immediately after surgery and for 5 wk thereafter. At 6 wk after surgery, the performance of the rats in sexual behavior tests was videotaped. CNI or sham surgery; IMPG of PBS, IgG, or TrkA-mAb; IC injection of PBS or TrkA-mAb. The intracavernous pressure response to cavernous nerve electrostimulation was measured and midpenile cross-sections were histologically examined. Western blotting (WB) of cavernous tissue protein was performed. Rats were assessed for chasing, mounting, intromission, and ejaculation behaviors during sexual behavior tests. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey-Kramer t test. Recovery of erectile function of varying degrees was observed in the TrkA-mAb groups. TrkA-mAb treatment significantly suppressed tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nerve fibers in the corpus cavernosum and enhanced neuronal nitric oxide synthase

  17. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  18. A new monoclonal antibody detects downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type γ in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Vezzalini, Marzia; Mafficini, Andrea; Tomasello, Luisa; Lorenzetto, Erika; Moratti, Elisabetta; Fiorini, Zeno; Holyoake, Tessa L; Pellicano, Francesca; Krampera, Mauro; Tecchio, Cristina; Yassin, Mohamed; Al-Dewik, Nader; Ismail, Mohamed A; Al Sayab, Ali; Monne, Maria; Sorio, Claudio

    2017-06-21

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma (PTPRG) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family known to act as a tumor suppressor gene in many different neoplasms with mechanisms of inactivation including mutations and methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region. Although a critical role in human hematopoiesis and an oncosuppressor role in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have been reported, only one polyclonal antibody (named chPTPRG) has been described as capable of recognizing the native antigen of this phosphatase by flow cytometry. Protein biomarkers of CML have not yet found applications in the clinic, and in this study, we have analyzed a group of newly diagnosed CML patients before and after treatment. The aim of this work was to characterize and exploit a newly developed murine monoclonal antibody specific for the PTPRG extracellular domain (named TPγ B9-2) to better define PTPRG protein downregulation in CML patients. TPγ B9-2 specifically recognizes PTPRG (both human and murine) by flow cytometry, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry. Co-localization experiments performed with both anti-PTPRG antibodies identified the presence of isoforms and confirmed protein downregulation at diagnosis in the Philadelphia-positive myeloid lineage (including CD34(+)/CD38(bright/dim) cells). After effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, its expression recovered in tandem with the return of Philadelphia-negative hematopoiesis. Of note, PTPRG mRNA levels remain unchanged in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) non-responder patients, confirming that downregulation selectively occurs in primary CML cells. The availability of this unique antibody permits its evaluation for clinical application including the support for diagnosis and follow-up of these disorders. Evaluation of PTPRG as a potential therapeutic target is also facilitated by the availability of a specific reagent capable to specifically

  19. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D.

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in understanding and modulating the IgG–FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG–FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found that several regions in the IgG Fab region also showed reduced deuterium uptake. Our findings indicate the presence of hitherto unknown FcRn interaction sites in the Fab region or a possible conformational link between the IgG Fc and Fab regions upon FcRn binding. Further, we investigated the role of IgG glycosylation in the conformational response of the IgG–FcRn interaction. Removal of antibody glycans increased the flexibility of the FcRn binding site in the Fc region. Consequently, FcRn binding did not induce a similar conformational stabilization of deglycosylated IgG as observed for the wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG–FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution. PMID:25378534

  20. Investigating the interaction between the neonatal Fc receptor and monoclonal antibody variants by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG(1) and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG-FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found that several regions in the IgG Fab region also showed reduced deuterium uptake. Our findings indicate the presence of hitherto unknown FcRn interaction sites in the Fab region or a possible conformational link between the IgG Fc and Fab regions upon FcRn binding. Further, we investigated the role of IgG glycosylation in the conformational response of the IgG-FcRn interaction. Removal of antibody glycans increased the flexibility of the FcRn binding site in the Fc region. Consequently, FcRn binding did not induce a similar conformational stabilization of deglycosylated IgG as observed for the wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG-FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  2. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments.

  3. Platelet receptors for the Streptococcus sanguis adhesin and aggregation-associated antigens are distinguished by anti-idiotypical monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, K; Wen, D Y; Ouyang, T; Rao, A T; Herzberg, M C

    1995-01-01

    Platelets aggregate in response to an adhesin and the platelet aggregation-associated protein (PAAP) expressed on the cell surfaces of certain strains of Streptococcus sanguis. We sought to identify the corresponding PAAP receptor and accessory adhesin binding sites on platelets. Since the adhesion(s) of S. sanguis for platelets has not been characterized, an anti-idiotype (anti-id) murine monoclonal antibody (MAb2) strategy was developed. First, MAb1s that distinguished the adhesin and PAAP antigens on the surface of S. sanguis I 133-79 were selected. Fab fragments of MAb1.2 (immunoglobulin G2b [IgG2b]; 70 pmol) reacted with 5 x 10(7) cells of S. sanguis to completely inhibit the aggregation of human platelets in plasma. Under similar conditions, MAb1.1 (IgG1) inhibited the adhesion of S. sanguis cells to platelets by a maximum of 34%, with a comparatively small effect on platelet aggregation. Together, these two MAb1s inhibited S. sanguis-platelet adhesion by 63%. In Western immunoblots, both MAb1s reacted with S. sanguis 133-79 87- and 150-kDa surface proteins and MAb1.2 also reacted with purified type I collagen. The hybridomas producing MAb1.1 and MAb1.2 were then injected into BALB/c mice. Enlarged spleens were harvested, and a panel of MAb2 hybridomas was prepared. To identify anti-ids against the specific MAb1s, the MAb2 panel was screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for reaction with rabbit polyclonal IgG antibodies against the 87- and 150-kDa antigens. The reactions between the specific rabbit antibodies and anti-ids were inhibited by the 87- and 150-kDa antigens. When preincubated with platelets, MAb2.1 (counterpart of MAb1.1) inhibited adhesion to platelets maximally by 46% and MAb2.2 (anti-MAb1.2) inhibited adhesion to platelets maximally by 35%. Together, both MAb2s inhibited the adhesion of S. sanguis to platelets by 81%. MAb2.2 also inhibited induction of platelet aggregation. MAb2.2 immunoprecipitated a biotinylated platelet membrane

  4. Human estrogen receptor beta-specific monoclonal antibodies: characterization and use in studies of estrogen receptor beta protein expression in reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, I; Ko, C; Park-Sarge, O K; Nie, R; Hess, R A; Graves, C; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2001-07-05

    Investigation of the role of the second, more recently described estrogen receptor, denoted ERbeta, will be critical in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue-specific gene regulation by estrogens. Expression of ERbeta in a variety of tissues has been examined predominantly at the mRNA level, and there is little information regarding the cellular localization and size of the endogenous ERbeta protein, due, in part, to the limited availability of human ERbeta-specific antibodies. Thus, our aim was to generate specific antibodies to human ERbeta and use them to determine the tissue-specific distribution and size(s) of the ERbeta protein. To this end, we have cloned three different hybridoma cell lines that produce monoclonal antibodies specific for the hormone-binding domain of human ERbeta. The antibodies, made in mice against human ERbeta amino acids 256-505 (hormone binding domain lacking the F domain), are designated CFK-E12 (E12), CMK-A9 (A9) and CWK-F12 (F12) and were determined to be the IgG gamma1 isotype for E12, and IgG gamma2b for A9 and F12. All three monoclonal antibodies could be used to detect in vitro translated, baculovirus expressed, and cell transfected and expressed ERbeta protein by Western blot analyses, and all failed to detect ERalpha. A9 and F12 were able to immunoprecipitate efficiently the native form of ERbeta protein in the presence and absence of estradiol. Epitope mapping studies indicate that the E12 and F12 antibodies recognize overlapping peptide sequences in the N-terminal region of the hormone-binding domain, a region that is highly conserved among species. Immunocytochemical studies with these antibodies reveal nuclear-specific localization of the ERbeta protein in granulosa cells of the rat ovary. Nuclear ERbeta is also specifically localized in epithelial and some stromal cells of mouse and rat epididymis. Western blot analysis with protein extracts from ovarian granulosa cells of human, rat, mouse, and pig

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  6. Analysis of Receptor for Vibrio cholerae El Tor Hemolysin with a Monoclonal Antibody That Recognizes Glycophorin B of Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyan; Takahashi, Junko; Seno, Taiko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Honda, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    El Tor hemolysin (ETH), a pore-forming toxin secreted by Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and most Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolates, is able to lyse erythrocytes and other mammalian cells. To study the receptor for this toxin or the related molecule(s) on erythrocyte, we first isolated a monoclonal antibody, B1, against human erythrocyte membrane, which not only blocks the binding of ETH to human erythrocyte but also inhibits the hemolytic activity of ETH. Biochemical characterization and immunoblotting revealed that this antibody recognized an epitope on the extracellular domain of glycophorin B, a sialoglycoprotein of erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes lacking glycophorin B but not glycophorin A were less sensitive to the toxin than were normal human erythrocytes. These results indicate that glycophorin B is a receptor for ETH or at least an associated molecule of the receptor for ETH on human erythrocytes. PMID:10496913

  7. Apoptosis induced by an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and its delay by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X; Fan, Z; Masui, H; Rosen, N; Mendelsohn, J

    1995-01-01

    Both EGF and insulin, or IGF, stimulate the growth of many cell types by activating receptors that contain tyrosine kinase activities. A monoclonal antibody (mAb 225) against the EGF receptor produced in this laboratory has been shown to competitively inhibit EGF binding and block activation of receptor tyrosine kinase. Here we report that a human colorectal carcinoma cell line, DiFi, which expresses high levels of EGF receptors on plasma membranes, can be induced to undergo G1 cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) when cultured with mAb 225 at concentrations that saturate EGF receptors. Addition of IGF-1 or high concentrations of insulin can delay apoptosis induced by mAb 225, while the G1 arrest cannot be reversed by either IGF-1 or insulin. Insulin/IGF-1 cannot activate EGF receptor tyrosine kinase that has been inhibited by mAb 225. Moreover, an mAb against the IGF-1 receptor, which has little direct effect on DiFi cell growth, can block the capacity of insulin/IGF-1 to delay apoptosis induced by mAb 225, suggesting that the insulin/IGF-1-mediated delay of apoptosis is acting through the IGF-1 receptor. In contrast, insulin/IGF-1 cannot delay the apoptosis caused by the DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. The results indicate that EGF receptor activation is required both for cell cycle progression and for prevention of apoptosis in DiFi cells, and that a signal transduction pathway shared by receptors for insulin/IGF-1 and EGF may be involved in regulating apoptosis triggered by blockade of the EGF receptor. Images PMID:7706497

  8. Monoclonal antibodies that coimmunoprecipitate the 1,4-dihydropyridine and phenylalkylamine receptors and reveal the Ca/sup 2 +/ channel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vandaele, S.; Fosset, M.; Galizzi, J.P.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-01-13

    Monoclonal hybridoma cell lines secreting antibodies against the (+)-PN 200-110 and the (-)-demethoxyverapamil binding components of the voltage-dependent calcium channel from rabbit transverse-tubule membranes have been isolated. The specificity of these monoclonal antibodies was established by their ability to coimmunoprecipitate (+)-(/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 and (-)-(/sup 3/H)demethoxyverapamil receptors. Monoclonal antibodies described in this work cross-reacted with rat, mouse, chicken, and frog skeletal muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channels but not with crayfish muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channels. Cross-reactivity was also detected with membranes prepared from rabbit heart, brain, and intestinal smooth muscle. These antibodies were used in immunoprecipitation experiments with /sup 125/I-labeled detergent (3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) and digitonin) solubilized membranes. They revealed a single immunoprecipitating component of molecular weight (M/sub r/) 170,000 in nonreducing conditions. After disulfide bridge reduction the CHAPS-solubilized (+)-PN 200-110-(-)-demethoxyverapamil binding component gave rise to a large peptide of M/sub r/ 140,000 and to smaller polypeptides of M/sub r/ 30,000 and 26,000 whereas the digitonin-solubilized receptor appeared with subunits at M/sub r/ 170,000, 140,000, 30,000, and 26,000. All these results taken together are interpreted as showing that both the 1,4-dihydropyridine and the phenylalkylamine receptors are part of a single polypeptide chain of M/sub r/ 170,000.

  9. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    PubMed

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field.

  10. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  11. Structure and transmembrane nature of the acetylcholine receptor in amphibian skeletal muscle as revealed by cross-reacting monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A collection of 126 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from the electric organs of Torpedo californica or Electrophorus electricus was tested for cross-reactivity with AChRs in cryostat sections of skeletal muscle from Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis by indirect immunofluorescence. 49 mAbs (39%) cross- reacted with AChRs from Rana, and 25 mAbs (20%) cross-reacted with AChRs from Xenopus. mAbs specific for each of the four subunits of electric organ AChR (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) cross-reacted with AChRs from each amphibian species. mAbs cross-reacting with Xenopus AChRs were, with one exception, a subset of the mAbs cross-reacting with Rana AChRs. The major difference detected between the two species was in binding by mAbs specific for the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the alpha-subunit. Whereas 22 of 33 anti-MIR mAbs tested cross- reacted with Rana AChRs, only one of these mAbs cross-reacted with Xenopus AChRs. Some (32) of the cross-reacting mAbs were tested for binding to AChRs in intact muscle. 21 of these mAbs bound to AChRs only when membranes were made permeable with saponin. Electron microscopy using immunoperoxidase or colloidal gold techniques revealed that these mAbs recognize cytoplasmic determinants and that mAbs that do not require saponin in order to bind AChRs in intact muscle recognize extracellular determinants. These results suggest that AChRs in skeletal muscle of Rana and Xenopus are composed of subunits corresponding to the alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-subunits of AChRs from fish electric organs. The subunit specificity of mAbs whose binding was examined by electron microscopy suggests that parts of each subunit (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) are exposed on the cytoplasmic surface and that, as in AChRs from fish electric organs and mammalian muscle, the MIR on alpha-subunits of Rana AChRs is exposed on the extracellular surface. PMID:6363425

  12. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments. PMID:27907150

  13. Evaluation of C3a receptor expression on human leucocytes by the use of novel monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    ZWIRNER, J; GÖTZE, O; BEGEMANN, G; KAPP, A; KIRCHHOFF, K; WERFEL, T

    1999-01-01

    Varying results have been published in the past regarding the reactivity of different leucocyte subpopulations, including neutrophils, monocytes and B lymphocytes, to the anaphylatoxin C3a and its degradation product C3a(desArg). To better characterize the cellular distribution of C3a receptor (C3aR) expression, monoclonal antibodies against two different epitopes on the third extracellular domain of the human C3aR were generated. Quantification of C3aR as compared with C5aR densities was performed on peripheral blood leucocytes by quantitative indirect immunofluorescence. Eosinophils and basophils expressed similar numbers of C3aR and C5aR molecules/cell. On eosinophils 10 700±4500 (mean±SD) C3aR and 14 700±4100 C5aR were found, whereas basophils carried 8100±2100 C3aR and 13 500±3800 C5aR. Monocytes expressed approximately six times more C5aR than C3aR molecules on their surface (6000±2500 C3aR versus 34 100±9300 C5aR molecules) whereas on neutrophils, the expression of C5aR was more than 20 times higher than the expression of C3aR (3100±1000 C3aR versus 63 500±12 200 C5aR). No C3aR expression was detectable on peripheral blood-derived B lymphocytes and on tonsillar B cells before and after stimulation with interleukin-2/Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I. Our findings correspond well with the paucity of data on C3a-induced functional activities in monocytes and neutrophils and suggest that eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes represent the primary effector cells in the peripheral blood which can be stimulated by C3a. PMID:10447728

  14. A panel of monoclonal antibodies for the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor. Epitope mapping, effects on ligand binding, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Soos, M A; Field, C E; Lammers, R; Ullrich, A; Zhang, B; Roth, R A; Andersen, A S; Kjeldsen, T; Siddle, K

    1992-06-25

    We obtained 20 mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for human type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors, using transfected cells expressing high levels of receptors (IGF-1R/3T3 cells) as immunogen. The antibodies immunoprecipitated receptor.125I-IGF-I complexes and biosynthetically labeled receptors from IGF-1R/3T3 cells but did not react with human insulin receptors or rat type I IGF receptors. Several antibodies stimulated DNA synthesis in IGF-1R/3T3 cells, but the maximum stimulation was only 25% of that produced by IGF-I. The antibodies fell into seven groups recognizing distinct epitopes and with different effects on receptor function. All the antibodies reacted with the extracellular portion of the receptor, and epitopes were localized to specific domains by investigating their reaction with a series of chimeric IGF/insulin receptor constructs. Binding of IGF-I was inhibited up to 90% by antibody 24-60 reacting in the region 184-283, and by antibody 24-57 reacting in the region 440-586. IGF-I binding was stimulated up to 2.5-fold by antibodies 4-52 and 16-13 reacting in the region 62-184, and by antibody 26-3 reacting downstream of 283. The latter two groups of antibodies also dramatically stimulated insulin binding to intact IGF-1R/3T3 cells (by up to 50-fold), and potentiated insulin stimulation of DNA synthesis. Scatchard analysis indicated that in the presence of these antibodies, the affinity of the type I IGF receptor for insulin was comparable with that of the insulin receptor. These data indicate that regions both within and outside the cysteine-rich domain of the receptor alpha-subunit are important in determining the affinity and specificity of ligand binding. These antibodies promise to be valuable tools in resolving issues of IGF-I receptor heterogeneity and in studying the structure and function of classical type I receptors and insulin/IGF receptor hybrids.

  15. The function of multiple extracellular matrix receptors in mediating cell adhesion to extracellular matrix: preparation of monoclonal antibodies to the fibronectin receptor that specifically inhibit cell adhesion to fibronectin and react with platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have identified monoclonal antibodies that inhibit human cell adhesion to collagen (P1H5), fibronectin (P1F8 or P1D6), and collagen and fibronectin (P1B5) that react with a family of structurally similar glycoproteins referred to as extracellular matrix receptors (ECMRs) II, VI, and I, respectively. Each member of this family contains a unique alpha subunit, recognized by the antibodies, and a common beta subunit, each of approximately 140 kD. We show here that ECMR VI is identical to the fibronectin receptor (FNR), very late antigen (VLA) 5, and platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa and shall be referred to as FNR. Monoclonal antibodies to FNR inhibit lymphocyte, fibroblast, and platelet adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces. ECMRs I, II, and FNR were differentially expressed in platelets, resting or activated lymphocytes, and myeloid, epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblast cell populations, suggesting a functional role for the receptors in vascular emigration and selective tissue localization. Tissue staining of human fetal skin localized ECMRs I and II to the basal epidermis primarily, while monoclonal antibodies to the FNR stained both the dermis and epidermis. Experiments carried out to investigate the functional roles of these receptors in mediating cell adhesion to complex extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cells in culture revealed that complete inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM required antibodies to both the FNR and ECMR II, the collagen adhesion receptor. These results show that multiple ECMRs function in combination to mediate cell adhesion to complex EMC templates and predicts that variation in ECM composition and ECMR expression may direct cell localization to specific tissue domains. PMID:2846588

  16. Use of Heteropolymeric Monoclonal Antibodies to Attach Antigens to the C3b Receptor of Human Erythrocytes: A Potential Therapeutic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ronald P.; Sutherland, William M.; Reist, Craig J.; Webb, Donna J.; Wright, Eleanor L.; Labuguen, Ronald H.

    1991-04-01

    We have prepared bispecific, cross-linked monoclonal antibodies (heteropolymers) with specificity for both targeted antigens and the human erythrocyte (RBC) complement receptor. These heteropolymers facilitate binding of target antigens (human IgG and dinitrophenylated bovine γ globulin) to human RBCs under conditions that either allow or preclude complement activation. Quantitative analyses of this binding agree well with the number of complement receptors per RBC. In vitro "whole-blood" model experiments indicate heteropolymer-facilitated binding of antigens to RBCs is rapid and stable at 37^circC. It may be possible to extend these prototype experiments to the in vivo situation and use heteropolymer-attached RBCs for the safe and rapid binding, neutralization, and removal from the circulation of pathogenic antigens associated with infectious disease.

  17. Use of heteropolymeric monoclonal antibodies to attach antigens to the C3b receptor of human erythrocytes: A potential therapeutic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Sutherland, W.M.; Reist, C.J.; Webb, D.J.; Wright, E.L.; Labuguen, R.H. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors prepared bispecific, cross-linked monoclonal antibodies (heteropolymers) with specificity for both targeted antigens and the human erythrocyte (RBC) complement receptor. These heteropolymers facilitate binding of target antigens (human IgG and dinitrophenylated bovine {gamma} globulin) to human RBCs under conditions that either allow or preclude complement activation. Radioimmuno-assay analyses of this binding agree well with the number of complement receptors per RBC. In vitro whole-blood model experiments indicate heteropolymer-facilitated binding of antigens to RBCs is rapid and stable at 37C. It may be possible to extend these prototype experiments to the in vivo situation and use heteropolymer-attached RBCs for the safe and rapid binding, neutralization, and removal from the circulation of pathogenic antigens associated with infectious disease.

  18. 1D5 and 6F11: An immunohistochemical comparison of two monoclonal antibodies for the evaluation of estrogen receptor status in primary breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Paul A; Frazier, Shellaine R; Loy, Timothy S; Diaz-Arias, Alberto A; Bradley, Kyle; Bickel, John T

    2005-02-01

    The optimal monoclonal antibody to examine steroid hormone receptor status of primary breast carcinoma has yet to be defined. Estrogen receptor status was evaluated in 592 cases using routinely prepared paraffin-embedded tissue samples from primary breast carcinomas with the 1D5 (DAKO, Carpinteria, CA) and 6F11 (Novocastra, Newcastle upon Tyne, England) monoclonal antibodies. The stains were compared, assessing the percentage of positive cells stained and their intensity. They also were examined for nonspecific cytoplasmic staining and fixation artifact. In addition, a cost analysis for their production was performed. Overall, 1D5 and 6F11 showed a 97.5% concordance rate. 6F11 stained a significantly higher percentage of cells (P < .0001), more intensely (P < .0001), with less nonspecific cytoplasmic staining (P < .0001). There was no significant difference in fixation artifact between the 2 clones. The cost of antibody used for preparing a 1D5-stained slide was 86% more than for preparing a 6F11-stained slide (dollars 14.27 vs dollars 7.67).

  19. IMC-A12, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody to the insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    PubMed

    Rowinsky, Eric K; Youssoufian, Hagop; Tonra, James R; Solomon, Phillip; Burtrum, Douglas; Ludwig, Dale L

    2007-09-15

    Targeted monoclonal antibody therapy is an important strategy in cancer therapeutics. Among the most promising characteristics of therapeutic targets are those that modulate the growth and survival of malignant neoplasms and their sensitivity to anticancer therapies. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is overexpressed in many types of solid and hematopoietic malignancies, and has been implicated as a principal cause of heightened proliferative and survival signaling. IGF-IR has also been shown to confer resistance to cytotoxic, hormonal, and targeted therapies, suggesting that therapeutics targeting IGF-IR may be effective against a broad range of malignancies. IMC-A12 (ImClone Systems Incorporated), a fully human monoclonal IgG1 antibody that binds with high affinity to the IGF-IR, inhibits ligand-dependent receptor activation and downstream signaling. IMC-A12 also mediates robust internalization and degradation of the IGF-IR. In human tumor xenograft models, IGF-IR blockade by IMC-A12 results in rapid and profound growth inhibition of cancers of the breast, lung, colon, and pancreas, and many other neoplasms. Although promising single-agent activity has been observed, the most impressive effects of targeting the IGF-IR with IMC-A12 have been noted when this agent was combined with cytotoxic agents or other targeted therapeutics. The results with IMC-A12 to date suggest that it may be an effective therapeutic in a diverse array of oncologic indications.

  20. First case report of exacerbated ulcerative colitis after anti-interleukin-6R salvage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Raja; Billmeier, Ulrike; Rath, Timo; Mudter, Jonas; Vieth, Michael; Neumann, Helmut; Neurath, Markus F

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with long-standing ulcerative colitis and severe, steroid-dependent disease course unresponsive to treatment with azathioprine, methotrexate, anti-TNF antibodies (infliximab, adalimumab) and tacrolimus, who refused colectomy as a therapeutic option. As the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) had been identified as a crucial regulator in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, we treated the patient with biweekly intravenous infusions of an anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab) for 12 wk. However, no clinical improvement of disease activity was noted. In fact, endoscopic, histological and endomicroscopic assessment demonstrated exacerbation of mucosal inflammation and ulcer formation upon anti-IL-6R therapy. Mechanistic studies revealed that tocilizumab treatment failed to suppress intestinal IL-6 production, impaired epithelial barrier function and induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-21 and IFN-γ. Inhibition of IL-6 by tocilizumab had no clinical benefit in this patient with intractable ulcerative colitis and even led to exacerbation of mucosal inflammation. Our findings suggest that anti-IL-6R antibody therapy may lead to aggravation of anti-TNF resistant ulcerative colitis. When targeting IL-6, the differential responsiveness of target cells has to be taken into account, as IL-6 on the one side promotes acute and chronic mucosal inflammation via soluble IL-6R signaling but on the other side also strongly contributes to epithelial cell survival via membrane bound IL-6R signaling. PMID:26668517

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Fusicoccin with Binding Characteristics Similar to the Putative Fusicoccin Receptor of Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Feyerabend, Martin; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against fusicoccin. The toxin, linked to bovine serum albumin through its t-pentenyl moiety, served as immunogen. Hybridomas secreting anti-fusicoccin antibodies were screened by radioimmunoassay employing a novel radioactive derivative, [3H]-nor-fusicoccin-alcohol of high specific activity (1.5 × 1014Bq/mole). The two monoclonal antibodies reported here are of high apparent affinity for fusicoccin (0.71 × 10−9 molar and 1.85 × 10−9 molar). This is comparable to the apparent affinity of rabbit antiserum raised against the same type of conjugate (9.3 × 10−9 molar). A method for the single step purification of the monoclonal antibodies from ascites fluid is reported. A solid-phase immunoassay, using alkaline phosphatase as enzyme, exhibits a measuring range from 0.1 to 1.5 picomoles (about 70 picograms to 1 nanogram) of fusicoccin. The displacement of [3H]-nor-fusicoccin-alcohol from the antibodies by compounds structurally related to fusicoccin exhibits similar selectivity as a microsomal binding assay with the same tracer as radiolabeled probe. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16665786

  2. Ultrasonic atomization and subsequent desolvation for monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the glycoprotein (GP) IIIa receptor into drug eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Wang, G X; Luo, L L; Yin, T Y; Li, Y; Jiang, T; Ruan, C G; Guidoin, R; Chen, Y P; Guzman, R

    2010-01-01

    An eluting-stent system with mAb dispersed in the PLLA (poly (L-lactic acid)) was validated in vitro. Specifically designed spray equipment based on the principle of ultrasonic atomization was used to produce a thin continuous PLLA (poly (L-lactic acid)) polymer coating incorporating monoclonal antibody (mAb). This PLLA coating was observed in light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration of the monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIIa receptor and the eluting rate were then measured by a radioisotope technique with (125)I-labelled GP IIIa mAb. An in vitro perfusion circuit was designed to evaluate the release rates at different velocities (10 or 20 ml min(-1)). The PLLA coating was thin and transparent, uniformly distributed on the surface of the stent. Three factors influenced its thickness: PLLA concentration, duration and gas pressure. The concentration of mAb was influenced by the duration of absorption and the concentration of the mAb solution; the maximum was 1662.23 + or - 38.83 ng. The eluting rate was fast for the first 2 h, then decreased slowly and attained 80% after 2 weeks. This ultrasonic atomization spray equipment and technological process to prepare protein eluting-stents were proved to be effective and reliable.

  3. Radiolabeling of monoclonal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR 1) with (177)Lu for potential use in radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Hong, Young-Don; Pyun, Mi-Sun; Felipe, Penelope M; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to optimize the radioimmunoconjugation of monoclonal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR 1) with (177)Lu as a potential angiogenic molecular tracer for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). For a successful radiolabeling, we chose cysteine derivative DTPA-NCS as the bifunctional chelating agent and optimized radiolabeling condition with modifications on the factors such as the reaction time and molar ratio which are known to be very critical in radiolabeling. Under the optimized conditions, radiolabeling yield was greater than 99%. Immunoactivity of the radioimmunoconjugate was investigated using combinations of radioanalytical and bioanalytical techniques (ITLC-SG, Cyclone phosphorimager, and SDS-PAGE). For biological evaluations we carried out the cell binding assay and biodistribution study using mice bearing Calu6 non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. The biodistribution study showed high specificity in accumulating in tumor tissues where the tumor-to-blood ratio was 3.25:1 24h post-injection. In conclusion, the anti-VEGFR1 monoclonal antibody for angiogenesis targeting was effectively radioconjugated with (177)Lu. This radioimmunoconjugate is applicable to detect of angiogenesis sites in various diseases and treat tumors overexpressing VEGFR 1.

  4. Epitope Structure of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Asialoglycoprotein Receptor to a Monoclonal Antibody Revealed by High-Resolution Proteolytic Excision Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Raluca; Born, Rita; Moise, Adrian; Ernst, Beat; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the H1 subunit of the carbohydrate recognition domain (H1CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor is used as an entry site into hepatocytes by hepatitis A and B viruses and Marburg virus. Thus, molecules binding specifically to the CRD might exert inhibition towards these diseases by blocking the virus entry site. We report here the identification of the epitope structure of H1CRD to a monoclonal antibody by proteolytic epitope excision of the immune complex and high-resolution MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry. As a prerequisite of the epitope determination, the primary structure of the H1CRD antigen was characterised by ESI-FTICR-MS of the intact protein and by LC-MS/MS of tryptic digest mixtures. Molecular mass determination and proteolytic fragments provided the identification of two intramolecular disulfide bridges (seven Cys residues), and a Cys-mercaptoethanol adduct formed by treatment with β-mercaptoethanol during protein extraction. The H1CRD antigen binds to the monoclonal antibody in both native and Cys-alkylated form. For identification of the epitope, the antibody was immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose. Epitope excision and epitope extraction with trypsin and FTICR-MS of affinity-bound peptides provided the identification of two specific epitope peptides (5-16) and (17-23) that showed high affinity to the antibody. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope peptides revealed independent binding of each peptide to the antibody.

  5. Antibody guided diagnosis and therapy of brain gliomas using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Kalofonos, H.P.; Pawlikowska, T.R.; Hemingway, A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Dhokia, B.; Snook, D.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hooker, G.R.; McKenzie, C.G.; Lavender, P.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with brain glioma were scanned using {sup 123}I-labeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR1) or placental alkaline phosphatase (H17E2). Successful localization was achieved in 18 out of 27 patients. Eleven out of 27 patients were also studied using a nonspecific control antibody (11.4.1) of the same immunoglobulin subclass and observable tumor localization was also achieved in five patients. The specificity of targeting was assessed by comparing images obtained with specific and nonspecific antibodies and by examining tumor and normal tissue biopsies after dual antibody administration. Ten patients with recurrent grade III or IV glioma who showed good localization of radiolabeled antibody were treated with 40-140 mCi of {sup 131}I-labeled antibody delivered to the tumor area intravenously (n = 5) or by infusion into the internal carotid artery (n = 5). Six patients showed clinical improvement lasting from 6 mo to 3 yr. One patient continues in remission (3 yr after therapy), but the other five who responded initially relapsed 6-9 mo after therapy and died. No major toxicity was attributable to antibody-guided irradiation. Targeted irradiation by monoclonal antibody may be clinically useful and should be explored further in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor double targeting by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Iressa) and a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab). Impact on cell growth and molecular factors

    PubMed Central

    Fischel, J-L; Formento, P; Milano, G

    2005-01-01

    Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications focused on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. In view of the different modes of action of monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), it is tempting to examine the effect of a combination between these two EGFR targeting approaches. It was the purpose of the present study to test this combination at experimental level by using two epidermoid human cell lines CAL 33 and CAL 39. As C225 (Cetuximab®) and ZD1839 (Iressa®) are, respectively, the most clinically advanced drugs in the category of anti-EGFR drugs, the experiments were performed using these two representative compounds. The combination of C225 and ZD1839 was antagonistic whatever the cell line considered. These antagonistic effects were corroborated by molecular changes in apoptosis (PARP) and EGFR signalling (phospho-p42–44). Drugs alone led to a diminution in EGFR levels, while their combination increased the cellular expression in EGFR. These data suggest that new and tempting treatment strategies on the EGFR target consisting in a double hit with a monoclonal antibody and a TKI must be considered with caution. PMID:15756277

  7. Comparison of (/sup 125/I)beta-endorphin binding to rat brain and NG108-15 cells using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; O'Malley, W.E.; Schulz, R.

    1988-02-01

    The properties of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin-binding sites from rat brain membranes and membranes from the NG108-15 cell line were compared using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor and opioid peptides as probes. The binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to both rat brain and NG108-15 membranes yielded linear Scatchard plots with Kd values of 1.2 nM and 1.5 nM, respectively, and Bmax values of 865 fmol/mg rat brain membrane protein and 1077 fmol/mg NG108-15 membrane protein. A monoclonal antibody, OR-689.2.4, capable of inhibiting mu and delta binding but not kappa binding to rat brain membranes, noncompetitively inhibited the binding of 1 nM (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to rat brain and NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 405 nM for rat brain membranes and 543 nM for NG108-15 membranes. The monoclonal antibody also inhibited the binding of 3 nM (/sup 3/H) (D-penicillamine2, D-penicillamine5) enkephalin to NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 370 nM. In addition to blocking the binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to brain membranes, the antibody also displaced (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin from membranes. Site-specific opioid peptides had large variations in their IC50 values depending on whether they were inhibiting (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to rat brain or the NG108-15 membranes. When the peptides were tested with the monoclonal antibody for their combined ability to inhibit (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to both membrane preparations, the peptides and antibody blocked binding as though they were acting at allosterically coupled sites, not two totally independent sites. These studies suggest that mu-, delta-, and beta-endorphin-binding sites share some sequence homology with the 35,000-dalton protein that the antibody is directed against.

  8. Two monoclonal rat antibodies with specificity for the beta-chain variable region V beta 6 of the murine T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J; Huber, B T; Cannon, N A; Schneider, R; Schilham, M W; Acha-Orbea, H; MacDonald, H R; Hengartner, H

    1988-01-01

    Two rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 44-22-1 and 46-6B5, which recognize an alloreactive cytotoxic clone, 3F9, have been further tested on a panel of T hybridomas and cytotoxic T-cell clones for binding and functional activities. The mAbs recognized only those cells sharing the expression of the T-cell receptor beta-chain variable region gene V beta 6 with 3F9. All V beta 6+ cells were activated by these mAbs under cross-linking conditions and their antigen-specific activation was blocked by soluble mAb. Furthermore, depletion of 46-6B5+ normal lymph node T cells eliminated all cells expressing the epitope recognized by 44-22-1 and V beta 6 mRNA. Images PMID:2459713

  9. Rationale for the development of IMC-3G3, a fully human immunoglobulin G subclass 1 monoclonal antibody targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav D; Loizos, Nick; Youssoufian, Hagop; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2010-02-15

    A large body of evidence suggests that the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family and associated receptors are potential targets in oncology therapeutic development because of their critical roles in the proliferation and survival of various cancers and in the regulation and growth of the tumor stroma and blood vessels. Several small molecules that nonspecifically target the PDGF signaling axis are in current use or development as anticancer therapies. However, for the majority of these agents, PDGF and its receptors are neither the primary targets nor the principal mediators of anticancer activity. IMC-3G3, a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1, specifically binds to the human PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) with high affinity and blocks PDGF ligand binding and PDGFRalpha activation. The results of preclinical studies and the frequent expression of PDGFRalpha in many types of cancer and in cancer-associated stroma support a rationale for the clinical development of IMC-3G3. Currently, IMC-3G3 is being evaluated in early clinical development for patients with several types of solid malignancies.

  10. Development of EMab-51, a Sensitive and Specific Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Flow Cytometry, Western Blot, and Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Itai, Shunsuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Yamada, Shinji; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Handa, Saori; Chang, Yao-Wen; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-09-11

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is involved in cell growth and differentiation. EGFR homodimers or heterodimers with other HER members, such as HER2 and HER3, activate downstream signaling cascades in many cancers. In this study, we developed novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and characterized their efficacy in flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses. First, we expressed the full-length or ectodomain of EGFR in LN229 glioblastoma cells and then immunized mice with LN229/EGFR or ectodomain of EGFR, and performed the first screening using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Subsequently, we selected mAbs according to their efficacy in flow cytometry (second screening), Western blot (third screening), and immunohistochemical (fourth screening) analyses. Among 100 mAbs, only one clone EMab-51 (IgG1, kappa) reacted with EGFR in Western blot analysis. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses with EMab-51 showed sensitive and specific reactions against oral cancer cells, warranting the use of EMab-51 to detect EGFR in pathological analyses of EGFR-expressing cancers.

  11. Comparative analysis of binding affinities to epidermal growth factor receptor of monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Casanova, E; Beausoleil, I

    2011-07-01

    Although pharmaco/toxicological studies have always been conducted in pharmacologically relevant species in which the test material is pharmacologically active, the very specificity of many biopharmaceuticals could present challenges in the identification of a relevant species for pharmaco/toxicological studies. Alternative approaches may improve the predictive value of preclinical assessments of species-specific biopharmaceuticals. This could lead to improved decision-making, reduce the number of experimental animals by eliminating non-relevant studies, and decrease the time and cost involved in the drug development process. As an alternative to utilizing traditional animal models, this study investigated the activity of human EGF and the anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using the placenta microsomal fraction of different experimental animals. Ligand-receptor binding curves were obtained from the different experimental animal models, and binding constants were calculated based on the Scatchard plots. The constants for human and monkey EGF receptor expressed on the placental extract showed a K(a)<10(-8)M, while rabbits, mice and rats showed a K(a)>10(-8)M. The K(a) values obtained from animal placentas show that Macaca fascicularis and Cercopitecus aethiops monkeys are relevant species for studying the pharmaco/toxicological properties of nimotuzumab and cetuximab.

  12. Effects of in-vivo administration of a monoclonal antibody specific for the interleukin-2 receptor on the acute graft-versus-host reaction in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Volk, H D; Brocke, S; Osawa, H; Diamantstein, T

    1986-01-01

    Parental strain T lymphocyte injected into F1 mice respond to allogeneic MHC antigens and so induce the symptoms of a graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR). We have measured the local GVHR by the popliteal lymph node assay, and showed the suppression of the local GVHR in mice by treatment with the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) AMT-13 which is specific against the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor on activated mouse lymphocytes. The inhibitory effect of the AMT-13 administration was comparable with the suppression of the local GVHR by treatment with L3T4, an MoAb directed against the T helper subset. The L3T4 administration caused a dramatic decrease in the proportion of the cells with the L3T4 phenotype in the circulation and a marginal reduction of these cells in the lymph nodes. In contrast, the AMT-13 treated mice showed no changes in the distribution of the T lymphocyte subsets besides those in the GVHR-stimulated lymph nodes. Obviously, only the small subset of antigen-activated IL-2 receptor-bearing lymphocytes was influenced by treatment with AMT-13. MoAb directed against antigens whose expression is restricted to activated lymphocytes, such as the IL-2 receptor, might become useful for a short term immunosuppression with limited side effects. PMID:3100116

  13. A novel site contributing to growth-arrest-specific gene 6 binding to its receptors as revealed by a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Gas6 (growth-arrest-specific gene 6) is a vitamin K-dependent protein known to activate the Axl family of receptor tyrosine kinases. It is an important regulator of thrombosis and many other biological functions. The C-terminus of Gas6 binds to receptors and consists of two laminin-like globular domains LG1 and LG2. It has been reported that a Ca2+-binding site at the junction of LG1 and LG2 domains and a hydrophobic patch at the LG2 domain are important for receptor binding [Sasaki, Knyazev, Cheburkin, Gohring, Tisi, Ullrich, Timpl and Hohenester (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 44164–44170]. In the present study, we developed a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, named CNTO300, for Gas6. The antibody was generated by immunization of human IgG-expressing transgenic mice with recombinant human Gas6 protein and the anti-Gas6 IgG sequences were rescued from an unstable hybridoma clone. Binding of Gas6 to its receptors was partially inhibited by the CNTO300 antibody in a dose-dependent manner. To characterize further the interaction between Gas6 and this antibody, the binding kinetics of CNTO300 for recombinant Gas6 were compared with independently expressed LG1 and LG2. The CNTO300 antibody showed comparable binding affinity, yet different dependence on Ca2+, to Gas6 and LG1. No binding to LG2 was detected. In the presence of EDTA, binding of the antibody to Gas6 was disrupted, but no significant effect of EDTA on LG1 binding was evident. Further epitope mapping identified a Gas6 peptide sequence recognized by the CNTO300 antibody. This peptide sequence was found to be located at the LG1 domain distant from the Ca2+-binding site and the hydrophobic patch. Co-interaction of Gas6 with its receptor and CNTO300 antibody was detected by BIAcore analysis, suggesting a second receptor-binding site on the LG1 domain. This hypothesis was further supported by direct binding of Gas6 receptors to an independently expressed LG1 domain. Our results revealed, for the first time, a

  14. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab as immune-modulating monoclonal antibodies targeting the PD-1 receptor to treat melanoma.

    PubMed

    Faghfuri, Elnaz; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is an important issue in oncology due to its high incidence, high mortality, and resistance to systemic therapy; however, targeted immunotherapy has noticeably improved the survival rates of melanoma patients. Promising targeted immunotherapies for malignant melanoma include the blockade of immune checkpoints with antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and the programmed cell death protein 1 pathway. The US FDA-approved antibody ipilimumab targets cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4; however, it was limited by toxicity and a low response. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab (formerly lambrolizumab), the two FDA-approved anti-programmed death-1 monoclonal antibodies, show highly durable response rates and long-term safety, validating the importance of the programmed cell death protein 1 pathway blockade for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  15. Involvement of tachykinins and NK1 receptor in the joint inflammation with collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Akira; Sakai, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromoto; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic multisystem disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation associated with severe pain. Because RA is an immune-mediated joint disease and because type II collagen is considered an autoantigen, rodent models of arthritis using collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibodies are valuable for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and for evaluating therapeutic strategies. The tachykinin family peptides, substance P (SP) and hemokinin-1 (HK-1), are expressed in the nervous systems and in many peripheral organs and immunocompetent cells and activate tachykinin NK1 receptors with similar affinities. NK1 receptors are involved in the inflammation and hyperalgesia associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined the involvement of SP and HK-1 in the joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of the TAC1 gene encoding SP and of the TAC4 gene encoding HK-1 were decreased in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord at the peak of the inflammatory symptoms in CAIA. Systemic injection of an NK1 receptor antagonist, WIN 51708, significantly inhibited the joint swelling, but not the mechanical allodynia, on day 7 in CAIA mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of TAC1 and TAC4 in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord were unaffected by treatment with WIN 51708. These findings suggest that tachykinins and NK1 receptors play a key role in joint inflammation, rather than in nociceptive sensitization, in CAIA.

  16. A monoclonal anti-peptide antibody reacting with the insulin receptor beta-subunit. Characterization of the antibody and its epitope and use in immunoaffinity purification of intact receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ganderton, R H; Stanley, K K; Field, C E; Coghlan, M P; Soos, M A; Siddle, K

    1992-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (CT-1) was prepared against the C-terminal peptide sequence of the human insulin receptor beta-subunit (KKNGRILTLPRSNPS). The antibody reacted with native human and rat insulin receptors in solution, whether or not insulin was bound and whether or not the receptor had undergone prior tyrosine autophosphorylation. The antibody also reacted specifically with the receptor beta-subunit on blots of SDS/polyacrylamide gels. Preincubation of soluble receptors with antibody increased the binding of 125I-insulin approx. 2-fold. The antibody did not affect insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation, but increased the basal autophosphorylation rate approx. 2-fold. The amino acid residues contributing to the epitope for CT-1 were defined by construction and screening of an epitope library. Oligonucleotides containing 23 random bases were synthesized and ligated into the vector pCL627, and the corresponding peptide sequences expressed as fusion proteins in Escherichia coli were screened by colony blotting. Reactive peptides were identified by sequencing the oligonucleotide inserts in plasmids purified from positive colonies. Six different positive sequences were found after 900,000 colonies had been screened, and the consensus epitope was identified as GRVLTLPRS. Phosphorylation of the threonine residue within this sequence (corresponding to the known phosphorylation site Thr-1348 in the insulin receptor) decreased the affinity of antibody binding approx. 100-fold, as measured by competition in an e.l.i.s.a. Antibody CT-1 was used for immunoaffinity isolation of insulin receptor from detergent-solubilized human placental or rat liver microsomal membranes. Highly purified receptor was obtained in 60% yield by binding to CT-1-Sepharose immunoadsorbent and specific elution with a solution of peptide corresponding to the known epitope. This approach to purification under very mild conditions may in principle be used with any protein for which an antibody is

  17. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs. PMID:25484051

  18. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  19. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, Thomas J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  20. CD32B, the human inhibitory Fc-gamma receptor IIB, as a target for monoclonal antibody therapy of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Christopher T; Veri, Maria-Concetta; Gorlatov, Sergey; Tuaillon, Nadine; Burke, Steve; Huang, Ling; Inzunza, H David; Li, Hua; Thomas, Shannon; Johnson, Syd; Stavenhagen, Jeffrey; Koenig, Scott; Bonvini, Ezio

    2006-10-01

    Human CD32B (FcgammaRIIB), the low-affinity inhibitory receptor for IgG, is the predominant Fc receptor (FcR) present on B cells. Immunohistochemical and expression studies have identified CD32B expression in a variety of B-cell malignancies, suggesting that CD32B is a potential immunotherapeutic target for B-cell malignancies. A high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb 2B6), from a novel panel of anti-human CD32B-specific mAbs, was chimerized (ch2B6) and humanized (hu2B6-3.5). Both ch2B6 and hu2B6-3.5 were capable of directing cytotoxicity by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages against B-lymphoma lines in vitro. In a human B-cell lymphoma mouse xenograft model, administration of ch2B6 or hu2B6-3.5 reduced tumor growth rate and improved tumor-free survival. Both the in vitro and in vivo activities of 2B6 required an intact Fc, suggesting an FcR-mediated mechanism of action. These data support the hypothesis that CD32B is a viable target for mAb treatment of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  1. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, William J; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T; Martin, Thomas J; Parker, Michael W

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 A, and diffracted to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  2. Identification of a monoclonal antibody against the leptin receptor that acts as an antagonist and blocks human monocyte and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Mehdi; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Wu, Zida; Maamra, Mabrouka; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Pockley, A Graham; Watson, Philip; Matarese, Giuseppe; Strasburger, Christian J; Ross, Richard J M

    2006-05-30

    Nutritional status has a major impact on the immune response and this is in part mediated by leptin, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Preliminary data suggest that antagonism of leptin may offer a therapeutic approach for the treatment of some inflammatory disorders. We have tested monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human leptin receptor (ObR) for antagonist activity using a leptin signalling bioassay. We identified a mAb, 9F8, which demonstrated dose-dependent antagonist activity in the leptin bioassay. Specificity of the mAb for ObR was confirmed using a plate binding assay. The 9F8 mAb displaced leptin binding to human ObR and enzymatically generated Fab fragments of 9F8 retained antagonist activity. Therefore the Fab fragment of 9F8 was cloned and recombinant 9F8 Fab (rFab) was purified from E. coli periplasmic fraction using a C-terminal His tag. Purified 9F8 rFab bound to human ObR and exhibited leptin antagonist activity. In vitro studies demonstrated that the 9F8 mAb inhibited leptin induced TNF-alpha production from human monocytes and anti-CD3 mAb induced proliferation of human T cells in PBMC culture. In conclusion, this study has identified a mAb to the human leptin receptor which inhibits leptin signalling and acts as a leptin antagonist in vitro.

  3. Structural and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Potent and Selective Monoclonal Antibody Antagonists of Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP. PMID:23689510

  4. Structural and pharmacological characterization of novel potent and selective monoclonal antibody antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H

    2013-07-05

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP.

  5. Fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies directed at human T cell receptor variable regions: comparison with oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta expression.

    PubMed

    Diu, A; Romagné, F; Genevée, C; Rocher, C; Bruneau, J M; David, A; Praz, F; Hercend, T

    1993-07-01

    Seven distinct anti-human T cell receptor (TcR) V region monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated by immunizing mice with either human T cell lines or transfected murine cells expressing human TcR V beta genes. The specificity of these reagents was determined as follows: T cells recognized by each mAb were purified from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and TcR transcripts expressed in these cells were analyzed using oligonucleotide-driven amplification and cDNA sequencing. Four mAb were found to delineate the V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamilies, respectively. The remaining reagents recognize subsets within the V beta 2, V beta 5 and V beta 13 subfamilies. Reactivity of the mAb with circulating T cells from 18 unrelated healthy individuals was determined. Limited variability was found from an individual to another. In four donors, mAb staining was compared to oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamily expression in the peripheral blood. Although the V gene subfamily-specific oligonucleotides used in this study belong to a carefully controlled series, our results show that this method does not give an accurate estimate of the percentage of peripheral T cells expressing a given TcR beta chain. The present data confirm the necessity to establish a complete set of well-characterized monoclonal reagents to study human T cell responses.

  6. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  7. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  8. Anti-tumor activity of TRA-8 anti-death receptor 5 (DR5) monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model.

    PubMed

    Straughn, J Michael; Oliver, Patsy G; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Alvarez, Ronald D; Grizzle, William E; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2006-04-01

    There is substantial evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) causes apoptosis via activation of death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). We sought to determine the therapeutic potential of TRA-8 (anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody) in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model. DR5 expression in 7 human cervical cancer cell lines was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using murine TRA-8 in combination with flow cytometry. Cell lines were treated with TRA-8 alone or in combination with cisplatin, topotecan, or radiation, and cytotoxicity assays were performed. Mice were inoculated with ME-180 cancer cells and treated with different combinations of therapy. Animals receiving antibody were injected intraperitoneally with 200 microg of TRA-8. Animals received 9 Gy 60Co radiation divided into 3 fractions and 3 intraperitoneal doses of cisplatin (6 mg/kg) 1 h before radiation. A similar experiment was performed using topotecan (2 mg/kg) as the chemotherapeutic agent. DR5 was expressed to a varying degree on the cervical cancer cell lines. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and chemotherapy or radiation resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8, cisplatin, and radiation produced tumor growth inhibition that was significantly greater than the other groups. Similar results were seen in combination studies with topotecan. These data suggest that DR5 is a good target for activation of the apoptotic pathway. Monoclonal antibodies such as TRA-8 may play an important role in the development of an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced cervical cancer.

  9. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-09-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC 50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC 50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor.

  10. Identification of key amino acid residues in a thyrotropin receptor monoclonal antibody epitope provides insight into its inverse agonist and antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2008-07-01

    CS-17 is a murine monoclonal antibody to the human TSH receptor (TSHR) with both inverse agonist and antagonist properties. Thus, in the absence of ligand, CS-17 reduces constitutive TSHR cAMP generation and also competes for TSH binding to the receptor. The present data indicate that for both of these functions, the monovalent CS-17 Fab (50 kDa) behaves identically to the intact, divalent IgG molecule (150 kDa). The surprising observation that CS-17 competes for TSH binding to the human but not porcine TSHR enabled identification of a number of amino acids in its epitope. Replacement of only three human TSHR residues (Y195, Q235, and S243) with the homologous porcine TSHR residues totally abolishes CS-17 binding as detected by flow cytometry. TSH binding is unaffected. Of these residues, Y195 is most important, with Q235 and S243 contributing to CS-17 binding to a much lesser degree. The functional effects of CS-17 IgG and Fab on constitutive cAMP generation by porcinized human TSHR confirm the CS-17 binding data. The location of TSHR amino acid residues Y195, Q235, and S243 deduced from the crystal structure of the FSH receptor leucine-rich domain provides valuable insight into the CS-17 and TSH binding sites. Whereas hormone ligands bind primarily to the concave surface of the leucine-rich domains, a major portion of the CS-17 epitope lies on the opposite convex surface with a minor component in close proximity to known TSH binding residues.

  11. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O’Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor. PMID:24921944

  12. Pharmacokinetics and brain uptake in the rhesus monkey of a fusion protein of arylsulfatase a and a monoclonal antibody against the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Hui, Eric K-W; Sumbria, Rachita K; Pardridge, William M

    2013-05-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder of the brain caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal sulfatase, arylsulfatase A (ASA). It is not possible to treat the brain in MLD with recombinant ASA, because the enzyme does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present investigation, a BBB-penetrating IgG-ASA fusion protein is engineered and expressed, where the ASA monomer is fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of an engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb crosses the BBB via receptor-mediated transport on the endogenous BBB insulin receptor, and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the ASA into brain from blood. The HIRMAb-ASA is expressed in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells grown in serum free medium, and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. The fusion protein retains high affinity binding to the HIR, EC50 = 0.34 ± 0.11 nM, and retains high ASA enzyme activity, 20 ± 1 units/mg. The HIRMAb-ASA fusion protein is endocytosed and triaged to the lysosomal compartment in MLD fibroblasts. The fusion protein was radio-labeled with the Bolton-Hunter reagent, and the [(125) I]-HIRMAb-ASA rapidly penetrates the brain in the Rhesus monkey following intravenous administration. Film and emulsion autoradiography of primate brain shows global distribution of the fusion protein throughout the monkey brain. These studies describe a new biological entity that is designed to treat the brain of humans with MLD following non-invasive, intravenous infusion of an IgG-ASA fusion protein.

  13. Immunoglobulin superfamily receptor translocation associated 2 protein on lymphoma cell lines and hairy cell leukemia cells detected by novel monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ise, Tomoko; Maeda, Hiroshi; Santora, Kenneth; Xiang, Laiman; Kreitman, Robert J; Pastan, Ira; Nagata, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily receptor translocation associated 2 (IRTA2) gene encodes a cell surface receptor homologous to the family of Fc receptors. Because of the restricted expression of mRNA in B cell-lineage cells, IRTA2 is a new potential target for the immunotherapy of B cell malignancies. To study the expression of the IRTA2 gene product, we produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to IRTA2. A mouse used for cell fusion was DNA-immunized with an expression plasmid encoding the IRTA2 cDNA. The reactivity of MAbs secreted from the hybridomas were characterized with recombinant proteins of IRTA family members in an enzyme immunoassay and a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Nineteen human lymphoma cell lines and blood cells from five patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) were analyzed with IRTA2 expression using FACS. Three MAbs (F25, F56, and F119) were selected based on their specific reactivity with recombinant IRTA2 and lack of cross-reactivity with other IRTA family members. In a FACS analysis, MAbs F56 and F119 detected IRTA2 expression in six of seven B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one of six Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments and Western blotting using MAb F25 confirmed the expression profile. We also found that HCL cells from five patients expressed IRTA2. Our results provide the first evidence that IRTA2 is expressed on the surface of human lymphoma cell lines and HCL cells. IRTA2 could be useful as a new target for immunotherapy.

  14. The effectiveness of an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody combined with chemotherapy to target colon cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jin; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kondo, Jumpei; Hayashi, Yoshito; Kato, Motohiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Inoue, Takuta; Shiraishi, Eri; Inoue, Tahahiro; Hiyama, Satoshi; Tsujii, Yoshiki; Maekawa, Akira; Kawai, Shoichiro; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Araki, Maekawa; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Watabe, Kenji; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) can initiate and sustain tumor growth and exhibit resistance to clinical cytotoxic therapies. Therefore, CSCs represent the main target of anticancer therapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) promotes cellular proliferation and drug resistance in colorectal cancer, and its serum levels correlate with patient survival. Therefore, IL-6 and its downstream signaling molecule the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) represent potential molecular targets. In the present study, we investigated the effects of IL-6 and its downstream signaling components on stem cell biology, particularly the chemoresistance of CSCs, to explore potential molecular targets for cancer therapy. The colon cancer cell line WiDr was cultured in serum-free, non-adherent, and three-dimensional spheroid-forming conditions to enrich the stem cell-like population. Spheroid-forming cells slowly proliferated and expressed high levels of Oct-4, Klf4, Bmi-1, Lgr5, IL-6, and Notch 3 compared with adherent cells. Treatment with an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody reduced spheroid formation, stem cell-related gene expression, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance. In addition, IL-6 treatment enhanced the levels of p-STAT3 (Tyr705), the expression of Oct-4, Klf4, Lgr5, and Notch 3, and chemoresistance to 5-FU. siRNA targeting Notch 3 suppressed spheroid formation, Oct-4 and Lgr5 expression, and 5-FU chemoresistance, whereas STAT3 inhibition enhanced Oct-4, Klf4, Lgr5, and Notch 3 expression and 5-FU chemoresistance along with reduced spheroid growth. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-6 functions in dichotomous pathways involving Notch 3 induction and STAT3 activation. The former pathway is involved in cancer stem-like cell biology and enhanced chemoresistance, and the latter pathway leads to accelerated proliferation and reduced chemoresistance. Thus, an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody or Notch 3

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  16. A variety of human monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor isolated from a phage antibody library.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Gene; Kondo, Mariko; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-11-04

    When the technology for constructing human antibody (Ab) libraries using a phage-display system was developed, many researchers in Ab-related fields anticipated that it would be widely applied to the development of pharmaceutical drugs against various diseases, including cancers. However, successful examples of such applications are very limited. Moreover, researchers who utilize phage-display technology now show divergent ways of thinking about phage Ab libraries. For example, there is debate about what should be the source of VH and VL genes for the construction of libraries to cover the whole repertoire of Abs present in the human body. In the immune system, the introduction of mutations into V genes followed by selection based on binding activity, termed Ab maturation, is required for the production of Abs exhibiting high affinity to the antigen (Ag). Therefore, introduction of mutations and selection are required for isolation of Abs with high affinity after isolation of clones from phage Ab libraries. We constructed a large human Ab library termed AIMS, developed a screening method termed ICOS, and succeeded in isolating many human monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that specifically and strongly bind to various tumor-associated Ags. Eight anti-EGFR mAbs were included, which we characterized. These mAbs showed various different activities against EGFR-expressing cancer cells. In this paper, we describe these data and discuss the possibility and necessity that the mAbs isolated from the AIMS library might be developed as therapeutic drugs against cancers without introduction of mutations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood-brain barrier drug delivery of IgG fusion proteins with a transferrin receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2015-02-01

    Biologic drugs are large molecules that do not cross the blood- brain barrier (BBB). Brain penetration is possible following the re-engineering of the biologic drug as an IgG fusion protein. The IgG domain is a MAb against an endogenous BBB receptor such as the transferrin receptor (TfR). The TfRMAb acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the fused biologic drug into the brain via receptor-mediated transport on the endogenous BBB TfR. This review discusses TfR isoforms, models of BBB transport of transferrin and TfRMAbs, and the genetic engineering of TfRMAb fusion proteins, including BBB penetrating IgG-neurotrophins, IgG-decoy receptors, IgG-lysosomal enzyme therapeutics and IgG-avidin fusion proteins, as well as BBB transport of bispecific antibodies formed by fusion of a therapeutic antibody to a TfRMAb targeting antibody. Also discussed are quantitative aspects of the plasma pharmacokinetics and brain uptake of TfRMAb fusion proteins, as compared to the brain uptake of small molecules, and therapeutic applications of TfRMAb fusion proteins in mouse models of neural disease, including Parkinson's disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and lysosomal storage disorders. The review covers the engineering of TfRMAb-avidin fusion proteins for BBB targeted delivery of biotinylated peptide radiopharmaceuticals, low-affinity TfRMAb Trojan horses and the safety pharmacology of chronic administration of TfRMAb fusion proteins. The BBB delivery of biologic drugs is possible following re-engineering as a fusion protein with a molecular Trojan horse such as a TfRMAb. The efficacy of this technology will be determined by the outcome of future clinical trials.

  18. A Monoclonal Antibody TrkB Receptor Agonist as a Potential Therapeutic for Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Daniel; Gowers, Ian; Dowler, Simon J.; Wall, Michael D.; McAllister, George; Fischer, David F.; Dijkstra, Sipke; Fratantoni, Silvina A.; van de Bospoort, Rhea; Veenman-Koepke, Jessica; Flynn, Geraldine; Arjomand, Jamshid; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Wityak, John; Bard, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating, genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by a tri-nucleotide expansion in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene. HD is clinically characterized by chorea, emotional and psychiatric disturbances and cognitive deficits with later symptoms including rigidity and dementia. Pathologically, the cortico-striatal pathway is severely dysfunctional as reflected by striatal and cortical atrophy in late-stage disease. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neuroprotective, secreted protein that binds with high affinity to the extracellular domain of the tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor promoting neuronal cell survival by activating the receptor and down-stream signaling proteins. Reduced cortical BDNF production and transport to the striatum have been implicated in HD pathogenesis; the ability to enhance TrkB signaling using a BDNF mimetic might be beneficial in disease progression, so we explored this as a therapeutic strategy for HD. Using recombinant and native assay formats, we report here the evaluation of TrkB antibodies and a panel of reported small molecule TrkB agonists, and identify the best candidate, from those tested, for in vivo proof of concept studies in transgenic HD models. PMID:24503862

  19. Antipeptide monoclonal antibodies inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Antoni, G; Cusi, M G; Lozzi, L; Niccolai, N; Petreni, S; Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Valensin, P E

    1988-09-01

    It has been reported that binding to muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the post-synaptic membrane is an important event of the rabies virus neurotropism. The binding site can be located within the 190-203 region of the virus glycoprotein sharing a high degree of homology with the "toxic loop" of the curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins. We have synthesized a tetradecapeptide corresponding to this glycoprotein region and used it, following conjugation with an immunogenic carrier to raise MAbs. We found that some MAbs raised against the peptide were able to recognize both the virus glycoprotein and the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin; moreover, they can inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor extracted from the electric organs of Torpedo marmorata. On the basis of this cross-reactivity, we suggest that rabies virus glycoprotein and curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins share three-dimensionally similar structures in order to bind to the nicotinic cholinergic receptor. The potential use of the immunogenic properties of the peptide for the rational design of a synthetic vaccine against rabies is proposed.

  20. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a humanized monoclonal antibody against the IL-2 receptor (DACLIZUMAB) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Brok, H P M; Tekoppele, J M; Hakimi, J; Kerwin, J A; Nijenhuis, E M; De Groot, C W; Bontrop, R E; ‘T Hart, B A

    2001-01-01

    CIA in the rhesus monkey is an autoimmune-based polyarthritis with inflammation and erosion of synovial joints that shares various features with human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The close phylogenetic relationship between man and rhesus monkey makes the model very suitable for preclinical safety and efficacy testing of new therapeutics with exclusive reactivity in primates. In this study we have investigated the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a humanized monoclonal antibody (Daclizumab) against the α-chain of the IL-2 receptor (CD25). When Daclizumab treatment was started well after immunization but before the expected onset of CIA a significant reduction of joint-inflammation and joint-erosion was observed. A therapeutic treatment, initiated as soon as the first clinical signs of CIA were observed, proved also effective since joint-degradation was abrogated. The results of this study indicate that Daclizumab has clinical potential for the treatment of RA during periods of active inflammation and suppression of the destruction of the joint tissues. PMID:11359452

  1. Production and characterisation of a monoclonal antibody that recognises the chicken CSF1 receptor and confirms that expression is restricted to macrophage-lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Rothwell, Lisa; Moffat, Lindsey; Garceau, Valerie; Balic, Adam; Sang, Helen M; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A

    2014-02-01

    Macrophages contribute to innate and acquired immunity as well as many aspects of homeostasis and development. Studies of macrophage biology and function in birds have been hampered by a lack of definitive cell surface markers. As in mammals, avian macrophages proliferate and differentiate in response to CSF1 and IL34, acting through the shared receptor, CSF1R. CSF1R mRNA expression in the chicken is restricted to macrophages and their progenitors. To expedite studies of avian macrophage biology, we produced an avian CSF1R-Fc chimeric protein and generated a monoclonal antibody (designated ROS-AV170) against the chicken CSF1R using the chimeric protein as immunogen. Specific binding of ROS-AV170 to CSF1R was confirmed by FACS, ELISA and immunohistochemistry on tissue sections. CSF1 down-regulated cell surface expression of the CSF1R detected with ROS-AV170, but the antibody did not block CSF1 signalling. Expression of CSF1R was detected on the surface of bone marrow progenitors only after culture in the absence of CSF1, and was induced during macrophage differentiation. Constitutive surface expression of CSF1R distinguished monocytes from other myeloid cells, including heterophils and thrombocytes. This antibody will therefore be of considerable utility for the study of chicken macrophage biology. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 targeting RON receptor tyrosine kinase enhances chemosensitivity of bladder cancer cells to Epirubicin by promoting G1/S arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Feng; Yu, Bi-Xia; Yu, Rui; Ma, Liang; Lv, Xiu-Yi; Cheng, Yue; Ma, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Epirubicin (EPI) is one of the most used intravesical chemotherapy agents after transurethral resection to non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (NMIBC) to prevent cancer recurrence and progression. However, even after resection of bladder tumors and intravesical chemotherapy, half of them will recur and progress. RON is a membrane tyrosine kinase receptor usually overexpressed in bladder cancer cells and associated with poor pathological features. This study aims to investigate the effects of anti-RON monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 on the chemosensitivity of bladder cells to EPI. After Zt/g4 treatment, cell cytotoxicity was significantly increased and cell invasion was markedly suppressed in EPI-treated bladder cancer cells. Further investigation indicated that combing Zt/g4 with EPI promoted cell G1/S-phase arrest and apoptosis, which are the potential mechanisms that RON signaling inhibition enhances chemosensitivity of EPI. Thus, combing antibody-based RON targeted therapy enhances the therapeutic effects of intravesical chemotherapy, which provides new strategy for further improvement of NMIBC patient outcomes. PMID:28075465

  3. A novel agonistic anti-human death receptor 5 monoclonal antibody with tumoricidal activity induces caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Yao-Wu; Chen, Ju-Gao; Bai, Hui-Ling; Huang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Jing; Li, Shu-Lian; Liu, Guang-Chao; Jiang, Qi; Chai, Jing; Zhao, Yue-Ping; Ma, Yuan-Fang

    2011-04-01

    An agonistic antibody against TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand death receptor 5 (DR5) is a practicable candidate drug for antitumor therapy. In this study, a novel murine anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, mDRA-6(IgG1-κ), has been generated. This study aimed to explore the caspase-dependent and mitochondrial mechanisms of mDRA-6 in inducing apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells. The apoptotic effects of mDRA-6 on Jurkat cells, which express DR5 on the cell surface, were detected by flow cytometry and western blot after exposure to different doses of mDRA-6 and at fixed doses of mDRA-6 at different times. It was demonstrated that mDRA-6 can induce Jurkat cell apoptosis via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent pathways. These results indicate that the novel antibody mDRA-6 against DR5 has an antitumor function and may provide a new reagent for tumor therapy.

  4. Thirteen-week Intravenous Toxicity Study of a Novel Humanized Anti-Human Death Receptor 5 Monoclonal Antibody, CS-1008, in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kohji; Sugiura, Tomomi; Koyama, Kumiko; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamimura, Yasuhiro; Takasaki, Wataru; Manabe, Sunao

    2010-01-01

    CS-1008, a humanized monoclonal antibody that is agonistic to human death receptor 5, was intravenously administered to cynomolgus monkeys twice a week for 13 weeks at 3 different dose levels (5, 15 and 42 mg/kg) in order to evaluate its potential toxicity. A control group received phosphate buffered saline containing 0.01% polysorbate 80. Each of the 4 groups consisted of 3 male and 3 female cynomolgus monkeys. No animal in any group died during the dosing period. No toxic changes in clinical signs, food consumption, body weight, electrocardiography, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, blood chemistry, gross pathology, organ weights or histopathology were noted in any group during the dosing period. In the toxicokinetic analysis, the values for the maximum concentration of CS-1008 in plasma and the area under the curve generally increased with increasing dose. No clear differences in the toxicokinetic parameters or profiles were observed between the sexes. Development of anti-CS-1008 antibodies was not detected in any sample. The no-observed adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of CS-1008 in cynomolgus monkeys under the conditions of this study was concluded to be 42 mg/kg in both sexes, when administered intravenously twice a week for 13 weeks. This study supports the development of CS-1008 as a therapeutic biopharmaceutical. PMID:22272006

  5. Epitope mapping of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody and induction of growth-inhibitory polyclonal antibodies by vaccination with EGFR mimotope.

    PubMed

    Navari, Mohsen; Zare, Mehrak; Javanmardi, Masoud; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Modjtahedi, Helmout; Rasaee, Mohammad Javed

    2014-10-01

    One of the proposed approaches in cancer therapy is to induce and direct the patient's own immune system against cancer cells. In this study, we determined the epitope mapping of the rat anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody ICR-62 using a phage display of random peptide library and identified a 12 amino acids peptide, which was recognized as a mimotope. The peptide was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as carrier protein (P-BSA). We have shown that ICR-62 can react specifically with P-BSA as well as native EGFR. Two rabbits were immunized either by BSA or P-BSA and the rabbits IgGs were purified and examined for binding to the antigens, mimotope and the EGFR protein purified from the EGFR overexpressing A431 cell line. We showed that the rabbit IgG generated against the mimotope is capable of inhibiting the growth of A431 cells by 15%, but does not have any effect on the growth of EGFR-negative MDA-MB-453 cell line in vitro. Our results support the need for further investigations on the potential of vaccination with either mimotope of the EGFR or epitope displayed on the surface of phage particles for use in active immunotherapy of cancer.

  6. Detection of monoclonality in intestinal lymphoma with polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to differentiate from enteritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, S; Leipig, M; Schöpper, I; Hergt, F; Weber, K; Rütgen, B C; Tsujimoto, H; Hermanns, W; Hirschberger, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of canine intestinal lymphoma by morphological examination is challenging, especially when endoscopic tissue specimens are used. The utility of detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction (PARR) in canine lymphoma has been well established, but its usefulness to distinguish enteritis and intestinal lymphoma remains unclear. In this retrospective study we assessed clonality of 29 primary canine intestinal lymphoma, 14 enteritis and 15 healthy control cases by PARR analysis, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded full-thickness tissue specimens. We could detect monoclonal rearrangements in 22 of 29 canine intestinal lymphomas [76%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-90%] and polyclonal rearrangements in all of the enteritis and healthy control cases (100%; CI 88-100%). We revealed a predominance of T-cell phenotype compared to B-cell phenotype (85%; CI 65-96% and 15%; CI 4-35%, respectively). We showed that PARR analysis contributes to differentiation of canine intestinal lymphoma from enteritis and to phenotyping of lymphomas.

  7. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design.

  8. Targeted therapy of osteosarcoma with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody to an insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor (IGF2R).

    PubMed

    Geller, David S; Morris, Jonathan; Revskaya, Ekaterina; Kahn, Mani; Zhang, Wendong; Piperdi, Sajida; Park, Amy; Koirala, Pratistha; Guzik, Hillary; Hall, Charles; Hoang, Bang; Yang, Rui; Roth, Michael; Gill, Jonathan; Gorlick, Richard; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-12-01

    Osteosarcoma overall survival has plateaued around 70%, without meaningful improvements in over 30years. Outcomes for patients with overt metastatic disease at presentation or who relapse are dismal. In this study we investigated a novel osteosarcoma therapy utilizing radioimmunotherapy (RIT) targeted to IGF2R, which is widely expressed in OS. Binding efficiency of the Rhenium-188((188)Re)-labeled IGF2R-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) to IGF2R on OS17 OS cells was assessed with Scatchard plot analysis. Biodistribution studies were performed in heterotopic murine osteosarcoma xenografts. Tumor growth was compared over a 24-day period post-treatment between mice randomized to receive (188)Re-labeled IGF2R-specific murine mAb MEM-238 ((188)Re-MEM-238) or one of three controls: (188)Re-labeled isotype control mAb, unlabeled MEM-238, or no treatment. Results demonstrate that the radioimmunoconjugate had a high binding constant to IGF2R. Both (188)Re-MEM-238 and the isotype control had similar initial distribution in normal tissue. After 48h (188)Re-MEM-238 exhibited a 1.8 fold selective uptake within tumor compared to the isotype control (p=0.057). Over 24days, the tumor growth ratio was suppressed in animals treated with RIT compared to unlabeled and untreated controls (p=0.005) as demonstrated by a 38% reduction of IGF2R expressing osteosarcoma cells in the RIT group (p=0.002). In conclusion, given the lack of new effective therapies in osteosarcoma, additional investigation into this target is warranted. High expression of IGF2R on osteosarcoma tumors, paired with the specificity and in vivo anti-cancer activity of (188)Re-labeled IGF2R-specific mAb suggests that IGF2R may represent a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of osteosarcoma. This targeted approach offers the benefits of being independent of a specific pathway, a resistance mechanism, and/or an inherent biologic tumor trait and therefore is relevant to all OS tumors that express IGF2R. Copyright

  9. Cholera toxin and pertussis toxin regulate the Fc receptor-mediated phagocytic response of human neutrophils in a manner analogous to regulation by monoclonal antibody 1C2.

    PubMed

    Gresham, H D; Clement, L T; Volanakis, J E; Brown, E J

    1987-12-15

    Data presented in this paper indicate that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis can be markedly augmented and that this augmentation is under regulatory control. Stimulation of PMN with either a low m.w., heat-labile cytokine(s) (the culture supernatant effluent from a YM-10 Centricon unit, YM-10E), phorbol esters (phorbol dibutyrate), or the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B, enhances Fc-mediated ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. YM-10 effluent- and amphotericin B-stimulated ingestion is completely abrogated by treating the PMN with either pertussis toxin (PT), cholera toxin (CT), or a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1C2. However, neither toxin nor mAb 1C2 affects nonstimulated ingestion or phagocytosis stimulated by phorbol esters or synthetic diacylglycerol. Increasing intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels by stimulation with prostaglandin E1 and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, isobutylmethylxanthine, does not mimic the effect of either toxin or mAb 1C2. In addition, toxin-mediated inhibition is not due to loss of either the Fc receptor recognized by mAb 3G8 or the antigen recognized by mAb 1C2. These data indicate that both CT and PT regulate the phagocytic response of PMN, in a manner like mAb 1C2, probably by affecting a guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein distinct from those that regulate adenylate cyclase. Since phorbol ester-stimulated ingestion is not inhibited by either PT, CT, or mAb 1C2 and phorbol esters activate protein kinase C directly, phagocytosis amplification regulated by PT, CT, and mAb 1C2 may involve protein kinase C activation.

  10. Anti-interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody (BT 563) in the treatment of severe acute GVHD refractory to systemic corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, R J; Phillips, G L; Barnett, M J; Nantel, S H; Reece, D E; Shepherd, J D; Klingemann, H G

    1992-11-01

    Fourteen patients with corticosteroid-resistant acute GVHD were treated with a murine monoclonal antibody to the pp55 interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (MoAb BT 563). Nine of the 14 patients had also failed Xoma-Zyme-H65 as GVHD prophylaxis and/or treatment. Seven patients had received HLA-matched sibling donor bone marrow transplants, five had received HLA-matched transplants from unrelated volunteer donors, and two had received one-antigen mismatched transplants from unrelated volunteer donors. At the time of MoAb BT 563 therapy, the overall clinical grading of acute GVHD (Seattle grading system) was as follows: grade II--one patient, grade III--four patients, and grade IV--nine patients. MoAb BT 563 was administered as a short iv infusion of 5 mg daily for 10 doses, followed by 5 mg on alternate days for a further five doses. A complete response (CR) was observed in four patients (28%), and a partial response (PR) in four patients (28%). All four complete responders were treated within 28 days of first onset of grade > or = II acute GVHD. Four patients (three CR, one PR) remain alive. One complete responder subsequently died from chronic GVHD. MoAb BT 563 administration was well tolerated in all 14 patients; no significant toxicity was observed. We conclude that MoAb BT 563 directed against the IL-2 receptor on activated T lymphocytes may be useful in treating corticosteroid-resistant acute GVHD if given early, but that it is of limited value in attempting to rescue patients with far-advanced refractory acute GVHD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The efficacy of IGF-I receptor monoclonal antibody against human gastrointestinal carcinomas is independent of k-ras mutation status.

    PubMed

    Ii, Masanori; Li, Hua; Adachi, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2011-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling is required for carcinogenicity and proliferation of gastrointestinal cancers. We have previously shown successful targeting therapy for colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and esophageal carcinomas using recombinant adenoviruses expressing dominant negative IGF-IR. Mutation in k-ras is one of key factors in gastrointestinal cancers. In this study, we sought to evaluate the effect of a new monoclonal antibody for IGF-IR, figitumumab (CP-751,871), on the progression of human gastrointestinal carcinomas with/without k-ras mutation. We assessed the effect of figitumumab on signal transduction, proliferation, and survival in six gastrointestinal cancer cell lines with/without k-ras mutation, including colorectal and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and hepatoma. Combination effects of figitumumab and chemotherapy were also studied. Then figitumumab was evaluated in the treatment of xenografts in nude mice. Figitumumab blocked autophosphorylation of IGF-IR and its downstream signals. The antibody suppressed proliferation and tumorigenicity in all cell lines. Figitumumab inhibited survival by itself and up-regulated chemotherapy (5-FU and gemcitabine) induced apoptosis. Moreover, the combination of this agent and chemotherapy was effective against tumors in mice. The effect of figitumumab was not influenced by the mutation status of k-ras. Figitumumab reduced expression of IGF-IR but not insulin receptor in these xenografted tumors. The drug did not affect murine body weight or blood concentrations of glucose, insulin, IGF binding protein 3, and growth hormone. IGF-IR might be a good molecular therapeutic target and figitumumab may thus have therapeutic value in human gastrointestinal malignancies even in the presence of k-ras mutations. ©2011 AACR.

  12. A public T cell receptor recognized by a monoclonal antibody specific for the D-J junction of the β-chain.

    PubMed

    Frigstad, T; Løset, G Å; Sandlie, I; Bogen, B

    2013-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that T cell responses against many antigens are dominated by public α/β T cell receptors (TCRs) with restricted heterogeneity. Because expression of public TCRs may be related to resistance, or predisposition to diseases, it is relevant to measure their frequencies. Although staining with tetrameric peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules gives information about specificity, it does not give information about the TCR composition of the individual T cells that stain. Moreover, next-generation sequencing of TCR does not yield information on pairing of α- and β-chains in single T cells. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we have here investigated the possibility of raising a monoclonal antibody (moAb) that recognizes a public TCR. As a model system, we have used T cells responding to the 91-101 CDR3 peptide of an Ig L-chain (λ2³¹⁵), presented by the MHC class II molecule I-E(d). The CD4⁺ T cell responses against this pMHC are dominated by a receptor composed of Vα3Jα1;Vβ6DβJβ1.1. Even the V(D)J junctions are to a large extent shared between T cell clones derived from different BALB/c mice. We here describe a murine moAb (AB10) of B10.D2 origin that recognizes this public TCR, while binding to peripheral T cells is negligible. Binding of the moAb is abrogated by introduction of two Gly residues in the D-J junction of the CDR3 of the β-chain. A model for the public TCR determinant is presented. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Cys-Rich Region of Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1 Is Required for Binding of Hepatitis A Virus and Protective Monoclonal Antibody 190/4

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter; Lu, Jinhua; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    1998-01-01

    The hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVcr-1) cDNA codes for a class I integral membrane glycoprotein, termed havcr-1, of unknown natural function which serves as an African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cell receptor for HAV. The extracellular domain of havcr-1 has an N-terminal Cys-rich region that displays homology with sequences of members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, followed by a Thr/Ser/Pro (TSP)-rich region characteristic of mucin-like O-glycosylated proteins. The havcr-1 glycoprotein contains four putative N-glycosylation sites, two in the Cys-rich region and two in the TSP-rich region. To characterize havcr-1 and define region(s) involved in HAV receptor function, we expressed the TSP-rich region in Escherichia coli fused to glutathione S-transferase and generated antibodies (Ab) in rabbits (anti-GST2 Ab). Western blot analysis with anti-GST2 Ab detected 62- and 65-kDa bands in AGMK cells and 59-, 62-, and 65-kDa bands in dog cells transfected with the HAVcr-1 cDNA (cr5 cells) but not in dog cells transfected with the vector alone (DR2 cells). Treatment of AGMK and cr5 cell extracts with peptide-N-glycosidase F resulted in the collapse of the havcr-1-specific bands into a single band of 56 kDa, which indicated that different N-glycosylated forms of havcr-1 were expressed in these cells. Treatment of AGMK and cr5 cells with tunicamycin reduced binding of protective monoclonal Ab (MAb) 190/4, which suggested that N-glycans are required for binding of MAb 190/4 to havcr-1. To test this hypothesis, havcr-1 mutants lacking the N-glycosylation motif at the first site (mut1), second site (mut2), and both (mut3) sites were constructed and transfected into dog cells. Binding of MAb 190/4 and HAV to mut1 and mut3 cells was highly reduced, while binding to mut2 cells was not affected and binding to dog cells expressing an havcr-1 construct containing a deletion of the Cys-rich region (d1− cells) was undetectable. HAV-infected cr5 and mut2 cells but not

  14. The Cys-rich region of hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 is required for binding of hepatitis A virus and protective monoclonal antibody 190/4.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P; Lu, J; Kaplan, G G

    1998-05-01

    The hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVcr-1) cDNA codes for a class I integral membrane glycoprotein, termed havcr-1, of unknown natural function which serves as an African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cell receptor for HAV. The extracellular domain of havcr-1 has an N-terminal Cys-rich region that displays homology with sequences of members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, followed by a Thr/Ser/Pro (TSP)-rich region characteristic of mucin-like O-glycosylated proteins. The havcr-1 glycoprotein contains four putative N-glycosylation sites, two in the Cys-rich region and two in the TSP-rich region. To characterize havcr-1 and define region(s) involved in HAV receptor function, we expressed the TSP-rich region in Escherichia coli fused to glutathione S-transferase and generated antibodies (Ab) in rabbits (anti-GST2 Ab). Western blot analysis with anti-GST2 Ab detected 62- and 65-kDa bands in AGMK cells and 59-, 62-, and 65-kDa bands in dog cells transfected with the HAVcr-1 cDNA (cr5 cells) but not in dog cells transfected with the vector alone (DR2 cells). Treatment of AGMK and cr5 cell extracts with peptide-N-glycosidase F resulted in the collapse of the havcr-1-specific bands into a single band of 56 kDa, which indicated that different N-glycosylated forms of havcr-1 were expressed in these cells. Treatment of AGMK and cr5 cells with tunicamycin reduced binding of protective monoclonal Ab (MAb) 190/4, which suggested that N-glycans are required for binding of MAb 190/4 to havcr-1. To test this hypothesis, havcr-1 mutants lacking the N-glycosylation motif at the first site (mut1), second site (mut2), and both (mut3) sites were constructed and transfected into dog cells. Binding of MAb 190/4 and HAV to mut1 and mut3 cells was highly reduced, while binding to mut2 cells was not affected and binding to dog cells expressing an havcr-1 construct containing a deletion of the Cys-rich region (d1- cells) was undetectable. HAV-infected cr5 and mut2 cells but not mut1

  15. The anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 monoclonal antibody D16F7 inhibits invasiveness of human glioblastoma and glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Maria Grazia; Tentori, Lucio; Ruffini, Federica; Ceci, Claudia; Lisi, Lucia; Bonanno, Elena; Scimeca, Manuel; Eskilsson, Eskil; Daubon, Thomas; Miletic, Hrvoje; Ricci Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Navarra, Pierluigi; Bjerkvig, Rolf; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Graziani, Grazia

    2017-08-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly migratory, invasive, and angiogenic brain tumor. Like vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) promotes GBM angiogenesis. VEGF-A is a ligand for both VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2, while PlGF interacts exclusively with VEGFR-1. We recently generated the novel anti-VEGFR-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) D16F7 that diminishes VEGFR-1 homodimerization/activation without affecting VEGF-A and PlGF binding. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of VEGFR-1 in human GBM tissue samples (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry, in cell lines (n = 6) and GBM stem cells (GSCs) (n = 18) by qRT-PCR and/or western blot analysis. In VEGFR-1 positive GBM or GSCs we also analyzed the ability of D16F7 to inhibit GBM invasiveness in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Most of GBM specimens stained positively for VEGFR-1 and all but one GBM cell lines expressed VEGFR-1. On the other hand, in GSCs the expression of the receptor was heterogeneous. D16F7 reduced migration and invasion of VEGFR-1 positive GBM cell lines and patient-derived GSCs in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Interestingly, this effect was also observed in VEGFR-1 positive GSCs transfected to over-express wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt(+)) or mutant EGFR (ligand binding domain-deficient EGFRvIII(+)). Furthermore, D16F7 suppressed intracellular signal transduction in VEGFR-1 over-expressing GBM cells by reducing receptor auto-phosphorylation at tyrosine 1213 and downstream Erk1/2 activation induced by receptor ligands. The results from this study suggest that VEGFR-1 is a relevant target for GBM therapy and that D16F7-derived humanized mAbs warrant further investigation.

  16. Maximizing the potency of an anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody by exploiting proximity to Fcγ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Loyau, Jérémy; Malinge, Pauline; Daubeuf, Bruno; Shang, Limin; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    In order to treat Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated diseases, we generated a potent antagonistic antibody directed against human TLR4, Hu 15C1. This antibody's potency can be modulated by engaging not only TLR4 but also Fcγ receptors (FcγR), a mechanism that is driven by avidity and not cell signaling. Here, using various formats of the antibody, we further dissect the relative contributions of the Fv and Fc portions of Hu 15C1, discovering that the relationship to potency of the different antibody arms is not linear. First, as could be anticipated, we observed that Hu 15C1 co-engages up to 3 receptors on the same plasma membrane, i.e., 2 TLR4 molecules (via its variable regions) and either FcγRI or FcγRIIA (via the Fc). The Kd of these interactions are in the nM range (3 nM of the Fv for TLR4 and 47 nM of the Fc for FcγRI). However, unexpectedly, neutralization experiments revealed that, due to the low level of cell surface TLR4 expression, the avidity afforded by engagement through 2 Fv arms was significantly limited. In contrast, the antibody's neutralization capacity increases by 3 logs when able to exploit Fc-FcγR interactions. Taken together, these results demonstrate an unforeseen level of contribution by FcγRs to an antibody's effectiveness when targeting a cell surface protein of relatively low abundance. These findings highlight an exploitable mechanism by which FcγR-bearing cells may be more powerfully targeted, envisioned to be broadly applicable to other reagents aimed at neutralizing cell surface targets on cells co-expressing FcγRs. PMID:25484053

  17. Identification of the epitope of a monoclonal antibody that disrupts binding of human transferrin to the human transferrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Teh, Evelyn M; Hewitt, Jeff; Ung, Karen C; Griffiths, Tanya A M; Nguyen, Vinh; Briggs, Sara K; Mason, Anne B; MacGillivray, Ross T A

    2005-12-01

    The molecular basis of the transferrin (TF)-transferrin receptor (TFR) interaction is not known. The C-lobe of TF is required to facilitate binding to the TFR and both the N- and C-lobes are necessary for maximal binding. Several mAb have been raised against human transferrin (hTF). One of these, designated F11, is specific to the C-lobe of hTF and does not recognize mouse or pig TF. Furthermore, mAb F11 inhibits the binding of TF to TFR on HeLa cells. To map the epitope for mAb F11, constructs spanning various regions of hTF were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The recombinant fusion proteins were analysed in an iterative fashion by immunoblotting using mAb F11 as the probe. This process resulted in the localization of the F11 epitope to the C1 domain (residues 365-401) of hTF. Subsequent computer modelling suggested that the epitope is probably restricted to a surface patch of hTF consisting of residues 365-385. Mutagenesis of the F11 epitope of hTF to the sequence of either mouse or pig TF confirmed the identity of the epitope as immunoreactivity was diminished or lost. In agreement with other studies, these epitope mapping studies support a role for residues in the C1 domain of hTF in receptor binding.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor as a radioimmunodiagnostic and radioimmunotherapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Ray, G L; Baidoo, K E; Wong, K J; Williams, M; Garmestani, K; Brechbiel, M W; Milenic, D E

    2009-08-01

    The studies described here are the first to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo properties of (111)In-CHX-A''-panitumumab for radioimmunotherapy (alpha- and beta(-)-emitters) and radioimmunoimaging (single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography). Twenty-seven human carcinoma cell lines were analysed for expression of epidermal growth factor receptors by flow cytometry. Panitumumab was conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA (diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid) and radiolabelled with (111)In. Immunoreactivity of the CHX-A''-DTPA-panitumumab and (111)In-CHX-A''-DTPA-panitumumab was evaluated by radioimmunoassays. Tumour targeting was determined in vivo by direct quantitation of tumour and normal tissues and by gamma-scintigraphy. For 26 of 27 human tumour cell lines, 95% of the cells expressed epidermal growth factor receptors over a range of intensity. Immunoreactivity of panitumumab was retained after modification with CHX-A''-DTPA. Radiolabelling of the immunoconjugate with (111)In was efficient with a specific activity of 19.5 +/- 8.9 mCi.mg(-1) obtained. Immunoreactivity and specificity of binding of the (111)In-panitumumab was shown with A431 cells. Tumour targeting by (111)In-panitumumab was demonstrated in athymic mice bearing A431, HT-29, LS-174T, SHAW or SKOV-3 s.c. xenografts with little uptake observed in normal tissues. The (111)In-panitumumab was also evaluated in non-tumour-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic studies compared the plasma retention time of the (111)In-panitumumab in both non-tumour-bearing and A431 tumour-bearing mice. Tumour targeting was also visualized by gamma-scintigraphy. Panitumumab can be efficiently radiolabelled with (111)In with high labelling yields. Based on the efficiency in tumour targeting and low normal tissue uptake, panitumumab may be an effective targeting component for radioimmunodiagnostic and radioimmunotherapeutic applications.

  19. Evaluation of the QTc prolongation potential of a monoclonal antibody, siltuximab, in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering multiple myeloma, or low-volume multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sheeba K; Suvorov, Alexander; Noens, Lucien; Rukavitsin, Oleg; Fay, Joseph; Wu, Ka Lung; Zimmerman, Todd M; van de Velde, Helgi; Bandekar, Rajesh; Puchalski, Thomas A; Qi, Ming; Uhlar, Clarissa; Samoylova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    A phase 1 study evaluated the QTc prolongation potential of siltuximab, a chimeric, anti-interleukin-6 mAb, in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), or low-volume MM. Patients with baseline QTcF and QTcB ≤ 500 ms, QRS < 100 ms, PR < 200 ms and no significant cardiac disease received siltuximab 15 mg/kg q3w, the highest dosage used in clinical studies, for 4 cycles. Twelve-lead ECGs obtained at multiple time points pre- and post-infusion at cycles 1 and 4 were evaluated by central cardiology laboratory. No effect on QTc interval was concluded if the upper limit of least square (LS) mean 90 % CI for QTc change from baseline at each time point was <20 ms. An effect on QTc prolongation was ruled out, as the upper bound of 90 % CI was <10 ms at each time point in 27 evaluable patients (13 MGUS, 13 SMM, 1 low-volume MM) with no differences between disease types. Maximum mean QTc increase from baseline occurred 3 h after cycle 1 infusion (QTcF = 3.2 [LS mean 90 % CI -0.01, 6.45] ms; QTcB = 2.7 [-0.69, 6.14] ms). At all other time points, mean QTcF and QTcB increase from baseline was ≤1.5 ms and upper bound 90 % CI was ≤5.1 ms. Twenty patients had mostly low-grade AEs, including nausea, fatigue (20 % each); thrombocytopenia, headache (each 13 %); dyspnea, leukopenia, neutropenia, paresthesia, abnormal hepatic function, URTI (each 10 %). Three MGUS patients achieved 50 % M-protein reduction. There was no association between siltuximab pharmacokinetics and QTc interval. Siltuximab did not affect the QTc interval. Overall safety was similar to other single-agent siltuximab studies.

  20. Induction Therapy for Kidney Transplant Recipients: Do We Still Need Anti-IL2 Receptor Monoclonal Antibodies?

    PubMed

    Hellemans, R; Bosmans, J-L; Abramowicz, D

    2017-01-01

    Induction therapy with antilymphocyte biological agents is widely used after kidney transplantation, most commonly T lymphocyte-depleting rabbit-derived antithymocyte globulin (rATG) or an IL-2 receptor antagonist (IL2RA). Early randomized trials showed that rATG or IL2RA induction reduces early acute rejection, prompting recommendations by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes that IL2RA induction be used routinely in first-line therapy after kidney transplantation, with lymphocyte-depleting induction reserved for high-risk cases. These studies, however, mainly used outdated maintenance regimens. No large randomized trial has examined the effect of IL2RA or rATG induction versus no induction in patients receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids. With this triple maintenance therapy, the addition of induction may achieve an absolute risk reduction for acute rejection of only 1-4% in standard-risk patients without improving graft or patient survival. In contrast, rATG induction lowers the relative risk of acute rejection by almost 50% versus IL2RA in patients with high immunological risk. These recent data raise questions about the need for IL2RA in kidney transplantation, as it may no longer be beneficial in standard-risk transplantation and may be inferior to rATG in high-risk situations. Updated evidence-based guidelines are necessary to support clinicians deciding whether and what induction therapy is required for their transplant patients today.

  1. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  2. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; ...

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  3. Combined epidermal growth factor receptor targeting with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib (ZD1839) and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (IMC-C225): superiority over single-agent receptor targeting.

    PubMed

    Matar, Pablo; Rojo, Federico; Cassia, Raúl; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Di Cosimo, Serena; Tabernero, José; Guzmán, Marta; Rodriguez, Sonia; Arribas, Joaquín; Palacios, José; Baselga, José

    2004-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is abnormally activated in cancer and two classes of anti-EGFR agents, monoclonal antibodies and low-molecular-weight tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have shown antitumor activity in patients. Because these two classes of antireceptor agents target the EGFR at different sites, we decided to explore whether the combined administration of gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody, had superior antitumor activity than either agent given alone. We studied the effects of the combination of gefitinib and cetuximab in a panel of human cancer cell lines and in an EGFR-dependent human tumor xenograft model (A431). The effects of these two agents on EGFR signaling, proliferation, apoptosis, and vascularization were evaluated. In addition, we analyzed, with cDNA arrays, changes in gene expression profiles induced by both agents. The combined treatment with gefitinib and cetuximab resulted in a synergistic effect on cell proliferation and in superior inhibition of EGFR-dependent signaling and induction of apoptosis. In a series of in vivo experiments, single-agent gefitinib or cetuximab resulted in transient complete tumor remission only at the highest doses. In contrast, suboptimal doses of gefitinib and cetuximab given together resulted in a complete and permanent regression of large tumors. In the combination-treated tumors, there was a superior inhibition of EGFR, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Akt phosphorylation, as well as greater inhibition of cell proliferation and vascularization and enhanced apoptosis. Using cDNA arrays, we found 59 genes that were coregulated and 45 genes differentially regulated, including genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation, transcription, DNA synthesis and repair, angiogenesis, signaling molecules, cytoskeleton organization, and tumor invasion and metastasis. Our findings suggest both shared and complementary mechanisms of action with gefitinib

  4. Gene expression profiles normalized in psoriatic skin by treatment with brodalumab, a human anti-IL-17 receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Russell, Chris B; Rand, Hugh; Bigler, Jeannette; Kerkof, Keith; Timour, Martin; Bautista, Edgar; Krueger, James G; Salinger, David H; Welcher, Andrew A; Martin, David A

    2014-04-15

    The IL-17 pathway is an established driver of psoriasis pathogenesis. We examined the detailed molecular and cellular effects of blockade of IL-17 signaling in human psoriatic skin before and following treatment with brodalumab, a competitive inhibitor of the IL-17 Receptor A subunit. Thousands of aberrantly expressed genes in lesional skin normalized within 2 weeks following brodalumab treatment, with conversion of the lesional psoriasis transcriptome to resemble that seen in nonlesional skin. Keratinocyte-expressed genes appeared to normalize rapidly, whereas T cell-specific normalization occurred over six weeks. The three IL-17 ligand genes that are upregulated in lesional skin, IL17A, IL17C, and IL17F, were all downregulated in a dose-dependent manner following brodalumab treatment. Cellular measures also showed a similar pattern with dramatic decreases in keratinocyte hyperplasia within one week, and decreases in infiltrating leukocytes occurred over a longer timescale. Individuals with the highest brodalumab exposure showed normalization of both IL-17-responsive genes and the psoriasis transcriptome, whereas subjects with lower exposures showed transient or incomplete molecular responses. Clinical and molecular response appeared dependent on the extent of brodalumab exposure relative to the expression of IL-17 ligand genes, and reduction of IL-17 signaling into the nonlesional range was strongly correlated with normalization of the psoriasis transcriptome. These data indicate that blockade of IL-17 signaling in psoriatic skin leads to rapid transcriptomal changes initially in keratinocyte-expressed genes, followed by normalization in the leukocyte abnormalities, and demonstrates the essential role of the IL-17R on keratinocytes in driving disease pathogenesis.

  5. Inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinase ROR1 by anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies and siRNA induced apoptosis of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ghaemimanesh, Fatemeh; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Bayat, Ali-Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Mellstedt, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ROR1 is overexpressed and of importance for the survival of various malignancies, including lung adenocarcinoma, breast cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). There is limited information however on ROR1 in melanoma. In the present study we analysed in seven melanoma cell lines ROR1 expression and phosphorylation as well as the effects of anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and ROR1 suppressing siRNA on cell survival. ROR1 was overexpressed at the protein level to a varying degree and phosphorylated at tyrosine and serine residues. Three of our four self-produced anti-ROR1 mAbs (clones 3H9, 5F1 and 1A8) induced a significant direct apoptosis of the ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375 cell lines as well as cell death in complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ESTDAB081 and 094 cell lines respectively were resistant to direct apoptosis of the four anti-ROR1 mAbs alone but not in CDC or ADCC. ROR1 siRNA transfection induced downregulation of ROR1 expression both at mRNA and protein levels proceeded by apoptosis of the melanoma cells (ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375) including ESTDAB081, which was resistant to the direct apoptotic effect of the mAbs. The results indicate that ROR1 may play a role in the survival of melanoma cells. The surface expression of ROR1 on melanoma cells may support the notion that ROR1 might be a suitable target for mAb therapy.

  6. Inhibition of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROR1 by Anti-ROR1 Monoclonal Antibodies and siRNA Induced Apoptosis of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ghaemimanesh, Fatemeh; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Bayat, Ali-Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Mellstedt, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ROR1 is overexpressed and of importance for the survival of various malignancies, including lung adenocarcinoma, breast cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). There is limited information however on ROR1 in melanoma. In the present study we analysed in seven melanoma cell lines ROR1 expression and phosphorylation as well as the effects of anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and ROR1 suppressing siRNA on cell survival. ROR1 was overexpressed at the protein level to a varying degree and phosphorylated at tyrosine and serine residues. Three of our four self-produced anti-ROR1 mAbs (clones 3H9, 5F1 and 1A8) induced a significant direct apoptosis of the ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375 cell lines as well as cell death in complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ESTDAB081 and 094 cell lines respectively were resistant to direct apoptosis of the four anti-ROR1 mAbs alone but not in CDC or ADCC. ROR1 siRNA transfection induced downregulation of ROR1 expression both at mRNA and protein levels proceeded by apoptosis of the melanoma cells (ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375) including ESTDAB081, which was resistant to the direct apoptotic effect of the mAbs. The results indicate that ROR1 may play a role in the survival of melanoma cells. The surface expression of ROR1 on melanoma cells may support the notion that ROR1 might be a suitable target for mAb therapy. PMID:23593420

  7. Genetic engineering, expression, and activity of a chimeric monoclonal antibody-avidin fusion protein for receptor-mediated delivery of biotinylated drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-fang; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-03-01

    The genetic engineering, expression, and validation of a fusion protein of avidin (AV) and a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR) is described. The 15 kDa avidin monomer was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the HIRMAb. The fusion protein heavy chain reacted with antibodies specific for human IgG and avidin, and had the same affinity for binding to the HIR extracellular domain as the original chimeric HIRMAb. The fusion protein qualitatively bound biotinylated ligands, but was secreted fully saturated with biotin by COS cells, owing to the high level of biotin in tissue culture medium. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were permanently transfected with a tandem vector expressing the fusion protein genes, and high expressing cell lines were isolated by methotrexate amplification and dilutional cloning. The product expressed by CHO cells had high binding to the HIR, and migrated as a homogeneous species in size exclusion HPLC and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The CHO cells were adapted to a 4 week culture in biotin depleted medium, and the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein expressed under these conditions had 1 unoccupied biotin binding site per molecule, based on a [3H]-biotin ultrafiltration assay. The HIRMAb-AV increased biotin uptake by human cells >15-fold, and mediated the endocytosis of fluorescein-biotin, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. In summary, the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug targeting system for humans that can be adapted to monobiotinylated drugs or nucleic acids.

  8. An IgM-kappa rat monoclonal antibody specific for the type 1 sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptor with antagonist and agonist activities.

    PubMed

    Goetzl, Edward J; Dembrow, Dale; Van Brocklyn, James R; Gráler, Markus; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2004-04-30

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) type 1G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1 GPCRs) are specific high-affinity transducers for this lipid growth factor and cellular mediator. S1P1 GPCRs are widely-expressed and physiologically critical in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Functional rat monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been generated against human S1P1 GPCRs expressed in rat null-cell transductants to provide bioavailable agents capable of stimulating or suppressing the S1P-S1P1 GPCR axis. The rat IgM-kappa anti-S1P1 GPCR MoAb designated 4B5.2 binds specifically to native human or mouse S1P1 GPCRs in cell membranes, but not to solubilized and denatured S1P1 GPCRs. Specific binding of 32P-S1P to cellular S1P1 GPCRs is not blocked by 4B5.2. T cell chemotactic responses to S1P and S1P suppression of T cell chemotaxis to chemokines both are inhibited selectively by 4B5.2. In contrast, generation of gamma-interferon by stimulated T cells is diminished by 4B5.2 as by S1P. T cell S1P1 GPCR-selective antagonist and agonist effects of 4B5.2 in vivo may alter immune responses as distinctively as the available poly-S1P GPCR-directed pharmacological agents, without the undesirable side-effects attributable to actions of these agents on other S1P GPCRs.

  9. Anifrolumab, an Anti–Interferon‐α Receptor Monoclonal Antibody, in Moderate‐to‐Severe Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Khamashta, Munther; Merrill, Joan T.; Werth, Victoria P.; Kalunian, Kenneth; Brohawn, Philip; Illei, Gabor G.; Drappa, Jorn; Wang, Liangwei; Yoo, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of anifrolumab, a type I interferon (IFN) receptor antagonist, in a phase IIb, randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study of adults with moderate‐to‐severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients (n = 305) were randomized to receive intravenous anifrolumab (300 mg or 1,000 mg) or placebo, in addition to standard therapy, every 4 weeks for 48 weeks. Randomization was stratified by SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 score (<10 or ≥10), oral corticosteroid dosage (<10 or ≥10 mg/day), and type I IFN gene signature test status (high or low) based on a 4‐gene expression assay. The primary end point was the percentage of patients achieving an SLE Responder Index (SRI[4]) response at week 24 with sustained reduction of oral corticosteroids (<10 mg/day and less than or equal to the dose at week 1 from week 12 through 24). Other end points (including SRI[4], British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG]–based Composite Lupus Assessment [BICLA], modified SRI[6], and major clinical response) were assessed at week 52. The primary end point was analyzed in the modified intent‐to‐treat (ITT) population and type I IFN–high subpopulation. The study result was considered positive if the primary end point was met in either of the 2 study populations. The Type I error rate was controlled at 0.10 (2‐sided), within each of the 2 study populations for the primary end point analysis. Results The primary end point was met by more patients treated with anifrolumab (34.3% of 99 for 300 mg and 28.8% of 104 for 1,000 mg) than placebo (17.6% of 102) (P = 0.014 for 300 mg and P = 0.063 for 1,000 mg, versus placebo), with greater effect size in patients with a high IFN signature at baseline (13.2% in placebo‐treated patients versus 36.0% [P = 0.004] and 28.2% [P = 0.029]) in patients treated with anifrolumab 300 mg and 1,000 mg, respectively. At week 52, patients treated with anifrolumab

  10. Mitogenicity and down-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor by YTA-1 and YTA-2, monoclonal antibodies that recognize 75-kDa molecules on human large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y; Inamoto, T; Sugie, K; Masutani, H; Shindo, T; Tagaya, Y; Yamauchi, A; Ozawa, K; Yodoi, J

    1989-01-01

    A large number of interleukin 2 receptors lacking the Tac epitope (IL-2R/p75) were found to be constitutively expressed on the human large granular lymphocyte/natural killer cell line YT, which bears inducible IL-2R/p55 associated with Tac antigen. Two anti-YT IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, YTA-1 and YTA-2, recognizing different epitopes of the same 75- to 80-kDa molecule, were established. The 75-kDa antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies was strongly expressed on the large granular lymphocytes of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and on various lymphoid cell lines bearing IL-2R/p75. The YTA-1 and YTA-2 antibodies were mitogenic and were different from other mitogenic monoclonal antibodies such as anti-T3 (CD3), anti-T11 (CD2), and KOLT-2 (CD28). Further, they down-regulated the high-affinity IL-2R of peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 24 hr in culture. The relationship between the YTA-1/2 antigen and the IL-2R system is discussed. Images PMID:2465549

  11. A randomised phase IIb study of mavrilimumab, a novel GM-CSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burmester, Gerd R; McInnes, Iain B; Kremer, Joel; Miranda, Pedro; Korkosz, Mariusz; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Mysler, Eduardo; Sleeman, Matthew A; Godwood, Alex; Sinibaldi, Dominic; Guo, Xiang; White, Wendy I; Wang, Bing; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Ryan, Patricia C; Close, David; Weinblatt, Michael E

    2017-06-01

    Despite the therapeutic value of current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatments, agents with alternative modes of action are required. Mavrilimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor-α, was evaluated in patients with moderate-to-severe RA. In a phase IIb study (NCT01706926), patients with inadequate response to ≥1 synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug(s), Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28)-C reactive protein (CRP)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥3.2, ≥4 swollen joints despite methotrexate (MTX) were randomised 1:1:1:1 to subcutaneous mavrilimumab (150, 100, 30 mg), or placebo every other week (eow), plus MTX for 24 weeks. Coprimary outcomes were DAS28-CRP change from baseline to week 12 and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response rate (week 24). 326 patients were randomised (150 mg, n=79; 100 mg, n=85; 30 mg, n=81; placebo, n=81); 305 completed the study (September 2012-June 2013). Mavrilimumab treatment significantly reduced DAS28-CRP scores from baseline compared with placebo (change from baseline (SE); 150 mg: -1.90 (0.14), 100 mg: -1.64 (0.13), 30 mg: -1.37 (0.14), placebo: -0.68 (0.14); p<0.001; all dosages compared with placebo).Significantly more mavrilimumab-treated patients achieved ACR20 compared with placebo (week 24: 73.4%, 61.2%, 50.6% vs 24.7%, respectively (p<0.001)). Adverse events were reported in 43 (54.4%), 36 (42.4%), 41 (50.6%) and 38 (46.9%) patients in the mavrilimumab 150, 100, 30 mg eow and placebo groups, respectively. No treatment-related safety signals were identified. Mavrilimumab significantly decreased RA disease activity, with clinically meaningful responses observed 1 week after treatment initiation, representing a novel mechanism of action with persuasive therapeutic potential. NCT01706926; results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  12. A randomised, open label phase III trial with nimotuzumab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody in the treatment of newly diagnosed adult glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Heese, Oliver; Steinbach, Joachim P; Schnell, Oliver; Schackert, Gabriele; Mehdorn, Maximilian; Schulz, Dirk; Simon, Matthias; Schlegel, Uwe; Senft, Christian; Geletneky, Karsten; Braun, Christian; Hartung, Joachim G; Reuter, Dirk; Metz, Monika Warmuth; Bach, Ferdinand; Pietsch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    A randomised, open label phase III trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy of nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) added to standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. 149 glioblastoma patients stratified as with or without residual tumour were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous nimotuzumab 400mg weekly added to standard radiochemotherapy followed by 400mg biweekly after twelve weeks or standard radiochemotherapy. Progression status after 52 weeks (12moPFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) based on Macdonald criteria were co-primary and overall survival (OS), toxicity and quality of life secondary end-points. 142 patients were evaluated for efficacy (per protocol cohort). 12 moPFS was 25.6% in the experimental arm and 20.3% in the control group. In residual tumour patients (n=81) median PFS was 5.6 versus 4.0 months, (hazard ratio (HR), 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.55-1.37), for patients without residual tumour (n=61) it was 10.6 versus 9.9 months, (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57-1.77). Median OS in patients with residual tumour was 19.5 versus 16.7 months, (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.52-1.57; P=0.7061), for patients without 23.3 versus 21.0 months (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.41-1.44; P=0.4068). A small cohort of MGMT non-methylated patients with residual tumour showed PFS of 6.2 versus 4.0 months (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.35-1.67; P=0.4997) and OS of 19.0 versus 13.8 months (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.27-1.64; P=0.3648). EGF-R amplification did not correlate with clinical efficacy of nimotuzumab. Nimotuzumab was well tolerated. This study, albeit negative, contains hypothesis generating signals supporting evaluation of correlative, efficacy-predicting tumour parameters for nimotuzumab in the treatment of glioblastoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  14. Partial and transient modulation of the CD3–T-cell receptor complex, elicited by low-dose regimens of monoclonal anti-CD3, is sufficient to induce disease remission in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Devangi S; Christmas, Rudy A; Waldmann, Herman; Rosenzweig, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It has been established that a total of 250 μg of monoclonal anti-mouse CD3 F(ab′)2 fragments, administered daily (50 μg per dose), induces remission of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of autoimmune diabetes by preventing β cells from undergoing further autoimmune attack. We evaluated lower-dose regimens of monoclonal anti-CD3 F(ab′)2 in diabetic NOD mice for their efficacy and associated pharmacodynamic (PD) effects, including CD3–T-cell receptor (TCR) complex modulation, complete blood counts and proportions of circulating CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+ FoxP3+ T cells. Four doses of 2 μg (total dose 8 μg) induced 53% remission of diabetes, similarly to the 250 μg dose regimen, whereas four doses of 1 μg induced only 16% remission. While the 250 μg dose regimen produced nearly complete and sustained modulation of the CD3 –TCR complex, lower doses, spaced 3 days apart, which induced similar remission rates, elicited patterns of transient and partial modulation. In treated mice, the proportions of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells decreased, whereas the proportions of CD4+ FoxP3+ T cells increased; these effects were transient. Mice with greater residual β-cell function, estimated using blood glucose and C-peptide levels at the initiation of treatment, were more likely to enter remission than mice with more advanced disease. Thus, lower doses of monoclonal anti-CD3 that produced only partial and transient modulation of the CD3–TCR complex induced remission rates comparable to higher doses of monoclonal anti-CD3. Accordingly, in a clinical setting, lower-dose regimens may be efficacious and may also improve the safety profile of therapy with monoclonal anti-CD3, potentially including reductions in cytokine release-related syndromes and maintenance of pathogen-specific immunosurveillance during treatment. PMID:20059577

  15. Enhancement of the antitumor activity of ionising radiation by nimotuzumab, a humanised monoclonal antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines of differing epidermal growth factor receptor status

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Y; Okamoto, I; Iwasa, T; Yoshida, T; Suzuki, M; Hatashita, E; Yamada, Y; Satoh, T; Fukuoka, M; Ono, K; Nakagawa, K

    2008-01-01

    The expression and activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are determinants of radiosensitivity in several tumour types, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, little is known of whether genetic alterations of EGFR in NSCLC cells affect the therapeutic response to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to EGFR in combination with radiation. We examined the effects of nimotuzumab, a humanised mAb to EGFR, in combination with ionising radiation on human NSCLC cell lines of differing EGFR status. Flow cytometry revealed that H292 and Ma-1 cells expressed high and moderate levels of EGFR on the cell surface, respectively, whereas H460, H1299, and H1975 cells showed a low level of surface EGFR expression. Immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in H292 and Ma-1 cells but not in H460, H1299, or H1975 cells. Nimotuzumab augmented the cytotoxic effect of radiation in H292 and Ma-1 cells in a clonogenic assay in vitro, with a dose enhancement factor of 1.5 and 1.3, respectively. It also enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation on H292 and Ma-1 cell xenografts in nude mice, with an enhancement factor of 1.3 and 4.0, respectively. Nimotuzumab did not affect the radioresponse of H460 cells in vitro or in vivo. Nimotuzumab enhanced the antitumor efficacy of radiation in certain human NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. This effect may be related to the level of EGFR expression on the cell surface rather than to EGFR mutation. PMID:18253126

  16. Murine monoclonal antibodies against murine uPA receptor produced in gene-deficient mice: inhibitory effects on receptor-mediated uPA activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pass, Jesper; Jögi, Annika; Lund, Ida K; Rønø, Birgitte; Rasch, Morten G; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Lund, Leif R; Ploug, Michael; Rømer, John; Danø, Keld; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2007-06-01

    Binding of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to its cellular receptor, uPAR, potentiates plasminogen activation and localizes it to the cell surface. Focal plasminogen activation is involved in both normal and pathological tissue remodeling processes including cancer invasion. The interaction between uPA and uPAR therefore represents a potential target for anti-invasive cancer therapy. Inhibitors of the human uPA-uPAR interaction have no effect in the murine system. To enable in-vivo studies in murine cancer models we have now generated murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against murine uPAR (muPAR) by immunizing uPAR-deficient mice with recombinant muPAR and screened for antibodies, which inhibit the muPA-muPAR interaction. Two of the twelve mAbs obtained, mR1 and mR2, interfered with the interaction between muPAR and the amino-terminal fragment of muPA (mATF) when analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. The epitope for mR1 is located on domain I of muPAR, while that of mR2 is on domains (II-III). In cell binding experiments using radiolabelled mATF, the maximal inhibition obtained with mR1 was 85% while that obtained with mR2 was 50%. The IC(50) value for mR1 was 0.67 nM compared to 0.14 nM for mATF. In an assay based on modified anthrax toxins, requiring cell-bound muPA activity for its cytotoxity, an approximately 50% rescue of the cells could be obtained by addition of mR1. Importantly, in-vivo efficacy of mR1 was demonstrated by the ability of mR1 to rescue mice treated with a lethal dose of uPA-activatable anthrax toxins.

  17. The effect and safety of monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor on migraine: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xianfeng; Li, Pan; Hu, Xiaolin; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has been recognized as one of the leading causes of disability in the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study and seriously affects the quality of patients' life, current treatment options are not ideal. Monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor (CGRP-mAbs) appear more promising for migraine because of considerably better effect and safety profiles. The objective of this study is to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and safety of CGRP-mAbs for migraine therapy. A systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library and Baidu Scholar was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which compared the effect and safety of CGRP-mAbs with placebo on migraine. Regarding the efficacy, the reduction of monthly migraine days from baseline to weeks 1-4, 5-8, and 9-12; responder rates were extracted as the outcome measures of the effects of CGRP-mAbs. Regarding the safety, total adverse events, the main adverse events, and other adverse events were evaluated. We found significant reduction of monthly migraine days in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (weeks 1-4: SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.61 to -0.36; weeks 5-8: SMD -0.43, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.30; weeks 9-12: SMD -0.37, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.24). 50% and 75% responder rates (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.99 to 3.37; and OR 2.91, 95% CI 2.06 to 4.10) were significantly increased compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in total adverse events (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.51), and the main adverse events including upper respiratory tract infection (OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.55), nasopharyngitis (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.16), nausea (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.32), injection-site pain (OR 1.73, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.16) and back pain (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.90) were not obviously changed compared with placebo control, but the results showed significant increase of dizziness in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 9.45). This meta-analysis suggests that CGRP-mAbs are

  18. Clues to pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provided by analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and clustering of B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Varettoni, Marzia; Zibellini, Silvia; Capello, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Rossi, Davide; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Pochintesta, Lara; Gotti, Manuel; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We characterized immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements and searched for clusters of stereotyped B-cell receptors in 123 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM; n = 59) or immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM-MGUS) (n = 64). A productive monoclonal IGHV-D-J rearrangement was obtained in 99/123 patients (80%). Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes were mutated in 94/99 patients (95%) with a median somatic hypermutation rate of 6.7% (2.1-14.5). Compared with the normal B-cell repertoire, patients with WM/IgM-MGUS showed an over-representation of the IGHV3 subgroup (83% vs. 55%, p < 0.0001) and an under-representation of IGHV1 (7% vs. 14%, p = 0.04) and IGHV4 (7% vs. 23%, p = 0.0001) subgroups. At the gene level, in WM/IgM-MGUS there was an over-representation of IGHV3-23 (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.0003), IGHV3-64 (3% vs. < 1%, p = 0.003), IGHV3-7 (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.0001) and IGHV3-74 (9% vs. 2%, p < 0.0001), while IGHV4-39 was never used (0 vs. 5%, p = 0.03). Intra-WM/IgM-MGUS search for HCDR3 similarity showed no association fulfilling criteria for stereotyped receptors. WM/IgM-MGUS sequences were unrelated to known chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) subsets. In conclusion, the IGHV gene usage in WM and IgM-MGUS is remarkably biased as compared to the normal B-cell repertoire. WM and IgM-MGUS-specific HCDR3 clusters do not occur with a frequency detectable with currently available databases, not supporting a B-cell receptor-driven pathogenesis in WM and IgM-MGUS.

  19. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  20. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M.; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P.; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Hercus, Timothy R.; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J.; Fabri, Louis J.; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W.; Nash, Andrew D.; Wilson, Nicholas J.; Wilson, Michael J.; Owczarek, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU). PMID:26651396

  1. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M; Hercus, Timothy R; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Fabri, Louis J; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W; Nash, Andrew D; Wilson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Michael J; Owczarek, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU).

  2. The activation and differential signalling of the growth hormone receptor induced by pGH or anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lan, Hainan; Liu, Huimin; Fu, Zhiling; Yang, Yanhong; Han, Weiwei; Guo, Feng; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jingsheng; Zheng, Xin

    2013-08-25

    In this report, we have developed a panel of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to pGH by immunising BALB/c mice with a purified monoclonal anti-pGH antibody (1A3), among which one mAb, termed CG-8F, was selected for further characterisation. We found that CG-8F behaved as a typical Ab2β, not only conformationally competing with pGH for 1A3 but also exhibiting recognition for GHR in a rat hepatocyte model. We next examined the resulting signal transduction pathways triggered by this antibody in rat hepatocytes and found that both pGH and CG-8F could trigger the JAK2-STAT1/3/5-mediated signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation kinetics of pSTAT1/3/5 induced by either pGH or CG-8F were remarkably similar in the dose-response and time course rat hepatocyte experiments. In contrast, only pGH, but not CG-8F, was capable of inducing ERK phosphorylation. Further experimental studies indicated that the two functional binding sites on CG-8F are required for GHR activation. This study partially reveals the mechanism of action of GH anti-idiotypic antibodies and also indicates that monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies represent an effective way to produce GH mimics, suggesting that it is possible to produce signal-specific cytokine agonists using an anti-idiotypic antibody approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  5. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  6. Chronic exposure in vivo to thyrotropin receptor stimulating monoclonal antibodies sustains high thyroxine levels and thyroid hyperplasia in thyroid autoimmunity-prone HLA-DRB1*0301 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jeffrey C; Gilbert, Jacqueline A; Meroueh, Chady; Snower, Daniel P; David, Chella S; Kong, Yi-chi M; Paul Banga, J

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the induction of autoimmunity and the maintenance of sustained hyperthyroidism in autoimmunity-prone human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR3 transgenic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice following chronic stimulation of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) by monoclonal thyroid-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAbs). Animals received weekly injections over the course of 9 weeks of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with strong thyroid-stimulating properties. Administration of the mAbs KSAb1 (IgG2b) or KSAb2 (IgG2a), which have similar stimulating properties but different TSH-binding blocking activity, resulted in significantly elevated serum thyroxine (T4) levels and thyroid hyperplasia. After the first injection, an initial surge then fall in serum T4 levels was followed by sustained elevated levels with subsequent injections for at least 63 days. Examination of KSAb1 and KSAb2 serum bioactivity showed that the accumulation of the TSAbs in serum was related to their subclass half-lives. The thyroid glands were enlarged and histological examination showed hyperplastic follicles, with minimal accompanying thyroid inflammation. Our results show that chronic in vivo administration of mAbs with strong thyroid-stimulating activity resulted in elevated T4 levels, suggesting persistent stimulation without receptor desensitization, giving a potential explanation for the sustained hyperthyroid status in patients with Graves' disease. Moreover, despite the presence of HLA disease susceptibility alleles and the autoimmune prone NOD background genes, chronic stimulation of the thyroid gland did not lead to immune cell-mediated follicular destruction, suggesting the persistence of immunoregulatory influences to suppress autoimmunity. PMID:17535305

  7. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  8. Ascites fluid containing monoclonal antibody (EGFR1) to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation in solubilized placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michiel, D.F.; Hollenberg, M.D.

    1986-03-05

    Ascites fluid containing EGFR1 antibody precipitated EGFR prelabelled by phosphorylating human placental membranes with EGF and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The ascites fluid (at 1:100 dilution) was also found to stimulate phosphorylation of the solubilized placental membranes EGFR and the 35 kDa Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent substrate of the EGFR/kinase from placental membrane. In intact membranes, ascites fluid produced a small but noticeable stimulation of EGFR autophosphorylation. In solubilized membrane preparations, ascites fluid and EGF produced a comparable stimulation of phosphorylation both of the receptor and of pp35. The effect of EGF and ascites fluid appeared to be additive. Since EGFR1 does not inhibit the binding of EGF to the receptor, the data suggest that the antibody stimulates the receptor kinase activity by interacting with a site distinct from the EGF-binding site; the antibody effect is unmasked by receptor solubilization.

  9. Characterization of binding mode of action of a blocking anti-platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, reveals conformational flexibility and avidity needed for PDGF-BB to bind PDGF receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Jun; Mosyak, Lidia; Brooks, Jon; Cain, Michael; Carven, Gregory J; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishino, Tetsuya; Tam, May; Lavallie, Edward R; Yang, Zhiyong; Ponsel, Dirk; Rauchenberger, Robert; Arch, Robert; Pullen, Nick

    2015-03-17

    Platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is an important mitogen and cell survival factor during development. PDGF-BB binds PDGF receptor-β (PDGFRβ) to trigger receptor dimerization and tyrosine kinase activation. We present the pharmacological and biophysical characterization of a blocking PDGF-BB monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, and contrast this to PDGFRβ. MOR8457 binds to PDGF-BB with high affinity and selectivity, and prevents PDGF-BB induced cell proliferation competitively and with high potency. The structural characterization of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB complex indicates that MOR8457 binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry, but that binding of a single MOR8457 moiety is sufficient to prevent binding to PDGFRβ. Comparison of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB structure with that of the PDGFRβ-PDGF-BB complex suggested the potential reason for this was a substantial bending and twisting of PDGF-BB in the MOR8457 structure, relative to the structures of PDGF-BB alone, bound to a PDGF-BB aptamer or PDGFRβ, which makes it nonpermissive for PDGFRβ binding. These biochemical and structural data offer insights into the permissive structure of PDGF-BB needed for agonism as well as strategies for developing specific PDGF ligand antagonists.

  10. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  11. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  13. Functional study of a monoclonal antibody to IgE Fc receptor (Fc epsilon R2) of eosinophils, platelets, and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    An IgM mAb (BB10) was produced by immunization of mice with human eosinophils purified according to their abnormal low density ("hypodense" cells), and previously shown to exhibit increased IgE- dependent antiparasite cytotoxicity. This BB10 antibody, selected for positive fluorescence staining of hypodense blood or lung eosinophils and low or negative staining of normodense eosinophils or neutrophils, could strongly inhibit IgE-dependent cytotoxicity of human eosinophils and platelets. The specificity for the IgE Fc receptor was suggested by the high levels of inhibition of IgE rosettes formed by eosinophils after incubation with the purified IgM fraction of BB10, whereas other receptors (Fc gamma R, CR1) were not affected. On the other hand, BB10, able to inhibit rat eosinophil Fc epsilon R, did not react with the IgE Fc receptor on mast cells or basophils. A technique using radioiodinated BB10 allowed us to quantify the specific binding of BB10 to human eosinophils and platelets. Competition experiments revealed a crossinhibition between the binding of BB10 and IgE, suggesting the specificity of BB10 for the IgE binding site of eosinophil, platelet, and monocyte Fc epsilon R. Three proteins having extrapolated Mr of 32,000, 43,000-45,000, and 97,000 were found in the platelet extract eluted from a BB10 or from an IgE immunosorbent column. These findings confirm the similarities between IgE Fc receptors on human eosinophils, platelets, and macrophages, already observed with polyclonal antibodies directed against the B lymphocyte Fc epsilon receptor. They suggest, moreover, that the mAb BB10 can represent a good reagent for further investigations on the structure and the functions of this IgE Fc receptor (Fc epsilon R2). PMID:2425032

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) targeting with monoclonal antibody cixutumumab (IMC-A12) inhibits IGF-I action in endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Attias-Geva, Zohar; Bentov, Itay; Ludwig, Dale L; Fishman, Ami; Bruchim, Ilan; Werner, Haim

    2011-07-01

    Specific insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) targeting emerged in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in the Western world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of cixutumumab (IMC-A12, ImClone Systems), a fully human monoclonal antibody against the IGF-IR, to inhibit IGF-I-mediated biological actions and cell signalling events in four endometrial carcinoma-derived cell lines (ECC-1, Ishikawa, USPC-1 and USPC-2). Our results demonstrate that cixutumumab was able to block the IGF-I-induced autophosphorylation of the IGF-IR. In addition, the PI3K and MAPK downstream signalling pathways were also inactivated by cixutumumab in part of the cell lines. Prolonged (24h and 48h) exposures to cixutumumab reduced IGF-IR expression. Furthermore, confocal microscopy of GFP-tagged receptors shows that cixutumumab treatment led to IGF-IR redistribution from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Antiapoptotic effects were evaluated by cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP, and mitogenicity and transformation by proliferation and cell cycle assays. Results obtained showed that cixutumumab abrogated the IGF-I-stimulated increase in proliferation rate, and increased caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, two markers of apoptosis. Of importance, cixutumumab had no effect neither on insulin receptor (IR) expression nor on IGF-I activation of IR. In summary, in a cellular model of endometrial cancer cixutumumab was able to inhibit the IGF-I-induced activation of intracellular cascades, apoptosis and proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  16. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structural Basis of the Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    of chicken neurona .4receptor subunits. Sequences of al and a2 are from Net .Ot al. -l Sequences of a3 and a4 were determintl from clones described...Sucrose gradient analysis of neurona & nicotinic receptors was conducted as follows. Chicken ind rat brain receptors were extracted from crude

  17. Neuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The association of neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy has been known for several years, even if the clinical and pathogenetic relevance of this association is not completely defined. This is not a marginal problem since monoclonal gammopathy is present in 1-3% of the population above 50 years in whom it is often asymptomatic, and in at least 8% of patients is associated with a symptomatic neuropathy, representing one of the leading causes of neuropathy in aged people. Monoclonal gammopathy may result from malignant lymphoproliferative diseases including multiple myeloma or solitary plasmocytoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), other IgM-secreting lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and primary systemic amyloidosis (AL). In most instances it is not associated with any of these disorders and is defined monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for its possible, though infrequent, evolution into malignant forms. Several data support the pathogenetic role of the monoclonal gammopathy in the neuropathy particularly when of IgM isotype where IgM reactivity to several neural antigens has been reported. Increased levels of VEGF have been implicated in POEMS syndrome. However, there are as yet no defined therapies for these neuropathies, as their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized trials.

  18. In vivo analysis of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor humanized monoclonal antibody MK-0646 and small molecule kinase inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiphrakpam, Premila D; Agarwal, Ekta; Mathiesen, Michelle; Haferbier, Katie L; Brattain, Michael G; Chowdhury, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of effective anticancer drugs against colorectal cancer (CRC) is of urgent need since it is the second most common cause of cancer death. The study was designed to evaluate the effects of two IGF-1R antagonists, MK-0646, a recombinant fully humanized monoclonal antibody and OSI-906, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor on CRC cells. Xenograft study was performed on IGF-1R-dependent CRC cell lines for analyzing the antitumor activity of MK-0646 and OSI-906. Tumor proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using Ki67 and TUNEL assays, respectively. We also performed in vitro characterization of MK-0646 and OSI-906 treatment on CRC cells to identify mechanisms associated with drug-induced cell death. Exposure of the GEO and CBS tumor xenografts to MK-0646 or OSI-906 led to a decrease in tumor growth. TUNEL analysis showed an increase of approximately 45-55% in apoptotic cells in both MK-0646 and OSI-906 treated tumor samples. We report the novel finding that treatment with IGF-1R antagonists led to downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein involved in cell survival and inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, IGF-1R antagonists (MK-0646 and OSI-906) demonstrated single agent inhibition of subcutaneous CRC xenograft growth. This was coupled to pro-apoptotic effects resulting in downregulation of XIAP and inhibition of cell survival. We report a novel mechanism by which MK-0646 and OSI-906 elicits cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, these results indicate that MK-0646 and OSI-906 may be potential anticancer candidates for the treatment of patients with IGF-1R-dependent CRC.

  19. Phase II study of nimotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Strumberg, Dirk; Schultheis, Beate; Scheulen, M E; Hilger, R A; Krauss, J; Marschner, N; Lordick, F; Bach, F; Reuter, D; Edler, L; Mross, K

    2012-06-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the EGFR. Based on phase I data, the recommended dose has been established at 200 mg weekly. This study was aimed at evaluating the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab monotherapy in patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Pts who failed first line standard chemotherapy for advanced disease and had at least one measurable lesion were eligible for the study. Nimotuzumab was given intravenously at 200 mg once weekly for 6 weeks (wks). Follow up by CT scan was performed after 8 weeks. Pts continued receiving treatment 3-weekly until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Endpoints included tumor response (RECIST), progression-free survival (PFS), and safety. A total of 56 pts were enrolled for treatment (ECOG status of 1 [n = 41] or 0 [n = 15]), the majority (47 pts) had metastatic disease. Nearly half of the pts [n = 26] received ≥2 regimens. Pts evaluable for response: n = 36; CR: 0; PR: 0; SD: 6 pts. Median PFS for pts with SD was 19.2 weeks, for all pts 6.7 weeks (95% CI: 6.43-7.14 weeks). PFS after 1 year was 10.3% with a median overall survival of 18.1 weeks. Treatment-related adverse events were generally mild including rash grade 1 in 5 pts. After a single dose of 200 mg, the t(1/2) was calculated to 45 h. These data confirm that nimotuzumab is safe and very well tolerated. To improve efficacy, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with Gem has been initiated.

  20. In vivo analysis of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor humanized monoclonal antibody MK-0646 and small molecule kinase inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEIPHRAKPAM, PREMILA D.; AGARWAL, EKTA; MATHIESEN, MICHELLE; HAFERBIER, KATIE L.; BRATTAIN, MICHAEL G.; CHOWDHURY, SANJIB

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of effective anticancer drugs against colorectal cancer (CRC) is of urgent need since it is the second most common cause of cancer death. The study was designed to evaluate the effects of two IGF-1R antagonists, MK-0646, a recombinant fully humanized monoclonal antibody and OSI-906, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor on CRC cells. Xenograft study was performed on IGF-1R-dependent CRC cell lines for analyzing the antitumor activity of MK-0646 and OSI-906. Tumor proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using Ki67 and TUNEL assays, respectively. We also performed in vitro characterization of MK-0646 and OSI-906 treatment on CRC cells to identify mechanisms associated with drug-induced cell death. Exposure of the GEO and CBS tumor xenografts to MK-0646 or OSI-906 led to a decrease in tumor growth. TUNEL analysis showed an increase of approximately 45–55% in apoptotic cells in both MK-0646 and OSI-906 treated tumor samples. We report the novel finding that treatment with IGF-1R antagonists led to downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein involved in cell survival and inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, IGF-1R antagonists (MK-0646 and OSI-906) demonstrated single agent inhibition of subcutaneous CRC xenograft growth. This was coupled to pro-apoptotic effects resulting in downregulation of XIAP and inhibition of cell survival. We report a novel mechanism by which MK-0646 and OSI-906 elicits cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, these results indicate that MK-0646 and OSI-906 may be potential anticancer candidates for the treatment of patients with IGF-1R-dependent CRC. PMID:24173770

  1. Engagement of CD22 on B cells with the monoclonal antibody epratuzumab stimulates the phosphorylation of upstream inhibitory signals of the B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Lumb, Simon; Fleischer, Sarah J; Wiedemann, Annika; Daridon, Capucine; Maloney, Alison; Shock, Anthony; Dörner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The binding of antigen to the B cell receptor (BCR) results in a cascade of signalling events that ultimately drive B cell activation. Uncontrolled B cell activation is regulated by negative feedback loops that involve inhibitory co-receptors such as CD22 and CD32B that exert their functions following phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). The CD22-targeted antibody epratuzumab has previously been shown to inhibit BCR-driven signalling events, but its effects on ITIM phosphorylation of CD22 and CD32B have not been properly evaluated. The present study therefore employed both immunoprecipitation and flow cytometry approaches to elucidate the effects of epratuzumab on direct phosphorylation of key tyrosine (Tyr) residues on both these proteins, using both transformed B cell lines and primary human B cells. Epratuzumab induced the phosphorylation of Tyr(822) on CD22 and enhanced its co-localisation with SHP-1. Additionally, in spite of high basal phosphorylation of other key ITIMs on CD22, in primary human B cells epratuzumab also enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr(807), a residue involved in the recruitment of Grb2. Such initiation events could explain the effects of epratuzumab on downstream signalling in B cells. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that epratuzumab stimulated the phosphorylation of Tyr(292) on the low affinity inhibitory Fc receptor CD32B which would further attenuate BCR-induced signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that engagement of CD22 with epratuzumab leads to the direct phosphorylation of key upstream inhibitory receptors of BCR signalling and may help to explain how this antibody modulates B cell function.

  2. Antitumor activity of a novel anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 monoclonal antibody that does not interfere with ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Tentori, Lucio; Scimeca, Manuel; Dorio, Annalisa S.; Atzori, Maria Grazia; Failla, Cristina M.; Morea, Veronica; Bonanno, Elena; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that has also a soluble isoform containing most of the extracellular ligand binding domain (sVEGFR-1). VEGF-A binds to both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-1, whereas placenta growth factor (PlGF) interacts exclusively with VEGFR-1. In this study we generated an anti-VEGFR-1 mAb (D16F7) by immunizing BALB/C mice with a peptide that we had previously reported to inhibit angiogenesis and endothelial cell migration induced by PlGF. D16F7 did not affect binding of VEGF-A or PlGF to VEGFR-1, thus allowing sVEGFR-1 to act as decoy receptor for these growth factors, but it hampered receptor homodimerization and activation. D16F7 inhibited both the chemotactic response of human endothelial, myelomonocytic and melanoma cells to VEGFR-1 ligands and vasculogenic mimicry by tumor cells. Moreover, D16F7 exerted in vivo antiangiogenic effects in a matrigel plug assay. Importantly, D16F7 inhibited tumor growth and was well tolerated by B6D2F1 mice injected with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma cells. The antitumor effect was associated with melanoma cell apoptosis, vascular abnormalities and decrease of both monocyte/macrophage infiltration and myeloid progenitor mobilization. For all the above, D16F7 may be exploited in the therapy of metastatic melanoma and other tumors or pathological conditions involving VEGFR-1 activation. PMID:27655684

  3. Randomized Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Combination With Placebo or R1507, a Monoclonal Antibody to Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor, for Advanced-Stage Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Spigel, David R.; Chen, David; Steins, Martin B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Schneider, Claus-Peter; Novello, Silvia; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E.; Crino, Lucio; Habben, Kai; Liu, Lian; Jänne, Pasi A.; Brownstein, Carrie M.; Reck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose R1507 is a selective, fully human, recombinant monoclonal antibody (immunoglobulin G1 subclass) against insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The strong preclinical evidence supporting coinhibition of IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as anticancer therapy prompted this study. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression following one or two prior regimens, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0 to 2, and measurable disease were eligible. Patients were randomly assigned to receive erlotinib (150 mg orally once a day) in combination with either placebo, R1507 9 mg/kg weekly, or R1507 16 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. Treatment cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. The primary end point was comparison of the 12-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Results In all, 172 patients were enrolled: median age, 61 years; female, 33%; never-smokers, 12%; and performance status 0 or 1, 88%. The median number of R1507 doses was six for the weekly arm and 3.5 for the every-3-weeks arm. Grades 3 to 4 adverse events occurred in 37%, 44%, and 48% of patients with placebo, R1507 weekly, and R1507 every 3 weeks, respectively. The 12-week PFS rates were 39%, 37%, and 44%, and the median overall survival was 8.1, 8.1, and 12.1 months for the three groups, respectively, with statistically nonsignificant hazard ratios. The 12-week PFS rate in patients with KRAS mutation was 36% with R1507 compared with 0% with placebo. Conclusion The combination of R1507 with erlotinib did not provide PFS or survival advantage over erlotinib alone in an unselected group of patients with advanced NSCLC. Predictive biomarkers are essential for further development of combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR. PMID:22025157

  4. Anticancer activity of TTAC-0001, a fully human anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2/KDR) monoclonal antibody, is associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Geon; Jin, Younggeon; Jin, Juyoun; Yang, Heekyoung; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Weon Sup; Shim, Sang Ryeol; Kim, Sung-Woo; Yoo, Jinsang; Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoo, Jin-San; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors are considered the primary cause of tumor-induced angiogenesis. Specifically, VEGFR-2/kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) is part of the major signaling pathway that plays a significant role in tumor angiogenesis, which is associated with the development of various types of tumor and metastasis. In particular, KDR is involved in tumor angiogenesis as well as cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of TTAC-0001, a fully human antibody against VEGFR-2/KDR. To assess the efficacy of the antibody and pharmacokinetic (PK) relationship in vivo, we tested the potency of TTAC-0001 in glioblastoma and colorectal cancer xenograft models. Antitumor activity of TTAC-0001 in preclinical models correlated with tumor growth arrest, induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. We also evaluated the combination effect of TTAC-0001 with a chemotherapeutic agent in xenograft models. We were able to determine the relationship between PK and the efficacy of TTAC-0001 through in vivo single-dose PK study. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting VEGFR-2 with TTAC-0001 could be a promising approach for cancer treatment.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  7. Monoclonality and cytogenetic abnormalities in hyaline vascular Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chao; Wang, Yu-Chu; Hung, Liang-Yi; Huang, Wan-Ting; Tsou, Jen-Hui; M Jones, Dan; Song, Hsiang-Lin; Yeh, Yu-Min; Kao, Lin-Yuan; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    Hyaline vascular Castleman disease is traditionally regarded as a reactive hyperplastic process. Occasional cases, however, have been reported with cytogenetic anomalies bringing this concept into question. In this study, we used conventional and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction methods to assess the human androgen receptor α (HUMARA) gene in 29 female patients with hyaline vascular Castleman disease and compared the results with three cases of plasma cell Castleman disease and 20 cases of age-matched lymphoid hyperplasia. We also assessed for immunoglobulin gene and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements, and conventional cytogenetic analysis was performed in three cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease. In cases with informative results, conventional and methylation-specific human androgen receptor α gene analyses yielded a monoclonal pattern in 10 of 19 (53%) and 17 of 23 (74%) cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease, respectively. A monoclonal pattern was also detected in three cases of plasma cell Castleman disease but not in cases of lymphoid hyperplasia. The frequency of monoclonality was higher for lesions >5 cm in size (100%) and for the stromal-rich variant (91%). Cytogenetic abnormalities in stromal cells were revealed in two cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease and no cases showed monoclonal immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. Follow-up data showed persistent disease in 4 of 23 (17%) patients. We conclude that hyaline vascular Castleman disease is often a monoclonal proliferation, most likely of lymph node stromal cells.

  8. Binding of monoclonal antibody AA4 to gangliosides on rat basophilic leukemia cells produces changes similar to those seen with Fc epsilon receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The mAb AA4 binds to novel derivatives of the ganglioside Gd1b on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. Some of the gangliosides are located close to the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI), and binding of mAb AA4 inhibits Fc epsilon RI-mediated histamine release. In the present study, mAb AA4 was found to bind exclusively to mast cells in all rat tissues examined. In vitro, within 1 min of mAb AA4 binding, the cells underwent striking morphologic changes. They lost their normal spindle shaped appearance, increased their ruffling, and spread over the surface of the culture dish. These changes were accompanied by a redistribution of the cytoskeletal elements, actin, tubulin, and vimentin, but only the actin was associated with the membrane ruffles. Binding of mAb AA4 also induces a rise in intracellular calcium, stimulates phosphatidyl inositol breakdown, and activates PKC. However, the extent of these changes was less than that observed when the cells were stimulated with antigen or antibody directed against the Fc epsilon RI. None of these changes associated with mAb AA4 binding were seen when the cells were exposed to nonspecific IgG, IgE, or four other anti-cell surface antibodies, nor were the changes induced by binding mAb AA4 at 4 degrees C or in the absence of extracellular calcium. Although mAb AA4 does not stimulate histamine release, it enhances the effect of the calcium ionophore A23187 mediated release. The morphological and biochemical effects produced by mAb AA4 are similar to those seen following activation of the cell through the IgE receptor. Therefore, the surface gangliosides which bind mAb AA4 may function in modulating secretory events. PMID:1370498

  9. Monoclonal gammopathy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Peixoto, Daniela; Bogas, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    It is common to find monoclonal gammopathy in the investigation workout for an unrelated disorder. There are studies relating rheumatic diseases and therapies which show an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy. The specific mechanisms are not well understood but chronic antigen stimulation assumes an important role. Specific rheumatic diseases have consistently been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders but less attention has been paid to the possible association between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma. We reviewed previous studies regarding monoclonal gammopathy and different rheumatic diseases and treatments associated focusing on prevalence, risk factors and possible pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical approach of a monoclonal gammopathy and its follow-up are explained.

  10. HIV, EBV, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Landgren, Ola

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Ouedraogo et al have investigated the role of HIV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication in the persistence of monoclonal gammopathy.1 It has been known for some time that patients with HIV infection have an increased incidence of monoclonal gammopathy and plasma cell dyscrasias.2,3 The exact mechanism of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with HIV infection is unknown, but in many patients the monoclonal gammopathy and other B-cell abnormalities can be reversed with antiretroviral therapy. However, a proportion of patients will have persistent monoclonal gammopathy.

  11. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  12. ERBB oncogene proteins as targets for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Polanovski, O L; Lebedenko, E N; Deyev, S M

    2012-03-01

    General properties of the family of tyrosine kinase ERBB receptors are considered in connection with their role in the generation of cascades of signal transduction in normal and tumor cells. Causes of acquisition of oncogene features by genes encoding these receptors and their role in tumorigenesis are analyzed. Anti-ERBB monoclonal antibodies approved for therapy are described in detail, and mechanisms of their antitumor activity and development of resistance to them are reviewed. The existing and the most promising strategies for creating and using monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives for therapy of cancer are discussed.

  13. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structure and Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-16

    observed when the sections were coincubated in 400 nrL cold mAb 270. Adjacent Nissl -stained sections were used to identify labeled structures...affinity reagent for the acetylcholine receptor binding site. J Biol Chem 259:11662-11665. 7. Whiting PJ, JM Lindstrom. 1986 . Purification and...characterization of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from chick brain. Biochemistry 2502082-2093. 8. Whiting PJ, JM Lindstrom. 1986 . Pharmacological

  14. Brain Human Monoclonal Autoantibody from Sydenham Chorea Targets Dopaminergic Neurons in Transgenic Mice and Signals Dopamine D2 Receptor: Implications in Human Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Carol J.; Sharma, Meenakshi; Leckman, James F.; Zuccolo, Jonathan; Zuccolo, Amir; Kovoor, Abraham; Swedo, Susan E.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2013-01-01

    How autoantibodies target the brain and lead to disease in disorders such as Sydenham chorea (SC) is not known. SC is characterized by autoantibodies against the brain and is the main neurologic manifestation of streptococcal-induced rheumatic fever. Previously, our novel SC-derived mAb 24.3.1 was found to recognize streptococcal and brain antigens. To investigate in vivo targets of human mAb 24.3.1, VH/VL genes were expressed in B cells of transgenic (Tg) mice as functional chimeric human VH 24.3.1 - mouse constant region IgG1a autoantibody. Chimeric human-mouse IgG1a autoantibody co-localized with tyrosine hydroxylase in the basal ganglia within dopaminergic neurons in vivo in VH 24.3.1 Tg mice. Both human mAb 24.3.1 and IgG1a in Tg sera were found to react with human dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). Reactivity of chorea-derived mAb 24.3.1 or SC IgG with D2R was confirmed by 1) dose dependent inhibitory signaling of D2R as a potential consequence of targeting dopaminergic neurons, 2) reaction with surface-exposed FLAG epitope-tagged D2R, and 3) blocking of Ab reactivity by an extracellular D2R peptide. IgG from SC and a related subset of streptococcal associated behavioral disorders called pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococci (PANDAS) with small choreiform movements reacted in ELISA with D2R. Reaction with FLAG-tagged D2R distinguished SC from PANDAS while sera from both SC and PANDAS induced inhibitory signaling of D2R on transfected cells comparable to dopamine. Here we define a mechanism by which the brain may be altered by antibody in movement and behavioral disorders. PMID:24184556

  15. Polymorphisms of the Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1 in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells Result in Antigenic Variants That Do Not React with Protective Monoclonal Antibody 190/4

    PubMed Central

    Feigelstock, Dino; Thompson, Peter; Mattoo, Pravina; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 190/4 blocks binding of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to the HAV cellular receptor 1 (havcr-1) and protects African green monkey kidney (AGMK) clone GL37 cells (GL37 cells) against HAV infection. BS-C-1 and CV-1 cells, two widely used AGMK cell lines, did not react with MAb 190/4 but expressed havcr-1, as judged by Western blot analysis. The cDNA coding for havcr-1 was amplified from BS-C-1 and CV-1 total cellular RNA by reverse transcription-PCR. Alignment of the amino acid sequences inferred from the cDNA nucleotide sequences showed that BS-C-1 and CV-1 havcr-1 differed from GL37 havcr-1 by having two substitutions in the Cys-rich region, N48H and K108Q, and 10 to 11 additional substitutions plus the insertion of 18 to 22 amino acids in the mucin-like region. Studies with chimeras of GL37 havcr-1 and BS-C-1 havcr-1 showed that the K108Q substitution was responsible for the lack of reaction of MAb 190/4 with BS-C-1 and CV-1 cells. Binding studies indicated that HAV bound to dog cell transfectants expressing the BS-C-1 havcr-1 as well as the GL37/BS-C-1 havcr-1 chimeras. These results indicate that antigenic variants of havcr-1 are expressed in AGMK cells and that binding of HAV to these havcr-1 variants tolerates changes in protective epitope 190/4. PMID:9621093

  16. Polymorphisms of the hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 in African green monkey kidney cells result in antigenic variants that do not react with protective monoclonal antibody 190/4.

    PubMed

    Feigelstock, D; Thompson, P; Mattoo, P; Kaplan, G G

    1998-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 190/4 blocks binding of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to the HAV cellular receptor 1 (havcr-1) and protects African green monkey kidney (AGMK) clone GL37 cells (GL37 cells) against HAV infection. BS-C-1 and CV-1 cells, two widely used AGMK cell lines, did not react with MAb 190/4 but expressed havcr-1, as judged by Western blot analysis. The cDNA coding for havcr-1 was amplified from BS-C-1 and CV-1 total cellular RNA by reverse transcription-PCR. Alignment of the amino acid sequences inferred from the cDNA nucleotide sequences showed that BS-C-1 and CV-1 havcr-1 differed from GL37 havcr-1 by having two substitutions in the Cys-rich region, N48H and K108Q, and 10 to 11 additional substitutions plus the insertion of 18 to 22 amino acids in the mucin-like region. Studies with chimeras of GL37 havcr-1 and BS-C-1 havcr-1 showed that the K108Q substitution was responsible for the lack of reaction of MAb 190/4 with BS-C-1 and CV-1 cells. Binding studies indicated that HAV bound to dog cell transfectants expressing the BS-C-1 havcr-1 as well as the GL37/BS-C-1 havcr-1 chimeras. These results indicate that antigenic variants of havcr-1 are expressed in AGMK cells and that binding of HAV to these havcr-1 variants tolerates changes in protective epitope 190/4.

  17. Extended RAS Gene Mutation Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma to Predict Response to Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Carmen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mangu, Pamela B; Roach, Nancy; Hantel, Alexander; Schilsky, Richard L

    2016-01-10

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction after publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO update addresses the utility of extended RAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to detect resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials in mCRC demonstrate that patients whose tumors harbor RAS mutations in exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146) are unlikely to benefit from therapy with MoAbs directed against EGFR, when used as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. In addition to the evidence reviewed in the original PCO, 11 systematic reviews with meta-analyses, two retrospective analyses, and two health technology assessments based on a systematic review were obtained. These evaluated the outcomes for patients with mCRC with no mutation detected or presence of mutation in additional exons in KRAS and NRAS. PCO: All patients with mCRC who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory for mutations in both KRAS and NRAS exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146). The weight of current evidence indicates that anti-EGFR MoAb therapy should only be considered for treatment of patients whose tumor is determined to not have mutations detected after such extended RAS testing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-02-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody ..cap alpha..IR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I but not /sup 125/I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. ..cap alpha..IR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of ..cap alpha..IR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of < 1 ..mu..g/ml, the effect of insulin to stimulate (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 ..mu..g/ml) of insulin on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation are inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. ..cap alpha..IR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself.

  19. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structural Basis of the Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle, and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-16

    brains. We have also been studying nicotinic receptors from a human neuronal cell line which appear to be of the muscle type. Using synthetic...AND MUSCLE, AND TO DETERMINE THE STRUCTURE OF NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS ON NEURONS Annual Report Jon M. Lindstrom D T IC ELECTE March 16, 1987...AUTHOR(S) ON NEURONS . LINDSTROM. Jon M. 1 3a. TYPE OF REPORT I1 3b. TIME COVERED 114. DTOF REPORT (Year, Mlonth, Day) IS15 PAGE COUNT Annual IFROm2/15/8

  20. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Okada, Maki; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Satoh, Hirokazu; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR), is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models. TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted. MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced. 90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic cancer, although further investigation is

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology provisional clinical opinion: testing for KRAS gene mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma to predict response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Carmen J; Jessup, J Milburn; Somerfield, Mark R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hammond, Elizabeth H; Hayes, Daniel F; McAllister, Pamela K; Morton, Roscoe F; Schilsky, Richard L

    2009-04-20

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO), offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's oncologists following publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO addresses the utility of KRAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma to predict response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy with cetuximab or panitumumab (see Note). Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials demonstrate that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer benefit from therapy with monoclonal antibodies directed against the EGFR, when used either as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. Retrospective subset analyses of the data from these trials strongly suggest that patients who have KRAS mutations detected in codon 12 or 13 do not benefit from this therapy. Five randomized controlled trials of cetuximab or panitumumab have evaluated outcomes for patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma in relation to KRAS mutational status as no mutation detected (wild type) or abnormal (mutated). Another five single-arm studies have retrospectively evaluated tumor response according to KRAS status. Based on systematic reviews of the relevant literature, all patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested for KRAS mutations in a CLIA-accredited laboratory. If KRAS mutation in codon 12 or 13 is detected, then patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma should not receive anti-EGFR antibody therapy as part of their treatment. ASCO's provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and literature available at the time they are written, and are intended to assist physicians in clinical decision-making and identify questions and settings for further research. Due to the rapid flow of scientific information in

  3. [Pitfalls of monoclonal gammopathy].

    PubMed

    Meuleman, N

    2013-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a frequent condition affecting at least 3% of the general population over 50 years. Usually, the diagnosis of MGUS is made accidentally during a biological assessment for other conditions. Although MGUS is most frequently a benign and asymptomatic disorder, it has well been described that MGUS could be a premalignant status and that the risk of transformation into myeloma or other lymphoproliferative disorders is estimated at 1% per year. MGUS can also be associated with other diseases than malignant disorders such as Infections, autoimmune diseases. In some case it could reflect rare but severe disorders that will be crucial not to miss the diagnosis.

  4. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies to rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Valensin, P E; Tollis, M; Bracci, L; Petreni, S; Soldani, P

    1991-07-01

    The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) obtained by immunizing mice with a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the 190-203 region of rabies virus glycoprotein, involved in binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR), displayed different specificities to different rabies virus strains. These mAbs, when used in immunofluorescence tests, allowed differentiation of wild rabies viruses from the attenuated ones.

  5. Randomised phase II study of siltuximab (CNTO 328), an anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, in combination with mitoxantrone/prednisone versus mitoxantrone/prednisone alone in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fizazi, K; De Bono, J S; Flechon, A; Heidenreich, A; Voog, E; Davis, N B; Qi, Ming; Bandekar, R; Vermeulen, J T; Cornfeld, M; Hudes, G R

    2012-01-01

    This open-label phase II trial assessed mitoxantrone/prednisone (M/P) with and without siltuximab (CNTO 328), an anti-interleukin-6 chimeric monoclonal antibody, for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who received prior docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Part 1 assessed the safety of biweekly siltuximab 6 mg/kg plus M 12 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks and P. Part 2 assessed efficacy and safety of siltuximab plus M/P versus M/P alone. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS). Progression was defined as progressive disease per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST), or ≥ 3 new skeletal lesions with clinical deterioration or without deterioration confirmed by repeated bone scan. Rising prostate-specific antigen was not considered progression. Siltuximab plus M/P was well tolerated in Part 1 (n=9). In Part 2, 48 and 49 patients received siltuximab plus M/P or M/P alone, respectively. Enrolment was prematurely terminated by the Independent Data Monitoring Committee since an apparent imbalance in patient baseline characteristics (favoring the M/P only arm) made it unlikely that the study could achieve its primary efficacy end-point. Median PFS was 97 days with siltuximab combination and 228 days with M/P alone (hazard ratio, 1.72; P=0.043). Use of a novel non-validated PFS definition may have contributed to this result. Abnormal laboratory assessments were more frequent with the combination. Infection and febrile neutropenia rates were similar between groups. Greater C-reactive protein suppression was achieved during siltuximab combination treatment compared with M/P alone (P=0.0003). While siltuximab plus M/P appeared well tolerated, improvement in outcomes was not demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structural Basis of the Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-16

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 la. REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION The Salk Institute (If applicable) Receptor Biology Laboratory I 6c. ADDRESS (City...State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) San Diego, California 92138-9216 8a. NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 8b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9

  7. Recombinant monoclonal antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L

    2002-01-01

    With the development of murine hybridoma technology over a quarter century ago, the ability to produce large quantities of well-characterized monoclonal antibody preparations revolutionized diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. For many applications in transfusion medicine, however, the production of serological reagents in mice has certain biological limitations relating to the difficulty in obtaining murine monoclonal antibodies specific for many human blood group antigens. Furthermore, for therapeutic purposes, the efficacy of murine-derived immunoglobulin preparations is limited by the induction of anti-mouse immune responses. Technical difficulties inherent in human hybridoma formation have led to novel molecular approaches that facilitate the isolation and production of human antibodies without the need for B-cell transformation, tissue culture, or even immunized individuals. These technologies, referred to as 'repertoire cloning' or 'Fab/phage display', involve the rapid cloning of immunoglobulin gene segments to create immune libraries from which antibodies with desired specificities can be selected. The use of such recombinant methods in transfusion medicine is anticipated to play an important role in the development and production of renewable supplies of low-cost reagents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  8. Risk of tuberculosis is higher with anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody therapy than with soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor therapy: The three-year prospective French Research Axed on Tolerance of Biotherapies registry

    PubMed Central

    Tubach, Florence; Salmon, Dominique; Ravaud, Philippe; Allanore, Yannick; Goupille, Philippe; Bréban, Maxime; Pallot-Prades, Béatrice; Pouplin, Sophie; Sacchi, Antoinette; Chichemanian, Rose Marie; Bretagne, Stéphane; Emilie, Dominique; Lemann, Marc; Lorthololary, Olivier; Mariette, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy but whether it is drug-specific remains a concern. Our objective was to describe cases of tuberculosis associated with anti-TNF therapy, identify risk factors and estimate the incidence. Methods An incidence study with the French population as reference and a case-control analysis. We collected, for 3 years, cases of TB among French patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, whatever the indication, with two controls treated with anti-TNF agents per case. Results We collected 69 cases of TB in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis (n=40), spondylarthropathies (n=18), inflammatory colitis (n=9), psoriasis (n=1) and Behçet’s disease (n=1) treated with infliximab (n=36), adalimumab (n=28) and etanercept (n=5). None of the cases had received correct chemoprophylaxis treatment. The sex and age-adjusted incidence rate of TB was 116.7 per 100,000 patient-years. The SIR was 12.2 (95% confidence interval 9.7–15.5) and was higher for therapy with infliximab and adalimumab than for that with etanercept: 18.6 (13.4–25.8) and 29.3 (20.2–42.4) versus 1.8 (0.7–4.3), respectively. In the case-control analysis, the exposure to infliximab or adalimumab versus etanercept was an independent risk factor for TB: odds ratio=13.3 (2.6–69.0) and 17.1 (3.6–80.6), respectively. Other risk factors were age, the first year of anti-TNF treatment, and being born in an endemic area. Conclusions The risk of TB is higher for patients receiving monoclonal-antibody than soluble-receptor anti-TNF therapy. The increased risk with early anti-TNF treatment and the absence of correct chemoprophylaxis treatment favours the reactivation of latent TB. PMID:19565495

  9. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. II. Cross-reaction between a monoclonal antibody and two αβ T cell receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, Didier; Engberg, Jan; Stryhn, Anette; Andersen, Peter Sejer; Buus, Søren

    2000-01-01

    The recombinant antibody, pSAN13.4.1, has a unique T cell like specificity; it binds an Influenza Hemagglutinin octapeptide (Ha255-262) in an MHC (H-2Kk)-restricted manner, and a detailed comparison of the fine specificity of pSAN13.4.1 with the fine specificity of two Ha255-262-specific, H-2Kk-restricted T cell hybridomas has supported this contention. A three-dimensional model of pSAN13.4.1 has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the pSAN13.4.1 antibody in complex with the antigenic Ha-Kk ligand was derived after a flexible and automated docking of the MHC-peptide pair into the Fab combining site. Interestingly, the most energetically favored binding mode shows numerous analogies to the recently determined recognition of class I MHC-peptide complexes by αβ T cell receptors (TCRs). The pSAN13.4.1 also binds diagonally across the MHC binding groove but is more deeply anchored to the peptide-MHC (pep/MHC) ligand than TCRs, notably through numerous interactions of its heavy chain. The present model accounts well for the experimentally determined binding affinity of a set of 144 single amino acid substituted Ha analogues and the observed shared specificity between the pSAN antibody and two different T cell receptors for the Ha-Kk antigenic ligand. Analogies and differences between Fab and TCR recognition are explained by dissecting the binding role of each chain of the immune receptors as well as the contribution of all peptide amino acids.

  10. Monoclonal antibody against Toll-like receptor 4 attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury in rats by inhibiting MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cuiyuan; Pan, Linghui; Lin, Fei; Dai, Huijun; Fu, Ruili

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms through which mechanical ventilation causes non-infectious inflammatory diseases and lung injury are poorly understood. Animals models of this type of injury suggest that it involves signaling mediated by Toll‑like receptor (TLR)4 and 9. In this study, in order to gain further insight into the involvement of TLR4 in this type of injury, we performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the mechanisms through which TLR4 triggers inflammation. We also examined whether the use of TLR4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) can alleviate this type of injury. For this purpose, rats were tracheotomized and administered intratracheal injections of anti‑TLR4 mAb or saline, and then ventilated for 4 h at a high tidal volume (HTV) of 40 ml/ kg or allowed to breathe spontaneously for the same period of time (controls). Alveolar macrophages (AMs) were isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rats and stimulated for 16 h with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α in the presence or absence of anti‑TLR4 mAb. Lung injury was assessed by examining lung histopathology, lung wet/dry weight ratio, BALF total protein and cytokine levels in BALF and plasma. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR4, TLR9, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88) and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB were measured in cultured macrophages. Compared to the controls (spontaneous breathing), the ventilated rats exhibited greater pulmonary permeability, more severe inflammatory cell infiltration/lung edema, and higher levels of interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6 and TNF‑α in BALF and plasma. The AMs from the ventilated rats expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, TLR9, Myd88 and NF‑κB compared with the macrophages from the spontaneously breathing rats. The ventilated rats pre‑treated with anti‑TLR4 mAb exhibited markedly attenuated signs of ventilation‑induced injury, such as less lung inflammation and pulmonary edema, fewer cells in BALF, and

  11. Asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bories, Claire; Jagannath, Sundar

    2014-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent the earlier phases of plasma cell dyscrasias. Their definition is based on absence of end-organ damage with presence of a malignant clone that grows in the bone marrow. They share, as a common feature, the risk of progression to a symptomatic disease. MGUS progression risk is approximately 1% per year, and SMM has a risk of progression of 10% for the first 5 years which tapers off over time. The main purpose of identification of these earlier phases of the plasma cell dyscrasia was to identify patients who do not warrant treatment with chemotherapy, in whom the risk of treatment outweighs the benefit. Over the years, the definitions have not been modified to incorporate developments in imaging (magnetic resonance or positron emission and computed tomography), or genomics to identify patients at highest risk of progression within 2 years, where wait and watch might not be an appropriate option. In the absence of such definition, patients who have only a 50% chance of progression within 2 years are being offered therapy, which might also not be an optimal approach. In this review, we provide an overview of the definition, current prognostic factors, and risk stratifications in asymptomatic gammopathies, and discuss clinical trial outcomes in high-risk SMM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2009-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is a malignant disease with almost equal incidence and mortality. Effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are still urgently needed to improve its survival rate. With advances in structural and functional genomics, recent work has focused on targeted molecular therapy using monoclonal antibodies. This review summarizes the target molecules on the tumor cell surface and normal tissue stroma, which are related to pancreatic cancer oncogenesis, tumor growth or resistance to chemotherapy, as well as molecules involved in regulating inflammation and host immunoresponses. Targeted molecules include cell-surface receptors, such as the EGF receptor, HER2, death receptor 5 and IGF-1 receptor. Effects of monoclonal antibodies against these target molecules alone or in combination with chemotherapy, small-molecule signal transduction inhibitors, or radiation therapy are also discussed. Also discussed are the use of toxin or radioisotope conjugates, and information relating to the use of these targeting agents in pancreatic cancer clinical trials. Although targeted molecular therapy with monoclonal antibodies has made some progress in pancreatic cancer treatment, especially in preclinical studies, its clinical application to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients requires further investigation. PMID:20046965

  14. The Innate Immune Receptor NLRX1 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor by Reducing Colon Tumorigenesis and Key Tumor-Promoting Signals.

    PubMed

    Koblansky, A Alicia; Truax, Agnieszka D; Liu, Rongrong; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Ding, Shengli; Wilson, Justin E; Brickey, W June; Mühlbauer, Marcus; McFadden, Rita-Marie T; Hu, Peizhen; Li, Zengshan; Jobin, Christian; Lund, Pauline Kay; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-03-22

    NOD-like receptor (NLR) proteins are intracellular innate immune sensors/receptors that regulate immunity. This work shows that NLRX1 serves as a tumor suppressor in colitis-associated cancer (CAC) and sporadic colon cancer by keeping key tumor promoting pathways in check. Nlrx1(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to CAC, showing increases in key cancer-promoting pathways including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The tumor-suppressive function of NLRX1 originated primarily from the non-hematopoietic compartment. This prompted an analysis of NLRX1 function in the Apc(min/+) genetic model of sporadic gastrointestinal cancer. NLRX1 attenuated Apc(min/+) colon tumorigenesis, cellular proliferation, NF-κB, MAPK, STAT3 activation, and IL-6 levels. Application of anti-interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) antibody therapy reduced tumor burden, increased survival, and reduced STAT3 activation in Nlrx1(-/-)Apc(min/+) mice. As an important clinical correlate, human colon cancer samples expressed lower levels of NLRX1 than healthy controls in multiple patient cohorts. These data implicate anti-IL6R as a potential personalized therapy for colon cancers with reduced NLRX1.

  15. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  16. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  17. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  19. [Preparation and Assessment of IL1RAP Monoclonal Antibody].

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling-Ling; Ruan, Su-Hong; Tian, Yu; Xu, Kai Lin; Zhao, Kai

    2015-08-01

    To prepare and identify human monoclonal antibody against IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), which is a new identified surface marker for leukemia stem cells (LSC). BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with hybridoma cells (3H6E10, 10D8A7) and their ascites were collected. The monoclonal antibody against hu-IL1RAP specifically was purified from ascites, the nondenaturing-PAGE, ELISA and Western blot were used to detect the purity, titer and sensitivity of antibody. Two purified antibodies were obtained and named as 3H6E10 McAb and 10D8A7 McAb, whose purity was 95% and 94% respectively. The titer of two purified monoclonal antibodies was 1 : 81000 and specific conjugation of IL1RAP purified protein and endogenous protein from normal people and leukemia patients with purified antibodies were confirmed. The purified monoclonal antibodies which can specifically bind to hu-IL1RAP are successfully prepared, thus providing novel way to effectively clear LSC in the future.

  20. Application of monoclonal antibodies in tumor pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiter, D.J. ); Fleuren, G.J.; Warnaar, S.O. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers under the following three section headings: Basic and technical aspects; Tumor associated antigens; and Practical application and case presentations. Some of the paper titles are: Monoclonal antibodies to oncofetal antigens; Monoclonal antibodies against ovarian cancer; and Tumor associated antigens and oncogene products defined by monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  2. Inhibition of human tumor xenograft growth in nude mice by a conjugate of monoclonal antibody LA22 to epidermal growth factor receptor with anti-tumor antibiotics mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Wei; Zhao Shan; Liu Zhaofei; Zhang Jianzhong; Ma Shujun; Sato, J. Denry; Zhang Peng; Tong Mei; Han Jiping; Wang Yan; Bai Dongmei; Wang Fan . E-mail: wangfan@bjmu.edu.cn; Sun Le . E-mail: lsun@welsonpharma.com

    2006-10-20

    Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies LA22 and Erbitux bind to different epitopes of EGFR. The chemimmunoconjugates of MMC with LA22 or Erbitux were prepared, and in vitro cytotoxicity assays with A549 cells showed that LA22-MMC was much more potent than Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC. Viabilities of A549 cells treated with LA22-MMC, Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC were 35%, 94%, and 81%, respectively. Immunoscintigraphy of xenografts of human A431 and A549 cells in nude mice both showed that {sup 125}I-labeled-LA22-MMC enriched in tumor sites prominently. Most importantly, in vivo assays showed LA22-MMC was significantly more effective than free drug MMC in the treatment of subcutaneous xenografts of human A431 cells in nude mice (83% inhibition for LA22-MMC and 30% for MMC). We concluded that LA22-MMC could be a very potent drug for treatment of solid tumors.

  3. Monoclonal antibody OKB7, which identifies the 14OKd complement receptor type 2 (CR/sub 2/), also identifies a 72Kd secreted fragment of CR/sub 2/ that contains the C3d-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Myones, B.L.; Ross, G.D.

    1986-03-05

    CR/sub 2/ is a 140-145Kd glycoprotein expressed on B lymphocytes which binds both C3d and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). OKB7, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody to CR/sub 2/, blocks C3d and EBV binding, while HB-5, another monoclonal IgG/sub 2a/ anti-CR/sub 2/, does not. A 72Kd C3d-binding glycoprotein (gp72), isolated from Raji cell media, was previously thought to be CR/sub 2/ because a polyclonal rabbit anti-gp72 inhibited EC3d rosettes. ELISA assay demonstrated that OKB7, but not HB-5, bound to purified gp72 fixed to microtiter wells. Insoluble and soluble gp72 blocked Raji cell uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled OKB7, but not labeled anti-B2 or HB-5. Rabbit anti-gp72 immunoprecipitated bands at 140Kd and 72Kd from /sup 125/I-labelled and solubilized B cell membranes. Culture media from Raji cells grown in the presence /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids was sequentially immunoprecipitated by irrelevant antibody, OKB7, and HB-5. A single 72Kd radiolabeled band was demonstrated only with OKB7, and this was identical to that produced by the immunoprecipitation of /sup 125/I-labeled gp72 with rabbit anti-gp72. Thus, OKB7, which identifies the 140Kd CR/sub 2/ molecule, also identifies a 72Kd shed fragment of CR/sub 2/ isolated from Raji cell media, which contains the C3d-binding site.

  4. Quantitation of estrogen receptor in seventy-five specimens of breast cancer: comparison between an immunoassay (Abbott ER-EIA monoclonal) and a (3H)estradiol binding assay based on isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel

    SciTech Connect

    Pousette, A.; Gustafsson, S.A.; Thoernblad, A.M.N.; Nordgren, A.; Saellstroem, J.Li.; Lindgren, A.; Sundelin, P.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    Quantitation of estrogen receptor has been performed in cytosol prepared from 75 specimens of breast cancer tissue from patients who had not received hormonal therapy. The study was performed in order to compare an immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL) with our currently used method for estrogen receptor analysis based on isoelectric focusing of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-receptor complex in polyacrylamide gels. Using linear regression analysis, a regression coefficient (slope) of 1.30 and a correlation coefficient of 0.75 were calculated. The differences in results between the two methods are probably partly explained by the fact that the ligand-based method only measures unoccupied receptor, whereas the immunoassay detects the total amount of receptor, resulting in generally slightly higher concentrations with the latter method. However, in five of 75 specimens the ligand-based method gave a considerably higher concentration of estrogen receptor. This was most probably explained by partial proteolysis resulting in the formation of receptor fragment(s), which was undetectable with the immunoassay but detectable with the ligand-based method. These observations underline the importance of careful handling of specimens during the whole immunoassay procedure.

  5. [Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal B-lymphocytosis].

    PubMed

    Hübel, K; Hallek, M

    2013-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) are asymptomatic premalignant conditions which can progress to a symptomatic disease state requiring therapy. Considering the high prevalence rate of these disorders, precursor patients are often diagnosed during routine clinical examinations. Only a minor portion of cases progress to overt malignancies, which raises the question of how to identify patients with the probability of progression. In recent years improvements in the understanding of the pathogenesis of both disorders led to the development of risk models and the estimation of the individual risk of progression. The definition of high-risk and low-risk patients allows a tailored clinical management. This report provides information on the biology, risk stratification, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with MGUS and MBL.

  6. Selectivity verification of cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies for cardiac troponin detection by using conventional ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Adzhri, R.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preparation and characterization of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cardiac troponin detection to determine the selectivity of the cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies, used to capture and bind the targets in this experiment, are cTnI monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnI) and cTnT monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnT), while both cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) are used as targets. ELISA is performed inside two microtiter plates for MAb-cTnI and MAb-cTnT. For each plate, monoclonal antibodies are tested by various concentrations of cTnI and cTnT ranging from 0-6400 µg/l. The binding selectivity and level of detection between monoclonal antibodies and antigen are determined through visual observation based on the color change inside each well on the plate. ELISA reader is further used to quantitatively measured the optical density of the color changes, thus produced more accurate reading. The results from this experiment are utilized to justify the use of these monoclonal antibodies as bio-receptors for cardiac troponin detection by using field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors coupled with substrate-gate in the future.

  7. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  8. A phase I, open-label study of siltuximab, an anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Voorhees, Peter M; Casper, Corey; Furman, Richard R; Fayad, Luis; Lonial, Sagar; Borghaei, Hossein; Jagannath, Sundar; Sokol, Lubomir; Usmani, Saad Z; van de Velde, Helgi; Qin, Xiang; Puchalski, Thomas A; Hall, Brett; Reddy, Manjula; Qi, Ming; van Rhee, Frits

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of siltuximab, an anti-interleukin-6 chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), multiple myeloma, or Castleman disease. In an open-label, dose-finding, 7 cohort, phase I study, patients with NHL, multiple myeloma, or symptomatic Castleman disease received siltuximab 3, 6, 9, or 12 mg/kg weekly, every 2 weeks, or every 3 weeks. Response was assessed in all disease types. Clinical benefit response (CBR; composite of hemoglobin, fatigue, anorexia, fever/night sweats, weight, largest lymph node size) was also evaluated in Castleman disease. Sixty-seven patients received a median of 16 siltuximab doses for a median of 8.5 (maximum 60.5) months; 29 were treated 1 year or longer. There was no dose-limiting toxicity, antibodies to siltuximab, or apparent dose-toxicity relationship. The most frequently reported possible drug-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (25%), hypertriglyceridemia (19%), neutropenia (19%), leukopenia (18%), hypercholesterolemia (15%), and anemia (10%). None of these events led to dose delay/discontinuation except for neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (n = 1 each). No treatment-related deaths occurred. C-reactive protein (CRP) suppression was most pronounced at 12 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Mean terminal-phase half-life of siltuximab ranged 17.73 to 20.64 days. Thirty-two of 37 (86%) patients with Castleman disease improved in 1 or more CBR component; 12 of 36 evaluable Castleman disease patients had radiologic response [complete response (CR), n = 1; partial response (PR), n = 11], including 8 of 19 treated with 12 mg/kg; 2 of 14 (14%) evaluable NHL patients had PR; 2 of 13 (15%) patients with multiple myeloma had CR. No dose-related or cumulative toxicity was apparent across all disease indications. A dose of 12 mg/kg every 3 weeks was recommended on the basis of the high response rates in Castleman disease and the sustained CRP suppression. Randomized studies

  9. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting in immunoglobulin-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis (C3 glomerulopathy). Evaluation should include serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation as well as serum-free light-chain assay. If a monoclonal immunoglobulin is detected on these tests, bone marrow biopsy or imaging is needed to exclude more advanced plasma cell dyscrasia. Evaluation of alternative pathway of complement should be done in patients with Ig-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis. If monoclonal gammopathy is due to an underlying malignant disease such as myeloma, lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, then specific treatment should be aimed at treating the malignant disease, with the goal of eradicating the clonal cells producing the immunoglobulin. In contrast, if monoclonal gammopathy is due to a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, treatment options include bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone for a non-IgM monoclonal immunoglobulin and rituximab alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone for an IgM monoclonal

  10. Monoclonal antibody against mouse CAR following genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    Carson, Steven D; Switzer, Barbara L; Tracy, Steven M; Chapman, Nora M

    2004-02-01

    To broaden our repertoire of monoclonal antibodies against CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor), we inoculated mice with an expression vector containing the cDNA encoding human CAR extracellular and transmembrane sequence, and boosted the response by inoculation with soluble human CAR protein produced in E. coli. Of the hybridomas obtained following this immunization protocol, one secreted IgG with exceptional reactivity against mouse CAR. Since CAR has been shown to form dimers, expression of human CAR in cells that express mouse CAR may have stimulated the host immune system to recognize endogenous CAR in heterodimers.

  11. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    PubMed

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  12. Pulmonary monoclonal antibody delivery via a portable microfluidic nebulization platform

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Qi, Aisha; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Friend, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulizers have considerable advantages over conventional inhalers for pulmonary drug administration, particularly because they do not require coordinated breath actuation to generate and deliver the aerosols. Nevertheless, besides being less amenable to miniaturization and hence portability, some nebulizers are prone to denature macromolecular drugs due to the large forces generated during aerosolization. Here, we demonstrate a novel portable acoustomicrofluidic device capable of nebulizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies into a fine aerosol mist with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 1.1 μm, optimal for deep lung deposition via inhalation. The nebulized monoclonal antibodies were tested for their stability, immunoactivity, and pharmacological properties, which confirmed that nebulization did not cause significant degradation of the antibody. In particular, flow cytometry demonstrated that the antigen binding capability of the antibody is retained and able to reduce phosphorylation in cells overexpressing the EGFR, indicating that the aerosols generated by the device were loaded with stable and active monoclonal antibodies. The delivery of antibodies via inhalation, particularly for the treatment of lung cancer, is thus expected to enhance the efficacy of this protein therapeutic by increasing the local concentration where they are needed. PMID:25945147

  13. Monoclonal endothelial cells in appetite suppressant-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tuder, R M; Radisavljevic, Z; Shroyer, K R; Polak, J M; Voelkel, N F

    1998-12-01

    Anorexigens such as aminorex fumarate and dexfenfluramine are associated with the development of severe pulmonary hypertension (PH), which clinically and histopathologically is considered indistinguishable from idiopathic or primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). For the current study, we asked whether anorexigen-associated PH is characterized by monoclonal pulmonary endothelial cell proliferation (such as in PPH) or, alternatively, is associated with a polyclonal endothelial cell proliferation as found in secondary PH. Analysis of clonality by the human androgen receptor assay was performed in microdissected endothelial cells of plexiform lesions of two patients with anorexigen-associated PH. The four plexiform lesions of Patient 1 and the six of Patient 2 with anorexigen-associated PH exhibited a monoclonal expansion of pulmonary endothelial cells, with a mean clonality ratio of 0.03 +/- 0.01 SE. Our results indicate that appetite suppressant-associated PH is identical to PPH not only in clinical and histopathologic features but also, at a molecular level, in terms of the monoclonal nature of the endothelial cell proliferation. The anorexigens may accelerate the growth of pulmonary endothelial cells in patients with predisposition to develop PPH.

  14. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Brantley R; Alder, Matthew N; Roux, Kenneth H; Sina, Christina; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Boydston, Jeremy A; Turnbough, Charles L; Cooper, Max D

    2008-02-12

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) is mediated by lymphocytes that undergo combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments to create a diverse repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Immunization with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus anthracis spores. The recombinant VLR-B antibodies possess 8-10 uniform subunits that collectively bind antigen with high avidity. Sequence analysis, mutagenesis, and modeling studies show that antigen binding involves residues in the beta-sheets lining the VLR-B concave surface. EM visualization reveals tetrameric and pentameric molecules having a central core and highly flexible pairs of stalk-region "arms" with antigen-binding "hands." Remarkable antigen-binding specificity, avidity, and stability predict that these unusual LRR-based monoclonal antibodies will find many biomedical uses.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  16. Monoclonal antibody treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bossaller, Lukas; Rothe, Achim

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease and the most prevalent of all autoimmune disorders. Here we review recent advances in the development and availability of biologic agents with a focus on monoclonal antibody or smaller formats of targeted engineered therapeutics including novel, non-antibody-based therapeutics. Today an array of biologics blocking either proinflammatory cytokines or lymphocyte activation/survival are available that enable a substantial improvement over conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We review the engineering process of antibody-based biologics, their preclinical and clinical application, and current efforts to treat RA by interfering with B-cell function (notable targets covered are CD20, CD38, B-cell activating factor, transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating and cyclophilin interactor), with T-cell function (CD3, CD4, CD28), with bone erosion (RANKL), and with cytokines or growth factors (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-17, VEGF). Future treatment choices might encompass the blockade or modulation of danger-associated molecular patterns such as HMGB1, pattern recognition receptors, messenger RNAs or noncoding RNAs, histone acetylation, and inflammasome components. Although current therapies can reduce the signs and symptoms of RA for many patients, the quest for a cure (or a more complete blockade of the structural damage) in RA is still ongoing and will need treatment approaches, which are not exclusively confined to blocking a particular cytokine, receptor, or autoreactive B or T cell involved in disease progression. To this end exciting treatment alternatives and drug targets are on the horizon that may become available to patients in the future.

  17. Clinical pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ron J; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used in the treatment of various diseases for over 20 years and combine high specificity with generally low toxicity. Their pharmacokinetic properties differ markedly from those of non-antibody-type drugs, and these properties can have important clinical implications. mAbs are administered intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Oral administration is precluded by the molecular size, hydrophilicity and gastric degradation of mAbs. Distribution into tissue is slow because of the molecular size of mAbs, and volumes of distribution are generally low. mAbs are metabolized to peptides and amino acids in several tissues, by circulating phagocytic cells or by their target antigen-containing cells. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from degradation by binding to protective receptors (the neonatal Fc-receptor [FcRn]), which explains their long elimination half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Population pharmacokinetic analyses have been applied in assessing covariates in the disposition of mAbs. Both linear and nonlinear elimination have been reported for mAbs, which is probably caused by target-mediated disposition. Possible factors influencing elimination of mAbs include the amount of the target antigen, immune reactions to the antibody and patient demographics. Bodyweight and/or body surface area are generally related to clearance of mAbs, but clinical relevance is often low. Metabolic drug-drug interactions are rare for mAbs. Exposure-response relationships have been described for some mAbs. In conclusion, the parenteral administration, slow tissue distribution and long elimination half-life are the most pronounced clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics of mAbs.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9.

  19. Characterization of human T cells reactive with the Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM): generation of a monoclonal antibody against V beta 17, the T cell receptor gene product expressed by a large fraction of MAM-reactive human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    While all known microbial superantigens are mitogenic for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), the functional response induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM) is unique in that MAM stimulation of PBL consistently results in T cell-dependent B cell activation characterized by polyclonal IgM and IgG production. These immunostimulatory effects of MAM on the humoral arm of the human immune system warranted a more precise characterization of MAM-reactive human T cells. Using an uncloned MAM reactive human T cell line as immunogen, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (termed C1) specific for the T cell receptor V beta gene expressed by the major fraction of MAM- reactive human T cells, V beta 17. In addition, a V beta 17- MAM- reactive T cell population exists, assessed by MAM, induced T cell proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity. mAb C1 will be useful in characterizing the functional properties of V beta 17+ T cells and their potential role in autoimmune disease. PMID:1833503

  20. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells for sustained remissions in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M; Bunin, Nancy J; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F; Mahnke, Yolanda D; Melenhorst, Jan J; Rheingold, Susan R; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A

    2014-10-16

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×10(6) to 20.6×10(6) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by Novartis and others; CART19 Clinical

  1. Thrombotic microangiopathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Aishwarya; Go, Ronald S; Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2017-03-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare disease comprising of a diverse set of disorders linked by a common histologic finding of endothelial injury. Monoclonal immunoglobulins may act as a potential trigger in the pathogenesis of TMA. To determine the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy and clinicopathological features of TMA associated with monoclonal immunoglobulin, we performed a retrospective study in adults (18 and older) with a clinical diagnosis of TMA. Of 146 patients with TMA, we detected monoclonal immunoglobulin in 20 patients (13.7%). Among patients 50 and older, the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy was 21%, which is approximately five-fold higher than the 4.2% expected rate in this population. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, one had multiple myeloma, one with smoldering myeloma, two had POEMS syndrome, and one had T-cell lymphocytic leukemia. Renal biopsy was performed in 15 cases, of which six showed thrombi, 11 showed mesangiolysis, and all showed double contours along glomerular capillary walls. Acute tubular injury was present in 12 cases. Treatment options were varied and included therapeutic plasma exchange in 11 patients. Ten patients progressed to end-stage renal disease, of which two received kidney transplant. Thus, our study shows an unexpectedly high prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA, suggesting a potential pathogenetic mechanism. This study underscores the importance of evaluating for a monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA as well as the potential for targeting the underlying hematologic disorder as an approach to treating TMA.

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Neriishi, K; Yoshimoto, Y; Carter, R L; Matsuo, T; Ichimaru, M; Mikami, M; Abe, T; Fujimura, K; Kuramoto, A

    1993-03-01

    An analysis of monoclonal gammopathy in relation to radiation exposure was conducted on atomic bomb survivors examined between October 1979 and September 1981 and between June 1985 and May 1987. There was no overall increase in the relative risk of monoclonal gammopathy and only a suggestive increase in benign monoclonal gammopathy in the second survey which did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.17). Thirty-one cases were detected among 8796 individuals studied in the first survey, whereas 68 cases were found among 7350 people in the second survey. Among the 31 cases found in the first survey, 9 individuals (29%) died before the second survey: 4 of cancer, 4 of vascular disease, and 1 of infection. Among the 8 individuals with benign monoclonal gammopathy examined in both surveys, 4 developed suppression of residual immunoglobulin(s), suggesting the progression of monoclonal gammopathy. The overall relative risks of monoclonal gammopathy in atomic bomb survivors in the two surveys were not significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. Only benign monoclonal gammopathy in 1985-1987 showed a suggestive increase with radiation exposure. The relative risk of benign monoclonal gammopathy in 1985-1987 was 2.64 in the group exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy and 2.14 in the > or = 0.50-Gy group (95% confidence intervals = 0.90-8.82 and 0.69-7.31, respectively).

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  4. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  6. Cutaneous type of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma in a French West Indian woman. Clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes and monoclonal integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA in the skin infiltrate.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Moulonguet, I; Flageul, B; Perrin, P; Capesius, C; D'Agay, M F; Gisselbrecht, C; Sigaux, F; Civatte, J

    1990-11-01

    A 45-year-old woman, a native of the French West Indies who had lived in France since 1973, developed multiple cutaneous plaques and nodules in 1987. Histopathologic studies revealed dermal infiltration with mature activated T cells (CD4+, CD25+, DR+) with nuclear convolutions and epidermatotropisim. High titers of specific human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-I antibodies were detected in the serum. Molecular analysis of DNA extracted from the skin tumor biopsy specimen showed a clonal integration of an HTLV-I provirus and a T-cell clonal population as demonstrated by T-cell receptor beta and gamma gene rearrangement studies. Neither HTLV-I provirus nor T-cell receptor rearrangements were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells DNA despite the presence of rare adult T cell leukemia cells (less than 1%) and a small excess of DR-expressing cells, and detection of HTLV-I Pol and Px sequences by in vitro gene amplification. In this case only gene analysis of the skin lesions made possible an early diagnosis of a cutaneous adult T cell leukemia. This illustrates the need for such molecular studies to differentiate, in HTLV-I seropositive patients from endemic areas, a HTLV-I-induced T cell lymphoma from HTLV-I-nonrelated cutaneous T cell lymphomas.

  7. Modification of the Fc Region of a Human Anti-oncostatin M Monoclonal Antibody for Higher Affinity to FcRn Receptor and Extension of Half-life in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nnane, Ivo P; Han, Chao; Jiao, Qun; Tam, Susan H; Davis, Hugh M; Xu, Zhenhua

    2017-01-28

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anti-oncostatin M (OSM) IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, CNTO 1119 and its Fc variant (CNTO 8212), which incorporates the LS(Xtend) mutation to extend terminal half-life (T1/2 ), after a single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) administration in cynomolgus monkeys, and to predict human PK. In study 1, single doses of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 were administered IV or SC at 3 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3 per group). In study 2, single doses of CNTO 8212 were administered IV at 1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, or SC at 5 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 5 per group). Serial blood samples were collected for assessment of serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and/or CNTO 8212. A two-compartment population PK model with first-order elimination was utilized to simultaneously describe the serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 over time after IV and SC administration in cynomolgus monkeys. The typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys were clearance (CL) = 2.81 mL/day/kg, volume of distribution of central compartment (V1 ) = 31.3 mL/kg, volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V2 ) = 23.3 mL/kg, absolute bioavailability (F) = 0.84 and T1/2 = 13.4 days. In comparison, the typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 8212 in cynomolgus monkeys were CL = 1.41 mL/day/kg, V1 = 39.8 mL/kg, V2 = 32.6 mL/kg, F = 0.75 and T1/2 = 35.7 days. The mean CL of CNTO 8212 was ~50% lower compared with that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. The overall volume of distribution (V1 +V2 ) for CNTO 8212 was about 32% larger compared with that for CNTO 1119, but generally similar to the vascular volume in cynomolgus monkeys. The T1/2 of CNTO 8212 was significantly (p < 0.05) longer by about 2.7-fold than that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. Thus, the modification of the Fc portion of an anti-OSM IgG1 mAb for higher FcRn binding affinity resulted in lower systemic clearance and

  8. Monoclonal corneal gammopathy: topographic considerations.

    PubMed

    Sekundo, W; Seifert, P

    1996-09-01

    Desposition of immunoglobulins in the cornea occasionally occurs in benign and malignant lymphoproliferative conditions. A 52-year-old woman with recently discovered monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was referred to our hospital. Slit-lamp and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed bilateral deposits within all corneal layers. The precipitates were organized in a circle, leaving a perilimbal zone and the axial cornea clear. Light microscopy of a biopsy disclosed confluent subepithelial deposits and defects in Bowman's layer. Immunoperoxidase reaction was positive only for IgG and IgG-kappa. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of extracellular rectangular and arcuate immunoglobulin crystalloids with a 10-nm periodicity but a non-crystalline defraction pattern. A review of the literature showed that the circumferential pattern of immunoglobulin deposition is associated with short-term visual symptoms and good visual acuity. The present report supports a hypothesis of immunoglobulin deposition via the limbal arcade and contradicts the "tear theory."

  9. Effects of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade by a chimeric monoclonal antibody (abciximab) on acute and six-month outcomes after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction. EPIC investigators.

    PubMed

    Lefkovits, J; Ivanhoe, R J; Califf, R M; Bergelson, B A; Anderson, K M; Stoner, G L; Weisman, H F; Topol, E J

    1996-05-15

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for acute myocardial infarction is an attractive alternative to thrombolysis, but is still limited by recurrent ischemia and restenosis. We determined whether adjunctive platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade improved outcomes in patients undergoing direct and rescue PTCA in the Evaluation of c7E3 for Prevention of Ischemic Complications (EPIC) trial. Of the 2,099 patients undergoing percutaneous intervention who randomly received chimeric 7E3 Fab (c7E3) as a bolus, a bolus and 12-hour infusion, or placebo, 42 underwent direct PTCA for acute myocardial infarction and 22 patients had rescue PTCA after failed thrombolysis. The primary composite end point comprised death, reinfarction, repeat intervention, or bypass surgery. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were similar in direct and rescue PTCA patients. Pooling the 2 groups, c7E3 bolus and infusion reduced the primary composite end point by 83% (26.1% placebo vs 4.5% c7E3 bolus and infusion, p = 0.06). No reinfarctions or repeat urgent interventions occurred in c7E3 bolus and infusion patients at 30 days, although there was a trend toward more deaths in c7E3-treated patients. Major bleeding was increased with c7E3 (24% vs 13%, p = 0.28). At 6 months, ischemic events were reduced from 47.8% with placebo to 4.5% with c7E3 bolus and infusion (p = 0.002), particularly reinfarction (p = 0.05) and repeat revascularization (p = 0.002). We conclude that adjunctive c7E3 therapy during direct and rescue PTCA decreased acute ischemic events and clinical restenosis in the EPIC trial. These data provide initial evidence of benefit for glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade during PTCA for acute myocardial infarction.

  10. Analysis of human IL-2/IL-2 receptor beta chain interactions: monoclonal antibody H2-8 and new IL-2 mutants define the critical role of alpha helix-A of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Eckenberg, R; Xu, D; Moreau, J L; Bossus, M; Mazie, J C; Tartar, A; Liu, X Y; Alzari, P M; Bertoglio, J; Theze, J

    1997-07-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) interacts with a receptor (IL-2R) composed of three subunits (IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta and IL-2R gamma). IL-2R beta plays a critical role in signal transduction. An anti-human IL-2 mAb (H2-8) produced after immunization with peptide 1-30 of IL-2 was found to recognize the region occupied by Asp20, at the exposed interface between alpha-helices A and C. Muteins at position 17 and 20 are not recognized by mAb H2-8. mAb H2-8 specifically inhibits the IL-2 proliferation of TS1beta cells which are dependent on the expression of human IL-2R beta chain for IL-2 proliferation. Substitution at internal position Leu17 demonstrates that this position is essential for IL-2 binding and IL-2 bioactivity. New IL-2 mutants at position Asp20 have been analysed. Substitutions Asp --> Asn, Asp --> Lys, Asp --> Leu, show a correlation between diminished affinity for IL-2 receptor and reduced bioactivity measured on TS1beta cells. Mutein Asp Arg lose affinity for IL-2R and bioactivity simultaneously. Furthermore, during the course of the study we have found that mutein Asp20 --> Leu is an IL-2 antagonist. The biological effects of mAb H2-8 and the properties of new mutants at positions 17 and 20 demonstrate that this region of alpha helix-A is involved in IL-2-IL-2R beta interactions.

  11. Purification and identification of cell surface antigens using lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Ali, Shabab; St. Germain, Jonathan; Liu, Yanling; Yu, Xuecong; Jaye, David L.; Moran, Michael F.; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) B antibodies of the evolutionary distant sea lamprey are structurally distinct from conventional mammalian antibodies. The different protein architecture and large evolutionary distance of jawless vertebrates suggest that VLR antibodies may represent promising tools for biomarker discovery. Here we report the generation of panels of monoclonal VLR antibodies from lamprey larvae immunized with human T cells and the use of a recombinant monoclonal VLR antibody for antigen purification and mass spectrometric identification. We demonstrate that despite predicted low affinity of individual VLR antigen binding units to the antigen, the high avidity resulting from decameric assembly of secreted VLR antibodies allows for efficient antigen capture and subsequent identification by mass spectometry. We show that VLR antibodies detect their antigens with high specificity and can be used in various standard laboratory application techniques. The lamprey antibodies are novel reagents that can complement conventional monoclonal antibodies in multiple scientific research disciplines. PMID:22964555

  12. Effects of anti-alpha monoclonal antibodies on initiation and elongation by the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Venezia, N D; Krakow, J S

    1990-05-15

    Anti-alpha monoclonal antibodies have been used to investigate the role of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase in initiation and elongation. The four inhibitory monoclonal antibodies studied strongly inhibit cAMP receptor protein-dependent initiation with lac P+ and partially inhibit initiation directed by the lac UV5 promoter. The data suggest that the epitopes to which each of the monoclonal antibodies bind may be proximal to the contact domain between cAMP receptor protein and RNA polymerase. Recycling of RNA polymerase through the initiation process is slower in the presence of an inhibitory monoclonal antibody. Once a 9-nucleotide-long transcript has formed, incubation with the anti-alpha monoclonal antibody does not affect subsequent elongation. The monoclonal antibodies still bind to the elongation complex as indicated by sedimentation of the complex formed after incubation with Staphylococcus aureus cells (immunoprecipitin). These results suggest that the resistance of the elongation complex to these antibodies is not a consequence of their inability to bind to RNA polymerase. Only one of the alpha subunits may be involved in the initial process of transcription, and the antigenic domain of this subunit appears to be occluded by the nascent transcript present in the elongation complex.

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Since their introduction in medical therapy, in the last quarter of the 20th century, monoclonal antibodies have gained an increasing importance in the treatment of various diseases. Neurology has been one of the medical specialties benefiting of the therapeutic potential of these monoclonal antibodies and certain neurological conditions may now contain such drugs in their therapeutic algorithms. Multiple sclerosis is one of these diseases and, in addition to the monoclonal antibodies already licensed for clinical use, several others are in development for future utilization in this specific area. The future will certainly pass through this kind of drugs and, in this article, a review of the most relevant data related to monoclonal antibodies already in use and also in clinical development for multiple sclerosis treatment will be performed.

  15. Monoclonal endothelial cell proliferation is present in primary but not secondary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S D; Shroyer, K R; Markham, N E; Cool, C D; Voelkel, N F; Tuder, R M

    1998-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of the vascular lesions characterizing primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), an often fatal pulmonary vascular disease, are largely unknown. Plexiform lesions composed of proliferating endothelial cells occur in between 20 and 80% of the cases of this irreversible pulmonary vascular disease. Recently, technology to assess monoclonality has allowed the distinction between cellular proliferation present in neoplasms from that in reactive nonneoplastic tissue. To determine whether the endothelial cell proliferation in plexiform lesions in PPH is monoclonal or polyclonal, we assessed the methylation pattern of the human androgen receptor gene by PCR (HUMARA) in proliferated endothelial cells in plexiform lesions from female PPH patients (n = 4) compared with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients (n = 4). In PPH, 17 of 22 lesions (77%) were monoclonal. However, in secondary PH, all 19 lesions examined were polyclonal. Smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in pulmonary vessels (n = 11) in PPH and secondary PH was polyclonal in all but one of the examined vessels. The monoclonal expansion of endothelial cells provides the first marker that allows the distinction between primary and secondary PH. Our data of a frequent monoclonal endothelial cell proliferation in PPH suggests that a somatic genetic alteration similar to that present in neoplastic processes may be responsible for the pathogenesis of PPH. PMID:9486960

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-03-06

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities.

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities. PMID:28316940

  18. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-01-01

    /isotype mAb, did not promote bone regeneration and exhibited significantly lower mechanical properties (p < 0.05). Altogether, our results demonstrated that application of Protein G as a linker to adsorb anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies onto the scaffold was accompanied by increased in vitro binding of the anti-BMP-2 mAb/BMP immune complex to BMP-receptor positive cell, as well as increased volume and strength of de novo bone formation in vivo. PMID:26184354

  19. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  20. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance. PMID:21293176

  4. The therapeutic potential of anti-interleukin-20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-20, a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines, was discovered in 2001. IL-20 acts on multiple cell types by activating on a heterodimer receptor complex of either IL-20R1-IL-20R2 or IL-22R1-IL-20R2. Recent evidence indicates that IL-20's interaction with its receptors might have proinflammatory effects on chronic inflammatory diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoporosis, and breast cancer. Updated information about IL-20, such as its identification, expression, receptors, signaling, and biological activities, is illustrated in this review based on our research and the data available in the literature. IL-20 is a pleiotropic cytokine, which promotes inflammation, angiogenesis, and chemotaxis. IL-20 also regulates osteoclast differentiation by altering the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL) axis. Inflammation, angiogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis are critical for the pathogenesis of RA, osteoporosis, and breast cancer-induced osteolysis. Based on the in vitro and in vivo data and clinical samples, we demonstrated that IL-20 plays pivotal roles in these three diseases. In experimental models, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody ameliorates arthritis severity, protects against ovariectomized-induced bone loss, and inhibits breast tumor-induced osteolysis. This review presents the clinical implications of IL-20, which will lead to a better understanding of the biological functions of IL-20 in these diseases and provide new therapeutic options in the future.

  5. Efficacy of Tocilizumab in the treatment of Eosinophilic fasciitis: Report of one case.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Francisco; Jorgensen, Christian; Pers, Yves-Marie

    2015-12-01

    A 43-year-old man was diagnosed with an Eosinophilic fasciitis with cutaneous and articular involvement. The patient experienced an early response with high-dose corticosteroids achieving a global remission of disease. Nevertheless, during the steroids tapering phase, he presented a new flare and subsequently developed a corticosteroid refractory disease. The addition of Methotrexate in monotherapy then associated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent did not show any additional benefit. Therefore Tocilizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the interleukin-6 receptor, was initiated achieving an immediate response that persists after 36 months of follow-up. The use of this biological agent allows prednisone withdrawal at 3 months and remission of both articular and cutaneous manifestations at 6 months. This report describes for the first time the efficacy of an anti interleukin-6 agent in Eosinophilic fasciitis treatment.

  6. Mycobacterium kansasii Infection in a Patient Receiving Biologic Therapy-Not All Reactive Interferon Gamma Release Assays Are Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Nasir; Saba, Raya; Maddika, Srikanth; Weinstein, Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii, a nontuberculous mycobacterium, can lead to lung disease similar to tuberculosis. Immunotherapeutic biologic agents predispose to infections with mycobacteria, including M kansasii. T-cell-mediated interferon gamma release assays like QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test (QFT) are widely used by clinicians for the diagnosis of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, QFT may also show positive result with certain nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of M kansasii pulmonary infection, with a positive QFT, in an immunocompromised patient receiving prednisone, leflunomide and tocilizumab, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody. This case highlights the risk of mycobacterial infections with the use of various biologic agents and the need for caution when interpreting the results of interferon gamma release assays.

  7. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  8. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-07-28

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  9. Bone marrow histology in monoclonal macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Rywlin, A M; Civantos, F; Ortega, R S; Dominguez, C J

    1975-06-01

    Rywlin, Arkadi, M., Civantos, Francisco, Ortega, Rolando S., and Dominguez, Carlos J.: Bone marrow histology in monoclonal macroglobulinemiamam J Clin Pathol 63. 769-778, 1975. Histologic sections and smears of aspirated bone marrow particles in 26 cases of monoclonal macroglobulinemia were studied. The bone marrows did not show uniform histologic features. Twenty-two patients had various degrees of lymphoid infiltration of the marrow, including nodules of malignant lymphoma, diffuse lymphocytic infiltration, nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, and normal lymphoid nodules. Four patients had no demonstrable lymphoid collections in the marrow. Additional histologic features of the marrows are summarized. A variant of a Dutcher body consisting of multiple PAS-positive inclusions that by light microscopy appear intranuclear is described. Even though the average macroglobulin levels were higher in patients with abnormal lymphoid infiltrates than in patients with noraml or no lymphoid collections, there was considerable overlap between individual patients values in the different groups. Similarly, no correlation between macroglobulin levels and other histologic features could be established. Patients with monoclonal macroglobulinemia represent a spectrum including benign monoclonal gammopathy, lymphoproliferative disorders of the marrow, nodal or extranodal lymphomas. The separation of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia by arbitrary criteria does not appear justified. (key words: Bone marrow; Monoclonal macroglobulinemia.

  10. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Frank; Leung, Nelson; Hutchison, Colin A; Touchard, Guy; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Picken, Maria M; Herrera, Guillermo A; Kastritis, Efstathios; Merlini, Giampaolo; Roussel, Murielle; Fervenza, Fernando C; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) regroups all renal disorders caused by a monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) secreted by a nonmalignant B-cell clone. By definition, patients with MGRS do not meet the criteria for overt multiple myeloma/B-cell proliferation, and the hematologic disorder is generally consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, MGRS is associated with high morbidity due to the severity of renal and sometimes systemic lesions induced by the MIg. Early recognition is crucial, as suppression of MIg secretion by chemotherapy often improves outcomes. The spectrum of renal diseases in MGRS is wide, including old entities such as AL amyloidosis and newly described lesions, particularly proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal Ig deposits and C3 glomerulopathy with monoclonal gammopathy. Kidney biopsy is indicated in most cases to determine the exact lesion associated with MGRS and evaluate its severity. Diagnosis requires integration of morphologic alterations by light microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy, and in some cases by IF staining for Ig isotypes, immunoelectron microscopy, and proteomic analysis. Complete hematologic workup with serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and serum-free light-chain assay is required. This review addresses the pathologic and clinical features of MGRS lesions, indications of renal biopsy, and a proposed algorithm for the hematologic workup.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  12. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to equine CD16.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Leela E; Harman, Rebecca M; Wagner, Bettina; Antczak, Douglas F

    2012-04-15

    The low-affinity Fc receptor CD16 plays a central role in the inflammatory and innate immune responses of many species, but has not yet been investigated in the horse. Using the predicted extracellular region of equine CD16 expressed as a recombinant fusion protein with equine IL-4 (rIL-4/CD16), we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize equine CD16. Nine mAbs were chosen for characterization based upon recognition of CD16, but not IL-4, in ELISA. All nine mAbs recognized full-length, cell-surface CD16 expressed as a GFP fusion protein by CHO cells, but not the closely related Fc receptor CD32 expressed in the same system. In flow cytometric analysis with equine peripheral leukocytes, the mAbs labeled cells in the granulocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte populations in a pattern consistent with other species. Monocytes that were strongly labeled with CD16 mAb 9G5 were also positive for the LPS receptor CD14. Cytospins made with peripheral leukocytes were immunohistochemically labeled and showed mAb recognition of primarily mononuclear cells. ELISA revealed that the nine mAbs can be grouped into three patterns of epitope recognition. These new antibodies will serve as useful tools in the investigation of equine immune responses and inflammatory processes.

  13. Elotuzumab: the first approved monoclonal antibody for multiple myeloma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Hila; Muchtar, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Elotuzumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against the SLAMF7 receptor, expressed on normal and malignant plasma cells with a lower expression on other lymphoid cells such as natural killer (NK) cells. Elotuzumab has no significant antimyeloma activity when given as a single agent to patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). However, when combined with other antimyeloma agents, it results in improved response and outcome. Owing to the results from the landmark ELOQUENT-2 phase III clinical trial, which compared lenalidomide and dexamethasone with or without elotuzumab in patients with RRMM, elotuzumab in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone was approved by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2015 for multiple myeloma (MM) patients who received one to three prior lines of therapy. This review will give a brief description of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family receptors, the unique SLAMF7 receptor and the mechanism of action of elotuzumab. Thereafter, we will give an overview on its antimyeloma activity in preclinical and clinical trials, including its toxicity profile and management thereof. PMID:27493709

  14. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  15. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  16. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references.

  17. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathies, a new approach.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, S T; Mallin, J

    1975-08-01

    A new approach to the characterization (typing) of L- and H-chains of monoclonal immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein utilizing elution of a monoclonal immunoglobulin in conjunction with solid-support electrophoresis and the reverse Mancini procedure of radial immunodiffusion on Mylar-backed cellulose acetate membranes is described. A number of benefits are derived, particularly the use of only a fraction (1/200) of the antisera used with agar immunoelectrophoresis. The importance of "standardizing" commercial antisera (and a method for carrying this out) with the techniques described is emphasized.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  19. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  20. Localization of sulfatides in the epithelial lining of gastric mucosa: studies with a monoclonal antibody to sulfatides.

    PubMed

    Sugano, K; Tai, T; Kawashima, I; Kotani, M; Natomi, H; Kamisago, S; Fukushima, Y; Yazaki, Y; Iwamori, M

    1995-01-01

    A specific monoclonal antibody against sulfatides was used to examine the cellular localization of sulfatides, the most predominant acidic glycosphingolipids in both rabbit and human gastric mucosa. The monoclonal antibody selectively recognized sulfatides among the acidic glycolipids extracted from rabbit gastric mucosa. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that specific staining was localized in the epithelial cells of the stomach. Both epithelial and glandular cells were stained in the fundic mucosa. In human stomach, the staining pattern was essentially identical to that in rabbit stomach. The specific localization of sulfatides in the epithelial lining supports our hypothesis that they may be a component of mucosal defensive substances and an adhesion receptor for Helicobacter pylori.

  1. Production of monoclonal antibodies to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies in plant pathology has improved the quality and specificity of detection methods for diseases. Hybridoma technology allows the limitless production of highly specific antibodies which can be used to identify pathogens to the species or even sub-species level.

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  3. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  4. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  5. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  6. Targeted α-Particle Radiotherapy with 211At-labeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Reardon, David A.; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D.

    2007-01-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed on tumor cells to selectively deliver the α-particle emitting radiohalogen 211At to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels, and the lack of data concerning toxicity of α-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  7. Characterization of a Novel Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Against Ebola Virus GP.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E

    2015-10-01

    Ebola virus is the etiological agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. As the only protein exposed on the surface of viral particles, the spike glycoprotein GP is the unique target for neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we demonstrate the strong neutralization capacity of the monoclonal antibody #3327 and characterize its activity. GP residues that are required for recognition and neutralization were found to be located both in the internal fusion loop and in the receptor-binding domain. Analysis of Ebola virus entry in the presence of #3327 allows us to hypothesize that this antibody binds to the virus particle before internalization and endosomal processing of GP and likely prevents the final viral fusion step. Importantly, #3327 is able to block entry of virions bearing GP that contain the Q508 escape mutation common to a number of virus-neutralizing antibodies, and therefore provides future perspectives for treatment strategies against Ebola virus infection.

  8. Generation of Recombinant Human IgG Monoclonal Antibodies from Immortalized Sorted B Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Saxena, Abhishek; Hoffmann, Carolin; Hounjet, Judith; Coenen, Daniëlle; Molenaar, Peter; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2015-06-05

    Finding new methods for generating human monoclonal antibodies is an active research field that is important for both basic and applied sciences, including the development of immunotherapeutics. However, the techniques to identify and produce such antibodies tend to be arduous and sometimes the heavy and light chain pair of the antibodies are dissociated. Here, we describe a relatively simple, straightforward protocol to produce human recombinant monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Toll-like receptor 9 activation. With an adequate staining, B cells producing antibodies can be isolated for subsequent immortalization and clonal expansion. The antibody transcripts produced by the immortalized B cell clones can be amplified by PCR, sequenced as corresponding heavy and light chain pairs and cloned into immunoglobulin expression vectors. The antibodies obtained with this technique can be powerful tools to study relevant human immune responses, including autoimmunity, and create the basis for new therapeutics.

  9. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  10. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  11. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  12. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. [Glomerulopathies with organized monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits].

    PubMed

    Touchard, Guy; Bridoux, Frank; Goujon, Jean-Michel

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum of glomerular disorders with organized immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits is heterogeneous. It encompasses 2 mains categories: glomerulopathies with fibrillary deposits are mostly represented by immunoglobulinic amyloidosis (most commonly AL amyloidosis, characterized by monoclonal light chain deposits often of the lambda isotype), and pseudo-amyloid fibrillary glomerulonephritis in which deposits predominantly contain polyclonal IgG4. Glomerulopathies with microtubular deposits include cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis (type I and type II, with or without detectable serum cryoglobulin) and glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal Ig deposits (GOMMID) also referred to as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Pathological diagnosis requires meticulous studies by light microscopy (with systematic Congo red staining), immunofluorescence with specific conjugates, and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies are required to differentiate amyloid fibrils (8 to 10 nm in external diameter), pseudo-amyloid fibrils (15-20 nm) and microtubules (10 to 50 nm in external diameter, with a central hollow core). Glomerular deposits in type I cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis are arranged into parallel straight microtubules similar to those observed in GOMMID, but with different topography that allows distinction between the two entities. Glomerular substructures composed of circulating Igs should be distinguished from collagen fibrils that are commonly observed in glomerular disorders with or without deposition of monoclonal or polyclonal Igs. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  15. [Preparation of monoclonal antibody against phosphinothricin acetyltransferase].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xudong; Wang, Yongzhi; Shi, Shengfeng; Li, Zhongpeng; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhengkun; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Jiashi; Li, Qiyun; Wang, Jingang

    2013-05-01

    To express phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) with biological activity and prepare monoclonal antibodies against PAT. The full length bar gene was cloned by PCR and inserted into prokaryotic expression vector pET28a⁺. The recombinant plasmid pET28-bar was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3), and under the induction of IPTG, PAT was expressed. The expressed protein was purified by Ni⁺; affinity chromatography to analyze its activity. The purified PAT was used to immunize BALB/c mice, and then the spleen cells from the immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 cells. The hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against PAT were isolated by indirect ELISA and then subcloned. Soluble PAT was expressed in E.coli. The purified PAT had the activity of acetyltransferase. We totally prepared 9 hybridoma cell lines which secreted specific anti-PAT monoclonal antibodies. The expressed recombinant PAT can be used for biological reagent to prevent and relieve herbicide damage. Monoclonal antibodies against PAT may be used to detect the transgenic products.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M Z

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  17. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  18. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  19. The incidental monoclonal protein: current approach to management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Madan, Sumit; Greipp, Philip R

    2009-11-01

    'Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance' (MGUS) is a pre-malignant disorder characterized by limited clonal proliferation of the bone marrow plasma cells without any evidence of end-organ damage. A better understanding of the prevalence rates, natural history, and the risk factors for progression of MGUS, provides further insight into the clinical approach to management of this condition. The clinical implications of MGUS such as the risk of fracture, miscellaneous conditions associated with a monoclonal M-protein, and a practical approach to the management of MGUS patients based on a risk-stratification model are discussed in this review.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to Rh D--development and uses.

    PubMed

    Scott, M L; Voak, D

    2000-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-D has proved impossible to make in rodent systems. Human monoclonal anti-D has been produced using EBV transformed peripheral B cells, coupled with fusions to myeloma cell lines. More recently molecular biology techniques have been used to produce monoclonal anti-D. The range of monoclonal anti-D produced is considered. The selection of monoclonal anti-D for use as blood grouping reagents for typing donors and recipients is reviewed--all types of D positive should be typed as positive when donors are considered. However, DVI patients should be typed as D negative. Considerations for the development of monoclonal anti-D for prophylactic use are reviewed.

  1. Integrating novel therapeutic monoclonal antibodies into the management of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Ferris, Robert L

    2014-03-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an immunosuppressive malignancy. Interest in developing novel immunotherapies in HNSCC has been reawakened by the success of cetuximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which likely relies on immune as well as antisignaling mechanisms. This review focuses on novel therapeutic mAbs in current clinical development against established mechanisms of immune evasion in HNSCC, targeting: 1) tumor antigens, with resultant potential to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and T cell activation; 2) immunosuppressive cytokines; 3) costimulatory tumor necrosis factor-family receptors; and 4) coinhibitory immune checkpoint receptors. Clinical trials of immunotherapeutic mAbs as monotherapy, in combination with cytolytic standard therapies exposing tumor antigens or in combination with other immunomodulatory mAbs, are urgently needed in HNSCC.

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features.

  3. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  4. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  5. Mixed Lichenoid and Follicular T- and B-Cell Lymphoid Reaction to Red Tattoos With Monoclonal T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zaaroura, Hiba; Bergman, Reuven

    2017-09-28

    Pseudolymphomatous reactions have been described to occur in tattoos. Most cases have exhibited T-cell predominance and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. One case with monoclonal IgH gene rearrangements progressed into B-cell lymphoma. Lichenoid infiltrates are commonly described but lymphoid follicles much less frequently. We report a case with mixed lichenoid and follicular T- and B-cell reaction to red tattoos. The histopathology and the immunohistochemical studies were constant with a mixed T- and B-cell pseudolymphoma, the IgH gene rearrangement study was polyclonal, but the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement study was monoclonal. The patient who responded to intralesional corticosteroid injections remains under close scrutiny.

  6. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kubagawa, H; Mayumi, M; Kearney, J F; Cooper, M D

    1982-10-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts.

  7. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  8. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  9. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2017-05-04

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays.

  11. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    PubMed Central

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  12. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  13. Dissecting monoclonal antibody mega-deals

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) deals notable in size have made headlines recently. While deals with over US$ 1 bio in milestones were highly unusual in the past, even preclinical agreements, including some with very attractive co-promotion or profit-sharing clauses for the licensor, now reach this mark. This article presents an analysis of the structure of high-value mAb deals and the impact of increasingly sophisticated terms. Strategies of licensees and the impact of strategy on a deal's size and structure are also examined. PMID:20061828

  14. Nimotuzumab, a promising therapeutic monoclonal for treatment of tumors of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    Eswaraiah, Anand; Crombet, Tania; Piedra, Patricia; Saurez, Giselle; Iyer, Harish; Arvind, AS

    2009-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized therapeutic monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Clinical trials are ongoing globally to evaluate nimotuzumab in different indications. Nimotuzumab has been granted approval for use in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN), glioma and nasopharyngeal cancer in different countries. This review focuses on the unique functional characteristics of nimotuzumab. Also, it discusses the safety and efficacy data obtained from the Phase IIb clinical trial conducted in India in SCCHN. Post marketing surveillance data from Cuba for the use of nimotuzumab in pediatric and adult glioma is also discussed. Overall, nimotuzumab has immense therapeutic potential in cancers of epithelial origin. PMID:20046573

  15. Nimotuzumab, a promising therapeutic monoclonal for treatment of tumors of epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Melarkode S; Eswaraiah, Anand; Crombet, Tania; Piedra, Patricia; Saurez, Giselle; Iyer, Harish; Arvind, A S

    2009-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized therapeutic monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Clinical trials are ongoing globally to evaluate nimotuzumab in different indications. Nimotuzumab has been granted approval for use in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN), glioma and nasopharyngeal cancer in different countries. This review focuses on the unique functional characteristics of nimotuzumab. Also, it discusses the safety and efficacy data obtained from the Phase IIb clinical trial conducted in India in SCCHN. Post marketing surveillance data from Cuba for the use of nimotuzumab in pediatric and adult glioma is also discussed. Overall, nimotuzumab has immense therapeutic potential in cancers of epithelial origin.

  16. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  17. Development and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies reactive with porcine CSF1R (CD115).

    PubMed

    Moffat, L; Rothwell, L; Garcia-Morales, C; Sauter, K A; Kapetanovic, R; Gow, D J; Hume, D A

    2014-11-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1) controls the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. CSF1, alongside a second ligand, interleukin-34 (IL-34), acts by binding to a cell surface receptor (CSF1R). We previously cloned and expressed pig CSF1 and IL-34. Here we produced a pig CSF1R-Ig+pFUSE Fc fusion protein and used it as an immunogen to produce three monoclonal antibodies (ROS8G11, ROS3A5 and ROS3B10) targeted against porcine CSF1R. Specific binding of each monoclonal antibody was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The antibodies did not block CSF1 signalling. The surface expression of CSF1R in pig peripheral blood was restricted to CD14-positive monocytes and was also detected on lung macrophages. These antibodies provided an opportunity to investigate the increase of available CSF1R during pig BMDM differentiation. The new monoclonal antibodies provide useful reagents to support the study of monocyte and macrophage biology in the pig.

  18. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  19. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  20. Establishment of a novel monoclonal antibody against LGR5.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kosaka, Hiromichi; Usami, Katsuaki; Toki, Hiroe; Kawai, Hironori; Shiraishi, Norihiko; Ota, Toshio; Nakamura, Kazuyasu; Furuya, Akiko; Satoh, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Kazumasa; Masuda, Kazuhiro

    2010-04-09

    LGR5 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed on the cell surface membrane. LGR5 is reported to be overexpressed in colon, liver, and ovary tumor compared to normal tissue. However, a specific ligand for LGR5 has not yet been determined, and the function is still not clear. An LGR5-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) is needed as a tool for detection and analysis of LGR5 biological function and cancer therapy. To date, no mAb against LGR5 that retains high affinity and specificity has been reported. Here, we report successful establishment and characterization of a mAb (KM4056) that specifically recognizes the extracellular N-terminal domain of human LGR5, but not LGR4 or LGR6. This mAb has potent complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activity in vitro and shows strong anti-tumor activity in vivo against xenograft model by transplanting LGR5 expressing CHO transfectants into SCID mice. Thus, KM4056 can be a useful tool for detection of LGR5 positive cells and analysis of LGR5 biological function.

  1. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies prevent Zika virus infection in macaques.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Diogo M; Rogers, Thomas F; Beutler, Nathan; Ricciardi, Michael J; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Strubel, Alexander; Gutman, Martin J; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Grubaugh, Nathan D; Silveira, Cassia G T; Maxwell, Helen S; Domingues, Aline; Martins, Mauricio A; Lee, David E; Okwuazi, Erica E; Jean, Sherrie; Strobert, Elizabeth A; Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido; Vanderford, Thomas H; Kallas, Esper G; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Whitehead, Stephen S; Burton, Dennis R; Watkins, David I

    2017-10-04

    Therapies to prevent maternal Zika virus (ZIKV) infection and its subsequent fetal developmental complications are urgently required. We isolated three potent ZIKV-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nmAbs) from the plasmablasts of a ZIKV-infected patient-SMZAb1, SMZAb2, and SMZAb5-directed against two different domains of the virus. We engineered these nmAbs with Fc LALA mutations that abrogate Fcγ receptor binding, thus eliminating potential therapy-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement. We administered a cocktail of these three nmAbs to nonhuman primates 1 day before challenge with ZIKV and demonstrated that the nmAbs completely prevented viremia in serum after challenge. Given that numerous antibodies have exceptional safety profiles in humans, the cocktail described here could be rapidly developed to protect uninfected pregnant women and their fetuses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Trial watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An expanding panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically target malignant cells or intercept trophic factors delivered by the tumor stroma is now available for cancer therapy. These mAbs can exert direct antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects as they inhibit pro-survival signal transduction cascades or activate lethal receptors at the plasma membrane of cancer cells, they can opsonize neoplastic cells to initiate a tumor-targeting immune response, or they can be harnessed to specifically deliver toxins or radionuclides to transformed cells. As an indication of the success of this immunotherapeutic paradigm, international regulatory agencies approve new tumor-targeting mAbs for use in cancer patients every year. Moreover, the list of indications for previously licensed molecules is frequently expanded to other neoplastic disorders as the results of large, randomized clinical trials become available. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of tumor-targeting mAbs for oncological indications. PMID:25949870

  3. [Monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9: from bench to clinic].

    PubMed

    Guijarro Herraiz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins with high specificity binding to multiple antigens due to the large number of structural conformations of the variable chains. Hybridoma technology (fusion of myeloma cells with immunoglobulin-producing lymphocytes) has allowed the synthesis of large quantities of unique antibodies (monoclonal [mAb]). mAbs were initially murine. Subsequently, chimeric mAbs were developed, followed by humanized mAbs and finally human mAbs. The high selectivity and good tolerance of human mAbs allows their therapeutic administration to block specific exogenous or endogenous molecules. Selective human mAbs to the catalytic domain of PCSK9 have recently been developed. These antibodies block PCSK9, favour low-density lipoprotein receptor recycling and markedly reduce circulating cholesterol. Preliminary studies indicate that lowering cholesterol through anti-PCSK9 antibodies may significantly reduce the cardiovascular complications of arteriosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan

    2006-04-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a key mediator of intracellular transport and metabolism of fatty acids in adipose tissues. FABP4 binds fatty acids with high affinity and transports them to various compartments in the cell. When in complex with fatty acids, FABP4 interacts with and modulates the activity of two important regulators of metabolism: hormone-sensitive lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Genetic studies in mice clearly indicated that deregulation of FABP4 function may lead to the development of severe diseases such as diabetes II type and atherosclerosis. In this study, we report the production and detailed characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against FABP4. Recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-FABP4 or His-FABP4 was expressed in bacteria, affinity purified, and used for immunization of mice, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, and characterization of selected clones. We have isolated two hybridoma clones that produced antibodies specific for recombinant and native FABP4, as shown by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. The specificity of generated antibodies was further tested in a cell-based model of adipogenesis. In this analysis, the accumulation of FABP4 during NIH 3T3-L1 differentiation into adipocytes was detected by generated antibodies, which correlates well with previously published data. Taken together, we produced MAbs that will be useful for the scientific community working on fatty acid-binding proteins and lipid metabolism.

  5. [The immunotherapy potential of agonistic anti-CD137 (4-1BB) monoclonal antibodies for malignancies and chronic viral diseases].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, C; Murillo, O; Tirapu, I; Azpilicueta, A; Huarte, E; Arina, A; Arribillaga, L; Pérez-Gracia, J L; Bendandi, M; Prieto, J; Lasarte, J J; Melero, I

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological intervention on the immune system to achieve more intense lymphocyte responses has potential application in tumour immunology and in the treatment of chronic viral diseases. Immunostimulating monoclonal antibodies are defined as a new family of drugs that augment cellular immune responses. They interact as artificial ligands with functional proteins of the immune system, either activating or inhibiting their functions. There are humanized monoclonal antibodies directed to the inhibitory receptor CD152 (CTLA-4) that are being tested in clinical trials with evidence of antitumoural activity. As a drawback, anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies induce severe autoimmunity reactions in a fraction of the patients. Anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies have the ability to induce potent immune responses mainly mediated by cytotoxic lymphocytes with the result of frequent complete tumour eradications in mice. Comparative studies in experimental models indicate that the antitumour activity of anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies is superior to that of anti-CD152. CD137 (4-1BB) is a leukocyte differentiation antigen selectively expressed on the surface of activated T and NK lymphocytes, as well as on dendritic cells. Monoclonal antibodies acting as artificial stimulatory ligands of this receptor (anti-CD137 agonist antibodies) enhance cellular antitumoural and antiviral immunity in a variety of mouse models. Paradoxically, anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies are therapeutic or preventive in the course of model autoimmune diseases in mice. In light of these experimental results, a number of research groups have humanized antibodies against human CD137 and early clinical trials are about to start.

  6. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Lacy, Martha Q; Kyle, Robert A

    2007-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are asymptomatic disorders characterized by monoclonal plasma cell proliferation in the bone marrow in the absence of end-organ damage. Updated diagnostic criteria for these disorders, risk-stratification models to determine prognosis, and the current management of these two entities are discussed in this review.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  9. Immunochemical Characterization of Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    formation. This conformation was first proposed using studies with monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide mimicking the sequence of the...distinct antigenic determinants on dengue -2 virus using monoclonal antibodies, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 31 (1982) 548-555. 7 D. De la Hoz, B.P. Doctor

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy with both nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Lei, Lin; Chen, Hai; Di, Li; Pang, Mi; Lu, Yan; Lu, Lu; Shen, Xin-Ming; Da, Yuwei

    2017-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies due to plasma cell dyscrasias can induce diverse rare neuromuscular disorders. Deposition of monoclonal antibody light chains in skeletal muscle causes amyloid myopathy. Monoclonal gammopathy is occasionally associated with sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy. Here we report a monoclonal gammopathy patient with both sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy. The diagnoses were based on immunofixation electrophoresis of urine, and serum for free light chain assay, Congo red staining and Thioflavin S staining of muscle biopsies, as well as immunohistochemical staining and electron-microscopic observation. Nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy can present in the same patient with monoclonal gammopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnoses and Management of Drug Hypersensitivity and Anaphylaxis in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Reactions to Taxanes and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi-Santos, Rafael; Castells, Mariana

    2016-06-08

    Due to the increase in utilization of chemotherapies and antibodies, drug hypersensitivity reactions have increased dramatically worldwide, preventing the use of first-line therapies and impacting patients' survival and quality of life. Some of the more frequently used medications in cancer include taxanes for ovarian, lung, breast, and prostate cancers. Monoclonal antibodies are used in the treatment of neoplastic, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases, and their clinical applications are becoming broader. Monoclonal antibody targets include CD20, HER-2, EGFR, IL-6 receptor, TNF-α, CD30, VEGF-A, IgE, and more, and examples of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases that respond to monoclonal antibodies include rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, and asthma. Neoplastic diseases include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and colorectal, breast, gastric, and lung cancer. The clinical presentation of drug hypersensitivity reactions ranges from mild cutaneous reactions to life-threatening symptoms including anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) has become a groundbreaking approach to the management of immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions IgE and non-IgE mediated. It is the only effective procedure that enables sensitized patients to receive the full treatment dose safely, thus representing an important advance in the patients' treatment and prognosis. The aim of this review is to provide an update on hypersensitivity reactions to commonly used monoclonal and taxanes, their clinical presentations, diagnosis, and the use of RDD for their management.

  12. Acute treatment with XMetA activates hepatic insulin receptors and lowers blood glucose in normal mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been proposed that monoclonal antibodies may become therapeutics for metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. We have previously characterized an allosteric monoclonal antibody to the human insulin receptor (IR), XMetA, that activated metabolic signaling leading to enhanced glucose tran...

  13. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies: the next generation?

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-10-01

    There is a clear need for renewed efforts to combat the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance. While the antibiotic resistance epidemic is due in part to the misuse of antibiotics, even proper empiric antibiotic therapy increases the selective pressure and potential for drug-resistance and spread of resistance mechanisms between bacteria. Antibiotic resistance coupled with the detrimental effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the healthy microbiome, have led the field to explore pathogen specific antibacterials such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Medical need along with advances in mAb discovery, engineering, and production have driven significant effort developing mAb-based antibacterials. If successful, they will provide physicians with precision weapons to combat bacterial infections and can help prevent a return to a pre-antibiotic era.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against metallothioneins and metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Talbot, B G; Bilodeau, G; Thirion, J P

    1986-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit metallothioneins (MT) were prepared by in vitro immunization of mouse lymphocytes with a mixture of the two forms of metallothionein MT1 and MT2. Six IgM antibodies (TN1,3,4,5,6,7) which bind to metallothionein were characterized. Antibody TN3 is specific for rabbit MT1 and does not react with any other MT's tested. TN5 is specific for both rabbit MT1 and MT2. TN7 is specific for rabbit MT2 but not MT1 and cross-reacts also with Chinese hamster, mouse and rat metallothioneins. The antibodies TN1, TN4 and TN6 bind not only to rabbit MT1 and MT2 but also to other metal binding proteins like alcohol dehydrogenase and carbonic anhydrase.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with murine teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P N; Levinson, J R; Williams, V E; McDevitt, H O

    1979-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced in vitro by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a rat immunized with the C3H mouse teratocarcinoma C86-S1. After the fusion two clones were chosen for further analysis. The first clone, 3C4-10, produced an antibody recognizing an antigen with a distribution restricted to teratocarcinoma cell lines, an endoderm cell line, and a neuroblastoma. The second clone, 4A1-9, produced an antibody that reacted with all cultured murine cells tested and adult brain. Neither antibody reacted with preimplantation embryos. The 3C4-10 antibody recognized an antigen associated with proteins. The apparent molecular weight of the 3C4-10 antigen was greater than 100,000. PMID:284353

  17. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  18. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  19. Monitoring therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Berenguer, Caroline; Villard, Claude; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Beck, Alain; Chinot, Olivier; Lafitte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab induces normalization of abnormal blood vessels, making them less leaky. By binding to vascular endothelial growth factor, it indirectly attacks the vascular tumor mass. The optimal delivery of targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies or anti-angiogenesis drugs to the target tissue highly depends on the blood-brain barrier permeability. It is therefore critical to investigate how drugs effectively reach the tumor. In situ investigation of drug distribution could provide a better understanding of pharmacological agent action and optimize chemotherapies for solid tumors. We developed an imaging method coupled to protein identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This approach monitored bevacizumab distribution within the brain structures, and especially within the tumor, without any labeling. PMID:25484065

  20. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against methionyl recombinant human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Paris, N; Robert, R; Mercier, L

    1993-02-01

    Hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibody (Mab) against recombinant human prolactin (rhPrl) were established from fusion between X63-Ag8 myeloma cells and Balb/c mice splenocytes. Four Mabs numbered I to IV were selected by ELISA, purified and characterized. All these Mabs were of the Ig1 kappa isotype and able to recognize oxidized as well as reduced rhPrl. As shown by a competitive inhibition assay, Mab IV did not compete with any of the three others. Moreover, both rhPrl and hPrl extracted from human pituitaries, were recognized equally by this Mab. Properties displayed by Mab IV make it very attractive for the evaluation of prolactin levels by sandwich immunoassays.

  2. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  3. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  4. Probing myosin head structure with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, D A; Lowey, S

    1986-04-20

    Monoclonal antibodies that react with defined regions of the heavy and light chains of chicken skeletal muscle myosin have been used to provide a correlation between the primary and the tertiary structures of the head. Electron microscopy of rotary shadowed antibody-myosin complexes shows that the sites for three epitopes in the 25,000 Mr tryptic fragment (25k) of subfragment-1, including one within 4000 Mr of the amino terminus of the myosin heavy chain, are clustered 145(+/- 20) A from the head-rod junction. An epitope in the 50,000 Mr fragment maps even further out on the head. These antibodies bind to the head in several orientations, suggesting that each of the heads can rotate can rotate 180 degrees about the head-rod junction. The epitopes are accessible on subfragment-1 bound to actin when they were probed with Fab fragments; therefore, none of these heavy chain sites is is on the contact surface between the head and actin. Two of the anti-25k antibodies affect the K+-EDTA-and Ca2+-ATPase activities of myosin in a manner that mimics the effect on activity of the modification of the reactive thiol, SH-1. These two antibodies also inhibit the actin-activated ATPase non-competitively with respect to actin. None of the other eight antibodies tested had any marked effect on activity. A monoclonal antibody that reacts with an epitope in the amino-terminal third of myosin light chain 2 maps close to the head-rod junction. A polyclonal antibody specific for the amino terminus of light chain 3 binds further up in the "neck region" of the head, indicating that these portions of the two classes of light chains are located at different sites.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies as catalysts for cyanide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.E.; Whisnant, C.C.; Miller, D.B.; Allen, D.A.; Basta, P.V.

    1993-05-13

    We have shown that hydrogen cyanide reacts with alpha, beta-unsaturated ketones to form stable compounds under physiological conditions (temperature, pH). Although spontaneous reaction is too slow for protection against cyanide intoxication, rate enhancement in the presence of a suitable catalyst would permit the use of alpha, beta-unsaturated ketones (enones) as prophylactics for cyanide exposure. Based on the accepted mechanism for this 1,4-addition reaction, we have designed and synthesized sized a transition state analog (TSA), conjugated it to protein and used the conjugate to produce more than 300 monoclonal antibodies which bind the TSA. Approximately 10% of these antibodies have been purified from ascites and tested for catalysis of the addition reaction of cyanide to enone. Product formation was measured by HPLC. Four antibodies have been found which significantly enhance the initial velocity of the reaction. The TSA markedly diminishes the reaction velocity, indicating the involvement of the antibody binding site in the observed enhancement. Preliminary kinetic analysis on one antibody gave values of K sub (enone) and K sub KCN 51 uM and 9.6 mM, respectively. The value of k sub (cat) was 2.33 hr-1. The data suggest a rate enhancement of 2 x 10 to the 4th power for the encounter of the enone with the antibody-cyanide complex, whereas the rate enhancement for encounter of cyanide with the antibody-enone complex is 70. To utilize the potential of genetic engineering for modifying the proper-lies of anti-TSA monoclonal antibodies, we are cloning heavy and light chain genes for sequencing and subsequent site-specific mutagenesis.

  6. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  7. Biochemical and functional analysis of smallpox growth factor (SPGF) and anti-SPGF monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikyung; Yang, Hailin; Kim, Sung-Kwon; Reche, Pedro A; Tirabassi, Rebecca S; Hussey, Rebecca E; Chishti, Yasmin; Rheinwald, James G; Morehead, Tiara J; Zech, Tobias; Damon, Inger K; Welsh, Raymond M; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2004-06-11

    Variola, the causative agent of smallpox, is a highly infectious double-stranded DNA virus of the orthopox genus that replicates within the cytoplasm of infected cells. For unknown reasons prominent skin manifestations, including "pox," mark the course of this systemic human disease. Here we characterized smallpox growth factor (SPGF), a protein containing an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain that is conserved among orthopox viral genomes, and investigated its possible mechanistic link. We show that after recombinant expression, refolding, and purification, the EGF domain of SPGF binds exclusively to the broadly expressed cellular receptor, erb-B1 (EGF receptor), with subnanomolar affinity, stimulating the growth of primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. High affinity monoclonal antibodies specific for SPGF reveal in vivo immunoprotection in a murine vaccinia pneumonia model by a mechanism distinct from viral neutralization. These findings suggest that blockade of pathogenic factor actions, in general, may be advantageous to the infected host.

  8. [Cloning and expression of VLRB of Lampetra japonica and generation of the corresponding monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen-Fang; Ma, Ning; Chen, Li-Yong; Su, Peng; Li, Qing-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The agnathans (lampreys and hagfishes) are representatives of the jawless vertebrates. The receptor molecules of adaptive immune system in lampreys are different from the antigen receptors in mammal vertebrates. The unique receptor molecules of lampreys are known as variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR). There are three types of VLRs in lampreys, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC. Multimeric antigen-specific VLRB antibodies are secreted by VLRB+ lymphocytes and constitute the major components of the humoral arm of the lamprey adaptive immune system. Oligomeric VLRB antibodies are composed of four or five disulfide-linked dimeric subunits, which are similar to IgM antibodies in structure and function. In this study, the conservative c-terminal of Lampetra japonica VLRB was cloned and expressed in BL21 E. coli. The recombinant VLRB protein was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. After Balb/c mice immunity, cell fusion, the positive clones were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, the hybridoma cells that produced specific anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In order to get a large number of antibodies against VLRB, the hybridoma cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of Balb/c mice and the antibodies were purified by protein G sepharose. The results of ELISA indicated that the valence of anti-VLRB antibodies was 1:40000. Western blotting assay showed that the antibodies were able to detect both recombinant VLRB and secreted VLRB in lamprey sera. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed the existence of VLRB on the surface of lymphocytes. In summary, the anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies provided a major tool for studying lamprey adaptive immune system.

  9. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  10. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Gowda, K K; Joshi, K; Ramachandran, R; Nada, R

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia.

  12. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  13. Therapeutic antibodies against CGRP or its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bigal, Marcelo E; Walter, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    CGRP is an extensively studied neuropeptide that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. While a number of small molecule antagonists against the CGRP receptor have demonstrated that targeting this pathway is a valid and effective way of treating migraine, off-target hepatoxicity and formulation issues have hampered the development for regulatory approval of any therapeutic in this class. The development of monoclonal antibodies to CGRP or its receptor as therapeutic agents has allowed this pathway to be re-investigated. Herein we review why CGRP is an ideal target for the prevention of migraine and describe four monoclonal antibodies against either CGRP or its receptor that are in clinical development for the treatment of both episodic and chronic migraine. We describe what has been publically disclosed about their clinical trials and future clinical development plans. PMID:25614243

  14. A Monoclonal Antibody Toolkit for C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Gayla; Dour, Scott; Arur, Swathi; Fox, Paul; Nonet, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1), a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10), a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1), a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4), which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2), a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5); to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1); to EHD1 (RME-1) a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1), a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1), a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8) that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60) targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1), a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7) of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1) and to the α-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2) as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1) and cadherin (HMR-1), both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1), which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413) which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7) which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to working

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  17. Generalized livedo reticularis associated with monoclonal cryoglobulinemia and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Requena, Luis; Kutzner, Heinz; Angulo, Jorge; Renedo, Guadalupe

    2007-02-01

    Cryoglobulins are detected in a wide variety of diseases, including malignancies, infections and systemic autoimmune diseases. Classically, monoclonal cryoglobulinemia is associated with hematologic malignancies, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemias are reported in association with hepatitis C virus infections or autoimmune diseases. We present a patient with generalized livedo reticularis as the first manifestation of monoclonal cryoglobulinemia and multiple myeloma. Histopathology demonstrated that nearly all small blood vessels of the upper and deep dermis, as well as the capillaries of the fat lobule, were filled with homogeneous, eosinophilic material that corresponded to monoclonal cryoglobulin deposits within the vascular lumina. Our case of livedo reticularis associated with monoclonal cryoglobulinemia and multiple myeloma was exceptional, because the mottled cyanotic discoloration of the skin with a reticular pattern was generalized, covering most of the skin surface. We have not found previous report of similar cases. Therefore, we recommend that dermatologists be made aware of the significance of this diagnosis.

  18. Adverse cardiac events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are currently used in the treatment of neoplastic, hematological, or inflammatory diseases, a practice that is occasionally associated with a variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events. Cardiac adverse events include cardiomyopathy, ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias, arrests, and acute coronary syndromes, such as acute myocardial infarction and vasospastic angina pectoris. These events generally follow hypersensitivity reactions including cutaneous erythema, pruritus chills, and precordial pain. Recently, IgE specific for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been detected, pointing to the existence of hypersensitivity and Kounis hypersensitivity-associated syndrome. Therefore, the careful monitoring of cardiovascular events is of paramount importance in the course of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. Moreover, further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of cardiovascular adverse events elicited by monoclonal antibodies and to identify preventive, protective, and therapeutic measures. PMID:25340003

  19. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  20. Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma associated with monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yoon K; Elpern, David J

    2015-10-01

    Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma (DNPX) was first described by Altman and Winkelmann in 1962. It is a rare and non-inherited form of xanthomatosis. Clinically, the dermatosis is characterized by the presence of symmetric yellowish-orange plaques that favor the neck, upper trunk, flexural folds and periorbital region. It has been recognized to be associated with hematological diseases, especially with multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy. We present a patient with diffuse plane xanthoma, normal lipid level, and monoclonal gammopathy.

  1. Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma associated with monoclonal gammopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yoon K.; Elpern, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma (DNPX) was first described by Altman and Winkelmann in 1962. It is a rare and non-inherited form of xanthomatosis. Clinically, the dermatosis is characterized by the presence of symmetric yellowish-orange plaques that favor the neck, upper trunk, flexural folds and periorbital region. It has been recognized to be associated with hematological diseases, especially with multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy. We present a patient with diffuse plane xanthoma, normal lipid level, and monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:26693095

  2. Use of Human Hybridoma Technology To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-01

    The human hybridoma technique offers an important approach for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. A diversity of approaches can be used with varying success. Recent technical advances in expanding the starting number of human antigen-specific B cells, improving fusion efficiency, and isolating new myeloma partners and new cell cloning methods have enabled the development of protocols that make the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from blood samples feasible. Undoubtedly, additional innovations that could improve efficiency are possible.

  3. Renal involvement of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with an unusual monoclonal immunoglobulin A glycan profile.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Syuzou; Usui, Joichi; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Ito, Hiromi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Nagata, Michio; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2010-08-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for the evaluation of proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and monoclonal IgA-kappa gammopathy. The initial renal pathological findings showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with endocapillary proliferation, a necrotizing lesion, and cellular crescent formation accompanied by IgA1-kappa deposition in the mesangium. Neither typical immune-complex deposits nor organized-structure deposits were detected. We diagnosed the patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) associated with monoclonal IgA (mIgA). After the initiation of a monthly treatment with melphalan and predonisolone (MP therapy), the patient's serum IgA levels declined, and clinical remission was ultimately achieved. The follow-up renal biopsy showed reduced IgA-kappa staining, and both the endocapillary proliferation and the necrotizing lesion had disappeared. To elucidate the mechanism of IgA deposition, we investigated the glycan profile of the patient's serum mIgA using a mass spectrometry technique. The results revealed an unusual N-glycan profile compared to that of another patient with circulating mIgA lacking renal involvement and that of a healthy control. mIgA deposition in the mesangial area is a rare disease, and the glycan profiling of MIDD with renal involvement has not been reported previously. Thus, the present case suggests that any variation in Ig glycosylation may be a step in the pathogenesis of MIDD with renal involvement and/or contribute to some cases of IgA nephropathy.

  4. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Xenopus Greatwall Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is known to be regulated by protein kinases, including MPF, Plk1, Aurora kinases, and so on, which become active in M-phase and phosphorylate a wide range of substrates to control multiple aspects of mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Mechanistic investigations of these kinases not only provide key insights into cell cycle regulation, but also hold great promise for cancer therapy. Recent studies, largely in Xenopus, characterized a new mitotic kinase named Greatwall (Gwl) that plays essential roles in both mitotic entry and maintenance. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Xenopus Gwl and characterized these antibodies for their utility in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts. Importantly, we generated an MAb that is capable of neutralizing endogenous Gwl. The addition of this antibody into M-phase extracts results in loss of mitotic phosphorylation of Gwl, Plk1, and Cdk1 substrates. These results illustrate a new tool to study loss-of-function of Gwl, and support its essential role in mitosis. Finally, we demonstrated the usefulness of the MAb against human Gwl/MASTL. PMID:22008075

  7. Recombinant genetic libraries and human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jarrett J; Nelson, Bryce; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively manipulate the human proteome we require a vast repertoire of pharmacological reagents. To address these needs we have developed repertoires of synthetic antibodies by phage display, where diversified oligonucleotides are used to modify the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of a human antigen-binding fragment (Fab) scaffold. As diversity is produced outside the confines of the mammalian immune system, synthetic antibody libraries allow us to bypass several limitations of hybridoma technology while improving the experimental parameters under which pharmacological reagents are produced. Here we describe the methodologies used to produce synthetic antibody libraries from a single human framework with diversity restricted to four CDRs. These synthetic repertoires can be extremely functional as they produce highly selective, high affinity Fabs to the majority of soluble human antigens. Finally we describe selection methodologies that allow us to overcome immuno-dominance in our selections to target a variety of epitopes per antigen. Together these methodologies allow us to produce human monoclonal antibodies to manipulate the human proteome.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to human urinary thrombopoietin

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.P.; Clift, R.; Cottrell, M.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MA) to a thrombocytopoiesis-stimulating factor (TSF or thrombopoietin) were obtained from hybridomas derived from the fusion of P3 x 63/Ag 8 cells and spleen cells from TSF-immunized BALB/c mice. Media from several hybrid cultures were tested in a microantibody detection technique that measured the binding of MA to a /sup 125/I-purified TSF preparation from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Hybridized cells were injected into pristane-primed mice and the antibodies produced in the ascites fluid were also shown to bind the /sup 125/I-TSF. Compared to the results of normal mouse serum, ascites fluid containing MA was shown to bind the unlabeled TSF from HEK cells. The TSF activity was significantly reduced in the supernatant fluid after precipitating the TSF-anti-TSF immune complex by a second antibody when tested in an immunothrombocythemic mouse assay. After SDS-PAGE, the precipitate from this TSF-Ma conjugate showed that the antiserum bound a single 32,000 mol wt component, indicating the monospecificity of the MA. MA directed toward human TSF will allow studies that were not previously possible.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  10. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    PubMed

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  11. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  12. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  13. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of human c-Met neutralizing monoclonal antibody CE-355621

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Neil R.; Jani, Jitesh P.; Hillerman, Stephen; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos E.; Barbacci-Tobin, Elsa G.; Knauth, Elisabeth; Putz Jr., Henry; Campbell, Mary; Karam, George A.; Chrunyk, Boris; Gebhard, David F.; Green, Larry L.; Xu, Jinghai J.; Dunn, Margaret C.; Coskran, Tim M.; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Cohen, Bruce D.; Coleman, Kevin G.; Bedian, Vahe; Vincent, Patrick; Kajiji, Shama; Steyn, Stefan J.; Borzillo, Gary V.; Los, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    The c-Met proto-oncogene is a multifunctional receptor tyrosine kinase that is stimulated by its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), to induce cell growth, motility and morphogenesis. Dysregulation of c-Met function, through mutational activation or overexpression, has been observed in many types of cancer and is thought to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis by affecting mitogenesis, invasion, and angiogenesis. We identified human monoclonal antibodies that bind to the extracellular domain of c-Met and inhibit tumor growth by interfering with ligand-dependent c-Met activation. We identified antibodies representing four independent epitope classes that inhibited both ligand binding and ligand-dependent activation of c-Met in A549 cells. In cells, the antibodies antagonized c-Met function by blocking receptor activation and by subsequently inducing downregulation of the receptor, translating to phenotypic effects in soft agar growth and tubular morphogenesis assays. Further characterization of the antibodies in vivo revealed significant inhibition of c-Met activity (≥ 80% lasting for 72–96 h) in excised tumors corresponded to tumor growth inhibition in multiple xenograft tumor models. Several of the antibodies identified inhibited the growth of tumors engineered to overexpress human HGF and human c-Met (S114 NIH 3T3) when grown subcutaneously in athymic mice. Furthermore, lead candidate antibody CE-355621 inhibited the growth of U87MG human glioblastoma and GTL-16 gastric xenografts by up to 98%. The findings support published pre-clinical and clinical data indicating that targeting c-Met with human monoclonal antibodies is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23007574

  14. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of human c-Met neutralizing monoclonal antibody CE-355621.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Neil R; Jani, Jitesh P; Hillerman, Stephen; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos E; Barbacci-Tobin, Elsa G; Knauth, Elisabeth; Putz, Henry; Campbell, Mary; Karam, George A; Chrunyk, Boris; Gebhard, David F; Green, Larry L; Xu, Jinghai J; Dunn, Margaret C; Coskran, Tim M; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Cohen, Bruce D; Coleman, Kevin G; Bedian, Vahe; Vincent, Patrick; Kajiji, Shama; Steyn, Stefan J; Borzillo, Gary V; Los, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    The c-Met proto-oncogene is a multifunctional receptor tyrosine kinase that is stimulated by its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), to induce cell growth, motility and morphogenesis. Dysregulation of c-Met function, through mutational activation or overexpression, has been observed in many types of cancer and is thought to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis by affecting mitogenesis, invasion, and angiogenesis. We identified human monoclonal antibodies that bind to the extracellular domain of c-Met and inhibit tumor growth by interfering with ligand-dependent c-Met activation. We identified antibodies representing four independent epitope classes that inhibited both ligand binding and ligand-dependent activation of c-Met in A549 cells. In cells, the antibodies antagonized c-Met function by blocking receptor activation and by subsequently inducing downregulation of the receptor, translating to phenotypic effects in soft agar growth and tubular morphogenesis assays. Further characterization of the antibodies in vivo revealed significant inhibition of c-Met activity (≥ 80% lasting for 72-96 h) in excised tumors corresponded to tumor growth inhibition in multiple xenograft tumor models. Several of the antibodies identified inhibited the growth of tumors engineered to overexpress human HGF and human c-Met (S114 NIH 3T3) when grown subcutaneously in athymic mice. Furthermore, lead candidate antibody CE-355621 inhibited the growth of U87MG human glioblastoma and GTL-16 gastric xenografts by up to 98%. The findings support published pre-clinical and clinical data indicating that targeting c-Met with human monoclonal antibodies is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer.

  15. Quantitative and sensitive detection of the SARS-CoV spike protein using bispecific monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Hoon H; Palaniyappan, Arivazhagan; Ganguly, Advaita; Bhatnagar, Pravin K; Das, Dipankar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2013-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike protein is known to mediate receptor interaction and immune recognition and thus it is considered as a major target for vaccine design. The spike protein plays an important role in virus entry, virus receptor interactions, and virus tropism. Sensitive diagnosis of SARS is essential for the control of the disease in humans. Recombinant SARS-CoV S1 antigen was produced and purified for the development of monoclonal and bi-specific monoclonal antibodies. The hybridomas secreting anti-S1 antibodies, F26G18 and P136.8D12, were fused respectively with the YP4 hybridoma to generate quadromas. The sandwich ELISA was formed by using F26G18 as a coating antibody and biotinylated F26G18 as a detection antibody with a detection limit of 0.037μg/ml (p<0.02). The same detection limit was found with P136.8D12 as a coating antibody and biotinylated F26G18 as a detection antibody. The sensitivity was improved (detection limit of 0.019μg/ml), however, when using bi-specific monoclonal antibody (F157) as the detection antibody. In conclusion, the method described in this study allows sensitive detection of a recombinant SARS spike protein by sandwich ELISA with bi-specific monoclonal antibody and could be used for the diagnosis of patients suspected with SARS.

  16. Binding and signalling properties of a growth hormone enhancing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J; Bramani, S; Secchi, C; Mockridge, J

    1999-08-01

    We have used a sequential, qualitative biosensor based assay to demonstrate that OA15, a monoclonal antibody which enhances in vivo the activity of bovine growth hormone (bGH) does not disrupt the interaction between bGH and its cognate receptor (as represented by recombinant bovine GH binding protein -rbGHBP). We have confirmed this using a classical cell-based radio-receptor assay with the GH-responsive mouse pre-adipocyte cell line 3T3-F442A. The fact that OA 15 binding to bGH still allows hormone to interact with its receptor, allows us to test the hypothesis that there is any amplification of signalling events following hormone-MAb treatment of 3T3-F442A cells. We have used as a reporter of GH activity the rapid stimulation of JAK-2 tyrosine phosphorylation which is a critical first step in GH signalling events. We demonstrate that binding of rbGH by OA15 attenuates hormone stimulation of JAK-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. We conclude that although OA15 does not disrupt GH-GH receptor (GHR) interactions it does interfere with subsequent GH activity at the molecular and cellular level. We further speculate therefore that the biological enhancing activity of this antibody is most likely due to an in vivo effect as presentation of antibody-hormone complexes to a GH-target cell inhibits hormone activity.

  17. [Comparative studies on monoclonal antibody KM10 and anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Yamamoto, M; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1989-11-01

    The specificity of KM10 was evaluated in comparison with newly developed anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (A10, B9, JA4, AH3). Both KM10 and all anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies reacted with CEA in ELISA system, and with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, colon, and pancreas in the immunohistochemical assay. B9, JA4, and AH3 were suggested to react with CEA related antigens, such as NCA and BGPI, whereas KM10 and A10 were suggested to recognize the distinctive part of CEA. The antigenic determinant of CEA reactive with KM10 and A10 was revealed to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay, however, indicated that epitopes of KM10 and A10 were different each other. Enzyme immunoassay using both KM10 and A10 could detect CEA. These findings showed the possible use of both KM10 and A10 for clinical diagnosis and treatment by means of targeting for the distinctive part of CEA.

  18. Binding of alpha-fetoprotein by immobilized monoclonal antibodies during episodes of zero-gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, Brian S.; Guikema, James A.; Barnes, Grady

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a single-chain polypeptide which is synthesized by the liver and yolk sac of the human fetus, provided a model ligand for assessing the effects of microgravity on ligand binding to surface-immobilized model receptor molecules. Monoclonal antibodies, used as receptors for AFP, were immobilized by covalent attachment to latex microparticles. Zero gravity environment was obtained by parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, a modified KC-135 aircraft. Buring the onset of an episode of zero gravity, ligand and receptor were mixed. Timed incubation (20 s) was terminated by centrifugation, the supernatant removed, and microparticies were assessed for bound AFP by immunochemical methods. The extent of binding was not influenced by microgravity, when compared with 1-G controls, which suggests that aberrant cellular activities observed in microgravity are not the simple expression of altered macromolecular interactions.

  19. Binding of alpha-fetoprotein by immobilized monoclonal antibodies during episodes of zero-gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, Brian S.; Guikema, James A.; Barnes, Grady

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a single-chain polypeptide which is synthesized by the liver and yolk sac of the human fetus, provided a model ligand for assessing the effects of microgravity on ligand binding to surface-immobilized model receptor molecules. Monoclonal antibodies, used as receptors for AFP, were immobilized by covalent attachment to latex microparticles. Zero gravity environment was obtained by parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, a modified KC-135 aircraft. Buring the onset of an episode of zero gravity, ligand and receptor were mixed. Timed incubation (20 s) was terminated by centrifugation, the supernatant removed, and microparticies were assessed for bound AFP by immunochemical methods. The extent of binding was not influenced by microgravity, when compared with 1-G controls, which suggests that aberrant cellular activities observed in microgravity are not the simple expression of altered macromolecular interactions.

  20. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Gnathostoma nipponicum.

    PubMed

    Ikadai, H; Fujii, T; Nagai, T; Yoshioka, K; Nagasao, J; Kudo, N; Oyamada, T

    2003-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the proteins of advanced third-stage larvae (AdL3) of Gnathostoma nipponicum. Six mAbs (Gn2C3, Gn2H3, Gn4C3, Gn4E9, GnSH1, and Gn10B7) were obtained as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gn4E9 and GnSH1 seemed to be genus-specific, as they did not cross-react with Anisakis sp., Dirofilaria immitis, Gongylonema pulchrum, Toxocara canis, Trichinella sp., Trichuris vulpis, Metagonimus sp., or Spirometra erinaceieuropaei by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry showed that Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted strongly with the central esophagus; Gn2H3 reacted with cuticle,muscle, intestine, and the cervical sac; and Gn4C3 and Gn10B7 reacted with cuticle, muscle, esophagus, intestine, and the cervical sac of AdL3. In Western blotting analysis, Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted to 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa proteins; Gn4C3 reacted to the AdL3 protein of G. nipponicum (>42 kDa). Moreover, proteins purified using a mAb Gn4E9 immunoprecipitation method (sizes 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa) were used as antigens in ELISAs. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was shown between mouse sera infected with G. nipponicum and sera infected with Trichnella sp. or not infected. These results provide a rationale for evaluating esophageal proteins for the development of diagnostic methods for detecting G. nipponicum or Gnathostoma sp. infections.

  1. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  2. Chromatofocusing studies involving a monoclonal Fab'.

    PubMed

    Tarburton, J P; Halpern, S E

    1992-12-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the Fab' derivative of murine monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 is known to detect at least six bands having isoelectric points (pI) ranging from 5.4 to 7.8. Chromatofocusing was employed to separate these bands. Electrophoresis of the starting materials under nonreducing conditions indicated all of the materials to migrate as Fab'. The electrophoresis of urine samples obtained from Balb/c and nude mice 8 hr after the i.v. injection of the various 125I bands revealed the low pI bands to migrate approximately as a 125I-Fab'. The higher pI band activity was located in lower molecular weight regions. Serum samples taken at 8 hr postinjection from the above mice revealed a series of what appeared to be high molecular weight complexes and some low molecular weight species. Biodistribution studies in comparison Balb/c mice and nude mice revealed that the low pI 125I-Fab' bands gave an organ and tumor uptake at 8 hr very similar to Fab', while the high pI 125I-Fab' bands were rapidly excreted into the urine and feces and did not concentrate in the tumor. The data suggest that the population of molecules making up the Fab' of this antibody is heterogeneous and variably stable. Theoretically, some of the entities observed could be counter productive to successful radioimmunoimaging. It is also possible that some of the labeled molecules are associating in vivo with endogenous proteins that might, in some Mabs, affect the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Systemic sclerosis and prevalence of monoclonal immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Trad, Salim; Nosbaum, Audrey; Musset, Lucile; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Launay, David; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Saadoun, David; Cabane, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Hanslik, Thomas; Frances, Camille

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) among patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) according to the capillary electrophoresis or immunofixation method of detection and to search for any related clinical correlations. Retrospective multicenter comparison of capillary electrophoresis and immunofixation results in SSc patients and of the characteristics of patients with and without MIg. The study included 244 SSc patients (216 women and 28 men, mean age: 55±14 years). Median time since SSc diagnosis was 51 months [0-320]; disease was diffuse in 48% of cases. Ten percent of patients had cancer, including Waldenström macroglobulinemia (n=1) and multiple myeloma (n=3). Capillary electrophoresis showed a γ-globulin anomaly in 41% of cases, and immunofixation in 18%: MIg (13.5%) and restriction of heterogeneity (4.5%). Capillary electrophoresis failed to detect 60% of the 33 MIg patients. Measurable MIg concentrations were obtained from 7 patients. MIg patients were significantly older at SSc diagnosis than those without MIg (p=0.002), had a lower diffusing capacity (p=0.002), a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and cancer (p=0.002) and were more frequently positive for anti-mitochondrial and anti-beta2-glycoprotein-I antibodies (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that only age at test [hazard ratio 1.03 (95% CI, 1.00-1.07, p=0.04)] and presence of cancer [hazard ratio 4.46 (95% CI, 1.6-12.4, p=0.004)] were associated with MIg. Immunofixation detected a high prevalence of MIg among SSc patients especially in patients aged 50-years or older. MIg was not detected by the standard capillary electrophoresis in 60% of cases and was significantly associated with cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cation-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Urmann, Marina; Graalfs, Heiner; Joehnck, Matthias; Jacob, Lothar R

    2010-01-01

    A novel cation-exchange resin, Eshmuno™ S, was compared to Fractogel® SO3− (M) and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The stationary phases have different base matrices and carry specific types of polymeric surface modifications. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used as model proteins to characterize these chromatographic resins. Results from gradient elutions, stirred batch adsorptions and confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations were used to elucidate binding behavior of mAbs onto Eshmuno™ S and Fractogel® SO3− and the corresponding transport mechanisms on these two resins. The number of charges involved in mAb binding for Eshmuno™ S is lower than for Fractogel® SO3−, indicating a slightly weaker electrostatic interaction. Kinetics from batch uptake experiments are compared to kinetic data obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. Both experimental approaches show an accelerated protein adsorption for the novel stationary phase. The influence of pH, salt concentrations and residence times on dynamic binding capacities was determined. A higher dynamic binding capacity for Eshmuno™ S over a wider range of pH values and residence times was found compared to Fractogel® SO3− and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The capture of antibodies from cell culture supernatant, as well as post-protein A eluates, were analyzed with respect to their host cell protein (hcp) removal capabilities. Comparable or even better hcp clearance was observed at much higher protein loading for Eshmuno™ S than Fractogel® SO3− or Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. PMID:20559022

  5. The use of receptor-specific antibodies to study G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Achla; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2006-07-01

    The identification of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) cDNAs has facilitated a number of studies characterizing the biochemical properties of the receptor protein. Most of these studies have used antibodies directed against the epitope-tagged receptor expressed in heterologous cells, because of the lack of sensitive and selective antibodies capable of recognizing endogenous receptors in their native state. In order to facilitate studies with endogenous receptors, efforts have been made to generate receptor-type selective, sensitive antibodies that are able to recognize endogenous receptors. In this review, we discuss the strategies as well as the details of the techniques used for the generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with a focus on family A GPCRs.

  6. An automated robotic platform for rapid profiling oligosaccharide analysis of monoclonal antibodies directly from cell culture.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Margaret; Bones, Jonathan; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Telford, Jayne E; Harmon, Bryan; DeFelippis, Michael R; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-11-01

    Oligosaccharides attached to Asn297 in each of the CH2 domains of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in antibody effector functions by modulating the affinity of interaction with Fc receptors displayed on cells of the innate immune system. Rapid, detailed, and quantitative N-glycan analysis is required at all stages of bioprocess development to ensure the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic. The high sample numbers generated during quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) create a demand for high-performance, high-throughput analytical technologies for comprehensive oligosaccharide analysis. We have developed an automated 96-well plate-based sample preparation platform for high-throughput N-glycan analysis using a liquid handling robotic system. Complete process automation includes monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification directly from bioreactor media, glycan release, fluorescent labeling, purification, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. The entire sample preparation and commencement of analysis is achieved within a 5-h timeframe. The automated sample preparation platform can easily be interfaced with other downstream analytical technologies, including mass spectrometry (MS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), for rapid characterization of oligosaccharides present on therapeutic antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Monoclonal antibody against brain natriuretic peptide and characterization of brain natriuretic peptide-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Tanaka, I; Mukoyama, M; Suga, S; Ogawa, Y; Tamura, N; Ishibashi, R; Goto, M; Nakagawa, O; Sugawara, A; Nakao, K

    2001-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a ventricular hormone with natriuretic, diuretic and vasodilatory actions. Acute infusion of BNP reduces cardiac pre- and after-load in healthy and diseased subjects, but its long-term therapeutic usefulness remains unclear. We prepared a monoclonal antibody specific to mouse BNP, and characterized transgenic mice overexpressing BNP in the liver (BNP-Tg mice) as a model of its chronic overproduction. Radioimmunoassay and neutralization experiments using the monoclonal antibody, KY-mBNP-I, were performed in BNP-Tg mice in conjunction with examinations of blood pressure (BP) and other markers for body fluid homeostasis. We developed highly sensitive radioimmunoassay to mouse BNP. In BNP-Tg mice, the plasma BNP concentration increased more than 100-fold, while ventricular BNP concentration did not alter, suggesting that ventricular BNP production was not down-regulated in BNP-Tg mice. The BNP concentration in the kidneys was 10-fold higher than nontransgenic (nonTg) littermates, accompanied with marked reduction in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration, that may be due to binding of circulating BNP to the natriuretic peptide receptors. BNP-Tg mice showed significantly low arterial BP, and a bolus intraperitoneal administration of KYmBNP-I completely abolished enhanced cGMP excretion in the urine and significantly increased the systolic BP. These results suggested that biological actions of BNP last and reduce cardiac overload in its longterm overproduction in the transgenic mouse model.

  8. Monoclonal suppressor T-cell factor displaying V H restriction and fine antigenic specificity.

    PubMed

    Adorini, L; Pini, C; De Santis, R; Robbiati, F; Doria, G; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P

    The production of stable T-cell clones is essential for the study of T-cell-derived, specific immunoregulatory products and of specific T-cell receptors. T-cell clones have been established by radiation leukaemia virus (RadLV)-induced transformation of suppressor T lymphocytes specific for hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). We report here that culture supernatant obtained from these T-cell clones can, when injected into mice, specifically suppress the anti-HEL antibody response. This monoclonal T-cell product suppresses the antibody response induced by HEL and human lysozyme, but not that induced by ring-necked pheasant egg white lysozyme (REL), thus displaying fine antigenic specificity probably restricted to an epitope involving phenylalanine at amino acid residue 3, present in the N-terminal region of HEL and shared by human lysozyme but absent in REL. The suppression induced by this monoclonal T-cell product is restricted by both H-2 and Igh-1 genes whereas anti-HEL antibodies bearing a predominant idiotype are induced in all mice strains tested, irrespective of their H-2 haplotype or Igh-1 allotype.

  9. Determining the specificity of monoclonal antibody HPT-101 to tau-peptides with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Stangner, Tim; Wagner, Carolin; Singer, David; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Gutsche, Christof; Dzubiella, Joachim; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-12-23

    Optical tweezers-assisted dynamic force spectroscopy is employed to investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions on the level of single binding events. In particular, we analyze binding of the phosphorylation-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HPT-101 to synthetic tau-peptides with two potential phosphorylation sites (Thr231 and Ser235), being the most probable markers for Alzheimer's disease. Whereas the typical interpretation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggests that this monoclonal antibody binds exclusively to the double-phosphorylated tau-peptide, we show here by DFS that the specificity of only mAb HPT-101 is apparent. In fact, binding occurs also to each sort of monophosphorylated peptide. Therefore, we characterize the unbinding process by analyzing the measured rupture force distributions, from which the lifetime of the bond without force τ0, its characteristic length xts, and the free energy of activation ΔG are extracted for the three mAb/peptide combinations. This information is used to build a simple theoretical model to predict features of the unbinding process for the double-phosphorylated peptide purely based on data on the monophosphorylated ones. Finally, we introduce a method to combine binding and unbinding measurements to estimate the relative affinity of the bonds. The values obtained for this quantity are in accordance with ELISA, showing how DFS can offer important insights about the dynamic binding process that are not accessible with this common and widespread assay.

  10. Novel anti-ErbB3 monoclonal antibodies show therapeutic efficacy in xenografted and spontaneous mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Carlomosti, Fabrizio; De Vitis, Claudia; Noto, Alessia; Gunes, Zeynep; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Mancini, Rita; Alimandi, Maurizio; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2012-10-01

    The role of the ErbB3 receptor in signal transduction is to augment the signaling repertoire of active heterodimeric ErbB receptor complexes through activating the PI3K/AKT pathway, which in turn promotes survival and proliferation. ErbB3 has recently been proposed to be involved in acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and is therefore a promising new drug cancer target. Since ErbB3 is a kinase defective receptor, it cannot be targeted by small molecule inhibitors, whereas monoclonal antibodies may offer a viable strategy for pharmacological intervention. In this study, we have utilized DNA electroporation (DNA-EP) to generate a set of novel hybridomas directed against human ErbB3, which have been characterized for their biochemical and functional properties and selected for their ability to negatively regulate the ErbB3-mediated signaling pathway. In vitro, the anti-ErbB3 antibodies modulate the growth rate of cancer cells of different origins. In vivo they show antitumoral properties in a xenograft model of human pancreatic tumor and in the ErbB2-driven carcinogenesis genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for mammary tumor, the BALB/neuT. Our data confirm that downregulating the ErbB3-mediated signals with the use of anti-ErbB3 monoclonal antibodies is both feasible and relevant for therapeutic purposes and provides new opportunities for novel anti-ErbB3 combinatory strategies for cancer treatment.

  11. Specific immunofluorescent staining of pathogenic treponemes with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, F; Hunter, E F; George, R W; Pope, V; Larsen, S A

    1992-01-01

    Two hybrid cell lines which produced mouse monoclonal antibody to the DAL-1 street strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were established. These monoclonal antibodies strongly reacted with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain, DAL-1, and two other street strains, strains MN-1 and MN-3) and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue by indirect microimmunofluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, but they did not react with normal rabbit testicular tissue. These monoclonal antibodies did not react with nonpathogenic treponemes, such as T. phagedenis Reiter, T. denticola MRB, T. refringens Noguchi, or other spirochetes, such as Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona in microimmunofluorescent antibody smear slides or in Western blots (immunoblots). While unlabeled antibodies are useful for investigating the antigenic structures of T. pallidum, we labeled these monoclonal antibodies with fluorescein isothiocyanate and used them for diagnosing syphilis by direct staining of lesion exudate or T. pallidum subsp. pallidum in formalin-fixed tissues from patients suspected of having syphilis. Both monoclonal antibodies were directed against antigens of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum with a molecular weight of 37,000 as determined by the Western blotting technique. Images PMID:1374079

  12. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  13. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease.

    PubMed

    Balderman, Sophia R; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2015-07-30

    Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome) or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease). In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  14. Two novel anti-von Willebrand factor monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spadafora-Ferreira, M; Lopes, A A; Coelho, V; Guilherme, L; Kalil, J

    2000-01-15

    Von Willebrand Factor is a multimer produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, being stored in intracellular organelles, such as the Weibel-Palade bodies and alpha-granules in endothelial cells and platelets, respectively. This molecule acts as a carrier protein for factor VIIIc, involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation maintaining its stability in circulation. Von Willebrand Factor also plays an important role in platelet aggregation and adhesion to injured vessel wall. It interacts with platelets through two distinct glycoproteins, GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, ECA-3 and ECA-4, against human umbilical vascular endothelial cells that recognize and immunoprecipitate von Willebrand Factor. Interestingly, ECA-4 monoclonal antibody is able to completely inhibit platelet agglutination induced by ristocetin, suggesting that it binds to von Willebrand Factor close to platelet GPIb binding site. The use of monoclonal antibodies to identify von Willebrand Factor binding regions to factor VIII or platelets has been reported by others. In pulmonary hypertension, abnormalities have been detected on the multimeric structure of the molecule as well as on its proteolytic fragments, by using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies raised against specific regions of von Willebrand Factor molecule may allow studies of functional abnormalities of this protein in inherited and acquired disorders like subtypes of von Willebrand's disease.

  15. New monoclonal antibodies on the horizon in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Elizabeth K.; Raje, Noopur S.

    2016-01-01

    Across all cancers, monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Monoclonal antibodies target antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and accessory cells. This targeted approach uses the host’s immune system to promote the killing of cancer cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy that remains incurable in the majority of patients. The treatment of MM has evolved dramatically over the past decade and continues to evolve with the approval of four new drugs in 2015. Most recently the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved two monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of this disease. Monoclonal antibodies are generally well-tolerated and offer a novel method of action for treated relapsed and refractory disease and are now being studied in the upfront setting. In this article, we review the evidence for the existing approved monoclonal antibodies and discuss promising targeted therapies and innovative strategies for the treatment of MM. PMID:28203341

  16. Breast cancer immunotherapy: monoclonal antibodies and peptide-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Hashemi, Atieh; Allahyari, Mojgan

    2014-07-01

    Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a treatment strategy in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer. In this review, monoclonal antibodies in passive and peptide-based vaccines, as one of the most commonly studied in active immunotherapy approaches, are discussed. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu, has demonstrated considerable efficacy. However, resistance to trastuzumab has led to development of many targeted therapies which have been examined in clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies against immune-checkpoint molecules that are dysregulated by tumors as an immune resistance mechanism are also explained in this review. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies with the ability to target breast cancer stem cells that play a role in cancer recurrence are mentioned. Here, clinical trials of HER-2/neu B and T cells, MUC1 and hTERT cancer peptide vaccines are also presented. In addition, various strategies for enhancing vaccine efficacy including combination with monoclonal antibodies and using different delivery systems for peptide/protein-based vaccine are described.

  17. Characterization of murine monoclonal antibodies that recognize defined epitopes of pertussis toxin and neutralize its toxic effect on Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M J; Wehland, J; Timmis, K N; Raupach, B; Schmidt, M A

    1991-01-01

    Three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb), E19, E205, and E251, raised against pertussis toxin reacted in Western blots (immunoblots) with the S1, S4, and S2-S3 subunits, respectively, and neutralized the Chinese hamster ovary cell-clustering activity of pertussis toxin. MAb E251 recognized a linear synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 107 to 120 of the S2 subunit, suggesting a role for this region in receptor binding. Images PMID:1718872

  18. Development of a monoclonal anti-ADAMTS-5 antibody that specifically blocks the interaction with LRP1.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Salvatore; Fedorov, Oleg; McCafferty, John; Murphy, Gillian; Dudhia, Jayesh; Nagase, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-17

    The potent aggrecanase ADAMTS-5 is constitutively secreted by chondrocytes, but it is rapidly endocytosed in normal cartilage via the cell surface endocytic receptor LRP1. Therefore it is difficult to detect the total ADAMTS-5 activity produced. In this study, we isolated a monoclonal anti-ADAMTS-5 antibody 1B7 that blocks LRP1-mediated internalization without affecting the aggrecanolytic activity. Addition of 1B7 to cultured human chondrocytes revealed the full aggrecanolytic activity of ADAMTS-5 generated by the cells. 1B7 is a useful tool to estimate the ADAMTS-5 activity and to identify its potential roles in the tissues.

  19. Review of melanoma antigens recognized by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Their functional significance and applications in diagnosis and treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P

    1985-04-01

    The introduction of monoclonal antibody techniques has led to a rapid advance in information concerning antigenic structures in melanoma cell membranes. These have been classified according to the extent of their expression on cells of other tissues, but it is evident that a more precise classification based on their biochemical nature is possible. Several monoclonal antibodies appear to define antigens restricted to melanoma cells and fetal tissues. Many antibodies recognize antigens shared with gliomas and nevi, whereas other groups can be defined which recognize antigens on melanocytes or other carcinomas. One of the commonly detected antigens was shown to be a high molecular weight (MW) proteoglycan which may be involved in reactions with other cells and the intercellular matrix. A second antigen was shown to be a ganglioside which may have receptor functions in cells. A third was shown to be a glycoprotein with iron transport functions. The latter antigen and the large MW proteoglycan have been a focus of attention for in vivo targeting studies in treatment and diagnosis. The ganglioside, large MW proteoglycan and a melanocarcinoma antigen may be detected in the circulation of patients and are being evaluated for monitoring of disease activity in patients with melanoma. Several monoclonals may be of value in histological evaluation of melanoma, e.g. diagnosis of preneoplastic lesions, metastatic lesions of unknown origin and identification of cell structures related to metastatic behaviour in the host. Further studies should help to define cellular structures recognized by the immune system in humans.

  20. Detection and Quantitation of Afucosylated N-Linked Oligosaccharides in Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Enzymatic Digestion and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi; May, Kimberly; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng

    2012-07-01

    The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides in the CH2 domain has a significant impact on the structure, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The impact is also highly dependent on the specific oligosaccharide structures. The absence of core-fucose has been demonstrated to result in increased binding affinity to Fcγ receptors and, thus, enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, a method that can specifically determine the level of oligosaccharides without the core-fucose (afucosylation) is highly desired. In the current study, recombinant monoclonal antibodies and tryptic peptides from the antibodies were digested using endoglycosidases F2 and H, which cleaves the glycosidic bond between the two primary GlcNAc residues. As a result, various oligosaccharides of either complex type or high mannose type that are commonly observed for recombinant monoclonal antibodies are converted to either GlcNAc residue only or GlcNAc with the core-fucose. The level of GlcNAc represents the sum of all afucosylated oligosaccharides, whereas the level of GlcNAc with the core-fucose represents the sum of all fucosylated oligosaccharides. LC-MS analysis of the enzymatically digested antibodies after reduction provided a quick estimate of the levels of afucosylation. An accurate determination of the level of afucosylation was obtained by LC-MS analysis of glycopeptides after trypsin digestion.

  1. Generation and characterization of human B lymphocyte stimulator blocking monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Weiliang; Zhang, Jianjun; Pei, Lili; Fang, Shuping; Liu, Honghao; Wang, Ruixue; Su, Yunpeng

    2016-09-01

    The cytokine, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) is essential for activation and proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Based on its essential activity, Blys may be a potential therapeutic target for human autoimmune diseases. In this article, we have described the development of a novel humanized anti-Blys antibody, NMB04, that binds with high affinity and specificity to both soluble and membrane bound Blys. This monoclonal antibody has the potential to block Blys binding to all its three receptors, TACI, BCMA and BR-3. Further in vivo studies revealed that NMB04 possessed more potent inhibitory activity against human Blys as compared to an existing antibody, Belimumab. Therefore, NMB04 may have potential as a therapeutic candidate targeting autoimmune diseases.

  2. Clearance of persistent hepatitis C virus infection using a claudin-1-targeting monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Mailly, Laurent; Wilson, Garrick K.; Aubert, Philippe; Duong, François H. T.; Calabrese, Diego; Leboeuf, Céline; Fofana, Isabel; Thumann, Christine; Bandiera, Simonetta; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Davis, Christopher; Harris, Helen J.; Mee, Christopher J.; Girardi, Erika; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Ericsson, Maria; Fletcher, Nicola; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pessaux, Patrick; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip; Villa, Pascal; Kaderali, Lars; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Heim, Markus H.; Neunlist, Michel; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Dandri, Maura; McKeating, Jane A.; Robinet, Eric; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer1. Cell entry of HCV2 and other pathogens3-5 is mediated by tight junction (TJ) proteins, but successful therapeutic targeting of TJ proteins has not been reported yet. Using a human liver-chimeric mouse model6 we show that a monoclonal antibody specific for TJ protein claudin-17 eliminates chronic HCV infection without detectable toxicity. This antibody inhibits HCV entry, cell-cell transmission and virus-induced signaling events. Antibody treatment reduces the number of HCV-infected hepatocytes in vivo, highlighting the need for de novo infection via host entry factors to maintain chronic infection. In summary, we demonstrate that an antibody targeting a virus receptor can cure chronic viral infection and uncover TJ proteins as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:25798937

  3. Developing the next generation of monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jamie; Lowe, David; Sleeman, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases affecting 0.8% of the population. Over the last decade the treatment of this chronic disease has been revolutionized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins, targeting molecules like tumour necrosis factor alpha. Nevertheless, approximately one-third of subjects fail to respond to these therapies and therefore significant unmet medical need remains. Following a decade of use, clinical, government and regulatory agency expectations have changed for new antibodies therapies entering this highly competitive area. In this review, we discuss the current advances being made in antibody engineering and how they are being considered and used in the development of the next generation of antibodies to meet future expectations of healthcare providers, physicians and patients. Moreover, we discuss how pattern recognition receptors may provide new antibody tractable targets that may break the cycle of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21182494

  4. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  5. Potent human monoclonal antibodies against SARS CoV, Nipah and Hendra viruses.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Zhu, Zhongyu; Xiao, Xiaodong; Biragyn, Arya; Dimitrov, Antony S; Broder, Christopher C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-03-01

    Recently, several potently neutralizing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) targeting the severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS CoV) S glycoprotein, and the G glycoprotein of the paramyxoviruses Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) have been discovered [corrected]. To examine, compare and contrast the functional characteristics of hmAbs with the potential for prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by SARS CoV, HeV and NiV. A review of relevant literature. Structural, functional and biochemical analyses [corrected] have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition and antibody neutralization, and suggested that these antibodies alone or in combination could fight the viruses' heterogeneity and mutability, which is a major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies.

  6. Production and characterization of an Mls-1-specific monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Superantigens (SAGs) represent a new class of antigens, characterized as T cell receptor (TCR) V beta-reactive elements. Bacterial toxins constitute the major group of exogenous SAGs, while the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-encoded Mls molecules represent the endogenous SAGs. Mls-1 is the prototype of the latter SAGs, because it elicits a very potent T cell stimulatory response in vitro in unprimed T cells expressing the TCR V beta 6 or 8.1 chains. In vivo, Mls-1 causes deletion of immature T cells bearing the V beta 6, 7, 8.1, or 9 chains. Although Mls-1 was functionally discovered > 20 yr ago, it has not been possible to raise antibodies against this molecule. We have previously cloned and sequenced the Mtv-7 sag gene, which encodes Mls-1. Sequence comparisons with other MMTV sag genes suggested that the polymorphic 3' end encodes the TCR V beta specificity of these SAGs. We have, therefore, immunized hamsters with a 14-amino acid peptide from the deduced COOH-terminal sequence of the Mtv-7 sag gene. We describe here the production of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3B12, which is peptide specific and reacts with a recombinant baculovirus product of Mtv-7 sag. This mAb blocks Mls-1-specific T cell recognition and detects the Mls-1 protein on the surface of the B cell hybridoma LBB.A, but not on LBB.11, which is an Mtv-7 loss variant of LBB.A. Transfection of the Mtv-7 sag gene into LBB.11 renders this cell functionally Mls-1+ as well as positive for 3B12 binding, confirming the specificity of this mAb. It is well documented that B cells and CD8+ T cells express T cell stimulatory Mls-1 determinants, and we show here that this functional profile correlates with the expression of MMTV-specific mRNA. However, primary lymphocytes derived from Mls-1+ mice do not stain with 3B12, even after in vitro activation with mitogens or phorbol ester. PMID:8381154

  7. Monoclonal antibodies with selective specificity towards different glycosylation isoforms of FGFR1.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galina; Volkova, Darija; Mayilo, Dmytro; Gaman, Nadia; Khozhayenko, Yulia; Usenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. This diversity is possibly mediated by the existence of multiple FGFR1 isoforms, generated by alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, mainly through glycosylation. In this study we report the generation and characterization of a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed towards FGFR1. To achieve this, we used as an antigen a fragment of FGFR1, corresponding to loop II-III of the extracellular domain, which shares low homology to other members of the FGFR family and possesses numerous antigentic determinants. Two rounds of ELISA screening and Western blot analysis allowed us to isolate a panel of monoclonal antibodies, which recognize specifically recombinant FGFR1 loop II-III. The ability of generated antibodies to recognize endogenous FGFR1 was examined in 3T3 L1 cells, which are known to express FGFR1, but not other members of FGFR family. Immunoblot analysis of 3T3 L1 cell lysates with hybridoma media of selected clones revealed a different, but overlapping pattern of immunoreactive bands, which might represent splicing and post-translationally modified forms of FGFR1. Furthermore, we also tested the cross-reactivity of generated antibodies towards recombinant full-length FGFR3 and their ability to recognize FGFR1 in 3T3 L1 cells by cyto- and immunocytochemistry. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR1 in normal and pathological tissues.

  8. A perspective of monoclonal antibodies: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, F.H. )

    1989-07-01

    In 1975, the development of the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies revolutionized the approach to cancer detection and therapy. Hundreds of monoclonal antibodies to the epitopes of tumor cells have been produced, providing more specific tools for probing the cellular elements of cancer. At the same time, these tools have disclosed greater complexity in the character of these cells and stimulated further investigation. Although there are antibodies to specific epitopes of neoplastic cells, this purity has not provided the improved detection and therapy of cancer first expected. Technical manipulations have provided limited improvement in results, but more sophisticated techniques, such as biologic response modifiers, may be required to attain clinical results that can be universally applied. The intense research in monoclonal antibodies and their application does offer promise that the goal of improved cancer detection and therapy will be forthcoming. 58 references.

  9. Impact of cell culture on recombinant monoclonal antibody product heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Nowak, Christine; Shao, Mei; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Neill, Alyssa

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant monoclonal antibodies are commonly expressed in mammalian cell culture and purified by several steps of filtration and chromatography. The resulting high purity bulk drug substance still contains product variants differing in properties such as charge and size. Posttranslational modifications and degradations occurring during cell culture are the major sources of heterogeneity in bulk drug substance of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The focus of the current review is the impact of cell culture conditions on the types and levels of various modifications and degradations of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Understanding the relationship between cell culture and product variants can help to make consistently safe and efficacious products. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1103-1112, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. [Progress in monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yajun

    2015-06-01

    More than 100 years ago, Paul Ehrlich first proposed the "magic bullets" concept in which antibody targeting disease related antigen can fight against human disease. Since then, with the development of hybridoma technology for monoclonal antibody production and cancer serum therapy, immunotherapy based monoclonal antibody bas been used in chinical practice to treat hematological and solid tumor. Up to now, more than 20 recombinant antibody drugs were approved for cancer treatment worldwide. In recent years, the next-generation antibody drug, including immune checkpoint antagonists, bi-specific antibody, and antibody drug conjugates have successfully cured various malignant tumor. This review recalled the history of monoclonal antibody as potent immunotherapy of cancer firstly, and focused on the next-generation antibody drug's mechanism of action, construction strategies, and the side effects in clinic. Lastly, the future trend of anti-tumor antibody drug was also discussed.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Leung, Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a condition characterized by the presence of a monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in which the clonal mass has not reached a predefined state in which the condition is considered malignant. It is a precursor to conditions such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma at a rate of ~1%/year. Thus, from a hematologic standpoint, MGUS is a fairly benign condition. However, it is now recognized that organ damage resulting from just the MG without the need MM or lymphoma can occur. One of the most recognized is nephropathy secondary to monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS). Other well-recognized conditions include neuropathies, oculopathies and dermopathies. Some conditions such as autoimmune diseases and coagulopathies are less common and recognized. Finally, systemic involvement of multiple organs is well described in several entities. In all of these conditions, the role of the MG is no longer insignificant. Thus, the term MGUS should be avoided when describing these entities.

  12. Laboratory Persistence and Clinical Progression of Small Monoclonal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Murray, David L.; Seningen, Justin L.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Snyder, Melissa R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) that presents with no quantifiable M spike on immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can be termed IFE MGUS. We retrospectively identified patients with IFE MGUS who were monitored with at least 1 subsequent assessment that included an IFE, and evaluated the persistence of the monoclonal protein and the progression of disease. Although the monoclonal proteins persisted in the majority of patients, 16% did not experience this persistence, and had no documented immunomodulatory therapy. After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, the disease clinically progressed in 14 patients (3.2%). Eight of these 14 patients with clinical progression had an immunoglobulin (Ig) A IFE M protein and 6 had an IgG M protein. This study demonstrates that in some patients with IFE MGUS, the M proteins are transient and that IgA IFE MGUS is more likely to persist and progress to myeloma. PMID:23010717

  13. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  14. The Case for Adjunctive Monoclonal Antibody Immunotherapy in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian J; Buckley, Peter F

    2016-06-01

    This article presents the case in favor of clinical trials of adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in schizophrenia. Evidence for prenatal and premorbid immune risk factors for the development of schizophrenia in the offspring is highlighted. Then key evidence for immune dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia is considered. Next, previous trials of adjunctive anti-inflammatory or other immunotherapy in schizophrenia are discussed. Then evidence for psychosis as a side effect of immunotherapy for other disorders is discussed. Also presented is preliminary evidence for adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in psychiatric disorders. Finally, important considerations in the design and implementation of clinical trials of adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in schizophrenia are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.