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Sample records for anti-malarial drug sensitivity

  1. Anti-malarial Drugs Primaquine and Chloroquine Have Different Sensitization Effects with Anti-mitotic Drugs in Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Ju-Hwa; Woo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hyung Sik; Yoon, Sungpil

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that would increase the sensitivity of drug-resistant cancer cells. Previously, two anti-malarial drugs, chloroquine (CHL) and primaquine (PRI), showed different sensitization effects for vinblastine (VIB)-resistant cancer cells. Herein, we tested co-treatment of cells with CHL or PRI and other microtubule-targeting cancer drugs, namely, vinorelbine (VIO), paclitaxel (PAC), docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VIC), or halaven (HAL). We found that PRI sensitized P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing drug-resistant KBV20C cells to all six anti-mitotic drugs to a similar extent. CHL had a similar sensitization effect only for co-treatment with PAC, DOC, VIC, and HAL, while the sensitization effect was less marked for co-treatment with VIB or VIO. FACS analysis and western blot analysis revealed that G2arrest and apoptosis showed only a slight increase on co-treatment with VIB or VIO and CHL. We also found that phospho-histone H3 and pRb were markedly increased only by PRI-VIB co-treatment, but not by CHL-VIB co-treatment. This suggests that reduction in the expression of these proteins correlates with decreased G2arrest in CHL-VIB co-treatment. We further compared the effect of another anti-malarial drug, mefloquine (MEF), in combination with the six anti-mitotic drugs. We found that MEF and PRI had similar sensitization effects in co-treatment with these anti-mitotic drugs. PRI and MEF had generally similar sensitization effects in co-treatment with anti-mitotic drugs, suggesting that they do not have any preferred anti-mitotic drug partner in co-treatment. This indicates that only CHL shows specificity in co-treatment with anti-mitotic drugs in resistant cancer cells. Our results may contribute to the choice of anti-mitotic drugs to be used in co-treatment of resistant cancer cells with the anti-malarial drugs, CHL, PRI, and MEF. PMID:27069141

  2. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  3. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-01-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  4. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tipke, Maike; Diallo, Salou; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Störzinger, Dominic; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Sie, Ali; Müller, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers) and illicit (market and street vendors, shops) sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50%) chloroquine, 10/77 (13%) pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12%) quinine, 6/77 (8%) amodiaquine, 9/77 (12%) artesunate, and 4/77 (5%) artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42%) drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6%) and 27/30 (90.0%) samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the now wider available

  5. CRIMALDDI: a prioritized research agenda to expedite the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The CRIMALDDI Consortium has been a three-year project funded by the EU Framework Seven Programme. It aimed to develop a prioritized set of recommendations to speed up anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. It has attempted to align thinking on the high priority issues and then to develop action plans and strategies to address these issues. Through a series of facilitated and interactive workshops, it has concluded that these priorities can be grouped under five key themes: attacking artemisinin resistance; creating and sharing community resources; delivering enabling technologies; exploiting high throughput screening hits quickly; and, identifying novel targets. Recommendations have been prioritized into one of four levels: quick wins; removing key roadblocks to future progress; speeding-up drug discovery; and, nice to have (but not essential). Use of this prioritization allows efforts and resources to be focused on the lines of work that will contribute most to expediting anti-malarial drug discovery. Estimates of the time and finances required to implement the recommendations have also been made, along with indications of when recommendations within each theme will make an impact. All of this has been collected into an indicative roadmap that, it is hoped, will guide decisions about the direction and focus of European anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. PMID:24191947

  6. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  7. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production.

    PubMed

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  8. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change). It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative) has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade. PMID:20626844

  9. A SYBR Green 1-based in vitro test of susceptibility of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates to a panel of anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on report of declining efficacy of chloroquine, Ghana shifted to the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005 as the first-line anti-malarial drug. Since then, there has not been any major evaluation of the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in Ghana in vitro. The sensitivity of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates to anti-malarial drugs was, therefore, assessed and the data compared with that obtained prior to the change in the malaria treatment policy. Methods A SYBR Green 1 fluorescent-based in vitro drug sensitivity assay was used to assess the susceptibility of clinical isolates of P. falciparum to a panel of 12 anti-malarial drugs in three distinct eco-epidemiological zones in Ghana. The isolates were obtained from children visiting health facilities in sentinel sites located in Hohoe, Navrongo and Cape Coast municipalities. The concentration of anti-malarial drug inhibiting parasite growth by 50% (IC50) for each drug was estimated using the online program, ICEstimator. Results Pooled results from all the sentinel sites indicated geometric mean IC50 values of 1.60, 3.80, 4.00, 4.56, 5.20, 6.11, 10.12, 28.32, 31.56, 93.60, 107.20, and 8952.50 nM for atovaquone, artesunate, dihydroartemisin, artemether, lumefantrine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, piperaquine, chloroquine, tafenoquine, quinine, and doxycycline, respectively. With reference to the literature threshold value indicative of resistance, the parasites showed resistance to all the test drugs except the artemisinin derivatives, atovaquone and to a lesser extent, lumefantrine. There was nearly a two-fold decrease in the IC50 value determined for chloroquine in this study compared to that determined in 2004 (57.56 nM). This observation is important, since it suggests a significant improvement in the efficacy of chloroquine, probably as a direct consequence of reduced drug pressure after cessation of its use. Compared to that measured prior to the change in treatment policy

  10. Policy options for deploying anti-malarial drugs in endemic countries: a population genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial drugs are constantly exposed to the threat of evolving drug resistance so good stewardship of existing therapy is an essential component of public health policy. However, the widespread availability of numerous different drugs through informal providers could undermine official drug deployment policies. A policy of multiple first-line therapy (MFT) is compared with the conventional policy of sequential drug deployment, i.e., where one drug is used until resistance evolves and then replaced by the next drug in the sequence. Methods Population genetic models of drug resistance are used to make the comparison; this methodology explicitly tracks the genetics of drug resistance (including, importantly, recombination in the sexual stage, intrahost dynamics, and direction of linkage disequilibrium). Results A policy of MFT outlasts sequential application providing drug usages are low to moderate, and appears not to drive widespread multi-drug resistance. Inadequate dosing is an even more potent driver of drug resistance than the MFT/sequential policy decision. Conclusions The provision of MFT as a deliberate policy can be encouraged provided overall treatment rates are low or moderate (less than around half of malaria infections are treated) and the ad hoc provision of MFT through the private sector may be tolerated. This must be fully supported by education to ensure people take adequate doses of each of the drugs. PMID:23244624

  11. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from Yemen

  12. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug quality have occurred. Since intelligence provided by investigators indicates that some counterfeit producers may be adapting products to pass Minilab tests, the results are compared with those from a Raman spectrometer and discrepancies are discussed. Methods Between mid-2007 and early-2010, samples of anti-malarial drugs were bought covertly from pharmacies in Lagos on three different occasions (October 2007, December 2008, February 2010), and from pharmacies in Accra on two different occasions (October 2007, February 2010). All samples were tested using the Minilab® protocol, which includes disintegration and active ingredient assays as well as visual inspection, and most samples were also tested by Raman spectrometry. Results In Lagos, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 29% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 53% using Raman spectrometry, and 46% using visual inspection. In Accra, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 54% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 72% using Raman spectrometry, and 90% using visual inspection. Conclusions The evidence presented shows that drug quality is probably improving in both cities, especially Lagos, since major reductions of failure rates over time occur with all means of assessment. Many more samples failed when examined by Raman spectrometry than by Minilab® protocol. The discrepancy is most likely caused by the two techniques measuring different aspects of the medication and hence the discrepancy

  13. Quinine, an old anti-malarial drug in a modern world: role in the treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Quinine remains an important anti-malarial drug almost 400 years after its effectiveness was first documented. However, its continued use is challenged by its poor tolerability, poor compliance with complex dosing regimens, and the availability of more efficacious anti-malarial drugs. This article reviews the historical role of quinine, considers its current usage and provides insight into its appropriate future use in the treatment of malaria. In light of recent research findings intravenous artesunate should be the first-line drug for severe malaria, with quinine as an alternative. The role of rectal quinine as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria has not been fully explored, but it remains a promising intervention. In pregnancy, quinine continues to play a critical role in the management of malaria, especially in the first trimester, and it will remain a mainstay of treatment until safer alternatives become available. For uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) offers a better option than quinine though the difficulty of maintaining a steady supply of ACT in resource-limited settings renders the rapid withdrawal of quinine for uncomplicated malaria cases risky. The best approach would be to identify solutions to ACT stock-outs, maintain quinine in case of ACT stock-outs, and evaluate strategies for improving quinine treatment outcomes by combining it with antibiotics. In HIV and TB infected populations, concerns about potential interactions between quinine and antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs exist, and these will need further research and pharmacovigilance. PMID:21609473

  14. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Kaur, Harparkash; Dike, Nkem; Shu, Elvis; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Hanson, Kara; Okoye, Viola; Okonkwo, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural) in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples), which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Findings It was found that 60 (37%) of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46%) and SP formulations (39%) were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors). Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs. PMID:19208221

  15. Major Reduction in Anti-Malarial Drug Consumption in Senegal after Nation-Wide Introduction of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Sylla; Thior, Moussa; Faye, Babacar; Ndiop, Médoune; Diouf, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Mame Birame; Diallo, Ibrahima; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Albertini, Audrey; Lee, Evan; Jorgensen, Pernille; Gaye, Oumar; Bell, David

    2011-01-01

    Background While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. Methods and Findings Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584873 suspect fever cases). An estimated 516576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. Conclusions The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were achieved in ACT

  16. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes Primary resistance and restores sensitivity to Trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein—a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes—and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of “autophagy addiction” because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  17. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes primary resistance and restores sensitivity to trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein--a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes--and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of "autophagy addiction" because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  18. Malaria Related Perceptions, Care Seeking after Onset of Fever and Anti-Malarial Drug Use in Malaria Endemic Settings of Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Abebe, Lakew; Sudhakar, Morankar; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Yihdego, Yemane Ye-ebiyo; Alemayehu, Guda; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt care seeking and appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs are critical components of malaria prevention and control. This study assessed malaria related perceptions, care seeking behavior and anti-malarial drug use in malaria endemic settings of Ethiopia. Methods Data were generated from a community based cross-sectional study conducted among 798 households during January 2014 as part of a larger household behavioral study in three malaria endemic districts of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and STATA 12.0. Results In this study, only 76.1% of the respondents associated malaria to mosquito bite, and incorrect beliefs and perceptions were noted. Despite moderate level of knowledge (estimated mean = 62.2, Std Err = 0.7, 95% CI: 60.6–63.8%), quite high favorable attitude (overall estimated mean = 91.5, Std Err = 0.6, 95% CI: 90.1–92.9%) were recorded towards malaria preventive measures. The mean attitude score for prompt care seeking, appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs, LLIN use and Indoor Residual Spray acceptance was 98.5 (Std Err = 0.4, 95% CI:97.5–99.4), 92.7 (Std Err = 0.6 95% CI:91.5–93.9), 88.8 (Std Err = 0.5, 95% CI:85.5–92.1) and 86.5 (Std Err = 1.2, 95% CI: 83.9–89.1), respectively. The prevalence of fever was 2.9% (116/4107) and of the study participants with fever, 71.9% (95% CI: 65.5–78.3%) sought care and all of them consulted formal health care system. However, only 17 (19.8%) sought care within 24 hours after onset of fever. The frequency of care seeking was higher (77.8%, n = 21/27) and more prompt (28.6%, 6/21) for children under five as compared to old age groups despite it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, higher median time of seeking first care was observed among Muslims and people who did not attend school (p < 0.05). Of those who used anti-malarial drugs, 9.1% indicated that they used it inappropriately

  19. Markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Swaziland: identification of pfmdr1-86F in natural parasite isolates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ) has limited its use in many malaria endemic areas of the world. However, despite recent drug policy changes to adopt the more effective artemisinin-based combination (ACT) in Africa and in the Southern African region, in 2007 Swaziland still relied on CQ as first-line anti-malarial drug. Methods Parasite DNA was amplified from P. falciparum isolates from Swaziland collected in 1999 (thick smear blood slides) and 2007 (filter paper blood spots). Markers of CQ and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance were identified by probe-based qPCR and DNA sequencing. Results Retrospective microscopy, confirmed by PCR amplification, found that only six of 252 patients treated for uncomplicated malaria in 2007 carried detectable P. falciparum. The pfcrt haplotype 72C/73V/74I/75E/76T occurred at a prevalence of 70% (n = 64) in 1999 and 83% (n = 6) in 2007. Prevalence of the pfmdr1-86N allele was 24% in 1999 and 67% in 2007. A novel substitution of phenylalanine for asparagine at codon 86 of pfmdr1 (N86F) occurred in two of 51 isolates successfully amplified from 1999. The pfmdr1-1246Y allele was common in 1999, with a prevalence of 49%, but was absent among isolates collected in 2007. The 86N/184F/1246D pfmdr1 haplotype, associated with enhanced parasite survival in patients treated with artemether-lumefantrine, comprised 8% of 1999 isolates, and 67% among 2007 isolates. The pfdhfr triple-mutant 16C/51I/59R/108N/164I haplotype associated with pyrimethamine resistance was common in both 1999 (82%, n = 34) and 2007 (50%, n = 6), as was the wild-type 431I/436S/437A/540K/581A/613A haplotype of pfdhps (100% and 93% respectively in 1999 and 2007). The quintuple-mutant haplotype pfdhfr/pfdhps-CIRNI/ISGEAA, associated with high-level resistance to SP, was rare (9%) among 1999 isolates and absent among 2007 isolates. Conclusions The prevalence of pfcrt and pfmdr1 alleles reported in this study is

  20. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  1. High prevalence of pfdhfr-pfdhps triple mutations associated with anti-malarial drugs resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates seven years after the adoption of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in combination with artesunate as first-line treatment in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Maryam; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Pirahmadi, Sakineh; Raeisi, Ahmad; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2015-04-01

    The spread of anti-malarial drug resistance will challenge any malaria control and elimination strategies, and routine monitoring of resistance-associated molecular markers of commonly used anti-malarial drugs is very important. Therefore, in the present investigation, the extent of mutations/haplotypes in dhfr and dhps genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates (n=72) was analyzed seven years after the introduction of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus artesunate (AS) as first-line anti-malarial treatment in Iran using PCR-RFLP methods. The results showed that the majority of the patients (97.2%) carried both 59R and 108N mutations in pure form with wild-type genotype at positions N51 and I164. Additionally, a significant increase (P<0.05) was observed in the frequency of R59N108/G437 haplotype (79.2%) during 2012-2014. This raise was because of the significant increase (P<0.05) in the frequency of 437G mutation (81.9%), which more likely was due to more availability of SP as anti-malarial drug for treatment of falciparum patients in these malaria-endemic areas of Iran. However, no quintuple mutations associated with treatment failure were detected. In conclusion, the present results along with in vivo assays suggest that seven years after the adoption of SP-AS as the first-line treatment in Iran, this drug remains efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, as a partner drug with AS in these malaria-endemic areas.

  2. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  3. Artemisinins: pharmacological actions beyond anti-malarial.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Peh, Hong Yong; Chan, Tze Khee; Wong, W S Fred

    2014-04-01

    Artemisinins are a family of sesquiterpene trioxane lactone anti-malarial agents originally derived from Artemisia annua L. The anti-malarial action of artemisinins involves the formation of free radicals via cleavage of the endoperoxide bond in its structure, which mediate eradication of the Plasmodium species. With its established safety record in millions of malarial patients, artemisinins are also being investigated in diseases like infections, cancers and inflammation. Artemisinins have been reported to possess robust inhibitory effects against viruses (e.g. Human cytomegalovirus), protozoa (e.g. Toxoplasma gondii), helminths (e.g. Schistosoma species and Fasciola hepatica) and fungi (e.g. Cryptococcus neoformans). Artemisinins have demonstrated cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, promoting apoptosis, preventing angiogenesis, and abrogating cancer invasion and metastasis. Artemisinins have been evaluated in animal models of autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders and septic inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of artemisinins have been attributed to the inhibition of Toll-like receptors, Syk tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cγ, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, STAT-1/3/5, NF-κB, Sp1 and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. This review provides a comprehensive update on non-malarial use of artemisinins, modes of action of artemisinins in different disease conditions, and drug development of artemisinins beyond anti-malarial. With the concerted efforts in the novel synthesis of artemisinin analogs and clinical pharmacology of artemisinins, it is likely that artemisinin drugs will become a major armamentarium combating a variety of human diseases beyond malaria. PMID:24316259

  4. Development of transgenic Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood) plants with an enhanced content of artemisinin, an effective anti-malarial drug, by hairpin-RNA-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Jing, Fuyuan; Li, Fupeng; Li, Meiya; Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2009-03-01

    Artemisinin is an effective anti-malarial drug isolated from Artemisia annua L. (Chinese wormwood), but the content of artemisinin in A. annua is low. In the present study we explored the possibility of using genetic engineering to increase the artemisinin content of A. annua by suppressing the expression of SQS (squalene synthase), a key enzyme of sterol pathway (a pathway competitive with that of artemisinin biosynthesis) by means of a hairpin-RNA-mediated RNAi (RNA interference) technique. A total of 23 independent transgenic A. annua plants were obtained through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern-blot analyses. HPLC-evaporative light-scattering detection analysis showed that the artemisinin content of some transgenic plants was significantly increased, with the highest values reaching 31.4 mg/g dry weight, which is about 3.14-fold the content observed in untransformed control plants. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of SQS was suppressed significantly, and GC-MS analysis showed that sterol was efficiently decreased in the transgenic plants. The present study demonstrated that genetic-engineering strategy of RNAi is an effective means of increasing artemisinin content in plants.

  5. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Souares, Aurélia; Lalou, Richard; Sene, Ibra; Sow, Diarietou; Le Hesran, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP) association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years) (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004); and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer) (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006). Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013), and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001) were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance. PMID:19497103

  6. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (<8 %) were found in just two of the countries, whilst substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  7. Repositioning: the fast track to new anti-malarial medicines?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repositioning of existing drugs has been suggested as a fast track for developing new anti-malarial agents. The compound libraries of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Pfizer and AstraZeneca (AZ) comprising drugs that have undergone clinical studies in other therapeutic areas, but not achieved approval, and a set of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and other bio-actives were tested against Plasmodium falciparum blood stages. Methods Molecules were tested initially against erythrocytic co-cultures of P. falciparum to measure proliferation inhibition using one of the following methods: SYBR®I dye DNA staining assay (3D7, K1 or NF54 strains); [3H] hypoxanthine radioisotope incorporation assay (3D7 and 3D7A strain); or 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) DNA imaging assay (3D7 and Dd2 strains). After review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic and safety data, selected compounds with low μM activity and a suitable clinical profile were tested in vivo either in a Plasmodium berghei four-day test or in the P. falciparum Pf3D70087/N9 huSCID ‘humanized’ mouse model. Results Of the compounds included in the GSK and Pfizer sets, 3.8% (9/238) had relevant in vitro anti-malarial activity while 6/100 compounds from the AZ candidate drug library were active. In comparison, around 0.6% (24/3,800) of the FDA-approved drugs and other bio-actives were active. After evaluation of available clinical data, four investigational drugs, active in vitro were tested in the P. falciparum humanized mouse model: UK-112,214 (PAF-H1 inhibitor), CEP-701 (protein kinase inhibitor), CEP-1347 (protein kinase inhibitor), and PSC-833 (p-glycoprotein inhibitor). Only UK-112,214 showed significant efficacy against P. falciparum in vivo, although at high doses (ED90 131.3 mg/kg [95% CI 112.3, 156.7]), and parasitaemia was still present 96 hours after treatment commencement. Of the six actives from the AZ library, two compounds (AZ-1 and AZ-3) were marginally

  8. The association between price, competition, and demand factors on private sector anti-malarial stocking and sales in western Kenya: considerations for the AMFm subsidy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Households in sub-Saharan Africa are highly reliant on the retail sector for obtaining treatment for malaria fevers and other illnesses. As donors and governments seek to promote the use of artemisinin combination therapy in malaria-endemic areas through subsidized anti-malarials offered in the retail sector, understanding the stocking and pricing decisions of retail outlets is vital. Methods A survey of all medicine retailers serving Bungoma East District in western Kenya was conducted three months after the launch of the AMFm subsidy in Kenya. The survey obtained information on each anti-malarial in stock: brand name, price, sales volume, outlet characteristics and GPS co-ordinates. These data were matched to household-level data from the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance System, from which population density and fever prevalence near each shop were determined. Regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with retailers’ likelihood of stocking subsidized artemether lumefantrine (AL) and the association between price and sales for AL, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Results Ninety-seven retail outlets in the study area were surveyed; 11% of outlets stocked subsidized AL. Size of the outlet and having a pharmacist on staff were associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL. In the multivariable model, total volume of anti-malarial sales was associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL and competition was important; likelihood of stocking subsidized AL was considerably higher if the nearest neighbour stocked subsidized AL. Price was a significant predictor of sales volume for all three types of anti-malarials but the relationship varied, with the largest price sensitivity found for SP drugs. Conclusion The results suggest that helping small outlets overcome the constraints to stocking subsidized AL should be a priority. Competition between retailers and prices can play an important

  9. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis) and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems. PMID:22152094

  10. Analysis of genetic mutations associated with anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum from the Democratic Republic of East Timor

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Afonso; Arez, Ana Paula; Cravo, Pedro VL; do Rosário, Virgílio E

    2009-01-01

    Background In response to chloroquine (CQ) resistance, the policy for the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the Democratic Republic of East Timor (DRET) was changed in early 2000. The combination of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) was then introduced for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods Blood samples were collected in two different periods (2003–2004 and 2004–2005) from individuals attending hospitals or clinics in six districts of the DRET and checked for Plasmodium falciparum infection. 112 PCR-positive samples were inspected for genetic polymorphisms in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhfr and pfdhps genes. Different alleles were interrogated for potential associations that could be indicative of non-random linkage. Results Overall prevalence of mutations associated with resistance to CQ and SP was extremely high. The mutant form of Pfcrt (76T) was found to be fixed even after five years of alleged CQ removal. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfdhps 437G mutation (X2 = 31.1; p = 0.001) from the first to second survey periods. A non-random association was observed between pfdhfr51/pfdhps437 (p = 0.001) and pfdhfr 59/pfdhps 437 (p = 0.013) alleles. Conclusion Persistence of CQ-resistant mutants even after supposed drug withdrawal suggests one or all of the following: local P. falciparum may still be inadvertently exposed to the drug, that mutant parasites are being "imported" into the country, and/or reduced genetic diversity and low parasite transmission help maintain mutant haplotypes. The association between pfdhfr51/pfdhps437 and pfdhfr 59/pfdhps 437 alleles indicates that these are undergoing concomitant positive selection in the DRET. PMID:19358729

  11. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  12. A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A “reverse pharmacology” approach to developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine was designed and implemented in Mali, resulting in a new standardized herbal anti-malarial after six years of research. The first step was to select a remedy for development, through a retrospective treatment-outcome study. The second step was a dose-escalating clinical trial that showed a dose-response phenomenon and helped select the safest and most efficacious dose. The third step was a randomized controlled trial to compare the phytomedicine to the standard first-line treatment. The last step was to identify active compounds which can be used as markers for standardization and quality control. This example of “reverse pharmacology” shows that a standardized phytomedicine can be developed faster and more cheaply than conventional drugs. Even if both approaches are not fully comparable, their efficiency in terms of public health and their complementarity should be thoroughly considered. PMID:21411019

  13. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Das, AK

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial drug artemisinin has shown anticancer activity in vitro and animal experiments, but experience in human cancer is scarce. However, the ability of artemisinins to kill cancer cells through a variety of molecular mechanisms has been explored. A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti-cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. Experimental evidences suggest that artemisinin compounds may be a therapeutic alternative in highly aggressive cancers with rapid dissemination, without developing drug resistance. They also exhibit synergism with other anticancer drugs with no increased toxicity toward normal cells. It has been found that semisynthetic artemisinin derivatives have much higher antitumor activity than their monomeric counterparts via mechanisms like apoptosis, arrest of cell cycle at G0/G1, and oxidative stress. The exact mechanism of activation and molecular basis of these anticancer effects are not fully elucidated. Artemisinins seem to regulate key factors such as nuclear factor-kappa B, survivin, NOXA, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and BMI-1, involving multiple pathways that may affect drug response, drug interactions, drug resistance, and associated parameters upon normal cells. Newer synthetic artemisinins have been developed showing substantial antineoplastic activity, but there is still limited information regarding the mode of action of these synthetic compounds. In view of the emerging data, specific interactions with established chemotherapy need to be further investigated in different cancer cells and their phenotypes and validated further using different semisynthetic and synthetic artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25861527

  14. New anti-malarial phenylpropanoid conjugated iridoids from Morinda morindoides.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Syamsurizal; Itagaki, Sawako; Horii, Toshihiro; Taba, Muzele Kalulu; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-01

    A new phenylpropanoid conjugated iridoid together with four known congeners was isolated from Morinda morindoides, used for the therapy of malaria traditionally in some African countries, as anti-malarial principles through bioassay-guided separation. Furthermore, their absolute stereostructures were unambiguously established by a combination of modified Mosher's method and chemical correlation.

  15. QSAR models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Masand, Vijay H; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Mahajan, Devidas T

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, predictive quantitative structure - activity relationship (QSAR) models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines have been developed. CORAL, which is freely available on internet (http://www.insilico.eu/coral), has been used as a tool of QSAR analysis to establish statistically robust QSAR model of anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines. Six random splits into the visible sub-system of the training and invisible subsystem of validation were examined. Statistical qualities for these splits vary, but in all these cases, statistical quality of prediction for anti-malarial activity was quite good. The optimal SMILES-based descriptor was used to derive the single descriptor based QSAR model for a data set of 112 aminoquinolones. All the splits had r(2)> 0.85 and r(2)> 0.78 for subtraining and validation sets, respectively. The three parametric multilinear regression (MLR) QSAR model has Q(2) = 0.83, R(2) = 0.84 and F = 190.39. The anti-malarial activity has strong correlation with presence/absence of nitrogen and oxygen at a topological distance of six. PMID:24801104

  16. Review of pyronaridine anti-malarial properties and product characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pyronaridine was synthesized in 1970 at the Institute of Chinese Parasitic Disease and has been used in China for over 30 years for the treatment of malaria. Pyronaridine has high potency against Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine-resistant strains. Studies in various animal models have shown pyronaridine to be effective against strains resistant to other anti-malarials, including chloroquine. Resistance to pyronaridine appears to emerge slowly and is further retarded when pyronaridine is used in combination with other anti-malarials, in particular, artesunate. Pyronaridine toxicity is generally less than that of chloroquine, though evidence of embryotoxicity in rodents suggests use with caution in pregnancy. Clinical pharmacokinetic data for pyronaridine indicates an elimination T1/2 of 13.2 and 9.6 days, respectively, in adults and children with acute uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in artemisinin-combination therapy. Clinical data for mono or combined pyronaridine therapy show excellent anti-malarial effects against P. falciparum and studies of combination therapy also show promise against Plasmodium vivax. Pyronaridine has been developed as a fixed dose combination therapy, in a 3:1 ratio, with artesunate for the treatment of acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and blood stage P. vivax malaria with the name of Pyramax® and has received Positive Opinion by European Medicines Agency under the Article 58 procedure. PMID:22877082

  17. Anti-malarial market and policy surveys in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Diap, Graciela; Amuasi, John; Boakye, Isaac; Sevcsik, Ann-Marie; Pecoul, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    At a recent meeting (Sept 18, 2009) in which reasons for the limited access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in sub-Saharan Africa were discussed, policy and market surveys on anti-malarial drug availability and accessibility in Burundi and Sierra Leone were presented in a highly interactive brainstorming session among key stakeholders across private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. The surveys, the conduct of which directly involved the national malaria control programme managers of the two countries, provides the groundwork for evidence-based policy implementation. The results of the surveys could be extrapolated to other countries with similar socio-demographic and malaria profiles. The meeting resulted in recommendations on key actions to be taken at the global, national, and community level for better ACT accessibility. At the global level, both public and private sectors have actions to take to strengthen policies that lead to the replacement of loose blister packs with fixed-dose ACT products, develop strategies to ban inappropriate anti-malarials and regulate those bans, and facilitate technology and knowledge transfer to scale up production of fixed-dose ACT products, which should be readily available and affordable to those patients who are in the greatest need of these medicines. At the national level, policies that regulate the anti-malarial medicines market should be enacted and enforced. The public sector, including funding donors, should participate in ensuring that the private sector is engaged in the ACT implementation process. Research similar to the surveys discussed is important for other countries to develop and evaluate the right incentives at a local level. At the community level, community outreach and education about appropriate preventive and treatment measures must continue and be strengthened, with service delivery systems developed within both public and private sectors, among other measures, to decrease access to

  18. Anti-malarial market and policy surveys in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Diap, Graciela; Amuasi, John; Boakye, Isaac; Sevcsik, Ann-Marie; Pecoul, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    At a recent meeting (Sept 18, 2009) in which reasons for the limited access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in sub-Saharan Africa were discussed, policy and market surveys on anti-malarial drug availability and accessibility in Burundi and Sierra Leone were presented in a highly interactive brainstorming session among key stakeholders across private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. The surveys, the conduct of which directly involved the national malaria control programme managers of the two countries, provides the groundwork for evidence-based policy implementation. The results of the surveys could be extrapolated to other countries with similar socio-demographic and malaria profiles. The meeting resulted in recommendations on key actions to be taken at the global, national, and community level for better ACT accessibility. At the global level, both public and private sectors have actions to take to strengthen policies that lead to the replacement of loose blister packs with fixed-dose ACT products, develop strategies to ban inappropriate anti-malarials and regulate those bans, and facilitate technology and knowledge transfer to scale up production of fixed-dose ACT products, which should be readily available and affordable to those patients who are in the greatest need of these medicines. At the national level, policies that regulate the anti-malarial medicines market should be enacted and enforced. The public sector, including funding donors, should participate in ensuring that the private sector is engaged in the ACT implementation process. Research similar to the surveys discussed is important for other countries to develop and evaluate the right incentives at a local level. At the community level, community outreach and education about appropriate preventive and treatment measures must continue and be strengthened, with service delivery systems developed within both public and private sectors, among other measures, to decrease access to

  19. Do ethnobotanical and laboratory data predict clinical safety and efficacy of anti-malarial plants?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over 1200 plant species are reported in ethnobotanical studies for the treatment of malaria and fevers, so it is important to prioritize plants for further development of anti-malarials. Methods The “RITAM score” was designed to combine information from systematic literature searches of published ethnobotanical studies and laboratory pharmacological studies of efficacy and safety, in order to prioritize plants for further research. It was evaluated by correlating it with the results of clinical trials. Results and discussion The laboratory efficacy score correlated with clinical parasite clearance (rs=0.7). The ethnobotanical component correlated weakly with clinical symptom clearance but not with parasite clearance. The safety component was difficult to validate as all plants entering clinical trials were generally considered safe, so there was no clinical data on toxic plants. Conclusion The RITAM score (especially the efficacy and safety components) can be used as part of the selection process for prioritising plants for further research as anti-malarial drug candidates. The validation in this study was limited by the very small number of available clinical studies, and the heterogeneity of patients included. PMID:21411018

  20. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  1. Differences in anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline enantiomers and investigation of the presumed underlying mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A better anti-malarial efficiency and lower neurotoxicity have been reported for mefloquine (MQ) (+)- enantiomer. However, the importance of stereoselectivity remains poorly understood as the anti-malarial activity of pure enantiomer MQ analogues has never been described. Building on these observations, a series of enantiopure 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives has previously been synthesized to optimize the efficiency and reduce possible adverse effects. Their in vitro activity on Plasmodium falciparum W2 and 3D7 strains is reported here along with their inhibition of β-haematin formation and peroxidative degradation of haemin, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial drugs. Results The (S)-enantiomers of this series of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives were found to be at least as effective as both chloroquine (CQ) and MQ. The derivative with a 5-carbon side-chain length was the more efficient on both P. falciparum strains. (R )-enantiomers displayed an activity decreased by 2 to 15-fold as compared to their (S) counterparts. The inhibition of β-haematin formation was significantly stronger with all tested compounds than with MQ, irrespective of the stereochemistry. Similarly, the inhibition of haemin peroxidation was significantly higher for both (S) and (R)-enantiomers of derivatives with a side-chain length of five or six carbons than for MQ and CQ. Conclusions The prominence of stereochemistry in the anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives is confirmed. The inhibition of β-haematin formation and haemin peroxidation can be put forward as presumed mechanisms of action but do not account for the stereoselectivity of action witnessed in vitro. PMID:22401346

  2. Anti-malarial Activities of Two Soil Actinomycete Isolates from Sabah via Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Dhiana Efani; Salleh, Raifana Mohamad; Mahmud, Fauze; Chin, Lee Ping; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting natural resources for bioactive compounds is an attractive drug discovery strategy in search for new anti-malarial drugs with novel modes of action. Initial screening efforts in our laboratory revealed two preparations of soil-derived actinomycetes (H11809 and FH025) with potent anti-malarial activities. Both crude extracts showed glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory activities in a yeast-based kinase assay. We have previously shown that the GSK3 inhibitor, lithium chloride (LiCl), was able to suppress parasitaemia development in a rodent model of malarial infection. The present study aims to evaluate whether anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 involve the inhibition of GSK3β. The acetone crude extracts of H11809 and FH025 each exerted strong inhibition on the growth of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.28 ± 0.11 µg/mL, respectively. The tested extracts exhibited Selectivity Index (SI) values exceeding 10 for the 3D7 strain. Both H11809 and FH025 showed dosage-dependent chemo-suppressive activities in vivo and improved animal survivability compared to non-treated infected mice. Western analysis revealed increased phosphorylation of serine (Ser 9) GSK3β (by 6.79 to 6.83-fold) in liver samples from infected mice treated with H11809 or FH025 compared to samples from non-infected or non-treated infected mice. A compound already identified in H11809 (data not shown), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed active anti-plasmodial activity against 3D7 (IC50 4.87 ± 1.26 µg/mL which is equivalent to 17.50 µM) and good chemo-suppressive activity in vivo (60.80% chemo-suppression at 300 mg/kg body weight [bw] dosage). DBP administration also resulted in increased phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β compared to controls. Findings from the present study demonstrate that the potent anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 were mediated via inhibition of host GSK3β. In addition

  3. Anti-malarial Activities of Two Soil Actinomycete Isolates from Sabah via Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β.

    PubMed

    Dahari, Dhiana Efani; Salleh, Raifana Mohamad; Mahmud, Fauze; Chin, Lee Ping; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting natural resources for bioactive compounds is an attractive drug discovery strategy in search for new anti-malarial drugs with novel modes of action. Initial screening efforts in our laboratory revealed two preparations of soil-derived actinomycetes (H11809 and FH025) with potent anti-malarial activities. Both crude extracts showed glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory activities in a yeast-based kinase assay. We have previously shown that the GSK3 inhibitor, lithium chloride (LiCl), was able to suppress parasitaemia development in a rodent model of malarial infection. The present study aims to evaluate whether anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 involve the inhibition of GSK3β. The acetone crude extracts of H11809 and FH025 each exerted strong inhibition on the growth of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.28 ± 0.11 µg/mL, respectively. The tested extracts exhibited Selectivity Index (SI) values exceeding 10 for the 3D7 strain. Both H11809 and FH025 showed dosage-dependent chemo-suppressive activities in vivo and improved animal survivability compared to non-treated infected mice. Western analysis revealed increased phosphorylation of serine (Ser 9) GSK3β (by 6.79 to 6.83-fold) in liver samples from infected mice treated with H11809 or FH025 compared to samples from non-infected or non-treated infected mice. A compound already identified in H11809 (data not shown), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed active anti-plasmodial activity against 3D7 (IC50 4.87 ± 1.26 µg/mL which is equivalent to 17.50 µM) and good chemo-suppressive activity in vivo (60.80% chemo-suppression at 300 mg/kg body weight [bw] dosage). DBP administration also resulted in increased phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β compared to controls. Findings from the present study demonstrate that the potent anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 were mediated via inhibition of host GSK3β. In addition

  4. Anti-malarial Activities of Two Soil Actinomycete Isolates from Sabah via Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Dhiana Efani; Salleh, Raifana Mohamad; Mahmud, Fauze; Chin, Lee Ping; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting natural resources for bioactive compounds is an attractive drug discovery strategy in search for new anti-malarial drugs with novel modes of action. Initial screening efforts in our laboratory revealed two preparations of soil-derived actinomycetes (H11809 and FH025) with potent anti-malarial activities. Both crude extracts showed glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory activities in a yeast-based kinase assay. We have previously shown that the GSK3 inhibitor, lithium chloride (LiCl), was able to suppress parasitaemia development in a rodent model of malarial infection. The present study aims to evaluate whether anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 involve the inhibition of GSK3β. The acetone crude extracts of H11809 and FH025 each exerted strong inhibition on the growth of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.28 ± 0.11 µg/mL, respectively. The tested extracts exhibited Selectivity Index (SI) values exceeding 10 for the 3D7 strain. Both H11809 and FH025 showed dosage-dependent chemo-suppressive activities in vivo and improved animal survivability compared to non-treated infected mice. Western analysis revealed increased phosphorylation of serine (Ser 9) GSK3β (by 6.79 to 6.83-fold) in liver samples from infected mice treated with H11809 or FH025 compared to samples from non-infected or non-treated infected mice. A compound already identified in H11809 (data not shown), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed active anti-plasmodial activity against 3D7 (IC50 4.87 ± 1.26 µg/mL which is equivalent to 17.50 µM) and good chemo-suppressive activity in vivo (60.80% chemo-suppression at 300 mg/kg body weight [bw] dosage). DBP administration also resulted in increased phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β compared to controls. Findings from the present study demonstrate that the potent anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 were mediated via inhibition of host GSK3β. In addition

  5. Novel in vivo active anti-malarials based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Claire-Lise; Siegrist, Romain; Aissaoui, Hamed; Marx, Léo; Racine, Sophie; Meyer, Solange; Binkert, Christoph; de Kanter, Ruben; Fischli, Christoph; Wittlin, Sergio; Boss, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    A novel series of anti-malarials, based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold, initially identified as peptidomimetic protease inhibitors is described. Combination of the hydroxy-ethyl-amine anti-malarial phramacophore with the known Mannich base pharmacophore of amodiaquine (57) resulted in promising in vivo active novel derivatives. PMID:23260352

  6. Anti-malarial activity and HS-SPME-GC-MS chemical profiling of Plinia cerrocampanensis leaf essential oil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plinia cerrocampanensis is an endemic plant of Panama. The leaf essential oil of this plant has shown antibacterial activity. However, anti-malarial activity and chemical profiling by HS-SPME-GC-MS of this essential oil have not been reported before. Methods Anti-malarial activity of the essential oil (EO) was evaluated in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive HB3 and chloroquine-resistant W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Synergistic effect of chloroquine and the EO on parasite growth was evaluated by calculating the combination index. A methodology involving headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was developed to investigate the composition of Plinia cerrocampanensis EO. Results Plinia cerrocampanensis EO showed a high anti-malarial activity and a synergistic interaction with chloroquine. The Plinia cerrocampanensis EO inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro at an IC50 of 7.3 μg/mL. Chloroquine together with the EO decreased the IC50 of chloroquine from 0.1 μg/mL to 0.05 μg/mL, and of the EO from 7.3 μg/mL to 1.1 μg/mL. The measured combination index was 0.58, which clearly indicates that the EO acts synergistically with chloroquine. Since the EO maintained its inhibitory activity on the chloroquine-sensitive strain of the parasite, it could be acting by a different mechanism of action than chloroquine. The best HS-SPME-GC-MS analytical conditions were obtained when the temperature of extraction was 49°C, incubation time 14 min, and the time of extraction 10 min. This method allowed for the identification of 53 volatile constituents in the EO, including new compounds not reported earlier. Conclusions The anti-malarial activity exhibited by the Plinia cerrocampanensis EO may lend support for its possible use as an alternative for anti-malarial therapy. PMID:24410874

  7. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas M; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Folkes, Lisa K; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M; Hammond, Ester M; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J; Higgins, Geoff S; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  8. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  9. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  10. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Holly Ann; Vincent-Mark, Arlene; Herrera, Yenni; Chang, O Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru). Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents), a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a) having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b) engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c) respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d) reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e) use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f) transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the change, utilized

  11. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part II: a pharmacological evaluation of non-alkaloids and non-terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to various factors which are not yet under check. Drug discovery projects targeting malaria often resort to natural sources in the search for lead compounds. A survey of the literature has led to a summary of the major findings regarding plant-derived compounds from African flora, which have shown anti-malarial/antiplasmodial activities, tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. Considerations have been given to compounds with activities ranging from “very active” to “weakly active”, leading to >500 chemical structures, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarins, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids and lignans. However, only the compounds that showed anti-malarial activity, from “very active” to “moderately active”, are discussed in this review. PMID:24602358

  12. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from “very active” to “weakly active”. However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from “very active” to “moderately active” are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria. PMID:24330395

  13. Structure-activity relationship of anti-malarial spongean peroxides having a 3-methoxy-1,2-dioxane structure.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Motoyuki; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Itagaki, Sawako; Horii, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2004-10-15

    In order to study the structure-activity relationship of anti-malarial spongean peroxides, several analogues concerning with the 6-methoxyacetyl moiety and the 3-pentyl residue in methyl 2-(3-methoxy-3-pentyl-1,2-dioxan-6-yl)acetate were synthesized and evaluated for anti-malarial activity. The tert-butyl ester analogue 14 showed stability in mouse serum and a high selectivity index against the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and the citronellyl analogue 31 exhibited the strongest in vitro anti-malarial activity among them, and the imidazole analogue 25 showed desirable in vivo anti-malarial activity against P. berghei infected mice. PMID:15388157

  14. The anti-malarial artesunate is also active against cancer.

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Dunstan, H; Sauerbrey, A; Miyachi, H; Chitambar, C R

    2001-04-01

    Artesunate (ART) is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, the active principle of the Chinese herb Artemisia annua. ART reveals remarkable activity against otherwise multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria. ART has now been analyzed for its anti-cancer activity against 55 cell lines of the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute, USA. ART was most active against leukemia and colon cancer cell lines (mean GI50 values: 1.11+/-0.56 microM and 2.13+/-0.74 microM , respectively). Non-small cell lung cancer cell lines showed the highest mean GI50 value (25.62+/-14.95 microM) indicating the lowest sensitivity towards ART in this test panel. Intermediate GI50 values were obtained for melanomas, breast, ovarian, prostate, CNS, and renal cancer cell lines. Importantly, a comparison of ART's cytotoxicity with those of other standard cytostatic drugs showed that ART was active in molar ranges comparable to those of established anti-tumor drugs. Furthermore, we tested CEM leukemia sub-lines resistant to either doxorubicin, vincristine, methotrexate, or hydroxyurea which do not belong to the N.C.I. screening panel. None of these drug-resistant cell lines showed cross resistance to ART. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of ART's cytotoxicity, we used a panel of isogenic Saccaromyces cerevisiae strains with defined genetic mutations in DNA repair, DNA checkpoint and cell proliferation genes. A yeast strain with a defective mitosis regulating BUB3 gene showed increased ART sensitivity and another strain with a defective proliferation-regulating CLN2 gene showed increased ART resistance over the wild-type strain, wt644. None of the other DNA repair or DNA check-point deficient isogenic strains were different from the wild-type. These results and the known low toxicity of ART are clues that ART may be a promising novel candidate for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:11251172

  15. Diversity oriented synthesis for novel anti-malarials.

    PubMed

    Bathula, Chandramohan; Singh, Shailja; Sen, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Malaria a global pandemic has engulfed nearly 0.63 million people globally. It is high time that a cure for malaria is required to stop its ever increasing menace. Our commentary discusses the advent and contribution of diversity oriented synthesis (DOS) in the drug discovery efforts towards developing cure for malaria. DOS based on chemical genetics focusses on design and synthesis of molecular libraries which covers large tracts of biologically relevant chemical space. Herein we will discuss the applications, advantages, disadvantages and future directions of DOS with respect to malaria.

  16. Targeting histone deacetylase inhibitors for anti-malarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Katherine T; Tran, Thanh N; Wheatley, Nicole C; Fairlie, David P

    2009-01-01

    It is now clear that histone acetylation plays key roles in regulating gene transcription in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the acetylated form inducing gene expression while deacetylation silences genes. Recent studies have identified roles for histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and/or histone deacetylases (HDACs) in a number of parasites including Entamoeba histolytica, Toxoplasma gondii, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptosporidium sp., Leishmania donovani, Neospora caninum, and Plasmodium falciparum. Here we survey fairly limited efforts to date in profiling antimalarial activities of HDAC inhibitors, showing that such compounds are potent inhibitors of the growth of P. falciparum in vitro and in vivo. Most of the compounds evaluated so far have borne a zinc-binding hydroxamate group that tends to be metabolized in vivo, and thus new zinc-binding groups need to be incorporated into second generation inhibitors in order to mask the catalytic zinc in the active site of HDACs. Also the development of compounds that are selective for parasitic HDACs over mammalian HDACs is still in relative infancy and it will take some time to derive antiparasitic HDAC inhibitor compounds with minimal toxicity for the host and acceptable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles for human treatment. Nevertheless, results to date suggest that HDAC inhibitor development represents a promising new approach to the potential treatment of parasitic infections, including those induced by malaria protozoa, and may offer new therapeutic targets within increasingly drug-resistant malarial parasites. PMID:19355992

  17. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with

  18. A Water-Soluble Polysaccharide from the Fruit Bodies of Bulgaria inquinans (Fries) and Its Anti-Malarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongtao; Han, Han; Li, Zonghong; Ni, Weihua; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Jingjing; Gao, Tingting; Hao, Miao; Zhou, Yifa

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (BIWS-4b) was purified from the fruit bodies of Bulgaria inquinans (Fries). It is composed of mannose (27.2%), glucose (15.5%) and galactose (57.3%). Its molecular weight was estimated to be 7.4 kDa (polydispersity index, Mw/Mn: 1.35). Structural analyses indicated that BIWS-4b mainly contains (1 → 6)-linked, (1 → 5)-linked and (1 → 5,6)-linked β-Galf units; (1 → 4)-linked and non-reducing terminal β-Glcp units; and (1 → 2)-linked, (1 → 6)-linked, (1 → 2,6)-linked and non-reducing terminal α-Manp units. When examined by the 4-day method and in a prophylactic assay in mice, BIWS-4b exhibited markedly suppressive activity against malaria while enhancing the activity of artesunate. Immunological tests indicated that BIWS-4b significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis and splenic lymphocyte proliferation in malaria-bearing mice and normal mice. The anti-malarial activity of BIWS-4b might be intermediated by enhancing immune competence and restoring artesunate-suppressed immune function. Thus, BIWS-4b is a potential adjuvant of anti-malaria drugs. PMID:21785644

  19. Self-medication with anti-malarials is a common practice in rural communities of Kilosa district in Tanzania despite the reported decline of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-medication has been widely practiced worldwide particularly in developing countries including Tanzania. In sub-Saharan Africa high incidences of malaria have contributed to self-medication with anti-malarial drugs. In recent years, there has been a gain in malaria control, which has led to decreased malaria transmission, morbidity and mortality. Therefore, understanding the patterns of self-medication during this period when most instances of fever are presumed to be due to non-malaria febrile illnesses is important. In this study, self-medication practice was assessed among community members and information on the habit of self-medication was gathered from health workers. Methods Twelve focus group discussions (FGD) with members of communities and 14 in-depth interviews (IDI) with health workers were conducted in Kilosa district, Tanzania. The transcripts were coded into different categories by MaxQDA software and then analysed through thematic content analysis. Results The study revealed that self-medication was a common practice among FGD participants. Anti-malarial drugs including sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine were frequently used by the participants for treatment of fever. Study participants reported that they visited health facilities following failure of self-medication or if there was no significant improvement after self-medication. The common reported reasons for self-medication were shortages of drugs at health facilities, long waiting time at health facilities, long distance to health facilities, inability to pay for health care charges and the freedom to choose the preferred drugs. Conclusion This study demonstrated that self-medication practice is common among rural communities in the study area. The need for community awareness is emphasized for correct and comprehensive information about drawbacks associated with self-medication practices. Deliberate efforts by the government and other stakeholders to improve health care

  20. Methods for implementing a medicine outlet survey: lessons from the anti-malarial market

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years an increasing number of public investments and policy changes have been made to improve the availability, affordability and quality of medicines available to consumers in developing countries, including anti-malarials. It is important to monitor the extent to which these interventions are successful in achieving their aims using quantitative data on the supply side of the market. There are a number of challenges related to studying supply, including outlet sampling, gaining provider cooperation and collecting accurate data on medicines. This paper provides guidance on key steps to address these issues when conducting a medicine outlet survey in a developing country context. While the basic principles of good survey design and implementation are important for all surveys, there are a set of specific issues that should be considered when conducting a medicine outlet survey. Methods This paper draws on the authors’ experience of designing and implementing outlet surveys, including the lessons learnt from ACTwatch outlet surveys on anti-malarial retail supply, and other key studies in the field. Key lessons and points of debate are distilled around the following areas: selecting a sample of outlets; techniques for collecting and analysing data on medicine availability, price and sales volumes; and methods for ensuring high quality data in general. Results and conclusions The authors first consider the inclusion criteria for outlets, contrasting comprehensive versus more focused approaches. Methods for developing a reliable sampling frame of outlets are then presented, including use of existing lists, key informants and an outlet census. Specific issues in the collection of data on medicine prices and sales volumes are discussed; and approaches for generating comparable price and sales volume data across products using the adult equivalent treatment dose (AETD) are explored. The paper concludes with advice on practical considerations

  1. Combating poor-quality anti-malarial medicines: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Bassat, Quique; Tanner, Marcel; Guerin, Philippe J; Stricker, Kirstin; Hamed, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    The circulation of poor-quality medicines continues to undermine the fight against many life-threatening diseases. Anti-malarial medicines appear to have been particularly compromised and present a major public health threat in malaria-endemic countries, negatively affecting individuals and their communities. Concerted collaborative efforts are required from global, regional and national organizations, involving the public and private sectors, to address the problem. While many initiatives are underway, a number of unmet needs deserve urgent and increased multisector attention. At the global level, there is a need for an international public health legal framework or treaty on poor-quality medicines, with statutes suitable for integration into national laws. In addition, increased international efforts are required to strengthen the governance of global supply chains and enhance cooperation between national medicine regulation authorities and law enforcement bodies. Increased investment is needed in innovative technologies that will enable healthcare teams to detect poor-quality medicines at all levels of the supply chain. At the regional level, a number of initiatives would be beneficial-key areas are standardization, simplification, and reciprocal recognition of registration processes and development of quality control capacity in regional centres of excellence that are better aligned with public health needs; improved surveillance methods and creation of a framework for compulsory and transparent reporting of poor-quality medicines; additional support for national medicine regulation authorities and other national partner authorities; and an increase in support for regional laboratories to boost their capabilities in detecting poor-quality medicines. It is vital that all stakeholders involved in efforts against poor-quality anti-malarial medicines extend and strengthen their actions in these critical areas and thus effectively support global health development

  2. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  3. In vitro inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii by the anti-malarial candidate, 6-(1,2,6,7-tetraoxaspiro[7.11]nonadec-4-yl)hexan-1-ol.

    PubMed

    Xin, Chun-Feng; Kim, Hye-Sook; Sato, Akira; Lee, Hak-Jae; Lee, You-Won; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-10-01

    An anti-malarial candidate, 6-(1,2,6,7-tetraoxaspiro[7.11]nonadec-4-yl)hexan-1-ol (N-251), was studied to characterize its potential as a novel anti-Toxoplasma gondii drug. In the present study, IC50 and LC50 of N-251 on host cells and T. gondii were compared to those of artemisinin and sulfadiazine. The IC50 on Huh-7 cells was 10.19μg/ml, 67.69μg/ml and 310.17μg/ml for N-251, artemisinin, and sulfadiazine, respectively. The LC50 for anti-T. gondii effect was shown to be 1.11μg/ml, 5.79μg/ml, and 5.45μg/ml for N-251, artemisinin and sulfadiazine, respectively. N-251 concentration causing complete parasiticidal effect with minimal cytotoxicity on host cells was determined to be 5μg/ml. Additionally, the anti-T. gondii effect of N-251 was confirmed by ultrastructural changes, loss of organelles, degenerated morphology and the increase of amylopectin as detected by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Accordingly, the present study suggests that the anti-malarial synthetic endoperoxide, N-251, is an emerging drug candidate more effective than artemisinin and sulfadiazine. PMID:27380994

  4. Effect of selenium (Se) deficiency on the anti-malarial action of Qinghaosu (QHS) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, O.A.; Ager, A.L.; May, R.

    1986-03-01

    QHS is an endoperoxide, so it occurred to the authors that its anti-malarial action might be potentiated by low glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. Weanling female mice were fed 1 of 4 diets: chow or a Torula yeast-based diet supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.5 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/. After 6 weeks, mean hepatic GSH-Px activities and plasma Se levels in these 4 dietary groups were 17.3, 0.1, 5.4, and 14.5 munits/mg protein and 242, 4, 230, and 532 ng/ml, respectively. At this time, all mice were inoculated i.p. with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium yoelii. Then groups of 7 or 8 mice fed each diet were given 0, 4, 16, or 64 mg QHS/kg orally bid at 3, 4, and 5 days post inoculation. On the 6th day, blood films were taken and antimalarial activity was assessed by determining % parasitemia (% PARA). Mice given 0 or 4 mg QHS/kg averaged 47% PARA and this was not affected by diet. Mice receiving 64 mg QHS/kg averaged about 1% PARA irrespective of diet. However, mice given 16 mg QHS/kg had 25% PARA when fed chow but only 8 to 11% PARA when fed the Torula diet, regardless of Se intake. Thus, while Se status did not appear to influence the antimalarial potency of QHS, some factor(s) in the Torula diet enhanced its activity at intermediate doses vs. the chow diet.

  5. Innovative public-private partnerships to maximize the delivery of anti-malarial medicines: lessons learned from the ASAQ Winthrop experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This case study describes how a public-private partnership initiated to develop a new anti-malarial combination, ASAQ Winthrop, has evolved over time to address issues posed by its effective deployment in the field. Case description In 2002, DNDi created the FACT project to develop two fixed-dose combinations, artesunate-amodiaquine and artesunate-mefloquine, to meet the WHO anti-malarial treatment recommendations and international regulatory agencies approval standards. In 2002, Sanofi-aventis had started a development programme for a fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine, to replace its co-blister combination. DNDi and sanofi-aventis joined forces in 2004, with the objective of developing within the shortest possible time frame a non-patented, affordable and easy to use fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine adapted to the needs of patients, in particular, those of children. The partners developed Coarsucam®/Artesunate Amodiaquine Winthrop® ("ASAQ Winthrop") which was prequalified by the WHO in 2008. Additional partnerships have since been established by DNDi and sanofi-aventis to ensure: 1) the adoption of this new medicine by malaria-endemic countries, 2) its appropriate usage through a broad range of information tools, and 3) the monitoring of its safety and efficacy in the field through an innovative Risk Management Plan. Discussion and evaluation The partnership between DNDi and sanofi-aventis has enabled the development and pre-qualification of ASAQ Winthrop in a short timeframe. As a result of the multiple collaborations established by the two partners, as of late 2010, ASAQ Winthrop was registered in 30 sub-Saharan African countries and in India, with over 80 million treatments distributed in 21 countries. To date, 10 clinical studies, involving 3432 patients with ASAQ Winthrop were completed to document efficacy and safety issues identified in the Risk Management Plan. Conclusions The speed at which ASAQ Winthrop

  6. Anti-malarials exert a protective effect while Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing SLE renal disease: data from a Latin-American cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Hachuel, Leticia; Boggio, Gabriela; Wojdyla, Daniel; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Soriano, Enrique R.; Saurit, Verónica; Cavalcanti, Fernando S.; Guzman, Renato A.; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Sauza del Pozo, Maria J.; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Alva, Magaly; Esteva-Spinetti, Maria H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the role of ethnicity and the use of anti-malarials (protective) on lupus renal disease. Methods. A nested case–control study (1:2 proportion, n = 265 and 530) within GLADEL's (Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus) longitudinal inception cohort was carried out. The end-point was ACR renal criterion development after diagnosis. Cases and controls were matched for follow-up time (end-point or a comparable time, respectively). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Additional analyses were done to determine if the protective effect of anti-malarials persisted after adjusting for intake-associated confounders. Results. Of the cases, 233 (87.9%) were women; their mean (s.d.) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years and their median (Q3–Q1 interquartile range) follow-up time for cases and controls was 8.3 months (Q3–Q1: 23.5); 56.6% of the cases and 74.3% of the controls were anti-malarial users. Mestizo ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48] and hypertension (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.38, 3.70) were independently associated with a higher risk of renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.26, 0.58), older age at disease onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96, 0.99) and female gender (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 0.99) were negatively associated with such occurrence. After adjusting for variables associated with their intake, the protective effect of anti-malarials on renal disease occurrence persisted (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25, 0.58). Conclusion. Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use protects patients from such an occurrence. PMID:22389125

  7. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Juen; Litvin, Oren; Ungar, Lyle; Pe’er, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression), an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should—and should not—be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features. PMID:26274927

  8. Development and evaluation of anti-malarial bio-conjugates: artesunate-loaded nanoerythrosomes.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Jaya; Saraf, Shubhini; Singh, Sobhna; Bigoniya, Papiya

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable cellular carrier has desired properties for achieving effective long-term controlled release of drugs having short half life. To reduce the undesired effects of drug, advanced drug delivery systems are needed which are based on specific cell targeting module. Artesunate (ART) conjugation on nanoerythrosomes (NE) can have controlled delivery to avoid drug leakage, increase the stability, and reduce cost and toxicities. In this study nanosized lipoprotein membrane vesicles bearing ART were prepared by extrusion method. Developed ART-NE conjugate formulations were optimized on the basis of vesicle morphology, size and size distribution, polydispersity index, integrity of membrane, loaded drug concentration, drug leakage, effect of temperature and viscosity, syringeability, in vitro release profile and in vivo plasma concentration estimation studies. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy reveals that lipid chain order of RBCs are insignificantly affected in moderate conditions after ART loading. The formulated ART-NE carrier revealed non aggregated, uniformly sized particles with smooth surfaces. The maximum drug loading was found to be 25.20 ± 1.3 μg/ml. ART-NE formulation was best fit for zero order kinetics and was found to be capable of controlled release of drug for 8 hrs. ART-NE formulation showed good redispersibility with desirable properties for parenteral administration. Formulation was stable when subjected to stress by centrifugal force of 7500 rpm and could bear turbulence shock of 15 passes from hypodermic needle of size 23 gauges. The ART-NE formulation administered intravenously showed higher plasma concentration compared to free drug signifying not only controlled release but higher rate of in vivo release. The developed formulation exhibited zero order release profile as per kinetic study analysis suggesting the suitability of carrier for the sustained and targeted delivery of ART. The developed ART-NE drug delivery system

  9. Development and evaluation of anti-malarial bio-conjugates: artesunate-loaded nanoerythrosomes.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Jaya; Saraf, Shubhini; Singh, Sobhna; Bigoniya, Papiya

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable cellular carrier has desired properties for achieving effective long-term controlled release of drugs having short half life. To reduce the undesired effects of drug, advanced drug delivery systems are needed which are based on specific cell targeting module. Artesunate (ART) conjugation on nanoerythrosomes (NE) can have controlled delivery to avoid drug leakage, increase the stability, and reduce cost and toxicities. In this study nanosized lipoprotein membrane vesicles bearing ART were prepared by extrusion method. Developed ART-NE conjugate formulations were optimized on the basis of vesicle morphology, size and size distribution, polydispersity index, integrity of membrane, loaded drug concentration, drug leakage, effect of temperature and viscosity, syringeability, in vitro release profile and in vivo plasma concentration estimation studies. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy reveals that lipid chain order of RBCs are insignificantly affected in moderate conditions after ART loading. The formulated ART-NE carrier revealed non aggregated, uniformly sized particles with smooth surfaces. The maximum drug loading was found to be 25.20 ± 1.3 μg/ml. ART-NE formulation was best fit for zero order kinetics and was found to be capable of controlled release of drug for 8 hrs. ART-NE formulation showed good redispersibility with desirable properties for parenteral administration. Formulation was stable when subjected to stress by centrifugal force of 7500 rpm and could bear turbulence shock of 15 passes from hypodermic needle of size 23 gauges. The ART-NE formulation administered intravenously showed higher plasma concentration compared to free drug signifying not only controlled release but higher rate of in vivo release. The developed formulation exhibited zero order release profile as per kinetic study analysis suggesting the suitability of carrier for the sustained and targeted delivery of ART. The developed ART-NE drug delivery system

  10. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global database and linked Antimalarial Quality Surveyor, an online visualization tool. Analysis of the database is described here, the limitations of the studies and data reported, and their public health implications discussed. Methods The database collates customized summaries of 251 published anti-malarial quality reports in English, French and Spanish by time and location since 1946. It also includes information on assays to determine quality, sampling and medicine regulation. Results No publicly available reports for 60.6% (63) of the 104 malaria-endemic countries were found. Out of 9,348 anti-malarials sampled, 30.1% (2,813) failed chemical/packaging quality tests with 39.3% classified as falsified, 2.3% as substandard and 58.3% as poor quality without evidence available to categorize them as either substandard or falsified. Only 32.3% of the reports explicitly described their definitions of medicine quality and just 9.1% (855) of the samples collected in 4.6% (six) surveys were conducted using random sampling techniques. Packaging analysis was only described in 21.5% of publications and up to twenty wrong active ingredients were found in falsified anti-malarials. Conclusions There are severe neglected problems with anti-malarial quality but there are important caveats to accurately estimate the prevalence and distribution of poor quality anti-malarials. The lack of reports in many malaria-endemic areas, inadequate sampling techniques and inadequate chemical analytical methods and

  11. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (< 25%). In the public/not-for-profit sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was available for free in all countries except Benin and the DRC (US$1.29 [Inter Quartile Range (IQR): $1.29-$1.29] and $0.52[IQR: $0.00-$1.29] per adult equivalent dose respectively). In the private sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was 5-24 times more expensive than non-artemisinin therapies. The exception was Madagascar where, due to national social marketing of subsidized ACT, the price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share

  12. Chloroquine and its analogs: a new promise of an old drug for effective and safe cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Solomon, V Raja; Lee, Hoyun

    2009-12-25

    Chloroquine (CQ), N'-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N,N-diethyl-pentane-1,4-diamine, is widely used as an effective and safe anti-malarial and anti-rheumatoid agent. CQ was discovered 1934 as "Resochin" by Andersag and co-workers at the Bayer laboratories. Ironically, CQ was initially ignored for a decade because it was considered too toxic to use in humans. CQ was "re-discovered" during World War II in the United States in the course of anti-malarial drug development. The US government-sponsored clinical trials during this period showed unequivocally that CQ has a significant therapeutic value as an anti-malarial drug. Consequently, CQ was introduced into clinical practice in 1947 for the prophylaxis treatment of malaria (Plasmodium vivax, ovale and malariae). CQ still remains the drug of choice for malaria chemotherapy because it is highly effective and well tolerated by humans. In addition, CQ is widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus and amoebic hepatitis. More recently, CQ has been studied for its potential as an enhancing agent in cancer therapies. Accumulating lines of evidence now suggest that CQ can effectively sensitize cell-killing effects by ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in a cancer-specific manner. The lysosomotrophic property of CQ appears to be important for the increase in efficacy and specificity. Although more studies are needed, CQ may be one of the most effective and safe sensitizers for cancer therapies. Taken together, it appears that the efficacy of conventional cancer therapies can be dramatically enhanced if used in combination with CQ and its analogs. PMID:19836374

  13. [Development of anti-malarial vaccines and need for clinical trials in accordance with international standards in South Africa].

    PubMed

    Doumbo, O K; Djimdé, A A; Théra, M A

    2008-06-01

    In the 20th century malaria remains a major problem of public health in sub-Saharan Africa. This haemosporidium discovered in Africa by Laveran in 1880, kills one child every 30 seconds which amounts to three "tsunami" flowing each year into the African continent. The current international solidarity raises new hopes as regards the possibility to suppress the morbidity effects on the population's health condition. In order to be efficient, today's strategies (impregnated mosquito nets, intermittent preventive treatments, artemisinin based combination therapy) should reach at least 80% of the targeted population (pregnant women and children). By 2025, the uncontrolled urbanization of the African population and the social disorders will make a new population a target for malaria. The new data of functional genomics and proteonics open new avenues of research for new mechanisms, new therapeutics and vaccine targets and new tools of diagnosis and prognosis. The current candidate vaccines of the first generation have allowed the development of African competences in clinical trials of international standard. Although they represent scientific advances they will not resolve the problem of public health. Research on candidate vaccines of 2nd and 3rd generation remains a challenge for the international scientific community. Africa should play a determining role in this process. Scientific information on the field remains essential for these generations of new anti-malarial vaccines. The ethical aspects regarding those clinical trials and actions of public health and research remain an universal necessity Deontology and ethics are two complementary approaches for the good practice of medicine and research of a good practitioner. For the protection and advantages of the patient and/or volunteer of the research are the cornerstones of the ethical approach. The scientific quality of a research protocol submitted to an independent research ethics committee and the volunteer 's

  14. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Hostettmann, Kurt; Haouala, Amina; Cuendet, Muriel; Falquet, Jacques; Graz, Bertrand; Christen, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Classical pharmacology has been the basis for the discovery of new chemical entities with therapeutic effects for decades. In natural product research, compounds are generally tested in vivo only after full in vitro characterization. However drug screening using this methodology is expensive, time-consuming and very often inefficient. Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodiumfalciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant. PMID:25516845

  15. Genetic polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial antibody levels in a low and unstable malaria transmission area in southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of malaria in Sri Lanka has significantly declined in recent years. Similar trends were seen in Kataragama, a known malaria endemic location within the southern province of the country, over the past five years. This is a descriptive study of anti-malarial antibody levels and selected host genetic mutations in residents of Kataragama, under low malaria transmission conditions. Methods Sera were collected from 1,011 individuals residing in Kataragama and anti-malarial antibodies and total IgE levels were measured by a standardized ELISA technique. Host DNA was extracted and used for genotyping of selected SNPs in known genes associated with malaria. The antibody levels were analysed in relation to the past history of malaria (during past 10 years), age, sex, the location of residence within Kataragama and selected host genetic markers. Results A significant increase in antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum antigens AMA1, MSP2, NANP and Plasmodium vivax antigen MSP1 in individuals with past history of malaria were observed when compared to those who did not. A marked increase of anti-MSP1(Pf) and anti-AMA1(Pv) was also evident in individuals between 45–59 years (when compared to other age groups). Allele frequencies for two SNPs in genes that code for IL-13 and TRIM-5 were found to be significantly different between those who have experienced one or more malaria attacks within past 10 years and those who did not. When antibody levels were classified into a low-high binary trait, significant associations were found with four SNPs for anti-AMA1(Pf); two SNPs for anti-MSP1(Pf); eight SNPs for anti-NANP(Pf); three SNPs for anti-AMA1(Pv); seven SNPs for anti-MSP1(Pv); and nine SNPs for total IgE. Eleven of these SNPs with significant associations with anti-malarial antibody levels were found to be non–synonymous. Conclusions Evidence is suggestive of an age–acquired immunity in this study population in spite of low malaria

  16. Inhibition of the growth and development of asexual and sexual stages of drug-sensitive and resistant strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum by Neem (Azadirachta indica) fractions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, R; Zhang, K; Talwar, G P; Garg, S; Kumar, N

    1998-05-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) has been shown to possess anti-malarial activity. In this study we systematically evaluated extracts of neem seeds and purified fractions further enriched in polar or non-polar constituents for their effect on in vitro growth and development of asexual and sexual stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Use of synchronized stages of parasites suggested trophozoites/schizonts as the susceptible target stages to various neem extracts. In addition, all the maturation stages of gametocytes were also killed by various neem fractions tested. The anti-plasmodial effect of neem components was also observed on parasites previously shown to be resistant to other anti-malarial drugs, i.e. chloroquine and pyrimethamine suggesting a different mode of action. Neem seed fractions are thus active not only against the parasite stages that cause the clinical infection but also against the stages responsible for continued malaria transmission. PMID:9687079

  17. FcγRIIa (CD32) polymorphism and anti-malarial IgG subclass pattern among Fulani and sympatric ethnic groups living in eastern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Amre; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C; Giha, Hayder A; Balogun, Halima A; Anders, Robin F; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; ElGhazali, Gehad; Berzins, Klavs

    2009-01-01

    Background A SNP at position 131, in the FcγRIIa gene, affects the binding of the different IgG subclasses and may influence the clinical variation seen in patients with falciparum malaria. This study confirms and extends previous findings, analysing the FcγRIIa (CD32) polymorphism in relation to the IgG subclass distribution seen among two sympatric tribes living in eastern Sudan, characterized by marked differences in susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods Two hundred and fifty Fulani subjects living in an area of meso-endemic P. falciparum malaria infection were genotyped for the FcγRIIa-131 polymorphism. For comparison, 101 non-Fulani donors – (Masaleit, Hausa and Four) – living in the same study area, were genotyped. The levels of plasma antibodies (IgG and subclasses) to four malaria antigens (AMA-1, MSP 2 – 3D7 & FC27, Pf332-C231) were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results The FcγRIIa-H/H131 genotype was found to be significantly more prevalent in the Fulani as compared to the non-Fulani ethnic groups (36.0% for Fulani versus 17.8% for non-Fulani, adjusted OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.61–5.97, P value < 0.001). The Fulani showed lower anti-malarial IgG1 and IgG3 antibody levels as compared to the non-Fulani and higher levels of IgG2 antibodies. Conclusion The FcγRIIa-H/H131 genotype and H131 allele is at higher frequency in the Fulani ethnic group. The H/H131 genotype was consistently associated with higher levels of anti-malarial IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies, while the R/R131 genotype was associated with higher levels of IgG1 antibodies. PMID:19284648

  18. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In vitro drug susceptibility assay of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates processed “immediate ex vivo” (IEV), without culture adaption, and tested using histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP-2) detection as an assay, is an expedient way to track drug resistance. Methods From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) against seven anti-malarial drugs, including artesunate (AS), dihydroartemisinin (DHA), and piperaquine. Results In western Cambodia, from 2006 to 2010, geometric mean (GM) IC50 values for chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, AS, DHA, and lumefantrine increased. In northern Cambodia, from 2009–2010, GM IC50 values for most drugs approximated the highest western Cambodia GM IC50 values in 2009 or 2010. Conclusions Western Cambodia is associated with sustained reductions in anti-malarial drug susceptibility, including the artemisinins, with possible emergence, or spread, to northern Cambodia. This potential public health crisis supports continued in vitro drug IC50 monitoring of P. falciparum isolates at key locations in the region. PMID:22694953

  19. Anti-malarial prescription practices among outpatients with laboratory-confirmed malaria in the setting of a health facility-based sentinel site surveillance system in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most African countries have adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. The World Health Organization now recommends limiting anti-malarial treatment to those with a positive malaria test result. Limited data exist on how these policies have affected ACT prescription practices. Methods Data were collected from all outpatients presenting to six public health facilities in Uganda as part of a sentinel site malaria surveillance programme. Training in case management, encouragement of laboratory-based diagnosis of malaria, and regular feedback were provided. Data for this report include patients with laboratory confirmed malaria who were prescribed anti-malarial therapy over a two-year period. Patient visits were analysed in two groups: those considered ACT candidates (defined as uncomplicated malaria with no referral for admission in patients ≥ 4 months of age and ≥ 5 kg in weight) and those who may not have been ACT candidates. Associations between variables of interest and failure to prescribe ACT to patients who were ACT candidates were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 51,355 patient visits were included in the analysis and 46,265 (90.1%) were classified as ACT candidates. In the ACT candidate group, 94.5% were correctly prescribed ACT. Artemether-lumefantrine made up 97.3% of ACT prescribed. There were significant differences across the sites in the proportion of patients for whom there was a failure to prescribe ACT, ranging from 3.0-9.3%. Young children and woman of childbearing age had higher odds of failure to receive an ACT prescription. Among patients who may not have been ACT candidates, the proportion prescribed quinine versus ACT differed based on if the patient had severe malaria or was referred for admission (93.4% vs 6.5%) or was below age or weight cutoffs for ACT (41.4% vs 57.2%). Conclusions High rates of compliance with

  20. The challenge to avoid anti-malarial medicine stock-outs in an era of funding partners: the case of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Between 2007 and 2013, the Tanzanian public sector received 93.1 million doses of first-line anti-malarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the form of artemether-lumefantrine entirely supplied by funding partners. The introduction of a health facility ACT stock monitoring system using SMS technology by the National Malaria Control Programme in mid 2011 revealed a high frequency of stock-outs of ACT in primary care public health facilities. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of availability of ACT and possible causes of observed stock-outs across public health facilities in Tanzania since mid-2011. Methods Data were collected weekly by the mobile phone reporting tool SMS for Life on ACT availability from over 5,000 public health facilities in Tanzania starting from September 2011 to December 2012. Stock data for all four age-dose levels of ACT across health facilities were summarized and supply of ACT at the national level was also documented. Results Over the period of 15 months, on average 29% of health facilities in Tanzania were completely stocked out of all four-age dose levels of the first-line anti-malarial with a median duration of total stock-out of six weeks. Patterns of total stock-out by region ranged from a low of 9% to a high of 52%. The ACT stock-outs were most likely caused by: a) insufficient ACT supplies entering Tanzania (e.g. in 2012 Tanzania received 10.9 million ACT doses compared with a forecast demand of 14.4 million doses); and b) irregular pattern of ACT supply (several months with no ACT stock). Conclusion The reduced ACT availability and irregular pattern of supply were due to cumbersome bureaucratic processes and delays both within the country and from the main donor, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Tanzania should invest in strengthening both the supply system and the health information system using mHealth solutions such as SMS for Life. This will continue to

  1. A pre-PEXEL histidine-rich protein II erythrocyte binding peptide as a new way for anti-malarial vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Gladys; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Reyes, Claudia; Córtes, Jimena; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2007-08-17

    The Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite produces several proteins characterised by an unusually high histidine content in infected red blood cells (iRBC). The histidine-rich protein II (HRP-II) is synthesised throughout the parasite's asexual and gametocyte stages, transported through the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) to iRBC cytosol and membrane and released to the bloodstream via a PEXEL motif. Immunogenicity and protection-inducing studies were begun with an RBC high activity binding peptide (HABP) from this protein named 6800 (preceding the PEXEL motif) in the experimental Aotus monkey model. Modifying critical residues (determined by glycine scanning in this HABP) induced immunogenicity and protection against experimental challenge. Native 6800 did not bind to any HLA-DRbeta(1)(*) molecule, but these modified HABPs acquired the ability to specifically bind to HLA-DRbeta(1)(*)0701. (1)H NMR studies revealed that whilst 6800 had a random structure, modified immunogenic and protection-inducing 24230 displayed very short alpha-helical segments allowing appropriate binding to the MHCII-pep-TCR complex. Modifications in conserved HABPs preceding PEXEL motifs thus open up new avenues for subunit-based, multi-component synthetic anti-malarial vaccine development.

  2. Mining of miRNAs and potential targets from gene oriented clusters of transcripts sequences of the anti-malarial plant, Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Sablok, Gaurav; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Conesa, Ana; Kuo, Jimmy; López, Camilo

    2012-04-01

    miRNAs involved in the biosynthesis of artemisinin, an anti-malarial compound form the plant Artemisia annua, have been identified using computational approaches to find conserved pre-miRNAs in available A. annua UniGene collections. Eleven pre-miRNAs were found from nine families. Targets predicted for these miRNAs were mainly transcription factors for conserved miRNAs. No target genes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis were found. However, miR390 was predicted to target a gene involved in the trichome development, which is the site of synthesis of artemisinin and could be a candidate for genetic transformation aiming to increase the content of artemisinin. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out to determinate the relation between A. annua and other plant pre-miRNAs: the pre-miRNA-based phylogenetic trees failed to correspond to known phylogenies, suggesting that pre-miRNA primary sequences may be too variable to accurately predict phylogenetic relations.

  3. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study observation period. The only in

  4. Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in malaria patients from six African countries enrolled in two randomized anti-malarial clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is common in populations living in malaria endemic areas. G6PD genotype and phenotype were determined for malaria patients enrolled in the chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA) phase III clinical trial programme. Methods Study participants, aged > 1 year, with microscopically confirmed uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and haemoglobin ≥ 70 g/L or haematocrit ≥ 25%, were recruited into two clinical trials conducted in six African countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mali). G6PD genotype of the three most common African forms, G6PD*B, G6PD*A (A376G), and G6PD*A- (G202A, A542T, G680T and T968C), were determined and used for frequency estimation. G6PD phenotype was assessed qualitatively using the NADPH fluorescence test. Exploratory analyses investigated the effect of G6PD status on baseline haemoglobin concentration, temperature, asexual parasitaemia and anti-malarial efficacy after treatment with CDA 2/2.5/4 mg/kg or chlorproguanil-dapsone 2/2.5 mg/kg (both given once daily for three days) or six-dose artemether-lumefantrine. Results Of 2264 malaria patients enrolled, 2045 had G6PD genotype available and comprised the primary analysis population (1018 males, 1027 females). G6PD deficiency prevalence was 9.0% (184/2045; 7.2% [N = 147] male hemizygous plus 1.8% [N = 37] female homozygous), 13.3% (273/2045) of patients were heterozygous females, 77.7% (1588/2045) were G6PD normal. All deficient G6PD*A- genotypes were A376G/G202A. G6PD phenotype was available for 64.5% (1319/2045) of patients: 10.2% (134/1319) were G6PD deficient, 9.6% (127/1319) intermediate, and 80.2% (1058/1319) normal. Phenotype test specificity in detecting hemizygous males was 70.7% (70/99) and 48.0% (12/25) for homozygous females. Logistic regression found no significant effect of G6PD genotype on adjusted mean baseline haemoglobin (p = 0.154), adjusted mean baseline temperature (p = 0.9617), or

  5. The Plasmodium berghei sexual stage antigen PSOP12 induces anti-malarial transmission blocking immunity both in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sala, K A; Nishiura, H; Upton, L M; Zakutansky, S E; Delves, M J; Iyori, M; Mizutani, M; Sinden, R E; Yoshida, S; Blagborough, A M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-malarial transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) aim to inhibit the transmission of Plasmodium from humans to mosquitoes by targeting the sexual/ookinete stages of the parasite. Successful use of such interventions will subsequently result in reduced cases of malarial infection within a human population, leading to local elimination. There are currently only five lead TBV candidates under examination. There is a consequent need to identify novel antigens to allow the formulation of new potent TBVs. Here we describe the design and evaluation of a potential TBV (BDES-PbPSOP12) targeting Plasmodium berghei PSOP12 based on the baculovirus dual expression system (BDES), enabling expression of antigens on the surface of viral particles and within infected mammalian cells. In silico studies have previously suggested that PSOP12 (Putative Secreted Ookinete Protein 12) is expressed within the sexual stages of the parasite (gametocytes, gametes and ookinetes), and is a member of the previously characterized 6-Cys family of plasmodial proteins. We demonstrate that PSOP12 is expressed within the sexual/ookinete forms of the parasite, and that sera obtained from mice immunized with BDES-PbPSOP12 can recognize the surface of the male and female gametes, and the ookinete stages of the parasite. Immunization of mice with BDES-PbPSOP12 confers modest but significant transmission-blocking activity in vivo by active immunization (53.1% reduction in oocyst intensity, 10.9% reduction in oocyst prevalence). Further assessment of transmission-blocking potency ex vivo shows a dose-dependent response, with up to a 76.4% reduction in intensity and a 47.2% reduction in prevalence observed. Our data indicates that PSOP12 in Plasmodium spp. could be a potential new TBV target candidate, and that further experimentation to examine the protein within human malaria parasites would be logical. PMID:25454088

  6. Effect of external stress on density and size of glandular trichomes in full-grown Artemisia annua, the source of anti-malarial artemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Kjær, Anders; Grevsen, Kai; Jensen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Glandular trichomes (GT) of Artemisia annua produce valuable compounds for pharmaceutical and industrial uses, most notably the anti-malarial artemisinin. Our aim was to find out whether the density, number and size of GT can be manipulated to advantage by environmental stress. A range of external stress treatments, including stress response regulators, was therefore given to fully grown plants under field and greenhouse conditions. Methodology In a field experiment (Ex1), seed-grown plants were subjected to chemical or physical stress and plants analysed after 5 weeks. In a greenhouse experiment (Ex2), three groups of clonally derived plants were stressed at weekly intervals for 5 weeks. Stress treatments included sandblasting, leaf cutting and spraying with jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), H2O2 (HP) and NaCl (SC)at different concentrations. Leaves from an upper and a lower position on the plants were analysed by fluorescence microscopy to determine the density and size of GT. Principal results Densities of GT on upper leaves of full-grown A. annua plants generally showed no response to external stress and only plants from one clone of Ex2 supported the hypothesis that increased density of GT was inducible in upper leaves by stress (significant for SC, HP and COS). The density of GT on lower leaves was not affected by stress in any experiment. Glandular trichomes were significantly smaller on the lower leaves in response to stress in Ex2, and a similar non-significant trend was observed in Ex1. Conclusions The results indicate a dynamic system in which stress treatments of large A. annua plants had a minor promoting effect on the initiation of GT in developing leaves, and a maturing effect of GT later in the lifetime of the individual GT. The hypothesis that applying stress can induce larger GT or more numerous GT was rejected. PMID:22833781

  7. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. Results As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. Conclusions The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10–20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health

  8. Direct comparison of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Performance of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference strains and fresh ex vivo isolates from Cambodia against a panel of standard anti-malarials. The objective was to determine which of these two common assays is more appropriate for studying drug susceptibility of “immediate ex vivo” (IEV) isolates, analysed without culture adaption, in a region of relatively low malaria transmission. Methods Using the HRP-2 and MSF methods, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against a panel of malaria drugs were determined for P. falciparum reference clones (W2, D6, 3D7 and K1) and 41 IEV clinical isolates from an area of multidrug resistance in Cambodia. Comparison of the IC50 values from the two methods was made using Wilcoxon matched pair tests and Pearson’s correlation. The lower limit of parasitaemia detection for both methods was determined for reference clones and IEV isolates. Since human white blood cell (WBC) DNA in clinical samples is known to reduce MSF assay sensitivity, SYBR Green I fluorescence linearity of P. falciparum samples spiked with WBCs was evaluated to assess the relative degree to which MSF sensitivity is reduced in clinical samples. Results IC50 values correlated well between the HRP-2 and MSF methods when testing either P. falciparum reference clones or IEV isolates against 4-aminoquinolines (chloroquine, piperaquine and quinine) and the quinoline methanol mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted when testing artemisinins against reference clones and lack of correlation when testing IEV isolates. The HRP-2 ELISA produced a higher overall success rate (90% for producing IC50 best-fit sigmoidal curves), relative to only a 40% success rate for the

  9. Drug resistance in Plasmodium: natural products in the fight against malaria.

    PubMed

    Turschner, Simon; Efferth, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Malaria, perhaps one of the most serious and widespread diseases encountered by mankind, continues to be a major threat to about 40 % of the world's population, especially in the developing world. As malaria vaccines remain problematic, chemotherapy still is the most important weapon in the fight against the disease. However, almost all available drugs have been compromised by the highly adaptable parasite, and the increasing drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum continues to be the main problem. Therefore, the limited clinical repertoire of effective drugs and the emergence of multi-resistant strains substantiate the need for new anti-malarials. Plant-derived artemisinin is currently the only available drug that is globally effective, but alarmingly, recent studies suggest that resistance already may be developing. Nevertheless, the success story of artemisinin from the herb Qing Hao (Artemisia annua L.), used as a remedy in traditional Chinese medicine for more than two thousand years, shows once again that natural products serve as an invaluable reservoir of lead compounds for sophisticated small molecules. This review outlines the major anti-malarials, summarizing recent knowledge about their mode of action and the development of drug resistance. Furthermore, the most promising and recently discovered natural products with anti-malarial potential will be introduced. PMID:19200025

  10. Conditioned saccharin avoidance and sensitization to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Cadoni, Cristina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2010-12-25

    Saccharin avoidance conditioned by drugs of abuse (CSA) has been interpreted as an expression of the appetitive, dopamine-dependent, properties of the drug. Repeated exposure to these drugs induces an increase (sensitization) of their motor stimulant properties associated with differential changes in DA transmission in the NAc shell and core. The present study investigated the changes in drug CSA induced by schedules of repeated drug exposure that induce behavioral sensitization. CSA was performed in a two-bottle choice paradigm with two saccharin-drug associations in rats previously sensitized to morphine, cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine. In control rats morphine (1 and 5mg/kg s.c.), cocaine (5 and 10mg/kg i.p.), amphetamine (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg s.c.) and nicotine (0.4 mg/kg s.c.) induced dose-dependent CSA. Sensitization to morphine, cocaine and nicotine, which is known to reduce the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the same drugs, also reduced CSA. In contrast, sensitization to amphetamine, that does not affect the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the drug, failed to affect CSA. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that NAc shell DA is a substrate of the appetitive properties of drugs of abuse.

  11. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alex; Elya, Carolyn; Anderson, Johanna; Clark, Julie; Connelly, Michele; Yang, Lei; Min, Jaeki; Sato, Yuko; Guy, R. Kiplin; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target. PMID:25894322

  12. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-01-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way. PMID:2926418

  13. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-03-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way.

  14. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  15. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  16. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  17. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  18. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-11-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  19. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Figadere, Bruno; Glisic, Sanja; Veljkovic, Nevena; Perovic, Vladimir R.; Cavanaugh, David P.; Branch, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD). Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established. PMID:25717373

  20. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J; Leslie, Christina S

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  1. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  2. In Vitro Drug Sensitivity Tests to Predict Molecular Target Drug Responses in Surgically Resected Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ryohei; Anayama, Takashi; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Okada, Hironobu; Kume, Motohiko; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors have dramatically changed the strategy of medical treatment of lung cancer. Patients should be screened for the presence of the EGFR mutation or echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion gene prior to chemotherapy to predict their clinical response. The succinate dehydrogenase inhibition (SDI) test and collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) are established in vitro drug sensitivity tests, which may predict the sensitivity of patients to cytotoxic anticancer drugs. We applied in vitro drug sensitivity tests for cyclopedic prediction of clinical responses to different molecular targeting drugs. Methods The growth inhibitory effects of erlotinib and crizotinib were confirmed for lung cancer cell lines using SDI and CD-DST. The sensitivity of 35 cases of surgically resected lung cancer to erlotinib was examined using SDI or CD-DST, and compared with EGFR mutation status. Results HCC827 (Exon19: E746-A750 del) and H3122 (EML4-ALK) cells were inhibited by lower concentrations of erlotinib and crizotinib, respectively than A549, H460, and H1975 (L858R+T790M) cells were. The viability of the surgically resected lung cancer was 60.0 ± 9.8 and 86.8 ± 13.9% in EGFR-mutants vs. wild types in the SDI (p = 0.0003). The cell viability was 33.5 ± 21.2 and 79.0 ± 18.6% in EGFR mutants vs. wild-type cases (p = 0.026) in CD-DST. Conclusions In vitro drug sensitivity evaluated by either SDI or CD-DST correlated with EGFR gene status. Therefore, SDI and CD-DST may be useful predictors of potential clinical responses to the molecular anticancer drugs, cyclopedically. PMID:27070423

  3. Drug uptake and pharmacological modulation of drug sensitivity in leukemia by AQP9.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Carbrey, Jennifer; Rosen, Barry P; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2004-09-24

    Leukemia is the most common childhood cancer. Trisenox, the active ingredient of which is trivalent arsenic, is the first line of treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Since drug action usually requires uptake of the drug, it is of importance to determine the transport system responsible for Trisenox uptake. Recently, human aquaglyceroporin 9 (AQP9) has been shown to transport As(III) in Xenopus oocytes. In this study we report to show that AQP9 expression modulates the drug sensitivity of leukemic cells. AQP9 was transfected into the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. The transfectants became hypersensitive to Trisenox and Sb(III). The promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 treated with vitamin D showed higher expression of AQP9 and hypersensitivity to Trisenox and Sb(III). This sensitivity was due to higher rates of uptake of the trivalent metalloids by the cell lines overexpressing AQP9. Trisenox hypersensitivity results from increased expression of AQP9 drug uptake system. The possibility of using pharmacological agents to increase expression of AQP9 gene delivers the promise of new therapies for the treatment of leukemia. Thus, drug hypersensitivity can be correlated with increased expression of the drug uptake system. This is the first demonstration that AQP9 can modulate drug sensitivity in cancer.

  4. Plasmodium falciparum transfected with ultra bright NanoLuc luciferase offers high sensitivity detection for the screening of growth and cellular trafficking inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mauro F; Nie, Catherine Q; Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C; Sanders, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  5. [Procedure for determination of individual sensitivity to antitumor drugs].

    PubMed

    Abduvaliev, A A; Gil'dieva, M S; Tatarskiĭ, V P

    2006-05-01

    The present paper proposes to employ the cultured tumor cells of the breast and chick fibroblasts after long-term cultivation (for above 24 days) to determine their individual drug sensitivity and, as a criterion of cell damage, to use the percent of destruction of the cell layer formed in the wells 24 hours after drug insertion. It also presents the comparative results of tests of 2 cellular models that have been used to determine the in vitro sensitivity of the cells of breast cancer and chick fibroblasts to melfalan and its complex compound with copper acetylacetonate - MOK*M. At the same time, the cytotoxic activity of MOK*M and melfalan against tumor cells has been not shown to differ greatly (16.02+/-1.85 and 15.71+/-0.65% cell layer destruction, respectively), but the same activity of MOK*M against the model of intact cells (chick fibroblasts) was much less (15.23+/-1.97%) than that of melfalan (95.39+/-1.11%). The test system proposed by the authors is of certain informative value and it may be used for the determination of the individual sensitivity of tumor cells to antitumor drugs.

  6. pH-sensitive Eudragit nanoparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Wook; Giri, Namita; Lee, Chi H

    2011-01-17

    Drug delivery via vaginal epithelium has suffered from lack of stability due to acidic and enzymatic environments. The biocompatible pH-sensitive nanoparticles composed of Eudragit S-100 (ES) were developed to protect loaded compounds from being degraded under the rigorous vaginal conditions and achieve their therapeutically effective concentrations in the mucosal epithelium. ES nanoparticles containing a model compound (sodium fluorescein (FNa) or nile red (NR)) were prepared by the modified quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method. Loading efficiencies were found to be 26% and 71% for a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic compound, respectively. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic model drugs remained stable in nanoparticles at acidic pH, whereas they are quickly released from nanoparticles upon exposure at physiological pH. The confocal study revealed that ES nanoparticles were taken up by vaginal cells, followed by pH-responsive drug release, with no cytotoxic activities. The pH-sensitive nanoparticles would be a promising carrier for the vaginal-specific delivery of various therapeutic drugs including microbicides and peptides/proteins.

  7. Comparison between Flow Cytometry, Microscopy, and Lactate Dehydrogenase-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Plasmodium falciparum Drug Susceptibility Testing under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Woodrow, Charles J.; Wangsing, Chirapat; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Christensen, Peter R.; Nosten, Francois; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an objective method for conducting in vitro antimalarial sensitivity assays with increasing potential for application in field sites. We examined in vitro susceptibility to seven anti-malarial drugs for 40 fresh P. falciparum field isolates via a flow cytometry method (FCM), a colorimetric LDH-based ELISA (DELI), and standard microscopic slide analysis of growth. For FCM, 184/280 (66%) assays met analytical acceptance criteria, compared to 166/280 (59%) for DELI. There was good agreement between FCM and microscopy, while DELI tended to produce higher half-maximal inhibition constants (IC50s) than FCM, with an overall bias of 2.2-fold (Bland-Altman comparison). Values for artesunate and dihydroartemisinin were most affected. Paradoxical increases in signal at very high concentrations of mefloquine and related compounds were more marked with the DELI assay, suggesting that off-target effects on LDH production may be responsible. Loss of FCM signal due to reinvasion or slow growth was observed in a small number of samples. These results extend previous work on use of flow cytometry to determine antimalarial susceptibility in terms of the number of samples, range of drugs, and comparison with other methods. PMID:26269616

  8. [Sensitivity test of antitumor drugs by the use of isotope].

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Okui, K

    1982-04-01

    A sensitivity test of antitumor drugs using primary shortterm culture with 3H-thymidine was performed on stomach cancer patients. Stomach cancer tissues, which were removed in the operating room, were cut into cubes of 1 to 2 mm. Thereafter, they were put on a stainless steel mesh which was placed in a small petri dish (40 X 15 mm) and they were moisted with the cultivating medium. An appropriate dose of antitumor drugs (MM-C, 5-FU, cytosine arabinoside) was added at the onset of cultivation and 3H-thymidine was further added 24 hours later. At the end of cultivation in a CO2 incubator for about 3 days, the specimens were homogenized in an ice-cold homogenizer with 5% trichloroacetic acid. DNA fraction of the specimens was extracted by Schmidt-Thannhauser method. The isotope activity in DNA fraction was measured in a scintillation counter and was represented as cpm/microgram DNA. Sensitivities of antitumor drugs can be determined by comparison between isotope incorporations into the specimens tested and those into control specimens. Bacterial and fungal contaminations were observed in primary stomach cancer tissues. PMID:7184415

  9. Crosslinked ionic polysaccharides for stimuli-sensitive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Blanco-Fernandez, Barbara; Puga, Ana M; Concheiro, Angel

    2013-08-01

    Polysaccharides are gaining increasing attention as components of stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems, particularly since they can be obtained in a well characterized and reproducible way from the natural sources. Ionic polysaccharides can be readily crosslinked to render hydrogel networks sensitive to a variety of internal and external variables, and thus suitable for switching drug release on-off through diverse mechanisms. Hybrids, composites and grafted polymers can reinforce the responsiveness and widen the range of stimuli to which polysaccharide-based systems can respond. This review analyzes the state of the art of crosslinked ionic polysaccharides as components of delivery systems that can regulate drug release as a function of changes in pH, ion nature and concentration, electric and magnetic field intensity, light wavelength, temperature, redox potential, and certain molecules (enzymes, illness markers, and so on). Examples of specific applications are provided. The information compiled demonstrates that crosslinked networks of ionic polysaccharides are suitable building blocks for developing advanced externally activated and feed-back modulated drug delivery systems.

  10. Drug Sensitivity in Older Adults: The Role of Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; Morton, Mark R.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics (how drugs are used in the body) lead to increased drug sensitivity and potentially harmful drug effects. Addresses heightened sensitivity to drug effects seen in older adults. Presents three examples of physiologic decline and discusses some broad considerations for geriatric…

  11. Numerical modeling of the transmission dynamics of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant HSV-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.

    2001-03-01

    A competitive finite-difference method will be constructed and used to solve a modified deterministic model for the spread of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) within a given population. The model monitors the transmission dynamics and control of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant HSV-2. Unlike the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (RK4), which fails when the discretization parameters exceed certain values, the novel numerical method to be developed in this paper gives convergent results for all parameter values.

  12. Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Mutemi, W M; Willetts, A; Bayah, K; Were, S; Ross, A; Marsh, K

    2004-04-01

    Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria. PMID:15078263

  13. Photoactive Fluoropolymer Surfaces that Release Sensitizer Drug Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Abramova, Inna; Cengel, Keith; Busch, Theresa M.; Greer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We describe a physical-organic study of two fluoropolymers bearing a photoreleasable PEGylated photosensitizer which generates 1O2(1Δg) [chlorin e6 methoxy tri(ethylene glycol) triester]. The surfaces are Teflon/polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanocomposite and fluorinated silica. The relative efficiency of these surfaces to photorelease the PEGylated sensitizer [shown previously to be phototoxic to ovarian cancer cells (Kimani, S. et al J. Org. Chem 2012, 77, 10638)] was slightly higher for the nanocomposite. In the presence of red light and O2, 1O2 is formed, which cleaves an ethene linkage to liberate the sensitizer in 68–92% yields. The fluoropolymers were designed to deal with multiple problems. Namely, their success relied not only high O2 solubility and drug repellency, but that the C−F bonds physically quench little 1O2 for its productive use away from the surface. The results obtained here indicate that Teflon-like surfaces have potential uses of delivering sensitizer and singlet oxygen for applications in tissue repair and photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:25686407

  14. Regulation of drug sensitivity by ribosomal protein S3a.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z B; Minden, M D; McCulloch, E A; Stahl, J

    2000-02-01

    When bcl-2 is immunoprecipitated from (32)P-labeled cell extracts of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) blasts, a phosphorylated protein of approximately 30 kd is coprecipitated. This protein has been identified as ribosomal protein S3a. The biologic effects of S3a include favoring apoptosis and enhancing the malignant phenotype. We sought to determine whether S3a, like bcl-2, influenced the response of cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and ATRA. Cell lines were studied in which S3a was genetically increased or disrupted; increased S3a was regularly associated with increased plating efficiency and increased sensitivity to either cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) or doxorubicin (DNR). S3a did not affect the sensitivity of cells to paclitaxel. Pulse exposures to either (3)HTdR or ara-C showed a greater percentage of clonogenic cells in the S phase of the cell cycle in cells with increased S3a than in controls. Cells with increased S3a responded to ATRA by increased ara-C or DNR sensitivity, whereas cells with reduced S3a protein were either protected by ATRA or not affected. We studied cryopreserved blast cells from patients with AML or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). S3a protein levels were heterogeneous in these populations. In 32 cryopreserved blast populations, S3a levels were significantly correlated with both bcl-2 and with cell growth in culture. As in cell lines, high S3a in cryopreserved blasts was associated with ATRA-induced sensitization to ara-C. No significant association was seen between S3a levels and response to treatment. PMID:10648421

  15. Protein microarray: sensitive and effective immunodetection for drug residues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Veterinary drugs such as clenbuterol (CL) and sulfamethazine (SM2) are low molecular weight (<1000 Da) compounds, or haptens, that are difficult to develop immunoassays due to their low immunogenicity. In this study, we conjugated the drugs to ovalbumin to increase their immunogenicity for antiserum production in rabbits and developed a protein microarray immunoassay for detection of clenbuterol and sulfamethazine. The sensitivity of this approach was then compared to traditional ELISA technique. Results The artificial antigens were spotted on microarray slides. Standard concentrations of the compounds were added to compete with the spotted antigens for binding to the antisera to determine the IC50. Our microarray assay showed the IC50 were 39.6 ng/ml for CL and 48.8 ng/ml for SM2, while the traditional competitive indirect-ELISA (ci-ELISA) showed the IC50 were 190.7 ng/ml for CL and 156.7 ng/ml for SM2. We further validated the two methods with CL fortified chicken muscle tissues, and the protein microarray assay showed 90% recovery while the ci-ELISA had 76% recovery rate. When tested with CL-fed chicken muscle tissues, the protein microarray assay had higher sensitivity (0.9 ng/g) than the ci-ELISA (0.1 ng/g) for detection of CL residues. Conclusions The protein microarrays showed 4.5 and 3.5 times lower IC50 than the ci-ELISA detection for CL and SM2, respectively, suggesting that immunodetection of small molecules with protein microarray is a better approach than the traditional ELISA technique. PMID:20158905

  16. Roles of sildenafil in enhancing drug sensitivity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Patel, Atish S; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has decreased the hope for successful cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transmembrane family. The overexpression of ABC transporters is a major determinant of MDR in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Unfortunately, until recently, most of the strategies used to surmount ABC-transporter-mediated MDR have had limited success. An ideal modulator of MDR would be one that has a low liability to induce toxicity and alter the pharmacokinetic profile of antineoplastic drugs. Sildenafil, an inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, was found to significantly reverse ABC-transporter-mediated MDR. Our results indicate that sildenafil has differential inhibitory effects on ABC transporters: It significantly decreases the efflux activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2, but has no significant effects on ABCC1. Emerging evidence indicates that sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors may enhance the sensitivity of certain types of cancer to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21610107

  17. Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

    2011-07-18

    This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

  18. Aspergillus nidulans galactofuranose biosynthesis affects antifungal drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; El-Ganiny, Amira M; Afroz, Sharmin; Sanders, David A R; Liu, Juxin; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2012-12-01

    The cell wall is essential for fungal survival in natural environments. Many fungal wall carbohydrates are absent from humans, so they are a promising source of antifungal drug targets. Galactofuranose (Galf) is a sugar that decorates certain carbohydrates and lipids. It comprises about 5% of the Aspergillus fumigatus cell wall, and may play a role in systemic aspergillosis. We are studying Aspergillus wall formation in the tractable model system, A. nidulans. Previously we showed single-gene deletions of three sequential A. nidulans Galf biosynthesis proteins each caused similar hyphal morphogenesis defects and 500-fold reduced colony growth and sporulation. Here, we generated ugeA, ugmA and ugtA strains controlled by the alcA(p) or niiA(p) regulatable promoters. For repression and expression, alcA(p)-regulated strains were grown on complete medium with glucose or threonine, whereas niiA(p)-regulated strains were grown on minimal medium with ammonium or nitrate. Expression was assessed by qPCR and colony phenotype. The alcA(p) and niiA(p) strains produced similar effects: colonies resembling wild type for gene expression, and resembling deletion strains for gene repression. Galf immunolocalization using the L10 monoclonal antibody showed that ugmA deletion and repression phenotypes correlated with loss of hyphal wall Galf. None of the gene manipulations affected itraconazole sensitivity, as expected. Deletion of any of ugmA, ugeA, ugtA, their repression by alcA(p) or niiA(p), OR, ugmA overexpression by alcA(p), increased sensitivity to Caspofungin. Strains with alcA(p)-mediated overexpression of ugeA and ugtA had lower caspofungin sensitivity. Galf appears to play an important role in A. nidulans growth and vigor.

  19. The neural basis of drug craving: an incentive-sensitization theory of addiction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T E; Berridge, K C

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a biopsychological theory of drug addiction, the 'Incentive-Sensitization Theory'. The theory addresses three fundamental questions. The first is: why do addicts crave drugs? That is, what is the psychological and neurobiological basis of drug craving? The second is: why does drug craving persist even after long periods of abstinence? The third is whether 'wanting' drugs (drug craving) is attributable to 'liking' drugs (to the subjective pleasurable effects of drugs)? The theory posits the following. (1) Addictive drugs share the ability to enhance mesotelencephalic dopamine neurotransmission. (2) One psychological function of this neural system is to attribute 'incentive salience' to the perception and mental representation of events associated with activation of the system. Incentive salience is a psychological process that transforms the perception of stimuli, imbuing them with salience, making them attractive, 'wanted', incentive stimuli. (3) In some individuals the repeated use of addictive drugs produces incremental neuroadaptations in this neural system, rendering it increasingly and perhaps permanently, hypersensitive ('sensitized') to drugs and drug-associated stimuli. The sensitization of dopamine systems is gated by associative learning, which causes excessive incentive salience to be attributed to the act of drug taking and to stimuli associated with drug taking. It is specifically the sensitization of incentive salience, therefore, that transforms ordinary 'wanting' into excessive drug craving. (4) It is further proposed that sensitization of the neural systems responsible for incentive salience ('for wanting') can occur independently of changes in neural systems that mediate the subjective pleasurable effects of drugs (drug 'liking') and of neural systems that mediate withdrawal. Thus, sensitization of incentive salience can produce addictive behavior (compulsive drug seeking and drug taking) even if the expectation of drug

  20. Induction of an acetaminophen-sensitive cyclooxygenase with reduced sensitivity to nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D L; Botting, R M; Robertson, P M; Madsen, M L; Vane, J R

    1999-03-16

    The transformed monocyte/macrophage cell line J774.2 undergoes apoptosis when treated for 48 h with competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes 1 and 2. Many of these nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but in particular diclofenac, induce during this time period a COX activity that coincides with a robust induction of COX-2 protein. Induction of this activity requires high, apoptosis-inducing concentrations of diclofenac (>100 microM). Prolonged treatment of J774.2 cells with lower doses of diclofenac inhibits COX activity, indicating that diclofenac is a time-dependent, pseudoirreversible inhibitor of COX-2. It is difficult to wash out the inhibition. However, the activity evoked by high concentrations of diclofenac has a profoundly distinct COX active site that allows diclofenac, its inducer, to be washed readily from its active site. The diclofenac-induced activity also has the unusual property of being more sensitive to inhibition by acetaminophen (IC50 = 0.1-1.0 mM) than COX-2 induced with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, relative to COX-1 or COX-2, diclofenac-induced enzyme activity shows significantly reduced sensitivity to inhibition by diclofenac or other competitively acting nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the enzyme activity is insensitive to aspirin. If the robust induction of COX-2 observed is responsible for diclofenac-induced COX enzyme activity, it is clear that COX-2 can, therefore, exist in two catalytically active states. A luciferase reporter-construct that contains part of the COX-2 structure and binds into the membrane showed that chronic diclofenac treatment of fibroblasts results in marked mobilization of the fusion protein. Such a mobilization could result in enzymatically distinct COX-2 populations in response to chronic diclofenac treatment. PMID:10077674

  1. New Insight into Isoprenoids Biosynthesis Process and Future Prospects for Drug Designing in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Gagandeep S.; Pala, Zarna R.; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The MEP (Methyl Erythritol Phosphate) isoprenoids biosynthesis pathway is an attractive drug target to combat malaria, due to its uniqueness and indispensability for the parasite. It is functional in the apicoplast of Plasmodium and its products get transported to the cytoplasm, where they participate in glycoprotein synthesis, electron transport chain, tRNA modification and several other biological processes. Several compounds have been tested against the enzymes involved in this pathway and amongst them Fosmidomycin, targeted against IspC (DXP reductoisomerase) enzyme and MMV008138 targeted against IspD enzyme have shown good anti-malarial activity in parasite cultures. Fosmidomycin is now-a-days prescribed clinically, however, less absorption, shorter half-life, and toxicity at higher doses, limits its use as an anti-malarial. The potential of other enzymes of the pathway as candidate drug targets has also been determined. This review details the various drug molecules tested against these targets with special emphasis to Plasmodium. We corroborate that MEP pathway functional within the apicoplast of Plasmodium is a major drug target, especially during erythrocytic stages. However, the major bottlenecks, bioavailability and toxicity of the new molecules needs to be addressed, before considering any new molecule as a potent antimalarial. PMID:27679614

  2. New Insight into Isoprenoids Biosynthesis Process and Future Prospects for Drug Designing in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Gagandeep S.; Pala, Zarna R.; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The MEP (Methyl Erythritol Phosphate) isoprenoids biosynthesis pathway is an attractive drug target to combat malaria, due to its uniqueness and indispensability for the parasite. It is functional in the apicoplast of Plasmodium and its products get transported to the cytoplasm, where they participate in glycoprotein synthesis, electron transport chain, tRNA modification and several other biological processes. Several compounds have been tested against the enzymes involved in this pathway and amongst them Fosmidomycin, targeted against IspC (DXP reductoisomerase) enzyme and MMV008138 targeted against IspD enzyme have shown good anti-malarial activity in parasite cultures. Fosmidomycin is now-a-days prescribed clinically, however, less absorption, shorter half-life, and toxicity at higher doses, limits its use as an anti-malarial. The potential of other enzymes of the pathway as candidate drug targets has also been determined. This review details the various drug molecules tested against these targets with special emphasis to Plasmodium. We corroborate that MEP pathway functional within the apicoplast of Plasmodium is a major drug target, especially during erythrocytic stages. However, the major bottlenecks, bioavailability and toxicity of the new molecules needs to be addressed, before considering any new molecule as a potent antimalarial.

  3. New Insight into Isoprenoids Biosynthesis Process and Future Prospects for Drug Designing in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Saggu, Gagandeep S; Pala, Zarna R; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The MEP (Methyl Erythritol Phosphate) isoprenoids biosynthesis pathway is an attractive drug target to combat malaria, due to its uniqueness and indispensability for the parasite. It is functional in the apicoplast of Plasmodium and its products get transported to the cytoplasm, where they participate in glycoprotein synthesis, electron transport chain, tRNA modification and several other biological processes. Several compounds have been tested against the enzymes involved in this pathway and amongst them Fosmidomycin, targeted against IspC (DXP reductoisomerase) enzyme and MMV008138 targeted against IspD enzyme have shown good anti-malarial activity in parasite cultures. Fosmidomycin is now-a-days prescribed clinically, however, less absorption, shorter half-life, and toxicity at higher doses, limits its use as an anti-malarial. The potential of other enzymes of the pathway as candidate drug targets has also been determined. This review details the various drug molecules tested against these targets with special emphasis to Plasmodium. We corroborate that MEP pathway functional within the apicoplast of Plasmodium is a major drug target, especially during erythrocytic stages. However, the major bottlenecks, bioavailability and toxicity of the new molecules needs to be addressed, before considering any new molecule as a potent antimalarial. PMID:27679614

  4. An implantable microdevice to perform high-throughput in vivo drug sensitivity testing in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Oliver; Landry, Heather M.; Fuller, Jason E.; Santini, John T.; Baselga, Jose; Tepper, Robert I.; Cima, Michael J.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Current anticancer chemotherapy relies on a limited set of in vitro or indirect prognostic markers of tumor response to available drugs. A more accurate analysis of drug sensitivity would involve studying tumor response in vivo. To this end, we have developed an implantable device that can perform drug sensitivity testing of several anticancer agents simultaneously inside the living tumor. The device contained reservoirs that released microdoses of single agents or drug combinations into spatially distinct regions of the tumor. The local drug concentrations were chosen to be representative of concentrations achieved during systemic treatment. Local efficacy and drug concentration profiles were evaluated for each drug or drug combination on the device, and the local efficacy was confirmed to be a predictor of systemic efficacy in vivo for multiple drugs and tumor models. Currently, up to 16 individual drugs or combinations can be assessed independently, without systemic drug exposure, through minimally invasive biopsy of a small region of a single tumor. This assay takes into consideration physiologic effects that contribute to drug response by allowing drugs to interact with the living tumor in its native microenvironment. Because these effects are crucial to predicting drug response, we envision that these devices will help identify optimal drug therapy before systemic treatment is initiated and could improve drug response prediction beyond the biomarkers and in vitro and ex vivo studies used today. These devices may also be used in clinical drug development to safely gather efficacy data on new compounds before pharmacological optimization. PMID:25904741

  5. An implantable microdevice to perform high-throughput in vivo drug sensitivity testing in tumors.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Landry, Heather M; Fuller, Jason E; Santini, John T; Baselga, Jose; Tepper, Robert I; Cima, Michael J; Langer, Robert

    2015-04-22

    Current anticancer chemotherapy relies on a limited set of in vitro or indirect prognostic markers of tumor response to available drugs. A more accurate analysis of drug sensitivity would involve studying tumor response in vivo. To this end, we have developed an implantable device that can perform drug sensitivity testing of several anticancer agents simultaneously inside the living tumor. The device contained reservoirs that released microdoses of single agents or drug combinations into spatially distinct regions of the tumor. The local drug concentrations were chosen to be representative of concentrations achieved during systemic treatment. Local efficacy and drug concentration profiles were evaluated for each drug or drug combination on the device, and the local efficacy was confirmed to be a predictor of systemic efficacy in vivo for multiple drugs and tumor models. Currently, up to 16 individual drugs or combinations can be assessed independently, without systemic drug exposure, through minimally invasive biopsy of a small region of a single tumor. This assay takes into consideration physiologic effects that contribute to drug response by allowing drugs to interact with the living tumor in its native microenvironment. Because these effects are crucial to predicting drug response, we envision that these devices will help identify optimal drug therapy before systemic treatment is initiated and could improve drug response prediction beyond the biomarkers and in vitro and ex vivo studies used today. These devices may also be used in clinical drug development to safely gather efficacy data on new compounds before pharmacological optimization. PMID:25904741

  6. Triclosan Derivatives: Towards Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlich, Joel S.; Wang, Feng; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gulten, Gulcin; Langley, Robert; Schiehser, Guy A.; Jacobus, David P.; Jacobs, Jr., William R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-06-30

    Isoniazid (INH) is a frontline antitubercular drug that inhibits the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA. Novel inhibitors of InhA that are not cross-resistant to INH represent a significant goal in antitubercular chemotherapy. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of a series of triclosan-based inhibitors is reported, including their promising efficacy against INH-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Triclosan has been previously shown to inhibit InhA, an essential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, the inhibition of which leads to the lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a structure-based drug design approach, a series of 5-substituted triclosan derivatives was developed. Two groups of derivatives with alkyl and aryl substituents, respectively, were identified with dramatically enhanced potency against purified InhA. The most efficacious inhibitor displayed an IC{sub 50} value of 21 nM, which was 50-fold more potent than triclosan. X-ray crystal structures of InhA in complex with four triclosan derivatives revealed the structural basis for the inhibitory activity. Six selected triclosan derivatives were tested against isoniazid-sensitive and resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Among those, the best inhibitor had an MIC value of 4.7 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (13 {mu}M), which represents a tenfold improvement over the bacteriocidal activity of triclosan. A subset of these triclosan analogues was more potent than isoniazid against two isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis strains, demonstrating the significant potential for structure-based design in the development of next generation antitubercular drugs.

  7. Comparison and validation of genomic predictors for anticancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; De Jay, Nicolas; Hachem, Nehme; Olsen, Catharina; Bontempi, Gianluca; Aerts, Hugo J W L; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Background An enduring challenge in personalized medicine lies in selecting the right drug for each individual patient. While testing of drugs on patients in large trials is the only way to assess their clinical efficacy and toxicity, we dramatically lack resources to test the hundreds of drugs currently under development. Therefore the use of preclinical model systems has been intensively investigated as this approach enables response to hundreds of drugs to be tested in multiple cell lines in parallel. Methods Two large-scale pharmacogenomic studies recently screened multiple anticancer drugs on over 1000 cell lines. We propose to combine these datasets to build and robustly validate genomic predictors of drug response. We compared five different approaches for building predictors of increasing complexity. We assessed their performance in cross-validation and in two large validation sets, one containing the same cell lines present in the training set and another dataset composed of cell lines that have never been used during the training phase. Results Sixteen drugs were found in common between the datasets. We were able to validate multivariate predictors for three out of the 16 tested drugs, namely irinotecan, PD-0325901, and PLX4720. Moreover, we observed that response to 17-AAG, an inhibitor of Hsp90, could be efficiently predicted by the expression level of a single gene, NQO1. Conclusion These results suggest that genomic predictors could be robustly validated for specific drugs. If successfully validated in patients’ tumor cells, and subsequently in clinical trials, they could act as companion tests for the corresponding drugs and play an important role in personalized medicine. PMID:23355484

  8. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Areas covered Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Expert opinion Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients. PMID:23930949

  9. Novel drug candidates for blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia from high-throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Pietarinen, P O; Pemovska, T; Kontro, M; Yadav, B; Mpindi, J P; Andersson, E I; Majumder, M M; Kuusanmäki, H; Koskenvesa, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Mustjoki, S; Porkka, K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML BC) remains a challenging disease to treat despite the introduction and advances in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. In this study we set out to identify novel candidate drugs for CML BC by using an unbiased high-throughput drug testing platform. We used three CML cell lines representing different types of CML blast phases (K562, EM-2 and MOLM-1) and primary leukemic cells from three CML BC patients. Profiling of drug responses was performed with a drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform comprising 295 anticancer agents. Overall, drug sensitivity scores and the drug response profiles of cell line and primary cell samples correlated well and were distinct from other types of leukemia samples. The cell lines were highly sensitive to TKIs and the clinically TKI-resistant patient samples were also resistant ex vivo. Comparison of cell line and patient sample data identified new candidate drugs for CML BC, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our results indicate that these drugs in particular warrant further evaluation by analyzing a larger set of primary patient samples. The results also pave way for designing rational combination therapies. PMID:25933373

  10. A framework for personalized medicine: prediction of drug sensitivity in cancer by proteomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of personalized medicine is to provide patients optimal drug screening and treatment based on individual genomic or proteomic profiles. Reverse-Phase Protein Array (RPPA) technology offers proteomic information of cancer patients which may be directly related to drug sensitivity. For cancer patients with different drug sensitivity, the proteomic profiling reveals important pathophysiologic information which can be used to predict chemotherapy responses. Results The goal of this paper is to present a framework for personalized medicine using both RPPA and drug sensitivity (drug resistance or intolerance). In the proposed personalized medicine system, the prediction of drug sensitivity is obtained by a proposed augmented naive Bayesian classifier (ANBC) whose edges between attributes are augmented in the network structure of naive Bayesian classifier. For discriminative structure learning of ANBC, local classification rate (LCR) is used to score augmented edges, and greedy search algorithm is used to find the discriminative structure that maximizes classification rate (CR). Once a classifier is trained by RPPA and drug sensitivity using cancer patient samples, the classifier is able to predict the drug sensitivity given RPPA information from a patient. Conclusion In this paper we proposed a framework for personalized medicine where a patient is profiled by RPPA and drug sensitivity is predicted by ANBC and LCR. Experimental results with lung cancer data demonstrate that RPPA can be used to profile patients for drug sensitivity prediction by Bayesian network classifier, and the proposed ANBC for personalized cancer medicine achieves better prediction accuracy than naive Bayes classifier in small sample size data on average and outperforms other the state-of-the-art classifier methods in terms of classification accuracy. PMID:22759571

  11. Drug Loading Capacity of Environmentally Sensitive Polymeric Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Ryan; Streletzky, Kiril; Bayachou, Mekki; Peiris, Pubudu

    2009-10-01

    Microgel nanoparticles consisting of cross-linked polymer hydroxypropyl cellulose chains have a temperature dependent volume phase transition, prompting the use of microgels for controlled drug transport. Drug particles aggregate in the slightly hydrophobic interior of microgels. Microgels are stored in equilibrium until the critical temperature (Tv) is reached and the volume phase transition limits available space, thus expelling the drugs. Our study was designed to test this property of microgels using amperometric electrochemical methods. A critical assumption was that small molecules inside microgels would not interact via diffusion with the electrode surface and thus total current would be decreased across the electrodes in a microgel sample. A room temperature (Troom) flow amperometric measurement comparing microgel/tylenol solution with control tylenol samples yielded about 20% tylenol concentration reduction of the microgel sample. Results from the steady state electrochemical experiment confirm the presence of about 20% tylenol concentration drop of the microgel sample compared to control sample at Troom. Using the steady-state experiment with a cyclic temperature ramp from Troom to beyond Tv showed that the tylenol concentration change between the temperature extremes was greater for the microgel solution than for the control solution.

  12. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

  13. A new approach for prediction of tumor sensitivity to targeted drugs based on functional data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The success of targeted anti-cancer drugs are frequently hindered by the lack of knowledge of the individual pathway of the patient and the extreme data requirements on the estimation of the personalized genetic network of the patient’s tumor. The prediction of tumor sensitivity to targeted drugs remains a major challenge in the design of optimal therapeutic strategies. The current sensitivity prediction approaches are primarily based on genetic characterizations of the tumor sample. We propose a novel sensitivity prediction approach based on functional perturbation data that incorporates the drug protein interaction information and sensitivities to a training set of drugs with known targets. Results We illustrate the high prediction accuracy of our framework on synthetic data generated from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and an experimental dataset of four canine osteosarcoma tumor cultures following application of 60 targeted small-molecule drugs. We achieve a low leave one out cross validation error of <10% for the canine osteosarcoma tumor cultures using a drug screen consisting of 60 targeted drugs. Conclusions The proposed framework provides a unique input-output based methodology to model a cancer pathway and predict the effectiveness of targeted anti-cancer drugs. This framework can be developed as a viable approach for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:23890326

  14. Discovery of drug-resistant and drug-sensitizing mutations in the oncogenic PI3K isoform p110α

    PubMed Central

    Zunder, Eli R.; Knight, Zachary A.; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Apsel, Beth; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary p110α (PIK3CA) is the most frequently mutated kinase in human cancer, and numerous drugs targeting this kinase are currently in pre-clinical development or early stage clinical trials. Clinical resistance to protein kinase inhibitors frequently results from point mutations that block drug binding; similar mutations in p110α are likely, but currently none have been reported. Using a S. cerevisiae screen against a structurally diverse panel of PI3K inhibitors, we have identified a potential hotspot for resistance mutations (I800), a drug-sensitizing mutation (L814C), and a surprising lack of resistance mutations at the “gatekeeper” residue. Our analysis further reveals that clinical resistance to these drugs may be attenuated by using multi-targeted inhibitors that simultaneously inhibit additional PI3K pathway members. Significance Point mutations that block drug binding are likely to be a major mechanism of clinical resistance to PI3K-targeted cancer therapy. Here we report resistance mutations in the oncogenic PI3K isoform p110α, as well as a drug-sensitizing mutation that will be useful for chemical genetic studies. This study anticipates p110α mutations that are likely to emerge against PI3K-targeted drugs, and identifies inhibitor classes that can overcome these resistance mutations. Our experiments in mammalian cells show that multi-targeted inhibitors with additional PI3K pathway targets are less susceptible to drug resistance than selective PI3K inhibitors. The screening protocol described here is applicable to several other drug targets that inhibit S. cerevisiae growth in addition to p110α. PMID:18691552

  15. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-01

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of a Pharmacokinetic Model of Vaginal Anti-HIV Microbicide Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Angela M; Gao, Yajing; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Cogan, Nicholas G; Katz, David F

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in parameter values in microbicide pharmacokinetics (PK) models confound the models' use in understanding the determinants of drug delivery and in designing and interpreting dosing and sampling in PK studies. A global sensitivity analysis (Sobol' indices) was performed for a compartmental model of the pharmacokinetics of gel delivery of tenofovir to the vaginal mucosa. The model's parameter space was explored to quantify model output sensitivities to parameters characterizing properties for the gel-drug product (volume, drug transport, initial loading) and host environment (thicknesses of the mucosal epithelium and stroma and the role of ambient vaginal fluid in diluting gel). Greatest sensitivities overall were to the initial drug concentration in gel, gel-epithelium partition coefficient for drug, and rate constant for gel dilution by vaginal fluid. Sensitivities for 3 PK measures of drug concentration values were somewhat different than those for the kinetic PK measure. Sensitivities in the stromal compartment (where tenofovir acts against host cells) and a simulated biopsy also depended on thicknesses of epithelium and stroma. This methodology and results here contribute an approach to help interpret uncertainties in measures of vaginal microbicide gel properties and their host environment. In turn, this will inform rational gel design and optimization. PMID:27012224

  17. Sensitization to petrolatum: an unusual cause of false-positive drug patch-tests.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, G; Schmutz, J L; Trechot, Ph; Commun, N; Barbaud, A

    2004-09-01

    We report on an unexpected sensitization to petrolatum diagnosed with the occurrence of multiple nonrelevant and false-positive drug patch-tests performed while investigating a patient suffering from many cutaneous adverse drug reactions. All the positive drug patch-tests were prepared with GILBERT vaseline. This petrolatum reaction is positive as it was tested with five other brands of petrolatums a few months later. As the same petrolatums, but from different batches were tested, patch-tests with GILBERT petrolatum were doubtful, while other petrolatums were positive. White petrolatum is a mixture of semisolid hydrocarbons of the methane series. The sensitizing impurities of petrolatum are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g. phenanthrene derivatives. The purity of petrolatum depends on both the petroleum stock and on the production and packaging methods. Even if rare, contact sensitization to petrolatum can disturb the interpretation of drug patch-tests. It is necessary in the interpretation of drug patch-tests to test both in petrolatum and other vehicles and with all the different petrolatums used in preparing the material for drug patch-tests. So, it is essential to advise the patients sensitized to petrolatum to remove all the topical drugs, such as all the cosmetics, which contain petrolatum in their formulation.

  18. An Ensemble Based Top Performing Approach for NCI-DREAM Drug Sensitivity Prediction Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qian; Pal, Ranadip

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting sensitivity of cancer cell lines to new drugs based on supervised learning on genomic profiles. The genetic and epigenetic characterization of a cell line provides observations on various aspects of regulation including DNA copy number variations, gene expression, DNA methylation and protein abundance. To extract relevant information from the various data types, we applied a random forest based approach to generate sensitivity predictions from each type of data and combined the predictions in a linear regression model to generate the final drug sensitivity prediction. Our approach when applied to the NCI-DREAM drug sensitivity prediction challenge was a top performer among 47 teams and produced high accuracy predictions. Our results show that the incorporation of multiple genomic characterizations lowered the mean and variance of the estimated bootstrap prediction error. We also applied our approach to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia database for sensitivity prediction and the ability to extract the top targets of an anti-cancer drug. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in predicting drug sensitivity from heterogeneous genomic datasets. PMID:24978814

  19. Drug Predictive Cues Activate Aversion-Sensitive Striatal Neurons That Encode Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel S.; Robble, Mykel A.; Hebron, Emily M.; Dupont, Matthew J.; Ebben, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  20. Drug predictive cues activate aversion-sensitive striatal neurons that encode drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Robble, Mykel A; Hebron, Emily M; Dupont, Matthew J; Ebben, Amanda L; Wheeler, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking.

  1. Drug predictive cues activate aversion-sensitive striatal neurons that encode drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Robble, Mykel A; Hebron, Emily M; Dupont, Matthew J; Ebben, Amanda L; Wheeler, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  2. Evaluation of the drug sensitivity and expression of 16 drug resistance-related genes in canine histiocytic sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    ASADA, Hajime; TOMIYASU, Hirotaka; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is an aggressive tumor type originating from histiocytic cell lineages. This disease is characterized by poor response to chemotherapy and short survival time. Therefore, it is of critical importance to identify and develop effective antitumor drugs against HS. The objectives of this study were to examine the drug sensitivities of 10 antitumor drugs. Using a real-time RT-PCR system, the mRNA expression levels of 16 genes related to drug resistance in 4 canine HS cell lines established from dogs with disseminated HS were determined and compared to 2 canine lymphoma cell lines (B-cell and T-cell). These 4 canine HS cell lines showed sensitivities toward microtubule inhibitors (vincristine, vinblastine and paclitaxel), comparable to those in the canine B-cell lymphoma cell line. Moreover, it was shown that P-gp in the HS cell lines used in this study did not have enough function to efflux its substrate. Sensitivities to melphalan, nimustine, methotrexate, cytarabine, doxorubicin and etoposide were lower in the 4 HS cell lines than in the 2 canine lymphoma cell lines. The data obtained in this study using cultured cell lines could prove helpful in the developing of advanced and effective chemotherapies for treating dogs that are suffering from HS. PMID:25715778

  3. Fluorescent graphene quantum dots as traceable, pH-sensitive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jichuan; Zhang, Ruibin; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Tang, Wei; Rivera Gil, Pilar; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were rationally fabricated as a traceable drug delivery system for the targeted, pH-sensitive delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug into cancer cells. The GQDs served as fluorescent carriers for a well-known anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox). The whole system has the capacity for simultaneous tracking of the carrier and of drug release. Dox release is triggered upon acidification of the intracellular vesicles, where the carriers are located after their uptake by cancer cells. Further functionalization of the loaded carriers with targeting moieties such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides enhanced their uptake by cancer cells. DU-145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines were used to evaluate the anticancer ability of Dox-loaded RGD-modified GQDs (Dox-RGD-GQDs). The results demonstrated the feasibility of using GQDs as traceable drug delivery systems with the ability for the pH-triggered delivery of drugs into target cells. PMID:26604747

  4. Integrating Domain Specific Knowledge and Network Analysis to Predict Drug Sensitivity of Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sebo; Sundaresan, Varsha; Zhou, Lei; Kahveci, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    One of fundamental challenges in cancer studies is that varying molecular characteristics of different tumor types may lead to resistance to certain drugs. As a result, the same drug can lead to significantly different results in different types of cancer thus emphasizing the need for individualized medicine. Individual prediction of drug response has great potential to aid in improving the clinical outcome and reduce the financial costs associated with prescribing chemotherapy drugs to which the patient's tumor might be resistant. In this paper we develop a network based classifier (NBC) method for predicting sensitivity of cell lines to anticancer drugs from transcriptome data. In the literature, this strategy has been used for predicting cancer types. Here, we extend it to estimate sensitivity of cells from different tumor types to various anticancer drugs. Furthermore, we incorporate domain specific knowledge such as the use of apoptotic gene list and clinical dose information in our method to impart biological significance to the prediction. Our experimental results suggest that our network based classifier (NBC) method outperforms existing classifiers in estimating sensitivity of cell lines for different drugs. PMID:27607242

  5. Integrating Domain Specific Knowledge and Network Analysis to Predict Drug Sensitivity of Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sebo; Sundaresan, Varsha; Zhou, Lei; Kahveci, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    One of fundamental challenges in cancer studies is that varying molecular characteristics of different tumor types may lead to resistance to certain drugs. As a result, the same drug can lead to significantly different results in different types of cancer thus emphasizing the need for individualized medicine. Individual prediction of drug response has great potential to aid in improving the clinical outcome and reduce the financial costs associated with prescribing chemotherapy drugs to which the patient’s tumor might be resistant. In this paper we develop a network based classifier (NBC) method for predicting sensitivity of cell lines to anticancer drugs from transcriptome data. In the literature, this strategy has been used for predicting cancer types. Here, we extend it to estimate sensitivity of cells from different tumor types to various anticancer drugs. Furthermore, we incorporate domain specific knowledge such as the use of apoptotic gene list and clinical dose information in our method to impart biological significance to the prediction. Our experimental results suggest that our network based classifier (NBC) method outperforms existing classifiers in estimating sensitivity of cell lines for different drugs. PMID:27607242

  6. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity of Human Leukaemic Myeloblasts

    PubMed Central

    FalcãO, R. P.; Sonis, S.; MacLennan, I. C. M.; Chassoux, D.; Davies, A. J. S.; Munro, T. R.

    1977-01-01

    The compound 125IUdR can be incorporated in a stable form into the DNA of cells. The isotope is released if labelled cells or their progeny die. Consequently the rate of 125I excretion from mice can be used to follow the fate of labelled cells in vivo. Using these principles we show: (1) Sufficient label can be incorporated in vitro into both fresh and cryopreserved human leukaemic myeloblasts, in non-toxic concentrations, to allow their survival in mice to be estimated by whole-body counting; (2) The release of isotope from labelled cells is sufficiently slow to offer reasonable expectation that this technique can be used for assessing the sensitivity of myeloblasts to cytotoxic agents in vivo (an application described in the second paper in this series, Sonis, Falcão and MacLennon, 1977); (3) The rate of 125Iexcretion from mice injected with myeloblasts from different donors varies. This probably reflects different rates of spontaneous death of injected myeloblasts; (4) Active rejection of myeloblasts starts within 48 h of their injection into mice; (5) Indirect evidence that phagocytic cells may be active agents in myeloblast destruction in mice; (6) Various methods of immunologically depriving mice were assessed to see if they would result in a useful increase in survival of injected human myeloblasts. We conclude that there is little advantage and some limitations in using mice thus deprived; (7) One of the agents used for immunological deprivation—silica powder—markedly decreased the rate of 125I loss from mice injected with labelled killed myeloblasts. This experience emphasizes the importance of including the killed-cell control in this assay. PMID:270372

  7. DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by N-myc in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai; Wang, Lin; Ke, Xiao-Xue; Gong, Xue-Yang; Wan, Jian-Hua; Hao, Xiang-Wei; Xu, Man; Xiang, Zonghuai; Cui, Zhao-Bo; Cui, Hongjuan

    2012-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumours in children (8-10% of all malignancies). Over 22% of cases have N-myc amplification associated with aggressively growing neuroblastomas. Oncogene-induced sensitization of cells to apoptosis is an important mechanism for suppression of tumorigenesis. Tumour suppressors often play a critical role in linking oncogenes to apoptotic machinery. For example, activated p53 then targets both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to promote apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Understanding of the involved mechanisms has important clinical implications. We have employed DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by oncogene N-myc as a model. DNA damaging drugs trigger high levels of p53, leading to caspase-9 activation in neuroblastoma cells. Inactivation of p53 protects cells from drug-triggered apoptosis sensitized by N-myc. These findings thus define a molecular pathway for mediating DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis sensitized by oncogene, and suggest that inactivation of p53 or other components of this apoptotic pathway may confer drug resistance in neuroblastoma cells. The data also suggests that inactivation of apoptotic pathways through co-operating oncogenes may be necessary for the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma with N-myc amplification.

  8. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  9. Malaria in South America: a drug discovery perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of controlling and eventually eradicating malaria means that new tools are urgently needed. South America’s role in this fight spans both ends of the research and development spectrum: both as a continent capable of discovering and developing new medicines, and also as a continent with significant numbers of malaria patients. This article reviews the contribution of groups in the South American continent to the research and development of new medicines over the last decade. Therefore, the current situation of research targeting malaria control and eradication is discussed, including endemicity, geographical distribution, treatment, drug-resistance and diagnosis. This sets the scene for a review of efforts within South America to discover and optimize compounds with anti-malarial activity. PMID:23706107

  10. Drug procurement, the Global Fund and misguided competition policies.

    PubMed

    Tren, Richard; Hess, Kimberly; Bate, Roger

    2009-12-22

    In an effort to increase competition and decrease price, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria recently began asking some grant recipients to use international competitive bidding processes for certain drug purchases. Unfortunately, for countries like Kenya, this request has caused more harm than good. After awarding the tender for its annual supply of the anti-malarial artemether-lumefantrine to the lowest bidder, Ajanta Pharma, Kenya experienced wide stock-outs in part due to the company's inability to supply the order in full and on time. Similar problems could arise in Uganda. Despite Kenya's experience, Uganda has awarded its next tender for artemether-lumefantrine to Ajanta Pharma. Uganda is already facing wide stock-outs and risks exacerbating an already dire situation the longer it takes to fulfil the procurement contract. A tender process based primarily on price cannot account for a company's ability to consistently supply sufficient product in time.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor 2 silencing restores taxol sensitivity in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone.

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Silencing Restores Taxol Sensitivity in Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J.; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone. PMID:24932685

  13. Ethnobotanical study of some Ghanaian anti-malarial plants.

    PubMed

    Asase, Alex; Oteng-Yeboah, Alfred A; Odamtten, George T; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2005-06-01

    An ethnobotanical study was conducted in the Wechiau Community Hippopotamus Sanctuary area in Ghana, through interviews and quadrate studies, to investigate the range and abundance of species used in the treatment of malaria. Forty-one species belonging to 17 families were encountered during the study. Of the 17 families studied Leguminosae and Anacardiaceae predominated in terms of number of species used to treat malaria. Eight plant species namely, Afraegle paniculata (Rutaceae), Haematostaphis barteri (Anacardiaceae), Indigo era pulchra (Leguminosae), Monanthotaxis sp. (Annonaceae), Ozoroa insignis (Anacardiaceae), Strychnos innocua (Loganiaceae), Strychnos spinosa (Loganiaceae) and Xeroderris stuhlmannii (Leguminosae) have not previously been documented for the treatment of malaria in Ghana. The results are discussed and recommendations made for future research to support the conservation and sustainable harvesting of the species reported to have medicinal properties. PMID:15894138

  14. Lactate as a Novel Quantitative Measure of Viability in Schistosoma mansoni Drug Sensitivity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie; Zöphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. PMID:25487803

  15. A Copula Based Approach for Design of Multivariate Random Forests for Drug Sensitivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Rahman, Raziur; Ghosh, Souparno; Pal, Ranadip

    2015-01-01

    Modeling sensitivity to drugs based on genetic characterizations is a significant challenge in the area of systems medicine. Ensemble based approaches such as Random Forests have been shown to perform well in both individual sensitivity prediction studies and team science based prediction challenges. However, Random Forests generate a deterministic predictive model for each drug based on the genetic characterization of the cell lines and ignores the relationship between different drug sensitivities during model generation. This application motivates the need for generation of multivariate ensemble learning techniques that can increase prediction accuracy and improve variable importance ranking by incorporating the relationships between different output responses. In this article, we propose a novel cost criterion that captures the dissimilarity in the output response structure between the training data and node samples as the difference in the two empirical copulas. We illustrate that copulas are suitable for capturing the multivariate structure of output responses independent of the marginal distributions and the copula based multivariate random forest framework can provide higher accuracy prediction and improved variable selection. The proposed framework has been validated on genomics of drug sensitivity for cancer and cancer cell line encyclopedia database. PMID:26658256

  16. Autocatalytic-Assisted Photorelease of a Sensitizer Drug Bound to a Silica Support

    PubMed Central

    Bartusik, Dorota; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghosh, Goutam; Greer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The photorelease of a sensitizer from a fluorinated silica surface occurs by a reaction of singlet oxygen with the vinyl ether bond linking with scission of a dioxetane intermediate. Irradiation of the released sensitizer generates singlet oxygen, which accelerates the release of more sensitizer via an autocatalytic reaction. Sigmoidal behavior of sensitizer release in n-butanol and n-octanol occurs at the optimal temperature of 20 °C. The photorelease efficiency was reduced at low temperatures, where the sensitizer was retained on the surface due to a long-lived dioxetane with inefficient scission; and also reduced at high temperatures, due to a slower reaction of 1O2 with the vinyl ether bond. Immediate acceleration is a result of released sensitizer being used as a dopant to eliminate the induction step further implicating an autocatalytic mechanism. However, the sigmoidal sensitizer release was not correlated to solvent viscosity, heat or light from the dioxetane decomposition, or to minor O2 solubility enhancements caused by the fluorinated silica. The mechanistic information collected here can be used to help control the pace of drug release; however, it remains to be seen whether an autocatalytic-based drug delivery system has an advantage to those with non-sigmoidal kinetics. PMID:23899089

  17. Polypyrrole nanoparticles for tunable, pH-sensitive and sustained drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Meiser, Jana L.; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-05-01

    We report the development of a generalized pH-sensitive drug delivery system that can release any charged drug preferentially at the pH range of interest. Our system is based on polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPy NPs), synthesized via a simple one-step microemulsion technique. These nanoparticles are highly monodisperse, stable in solution over the period of a month, and have good drug loading capacity (~15 wt%). We show that PPy NPs can be tuned to release drugs at both acidic and basic pH by varying the pH, the charge of the drug, as well as by adding small amounts of charged amphiphiles. Moreover, these NPs may be delivered locally by immobilizing them in a hydrogel. Our studies show encapsulation within a calcium alginate hydrogel results in sustained release of the incorporated drug for more than 21 days. Such a nanoparticle-hydrogel composite drug delivery system is promising for treatment of long-lasting conditions such as cancer and chronic pain which require controlled, localized, and sustained drug release.

  18. A community effort to assess and improve drug sensitivity prediction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Costello, James C; Heiser, Laura M; Georgii, Elisabeth; Gönen, Mehmet; Menden, Michael P; Wang, Nicholas J; Bansal, Mukesh; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Hintsanen, Petteri; Khan, Suleiman A; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Honkela, Antti; Aittokallio, Tero; Wennerberg, Krister; Collins, James J; Gallahan, Dan; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kaski, Samuel; Gray, Joe W; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    Predicting the best treatment strategy from genomic information is a core goal of precision medicine. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on a cohort of genomic, epigenomic and proteomic profiling data sets measured in human breast cancer cell lines. Through a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) project, we analyzed a total of 44 drug sensitivity prediction algorithms. The top-performing approaches modeled nonlinear relationships and incorporated biological pathway information. We found that gene expression microarrays consistently provided the best predictive power of the individual profiling data sets; however, performance was increased by including multiple, independent data sets. We discuss the innovations underlying the top-performing methodology, Bayesian multitask MKL, and we provide detailed descriptions of all methods. This study establishes benchmarks for drug sensitivity prediction and identifies approaches that can be leveraged for the development of new methods.

  19. A community effort to assess and improve drug sensitivity prediction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Costello, James C; Heiser, Laura M; Georgii, Elisabeth; Gönen, Mehmet; Menden, Michael P; Wang, Nicholas J; Bansal, Mukesh; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Hintsanen, Petteri; Khan, Suleiman A; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Honkela, Antti; Aittokallio, Tero; Wennerberg, Krister; Collins, James J; Gallahan, Dan; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kaski, Samuel; Gray, Joe W; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the best treatment strategy from genomic information is a core goal of precision medicine. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on a cohort of genomic, epigenomic and proteomic profiling data sets measured in human breast cancer cell lines. Through a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) project, we analyzed a total of 44 drug sensitivity prediction algorithms. The top-performing approaches modeled nonlinear relationships and incorporated biological pathway information. We found that gene expression microarrays consistently provided the best predictive power of the individual profiling data sets; however, performance was increased by including multiple, independent data sets. We discuss the innovations underlying the top-performing methodology, Bayesian multitask MKL, and we provide detailed descriptions of all methods. This study establishes benchmarks for drug sensitivity prediction and identifies approaches that can be leveraged for the development of new methods. PMID:24880487

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of sensitizer drug photorelease chemistry: Micro-optic method applied to singlet oxygen generation and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Goutam

    This thesis summarizes a new micro-optic method for singlet oxygen generation and sensitizer drug delivery, which include i) synthesis and evaluation of a first generation device for drug delivery from native and fluorinated silica probe tips, ii) synthesis of PEG conjugated sensitizers to study phototoxicity in ovarian cancer cells, and iii) synthesis and evaluation of tris-PEGylated chlorin conjugated fluorinated silica for its future integration into the device to use as a 2nd generation device. A first generation micro-optic device was developed that works by sparging O2 gas and light generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen that cleaves the covalently attached drug (sensitizer) from the probe tip at the distal end of the fiber. The aim is to develop a 1st and 2nd generation device for site specific delivery of photosensitizer and singlet oxygen to overcome the challenges involved in systemic administration of the sensitizer. Synthesis and evaluation of drug (pheophorbide-a) delivery applying micro-optic method from native and fluorinated silica probe tip was achieved. The amount of sensitizer photocleavage depends on the loading level of sensitizer onto the probe tips. We also found that photorelease efficiency depends on the nature of the solvents where sensitizer is photocleaved. For example, no photorelease was observed in an aqueous solvent where sensitizer remained adsorbed to the native silica probe-tip. But, 90% photocleavage was obtained in octanol. A significant amount of photosensitizer (formate ester of pyropheophorbide- a) diffused into the liposome when photocleavage study was carried out in liposome. Substantial increase of photorelease was observed in organic solvent when pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) sensitizer was attached to the partially fluorinated porous Vycor glass. We also explored sensitizer photorelease from the fluorinated silica surface at various temperatures and we found that autocatalytic photorelease happened at room temperature and above

  1. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil; Yoon, Sungpil

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  2. pH-sensitive, polymer modified, plasma stable niosomes: promising carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tila, Dena; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyede Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Arami, Sanam; Pourmoazzen, Zhaleh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of a novel plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomal formulation of Mitoxantrone by a modified ethanol injection method. Cholesterol hemisuccinate was added instead of cholesterol in order to produce pH-sensitivity property and using PEG-Poly (monomethyl itaconate)-CholC6 (PEG-PMMI-CholC6) copolymer introduced simultaneously pH-sensitivity and plasma stability properties in prepared niosomes. The pH-sensitivity and cytotoxicity of Mitoxantrone niosomes were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffer with different pHs as well as using human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3), human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results showed that both cholesterol derivatives bearing formulations had pH-sensitive property and were found to release their contents under mild acidic conditions rapidly. In addition, the PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based niosomes could reserve the pH-sensitivity after incubation in plasma. Both Mitoxantrone-loaded pH-sensitive niosomes showed higher cytotoxicity than the conventional niosomes on OVCAR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. However, both pH-sensitive niosomes exhibited lower cytotoxic effect on HUVEC cell line. Plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomes could improve the cytotoxic effect and reduce the side effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26417350

  3. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  4. Variability in initial nicotine sensitivity due to sex, history of other drug use, and parental smoking.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Coddington, Sarah B; Karelitz, Joshua L; Jetton, Christopher; Scott, John A; Wilson, Annette S; Lerman, Caryn

    2009-01-01

    Initial sensitivity to nicotine's effects during early exposure to tobacco may relate to dependence vulnerability. We examined the association of initial nicotine sensitivity with individual difference factors of sex, other drug use history (i.e. cross-tolerance or cross-sensitization), and parental smoking status in young adult nonsmokers (N=131). Participants engaged in 4 sessions, the first 3 to assess the dose-response effects of nasal spray nicotine (0, 5, 10 microg/kg) on rewarding, mood, physiological, sensory processing, and performance effects, and the fourth to assess nicotine reinforcement using a choice procedure. Men had greater initial sensitivity than women to some self-reported effects of nicotine related to reward and incentive salience and to impairment in sensory processing, but men and women did not differ on most other effects. Prior marijuana use was associated with greater nicotine reward, nicotine reinforcement was greater in men versus women among those with prior marijuana use, and having parents who smoked was related to increased incentive salience. However, history of other drug use and parental smoking were not otherwise associated with initial nicotine sensitivity. These findings warrant replication with other methods of nicotine administration, especially cigarette smoking, and in more diverse samples of subjects naïve to nicotine. Yet, they suggest that sex differences in initial sensitivity to nicotine reward occur before the onset of dependence. They also suggest that parental smoking may not increase risk of nicotine dependence in offspring by altering initial nicotine sensitivity, and that cross-tolerance between other drugs and nicotine may not be robust in humans. PMID:18775605

  5. Curcumin loaded pH-sensitive hybrid lipid/block copolymer nanosized drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jelezova, Ivelina; Drakalska, Elena; Momekova, Denitsa; Shalimova, Natalia; Momekov, Georgi; Konstantinov, Spiro; Rangelov, Stanislav; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-10-12

    Curcumin is a perspective drug candidate with pleiotropic antineoplastic activity, whose exceptionally low aqueous solubility and poor pharmacokinetic properties have hampered its development beyond the preclinical level. A possible approach to overcome these limitations is the encapsulation of curcumin into nano-carriers, incl. liposomes. The present contribution is focused on feasibility of using hybrid pH-sensitive liposomes, whereby curcumin is entrapped as a free drug and as a water soluble inclusion complex with PEGylated tert-butylcalix[4]arene, which allows the drug to occupy both the phospholipid membranes and the aqueous core of liposomes. The inclusion complexes were encapsulated in dipalmithoylphosphathydilcholine:cholesterol liposomes, whose membranes were grafted with a poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) diblock copolymer to confer pH-sensitivity. The liposomes were characterized by DLS, ζ-potential measurements, cryo-TEM, curcumin encapsulation efficacy, loading capacity, and in vitro release as a function of pH. Free and formulated curcumin were further investigated for cytotoxicity, apoptosis-induction and caspase-8, and 9 activation in chemosensitive HL-60 and its resistant sublines HL-60/Dox and HL-60/CDDP. Formulated curcumin was superior cytotoxic and apoptogenic agent vs. the free drug. The mechanistic assay demonstrated that the potent proapoptotic effects of pH-sensitive liposomal curcumin presumably mediated via recruitment of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in both HL-60 and HL-60/CDDP cells.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of Thermo-Sensitive, Magnetic Fluorescent Nanocomposite as Trifunctional Drug Delivery Carrier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Binhua; Wu, Juan; Xu, Shanshan; Tian, Renbing

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-sensitive magnetic fluorescent trifunctional nanocomposite (Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM) has been synthesized via a facile route. The obtained biocompatible nanocomposite was composed of monodisperse heterostructural Fe₃O₄/ZnS core and a thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) shell. Fe₃O₄/ZnS acted as magnetic response and fluorescence luminous body, PNIPAM acted as drug loaded platform which can adsorb and release drug controllably. Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM was characterized and all of the results showed that it had excellent magnetic response, photostability and thermo-sensitivity. Moreover, the drug release studies in vitro showed that the release rate increased with increasing temperature. MTT assays in model HepG2 cells demonstrated that Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM was practically non-toxic. Thus, our results revealed that Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM would be used in biomedical fields such as targeted drug delivery, as well as cancer diagnosis and treatment in the nearly future. PMID:27398451

  7. Multi-wavelength pulse plethysmography for real-time drug delivery monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pratik; Magaña, Isidro B.; O'Neal, Patrick D.

    2014-02-01

    A novel multi-wavelength photoplethysmograph (PPG), previously utilized to quantify optically absorptive circulating gold nanoparticles, has demonstrated the potential to enhance therapeutic treatment predictability as pharmacokinetic metrics are provided throughout the intravenous delivery phase of quinine in real-time. This report demonstrates how the PPG could be used to assess the real-time bioavailability of other types of intravenously delivered optically-absorbing nanoparticles and drugs. The drug currently under investigation is anti-malarial quinine (absorption peak ~350 nm). We describe how the algorithm has been adapted to quantify the concentration of quinine in the pulsatile, circulating blood based on its extinction at three wavelengths (340, 660 and 940 nm). We show an example of the system collecting data representing the baseline, injection, and the clearance phases. An examination of the raw signal suggests that the system is well suited to sense the concentration of quinine in the therapeutic range (10mg/kg).

  8. Energy metabolism determines the sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanide drugs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Ling-Chia; Hsia, Cheng-Yuan; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chi, Chin-Wen; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide particularly in Asia. Deregulation of cellular energetics was recently included as one of the cancer hallmarks. Compounds that target the mitochondria in cancer cells were proposed to have therapeutic potential. Biguanide drugs which inhibit mitochondrial complex I and repress mTOR signaling are clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM) and were recently found to reduce the risk of HCC in T2DM patients. However, whether alteration of energy metabolism is involved in regulating the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs is still unclear. In the present study, we treated four HCC cell lines with mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and oligomycin) and biguanide drugs (metformin and phenformin), and found that the HCC cells which had a higher mitochondrial respiration rate were more sensitive to these treatments; whereas the HCC cells which exhibited higher glycolysis were more resistant. When glucose was replaced by galactose in the medium, the altered energy metabolism from glycolysis to mitochondrial respiration in the HCC cells enhanced the cellular sensitivity to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. The energy metabolism change enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, mTOR repression and downregulation of cyclin D1 and Mcl-1 in response to the mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism upregulates the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs. Enhancing the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in combination with biguanide drugs may be a therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  9. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  10. Discovery of New Monocarbonyl Ligustrazine-Curcumin Hybrids for Intervention of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yong; Zhu, Bin; Ren, Caiping; Kang, Fenghua; Li, Jinlong; Huang, Zhangjian; Lai, Yisheng; Peng, Sixun; Ding, Ke; Tian, Jide; Zhang, Yihua

    2016-03-10

    The elevation of oxidative stress preferentially in cancer cells by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and/or enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has emerged as an effective strategy for selectively targeting cancer cells. In this study, we designed and synthesized 21 ligustrazine-curcumin hybrids (10a-u). Biological evaluation indicated that the most active compound 10d significantly inhibited the proliferation of drug-sensitive (A549, SPC-A-1, LTEP-G-2) and drug-resistant (A549/DDP) lung cancer cells but had little effect on nontumor lung epithelial-like cells (HBE). Furthermore, 10d suppressed the TrxR/Trx system and promoted intracellular ROS accumulation and cancer cell apoptosis. Additionally, 10d inhibited the NF-κB, AKT, and ERK signaling, P-gp-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123, P-gp ATPase activity, and P-gp expression in A549/DDP cells. Finally, 10d repressed the growth of implanted human drug-resistant lung cancer in mice. Together, 10d acts a novel TrxR inhibitor and may be a promising candidate for intervention of lung cancer. PMID:26891099

  11. Effects of X-shaped reduction-sensitive amphiphilic block copolymer on drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haijun; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of X-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers on delivery of docetaxel (DTX) and the reduction-sensitive property on drug release, a novel reduction-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer, (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 with a Gemini-like X-shape, was successfully synthesized. The formation of nanomicelles was proved with respect to the blue shift of the emission fluorescence as well as the fluorescent intensity increase of coumarin 6-loaded particles. The X-shaped polymers exhibited a smaller critical micelle concentration value and possessed higher micellar stability in comparison with those of linear ones. The size of X-shaped (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 polymer nanomicelles (XNMs) was much smaller than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. The reduction sensitivity of polymers was confirmed by the increase of micellar sizes as well as the in vitro drug release profile of DTX-loaded XNMs (DTX/XNMs). Cytotoxicity assays in vitro revealed that the blank XNMs were nontoxic against A2780 cells up to a concentration of 50 µg/mL, displaying good biocompatibility. DTX/XNMs were more toxic against A2780 cells than other formulations in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Cellular uptake assay displayed a higher intracellular drug delivery efficiency of XNMs than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. Besides, the promotion of tubulin polymerization induced by DTX was visualized by immunofluorescence analysis, and the acceleration of apoptotic process against A2780 cells was also imaged using a fluorescent staining method. Therefore, this X-shaped reduction-sensitive (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 copolymer could effectively improve the micellar stability and significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DTX by increasing the cellular uptake and selectively accelerating the drug release inside cancer cells. PMID:26346880

  12. Effects of X-shaped reduction-sensitive amphiphilic block copolymer on drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haijun; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of X-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers on delivery of docetaxel (DTX) and the reduction-sensitive property on drug release, a novel reduction-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer, (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 with a Gemini-like X-shape, was successfully synthesized. The formation of nanomicelles was proved with respect to the blue shift of the emission fluorescence as well as the fluorescent intensity increase of coumarin 6-loaded particles. The X-shaped polymers exhibited a smaller critical micelle concentration value and possessed higher micellar stability in comparison with those of linear ones. The size of X-shaped (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 polymer nanomicelles (XNMs) was much smaller than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. The reduction sensitivity of polymers was confirmed by the increase of micellar sizes as well as the in vitro drug release profile of DTX-loaded XNMs (DTX/XNMs). Cytotoxicity assays in vitro revealed that the blank XNMs were nontoxic against A2780 cells up to a concentration of 50 µg/mL, displaying good biocompatibility. DTX/XNMs were more toxic against A2780 cells than other formulations in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Cellular uptake assay displayed a higher intracellular drug delivery efficiency of XNMs than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. Besides, the promotion of tubulin polymerization induced by DTX was visualized by immunofluorescence analysis, and the acceleration of apoptotic process against A2780 cells was also imaged using a fluorescent staining method. Therefore, this X-shaped reduction-sensitive (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 copolymer could effectively improve the micellar stability and significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DTX by increasing the cellular uptake and selectively accelerating the drug release inside cancer cells. PMID:26346880

  13. Development of an in vitro drug sensitivity assay based on newly excysted larvae of Echinostoma caproni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Echinostomiasis is one of the major food-borne trematodiases and the species Echinostoma caproni serves as a useful model for trematocidal drug discovery. The current in vitro drug sensitivity assay uses adult E. caproni worms that are incubated with candidate drugs and scored microscopically for viability at 72 hrs. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of newly excysted larvae (NEL) of E. caproni for in vitro drug testing, which would be faster, more cost effective and more ethical compared to adult worm assays. Methods Larvae were obtained by collecting metacercariae from snails and triggering their excystation using the trypsin-bile salt excystation method. Studies concerning various parameters of this chemical transformation process as well as appropriate NEL culturing conditions were carried out and findings evaluated. NEL and adult worms were incubated with praziquantel, tribendimidine, albendazole and quinine and evaluated microscopically 72 hrs post-incubation. In addition, the colorimetric markers resazurin, CellTiter-Glo® and Vybrant® were tested as an alternative assay read-out method. Results The chemical excystation method successfully induced E. caproni metacercariae to excyst at a rate of about 20-60%. NEL remained viable in culture medium for 5–7 days. The results of an in vitro drug assay using NEL mirrored the results of an assay using adult worms incubated with the same drugs. None of the markers could reliably produce signals proportional to NEL viability or cytotoxicity without significant complications. Conclusion NEL are adequate for in vitro drug testing. Challenges remain in further improving the excystation yield and the practicability of the assay setup. Resolving these issues could also improve read-outs using colorimetric markers. Using NEL is in alignment with the 3 R rules of the ethical use of laboratory animals and can greatly increase the rate and affordability with which drugs are screened in vitro

  14. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  15. Controlled drug-release system based on pH-sensitive chloride-triggerable liposomes.

    PubMed

    Wehunt, Mark P; Winschel, Christine A; Khan, Ali K; Guo, Tai L; Abdrakhmanova, Galya R; Sidorov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    New pH-sensitive lipids were synthesized and utilized in formulations of liposomes suitable for controlled drug release. These liposomes contain various amounts of NaCl in the internal aqueous compartments. The release of the drug model is triggered by an application of HCl cotransporter and exogenous physiologically relevant NaCl solution. HCl cotransporter allows an uptake of HCl by liposomes to the extent of their being proportional to the transmembrane Cl(-) gradient. Therefore, each set of liposomes undergoes internal acidification, which, ultimately, leads to the hydrolysis of the pH-sensitive lipids and content release at the desired time. The developed system releases the drug model in a stepwise fashion, with the release stages separated by periods of low activity. These liposomes were found to be insensitive to physiological concentrations of human serum albumin and to be nontoxic to cells at concentrations exceeding pharmacological relevance. These results render this new drug-release model potentially suitable for in vivo applications.

  16. Enzastaurin inhibits tumours sensitive and resistant to anti-EGFR drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gelardi, T; Caputo, R; Damiano, V; Daniele, G; Pepe, S; Ciardiello, F; Lahn, M; Bianco, R; Tortora, G

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the antitumour effect and ability to overcome the resistance to anti-EGFR drugs of enzastaurin, an inhibitor of VEGFR-dependent PKCβ signalling. Enzastaurin was evaluated alone and in combination with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib, on growth and signalling protein expression in human cancer cells sensitive and resistant to anti-EGFR drugs, both in vitro and in nude mice. We demonstrated the marked inhibitory activity of enzastaurin against GEO colon and PC3 prostate cancer cells and their gefitinib-resistant counterparts GEO-GR and PC3-GR, accompanied by inhibition of pAkt and its effector pp70S6K, pGSK3β and VEGF expression and secretion. Moreover, enzastaurin showed a cooperative effect with gefitinib in parental and in gefitinib-resistant cells. Remarkably, these results were confirmed in vivo, where enzastaurin showed antitumour activity and cooperativity with gefitinib in mice grafted with GEO and GEO-GR tumours, incrementing their median survival and inhibiting the aforesaid protein expression and secretion in tumour specimens. In conclusion, enzastaurin by interfering with signalling proteins implicated in EGFR drug resistance markedly cooperates with gefitinib in sensitive and gefitinib-resistant tumours, thus overcoming and reverting such resistance and providing a rational basis for its development in patients resistant to anti-EGFR drugs. PMID:18665191

  17. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Since the Physicians start use of antibiotics long ago with un-notice drug resistance. However actual problem was recognized about 85 years ago. Antibiotic resistant and Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains are at rise throughout the world. It is physicians and researchers to take scientific research based appropriate action to overcome this ever-spreading problem. This study is designed to find out sensitive (S), resistant (R) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumanii strain along with other isolates in the resident patients of Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is excluded from other gram-negative organisms isolated from different sites as it will be dealt separately. This study is based in was retrospective observations designed to collect data of different stains of Acinetobacter baumanii with reference to their Sensitivity (S), Resistance (R), Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) along with other Gram negative isolated from different sites (from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2011) at King Abdulaziz Hospital located Eastern Region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). All necessary techniques were used to culture and perform sensitivity of these isolates. There were 4532 isolates out of which 3018 (67%) were from patients. Out of Acinetobacter baumanii infected were 906 (20%) while other 3626 (80%) isolates were miscellaneous. Numbers of patients or cases were 480 (53%) out of 906 isolates and numbers of patients or cases in other organisms were 2538 (70%) out of 3626 isolates. Acinetobacter baumanii infected patients 221 (46%) were male and 259 (54%) were female and the male and female ratio of 1:1.2. In other organisms this male female ratio was almost same. There was steady rise in number of patients and the hence the isolates from 2004 to 2011. Majority of the bacterial strains were isolated as single organism but some were isolated as double or triple or quadruple or more organisms from different sites. Sensitive, Resistant and

  18. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Himani; Prashanth Kumar, B N; Konar, Suraj; Tantubay, Sangeeta; Kr Mahto, Madhusudan; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~48 nm and 206.51 m(2)/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin. PMID:26706510

  19. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Himani; Prashanth Kumar, B N; Konar, Suraj; Tantubay, Sangeeta; Kr Mahto, Madhusudan; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~48 nm and 206.51 m(2)/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin.

  20. Spontaneous temperature-sensitive Pluronic(®) based niosomes: Triggered drug release using mild hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Lorena; Oliviero Rossi, Cesare; Picci, Nevio; Muzzalupo, Rita

    2016-09-25

    Inclusion of lipids or polymers with a transition temperature closer to physiological body temperature (40-42°C) is a strategy used in tumor therapy for more than 30 years, because it allows induction of drug release from delivery systems by mild hyperthermia. Unfortunately, most of these thermo-sensitive carriers are removed from circulation before completion of their function. Thus, novel multi-functional niosomes possessing spontaneous stealth and thermo-sensitive properties were developed from L64 Pluronic(®) and L64ox as its derivative, in presence or absence of cholesterol. The use of L64 both as amphiphilic constituent and thermo-sensitive molecule, gave the possibility to bypass the use of additional excipients and increased the system biocompatibility. Niosomes diameter ranged from 400 to 750nm and were long term stable. Calcein and 5-FU possess great affinity to niosomal matrices rich in PEO groups. Negative Z-potential values were attributed to the negative charges onto the niosomes surface and generally change according to the temperature. The in vitro drugs release studies were performed at 25°C, 37°C and 42°C, that are representative of certain conditions (storage, physiological condition and mild hyperthermia, respectively). Results showed that L64-based niosomes possess spontaneous thermo-sensitive properties: drugs releases were found to be more pronounced at 42°C. These early results are a promising first step for the development of multi-functional devices that combine several advantages such as stealth properties and temperature controllability at the desired location and time, for a more specific and efficient pharmacological therapy. PMID:27484834

  1. Maspin Expression in Prostate Tumor Cells Averts Stemness and Stratifies Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, M. Margarida; Kaplun, Alexander; Dzinic, Sijana H.; Li, Xiaohua; Irish, Jonathan; Mujagic, Adelina; Jakupovic, Benjamin; Back, Jessica B.; Van Buren, Eric; Han, Xiang; Dean, Ivory; Chen, Yong Q.; Heath, Elisabeth; Sakr, Wael; Sheng, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Future curative cancer chemotherapies have to overcome tumor cell heterogeneity and plasticity. To test the hypothesis that the tumor suppressor maspin may reduce microenvironment-dependent prostate tumor cell plasticity and thereby modulate drug sensitivity, we established a new schematic combination of 2D, 3D and suspension cultures to enrich prostate cancer cell subpopulations with distinct differentiation potentials. We report here that, depending on the level of maspin expression, tumor cells in suspension and 3D collagen I manifest the phenotypes of stem-like and dormant tumor cell populations, respectively. In suspension, the surviving maspin-expressing tumor cells lost the self-renewal capacity, underwent senescence, lost the ability to dedifferentiate in vitro and failed to generate tumors in vivo. Maspin-nonexpressing tumor cells that survived the suspension culture in compact tumorspheres, displayed a higher level of stem cell marker expression, maintained the self-renewal capacity, formed tumorspheres in 3D matrices in vitro and were tumorigenic in vivo. The drug sensitivities of the distinct cell subpopulations depend on the drug target and the differentiation state of the cells. In 2D, Docetaxel, MS275 and Salinomycin were all cytotoxic. In suspension, while MS275 and Salinomycin were toxic, Docetaxel showed no effect. Interestingly, cells adapted to 3D collagen I were only responsive to Salinomycin. Maspin expression correlated with higher sensitivity to MS275 in both 2D and suspension, and to Salinomycin in 2D and 3D collagen I. Our data suggest that maspin reduces prostate tumor cell plasticity, and enhances tumor sensitivity to Salinomycin which may hold promise in overcoming tumor cell heterogeneity and plasticity. PMID:26208903

  2. pH-sensitive micelles for targeted drug delivery prepared using a novel membrane contactor method.

    PubMed

    Laouini, Abdallah; Koutroumanis, Konstantinos P; Charcosset, Catherine; Georgiadou, Stella; Fessi, Hatem; Holdich, Richard G; Vladisavljević, Goran T

    2013-09-25

    A novel membrane contactor method was used to produce size-controlled poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polycaprolactone (PEG-PCL) copolymer micelles composed of diblock copolymers with different average molecular weights, Mn (9200 or 10,400 Da) and hydrophilic fractions, f (0.67 or 0.59). By injecting 570 L m(-2) h(-1) of the organic phase (a 1 mg mL(-1) solution of PEG-PCL in tetrahydrofuran) through a microengineered nickel membrane with a hexagonal pore array and 200 μm pore spacing into deionized water agitated at 700 rpm, the micelle size linearly increased from 92 nm for a 5-μm pore size to 165 nm for a 40-μm pore size. The micelle size was finely tuned by the agitation rate, transmembrane flux and aqueous to organic phase ratio. An encapsulation efficiency of 89% and a drug loading of ~75% (w/w) were achieved when a hydrophobic drug (vitamin E) was entrapped within the micelles, as determined by ultracentrifugation method. The drug-loaded micelles had a mean size of 146 ± 7 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.09 ± 0.01, and a ζ potential of -19.5 ± 0.2 mV. When drug-loaded micelles where stored for 50 h, a pH sensitive drug release was achieved and a maximum amount of vitamin E (23%) was released at the pH of 1.9. When a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond was incorporated between PEG and PCL blocks, no significant change in micelle size was observed at the same micellization conditions.

  3. Polydopamine-based surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Danfeng; Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Gan; Chen, Yuhan; Wang, Teng; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    A novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which were modified by polydopamine (PDA) for controlled release of cationic amphiphilic drug desipramine (DES) was prepared. MSNs-DES-PDA were characterized in terms of size, size distribution, surface morphology, BET surface area, mesoporous size and pore volume, drug loading content and in vitro drug release profile. MSNs-DES-PDA had high drug loading content and pH sensitivity. The DES release profiles of MSNs-DES and MSNs-DES-PDA were totally different, and the drug release of MSNs-DES-PDA accelerated with increasing acidity. MSNs-DES-PDA can be internalized into cells. In vitro experiments demonstrated that MSNs-DES-PDA had higher cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects on acid sphingomyelinase than those of free DES. This drug delivery system was beneficial for controlled release and cancer therapy.

  4. The wisdom of crowds and the repurposing of artesunate as an anticancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Yolanda; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kumar, Devinder; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic and water-soluble artemisinin-derivative used as an anti-malarial agent, has attracted the attention of cancer researchers due to a broad range of anti-cancer activity including anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory and treatment-sensitisation effects. In addition to pre-clinical evidence in a range of cancers, a recently completed randomised blinded trial in colorectal cancer has provided a positive signal for further clinical investigation. Used perioperatively artesunate appears to reduce the rate of disease recurrence - and the Neo-Art trial, a larger Phase II RCT, is seeking to confirm this positive effect. However, artesunate is a generic medication, and as with other trials of repurposed drugs, the Neo-Art trial does not have commercial sponsorship. In an innovative move, the trial is seeking funds directly from members of the public via a crowd-funding strategy that may have resonance beyond this single trial. PMID:26557887

  5. The wisdom of crowds and the repurposing of artesunate as an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Yolanda; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kumar, Devinder; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic and water-soluble artemisinin-derivative used as an anti-malarial agent, has attracted the attention of cancer researchers due to a broad range of anti-cancer activity including anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory and treatment-sensitisation effects. In addition to pre-clinical evidence in a range of cancers, a recently completed randomised blinded trial in colorectal cancer has provided a positive signal for further clinical investigation. Used perioperatively artesunate appears to reduce the rate of disease recurrence - and the Neo-Art trial, a larger Phase II RCT, is seeking to confirm this positive effect. However, artesunate is a generic medication, and as with other trials of repurposed drugs, the Neo-Art trial does not have commercial sponsorship. In an innovative move, the trial is seeking funds directly from members of the public via a crowd-funding strategy that may have resonance beyond this single trial.

  6. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA.

  7. Overexpression of the human HAP1 protein sensitizes cells to the lethal effect of bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Alamo, M J; Laval, F

    1999-03-01

    Abasic sites (AP sites) are generated in DNA either directly by DNA-damaging agents or by DNA glycosylases acting during base excision repair. These sites are repaired in human cells by the HAP1 protein, which, besides its AP-endonuclease activity, also possesses a redox function. To investigate the ability of HAP1 protein to modulate cell resistance to DNA-damaging agents, CHO cells were transfected with HAP1 cDNA, resulting in stable expression of the protein in the cell nuclei. The sensitivity of the transfected cells to the toxic effect of various agents, e.g. methylmethane sulfonate, bleomycin and H2O2, was not modified. However, the transfected cells became more sensitive to killing by mitomycin C, porfiromycin, daunorubicin and aziridinyl benzoquinone, drugs that are activated by reduction. To test whether the redox function of HAP1 protein was involved in this increased cytotoxicity, we have constructed a mutated HAP1 protein endowed with normal AP-endonuclease activity but deleted for redox function. When this mutated protein was expressed in the cells, elevated AP-endonuclease activity was measured, but sensitization to the lethal effects of compounds requiring bioreduction was no longer observed. These results suggest that HAP1 protein, besides its involvement in DNA repair, is able to activate bioreduction of alkylating drugs used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:10190555

  8. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa) was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn) formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite. In addition, the monomeric

  9. An Organotypic High Throughput System for Characterization of Drug Sensitivity of Primary Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariosto; Jacobson, Timothy; Meads, Mark; Distler, Allison; Shain, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In this work we describe a novel approach that combines ex vivo drug sensitivity assays and digital image analysis to estimate chemosensitivity and heterogeneity of patient-derived multiple myeloma (MM) cells. This approach consists in seeding primary MM cells freshly extracted from bone marrow aspirates into microfluidic chambers implemented in multi-well plates, each consisting of a reconstruction of the bone marrow microenvironment, including extracellular matrix (collagen or basement membrane matrix) and stroma (patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells) or human-derived endothelial cells (HUVECs). The chambers are drugged with different agents and concentrations, and are imaged sequentially for 96 hr through bright field microscopy, in a motorized microscope equipped with a digital camera. Digital image analysis software detects live and dead cells from presence or absence of membrane motion, and generates curves of change in viability as a function of drug concentration and exposure time. We use a computational model to determine the parameters of chemosensitivity of the tumor population to each drug, as well as the number of sub-populations present as a measure of tumor heterogeneity. These patient-tailored models can then be used to simulate therapeutic regimens and estimate clinical response. PMID:26274375

  10. A Network-Based Model of Oncogenic Collaboration for Prediction of Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Laderas, Ted G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Sönmez, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, involving the acquisition of multiple oncogenic mutations that transform cells, resulting in systemic dysregulation that enables proliferation, invasion, and other cancer hallmarks. The goal of precision medicine is to identify therapeutically-actionable mutations from large-scale omic datasets. However, the multiplicity of oncogenes required for transformation, known as oncogenic collaboration, makes assigning effective treatments difficult. Motivated by this observation, we propose a new type of oncogenic collaboration where mutations in genes that interact with an oncogene may contribute to the oncogene’s deleterious potential, a new genomic feature that we term “surrogate oncogenes.” Surrogate oncogenes are representatives of these mutated subnetworks that interact with oncogenes. By mapping mutations to a protein–protein interaction network, we determine the significance of the observed distribution using permutation-based methods. For a panel of 38 breast cancer cell lines, we identified a significant number of surrogate oncogenes in known oncogenes such as BRCA1 and ESR1, lending credence to this approach. In addition, using Random Forest Classifiers, we show that these significant surrogate oncogenes predict drug sensitivity for 74 drugs in the breast cancer cell lines with a mean error rate of 30.9%. Additionally, we show that surrogate oncogenes are predictive of survival in patients. The surrogate oncogene framework incorporates unique or rare mutations from a single sample, and therefore has the potential to integrate patient-unique mutations into drug sensitivity predictions, suggesting a new direction in precision medicine and drug development. Additionally, we show the prevalence of significant surrogate oncogenes in multiple cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas, suggesting that surrogate oncogenes may be a useful genomic feature for guiding pancancer analyses and assigning therapies across many tissue

  11. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26805296

  12. Registered report: Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Heuvel, John P; Bullenkamp, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about the reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells” by Garnett and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Garnett et al., 2012). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 4C, 4E, 4F, and Supplemental Figures 16 and 20. Garnett and colleagues performed a high throughput screen assessing the effect of 130 drugs on 639 cancer-derived cell lines in order to identify novel interactions for possible therapeutic approaches. They then tested this approach by exploring in more detail a novel interaction they identified in which Ewing’s sarcoma cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitors (Figure 4C). Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) transformed with the signature EWS-FLI1 translocation, the hallmark of Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors, exhibited increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor olaparib as compared to MPCs transformed with a different translocation (Figure 4E). Knockdown mediated by siRNA of EWS-FLI1 abrogated this sensitivity to olaparib (Figure 4F). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13620.001 PMID:27336789

  13. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ∼600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  14. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs.

    PubMed

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-09-29

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ~600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  15. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  16. Nutrient-sensitized screening for drugs that shift energy metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Sheth, Sunil A; Nilsson, Roland; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Perocchi, Fabiana; Chen, William; Clish, Clary B; Ayata, Cenk; Brookes, Paul S; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2010-03-01

    Most cells have the inherent capacity to shift their reliance on glycolysis relative to oxidative metabolism, and studies in model systems have shown that targeting such shifts may be useful in treating or preventing a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to ischemic injury. However, we currently have a limited number of mechanistically distinct classes of drugs that alter the relative activities of these two pathways. We screen for such compounds by scoring the ability of >3,500 small molecules to selectively impair growth and viability of human fibroblasts in media containing either galactose or glucose as the sole sugar source. We identify several clinically used drugs never linked to energy metabolism, including the antiemetic meclizine, which attenuates mitochondrial respiration through a mechanism distinct from that of canonical inhibitors. We further show that meclizine pretreatment confers cardioprotection and neuroprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in murine models. Nutrient-sensitized screening may provide a useful framework for understanding gene function and drug action within the context of energy metabolism. PMID:20160716

  17. Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cundian; Ren, Junli; Zhao, Cui; Kong, Weiqing; Dai, Qingqing; Chen, Qifeng; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Runcang

    2016-10-20

    Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking copolymerization of xylan with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and acrylic acid (AA) using N,Ń-methylenebis-acrylamide (MBA) as a cross-linker and 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone as a photoinitiator via ultraviolet irradiation. The influence of the NIPAm, AA and MBA amount on properties of xylan-based hydrogels was discussed. The morphology and interactions of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of hydrogels was investigated by DSC. The results indicated that the LCST of hydrogels emerged at around 34°C and increased with increasing the AA content. The drug encapsulation efficiency of as-prepared hydrogels reached to 97.60% and the cumulative release rate of acetylsalicylic acid was 90.12% and 26.35% in the intestinal and gastric fluid, respectively. Xylan-based hydrogels were proved to be biocompatible with NIH3T3 cell by MTT assay and showed the promising application as drug carriers for the intestinal-targeted oral drug delivery. PMID:27474557

  18. Effect of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acid additives to the mobile phase on enantioseparations of some basic drugs on a Chiralcel OD column.

    PubMed

    Bielejewska, A; Duszczyk, K; Zukowski, J

    2005-08-12

    This paper describes the modification of Chiralcel OD column properties by adsorption of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acids (CSAs) used as additives to the mobile phase. The effects on retention, selectivity and efficiency, of adsorption of (+) and (-) CSAs on a Chiralcel OD column were examined. Racemic anti-histamines, anti-malarial and anti-fungal drugs, namely doxylamine, miconazole, sulconazole, hydroxyzine, homochlorcyclizine, methoxypheniramine, cyclopentolate and ephedrine were investigated as chiral tested compounds. All the studied drugs have an amino nitrogen atom in their structure. Only the enantioseparation of ephedrine enantiomers with CSAs alone was studied on the Nucleosil stationary phase, and these results were compared with the results obtained on the Chiralcel OD phase. A new dynamically generated stationary phase, with very good enantioseparation ability towards the studied compounds, was obtained by the adsorption of (-) CSA on the Chiralcel OD column. PMID:16078699

  19. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA. PMID:25933112

  20. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean±s.d.=22.1±3.4 years) [11C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg−1, by mouth; n=8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n=9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P⩽0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P<0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [11C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [11C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P<0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  1. A highly sensitive magnetic biosensor for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs tagged to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, J.; Devkota, J.; Mai, T. T. T.; Nguyen, X. P.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.; Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology Collaboration; University of South Florida Team

    2014-03-01

    A precise detection of low concentrations of biomolecules attached to magnetic nanoparticles in complex biological systems is a challenging task and requires biosensors with improved sensitivity. Here, we present a highly sensitive magnetic biosensor based on the magneto-reactance (MX) effect of a Co65Fe4Ni2Si15B14 amorphous ribbon with nanohole-patterned surface for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs (Curcumin) tagged to Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The detection and quantification of Curcumin were assessed by the change in MX of the ribbon subject to varying concentrations of the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A high capacity of the MX-based biosensor in quantitative analysis of the nanoparticles was achieved in the range of 0 - 50 ng/ml, beyond which the detection sensitivity (η) remained unchanged. The η of the biosensor reached an extremely high value of 30%, which is about 4-5 times higher than that of a magneto-impedance (MI) based biosensor. This biosensor is well suited for detection of low-concentration magnetic biomarkers in biological systems. This work was supported by was supported by the Florida Cluster for Advanced Smart Sensor Technologies, USAMRMC (Grant # W81XWH-07-1-0708), and the NSF-funded REU program at the USF.

  2. A highly sensitive magnetic biosensor for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs tagged to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, J.; Wingo, J.; Mai, T. T. T.; Nguyen, X. P.; Huong, N. T.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2014-05-01

    We report on a highly sensitive magnetic biosensor based on the magneto-reactance (MX) effect of a Co65Fe4Ni2Si15B14 amorphous ribbon with a nanohole-patterned surface for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs (Curcumin) tagged to superparamagnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (mean size, ˜10 nm) were first coated with Alginate, and Curcumin was then tagged to the nanoparticles. The detection and quantification of Curcumin were assessed by the change in MX of the ribbon subject to varying concentrations of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles to which Curcumin was tagged. A high capacity of the MX-based biosensor in quantitative analysis of Curcumin-loaded Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved in the range of 0-50 ng/ml, beyond which the detection sensitivity of the sensor remained unchanged. The detection sensitivity of the biosensor reached an extremely high value of 30%, which is about 4-5 times higher than that of a magneto-impedance (MI) based biosensor. This biosensor is well suited for detection of low-concentration magnetic biomarkers in biological systems.

  3. A sensitive multidimensional method for the detection, characterization, and quantification of trace free drug species in antibody-drug conjugate samples using mass spectral detection

    PubMed Central

    Birdsall, Robert E.; McCarthy, Sean M.; Janin-Bussat, Marie Claire; Perez, Michel; Haeuw, Jean-François; Chen, Weibin; Beck, Alain

    2016-01-01

    abstract Conjugation processes and stability studies associated with the production and shelf life of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) can result in free (non-conjugated) drug species. These free drug species can increase the risk to patients and reduce the efficacy of the ADC. Despite stringent purification steps, trace levels of free drug species may be present in formulated ADCs, reducing the therapeutic window. The reduction of sample preparation steps through the incorporation of multidimensional techniques has afforded analysts more efficient methods to assess trace drug species. Multidimensional methods coupling size-exclusion and reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultra-violet detection (SEC-RPLC/UV) have been reported, but offer limited sensitivity and can limit method optimization. The current study addresses these challenges with a multidimensional method that is specific, sensitive, and enables method control in both dimensions via coupling of an on-line solid phase extraction column to RPLC with mass spectral detection (SPE-RPLC/MS). The proposed method was evaluated using an antibody-fluorophore conjugate (AFC) as an ADC surrogate to brentuximab vedotin and its associated parent maleimide-val-cit-DSEA payload and the derived N-acetylcysteine adduct formed during the conjugation process. Assay sensitivity was found to be 2 orders more sensitive using MS detection in comparison to UV-based detection with a nominal limit of quantitation of 0.30 ng/mL (1.5 pg on-column). Free-drug species were present in an unadulterated ADC surrogate sample at concentrations below 7 ng/mL, levels not detectable by UV alone. The proposed SPE-RPLC/MS method provides a high degree of specificity and sensitivity in the assessment of trace free drug species and offers improved control over each dimension, enabling straightforward integration into existing or novel workflows. PMID:26651262

  4. A rapid and automated colorimetric assay for evaluating the sensitivity of herpes simplex strains to antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Langlois, M; Allard, J P; Nugier, F; Aymard, M

    1986-07-01

    A rapid and sensitive colorimetric assay has been developed to evaluate the sensitivity of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) to antiviral agents. The chessboard titration of viruses and antiviral drugs and the automatic reading and analysis of the data allows objective and accurate results to be rapidly obtained. Virus sensitivity was expressed as an ED50 value which was the concentration of drug (micrograms/ml) reducing viral cpe by 50%. The ED50 values of antiviral drugs [acetylguanosine (ACV), idoxuridine (IDU), deoxycytidine (IDC) and bromovinyl deoxyuridine] for several HSV reference strains were determined and the method was then applied to clinical specimens. The selection of ACV and IDU resistant mutants was performed on a cloned sensitive HSV 1 ocular strain. We observed cross-resistance between ACV and IDU for the mutants isolated. The resistance to thymidine-kinase-dependent antiviral agents varied in inverse ratio to the thymidine kinase activity induced by HSV strains.

  5. Molecular basis and drug sensitivity of the delayed rectifier (IKr) in the fish heart.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fishes are increasingly used as models for human cardiac diseases, creating a need for a better understanding of the molecular basis of fish cardiac ion currents. To this end we cloned KCNH6 channel of the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) that produces the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), the main repolarising current of the fish heart. KCNH6 (ccErg2) was the main isoform of the Kv11 potassium channel family with relative transcript levels of 98.9% and 99.6% in crucian carp atrium and ventricle, respectively. KCNH2 (ccErg1), an orthologue to human cardiac Erg (Herg) channel, was only slightly expressed in the crucian carp heart. The native atrial IKr and the cloned ccErg2 were inhibited by similar concentrations of verapamil, terfenadine and KB-R7943 (P>0.05), while the atrial IKr was about an order of magnitude more sensitive to E-4031 than ccErg2 (P<0.05) suggesting that some accessory β-subunits may be involved. Sensitivity of the crucian carp atrial IKr to E-4031, terfenadine and KB-R7943 was similar to what has been reported for the Herg channel. In contrast, the sensitivity of the crucian carp IKr to verapamil was approximately 30 times higher than the previously reported values for the Herg current. In conclusion, the cardiac IKr is produced by non-orthologous gene products in fish (Erg2) and mammalian hearts (Erg1) and some marked differences exist in drug sensitivity between fish and mammalian Erg1/2 which need to be taken into account when using fish heart as a model for human heart. PMID:26215639

  6. Genetic diversity and signatures of selection of drug resistance in Plasmodium populations from both human and mosquito hosts in continental Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Plasmodium, the high level of genetic diversity and the interactions established by co-infecting parasite populations within the same host may be a source of selection on pathogen virulence and drug resistance. As different patterns have already been described in humans and mosquitoes, parasite diversity and population structure should be studied in both hosts to properly assess their effects on infection and transmission dynamics. This study aimed to characterize the circulating populations of Plasmodium spp and Plasmodium falciparum from a combined set of human blood and mosquito samples gathered in mainland Equatorial Guinea. Further, the origin and evolution of anti-malarial resistance in this area, where malaria remains a major public health problem were traced. Methods Plasmodium species infecting humans and mosquitoes were identified by nested-PCR of chelex-extracted DNA from dried blood spot samples and mosquitoes. Analysis of Pfmsp2 gene, anti-malarial-resistance associated genes, Pfdhps, Pfdhfr, Pfcrt and Pfmdr1, neutral microsatellites (STR) loci and Pfdhfr and Pfdhps flanking STR was undertaken to evaluate P. falciparum diversity. Results Prevalence of infection remains high in mainland Equatorial Guinea. No differences in parasite formula or significant genetic differentiation were seen in the parasite populations in both human and mosquito samples. Point mutations in all genes associated with anti-malarial resistance were highly prevalent. A high prevalence was observed for the Pfdhfr triple mutant in particular, associated with pyrimethamine resistance. Analysis of Pfdhps and Pfdhfr flanking STR revealed a decrease in the genetic diversity. This finding along with multiple independent introductions of Pfdhps mutant haplotypes suggest a soft selective sweep and an increased differentiation at Pfdhfr flanking microsatellites hints a model of positive directional selection for this gene. Conclusions Chloroquine is no longer recommended for

  7. Assessment of substance abuse liability in rodents: self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Neil E

    2012-09-01

    Assessing abuse liability is a crucial step in the development of a novel chemical entity (NCE) with central nervous system (CNS) activity or with chemical or pharmacological properties in common with known abused substances. Rodent assessment of abuse liability is highly attractive due to its relatively low cost and high predictive validity. Described in this unit are three rodent assays commonly used to provide data on the potential for abuse liability based on the acute effects of NCEs: specifically, self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization. As these assays provide insight into the potential abuse liability of NCEs as well as in vivo pharmacological mechanism(s) of action, they should form a key part of the development process for novel therapeutics aimed at treating CNS disorders.

  8. Highly Sensitive and Validated Spectrophotometric Technique for the Assay of Some Antidepressant Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepakumari, H. N.; Prashanth, M. K.; Kumar, B. C. Vasantha; Revanasiddappa, H. D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes a simple, rapid, reproducible, and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs: amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMH), clomipramine hydrochloride (CPH) and desipramine hydrochloride (DPH) in pure and in pharmaceutical preparations. The method is based on the bromination of the above drugs with known excess of bromine. The unreacted bromine is determined based on its ability to bleach the dye methyl red quantitatively at 520 nm. Regression analysis of Beer-Lambert plots showed a good correlation in the concentration range 0.0-2.5, 0-1.4, 0-1.4, and 0-1.0 μg/ml for AMT, IMH, CPH, and DPH, respectively. The molar absorptivity values were found to be 0.65 × 105, 1.41 × 105, 1.93 × 105, and 2.96 × 105l/mol/cm, with the corresponding Sandell's sensitivity values were 0.0048, 0.0022, 0.0018, and 0.0010 μg/cm2 for AMT, IMH, CPH, and DPH, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are also reported for the developed method. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision was established according to the current ICH guidelines. Application of the procedure to the analysis of various pharmaceutical preparations gave reproducible and accurate results. Further, the validity of the proposed method was confirmed by applying the standard addition technique, and the results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by the official method.

  9. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-04-02

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors.

  10. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  11. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  12. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25837486

  13. Competition between novelty and cocaine conditioned reward is sensitive to drug dose and retention interval

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Carmela M.; Bevins, Rick A.

    2010-01-01

    The following manuscript is the final accepted manuscript. It has not been subjected to the final copyediting, fact-checking, and proofreading required for formal publication. It is not the definitive, publisher-authenticated version. The American Psychological Association and its Council of Editors disclaim any responsibility or liabilities for errors or omissions of this manuscript version, any version derived from this manuscript by NIH, or other third parties. The published version is available at www.apa.org/pubs/journals/bne The conditioned rewarding effects of novelty compete with those of cocaine for control over choice behavior using a place-conditioning task. The purpose of the present study was to use multiple doses of cocaine to determine the extent of this competition and to determine whether novelty's impact on cocaine reward was maintained over an abstinence period. In Experiment 1, rats were conditioned with cocaine (7.5, 20, or 30 mg/kg, IP) to prefer one side of an unbiased place conditioning apparatus relative to the other. In a subsequent phase, all rats received alternating daily confinements to the previously cocaine-paired and unpaired sides of the apparatus. During this phase, half the rats had access to a novel object on their initially unpaired side; the remaining rats did not receive objects. The ability of novelty to compete with cocaine in a drug-free and cocaine-challenge test was sensitive to cocaine dose. In Experiment 2, a place preference was established with 10 mg/kg cocaine and testing occurred after 1, 14, or 28 day retention intervals. Findings indicate that choice behaviors mediated by cocaine conditioning are reduced with the passing of time. Taken together, competition between cocaine and novelty conditioned rewards are sensitive to drug dose and retention interval. PMID:20141289

  14. Simple and sensitive method for monitoring drug-induced cell injury in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirhatti, V.; Krishna, G.

    1985-06-01

    A simple, sensitive method has been developed for evaluating cell injury noninvasively in monolayer cells in culture. The cell ATP pool was radiolabeled by incubating the cells with (/sup 14/C)adenine. The uptake and incorporation of (/sup 14/C)adenine was shown to proportional to the number of cells. As determined by HPLC, about 65-70% of the incorporated /sup 14/C label was in the ATP pool, 15-20% was in the ADP pool, and the rest was in the 5'-AMP pool. When prelabeled cells were exposed to toxic drugs (acetaminophen, calcium ionophore A-23187, or daunomycin) there was a marked decrease in cell ATP with a concomitant increase in leakage of labeled nucleotides, mainly 5'-AMP and 5'IMP. The authors have shown that leakage of /sup 14/C label into the medium from the prelabeled cells may be employed for quantitation of cell injury. This new measure of toxicity was shown to correlate very well with LDH leakage from the cells, which is a well accepted measure of cell injury. The leakage of 5'-(/sup 14/C)AMP also correlated very well with the reduction of cell ATP in cardiac myocytes. This method has been used for monitoring drug-induced toxicity in liver cells, cardiac myocytes, and LB cells.

  15. Studies on psychomotoric effects and pharmacokinetic interactions of the new calcium sensitizing drug levosimendan and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Antila, S; Järvinen, A; Akkila, J; Honkanen, T; Karlsson, M; Lehtonen, L

    1997-07-01

    Levosimendan (CAS 141505-33-1) is a calcium sensitizing drug intended for the treatment of congestive heart failure. In animal experiments levosimendan has potentiated the sedative effects of ethanol. Due to poor water solubility of the compound, ethanol is used as a diluent in the intravenous formulation. In this study the possible interactions between levosimendan and ethanol in human have been studied. Twelve healthy male volunteers were included in this double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study consisted of three treatment periods: levosimendan 1 mg intravenously, levosimendan combined with ethanol orally and ethanol 0.8 g/kg alone. Blood samples for determination of levosimendan and ethanol concentrations were collected for 8 h after the dosing. To observe possible pharmacodynamic interactions psychomotoric tests were made before drug administration and 1h, 2h, 3h and 6h thereafter. These tests included Digit symbol substitution test, Maddox wing, Critical Flicker fusion and VAS-test for subjective assessment of performance status. Plasma levosimendan concentrations were not changed by the concomitant ethanol administration. Ethanol did not alter the pharmacokinetics of levosimendan except the volume of distribution of central compartment which was decreased. Levosimendan did neither affect elimination of ethanol. Levosimendan did not potentiate the psychomotoric effects of ethanol neither did it have any psychomotoric effects itself. In conclusion, levosimendan is not likely to have any psychomotoric adverse effects or any clinically significant interactions with ethanol.

  16. A simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for analysis of some nitrofuran drugs in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek Saied

    2008-09-01

    A simple, rapid, selective and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was described for the analysis of three nitrofuran drugs, namely, nifuroxazide (NX), nitrofurantoin (NT) and nitrofurazone (NZ). The method involved the alkaline hydrolysis of the studied drugs by warming with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution then dilution with distilled water for NX or 2-propanol for NT and NZ. The formed fluorophores were measured at 465 nm (lambda (Ex) 265 nm), 458 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) and 445 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The reaction pathway was discussed and the structures of the fluorescent products were proposed. The different experimental parameters were studied and optimized. Regression analysis showed good correlation between fluorescence intensity and concentration over the ranges 0.08-1.00, 0.02-0.24 and 0.004-0.050 microg ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The limits of detection of the method were 8.0, 1.9 and 0.3 ng ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The proposed method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision and specificity, and it was successfully applied for the assay of the three nitrofurans in their different dosage forms. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. The results were favorably compared with those obtained by reference spectrophotometric methods. PMID:18246413

  17. A simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for analysis of some nitrofuran drugs in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek Saied

    2008-09-01

    A simple, rapid, selective and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was described for the analysis of three nitrofuran drugs, namely, nifuroxazide (NX), nitrofurantoin (NT) and nitrofurazone (NZ). The method involved the alkaline hydrolysis of the studied drugs by warming with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution then dilution with distilled water for NX or 2-propanol for NT and NZ. The formed fluorophores were measured at 465 nm (lambda (Ex) 265 nm), 458 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) and 445 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The reaction pathway was discussed and the structures of the fluorescent products were proposed. The different experimental parameters were studied and optimized. Regression analysis showed good correlation between fluorescence intensity and concentration over the ranges 0.08-1.00, 0.02-0.24 and 0.004-0.050 microg ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The limits of detection of the method were 8.0, 1.9 and 0.3 ng ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The proposed method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision and specificity, and it was successfully applied for the assay of the three nitrofurans in their different dosage forms. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. The results were favorably compared with those obtained by reference spectrophotometric methods.

  18. Hollow fiber based quantum cascade laser spectrometer for fast and sensitive drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J.; Scherer, B.; Ruf, A.; Erb, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and fast identification of drugs or drug precursors is important and necessary in scenarios like baggage or container check by customs or police. Fraunhofer IPM is developing a laser spectrometer using external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) to obtain mid-infrared (IR) absorption spectra in the wavelength range of the specific vibrational bands of amphetamines and their precursors. The commercial EC-QCL covers a tuning range of about 225 cm-1 within 1.4 s. The system could be used for different sample types like bulk samples or liquid solutions. A sampling unit evaporates the sample. Because of small sample amounts a 3 m long hollow fiber with an inner volume smaller than 1ml is used as gas cell and wave guide for the laser beam. This setup is suitable as a detector of a gas chromatograph instead of a standard detector (TCD or FID). The advantage is the selective identification of drugs by their IR spectra in addition to the retention time in the gas chromatographic column. In comparison to Fourier Transform IR systems the EC-QCL setup shows a good mechanical robustness and has the advantage of a point light source. Because of the good fiber incoupling performance of the EC-QCL it is possible to use hollow fibers. So, a good absorption signal is achieved because of the long optical path in the small cell volume without significant dilution. In first laboratory experiments a detection limit in the microgram range for pseudo ephedrine is achieved.

  19. pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Iulia Ioana; Rădulescu, Marius; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, nanobiotechnology has evolved rapidly with an extensive impact on biomedical area. In order to improve bioavailability and minimize adverse effects, drug delivery systems based on magnetic nanocomposites are under development mainly for cancer imaging and antitumor therapy. In this regard, pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with accurate controlled size and shape are synthesized by various modern methods, such as homogeneous precipitation, coprecipitation, microemulsion or polyol approaches, high temperature and hydrothermal reactions, sol-gel reactions, aerosol÷vapor processes and sonolysis. Due to their unique combined physico-chemical and biological properties (such as higher dispensability, chemical and thermal stability, biocompatibility), pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs are widely investigated for controlled release of cytostatic drugs into the tumor site by means of pH change: magnetite@silicon dioxide (Fe3O4@SiO2), Fe3O4@titanium dioxide (TiO2), β-thiopropionate-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified Fe3O4@mSiO2, Fe3O4 NPs core coated with SiO2 with an imidazole group modified PEG-polypeptide (mPEG-poly-L-Asparagine), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and folic acid (FA) coating of the iron oxide NP core, methoxy polyethylene glycol-block-polymethacrylic acid-block-polyglycerol monomethacrylate (MPEG-b-PMAA-b-PGMA) attached by a PGMA block to a Fe3O4 core, PEG-modified polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer shell with Fe3O4 core and mesoporous silica coated on Fe3O4, mostly coated with an anticancer drug. This review paper highlights the modern research directions currently employed to demonstrate the utility of the pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs in diagnosis and treatment of oncological diseases. PMID:27151685

  20. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato; Correia, Sonia; Carvalho, Cristina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Moreira, Paula I.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  1. Decreased sensitivity of drug-resistant cells towards T cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Classen, C F; Fulda, S; Friesen, C; Debatin, K M

    1999-03-01

    Killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells is mediated by induction of apoptosis requiring functional death pathways. Kill is mediated either by the CD95 or the perforin/granzyme pathway. We found that SH-EP neuroblastoma cells are preferentially killed via CD95, while in the T leukemia cell line CEM CD95 and perforin/granzyme are involved. In both types of cell lines, cells resistant to CD95- and drug-induced apoptosis are crossresistant to cytotoxic T cell kill. Resistant cells show decreased apoptosis and deficient activation of caspases indicated by decreased cleavage of the prototype caspase substrate PARP. Preincubation with the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk strongly decreased LAK cell kill in sensitive cells. Although parental CEM cells could be sensitized for LAK kill by preincubation with doxorubicin, resistance could not be reverted in doxorubicin or CD95 resistant CEM cells. These data demonstrate the crossresistance in induction of apoptosis by different cytotoxic regimens in tumor cells and may have implications for the immunotherapy of tumors in which apoptosis resistance was induced by previous chemotherapy.

  2. A new, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for the determination of sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Yathirajan, Hemmige S; Sunitha, Kallanchira R; Vasantha, Ramanathapura A

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive, rapid, and simple spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of sulfa drugs. The method is based on the formation of a red-colored product by the diazotization of sulfonamides such as sulfathiazole (SFT), sulfadiazine (SFD), sulfacetamide (SFA), sulfamethoxazole (SFMx), sulfamerazine (SFMr), sulfaguanidine (SFG), and sulfamethazine (SFMt), followed by complexation with dopamine in the presence of molybdate ions in (1 + 1) H2SO4 medium. Absorbance of the resulting red product is measured at 490-510 nm, and the product is stable for 2 days at 27 degrees C. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration range of 0.04-8.0 microg/mL at the wavelength of maximum absorption. The method was used successfully for the determination of some sulfonamides in tablets and eye drops. Common excipients used as additives in pharmaceuticals do not interfere in the proposed method. The method offers the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and sensitivity without the need for extraction or heating. The limits of detection and quantitation were calculated for SFT, SFD, SFA, SFMx, SFMr, SFG, and SFMt.

  3. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato; Correia, Sonia; Carvalho, Cristina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Moreira, Paula I.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed. PMID:27713238

  4. In vitro inhibition of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by ethnobotanically selected South African plants.

    PubMed

    Lall, N; Meyer, J J

    1999-09-01

    Twenty South African medicinal plants used to treat pulmonary diseases were screened for activity against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A preliminary screening of acetone and water plant extracts against a drug-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, was done by the agar plate method. Fourteen of the 20 acetone extracts showed inhibitory activity at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml against this strain. Acetone as well as water extracts of Cryptocarya latifolia, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Thymus vulgaris inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis. Given the activity of 14 acetone extracts at 0.5 mg/ml against the drug-sensitive strain by the agar plate method, a further study was done employing a rapid radiometric method to confirm the inhibitory activity. These active acetone extracts were screened against the H37Rv strain as well as a strain resistant to the drugs isoniazid and rifampin. The minimal inhibitory concentration of Croton pseudopulchellus, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia was 0.1 mg/ml against the H37Rv strain by the radiometric method. Extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia were active against the resistant strain at 0.1 mg/ml. Eight plants showed activity against both strains at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml.

  5. Novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles as drug delivery vehicles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yongjiu; Hao, Lan; Hu, Wenjing; Ran, Ya; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Liangke

    2016-01-01

    This study fabricated novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles (PNP-MB) with the combined advantages of two excellent drug delivery vehicles, namely, pH-sensitive nanoparticles and microbubbles. As an antitumor drug, resveratrol (RES) was loaded into acetylated β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles (RES-PNP). The drug-loaded nanoparticles were then encapsulated into the internal space of the microbubbles. The characterization and morphology of this vehicle were investigated through dynamic light scattering and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. In vitro drug release was performed to investigate the pH sensitivity of RES-PNP. The antitumor property of RES-loaded PNP-MB (RES-PNP-MB) was also analyzed in vivo to evaluate the antitumor effect of RES-PNP-MB. Results suggested that PNP exhibited pH sensitivity, and was successfully encapsulated into the microbubbles. RES-PNP-MB exhibit effective tumor growth suppressing in vivo. Therefore, such drug delivery vehicle should be of great attention in tumor therapy.

  6. Novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles as drug delivery vehicles for enhanced tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yongjiu; Hao, Lan; Hu, Wenjing; Ran, Ya; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Liangke

    2016-01-01

    This study fabricated novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles (PNP-MB) with the combined advantages of two excellent drug delivery vehicles, namely, pH-sensitive nanoparticles and microbubbles. As an antitumor drug, resveratrol (RES) was loaded into acetylated β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles (RES-PNP). The drug-loaded nanoparticles were then encapsulated into the internal space of the microbubbles. The characterization and morphology of this vehicle were investigated through dynamic light scattering and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. In vitro drug release was performed to investigate the pH sensitivity of RES-PNP. The antitumor property of RES-loaded PNP-MB (RES-PNP-MB) was also analyzed in vivo to evaluate the antitumor effect of RES-PNP-MB. Results suggested that PNP exhibited pH sensitivity, and was successfully encapsulated into the microbubbles. RES-PNP-MB exhibit effective tumor growth suppressing in vivo. Therefore, such drug delivery vehicle should be of great attention in tumor therapy. PMID:27378018

  7. In vitro screening of clinical drugs identifies sensitizers of oncolytic viral therapy in glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berghauser Pont, L M E; Balvers, R K; Kloezeman, J J; Nowicki, M O; van den Bossche, W; Kremer, A; Wakimoto, H; van den Hoogen, B G; Leenstra, S; Dirven, C M F; Chiocca, E A; Lawler, S E; Lamfers, M L M

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) have broad potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of solid tumors. The present study addresses the feasibility of clinically applicable drugs to enhance the oncolytic potential of the OV Delta24-RGD in glioblastoma. In total, 446 drugs were screened for their viral sensitizing properties in glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in vitro. Validation was done for 10 drugs to determine synergy based on the Chou Talalay assay. Mechanistic studies were undertaken to assess viability, replication efficacy, viral infection enhancement and cell death pathway induction in a selected panel of drugs. Four viral sensitizers (fluphenazine, indirubin, lofepramine and ranolazine) were demonstrated to reproducibly synergize with Delta24-RGD in multiple assays. After validation, we underscored general applicability by testing candidate drugs in a broader context of a panel of different GSCs, various solid tumor models and multiple OVs. Overall, this study identified four viral sensitizers, which synergize with Delta24-RGD and two other strains of OVs. The viral sensitizers interact with infection, replication and cell death pathways to enhance efficacy of the OV. PMID:26196249

  8. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  9. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  10. Characterization of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation in DNA and differentiation of cancer cell drug sensitivity at microdose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hah, Sang Soo; Sumbad, Rhoda A; de Vere White, Ralph W; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Henderson, Paul T

    2007-12-01

    (trans-R, R)-1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II) (oxaliplatin) is a recently approved platinum analogue for use in the chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer. Like many cytotoxic drugs, oxaliplatin exerts its antitumor effects by covalent modification of DNA. We report an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair. We determined the apparent rate of oxaliplatin adduction to salmon sperm DNA. The oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution was further investigated at the nucleoside level by HPLC-AMS. Cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833K) and platinum-resistant breast and bladder (MDA-MB-231 and T24, respectively) cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological concentration of oxaliplatin (0.2 microM). Both cellular and DNA radiocarbon contents in the drug-sensitive testicular cells had approximately twice the area under the curve as compared to the more platinum-resistant cell lines, implying that differential accumulation of the drug may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1+/-0.1 amol/microg of DNA, when assaying 1 microg of DNA. This sensitivity for measuring oxaliplatin-DNA adducts is the highest reported to date. The sensitivity offered by this method may be applicable to other DNA-damaging drugs, metabolisms studies, and diagnostics development.

  11. pH-Sensitive brush polymer-drug conjugates by ring-opening metathesis copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiong; Jafr, Goran; Themistou, Efrosyni; Yap, Yoonsing; Wintrob, Zachary A P; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Ceacareanu, Alice C; Cheng, Chong

    2011-04-21

    Representing a new category of polymer-drug conjugates, brush polymer-drug conjugates were prepared by ring-opening metathesis copolymerization. Following judicious structural design, these conjugates exhibited well-shielded drug moieties, significant water solubility, well-defined nanostructures, and acid-triggered drug release.

  12. Nosocomial Infections and Drug Susceptibility Patterns in Methicillin Sensitive and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitish Kumar; Garg, Raina; Baliga, Shrikala; Bhat K., Gopalkrishna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and is known for its ability to develop resistance to antibiotics. The drug susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) may vary. Aims and Objectives: This study was carried out to determine and compare the drug susceptibility patterns in nosocomial MSSA and MRSA. Material and Methods: The study was conducted between September 2009 and August 2011. Standard conventional methods were used for the isolation and identification of S. aureus. MRSA was identified by the cefoxitin (30 μg) disk method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and the interpretation of the results was done using CLSI guidelines. Results: Out of 685 strains of S. aureus studied, 173(25.25%) were MRSA and 512 (74.25%) were MSSA. Out of 173 MRSA strains, 114(65.89%) were isolated from pus, 22(12.71%) from vaginal swab, 18(10.40%) from central catheter tip and the remaining from other specimens. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and least number of isolates were susceptible to penicillin. MRSA displayed significantly higher resistance to other antibiotics. 45.7% of MRSA strains were resistant to clindamycin, 64.7% to ciprofloxacin, 87.3% to cotrimoxazole, 54.3% to erythromycin, 17.3% to gentamicin, 16.8% to netilmycin, and 58.38% to tetracycline. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected in 37 (21.38%) strains of MRSA. Conclusion: Nosocomial infections caused by MRSA is a significant problem. MRSA and MSSA differ with their susceptibility to antibiotics. All MRSA isolates in our hospitals were susceptible to vancomycin. Proper selection of the antibiotics based on antibiotic susceptibility test results is needed for effective treatment and prevention of emergence of resistance in MRSA and MSSA. PMID:24298469

  13. Sensitive and Selective Plasmon Ruler Nanosensors for Monitoring the Apoptotic Drug Response in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Caspases are proteases involved in cell death, where caspase-3 is the chief executioner that produces an irreversible cutting event in downstream protein substrates and whose activity is desired in the management of cancer. To determine such activity in clinically relevant samples with high signal-to-noise, plasmon rulers are ideal because they are sensitively affected by their interparticle separation without ambiguity from photobleaching or blinking effects. A plasmon ruler is a noble metal nanoparticle pair, tethered in close proximity to one another via a biomolecule, that acts through dipole–dipole interactions and results in the light scattering to increase exponentially. In contrast, a sharp decrease in intensity is observed when the pair is confronted by a large interparticle distance. To align the mechanism of protease activity with building a sensor that can report a binary signal in the presence or absence of caspase-3, we present a caspase-3 selective plasmon ruler (C3SPR) composed of a pair of Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2@Au core–shell nanoparticles connected by a caspase-3 cleavage sequence. The dielectric core (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2)-shell (Au) geometry provided a brighter scattering intensity versus solid Au nanoparticles, and the magnetic core additionally acted as a purification handle during the plasmon ruler assembly. By monitoring the decrease in light scattering intensity per plasmon ruler, we detected caspase-3 activity at single molecule resolution across a broad dynamic range. This was observed to be as low as 100 fM of recombinant material or 10 ng of total protein from cellular lysate. By thorough analyses of single molecule trajectories, we show caspase-3 activation in a drug-treated chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cancer system as early as 4 and 8 h with greater sensitivity (2- and 4-fold, respectively) than conventional reagents. This study provides future implications for monitoring caspase-3 as a biomarker and efficacy of drugs. PMID:25166742

  14. Sensitive and selective plasmon ruler nanosensors for monitoring the apoptotic drug response in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tajon, Cheryl A; Seo, Daeha; Asmussen, Jennifer; Shah, Neil; Jun, Young-wook; Craik, Charles S

    2014-09-23

    Caspases are proteases involved in cell death, where caspase-3 is the chief executioner that produces an irreversible cutting event in downstream protein substrates and whose activity is desired in the management of cancer. To determine such activity in clinically relevant samples with high signal-to-noise, plasmon rulers are ideal because they are sensitively affected by their interparticle separation without ambiguity from photobleaching or blinking effects. A plasmon ruler is a noble metal nanoparticle pair, tethered in close proximity to one another via a biomolecule, that acts through dipole-dipole interactions and results in the light scattering to increase exponentially. In contrast, a sharp decrease in intensity is observed when the pair is confronted by a large interparticle distance. To align the mechanism of protease activity with building a sensor that can report a binary signal in the presence or absence of caspase-3, we present a caspase-3 selective plasmon ruler (C3SPR) composed of a pair of Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2@Au core-shell nanoparticles connected by a caspase-3 cleavage sequence. The dielectric core (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2)-shell (Au) geometry provided a brighter scattering intensity versus solid Au nanoparticles, and the magnetic core additionally acted as a purification handle during the plasmon ruler assembly. By monitoring the decrease in light scattering intensity per plasmon ruler, we detected caspase-3 activity at single molecule resolution across a broad dynamic range. This was observed to be as low as 100 fM of recombinant material or 10 ng of total protein from cellular lysate. By thorough analyses of single molecule trajectories, we show caspase-3 activation in a drug-treated chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cancer system as early as 4 and 8 h with greater sensitivity (2- and 4-fold, respectively) than conventional reagents. This study provides future implications for monitoring caspase-3 as a biomarker and efficacy of drugs.

  15. Drug-sensitive reward in crayfish: an invertebrate model system for the study of SEEKING, reward, addiction, and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert; Panksepp, Jules B; Nathaniel, Thomas; Alcaro, Antonio; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    In mammals, rewarding properties of drugs depend on their capacity to activate appetitive motivational states. With the underlying mechanisms strongly conserved in evolution, invertebrates have recently emerged as a powerful new model in addiction research. In crayfish natural reward has proven surprisingly sensitive to human drugs of abuse, opening an unlikely avenue of research into the basic biological mechanisms of drug addiction. In a series of studies we first examined the presence of natural reward systems in crayfish, then characterized its sensitivity to a wide range of human drugs of abuse. A conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to demonstrate that crayfish seek out those environments that had previously been paired with the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, and the opioid morphine. The administration of amphetamine exerted its effects at a number of sites, including the stimulation of circuits for active exploratory behaviors (i.e., SEEKING). A further study examined morphine-induced reward, extinction and reinstatement in crayfish. Repeated intra-circulatory infusions of morphine served as a reward when paired with distinct visual or tactile cues. Morphine-induced CPP was extinguished after repeated saline injections. Following this extinction phase, morphine-experienced crayfish were once again challenged with the drug. The priming injections of morphine reinstated CPP at all tested doses, suggesting that morphine-induced CPP is unrelenting. In an exploration of drug-associated behavioral sensitization in crayfish we concurrently mapped measures of locomotion and rewarding properties of morphine. Single and repeated intra-circulatory infusions of morphine resulted in persistent locomotory sensitization, even 5 days following the infusion. Moreover, a single dose of morphine was sufficient to induce long-term behavioral sensitization. CPP for morphine and context-dependent cues could not be disrupted over a drug free period of 5

  16. Doxorubicin in TAT peptide-modified multifunctional immunoliposomes demonstrates increased activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant ovarian cancer models.

    PubMed

    Apte, Anjali; Koren, Erez; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a hallmark of cancer cells and a crucial factor in chemotherapy failure, cancer reappearance, and patient deterioration. We have previously described the physicochemical characteristics and the in vitro anticancer properties of a multifunctional doxorubicin-loaded liposomal formulation. Lipodox(®), a commercially available PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin, was made multifunctional by surface-decorating with a cell-penetrating peptide, TATp, conjugated to PEG 1000-PE, to enhance liposomal cell uptake. A pH-sensitive polymer, PEG 2000-Hz-PE, with a pH-sensitive hydrazone (Hz) bond to shield the peptide in the body and expose it only at the acidic tumor cell surface, was used as well. In addition, an anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 attached to a long-chain polymer to target nucleosomes overexpressed on the tumor cell surface was also present. Here, we report the in vitro cell uptake and cytotoxicity of the modified multifunctional immunoliposomes as well as the in vivo studies on tumor xenografts developed subcutaneously in nude mice with MDR and drug-sensitive human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3). Our results show the ability of multifunctional immunoliposomes to overcome MDR by enhancing cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cells, compared with non-modified liposomes. Furthermore, in comparison with the non-modified liposomes, upon intravenous injection of these multifunctional immunoliposomes into mice with tumor xenografts, a significant reduction in tumor growth and enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug in both drug-resistant and drug-sensitive mice was obtained. The use of "smart" multifunctional delivery systems may provide the basis for an effective strategy to develop, improve, and overcome MDR cancers in the future. PMID:24145298

  17. Doxorubicin in TAT peptide-modified multifunctional immunoliposomes demonstrates increased activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant ovarian cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Anjali; Koren, Erez; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a hallmark of cancer cells and a crucial factor in chemotherapy failure, cancer reappearance, and patient deterioration. We have previously described the physicochemical characteristics and the in vitro anticancer properties of a multifunctional doxorubicin-loaded liposomal formulation. Lipodox®, a commercially available PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin, was made multifunctional by surface-decorating with a cell-penetrating peptide, TATp, conjugated to PEG1000-PE, to enhance liposomal cell uptake. A pH-sensitive polymer, PEG2000-Hz-PE, with a pH-sensitive hydrazone (Hz) bond to shield the peptide in the body and expose it only at the acidic tumor cell surface, was used as well. In addition, an anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 attached to a long-chain polymer to target nucleosomes overexpressed on the tumor cell surface was also present. Here, we report the in vitro cell uptake and cytotoxicity of the modified multifunctional immunoliposomes as well as the in vivo studies on tumor xenografts developed subcutaneously in nude mice with MDR and drug-sensitive human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3). Our results show the ability of multifunctional immunoliposomes to overcome MDR by enhancing cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cells, compared with non-modified liposomes. Furthermore, in comparison with the non-modified liposomes, upon intravenous injection of these multifunctional immunoliposomes into mice with tumor xenografts, a significant reduction in tumor growth and enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug in both drug-resistant and drug-sensitive mice was obtained. The use of “smart” multifunctional delivery systems may provide the basis for an effective strategy to develop, improve, and overcome MDR cancers in the future. PMID:24145298

  18. Expression of microRNA-30a-5p in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Wu, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongmei; Liang, Yijuan; Gao, Xinping; Cai, Zhihui; Wang, Weiming; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the expression of microRNA (miRNA or miR) in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines, and to seek the potential therapeutic target of ovarian cancer drug-resistant mechanism in order to improve drug resistance by altering miRNA levels. The drug-resistant characteristics of SKOV3/DDP, SKOV3, COC1/DDP and COC1 cell lines were studied. The miRNAs that were differentially expressed between cisplatin-resistant cells and its parental cells in ovarian cancer were screened with a miRNA chip. The effect of miRNAs was detected, and their drug-resistant mechanism was investigated by transfection and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide methods. Among the expression screening of miRNAs, 41 mRNAs, including Homo sapiens (hsa)-miR-30a-5p and hsa-miR-34c-5p, were highly expressed in the drug-resistant cells, whereas 44 miRNAs, including hsa-miR-96-5p and hsa-miR-200c-3p, were lowly expressed. The expression levels of hsa-miR-30a-5p in two types of ovarian cancer chemotherapy-resistant cell lines were significantly higher than those in chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, which was associated with ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance. In conclusion, high expression of miRNA-30a-5p was able to promote cell growth and colony forming ability, and enhance cell migration and invasion. Thus, miRNA-30a-5p is expected to become a meaningful novel target for ovarian cancer resistant treatment. PMID:27602140

  19. Novel pH-sensitive blend microspheres for controlled release of nifedipine--an antihypertensive drug.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Keerti V; Manjeshwar, Lata S; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2015-04-01

    Water-soluble acrylamide (AAm)-grafted-chitosan (CS) copolymer (AAm-g-CS) was synthesized using potassium persulfate (PPS) initiator from which interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) microspheres were prepared by water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion that are cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) and used for encapsulating nifedipine (NFD). Microspheres were coated with sodium alginate (NaAlg) to enhance their pH-sensitivity for extending the release time of NFD up to 14 h, releasing with 93% of NFD. The coated and uncoated microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to understand chemical interactions and blend compatibility. Morphology and particle size of the microspheres were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle zeta analyzer, respectively. Swelling and in vitro release experiments were performed in pH 1.2 and 7.4 buffer media, which showed a dependence on IPN blend composition, extent of cross-linking and amount of AAm used. Empirical analysis of drug patterns suggested the differences between NaAlg coated and uncoated microspheres.

  20. Zwitterionic Chitosan-Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Complex Nanoparticles as a pH-Sensitive Drug Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Karen C.; Yeo, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been widely explored as carriers of therapeutics and imaging agents. However, amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers is rarely utilized in systemic applications due to its cytotoxicity and risk of opsonization, caused by its cationic charges. Such undesirable effects may be mitigated by shielding the PAMAM dendrimer surface with polymers that reduce the charges. However, this shielding may also interfere with PAMAM dendrimers’ ability to interact with target cells, thus reducing cellular uptake and overall efficacy of the delivery system. Therefore, we propose to use zwitterionic chitosan (ZWC), a new chitosan derivative, which has a unique pH-sensitive charge profile, as an alternative biomaterial to modify the cationic surface of PAMAM dendrimers. Stable electrostatic complex of ZWC and PAMAM dendrimers was formed at pH 7.4, where the PAMAM dendrimer surface was covered with ZWC, as demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of ZWC coating protected red blood cells and fibroblast cells from hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of PAMAM dendrimers, respectively. Confocal microscopy showed that the protective effect of ZWC disappeared at low pH as the complex dissociated due to the charge conversion of ZWC, allowing PAMAM dendrimers to enter cells. These results demonstrate that ZWC is able to provide a surface coverage of PAMAM dendrimers in a pH-dependent manner and, thus, enhance the utility of PAMAM dendrimers as a drug carrier to solid tumors with acidifying microenvironment. PMID:23510114

  1. [Sensitivity to drugs of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry with coli septicemia].

    PubMed

    Giurov, B

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the susceptibility of a total of 223 strains of Escherichia coli to therapeutic agents with the employment of the disk diffusion method. The organisms were isolated from internal organs and bone marrow of birds died of coli septicaemia. The serologic classification of the strains was defined with the use of 88 anti-group OK-agglutinating sera obtained through hyperimmunization of rabbits with the following Escherichia coli serotypes: 01-063, 068, 071, 073, 075, 078, 086, 0101, 0103, 0111-0114, 0119, 0124, 0129, 0135-0141, 0146, 0147, and 0149. It was found that serologically the strains referred as follows: 01-41 strains, 02-70 strains, 04-2 strains, 08-3 strains, 026-1 strain, 078-70 strains, 0111-2 strains, 0103-1 strain, 0141-1 strain. The number of untypable strains amounted to 32. Highest number of strains proved sensitive to colistin--96.06%, the remaining drugs following in a descending order: flumequine--95.65%, apramycin - 95.5%, gentamycin--93.72%, amoxicillin--93,8%, amikacin--88.57%, carbenicillin--86.88%, furazolidone--83,13%, and kanamycin--79.36%. High was the percent of strains resistant to tetracycline--66.17%, spectinomycin--61.67%, ampicillin--51.12%, chloramphenicol--50.23%, and streptomycin--44.84%.

  2. Design and synthesis of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolan; Fan, Rongrong; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Jiexin; Le, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    pH-sensitive polymer poly (polylactide-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly (acrylic acid) was synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization and ring-opening polymerization and characterized by gel permeation chromatography and (1)H NMR. The polymers can self-assemble to form micelles in aqueous medium, which respond rapidly to pH change within the gastrointestinal relevant pH range. Critical micelle concentrations and pH response behavior of the polymeric micelle were investigated. Water-insoluble drug nifedipine was loaded and the drug-loading content can be controlled by tuning the composition of the polymers. The in vitro release studies indicate pH sensitivity enabled rapid drug release at the environment of simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.36), the cumulative released amount of NFD reached more than 80% within 24 h, while only 35% in the simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.35). All the results showed that the pH-sensitive P(PLAMA-co-MAA)-b-PAA micelle may be a prospective candidate as oral drug delivery carrier for hydrophobic drugs with controlled release behavior. PMID:27342342

  3. Design and synthesis of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolan; Fan, Rongrong; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Jiexin; Le, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    pH-sensitive polymer poly (polylactide-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly (acrylic acid) was synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization and ring-opening polymerization and characterized by gel permeation chromatography and (1)H NMR. The polymers can self-assemble to form micelles in aqueous medium, which respond rapidly to pH change within the gastrointestinal relevant pH range. Critical micelle concentrations and pH response behavior of the polymeric micelle were investigated. Water-insoluble drug nifedipine was loaded and the drug-loading content can be controlled by tuning the composition of the polymers. The in vitro release studies indicate pH sensitivity enabled rapid drug release at the environment of simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.36), the cumulative released amount of NFD reached more than 80% within 24 h, while only 35% in the simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.35). All the results showed that the pH-sensitive P(PLAMA-co-MAA)-b-PAA micelle may be a prospective candidate as oral drug delivery carrier for hydrophobic drugs with controlled release behavior.

  4. Why Hospital Pharmacists Have Failed to Manage Antimalarial Drugs Stock-Outs in Pakistan? A Qualitative Insight

    PubMed Central

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hussain, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of hospital pharmacists towards drug management and reasons underlying stock-outs of antimalarial drugs in Pakistan. Methods. A qualitative study was designed to explore the perceptions of hospital pharmacists regarding drug management and irrational use of antimalarial drugs in two major cities of Pakistan, namely, Islamabad (national capital) and Rawalpindi (twin city). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital pharmacists using indepth interview guides at a place and time convenient for the respondents. Interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, were evaluated by thematic content analysis and by other authors' analysis. Results. Most of the respondents were of the view that financial constraints, inappropriate drug management, and inadequate funding were the factors contributing toward the problem of antimalarial drug stock-outs in healthcare facilities of Pakistan. The pharmacists anticipated that prescribing by nonproprietary names, training of health professionals, accepted role of hospital pharmacist in drug management, implementation of essential drug list and standard treatment guidelines for malaria in the healthcare system can minimize the problem of drug stock outs in healthcare system of Pakistan. Conclusion. The current study showed that all the respondents in the two cities agreed that hospital pharmacist has failed to play an effective role in efficient management of anti-malarial drugs stock-outs. PMID:24223321

  5. Development and Application of Zirconia Coated Paper Substrate for High Sensitivity Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Bai, Zongquan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-07-19

    Paper spray mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be promising for direct analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS); however, the strong hydrogen bond and van de Waals interactions between paper substrate and analytes containing polar functional groups (e.g., therapeutic drugs) affect greatly the elution behavior and analysis sensitivity of compounds of interest during paper spray. Herein, we developed a one-sided ZrO2 coated paper substrate through a facile vacuum filtration approach using commercial ZrO2 particles as coating material and soluble starch as adhesive agent. Owing to the unique surface properties, as-prepared ZrO2 paper substrate has been shown to have excellent performance for analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS during paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to original cellulose paper substrates, improvements of 43-189-fold in lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were obtained for the tested drugs using ZrO2 coated paper for paper spray. In comparing with the previously reported grade SG81 paper and one-sided silica coated paper, the LLOQs of the tested drugs with as-prepared ZrO2 paper decreased 1.5-16.5-fold relative to those from the above two, revealing that ZrO2 coated paper is a good candidate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS.

  6. Development and Application of Zirconia Coated Paper Substrate for High Sensitivity Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Bai, Zongquan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-07-19

    Paper spray mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be promising for direct analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS); however, the strong hydrogen bond and van de Waals interactions between paper substrate and analytes containing polar functional groups (e.g., therapeutic drugs) affect greatly the elution behavior and analysis sensitivity of compounds of interest during paper spray. Herein, we developed a one-sided ZrO2 coated paper substrate through a facile vacuum filtration approach using commercial ZrO2 particles as coating material and soluble starch as adhesive agent. Owing to the unique surface properties, as-prepared ZrO2 paper substrate has been shown to have excellent performance for analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS during paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to original cellulose paper substrates, improvements of 43-189-fold in lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were obtained for the tested drugs using ZrO2 coated paper for paper spray. In comparing with the previously reported grade SG81 paper and one-sided silica coated paper, the LLOQs of the tested drugs with as-prepared ZrO2 paper decreased 1.5-16.5-fold relative to those from the above two, revealing that ZrO2 coated paper is a good candidate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS. PMID:27314839

  7. Characterization of kinase suppressor of Ras-1 expression and anticancer drug sensitivity in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Scott M; Cowan, Kenneth H

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway plays an important role not only in cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and differentiation, but also in determining the sensitivity of cells to anticancer agents as well. Furthermore, expression of kinase suppressor of Ras-1 (KSR1), a molecular scaffold that modulates signaling through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway, has been shown to influence the cellular sensitivity to the anticancer agent cisplatin. To further define the role of KSR1 expression on drug sensitivity, the expression of KSR1 was examined in the NCI60 anticancer drug screen, a panel of cancer cell lines representing nine tissue types, established by the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The expression of thousands of molecular targets has been examined in the NCI60 panel as well as the cellular toxicity for greater than 400,000 compounds. KSR1 expression varied almost 30-fold difference between the highest and lowest expressing cell lines in the NCI60. Using the COMPARE analysis algorithm, KSR1 expression was correlated with sensitivity of the compounds screened by DTP and several novel agents were identified whose sensitivity correlated with KSR1 expression in the NCI60 panel. Cytotoxicity of two agents, cytochalasin H and tunicamycin, identified through the COMPARE analysis of KSR1 expression and drug sensitivity, was also examined in wild type (KSR(+/+)) mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and MEFs deficient in KSR1 expression (KSR1(-/-)). These studies demonstrated enhanced sensitivity, as well as increased ERK activation, in KSR(-/-) MEFs following exposure to tunicamycin or cytochalasin H compared to KSR(+/+) MEFs. Furthermore, restoration of KSR1 expression in KSR(-/-) MEFs following stable transduction of cells with a KSR1 expression vector, enhanced sensitivity of cells to tunicamycin and cytochalasin H and decreased ERK1/2 activation following exposure to these drugs. In

  8. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya.

  9. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  10. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  11. Combating malaria with nanotechnology-based targeted and combinatorial drug delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Miloni; S, Brijesh

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advancement of science, infectious diseases such as malaria remain an ongoing challenge globally. The main reason this disease still remains a menace in many countries around the world is the development of resistance to many of the currently available anti-malarial drugs. While developing new drugs is rather expensive and the prospect of a potent vaccine is still evading our dream of a malaria-free world, one of the feasible options is to package the older drugs in newer ways. For this, nano-sized drug delivery vehicles have been used and are proving to be promising prospects in the way malaria will be treated in the future. Since, monotherapy has given way to combination therapy in malaria treatment, nanotechnology-based delivery carriers enable to encapsulate various drug moieties in the same package, thus avoiding the complications involved in conjugation chemistry to produce hybrid drug molecules. Further, we envisage that using targeted delivery approaches, we may be able to achieve a much better radical cure and curb the side effects associated with the existing drug molecules. Thus, this review will focus on some of the nanotechnology-based combination and targeted therapies and will discuss the possibilities of better therapies that may be developed in the future. PMID:27067712

  12. Brief intermittent cocaine self-administration and abstinence sensitizes cocaine effects on the dopamine transporter and increases drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-02-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  13. Brief Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration and Abstinence Sensitizes Cocaine Effects on the Dopamine Transporter and Increases Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  14. Effect of Ganoderma on drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sadava, David; Still, David W; Mudry, Ryan R; Kane, Susan E

    2009-05-18

    Multidrug resistance is a major problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Ganoderma lucidum is a widely used herb in traditional Chinese medicine. We tested the effects of Ganoderma on drug-sensitive (H69) and multi-drug resistant (VPA) human SCLC cells. Both cells showed equal cytotoxicity when incubated with extracts of mycelia of 9 species of Ganoderma, including G. lucidum. Cells treated with the IC(50) of cytotoxic Ganoderma and analyzed by flow cytometry-PI staining showed increases in S phase. When compared untreated controls or SCLC cells treated with extracts of non-cytotoxic Ganoderma species, cells treated with extracts of cytotoxic Ganoderma species responded with an induction of apoptosis similar to cells treated with the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide and doxorubicin. This was shown by four criteria: increased DNA fragmentation within cells as measured by ELISA; increased TUNEL staining for DNA breaks; increased specific activities of caspases 3 and 9, but not caspase 8 by colorimetric assays, indicating the endogenous pathway; and similar patterns changes in the expressions of 9 genes involved in the cell cycle/apoptosis, as measured by RT-PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Pre-incubation of drug-resistant SCLC cells with cytotoxic Ganoderma reduced the IC(50) for etoposide (3.4-0.21 microM) and doxorubicin (0.19-0.04 microM). These results show that extracts of several species of Ganoderma are cytotoxic to both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant SCLC cells, are pro-apoptotic, induce gene expression patterns that are similar to SCLC cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs, and can reverse resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  15. Development of a Sensitive Outcome for Economical Drug Screening for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Tanigawa, Makoto; Barbour, Chris; Cortese, Irene; Kelley, William; Snyder, Blake; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Lehky, Tanya; Wu, Tianxia; Greenwood, Mark; Nair, Govind; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials to select and validate the best-performing outcome. The 1-year pre-treatment period of adaptively designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248) and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094) Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing 8 clinical, 1 electrophysiological, 1 optical coherence tomography, 7 MRI volumetric, 9 quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over 1 year (Δ) in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning techniques, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE) that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS), Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and 9 hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ = 9.10%; p = 0.0003) and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR, and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98 progressive MS

  16. Development of a Sensitive Outcome for Economical Drug Screening for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Tanigawa, Makoto; Barbour, Chris; Cortese, Irene; Kelley, William; Snyder, Blake; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Lehky, Tanya; Wu, Tianxia; Greenwood, Mark; Nair, Govind; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials to select and validate the best-performing outcome. The 1-year pre-treatment period of adaptively designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248) and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094) Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing 8 clinical, 1 electrophysiological, 1 optical coherence tomography, 7 MRI volumetric, 9 quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over 1 year (Δ) in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning techniques, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE) that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS), Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and 9 hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ = 9.10%; p = 0.0003) and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR, and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98 progressive MS

  17. A Disposable Microfluidic Device for Controlled Drug Release from Thermal-Sensitive Liposomes by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Long; Deng, Zhiting; Niu, Lili; Li, Fei; Yan, Fei; Wu, Junru; Cai, Feiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The drug release triggered thermally by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been considered a promising drug delivery strategy due to its localized energy and non-invasive characters. However, the mechanism underlying the HIFU-mediated drug delivery remains unclear due to its complexity at the cellular level. In this paper, micro-HIFU (MHIFU) generated by a microfluidic device is introduced which is able to control the drug release from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSL) and evaluate the thermal and mechanical effects of ultrasound on the cellular drug uptake and apoptosis. By simply adjusting the input electrical signal to the device, the temperature of sample can be maintained at 37 °C, 42 °C and 50 °C with the deviation of ± 0.3 °C as desired. The flow cytometry results show that the drug delivery under MHIFU sonication leads to a significant increase in apoptosis compared to the drug release by incubation alone at elevated temperature of 42 °C. Furthermore, increased squamous and protruding structures on the surface membrane of cells were detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) after MHIFU irradiation of TSL. We demonstrate that compared to the routine HIFU treatment, MHIFU enables monitoring of in situ interactions between the ultrasound and cell in real time. Furthermore, it can quantitatively analyze and characterize the alterations of the cell membrane as a function of the treatment time. PMID:26379786

  18. Mammaglobin 1 promotes breast cancer malignancy and confers sensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Picot, Nadia; Guerrette, Roxann; Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Jean, Stéphanie; Michaud, Pascale; Harquail, Jason; Benzina, Sami; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2016-07-01

    Mammaglobin 1 (MGB1), a member of the secretoglobin family, is expressed in mammary epithelial tissues and is overexpressed in most mammary carcinomas. Despite the extensive research correlating MGB1 expression profiles to breast cancer pathogenesis and disease outcome, the biological significance of MGB1 in cancer processes is still unclear. We have thus set out to conduct a functional evaluation of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes leading to disease progression. Using a series of breast cancer cell models with conditional MGB1 expression, we demonstrate that MGB1 promotes cancer cell malignant features. More specifically, loss of MGB1 expression resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation, soft agar spheroid formation, migration, and invasion capacities of breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, we also observed that MGB1 expression activates signaling pathways mediated by MAPK members (p38, JNK, and ERK), the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and NFκB. Moreover, MGB1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) features and modulates Snail, Twist and ZEB1 expression levels. Interestingly, we also observed that expression of MGB1 confers breast cancer cell sensitivity to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results support a role for MGB1 in tumor malignancy in exchange for chemosensitivity. These findings provide one of the first descriptive overview of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes and may offer new insight to the development of therapeutic and prognostic strategies in breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207726

  19. Adolescent exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate cross-sensitizes adults to methamphetamine with drug- and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Ryan A; Ross, Jordan M; Doyle, Hillary H; Helton, Amanda K; Picou, Brittany N; Schulz, Jordyn; Tavares, Chris; Bryant, Sarah; Dawson, Bryan L; Lloyd, Steven A

    2015-03-15

    The increasing availability, over-prescription, and misuse and abuse of ADHD psychostimulant medications in adolescent populations necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs persisting into adulthood. Male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to amphetamine (AMPH) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), methylphenidate (MPD) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), or cocaine (COC) (5.0 mg/kg) from postnatal day 22 to 31, which represents an early adolescent period. After an extended period of drug abstinence, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg), to test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures on behavioral cross-sensitization using an open field chamber. There were no sex- or dose-specific effects on motor activity in adolescent, saline-treated controls. However, AMPH, MPD, and COC adolescent exposures induced cross-sensitization to a subacute METH dose in adulthood, which is a hallmark of addiction and a marker of long-lasting plastic changes in the brain. Of additional clinical importance, AMPH-exposed male mice demonstrated increased cross-sensitization to METH in contrast to the female-specific response observed in MPD-treated animals. There were no sex-specific effects after adolescent COC exposures. This study demonstrates differential drug, dose, and sex-specific alterations induced by early adolescent psychostimulant exposure, which leads to behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood.

  20. A murine model of epicutaneous protein sensitization is useful to study efficacies of topical drugs in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Maili; Savinko, Terhi; Wolff, Henrik; Kvist, Peter H; Kemp, Kaare; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2010-04-01

    We studied the suitability of our murine model for the treatment trials of atopic dermatitis (AD). In this model topical application of ovalbumin (OVA) together with bacterial superantigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) induces a cutaneous disease resembling AD. Injured mouse skin was treated with three different drugs: a class III corticosteroid, a calcineurin inhibitor and a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor. One-week treatment with corticosteroid and phosphodiesterase inhibitor remarkably decreased both epidermal and dermal thickness, whereas the calcineurin inhibitor affected only the epidermal thickness. All investigated drugs reduced the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells onto OVA/SEB sensitized skin areas, whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as CD11c+ dendritic cells variously diminished after corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitor treatments. Cutaneous expression of interleukin -4, -13, -10 and interferon-gamma also decreased differently depending on drug type. Interestingly, the calcineurin inhibitor and phosphodiesterase inhibitor increased total IgE antibodies and decreased SEB-specific IgG2a antibodies in OVA/SEB sensitized mice. All these drugs can ameliorate cutaneous inflammation, although the degree of recovery depends on the type of the drug. In summary, our results show that this mouse model can be used to test new topical treatments for AD. PMID:20074670

  1. pH-sensitive fluorescent hepatocyte-targeting multilayer polyelectrolyte hollow microspheres as a smart drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Liu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Novel multilayer polyelectrolyte hollow microspheres with pH-sensitive fluorescence and hepatocyte-targeting functions were successfully fabricated via a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-modified chitosan (CSFITC) and sodium hyaluronate (HA) (as the polycation and polyanion, respectively) on polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) templates with galactosylated chitosan (GC) as the outermost layer; after etching the templates by dialysis, the aim was to use the microspheres to target hepatocytes specifically. TEM analysis revealed that they have a hollow structure with a particle size of about 260 nm, and DLS analysis demonstrated that they have pH and ionic strength dual-responsive characteristics. The hollow microspheres showed pH-sensitive fluorescence at a very low concentration by fluorescent emission spectra. MTT assays revealed that doxorubicin (a water-insoluble anticancer drug)-loaded (CSFITC/HA)4/GC hollow microspheres can specifically target hepatocytes and exhibit favorable cytocompatibility. Three typical model drugs were loaded into the (CSFITC/HA)4/GC hollow microspheres, and their drug-release kinetics in simulated body fluid (SBF) were estimated with different mathematical models. The results demonstrated that the drug-loading mechanism is chemosorption and the primary governing force for drug release is diffusion. Thus, the designed hollow microspheres are expected to be used for the diagnosis and therapy of hepatic cancer.

  2. Development of novel polymeric materials for gene therapy and pH-sensitive drug delivery: Modeling, synthesis, characterization, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian Curtis

    The aim of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of drug release mechanisms from polymers that undergo thermoreversible gelation and to synthesize new polymers based on these that exhibit both pH and temperature sensitivity. Novel block and random copolymers with cationic character have been developed for drug delivery and gene therapy applications. The development of these materials began with a study of the mechanism of drug release from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) block copolymers. This study revealed the release rates of drugs from water-soluble hydrogels composed of the PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer PluronicRTM F127 was dictated almost solely by the rate of interfacial dissolution at the water/gel interface. A setup was designed to measure drug release from such soluble systems in order to avoid confounding hydrodynamic effects as a result of shear on the delicate polymer/gel interface. This study was followed by a complementary analysis of the effect ionic salts play in the phase transitions and drug release profiles in aqueous F127 solutions. In an attempt to incorporate pH sensitivity into such drug release systems, several block copolymers of poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM), PEO and PPO were synthesized via anionic polymerization. Diblock materials (PEO-b-PDEAEM), either with or without a carboxylic acid endcap, were synthesized and characterized. Tablet dissolution experiments demonstrated pH-sensitivity in their drug release profiles relative to PEO tablets. Pentablock materials (PDEAEM-b-PEO-b-PPO- b-PEO-b-PDEAEM) were synthesized that maintain the thermoreversible gelation and micellization properties of F127 while introducing pH-dependent release from aqueous gels of the copolymer. This is the first example of non-crosslinked materials that exhibit both pH- and temperature-sensitive behavior. Using a similar synthesis route, random copolymers of PDEAEM and poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl

  3. pH- and temperature-sensitive polymeric microspheres for drug delivery: the dissolution of copolymers modulates drug release.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Stanciu, Cristina; Theodoridis, Georgios; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Most pH-/temperature-responsive polymers for controlled release of drugs are used as cross-linked hydrogels. However, the solubility properties of the linear polymers below and above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) are not exploited. Here, the preparation and characterization of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM)) and poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm)), known as "smart" polymers (SP), is reported. Both poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) and poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) display pH- and temperature-responsive properties. Poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) was designed to be insoluble in the gastric fluid (pH = 1.2), but soluble in the intestinal fluid (pH = 6.8 and 7.4), at the body temperature (37 degrees C). Poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) was designed to have a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) corresponding to 37 degrees C at pH = 7.4, therefore it is not soluble above the LCST. The solubility characteristics of these copolymers were exploited to modulate the rate of release of drugs by changing pH and/or temperature. These copolymers were solubilized with hydrophobic cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and vitamin B(12) (taken as a water soluble drug model system) in an acetone/methanol mixture and dispersed in mineral oil. By a progressive evaporation of the solvent, the liquid droplets were transformed into loaded CAB/SP microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetric studies and scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the polymeric components of the microspheres precipitated separately during solvent evaporation forming small microdomains. Moreover, vitamin B(12) was found to be molecularly dispersed in both microdomains with no specific affinity for any polymeric component of microspheres. The release of vitamin B(12) was investigated as a function of temperature, pH, and the CAB/SP ratio.

  4. pH- and temperature-sensitive polymeric microspheres for drug delivery: the dissolution of copolymers modulates drug release.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Stanciu, Cristina; Theodoridis, Georgios; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Most pH-/temperature-responsive polymers for controlled release of drugs are used as cross-linked hydrogels. However, the solubility properties of the linear polymers below and above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) are not exploited. Here, the preparation and characterization of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM)) and poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm)), known as "smart" polymers (SP), is reported. Both poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) and poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) display pH- and temperature-responsive properties. Poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) was designed to be insoluble in the gastric fluid (pH = 1.2), but soluble in the intestinal fluid (pH = 6.8 and 7.4), at the body temperature (37 degrees C). Poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) was designed to have a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) corresponding to 37 degrees C at pH = 7.4, therefore it is not soluble above the LCST. The solubility characteristics of these copolymers were exploited to modulate the rate of release of drugs by changing pH and/or temperature. These copolymers were solubilized with hydrophobic cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and vitamin B(12) (taken as a water soluble drug model system) in an acetone/methanol mixture and dispersed in mineral oil. By a progressive evaporation of the solvent, the liquid droplets were transformed into loaded CAB/SP microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetric studies and scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the polymeric components of the microspheres precipitated separately during solvent evaporation forming small microdomains. Moreover, vitamin B(12) was found to be molecularly dispersed in both microdomains with no specific affinity for any polymeric component of microspheres. The release of vitamin B(12) was investigated as a function of temperature, pH, and the CAB/SP ratio. PMID:19562468

  5. Soft agarose culture human tumour colony forming assay for drug sensitivity testing: [3H]-thymidine incorporation vs colony counting.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C. A.; Tsukamoto, T.; O'Brien, P. C.; Uhl, C. B.; Alley, M. C.; Lieber, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity testing, both by optical colony counting and by a [3H]-TdR incorporation assay, was performed on human tumour cells proliferating in soft agar cultures. Cells from two different human tumour cell lines, 5 different human tumour xenografts, and 94 different primary human tumour specimens of various histologic types were studied. Regression analysis comparing the results of the colony counting assay and the [3H]-TdR assay revealed good to excellent correlations between the two assay endpoints for quantitating the effect of in vitro anticancer drug exposure for a large number of different agents. The presence of pre-existing tumour cell aggregates complicates the performance of the optical colony counting assay. The [3H]-TdR incorporation assay is more sensitive and reproducible than the colony counting assay when performed on samples containing a large number of initially seeded tumour cell aggregates. PMID:4041359

  6. Development of a glucose-sensitive drug delivery device: Microencapsulated liposomes and poly(2-ethylacrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanokpanont, Sorada

    The current study is the development a self-regulated, glucose responsive drug delivery system, using dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes, a pH sensitive polymer, poly (2-ethylacrylic acid)(PEAA), and the feed back reaction of glucose with glucose oxidase enzyme (GO). The thesis investigates the use of PEAR and liposomes to work inside a microcapsule in response to the glucose level of the environment, by following the release of fluorescence probes, 8-aminonapthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, disodium salt/p-xylene-bis-pyridimuim bromide (ANTS/DPX) and a model protein, myoglobin. The continuing studies of PEAR and liposome interaction indicated an evidence of the previous hypothesis of two-mode release at different pHs. Differential scanning calorimetric studies of DOPC and PEAA complexes revealed the possibility of polymer adsorption to the liposomes in the pH range 5.5--7.0 and insertion in the liposome bilayer at pH < 5.2. The rate and extent of ANTS/DPX release from un-encapsulated liposomes were found to be affected by pH, PEAR concentration, presence of cholesterol in the liposomes, Ca 2+, and the concentration of sodium alginate. We have also shown possibilities of anchoring PEAR on to liposome by covalent conjugation although this led to inactivation of the polymer. It is also possible to entrap small molecular weight PEAA in liposomes. The evidence of the pH-induced protein release by the interaction of PEAA and liposomes was first demonstrated in this thesis. Kinetic parameters of GO were estimated to use as a basis for determination optimal concentration in the capsules. The pH reduction inside the capsule due to GO reaction showed positive results for the use of GO in a non-buffered system. The procedure of liquid-core alginate capsules was modified to facilitate the pH-responsive release of ANTS/DPX and myoglobin. The capsules responded to high blood glucose concentration by releasing myoglobin within 30 minutes. Although more studies are

  7. Development of Novel Polymeric Materials for Gene Therapy and pH-Sensitive Drug Delivery: Modeling, Synthesis, Characterization, and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Curtis Anderson

    2002-08-27

    The underlying theme of this thesis is the use of polymeric materials in bioapplications. Chapters 2-5 either develop a fundamental understanding of current materials used for bioapplications or establish protocols and procedures used in characterizing and synthesizing novel materials. In chapters 6 and 7 these principles and procedures are applied to the development of materials to be used for gene therapy and drug delivery. Chapter one is an introduction to the ideas that will be necessary to understand the subsequent chapters, as well as a literature review of these topics. Chapter two is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Controlled Release'' that examines the mechanism of drug release from a polymer gel, as well as experimental design suggestions for the evaluation of water soluble drug delivery systems. Chapter three is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences'' that discusses the effect ionic salts have on properties of the polymer systems examined in chapter two. Chapter four is a paper published in the Materials Research Society Fall 2000 Symposium Series dealing with the design and synthesis of a pH-sensitive polymeric drug delivery device. Chapter five is a paper that has been published in the journal ''Biomaterials'' proposing a novel polymer/metal composite for use as a biomaterial in hip arthroplasty surgery. Chapter six is a paper that will appear in an upcoming volume of the Journal ''Biomaterials'' dealing with the synthesis of a novel water soluble cationic polymer with possible applications in non-viral gene therapy. Chapter seven is a paper that has been submitted to ''Macromolecules'' discussing several novel block copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) that possess both pH-sensitive and temperature sensitive properties. Chapter eight contains a summary of the research contained in chapters 2-7 and proposes future research for the gene therapy and

  8. pH-sensitive pullulan-based nanoparticle carrier for adriamycin to overcome drug-resistance of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jing; Yang, Xiaoying; Li, Rongshan; Wang, Yinsong; Zhang, Ning

    2014-10-13

    Urocanic acid was conjugated to pullulan to synthesize O-urocanyl pullulan (URPA) with degree of substitution (DS) of 8.2%. URPA nanoparticles prepared by dialysis method had spherical shapes and a mean diameter of 156.8 ± 16.8 nm. Adriamycin (ADR) was successfully loaded into URPA nanoparticles and exhibited pH-sensitive in vitro release property. MTT assay showed that ADR-loaded URPA (ADR/URPA) nanoparticles had a significant higher toxicity against drug resistant MCF-7/ADR cells than free ADR, and the reversal index reached up to 9.6. The results of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that URPA nanoparticles efficiently enhanced accumulation and retention of ADR in MCF-7/ADR cells and successfully delivered ADR into cell nucleus. The reversal effect of ADR/URPA nanoparticles on the drug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells was perhaps related with their cell entry and intracellular drug release mechanisms.

  9. Enhanced anticancer activity of nanopreparation containing an MMP2-sensitive PEG-drug conjugate and cell-penetrating moiety.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Wang, Tao; Perche, Federico; Taigind, Anton; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-10-15

    In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient tumor cell internalization/bioavailability, and side effects, we developed a unique tumor-targeted micellar drug-delivery platform. Using paclitaxel as a model therapeutic, a nanopreparation composed of a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive self-assembly PEG 2000-paclitaxel conjugate (as a prodrug and MMP 2-sensitive moiety), transactivating transcriptional activator peptide-PEG1000-phosphoethanolamine (PE) (a cell-penetrating enhancer), and PEG1000-PE (a nanocarrier building block) was prepared. Several major drug delivery strategies, including self-assembly, PEGylation, the enhanced permeability and retention effect, stimulus sensitivity, a cell-penetrating moiety, and the concept of prodrug, were used in design of this nanoparticle in a collaborative manner. The nanopreparation allowed superior cell internalization, cytotoxicity, tumor targeting, and antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo over its nonsensitive counterpart, free paclitaxel and conventional micelles. This uniquely engineered nanoparticle has potential for effective intracellular delivery of drug into cancer cells. PMID:24062440

  10. Enhanced anticancer activity of nanopreparation containing an MMP2-sensitive PEG-drug conjugate and cell-penetrating moiety

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Wang, Tao; Perche, Federico; Taigind, Anton; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient tumor cell internalization/bioavailability, and side effects, we developed a unique tumor-targeted micellar drug-delivery platform. Using paclitaxel as a model therapeutic, a nanopreparation composed of a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive self-assembly PEG 2000-paclitaxel conjugate (as a prodrug and MMP 2-sensitive moiety), transactivating transcriptional activator peptide-PEG1000-phosphoethanolamine (PE) (a cell-penetrating enhancer), and PEG1000-PE (a nanocarrier building block) was prepared. Several major drug delivery strategies, including self-assembly, PEGylation, the enhanced permeability and retention effect, stimulus sensitivity, a cell-penetrating moiety, and the concept of prodrug, were used in design of this nanoparticle in a collaborative manner. The nanopreparation allowed superior cell internalization, cytotoxicity, tumor targeting, and antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo over its nonsensitive counterpart, free paclitaxel and conventional micelles. This uniquely engineered nanoparticle has potential for effective intracellular delivery of drug into cancer cells. PMID:24062440

  11. Enzyme- and pH-Sensitive Branched Polymer-Doxorubicin Conjugate-Based Nanoscale Drug Delivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-05-11

    Owing to their dendritic architectural features, branched copolymers have been investigated as drug delivery systems. In this paper, an enzyme- and pH-sensitive branched poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] (polyHPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugate possessing a molecular weight (MW) of 165 kDa was designed and prepared via a one-pot reaction and drug conjugation. This conjugate's potential as a smart, nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) is also investigated. The branched conjugate was capable of forming nanoparticles with a negative surface charge. The self-assembled nanoparticles were 102 nm in diameter as measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 95 nm in diameter via scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The nanoparticles were degraded to low-MW products (23∼25 kDa) in the presence of papain or cathepsin B, and the degradation was monitored via DLS and size-exclusion chromatography. The nanoparticles demonstrated pH-sensitive drug release, as the DOX was attached to the branched copolymer via a hydrazone bond. In comparison to free DOX, the conjugate-based nanoparticles exhibited greater accumulation in breast tumors, resulting in enhanced antitumor therapeutic indexes. Furthermore, widespread dissemination of the conjugate among breast tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical assay. Finally, no obvious systemic toxicities were observed in vivo in normal mice. Thus, the branched HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate may be employed as a safe and efficient pH- and enzyme-responsive NDDS for cancer therapy.

  12. Enzyme- and pH-Sensitive Branched Polymer-Doxorubicin Conjugate-Based Nanoscale Drug Delivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-05-11

    Owing to their dendritic architectural features, branched copolymers have been investigated as drug delivery systems. In this paper, an enzyme- and pH-sensitive branched poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] (polyHPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugate possessing a molecular weight (MW) of 165 kDa was designed and prepared via a one-pot reaction and drug conjugation. This conjugate's potential as a smart, nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) is also investigated. The branched conjugate was capable of forming nanoparticles with a negative surface charge. The self-assembled nanoparticles were 102 nm in diameter as measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 95 nm in diameter via scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The nanoparticles were degraded to low-MW products (23∼25 kDa) in the presence of papain or cathepsin B, and the degradation was monitored via DLS and size-exclusion chromatography. The nanoparticles demonstrated pH-sensitive drug release, as the DOX was attached to the branched copolymer via a hydrazone bond. In comparison to free DOX, the conjugate-based nanoparticles exhibited greater accumulation in breast tumors, resulting in enhanced antitumor therapeutic indexes. Furthermore, widespread dissemination of the conjugate among breast tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical assay. Finally, no obvious systemic toxicities were observed in vivo in normal mice. Thus, the branched HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate may be employed as a safe and efficient pH- and enzyme-responsive NDDS for cancer therapy. PMID:27102364

  13. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Miyamoto, Fusako; Kawaji, Kumi; Hattori, Toshio; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  14. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-09-30

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  15. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistance in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Sato, Yoshitake; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the beta-lactamase-producing ability and resistance to 20 antibacterial agents of 448 clinically isolated strains of Haemophilus influenzae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 376 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions that participated in a nationwide Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. Between phase 1 and phase 2 the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS) strains declined from 62.9% to 34.3%; the proportions of beta-lactamase-positive ABPC-resistant (BLPAR) strains were 8.3% and 6.4% in phases 1 and 2, but the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR) strains increased from 28.8% in phase 1 to 59.3% in phase 2. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for H. influenzae in phase 1 and phase 2 showed that cefcapene, cefpodoxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, and clarithromycin kept the same level, while cefdinir, faropenem, and rokitamycin showed 2-fold to 8-fold decreases. With the exception of the above antibiotics, all of the other antibacterial agents tested showed 2-fold to 4-fold increases. The MIC(90) values of the beta-lactam drugs for BLNAR were 2-fold to 32-fold higher than the values for BLNAS. The proportion of BLNAR H. influenzae strains rose dramatically over the 3 years between phases 1 and 2. In relation to age, prior administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery as background factors, no significant differences between BLNAS and BLNAR were detected in phase 1. In the phase 2 survey, the proportion of BLNAR strains showed significant differences between children under 3 years and those aged 3 years or more, and there were also significant differences according to whether antibacterial agents, especially beta-lactams, had been administered previously. No significant difference was found in resistant bacteria according to whether or not

  16. Cellular HIV type 1 DNA levels are equivalent among drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral naive patients.

    PubMed

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Hezka, Johana; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Mamais, Ioannis; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    coreceptor tropism dominance suggests that both drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains behave similarly in early infection in newly diagnosed patients.

  17. Graphene oxide-enhanced sol-gel transition sensitivity and drug release performance of an amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huawen; Wang, Xiaowen; Lee, Ka I; Ma, Kaikai; Hu, Hong; Xin, John H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a highly sensitive amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite incorporating with graphene oxide (GO), which exhibited a low-intensity UV light-triggered sol-gel transition. Non-cytotoxicity was observed for the composite gels after the GO incorporation. Of particular interest were the microchannels that were formed spontaneously within the GO-incorporated UV-gel, which expedited sustained drug release. Therefore, the present highly UV-sensitive, non-cytotoxic amphiphilic copolymer-based composites is expected to provide enhanced photothermal therapy and chemotherapy by means of GO’s unique photothermal properties, as well as through efficient passive targeting resulting from the sol-gel transition characteristic of the copolymer-based system with improved sensitivity, which thus promises the enhanced treatment of patients with cancer and other diseases. PMID:27539298

  18. Graphene oxide-enhanced sol-gel transition sensitivity and drug release performance of an amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Huawen; Wang, Xiaowen; Lee, Ka I.; Ma, Kaikai; Hu, Hong; Xin, John H.

    2016-08-01

    We report the fabrication of a highly sensitive amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite incorporating with graphene oxide (GO), which exhibited a low-intensity UV light-triggered sol-gel transition. Non-cytotoxicity was observed for the composite gels after the GO incorporation. Of particular interest were the microchannels that were formed spontaneously within the GO-incorporated UV-gel, which expedited sustained drug release. Therefore, the present highly UV-sensitive, non-cytotoxic amphiphilic copolymer-based composites is expected to provide enhanced photothermal therapy and chemotherapy by means of GO’s unique photothermal properties, as well as through efficient passive targeting resulting from the sol-gel transition characteristic of the copolymer-based system with improved sensitivity, which thus promises the enhanced treatment of patients with cancer and other diseases.

  19. [The effects of the drug Mirtilene Sifi on retinal sensitivity in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Iliuţă, C; Nicodin, A; Ispăşoiu, C T; Mitulescu, D

    1999-01-01

    Our study involve 15 normal ophthalmological subjects, when take 4 doses a day of Mirtelene Sifi for 15 days. The assessment of the efficiency of this drug on visual performances was made by comparison of the results (before and after the administration) obtained by testing the retinal sensibility (threshold central 30-2, Humphrey visual field analyzer) and the adaptation ability to dark of the retina. The results show the real efficiency of the drug on both the parameters.

  20. Regulation of sensitivity of tumor cells to antitubulin drugs by Cdk1-TAZ signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yulei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Antitubulin drugs are commonly used for the treatment of numerous cancers. However, either the intrinsic or acquired resistances of patients to these drugs result in the failure of the treatment and high mortality of cancers. Therefore, identifying genes or signalling pathways involved in antitubulin drug resistances is critical for future successful treatment of cancers. TAZ (Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), which is a core component of the Hippo pathway, is overexpressed in various cancers. We have recently shown that high levels of TAZ in cancer cells result in Taxol resistance through up-regulation of downstream targets Cyr61 and CTGF. However, how TAZ is regulated in response to Taxol is largely unknown. In this study, we found that Cdk1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1) directly phosphorylated TAZ on six novel sites independent of the Hippo pathway, which further resulted in TAZ degradation through proteasome system. Phosphorylation-mimicking TAZ mutant was unstable, and therefore abolished TAZ-induced antitubulin drug resistances. This study provides first evidence that Cdk1 is a novel kinase phosphorylating and regulating TAZ stability and suggests that Cdk1-TAZ signalling is a critical regulator of antitubulin drug response in cancer cells and may be a potential target for the treatment of antitubulin-drug resistant cancer patients. PMID:26183396

  1. Propargyl-Linked Antifolates Are Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Behnoush; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Shoen, Carolyn; Krucinska, Jolanta; Cynamon, Michael; Anderson, Amy C.; Wright, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause widespread, life-threatening disease. In the last decade, this threat has grown dramatically as multi- and extensively-drug resistant (MDR and XDR) bacteria have spread globally and the number of agents that effectively treat these infections is significantly reduced. We have been developing the propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs) as potent inhibitors of the essential enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from bacteria and recently found that charged PLAs with partial zwitterionic character showed improved mycobacterial cell permeability. Building on a hypothesis that these PLAs may penetrate the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis and inhibit the essential cytoplasmic DHFR, we screened a group of PLAs for antitubercular activity. In this work, we identified several PLAs as potent inhibitors of the growth of M. tuberculosis with several of the compounds exhibiting minimum inhibition concentrations equal to or less than 1 μg/mL. Furthermore, two of the compounds were very potent inhibitors of MDR and XDR strains. A high resolution crystal structure of one PLA bound to DHFR from M. tuberculosis reveals the interactions of the ligands with the target enzyme. PMID:27580226

  2. Propargyl-Linked Antifolates Are Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hajian, Behnoush; Scocchera, Eric; Keshipeddy, Santosh; G-Dayanandan, Narendran; Shoen, Carolyn; Krucinska, Jolanta; Reeve, Stephanie; Cynamon, Michael; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause widespread, life-threatening disease. In the last decade, this threat has grown dramatically as multi- and extensively-drug resistant (MDR and XDR) bacteria have spread globally and the number of agents that effectively treat these infections is significantly reduced. We have been developing the propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs) as potent inhibitors of the essential enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from bacteria and recently found that charged PLAs with partial zwitterionic character showed improved mycobacterial cell permeability. Building on a hypothesis that these PLAs may penetrate the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis and inhibit the essential cytoplasmic DHFR, we screened a group of PLAs for antitubercular activity. In this work, we identified several PLAs as potent inhibitors of the growth of M. tuberculosis with several of the compounds exhibiting minimum inhibition concentrations equal to or less than 1 μg/mL. Furthermore, two of the compounds were very potent inhibitors of MDR and XDR strains. A high resolution crystal structure of one PLA bound to DHFR from M. tuberculosis reveals the interactions of the ligands with the target enzyme. PMID:27580226

  3. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    , due to leaky tumor vasculature and the resulting Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) phenomenon. In Chapter 2 we report that both gefitinib and the structurally similar EGFR inhibitor erlotinib display environment-dependent fluorescence properties. Peak excitation was 345 nm, and the emission peak ranged from 365 to 476 nm, depending upon the polarity of the environment and physical state of the drug. The fluorescence was negligible in aqueous solution, but intense in organic solvents or membrane bilayers. The environment-sensitive fluorescence properties of these drugs enabled rapid evaluation of numerous parameters affecting liposomal drug incorporation and performance. Up to 4-6 mol% of gefitinib could be incorporated in the liposome bilayer, based upon hydrophobic interactions with membrane bilayers. In contrast, 40-60 mol% could be loaded into the aqueous core of pre-formed liposomes at high efficiency, using a remote loading procedure. A stable formulation consisting of distearoylphosphatidylcholine: polyethylene glycol-distereoylphosphatidylethanolamine: cholesterol (DSPC:PEGDSPE:Chol, 9:1:5 mol:mol:mol) and containing drug at 50-60 mol% gefitinib (L-GEF) showed minimal leakage in serum-containing medium over 24 h at 37°C, which should be sufficient to improve biodistribution in vivo. Chapter 3 investigated the pharmacological activity of liposome-encapsulated gefitinib, alone and in combination with several prevalent anticancer agents. Experiments with MCF7 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that liposome encapsulated gefitinib formulation (L-GEF) had a 2-fold higher IC50 (concentration of drug resulting in half-maximal growth inhibition) than free gefitinib. Lower in vitro potency would be consistent with delayed drug release from the carrier. Therapeutic effects were investigated in combination with the cytotoxic agents paclitaxel and doxorubicin. The drug-resistant MCF7R cell line was 23-fold more resistant to paclitaxel than the parental, drug-sensitive

  4. pH-Sensitive micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic copolymer brush for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, You Qiang; Zheng, Ling Shan; Guo, Xin Dong; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Li Juan

    2011-01-10

    A novel pH-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer brush poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether monomethacrylate) [P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA] was defined and synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique. The molecular structures and characteristics of this copolymer and its precursors were confirmed by (1)H NMR, FT-IR, and GPC. The CMC of P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA in aqueous medium was determined to be 1-4 mg/L. This copolymer could self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution with an average size of 120-250 nm determined by DLS. The morphologies of the micelles were found to be spherical by SEM and TEM. Ibuprofen (IBU), a poorly water-soluble drug, was selected as the model drug and wrapped into the core of micelles via dialysis method. Drug entrapment efficiency reached to 90%. The in vitro release behavior of IBU from these micelles was pH-dependent. The cumulative release percent of IBU was less than 20% of the initial drug content in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1.2) over 12 h, but 90% was released in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4) within 6 h. The release profiles showed that the P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA micelles could inhibit the premature burst drug release under the intestinal conditions. All the results indicate that the P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA micelle may be a potential oral drug delivery carrier for poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:21121600

  5. High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode

  6. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  7. Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Modified Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Enables Progressive Drug Targeting of Tumors via pH-Sensitive Charge Inversion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaole; Qin, Jiayi; Fan, Yuchao; Qin, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Yujie; Wu, Zhenghong

    2016-04-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers are potential candidates for drug delivery systems due to their remarkable cell-penetrating power that results from their strong positive surface charge. However, the positively charged surfaces always lead to serious cytotoxicity and the rapid clearance of polyamidoamine in vivo, which limit the application of these dendrimers. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a carboxymethyl chitosan-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer to achieve progressive drug targeting of tumors via pH-sensitive charge inversion. With the shielding of carboxymethyl chitosan, the complex was negatively charged at physiological conditions (pH 7.4) and prone to enrich at tumor sites due to the enhanced permeation and retention effect; however, it regained a positive charge via the removal of the carboxymethyl chitosan coating under tumor-acidic conditions (pH 6.5) and achieved high intracellular uptake in tumor cells through electrostatic adsorptive endocytosis. In this study, these dendrimers exhibited 1.99- and 1.76-times higher cellular uptake efficiencies at pH 7.4 in MCF-7 or A549 cells, respectively, compared with efficiencies at pH 6.5, indicating an effective pH-dependent accumulation; the fluorescence intensities of these cells exposed to the dendrimers at pH 6.5 were also 16.45- and 9.27-fold greater, respectively, than those of free doxorubicin. After intravenous administration in mice bearing H22 tumors, doxorubicin-loaded dendrimers exhibited a 1.50-fold greater antitumor activity and presented no obvious systematic toxicity based on histological analysis compared with free drugs. Overall, a simple decoration of carboxymethyl chitosan demonstrated to be a promising way for cationic nanocarriers to achieve pH-sensitive drug release and charge conversion response to tumor microenvironment pH and enhance the antitumor therapy efficiency of anticancer drugs. PMID:27301193

  8. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eugene K.; Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C.; Khine, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to - and even superior to - fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function.

  9. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eugene K.; Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C.; Khine, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to – and even superior to – fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function. PMID:26139150

  10. Comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics in a rhesus macaque drug administration study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin J.; Yin, Weiwei; Arafat, Dalia; Tang, Yan; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Lapp, Stacey; Moreno, Alberto; Meyer, Esmeralda; DeBarry, Jeremy D.; Pakala, Suman; Nayak, Vishal; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Jones, Dean P.; Galinski, Mary; Styczynski, Mark P.; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Whole blood and bone marrow (BM) RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features) have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven timepoints before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modeling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modeling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the BM with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance was observed following each round of drug exposure. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine's predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system. PMID:25453034

  11. Ultrasound-mediated intracellular drug delivery using microbubbles and temperature-sensitive liposomes.

    PubMed

    Yudina, A; de Smet, M; Lepetit-Coiffé, M; Langereis, S; Van Ruijssevelt, L; Smirnov, P; Bouchaud, V; Voisin, P; Grüll, H; Moonen, C T W

    2011-11-01

    A novel two-step protocol for intracellular drug delivery has been evaluated in vitro. As a first step TO-PRO-3 (a cell-impermeable dye that displays a strong fluorescence enhancement upon binding to nucleic acids) encapsulated in thermosensitive liposomes was released after heating to 42°C. A second step consisted of ultrasound-mediated local permeabilization of cell membrane allowing TO-PRO-3 internalization observable as nuclear staining. Only the combination of two consecutive steps - heating and sonication in the presence of SonoVue microbubbles led to the model drug TO-PRO-3 release from the thermosensitive liposomes and its intracellular uptake. This protocol is potentially beneficial for the intracellular delivery of cell impermeable drugs that suffer from rapid clearance and/or degradation in blood and are not intrinsically taken up by cells.

  12. Magnetic/pH-sensitive κ-carrageenan/sodium alginate hydrogel nanocomposite beads: preparation, swelling behavior, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahdavinia, Gholam Reza; Rahmani, Zeinab; Karami, Shiva; Pourjavadi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of magnetic and pH-sensitive beads based on κ-carrageenan and sodium alginate for use as drug-targeting carriers. Physical cross-linking using K(+)/Ca(2+) ions was applied to obtain ionic cross-linked magnetic hydrogel beads. The produced magnetite beads were thoroughly characterized by TEM, SEM/EDS, XRD, FTIR, and VSM techniques. While the water absorbency (WA) of magnetic beads was enhanced by increasing the weight ratio of κ-carrageenan, introducing magnetic nanoparticles caused a decrease in WA capacity from 15.4 to 6.3 g/g. Investigation on the swelling of the hydrogel beads in NaCl, KCl, and CaCl2 solutions revealed the disintegration of beads depending on the composition of hydrogel beads and the type of metal cations in swelling media. The swelling ratio of beads indicated pH-dependent properties with maximum water absorbing at pH 7.4. Also, it was found that the strength of pH-sensitivity of magnetic beads was low for beads with the high content of carrageenan component. The in vitro drug release studies from hydrogels exhibited significant behaviors on the subject of physiological-simulated pH values and external magnetic fields. The maximum cumulative releases obtained were 98 and 43% at pH values 7.4 and 1.2, respectively. The Introducing magnetite nanoparticles influenced the cumulative release of drug. PMID:25197770

  13. Drug in adhesive patch of palonosetron: Effect of pressure sensitive adhesive on drug skin permeation and in vitro-in vivo correlation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hui, Mei; Quan, Peng; Fang, Liang

    2016-09-25

    Palonosetron (PAL) is recommended for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this study was to develop a long-acting PAL transdermal patch to improve patient compliance. We were particularly concerned about the effect of pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) on PAL skin permeability. Formulation factors including PSAs, backing films and drug loadings were investigated in the in vitro skin permeation study using rabbit skin. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer study and thermal analysis were conducted to investigate the drug-PSA interaction and thermodynamic activity of PSAs, respectively. The results indicated that high drug skin permeation amount was obtained in PSA DURO-TAK(®)87-2516, which had low interaction potential with PAL and high thermodynamic activity. The optimized patch was composed of PAL of 8 %, DURO-TAK(®)87-2516 as PSA, CoTran™ 9700 as backing film and Scotchpak™ 9744 as release liner. The in vitro skin permeation amount of the optimized patch was 734.0±55.8μg/cm(2) during 3-day administration. The absolute bioavailability of the optimized patch was 43 % in rabbit and a good in vitro-in vivo correlation coefficient was obtained (R(2)=0.989). These results indicated the feasibility of PAL transdermal patch in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. PMID:27521703

  14. Near-infrared light remote-controlled intracellular anti-cancer drug delivery using thermo/pH sensitive nanovehicle.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanping; Chen, Jun; Bi, Ying; Xu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Hui; Gao, Jimin; Hu, Yi; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2015-04-01

    Stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems have been developed to enhance the tumor-targeting drug transportation and minimize the severe side effects along with the chemotherapy. In this study, a near-infrared (NIR) light triggered drug delivery system was developed based on the amphiphilic chitosan derivative-coated single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) encapsulated in the thermo/pH sensitive nanogel (CS/PNIPAAm@CNT). The PEG diacrylate (Mw = 250 Da) was applied in the present work to tune the nanoparticles with the phase transition temperature at ∼ 38 °C, which was an attempt to match the prerequisite for the in vivo applications. Owing to the π-π stacking, hydrophobic interaction and the opportunity of Schiff-base formation between chitosan and doxorubicin (DOX), the nanoparticles possessed a relative high drug loading capacity (∼ 43%). The DOX loaded CS/PNIPAAm@CNT released DOX faster at 40 °C than at 25 °C, meanwhile faster at pH 5.0 in comparison with that at pH 7.4. Moreover, the rapid and repetitive release of DOX was observed when the DOX-loaded CS/PNIPAAm@CNT was irradiated under NIR light. Furthermore, DOX-loaded CS/PNIPAAm@CNT upon NIR irradiation showed significantly greater cytotoxicity in HeLa cells owing to NIR-triggered increase in temperature and enhanced DOX release. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was utilized to demonstrate the enhanced cell uptake of the as prepared nanoparticles and the faster drug release under the NIR irradiation and lower pH. All the results suggest that multifunctional DOX-loaded CS/PNIPAAm@CNT nanocomposite is a promising therapeutic nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery with great potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  15. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    , due to leaky tumor vasculature and the resulting Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) phenomenon. In Chapter 2 we report that both gefitinib and the structurally similar EGFR inhibitor erlotinib display environment-dependent fluorescence properties. Peak excitation was 345 nm, and the emission peak ranged from 365 to 476 nm, depending upon the polarity of the environment and physical state of the drug. The fluorescence was negligible in aqueous solution, but intense in organic solvents or membrane bilayers. The environment-sensitive fluorescence properties of these drugs enabled rapid evaluation of numerous parameters affecting liposomal drug incorporation and performance. Up to 4-6 mol% of gefitinib could be incorporated in the liposome bilayer, based upon hydrophobic interactions with membrane bilayers. In contrast, 40-60 mol% could be loaded into the aqueous core of pre-formed liposomes at high efficiency, using a remote loading procedure. A stable formulation consisting of distearoylphosphatidylcholine: polyethylene glycol-distereoylphosphatidylethanolamine: cholesterol (DSPC:PEGDSPE:Chol, 9:1:5 mol:mol:mol) and containing drug at 50-60 mol% gefitinib (L-GEF) showed minimal leakage in serum-containing medium over 24 h at 37°C, which should be sufficient to improve biodistribution in vivo. Chapter 3 investigated the pharmacological activity of liposome-encapsulated gefitinib, alone and in combination with several prevalent anticancer agents. Experiments with MCF7 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that liposome encapsulated gefitinib formulation (L-GEF) had a 2-fold higher IC50 (concentration of drug resulting in half-maximal growth inhibition) than free gefitinib. Lower in vitro potency would be consistent with delayed drug release from the carrier. Therapeutic effects were investigated in combination with the cytotoxic agents paclitaxel and doxorubicin. The drug-resistant MCF7R cell line was 23-fold more resistant to paclitaxel than the parental, drug-sensitive

  16. Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Ugandan Schoolchildren Selects for Plasmodium falciparum Transporter Polymorphisms That Modify Drug Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter I; Conrad, Melissa D; Legac, Jennifer; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Tumwebaze, Patrick; Wandera, Bonnie; Brooker, Simon J; Staedke, Sarah G; Kamya, Moses R; Nsobya, Sam L; Dorsey, Grant; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-10-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) offers prolonged protection against malaria, but its impact on Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity is uncertain. In a trial of intermittent preventive treatment in schoolchildren in Tororo, Uganda, in 2011 to 2012, monthly DP for 1 year decreased the incidence of malaria by 96% compared to placebo; DP once per school term offered protection primarily during the first month after therapy. To assess the impact of DP on selection of drug resistance, we compared the prevalence of key polymorphisms in isolates that emerged at different intervals after treatment with DP. Blood obtained monthly and at each episode of fever was assessed for P. falciparum parasitemia by microscopy. Samples from 160 symptomatic and 650 asymptomatic episodes of parasitemia were assessed at 4 loci (N86Y, Y184F, and D1246Y in pfmdr1 and K76T in pfcrt) that modulate sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials, utilizing a ligase detection reaction-fluorescent microsphere assay. For pfmdr1 N86Y and pfcrt K76T, but not the other studied polymorphisms, the prevalences of mutant genotypes were significantly greater in children who had received DP within the past 30 days than in those not treated within 60 days (86Y, 18.0% versus 8.3% [P = 0.03]; 76T, 96.0% versus 86.1% [P = 0.05]), suggesting selective pressure of DP. Full sequencing of pfcrt in a subset of samples did not identify additional polymorphisms selected by DP. In summary, parasites that emerged soon after treatment with DP were more likely than parasites not under drug pressure to harbor pfmdr1 and pfcrt polymorphisms associated with decreased sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under no. NCT01231880.). PMID:27401569

  17. Enhanced Sensitivity to Drug-Induced QT Interval Lengthening in Patients With Heart Failure Due to Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, James E.; Overholser, Brian R.; Wroblewski, Heather A.; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Amankwa, Kwadwo; Borzak, Steven; Kingery, Joanna R.; Coram, Rita; Zipes, Douglas P.; Flockhart, David A.; Kovacs, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) are at increased risk for drug-induced torsades de pointes (TdP) due to unknown mechanisms. Our objective was to determine if sensitivity to drug-induced QT interval lengthening is enhanced in patients with HF. In this multicenter, prospective study, 15 patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter requiring conversion to sinus rhythm were enrolled: 6 patients with New York Heart Association class II to III HF (mean ejection fraction [EF], 30% ± 9%), and 9 controls (mean EF, 53% ± 6%). Patients received ibutilide 1 mg intravenously. Blood samples and 12-lead electrocardiograms were obtained prior to and during 48 hours postinfusion. Serum ibutilide concentrations at 50% maximum effect on Fridericia-corrected QT (QTF) intervals (EC50) were determined, and areas under the effect (QTF interval vs time) curves (AUECs) were calculated. Ibutilide concentration–QTF relationships were best described by a sigmoidal Emax model with a hypothetical effect compartment. Median [interquartile range] AUEC from 0 to 4 hours was larger in the HF group than in controls (1.86 [1.86-1.93] vs 1.82 [1.81-1.84] s·h; P = .04). Median EC50 was lower in the HF group (0.48 [0.46-0.49] vs 1.85 [1.10-3.23] μg/L; P = .008). Sensitivity to drug-induced QT interval lengthening is enhanced in patients with systolic HF, which may contribute to the increased risk of drug-induced TdP. PMID:22045830

  18. Improving sensitivity in microchip electrophoresis coupled to ESI-MS/MS on the example of a cardiac drug mixture.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Fabian; Scholl, Tobias; Ohla, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2014-07-01

    A comprehensive study for a sensitivity optimization in MCE with mass spectrometric detection is presented. As a text mixture, we chose a mixture of the cardiac drugs propranolol, bisoprolol, lidocaine, procaine and studied the effect of different chip layouts and experimental parameters with the aim of achieving both high sensitivity in MS detection and adequate chip electrophoretic separation. An important aspect was a comparison of microfluidic layouts containing various sheath-flow channels with that avoiding sheath-flow junctions on-chip. We utilized glass chips with monolithically integrated nanospray emitter tips coupled dead volume-free to an IT mass spectrometer running in fragmentation mode (MS(n) ). With this setup, detection limits down to 0.6 ng/mL for the model compound propranolol were achieved.

  19. pH-sensitive poly(histidine)-PEG/DSPE-PEG co-polymer micelles for cytosolic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Zhu, Lin; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    To introduce pH sensitivity into the DSPE-PEG-based micellar system and achieve the quick intracellular drug release in response to the acidity in endosomes, a mixed polymeric micelle was developed based on three grafted copolymers, including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000(DSPE-PEG2000), antinucleosome antibody (mAb 2C5)-modified DSPE-PEG3400 (DSPE-PEG3400-2C5), and poly(ethylene glycol)-coupled poly(l-histidine) (PHIS-PEG2000). The structure of PHIS-PEG2000 was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The mixed micelles with the diameter ranging from 110 to 135nm were prepared using a dialysis method against pH 7.6 PBS. Paclitaxel (PCT) was used as a model drug, the encapsulation efficiency and loading content of PCT were 88% and 5%, respectively. The mixed micelles composed with 50wt% of PHIS-PEG2000 showed the desired pH-dependent drug release property with much faster drug release than micelles without PHIS-PEG2000. At pH around 5.5, about 75–95% of the loaded drug was released within 2 h. The MTT assay showed PCT-loaded mixed micelles had higher cytotoxicity at pH 5.8 than that at pH 7.4. Further modification of the mixed micelles with anti-cancer nucleosome- specific monoclonal antibody 2C5 significantly increased their cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity. Thus, the low pH in endosomes could trigger the PCT release from the pH-sensitive mixed micelles after 2C5-mediated endocytosis. The results of this study suggest that the mixed micelles (DSPE-PEG2000/DSPE-PEG3400-2C5/PHIS-PEG2000) could enhance the tumor cell-specific internalization and trigger the quick drug release, resulting in the improved anti-cancer efficacy. PMID:23102622

  20. pH-sensitive poly(histidine)-PEG/DSPE-PEG co-polymer micelles for cytosolic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Zhu, Lin; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    To introduce pH sensitivity into the DSPE-PEG-based micellar system and achieve the quick intracellular drug release in response to the acidity in endosomes, a mixed polymeric micelle was developed based on three grafted copolymers, including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000(DSPE-PEG(2000)), antinucleosome antibody (mAb 2C5)-modified DSPE-PEG(3400) (DSPE-PEG(3400)-2C5), and poly(ethylene glycol)-coupled poly(L-histidine) (PHIS-PEG(2000)). The structure of PHIS-PEG(2000) was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The mixed micelles with the diameter ranging from 110 to 135 nm were prepared using a dialysis method against pH 7.6 PBS. Paclitaxel (PCT) was used as a model drug, the encapsulation efficiency and loading content of PCT were 88% and 5%, respectively. The mixed micelles composed with 50 wt% of PHIS-PEG(2000) showed the desired pH-dependent drug release property with much faster drug release than micelles without PHIS-PEG(2000). At pH around 5.5, about 75-95% of the loaded drug was released within 2 h. The MTT assay showed PCT-loaded mixed micelles had higher cytotoxicity at pH 5.8 than that at pH 7.4. Further modification of the mixed micelles with anti-cancer nucleosome-specific monoclonal antibody 2C5 significantly increased their cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity. Thus, the low pH in endosomes could trigger the PCT release from the pH-sensitive mixed micelles after 2C5-mediated endocytosis. The results of this study suggest that the mixed micelles (DSPE-PEG(2000)/DSPE-PEG(3400)-2C5/PHIS-PEG(2000)) could enhance the tumor cell-specific internalization and trigger the quick drug release, resulting in the improved anti-cancer efficacy. PMID:23102622

  1. Disposition of ultrasound sensitive polymeric drug carrier in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Michael C.; Eisenbrey, John R.; Soulen, Michael C.; Schultz, Susan M.; Ouma, Richard O.; White, Sarah B.; Furth, Emma E.; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Rational and Objectives A doxorubicin-loaded microbubble has been developed that can be destroyed with focused ultrasound resulting in fragments, or “nanoshards” capable of escaping through the leaky tumor vasculature, promoting accumulation within the interstitium. This study utilizes a rat liver cancer model to examine the biodistribution and tumoral delivery of this microbubble platform compared with de novo drug-loaded polymer nanoparticles and free doxorubicin. Methods Microbubbles (1.8µm) and 217nm nanoparticles were prepared containing 14-C labeled doxorubicin. Microbubbles, nanoparticles, a combination of the two, or free doxorubicin were administered intravenously in rats bearing hepatomas, concomitant with tumor insonation. Doxorubicin levels in plasma, organs and tumors were quantified after 4hours, 7 and 14days. Tumors were measured upon sacrifice and evaluated with autoradiography and histology. Results Animals treated with microbubbles had significantly lower plasma doxorubicin concentrations (0.466±0.068%/ml) compared with free doxorubicin (3.033±0.612%/ml, p=0.0019). Drug levels in the myocardium were significantly lower in animals treated with microbubbles compared to free doxorubicin (0.168%/g tissue vs. 0.320%/g, p=0.0088). Tumors treated with microbubbles showed significantly higher drug levels than tumors treated with free doxorubicin (2.491±0.501 %/g vs. 0.373±0.087 %/g, p=0.0472). These tumors showed significantly less growth than tumors treated with free doxorubicin (p=0.0390). Conclusions Doxorubicin loaded microbubbles triggered with ultrasound provided enhanced, sustained drug delivery to tumors, reduced plasma and myocardium doxorubicin levels and arresting tumor growth. The results offer superior treatment than injection of de novo synthesized nanoparticles. PMID:21971256

  2. Stimuli Sensitive Polymers and Self Regulated Drug Delivery Systems: A Very Partial Review

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ronald A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the early days of the Journal of Controlled Release, there has been considerable interest in materials that can release drug on an “on-demand” basis. So called “stimuli-responsive” and “intelligent” systems have been designed to deliver drug at various times or at various sites in the body, according to a stimulus that is either endogenous or externally applied. In the past three decades, research along these lines has taken numerous directions, and each new generation of investigators has discovered new physicochemical principles and chemical schemes by which the release properties of materials can be altered. No single review could possibly do justice to all of these approaches. In this article, some general observations are made, and a partial history of the field is presented. Both open loop and closed loop systems are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on stimuli-responsive hydrogels, and on systems that can respond repeatedly. It is argued that the most success at present and in the foreseeable future is with systems in which biosensing and actuation (i.e. drug delivery) are separated, with a human and/or cybernetic operator linking the two. PMID:24984012

  3. Mesoscale Simulations and Experimental Studies of pH-Sensitive Micelles for Controlled Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Qiu Yu; Liu, Xu Bo; Zhang, Can Yang; Wu, Zhi Min; Guo, Xin Dong

    2015-11-25

    The microstructures of doxorubicin-loaded micelles prepared from block polymers His(x)Lys10 (x = 0, 5, 10) conjugated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are investigated under different pH conditions, using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The conformation of micelles and the DOX distributions in micelles were obviously influenced by pH values and the length of the histidine segment. At pH >6.0, the micelles self-assembled from the polymers were dense and compact. The drugs were entrapped well within the micellar core. The particle size increases as the histidine length increases. With the decrease of pH value to be lower than 6.0, there was no distinct difference for the micelles self-assembled from the polymer without histidine residues. However, the micelles prepared from the polymers with histidine residues shows a structural transformation from dense to swollen conformation, leading to an increased particle size from 10.3 to 14.5 DPD units for DHD-His10Lys10 micelles. This structural transformation of micelles can accelerate the DOX release from micelles under lower pH conditions. The in vitro drug release from micelles is accelerated by the decrease of pH value from 7.4 (physiological environment) to 5.0 (lysosomal environment). The integration of simulation and experiments might be a valuable method for the optimization and design of biomaterials for drug delivery with desired properties. PMID:26539742

  4. Development of pH sensitive polyacrylamide grafted pectin hydrogel for controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Prashant B; Mishra, Rakesh K; Pal, Kunal; Banthia, Ajit K

    2008-06-01

    In the present study an attempt was made to graft polyacrylamide on pectin. The grafted polymer was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Rheological property of pectin solution was compared with the product solution. The grafted polymer was cross-linked with varying amount of glutaraldehyde. The swelling properties of the cross-linked product were also studied. The salicylic acid, an antipyretic drug, was incorporated in the cross-linked gel as a model drug and the drug release studies were done in a modified Franz's diffusion cell. The effect of cross-linking density on the release property of salicylic acid was studied through the cross-linked product. The product showed better film forming property and gelling property than pectin. The comparative rheological properties of pectin and grafted copolymer indicated change in the property of the product. FTIR studies indicated incorporation of amide group. Differential scanning calorimetry and XRD suggested formation of a new polymer. Swelling study indicated pH dependent swelling of the cross-linked hydrogel. Salicylic acid release indicated pH dependent release from the hydrogel.

  5. Mesoscale Simulations and Experimental Studies of pH-Sensitive Micelles for Controlled Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Qiu Yu; Liu, Xu Bo; Zhang, Can Yang; Wu, Zhi Min; Guo, Xin Dong

    2015-11-25

    The microstructures of doxorubicin-loaded micelles prepared from block polymers His(x)Lys10 (x = 0, 5, 10) conjugated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are investigated under different pH conditions, using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The conformation of micelles and the DOX distributions in micelles were obviously influenced by pH values and the length of the histidine segment. At pH >6.0, the micelles self-assembled from the polymers were dense and compact. The drugs were entrapped well within the micellar core. The particle size increases as the histidine length increases. With the decrease of pH value to be lower than 6.0, there was no distinct difference for the micelles self-assembled from the polymer without histidine residues. However, the micelles prepared from the polymers with histidine residues shows a structural transformation from dense to swollen conformation, leading to an increased particle size from 10.3 to 14.5 DPD units for DHD-His10Lys10 micelles. This structural transformation of micelles can accelerate the DOX release from micelles under lower pH conditions. The in vitro drug release from micelles is accelerated by the decrease of pH value from 7.4 (physiological environment) to 5.0 (lysosomal environment). The integration of simulation and experiments might be a valuable method for the optimization and design of biomaterials for drug delivery with desired properties.

  6. Renal (tissue) kallikrein-kinin system in the kidney and novel potential drugs for salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Katori, Makoto; Majima, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    A large variety of antihypertensive drugs, such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, and others, are prescribed to hypertensive patients, with good control of the condition. In addition, all individuals are generally believed to be salt sensitive and, thus, severe restriction of salt intake is recommended to all. Nevertheless, the physiological defense mechanisms in the kidney against excess salt intake have not been well clarified. The present review article demonstrated that the renal (tissue) kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is ideally situated within the nephrons of the kidney, where it functions to inhibit the reabsorption of NaCl through the activation of bradykinin (BK)-B2 receptors localized along the epithelial cells of the collecting ducts (CD). Kinins generated in the CD are immediately inactivated by two kidney-specific kinin-inactivating enzymes (kininases), carboxypeptidase Y-like exopeptidase (CPY), and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Our work demonstrated that ebelactone B and poststatin are selective inhibitors of these kininases. The reduced secretion of the urinary kallikrein is linked to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, whereas potassium ions and ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers ameliorate salt-sensitive hypertension by accelerating the release of renal kallikrein. On the other hand, ebelactone B and poststatin prolong the life of kinins in the CD after excess salt intake, thereby leading to the augmentation of natriuresis and diuresis, and the ensuing suppression of salt-sensitive hypertension. In conclusion, accelerators of the renal kallikrein release and selective renal kininase inhibitors are both novel types of antihypertensive agents that may be useful for treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:25130040

  7. Neutralizing Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Associated with Successful Cure after Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Peng, Kaitian; Chia, Wan Ni; Siau, Anthony; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Gruner, Anne-Charlotte; Preiser, Peter; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    An effective antibody response can assist drug treatment to contribute to better parasite clearance in malaria patients. To examine this, sera were obtained from two groups of adult patients with acute falciparum malaria, prior to drug treatment: patients who (1) have subsequent recrudescent infection, or (2) were cured by Day 28 following treatment. Using a Plasmodium falciparum antigen library, we examined the antibody specificities in these sera. While the antibody repertoire of both sera groups was extremely broad and varied, there was a differential antibody profile between the two groups of sera. The proportion of cured patients with antibodies against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 was higher than the proportion of patients with recrudescent infection. The presence of these antibodies was associated with higher odds of treatment cure. Sera containing all six antibodies impaired the invasion of P. falciparum clinical isolates into erythrocytes. These results suggest that antibodies specific against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 in P. falciparum infections could assist anti-malarial drug treatment and contribute to the resolution of the malarial infection. PMID:27427762

  8. Neutralizing Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Associated with Successful Cure after Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yun Shan; Peng, Kaitian; Chia, Wan Ni; Siau, Anthony; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Gruner, Anne-Charlotte; Preiser, Peter; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J; Renia, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    An effective antibody response can assist drug treatment to contribute to better parasite clearance in malaria patients. To examine this, sera were obtained from two groups of adult patients with acute falciparum malaria, prior to drug treatment: patients who (1) have subsequent recrudescent infection, or (2) were cured by Day 28 following treatment. Using a Plasmodium falciparum antigen library, we examined the antibody specificities in these sera. While the antibody repertoire of both sera groups was extremely broad and varied, there was a differential antibody profile between the two groups of sera. The proportion of cured patients with antibodies against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 was higher than the proportion of patients with recrudescent infection. The presence of these antibodies was associated with higher odds of treatment cure. Sera containing all six antibodies impaired the invasion of P. falciparum clinical isolates into erythrocytes. These results suggest that antibodies specific against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 in P. falciparum infections could assist anti-malarial drug treatment and contribute to the resolution of the malarial infection. PMID:27427762

  9. The Potential Impact of Up-Front Drug Sensitivity Testing on India’s Epidemic of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Raizada, Neeraj; Gupta, Radhey Shyam; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan; Denkinger, Claudia; Paramasivan, Chinnambedu Nainarappan; Kulsange, Shubhangi; Thakur, Rahul; Dewan, Puneet; Boehme, Catharina; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan

    2015-01-01

    Background In India as elsewhere, multi-drug resistance (MDR) poses a serious challenge in the control of tuberculosis (TB). The End TB strategy, recently approved by the world health assembly, aims to reduce TB deaths by 95% and new cases by 90% between 2015 and 2035. A key pillar of this approach is early diagnosis of tuberculosis, including use of higher-sensitivity diagnostic testing and universal rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST). Despite limitations of current laboratory assays, universal access to rapid DST could become more feasible with the advent of new and emerging technologies. Here we use a mathematical model of TB transmission, calibrated to the TB epidemic in India, to explore the potential impact of a major national scale-up of rapid DST. To inform key parameters in a clinical setting, we take GeneXpert as an example of a technology that could enable such scale-up. We draw from a recent multi-centric demonstration study conducted in India that involved upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing of all TB suspects. Results We find that widespread, public-sector deployment of high-sensitivity diagnostic testing and universal DST appropriately linked with treatment could substantially impact MDR-TB in India. Achieving 75% access over 3 years amongst all cases being diagnosed for TB in the public sector alone could avert over 180,000 cases of MDR-TB (95% CI 44187 – 317077 cases) between 2015 and 2025. Sufficiently wide deployment of Xpert could, moreover, turn an increasing MDR epidemic into a diminishing one. Synergistic effects were observed with assumptions of simultaneously improving MDR-TB treatment outcomes. Our results illustrate the potential impact of new and emerging technologies that enable widespread, timely DST, and the important effect that universal rapid DST in the public sector can have on the MDR-TB epidemic in India. PMID:26132584

  10. Characterization of drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms among Plasmodium falciparum field isolates in Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2011, artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (ASP), instead of chloroquine, has been recommended for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in India. In Ujjain, central India, with an annual parasite index <0.1, the prevalence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum is unknown. In other parts of India chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-resistant P. falciparum is prevalent. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-malarial drug resistance-associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum collected in Ujjain in 2009 and 2010, prior to the introduction of ASP. Methods Blood samples from 87 patients with P. falciparum mono-infection verified by microscopy were collected on filter-paper at all nine major pathology laboratories in Ujjain city. Codons Pfcrt 72–76, pfmdr1 1034–1246, pfdhfr 16–185, pfdhps 436–632 and pfnhe1 ms4760 haplotypes were identified by sequencing. Pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and pfmdr1 gene copy number by real-time PCR. Results Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance-associated pfdhfr 108 N and 59R alleles were found in 75/78 (96%) and 70/78 (90%) samples, respectively, and pfdhps 437G was found in 7/77 (9%) samples. Double mutant pfdhfr 59R + 108 N were found in 62/76 (82%) samples. Triple mutant pfdhfr 59R + 108 N and pfdhps 437G were found in 6/76 (8%) samples. Chloroquine-resistance-associated pfcrt 76 T was found in 82/87 (94%). The pfcrt 72–76 haplotypes found were: 80/84 (95%) SVMNT, 3/84 (4%) CVMNK and 1/84 (1%) CVMNT. Pfmdr1 N86 and 86Y were identified in 70/83 (84%) and 13/83 (16%) samples, respectively. Pfmdr1 S1034 + N1042 + D1246 were identified together in 70/72 (97%) of successfully sequenced samples. One pfmdr1 gene copy was found in 74/75 (99%) successfully amplified samples. Conclusion This is the first characterization of key anti-malarial drug resistance-associated genetic markers among P

  11. Aspirin-sensitive asthma: significance of the cyclooxygenase-inhibiting and protein-binding properties of analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Williams, W R; Pawlowicz, A; Davies, B H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro release of endogenous and exogenous PgF2 alpha from plasma and serum proteins by aspirin and other analgesic drugs has been studied by RIA and equilibrium-dialysis techniques, respectively. Before aspirin addition, the mean plasma level of PgF2 alpha measured by RIA was significantly lower in aspirin-sensitive asthma (ASA) patients (11.3 +/- 6.5 pg/ml; n = 8) than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA) patients (25.0 +/- 11.4 pg/ml; n = 21). After aspirin addition (50 micrograms/ml) the mean PgF2 alpha level detected in plasma by RIA was higher in ASA patients (97.6 +/- 5.5 pg/ml) than in ATA patients (66.9 +/- 4.5). The binding of [3H]PgF2 alpha to serum protein was significantly inhibited by NSAIDs but not by paracetamol (0.2-1.0 mM). These results implicate PgF2 alpha and the protein-binding property of analgesic drugs in the pathogenesis of aspirin-sensitive asthma. PMID:1959973

  12. Characterization of Mycobacterium Abscessus Subtypes in Shanghai of China: Drug Sensitivity and Bacterial Epidemicity as well as Clinical Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liulin; Li, Bing; Chu, Haiqing; Huang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Lan; Sun, Xiwen; Xiao, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemic characteristics of Mycobacterium abscessus in Shanghai.Fifty-five strains from 55 M. abscessus pulmonary disease patients were isolated. Drug sensitivity was measured by a broth microdilution method. Subtypes of M. abscessus were identified by DNA sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mining spanning tree (MST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyze sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes (CC). Clinical manifestations were assessed by CT imaging.We identified 42 A isolates, 11 M, and 2 B-subtypes. A and M were highly sensitive to tigecycline and amikacin (97.6-100%). The A-type easily developed drug resistance against clarithromycin. Both types were highly resistance to sulfonamides, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem, and tobramycin. MLST analysis identified 41 STs including 32 new STs. The MST algorithm distributed 55 isolates into 12 separate CC. The PFGE analysis exhibited 53 distinct restriction patterns and the M-type was closely clustered according to their ST and CC numbers. CT imaging showed that tree-in-bud and patch shadow were commonly observed in M-type, whereas pulmonary cavities were often found in A-type infection patients (P < 0.001).ST1 in A and ST23 in M-type were the main epidemic strains in Shanghai. The M-type appeared to be prone to epidemic nosocomial transmission. PMID:26817866

  13. Suppression of Rev3, the catalytic subunit of Pol{zeta}, sensitizes drug-resistant lung tumors to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Doles, Jason; Oliver, Trudy G; Cameron, Eleanor R; Hsu, Gerald; Jacks, Tyler; Walker, Graham C; Hemann, Michael T

    2010-11-30

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs are front-line therapies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. However, intrinsic drug resistance limits the clinical efficacy of these agents. Recent evidence suggests that loss of the translesion polymerase, Polζ, can sensitize tumor cell lines to cisplatin, although the relevance of these findings to the treatment of chemoresistant tumors in vivo has remained unclear. Here, we describe a tumor transplantation approach that enables the rapid introduction of defined genetic lesions into a preclinical model of lung adenocarcinoma. Using this approach, we examined the effect of impaired translesion DNA synthesis on cisplatin response in aggressive late-stage lung cancers. In the presence of reduced levels of Rev3, an essential component of Polζ, tumors exhibited pronounced sensitivity to cisplatin, leading to a significant extension in overall survival of treated recipient mice. Additionally, treated Rev3-deficient cells exhibited reduced cisplatin-induced mutation, a process that has been implicated in the induction of secondary malignancies following chemotherapy. Taken together, our data illustrate the potential of Rev3 inhibition as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of chemoresistant malignancies, and highlight the utility of rapid transplantation methodologies for evaluating mechanisms of chemotherapeutic resistance in preclinical settings.

  14. Dextran hydrogel coated surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor for sensitive and label-free detection of small molecule drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Johnston, Trevor G.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    The label-free and sensitive detection of small molecule drugs on SPRi is still a challenging task, mainly due to the limited surface immobilization capacity of the sensor. In this research, a dextran hydrogel-coated gold sensor chip for SPRi was successfully fabricated via photo-cross-linking for enhanced surface immobilization capacity. The density of the dextran hydrogel was optimized for protein immobilization and sensitive small molecule detection. The protein immobilization capacity of the hydrogel was 10 times greater than a bare gold surface, and 20 times greater than an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) surface. Such a drastic improvement in immobilization capacity allowed the SPRi sensor to detect adequate response signals when probing small molecule binding events. The binding signal of 4 nM liquid-phase biotin to streptavidin immobilized on the dextran surface reached 435 RU, while no response was observed on bare gold or MUA surfaces. The dextran hydrogel-coated SPRi sensor was also applied in a kinetic study of the binding between an immunosuppressive drug (FK506) and its target protein (FKBP12) in a high-throughput microarray format. The measured binding affinity was shown to be consistent with reported literature values, and a detection limit of 0.5 nM was achieved.

  15. Reduction-sensitive amphiphilic triblock copolymers self-assemble into stimuli-responsive micelles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Toughraï, Smahan; Malinova, Violeta; Masciadri, Raffaello; Menon, Sindhu; Tanner, Pascal; Palivan, Cornelia; Bruns, Nico; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Polymeric nanostructures obtained through self-assembly of reduction-sensitive amphiphilic triblock copolymers were investigated as potential drug delivery systems. The characteristic feature of these polymers is their cleavable disulfide bond in the center of the hydrophobic block. Therefore, the triblock copolymers can be cleaved into amphiphilic diblock copolymers. A poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(butyl methacrylate)-S-S-poly(butyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA-b-(PBMA-S-S-PBMA)-b-PHEMA) triblock copolymer was synthesized. It self-assembled into micelles which were used to encapsulate hydrophobic dye molecules (Nile Red, BodiPy 630/650) as model payloads. The self-assembled nanostructures disintegrated upon reduction of the disulfide bond, releasing their cargo and yielding larger particles that formed aggregates in solution after 24 h. A burst release of payload was shown within the first 15 min, followed by a constant release over several hours. As concentration gradients of reducing agents are commonly found in biological systems, the micelles could be used as redox-sensitive nanocarriers for the intracellular delivery of drugs.

  16. A novel insulin sensitizer drug candidate-BGP-15-can prevent metabolic side effects of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Tory, Kálmán; Literáti-Nagy, Botond; Kolonics, Attila; Vígh, László; Vígh, László; Mandl, József; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2012-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPD) are widely used to treat severe psychiatric disorders, have well documented metabolic side effects such as disturbances in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance and weight gain. It has been shown that BGP-15, a hydroxylamine derivative with insulin sensitizing activity can prevent AAPD provoked fat accumulation in adipocyte cultures, and insulin resistance in animal experiments and in healthy volunteers. The aim of this study was to compare the preventive effect of BGP-15 with conventional oral antidiabetics on metabolic side effects of AAPDs. We found that BGP-15 that does not belong to either conventional insulin sensitizers or oral antidiabetics, is able to counteract insulin resistance and weight gain provoked by antipsychotic agents in rats while rosiglitazone and metformin were not effective in the applied doses. Our results confirm that BGP-15 is a promising new drug candidate to control the metabolic side effects of atypical antipsychotics. Data indicate that this rat model is suitable to analyze the metabolic side effects of AAPDs and the protective mechanism of BGP-15.

  17. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIN; YIN, HAILIN; PANANDIKAR, ASHWINI; GANDHI, VARSHA; SEN, SUBRATA

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells. PMID:26058363

  18. Redox modulation of adjacent thiols in VLA-4 by AS101 converts myeloid leukemia cells from a drug-resistant to drug-sensitive state.

    PubMed

    Layani-Bazar, Adi; Skornick, Itai; Berrebi, Alain; Pauker, Maor H; Noy, Elad; Silberman, Alon; Albeck, Michael; Longo, Dan L; Kalechman, Yona; Sredni, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Interaction between the integrin VLA-4 on acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells with stromal fibronectin is a decisive factor in chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we provide a rationale for a drug repositioning strategy to blunt integrin activation in AML cells and restore their sensitivity to chemotherapy. Specifically, we demonstrate that the nontoxic tellurium compound AS101, currently being evaluated in clinical trials, can abrogate the acquired resistance of AML. Mechanistic investigations revealed that AS101 caused redox inactivation of adjacent thiols in the exofacial domain of VLA-4 after its ligation to stromal fibronectin. This effect triggered cytoskeletal conformational changes that decreased PI3K/Akt/Bcl2 signaling, an obligatory step in chemosensitization by AS101. In a mouse xenograft of AML derived from patient leukemic cells with high VLA-4 expression and activity, we demonstrated that AS101 abrogated drug resistance and prolonged survival in mice receiving chemotherapy. Decreased integrin activity was confirmed on AML cells in vivo. The chemosensitizing activity of AS101 persisted in hosts with defective adaptive and innate immunity, consistent with evidence that integrin deactivation was not mediated by heightening immune attack. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to reposition the experimental clinical agent, AS101, to degrade VLA-4-mediated chemoresistance and improve clinical responses in patients with AML.

  19. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  20. Forensic drug testing for opiates. IV. Analytical sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of commercial urine opiate immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Dickerson, S; Paul, B D; Mitchell, J M

    1992-01-01

    Four commercial immunoassays, TDx Opiates (TDx), Coat-A-Count Morphine in Urine (CAC), Abuscreen Radioimmunoassay for Morphine (ABUS) and Emit d.a.u. Opiate Assay (EMIT), were tested for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with urine specimens containing known amounts of opiates and opiate metabolites. The immunoassays were evaluated in a semiquantitative mode by comparison of morphine equivalents to GC/MS assay of free and total morphine and codeine or to target concentrations. In all cases, the apparent sensitivities of the assays were higher than those required for detection of morphine at cutoffs mandated by the Health and Human Services guidelines for testing of Federal workers. The apparent specificities of the immunoassays varied considerably. The CAC assay was found to be highly selective for free morphine, whereas TDx, ABUS, and EMIT demonstrated broad cross-reactivity with other opiates. Comparison of semiquantitative results from the immunoassays with GC/MS data indicated a high degree of accuracy for determination of morphine levels. Generally, the patterns of sensitivity and cross-reactivity were unique for each assay, indicating that a detailed knowledge of assay performance characteristics is necessary for accurate interpretation of forensic urine testing data.

  1. pH-Sensitive ZnO Quantum Dots-Doxorubicin Nanoparticles for Lung Cancer Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaoli; Luo, Yanan; Zhang, Weiying; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, we reported a ZnO quantum dots-based pH-responsive drug delivery platform for intracellular controlled release of drugs. Acid-decomposable, luminescent aminated ZnO quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized as nanocarriers with ultrasmall size (∼3 nm). The dicarboxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) had been introduced to NH2-ZnO QDs, which rendered it stable under physiological fluid. Moreover, a targeting ligand, hyaluronic acid (HA), was conjugated to ZnO QDs for specifically binding to the overexpressed glycoprotein CD44 by cancer cells. Doxorubicin (DOX) molecules were successfully loaded to PEG functionalized ZnO QDs via formation of metal-DOX complex and covalent interactions. The pH-sensitive ZnO QDs dissolved to Zn(2+) in acidic endosome/lysosome after uptake by cancer cells, which triggered dissociation of the metal-drug complex and a controlled DOX release. As result, a synergistic therapy was achieved due to incorporation of the antitumor effect of Zn(2+) and DOX. PMID:27463610

  2. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). Methods: To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis and functional analysis was performed to identify the pathway/functions perturbed in ChoK-alpha-silenced cells, then validated by in vitro experiments. Results: In silenced cells, compared with control, we observed: (I) a significant reduction of both CHKA transcript and ChoK-alpha protein expression; (II) a dramatic, proportional drop in PCho content ranging from 60 to 71%, as revealed by 1H-magnetic spectroscopy analysis; (III) a 35–36% of cell growth inhibition, with no evidences of apoptosis or modification of the main cellular survival signalling pathways; (IV) 476 differentially expressed genes, including genes related to lipid metabolism. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified cellular functions related to cell death and cellular proliferation and movement as the most perturbed. Accordingly, CHKA-silenced cells displayed a significant delay in wound repair, a reduced migration and invasion capability were also observed. Furthermore, although CHKA silencing did not directly induce cell death, a significant increase of sensitivity to platinum, paclitaxel and doxorubicin was observed even in a drug-resistant context. Conclusion: We showed for the first time in EOC that CHKA downregulation significantly decreased the aggressive EOC cell behaviour also affecting cells' sensitivity to drug treatment. These observations open the way to further analysis for ChoK-alpha validation as a new EOC therapeutic target to be used alone or in combination with

  3. pH-Sensitive degradable polymersomes for triggered release of anticancer drugs: a comparative study with micelles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2010-02-25

    pH-Sensitive degradable polymersomes and micelles were prepared based on diblock copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and an acid-labile polycarbonate, poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidenepentaerythritol carbonate) (PTMBPEC). Polymersomes of PEG(1.9k)-PTMBPEC(6k) revealed average sizes of 100-200 nm. The acetals of polymersomes, similar to those of PEG(5k)-PTMBPEC(5.8k) micelles, though stable at pH 7.4 were prone to fast hydrolysis at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0, with half lives of 0.5 and 3d, respectively. The acetal hydrolysis resulted in significant size increase of polymersomes, to over 1000 nm in 24h at pH 4.0. Drug encapsulation studies revealed that polymersomes were able to simultaneously load paclitaxel (PTX, hydrophobic) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX.HCl, hydrophilic), whereas micelles loaded PTX only. Notably, polymersomes showed lower drug loading efficiencies for PTX than micelles (30.0-37.7% versus 61.4-65.2%). The in vitro release studies demonstrated that release of PTX and DOX.HCl from polymersomes was highly pH-dependent, i.e. significantly faster drug release at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0 compared to physiological pH. Furthermore, much higher release rates were observed for PTX release from the polymersomes compared to that from the micelles under otherwise the same conditions. These pH-sensitive nano-sized degradable polymersomes hold great promise for combination therapy for cancers.

  4. Multifunctional pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles for simultaneous imaging, sensing and targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-12-01

    A novel multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier was fabricated for synchronous cancer therapy and sensing. The nanocarrier, programed to display a response to environmental stimuli (pH value), was synthesized by coupling doxorubicin (DOX) to adipic dihydrazide-grafted gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (ADH-GAMNP) via the hydrolytically degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond. The resultant nanocarrier, DOX-ADH-GAMNP, had a mean diameter of 13.8 nm and the amount of DOX coupled was about 6.52 mg g-1. Also, it exhibited pH triggered release of DOX in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) but was relatively stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Furthermore, both GAMNP and DOX were found to possess fluorescence properties when excited in the near-infrared region due to the two-photon absorption mechanism. The coupling of DOX to GAMNP resulted in a reversible self-quenching of fluorescence through the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between the donor GAMNP and acceptor DOX. The release of DOX from DOX-ADH-GAMNP when exposed to acidic media indicated the recovery of fluorescence from both GAMNP and DOX. The change in the fluorescence intensity of DOX-ADH-GAMNP on the release of DOX can act as a potential sensor to sense the delivery of the drug. The analysis of zeta potential and plasmon absorbance in different pH conditions also confirmed the pH sensitivity of the product. This multifunctional nanocarrier is a significant breakthrough in developing a drug delivery vehicle that combines drug targeting as well as sensing and therapy at the same time.

  5. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  6. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a

  7. Assessment of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network Standardized Procedure for In Vitro Malaria Drug Sensitivity Testing Using SYBR Green Assay for Field Samples with Various Initial Parasitemia Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheruiyot, Agnes C.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Lee, Patricia J.; Yeda, Redemptah A.; Okello, Charles O.; Leed, Susan E.; Talwar, Mayank; Murthy, Tushar; Gaona, Heather W.; Hickman, Mark R.; Akala, Hoseah M.; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The malaria SYBR green assay, which is used to profile in vitro drug susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum, is a reliable drug screening and surveillance tool. Malaria field surveillance efforts provide isolates with various low levels of parasitemia. To be advantageous, malaria drug sensitivity assays should perform reproducibly among various starting parasitemia levels rather than at one fixed initial value. We examined the SYBR green assay standardized procedure developed by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) for its sensitivity and ability to accurately determine the drug concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50% (IC50) in samples with a range of initial parasitemia levels. The initial sensitivity determination of the WWARN procedure yielded a detection limit of 0.019% parasitemia. P. falciparum laboratory strains and field isolates with various levels of initial parasitemia were then subjected to a range of doses of common antimalarials. The IC50s were comparable for laboratory strains with between 0.0375% and 0.6% parasitemia and for field isolates with between 0.075% and 0.6% parasitemia for all drugs tested. Furthermore, assay quality (Z′) analysis indicated that the WWARN procedure displays high robustness, allowing for drug testing of malaria field samples within the derived range of initial parasitemia. The use of the WWARN procedure should allow for the inclusion of more malaria field samples in malaria drug sensitivity screens that would have otherwise been excluded due to low initial parasitemia levels. PMID:26856829

  8. Mock juror sensitivity to forensic evidence in drug facilitated sexual assaults.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Regina A; Ryan, Alison; Krauss, Daniel; Jenkins, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    Mock jurors' reactions to variations in the quality of toxicological evidence regarding the presence of drugs in a sexual assault trial were examined. In Study 1, participants received a trial summary in which a negative test result, a negative test result plus expert testimony, or no test result was presented. The time taken by the complainant to report the alleged sexual assault was manipulated. The negative test result influenced participants' judgments, but this effect was minimized by the presence of expert testimony. The complainant's delay in reporting had little impact on judgments. In Study 2, complainant time to report was again manipulated along with the outcome of the test result (negative finding and no result). Results revealed that men were less conviction prone when the negative test result was obtained early as opposed to late. In contrast, when the test result was unavailable, men were more conviction prone when the complainant reported late as oppose to early.

  9. In situ gelling pH- and temperature-sensitive biodegradable block copolymer hydrogels for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra K; Lee, Doo Sung

    2014-11-10

    Stimuli-sensitive injectable polymeric hydrogels have been extensively investigated during the past decade as bioactive agent delivery vehicles and for tissue engineering applications. An aqueous solution of these polymers undergoes a sol-to-gel phase transition in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, salt, light, biomolecules, electromagnetic field, etc. Bioactive molecules or cells can be mixed into the low-viscosity state of the polymer solution and injected into the body at a target site, forming an in situ hydrogel depot, which can then serve as bioactive-molecule-releasing carriers or a cell-growing microenvironment. This review systematically summarizes the recent progress in biodegradable and injectable block copolymer hydrogels, giving special attention to the novel and promising pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable block copolymer hydrogels for biomedical applications. The gelation mechanism, formation of ionic complexes, and biodegradation are highlighted as key factors responsible for controlled protein/drug delivery. The advantages and perspectives of pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable block copolymer hydrogels are also highlighted.

  10. Facile synthesis of glucose-sensitive chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel: Drug release optimization and swelling properties.

    PubMed

    Abureesh, Mosab Ali; Oladipo, Akeem Adeyemi; Gazi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    The study describes the development of glucose-sensitive hydrogel and optimization of bovine serum albumin release profile from the hydrogel. To enhance the glucose sensitivity and improve the swelling behaviors of the hydrogel system, boric acid crosslinking, and freeze-thawing cycle techniques were used to prepare chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel. The structure of the resultant hydrogel was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the swelling of the hydrogel was influenced by the pH of the medium, and the hydrogel displayed explicit glucose-sensitivity under physiological conditions. The values of the diffusion exponent range between 0.34 and 0.44 and the diffusion of water into the gel system are assumed to be pseudo-Fickian in nature. Under optimized conditions, the cumulative Bovine serum albumin (BSA) drug releases ranged between 69.33±1.95% and 86.45±1.16% at 37°C in the presence of glucose and pH 7.4, respectively. PMID:26459171

  11. Antibacterial effect of mango (Mangifera indica Linn.) leaf extract against antibiotic sensitive and multi-drug resistant Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Abdul; Asghar, Samra; Naeem, Tahir; Ikram Ullah, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Aneela, Syeda; Hussain, Shabbir

    2013-07-01

    Alternative herbal medicine has been used to treat various infections from centuries. Natural plants contain phytoconstituents having similar chemical properties as of synthetic antibiotics. Typhoid fever is a serious infection and failure of its treatment emerged multi-drug resistant (MDR) bugs of Salmonella typhi. Due to multiple and repeated issues with antibiotics efficacy, it became essential to evaluate biological properties of plants from different geographical origins. Mango leaves have been Reported for various medicinal effects like antioxidant, antimicrobial, antihelminthic, antidiabetic and antiallergic etc. Objective of present study was to investigate anti-typhoid properties of acetone mango leaf extract (AMLE) against antibiotic sensitive and MDR S. typhi isolates. A total of 50 isolates of S. typhi including MDR (n=30) and antibiotic sensitive (n=20) were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC14028) were used as quality control strains. AMLE was prepared and its antibacterial activity was evaluated by agar well diffusion screening method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), by agar dilution technique. Zone of inhibition (mm) of AMLE against MDR and antibiotic sensitive isolates was 18±1.5mm (Mean±S.D). Zone of S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and S. typhimurium (ATCC14028) was 20±1.5mm (Mean±S.D). MIC of AMLE was Reported in range from 10-50 mg/ml. The present study described the inhibitory effects of mango leaves against S. typhi.

  12. Sensitivity to cholinergic drug treatments of aged rats with variable degrees of spatial memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Stemmelin, J; Cassel, J C; Will, B; Kelche, C

    1999-01-01

    As a first step, the present experiment aimed at characterizing learning and memory capabilities, as well as some motor and sensorimotor faculties, in aged (24-26.5 months) Long-Evans female rats. As a second step, a psychopharmacological approach was undertaken in order to examine the sensitivity of aged rats to muscarinic blockade and to cholinomimetic treatments. Young adult (3-5.5 months) and aged rats were tested for beam-walking performance, locomotor activity in the home cage and an open field, and spatial learning/memory performance in a water maze and a radial maze. Spontaneous alternation rates were assessed in a T-maze. Statistical analysis discriminated between aged rats showing moderate impairment (AMI) and those showing severe impairment (ASI) in the water maze test. Beside their different degrees of impairment in the water maze, AMI and ASI rats were similarly (no significant difference) impaired in beam-walking capabilities, home cage activity and radial maze performance. In the spontaneous alternation task aged rats were not impaired and, in the open-field test, AMI rats were hypoactive, but not as much as ASI rats. Neither of the cognitive deficits was correlated with a locomotor or a sensorimotor variable, or with the body weight. When tested in the radial maze, a low dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) produced memory impairments which were significant in AMI and ASI rats, but not in young rats. Combined injections of scopolamine and physostigmine (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) or tacrine (THA, 3 mg/kg) showed physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg) to compensate for the scopolamine-induced impairments only in AMI rats. whereas THA was efficient in both AMI and ASI rats. The results indicate: (i) that rats with different degrees of spatial memory impairment in the water maze are similarly hypersensitive to muscarinic blockade when tested in a radial maze test; and (ii) that under the influence of a dose of scopolamine which is subamnesic in young rats, aged rats

  13. PES1 regulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Qu, Like; Meng, Lin; Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Jian; Shou, Chengchao

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► PES1 was overexpressed in diverse cancer cell lines. ► PES1-ablation enhances DNA damage response by decreasing DNA repair. ► PES1-ablation increases the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. ► PES1-ablation is associated with diminished nuclear entry of RAD51. -- Abstract: PES1 (also known as Pescadillo), a nucleolar protein, was involved in biogenesis of ribosomal RNA. Up-regulation of PES1 has been documented in some human cancers, indicating that PES1 may play some crucial roles in tumorigenesis. In our previous study, it was found that silencing of PES1 resulted in decreased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. We also noticed that depletion of PES1 altered expression profiles of diverse genes. In the present study, we validated the expression changes of a subset of genotoxic stress-related genes in PES1-silenced HCT116 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. The steady and etoposide-induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were higher in PES1-silenced cells than in control cells. Besides, etoposide-induced γ-H2AX persisted longer in PES1-silenced cells after removing the etoposide. Next, results of comet assay revealed decreased DNA repair after PES1-ablation. PES1-ablated cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents, which could be reversed by reconstitution with exogenous PES1. Furthermore, deletion of PES1 diminished steady and DNA damage-induced levels of nuclear RAD51. Our results uncover a potential role of PES1 in chemoresistance by regulating DNA damage response in colorectal cancer cells.

  14. Synthesis of new thermo/pH sensitive drug delivery systems based on tragacanth gum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Khadijeh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-06-01

    In this study, new pH/temperature responsive graft copolymers were synthesized based on natural Tragacanth Gum (TG) carbohydrate and their controlled drug release was investigated. Amphiphilic alkyne terminated terpolymers (mPEG-PCL-PDMAEMA-CCH)s consist of methylated poly(ethyleneglycol) (mPEG), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) were synthesized by using ring opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and then were grafted onto azide-functionalized TG molecules by click chemistry. Different techniques such as FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), thermo-gravimetrical analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to verify the successful synthesis of graft copolymers (TG-g-PDMAEMA-PCL-mPEG)s. The graft copolymers self-assembled to single micelles in aqueous solution and upon pH changes further assembled into micellar aggregates. These micelles were used to prepare quercetin loaded nanocarriers by probe sonication method. Size and morphology of the nanocarriers were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and SEM. The in vitro release behavior of quercetin from these micelles showed pH-dependence. The results showed that release profile of quercetin best followed the first order model.

  15. Application of firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to antimicrobial drug sensitivity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Schrock, C. G.; Deming, J. W.; Barza, M. J.; Wienstein, L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a rapid method for determining microbial susceptibilities to antibiotics using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is documented. The reduction of bacterial ATP by an antimicrobial agent was determined to be a valid measure of drug effect in most cases. The effect of 12 antibiotics on 8 different bacterial species gave a 94 percent correlation with the standard Kirby-Buer-Agar disc diffusion method. A 93 percent correlation was obtained when the ATP assay method was applied directly to 50 urine specimens from patients with urinary tract infections. Urine samples were centrifuged first to that bacterial pellets could be suspended in broth. No primary isolation or subculturing was required. Mixed cultures in which one species was predominant gave accurate results for the most abundant organism. Since the method is based on an increase in bacterial ATP with time, the presence of leukocytes did not interfere with the interpretation of results. Both the incubation procedure and the ATP assays are compatible with automation.

  16. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  17. Assessment of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network Standardized Procedure for In Vitro Malaria Drug Sensitivity Testing Using SYBR Green Assay for Field Samples with Various Initial Parasitemia Levels.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Lee, Patricia J; Yeda, Redemptah A; Okello, Charles O; Leed, Susan E; Talwar, Mayank; Murthy, Tushar; Gaona, Heather W; Hickman, Mark R; Akala, Hoseah M; Kamau, Edwin; Johnson, Jacob D

    2016-04-01

    The malaria SYBR green assay, which is used to profilein vitrodrug susceptibility ofPlasmodium falciparum, is a reliable drug screening and surveillance tool. Malaria field surveillance efforts provide isolates with various low levels of parasitemia. To be advantageous, malaria drug sensitivity assays should perform reproducibly among various starting parasitemia levels rather than at one fixed initial value. We examined the SYBR green assay standardized procedure developed by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) for its sensitivity and ability to accurately determine the drug concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50% (IC50) in samples with a range of initial parasitemia levels. The initial sensitivity determination of the WWARN procedure yielded a detection limit of 0.019% parasitemia.P. falciparumlaboratory strains and field isolates with various levels of initial parasitemia were then subjected to a range of doses of common antimalarials. The IC50s were comparable for laboratory strains with between 0.0375% and 0.6% parasitemia and for field isolates with between 0.075% and 0.6% parasitemia for all drugs tested. Furthermore, assay quality (Z') analysis indicated that the WWARN procedure displays high robustness, allowing for drug testing of malaria field samples within the derived range of initial parasitemia. The use of the WWARN procedure should allow for the inclusion of more malaria field samples in malaria drug sensitivity screens that would have otherwise been excluded due to low initial parasitemia levels.

  18. Development of a pressure-sensitive glyceryl tristearate capsule filled with a drug-containing hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Lisa; Bock, Mona; Glöckl, Gunnar; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2014-01-30

    The purpose of this work was to develop a new pressure-sensitive dosage form that breaks and releases its content in a fasted stomach at the predominant pressure at the pylorus. The content of the dosage form should be liquid so that the active pharmaceutical ingredient quickly reaches maximum absorption in the upper small intestine. For this purpose glyceryl tristearate capsules were developed, consisting of an extremely brittle shell, with a crushing behavior that can be controlled by modification of the shell thickness. The capsules were filled with a hydroxyethyl cellulose gel containing paracetamol. Dissolution testing using USP apparatus 2, performed for simulating the resting time in the stomach, did not show any release. Studies using a texture analyser showed a correlation between the glyceryl tristearate filling volume and the necessary force to break the capsule. Physiological conditions in dissolution testing, such as movement, pressure and discontinuous medium contact, were set in a stress test device and showed that the dosage forms did not break and release its pharmaceutical ingredient until a pressure of 300 mbar was applied which served as a threshold limit for physiological pressure occurring during gastric emptying of large solids. PMID:24333906

  19. Hemocompatible curcumin-dextran micelles as pH sensitive pro-drugs for enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Radhika; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2016-02-10

    Curcumin, a component in spice turmeric, is renowned to possess anti-cancer therapeutic potential. However, low aqueous solubility and instability of curcumin which subsequently affects its bioavailability pose as major impediments in its translation to clinical application. In this regard, we focused on conjugating hydrophobic curcumin to the hydrophilic backbone of dextran via succinic acid spacer to design a pro-drug. The structural confirmation of the conjugates was carried out using FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Critical micelle measurement affirmed the micelle formation of the pro-drug in aqueous media. The size distribution and zeta potential of the curcumin-dextran (Cur-Dex) micelles were determined using dynamic light scattering technique. The micellar architecture bestowed curcumin negligible susceptibility to degradation under physiological conditions along with enhanced aqueous solubility. Biocompatibility of the micelles was proved by the blood component aggregation and plasma protein interaction studies. In vitro release studies demonstrated the pH sensitivity release of curcumin which is conducive to the tumour micro environment. Profound cytotoxic effects of Cur-Dex micelles in C6 glioma cells were observed from MTT and Live/Dead assay experiments. Moreover, enhanced cellular internalization of the Cur-Dex micelles compared to free curcumin in the cancer cells was revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Our study focuses on the feasibility of Cur-Dex micelles to be extrapolated as promising candidates for safe and efficient cancer therapy.

  20. Hemocompatible curcumin-dextran micelles as pH sensitive pro-drugs for enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Radhika; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2016-02-10

    Curcumin, a component in spice turmeric, is renowned to possess anti-cancer therapeutic potential. However, low aqueous solubility and instability of curcumin which subsequently affects its bioavailability pose as major impediments in its translation to clinical application. In this regard, we focused on conjugating hydrophobic curcumin to the hydrophilic backbone of dextran via succinic acid spacer to design a pro-drug. The structural confirmation of the conjugates was carried out using FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Critical micelle measurement affirmed the micelle formation of the pro-drug in aqueous media. The size distribution and zeta potential of the curcumin-dextran (Cur-Dex) micelles were determined using dynamic light scattering technique. The micellar architecture bestowed curcumin negligible susceptibility to degradation under physiological conditions along with enhanced aqueous solubility. Biocompatibility of the micelles was proved by the blood component aggregation and plasma protein interaction studies. In vitro release studies demonstrated the pH sensitivity release of curcumin which is conducive to the tumour micro environment. Profound cytotoxic effects of Cur-Dex micelles in C6 glioma cells were observed from MTT and Live/Dead assay experiments. Moreover, enhanced cellular internalization of the Cur-Dex micelles compared to free curcumin in the cancer cells was revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Our study focuses on the feasibility of Cur-Dex micelles to be extrapolated as promising candidates for safe and efficient cancer therapy. PMID:26686156

  1. The CYP3A4 inhibitor intraconazole does not affect the pharmacokinetics of a new calcium-sensitizing drug levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Antila, S; Honkanen, T; Lehtonen, L; Neuvonen, P J

    1998-08-01

    Itraconazole is a potent inhibitor of CYP3A4 isoenzyme and it can cause clinically significant interactions with some other drugs. Levosimendan is a new calcium-sensitizing drug intended for congestive heart failure. We aimed to study possible interactions of itraconazole with levosimendan in healthy volunteers. Twelve healthy male volunteers were included into a randomized, double-blind, two-phase crossover study. A wash-out period of 4 weeks was held between the phases. The subjects were given orally itraconazole 200 mg or placebo daily for 5 days. On the fifth day, they received a single oral dose of 2 mg of levosimendan. Levosimendan plasma concentrations were determined up to 12 hours and ECG, heart rate, and blood pressure followed-up to 8 hours after intake of levosimendan. Itraconazole had no significant effects on the pharmacokinetic parameters of levosimendan. Neither were there any differences in heart rate, PQ-, QTc- or QRS intervals between the placebo and itraconazole phases. The systolic blood pressure was decreased slightly more (p < 0.05) during the itraconazole phase than during the placebo phase. In conclusion, because the potent CYP3A4 inhibitor itraconazole had no significant pharmacokinetic interaction with levosimendan, interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor, and oral levosimendan are unlikely.

  2. pH-sensitive nanocargo based on smart polymer functionalized graphene oxide for site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Thangavelu; Abdi, Syed Izhar Haider; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-04-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized covalently with pH-sensitive poly(2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by surface-initiated in situ atom transfer radical polymerization. The structure of the PDEA-grafted GO (GO-PDEA) were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and atomic force microscopy. The grafted PDEA endowed the GO sheets with good solubility and stability in physiological solutions. Simple physisorption by π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions on GO-PDEA can be used to load camptothecin (CPT), a widely used water-insoluble cancer drug. The loaded CPT was released only at the lower (acidic) pH normally found in a tumor environment but not in basic and neutral pH. GO-PDEA did not show practical toxicity to N2a cancer cells but the GO-PDEA-CPT complex exhibited high potency in killing N2a cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the GO-PDEA nanocargo carrier might be a promising material for site-specific anticancer drug delivery and controlled release.

  3. Identification and characterization of a drug-sensitive strain enables puromycin-based translational assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cary, Gregory A; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Torres, Cecilia Garmendia; Wang, Kathie; Hays, Michelle; Ludlow, Catherine; Goodlett, David R; Dudley, Aimée M

    2014-05-01

    Puromycin is an aminonucleoside antibiotic with structural similarity to aminoacyl tRNA. This structure allows the drug to bind the ribosomal A site and incorporate into nascent polypeptides, causing chain termination, ribosomal subunit dissociation and widespread translational arrest at high concentrations. In contrast, at sufficiently low concentrations, puromycin incorporates primarily at the C-terminus of proteins. While a number of techniques utilize puromycin incorporation as a tool for probing translational activity in vivo, these methods cannot be applied in yeasts that are insensitive to puromycin. Here, we describe a mutant strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is sensitive to puromycin and characterize the cellular response to the drug. Puromycin inhibits the growth of yeast cells mutant for erg6∆, pdr1∆ and pdr3∆ (EPP) on both solid and liquid media. Puromycin also induces the aggregation of the cytoplasmic processing body component Edc3 in the mutant strain. We establish that puromycin is rapidly incorporated into yeast proteins and test the effects of puromycin on translation in vivo. This study establishes the EPP strain as a valuable tool for implementing puromycin-based assays in yeast, which will enable new avenues of inquiry into protein production and maturation.

  4. Tumor-targeting, pH-sensitive nanoparticles for docetaxel delivery to drug-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan Hiep; Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Choi, Ju Yeon; Nguyen, Hanh Thuy; Pham, Thanh Tung; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulation time of drug-containing nanoparticles; however, this also negatively affects cellular uptake. To overcome this problem, unique lipid polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles were developed with a pH-responsive PEG layer that detached prior to cell uptake. Docetaxel (DTX) was incorporated into the lipid core of the nanoparticles, which was then shielded with the pH-responsive block co-polymer polyethylene glycol-b-polyaspartic acid (PEG-b-PAsp) using a modified emulsion method. The optimized LPH nanoparticles were ~200 nm and had a narrow size distribution. Drug release from DTX-loaded LPH (DTX-LPH) nanoparticles was pH-sensitive, which is beneficial for tumor targeting. More importantly, DTX-LPH nanoparticles were able to effectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The negative surface charge and PEG shell of vehicle remarkably enhanced the blood circulation and physiological activity of DTX-LPH nanoparticles compared with that of free DTX. The nanoparticles were also found to reduce the size of tumors in tumor-bearing xenograft mice. The in vivo anticancer effect of DTX-LPH nanoparticles was further confirmed by the elevated levels of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase found in the tumors after treatment. Thus, the results suggest that this novel LPH system could be an effective new treatment for cancer. PMID:26346426

  5. pH-sensitive nanocargo based on smart polymer functionalized graphene oxide for site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Thangavelu; Abdi, Syed Izhar Haider; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-04-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized covalently with pH-sensitive poly(2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by surface-initiated in situ atom transfer radical polymerization. The structure of the PDEA-grafted GO (GO-PDEA) were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and atomic force microscopy. The grafted PDEA endowed the GO sheets with good solubility and stability in physiological solutions. Simple physisorption by π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions on GO-PDEA can be used to load camptothecin (CPT), a widely used water-insoluble cancer drug. The loaded CPT was released only at the lower (acidic) pH normally found in a tumor environment but not in basic and neutral pH. GO-PDEA did not show practical toxicity to N2a cancer cells but the GO-PDEA-CPT complex exhibited high potency in killing N2a cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the GO-PDEA nanocargo carrier might be a promising material for site-specific anticancer drug delivery and controlled release. PMID:23454895

  6. Injections, Cocktails and Diviners: Therapeutic Flexibility in the Context of Malaria Elimination and Drug Resistance in Northeast Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Uk, Sambunny; Erhart, Annette; Gerrets, René; Sluydts, Vincent; Durnez, Lies; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann Muela, Susanna; Menard, Didier; Heng, Somony; Sochantha, Tho; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Peeters Grietens, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia’s elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia), their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling “cocktails” and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. Methods The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation) and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey). Results Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i) the public sector; ii) the private sector; iii) traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. Conclusions Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails) represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination. PMID:24244678

  7. Solid phase ELISA for determination of the virus dose dependent sensitivity of human cytomegalovirus to antiviral drugs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ståhle, E L; Schloss, L; Sundqvist, V A; Brytting, M; Hökeberg, I; Cox, S; Wahren, B; Linde, A

    1998-12-01

    The main problems in determining the true in vivo susceptibility of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) to antiviral compounds are the influence of the size of the viral inoculum, the variation in the replication capacity of different CMV strains and the subjective evaluation of the inhibition of viral growth in the plaque assay. In this study, a specific assay was developed which reproducibly determines the sensitivity of primary isolates of CMV. The assay includes simultaneous virus titration and determination of the antiviral sensitivity. When individual virus doses were evaluated, the IC50 was generally dependent on the virus dose, except for resistant isolates, where the IC50 did not change irrespective of the dose of virus. The novel method of IC50 calculation takes into account all values derived from the linear part of the inhibition curve. This may better reflect the in vivo conditions, where the antiviral drug encounters different amounts of virus in different organs. Two human fibroblast-derived cell lines showed similar results.

  8. A Drug-Sensitized Zebrafish Screen Identifies Multiple Genes, Including GINS3, as Regulators of Myocardial Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Milan, David J.; Kim, Albert M.; Winterfield, Jeffrey R.; Jones, Ian L.; Pfeufer, Arne; Sanna, Serena; Arking, Dan E.; Amsterdam, Adam H.; Sabeh, Khaled M.; Mably, John D.; Rosenbaum, David S.; Peterson, Randall T.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kääb, Stefan; Roden, Dan M.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac repolarization, the process by which cardiomyocytes return to their resting potential after each beat, is a highly regulated process that is critical for heart rhythm stability. Perturbations of cardiac repolarization increase the risk for life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While genetic studies of familial long QT syndromes have uncovered several key genes in cardiac repolarization, the major heritable contribution to this trait remains unexplained. Identification of additional genes may lead to a better understanding of the underlying biology, aid in identification of patients at risk for sudden death, and potentially enable new treatments for susceptible individuals. Methods and Results We extended and refined a zebrafish model of cardiac repolarization by using fluorescent reporters of transmembrane potential. We then conducted a drug-sensitized genetic screen in zebrafish, identifying 15 genes, including GINS3, that affect cardiac repolarization. Testing these genes for human relevance in two concurrently completed genome wide association studies revealed that the human GINS3 ortholog is located in the 16q21 locus which is strongly associated with QT interval. Conclusions This sensitized zebrafish screen identified 15 novel myocardial repolarization genes. Among these genes is GINS3, the human ortholog of which is a major locus in two concurrent human genome wide association studies of QT interval. These results reveal a novel network of genes that regulate cardiac repolarization. PMID:19652097

  9. Effects of the Selective MPS1 Inhibitor MPS1-IN-3 on Glioblastoma Sensitivity to Antimitotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    sensitizing glioblastoma cells to antimitotic drugs. PMID:23940287

  10. Correlation between potassium channel expression and sensitivity to drug-induced cell death in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; O'Reilly, Paul; Doyle, Anne; Venturini, Elisa; Zoratti, Mario; Szegezdi, Eva; Szabo, Ildiko

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) and mitochondrial (mt) ion channels - particularly potassium channels - became oncological targets soon after the discovery that they are involved both in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Some members of the Kv Shaker family, namely Kv1.1, Kv1.3, Kv1.5 and Kv11.1 (Herg), and the intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium KCa3.1 (IK) channels have been shown to contribute to apoptosis in various cell lines. Kv1.3, Kv1.5 and IK are located in the plasma membrane but also in the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they participate in apoptotic signalling. Interestingly, an altered protein expression of some of the channels mentioned above has been reported in neoplastic cell lines/tissues, but a systematic quantification addressing the protein expression of the above potassium channels in tumor cell lines of different origin has not been carried out yet. In the present study we investigated whether expression of specific potassium channels, at the mRNA and protein level, can be correlated with cell sensitivity to various apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapeutic drugs, in a panel of cancer cell lines. The results show correlation between the protein expression of the Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 channels and susceptibility to death upon treatment with staurosporine, C2-ceramide and cisplatin. Furthermore, we investigated the correlation between Kv channel expression and sensitivity to three distinct membrane-permeant Kv1.3 inhibitors, since these drugs have recently been shown to be able to induce apoptosis and also reduce tumor volume in an in vivo model. Higher protein expression of Kv1.3 significantly correlated with lower cell survival upon treatment with clofazimine, one of the Kv1.3 inhibitors. These results suggest that expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 sensitizes tumour cells of various origins to cytotoxins. Data reported in this work regarding potassium channel protein expression in different cancer cell lines may be exploited

  11. Presumptive Treatment of Malaria from Formal and Informal Drug Vendors in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ujuju, Chinazo; Nwokolo, Ernest; De La Cruz, Anna; Schatzkin, Eric; Modrek, Sepideh; Montagu, Dominic; Liu, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite policies that recommend parasitological testing before treatment for malaria, presumptive treatment remains widespread in Nigeria. The majority of Nigerians obtain antimalarial drugs from two types of for-profit drug vendors—formal and informal medicine shops—but little is known about the quality of malaria care services provided at these shops. Aims This study seeks to (1) describe the profile of patients who seek treatment at different types of drug outlets, (2) document the types of drugs purchased for treating malaria, (3) assess which patients are purchasing recommended drugs, and (4) estimate the extent of malaria over-treatment. Methods In urban, peri-urban, and rural areas in Oyo State, customers exiting proprietary and patent medicine vendor (PPMV) shops or pharmacies having purchased anti-malarial drugs were surveyed and tested with malaria rapid diagnostic test. A follow-up phone survey was conducted four days after to assess self-reported drug administration. Bivariate and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine the correlates of patronizing a PPMV versus pharmacy, and the likelihood of purchasing an artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) drug. Results Of the 457participants who sought malaria treatment in 49 enrolled outlets, nearly 92% had diagnosed their condition by themselves, a family member, or a friend. Nearly 60% pharmacy customers purchased an ACT compared to only 29% of PPMV customers, and pharmacy customers paid significantly more on average. Multivariate regression results show that patrons of PPMVs were younger, less wealthy, waited fewer days before seeking care, and were less likely to be diagnosed at a hospital, clinic, or laboratory. Only 3.9% of participants tested positive with a malaria rapid diagnostic test. Conclusions Poorer individuals seeking care at PPMVs are more likely to receive inappropriate malaria treatment when compared to those who go to pharmacies. Increasing accessibility to

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 2-sensitive multifunctional polymeric micelles for tumor-specific co-delivery of siRNA and hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Perche, Federico; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-04-01

    Co-delivery of hydrophilic siRNA and hydrophobic drugs is one of the major challenges for nanomaterial-based medicine. Here, we present a simple but multifunctional micellar platform constructed by a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive copolymer (PEG-pp-PEI-PE) via self-assembly for tumor-targeted siRNA and drug co-delivery. The micellar nanocarrier possesses several key features for siRNA and drug delivery, including (i) excellent stability; (ii) efficient siRNA condensation by PEI; (iii) hydrophobic drug solubilization in the lipid "core"; (iv) passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; (v) tumor targeting triggered by the up-regulated tumoral MMP2; and (vi) enhanced cell internalization after MMP2-activated exposure of the previously hidden PEI. These cooperative functions ensure the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, and synergistic antitumor activity of co-loaded siRNA and drug. PMID:24529391

  13. miR-134 in extracellular vesicles reduces triple-negative breast cancer aggression and increases drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Keith; Lowry, Michelle C; Corcoran, Claire; Martinez, Vanesa G; Daly, Melissa; Rani, Sweta; Gallagher, William M; Radomski, Marek W; MacLeod, Roderick A F; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-10-20

    Exosomes (EVs) have relevance in cell-to-cell communication carrying pro-tumorigenic factors that participate in oncogenesis and drug resistance and are proposed to have potential as self-delivery systems. Advancing on our studies of EVs in triple-negative breast cancer, here we more comprehensively analysed isogenic cell line variants and their EV populations, tissues cell line variants and their EV populations, as well as breast tumour and normal tissues. Profiling 384 miRNAs showed EV miRNA content to be highly representative of their cells of origin. miRNAs most substantially down-regulated in aggressive cells and their EVs originated from 14q32. Analysis of miR-134, the most substantially down-regulated miRNA, supported its clinical relevance in breast tumours compared to matched normal breast tissue. Functional studies indicated that miR-134 controls STAT5B which, in turn, controls Hsp90. miR-134 delivered by direct transfection into Hs578Ts(i)8 cells (in which it was greatly down-regulated) reduced STAT5B, Hsp90, and Bcl-2 levels, reduced cellular proliferation, and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Delivery via miR-134-enriched EVs also reduced STAT5B and Hsp90, reduced cellular migration and invasion, and enhanced sensitivity to anti-Hsp90 drugs. While the differing effects achieved by transfection or EV delivery are likely to be, at least partly, due to specific amounts of miR-134 delivered by these routes, these EV-based studies identified miRNA-134 as a potential biomarker and therapeutic for breast cancer. PMID:26416415

  14. miR-134 in extracellular vesicles reduces triple-negative breast cancer aggression and increases drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Keith; Lowry, Michelle C; Corcoran, Claire; Martinez, Vanesa G; Daly, Melissa; Rani, Sweta; Gallagher, William M; Radomski, Marek W; MacLeod, Roderick A F; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-10-20

    Exosomes (EVs) have relevance in cell-to-cell communication carrying pro-tumorigenic factors that participate in oncogenesis and drug resistance and are proposed to have potential as self-delivery systems. Advancing on our studies of EVs in triple-negative breast cancer, here we more comprehensively analysed isogenic cell line variants and their EV populations, tissues cell line variants and their EV populations, as well as breast tumour and normal tissues. Profiling 384 miRNAs showed EV miRNA content to be highly representative of their cells of origin. miRNAs most substantially down-regulated in aggressive cells and their EVs originated from 14q32. Analysis of miR-134, the most substantially down-regulated miRNA, supported its clinical relevance in breast tumours compared to matched normal breast tissue. Functional studies indicated that miR-134 controls STAT5B which, in turn, controls Hsp90. miR-134 delivered by direct transfection into Hs578Ts(i)8 cells (in which it was greatly down-regulated) reduced STAT5B, Hsp90, and Bcl-2 levels, reduced cellular proliferation, and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Delivery via miR-134-enriched EVs also reduced STAT5B and Hsp90, reduced cellular migration and invasion, and enhanced sensitivity to anti-Hsp90 drugs. While the differing effects achieved by transfection or EV delivery are likely to be, at least partly, due to specific amounts of miR-134 delivered by these routes, these EV-based studies identified miRNA-134 as a potential biomarker and therapeutic for breast cancer.

  15. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistant pathogens in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the resistance to 20 different antibacterial agents of 362 clinically isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 332 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions throughout Japan that participated in the surveys carried out by the Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. In phase 1, the proportions of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae (PSSP), penicillin-insensitive S. pneumoniae (PISP), and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) were 35.4%, 34.8%, and 29.8%, respectively, and the proportions were almost the same in phase 2: 33.1%, 37.0%, and 29.8%, respectively. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for PRSP in phase 1 and phase 2 revealed that these values for cefditoren, cefpodoxime, cefdinir, faropenem, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, meropenem, and vancomycin increased by twofold to fourfold during the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. However the MIC(90) of rokitamycin increased more than fourfold. The proportion of S. pneumoniae that were PISP + PRSP remained almost constant over the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. The background factors of patient age, previous administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery were examined; we found that in phase 1, the proportion of PISP + PRSP was significantly higher than that of PSSP in patients under 4 years old who had previously received antibacterial agents, but no significant differences were found in any of these background factors in the phase 2 survey. No significant difference was found in the proportions of penicillin-resistant bacteria according to whether or not the child had attended a day nursery. PMID:20012731

  16. Cytotoxicity of Elaoephorbia drupifera and other Cameroonian medicinal plants against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major hurdle for cancer treatment worldwide and accounts for chemotherapy failure in over 90% of patients with metastatic cancer. Evidence of the cytotoxicity of Cameroonian plants against cancer cell lines including MDR phenotypes is been intensively and progressively provided. The present work was therefore designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of twenty-two Cameroonian medicinal plants against sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines. Methods The methanol maceration was used to obtain the crude plant extracts whilst the cytotoxicity of the studied extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Results A preliminary assay on leukemia CCRF-CEM cells at 40 μg/mL shows that six of the twenty plant extract were able to enhance less than 50% of the growth proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells. These include Crinum zeylanicum (32.22%), Entada abyssinica (34.67%), Elaoephorbia drupifera (35.05%), Dioscorea bulbifera (45.88%), Eremomastax speciosa (46.07%) and Polistigma thonningii (45.11%). Among these six plants, E. drupifera showed the best activity with IC50 values below or around 30 μg/mL against the nine tested cancer cell lines. The lowest IC50 value of 8.40 μg/mL was recorded with the extract of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. The IC50 values below 10 μg/mL were recorded with the extracts of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, C. zeylanicum against HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/- colon cancer cells and E. abyssinica against HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Conclusion The results of the present study provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and a baseline information for the potential use of Elaoephorbia drupifera in the treatment of sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24088184

  17. Analogues of thiolactomycin as potential anti-malarial and anti-trypanosomal agents.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon M; Urch, Jonathan E; Brun, Reto; Harwood, John L; Berry, Colin; Gilbert, Ian H

    2004-02-15

    A series of analogues of the naturally occurring antibiotic thiolactomycin (TLM) have been synthesised and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Thiolactomycin is an inhibitor of Type II fatty acid synthase which is found in plants and most prokaryotes, but not an inhibitor of Type I fatty acid synthase in mammals. A number of the analogues showed inhibition equal to or greater than TLM. The introduction of hydrophobic alkyl groups at the C3 and C5 positions of the thiolactone ring lead to increased inhibition, the best showing a fourteenfold increase in activity over TLM. In addition, some of the analogues showed activity when assayed against the parasitic protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei.

  18. Carolus Linnaeus, the ash, worm-wood and other anti-malarial plants.

    PubMed

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Thorsell, Walborg; Wahlgren, Mats

    2010-12-01

    In 1735 Carolus Linnaeus wrote that quinine was the preferred treatment for malaria but that the bark of the ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and worm-wood (Artemisia absinthium) also had effects on the disease. We here report that lipo- and hydrophilic extracts of the bark of the ash inhibit the in vitro growth of the asexual stages of P. falciparum. The data suggests that the knowledge of the treatment of malaria was already available in Europe some 300 years ago.

  19. Access to artemisinin-based anti-malarial treatment and its related factors in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) has been widely adopted as one of the main malaria control strategies. However, its promise to save thousands of lives in sub-Saharan Africa depends on how effective the use of ACT is within the routine health system. The INESS platform evaluated effective coverage of ACT in several African countries. Timely access within 24 hours to an authorized ACT outlet is one of the determinants of effective coverage and was assessed for artemether-lumefantrine (Alu), in two district health systems in rural Tanzania. Methods From October 2009 to June 2011we conducted continuous rolling household surveys in the Kilombero-Ulanga and the Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites (HDSS). Surveys were linked to the routine HDSS update rounds. Members of randomly pre-selected households that had experienced a fever episode in the previous two weeks were eligible for a structured interview. Data on individual treatment seeking, access to treatment, timing, source of treatment and household costs per episode were collected. Data are presented on timely access from a total of 2,112 interviews in relation to demographics, seasonality, and socio economic status. Results In Kilombero-Ulanga, 41.8% (CI: 36.6–45.1) and in Rufiji 36.8% (33.7–40.1) of fever cases had access to an authorized ACT provider within 24 hours of fever onset. In neither of the HDSS site was age, sex, socio-economic status or seasonality of malaria found to be significantly correlated with timely access. Conclusion Timely access to authorized ACT providers is below 50% despite interventions intended to improve access such as social marketing and accreditation of private dispensing outlets. To improve prompt diagnosis and treatment, access remains a major bottle neck and new more innovative interventions are needed to raise effective coverage of malaria treatment in Tanzania. PMID:23651521

  20. Carolus Linnaeus, the ash, worm-wood and other anti-malarial plants.

    PubMed

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Thorsell, Walborg; Wahlgren, Mats

    2010-12-01

    In 1735 Carolus Linnaeus wrote that quinine was the preferred treatment for malaria but that the bark of the ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and worm-wood (Artemisia absinthium) also had effects on the disease. We here report that lipo- and hydrophilic extracts of the bark of the ash inhibit the in vitro growth of the asexual stages of P. falciparum. The data suggests that the knowledge of the treatment of malaria was already available in Europe some 300 years ago. PMID:20936911

  1. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Bosman, Fred; Tejpar, Sabine; Roth, Arnaud; Brunner, Nils; Hansen, Anker; Knudsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether gene signatures for chemosensitivity for irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derived from in vitro grown cancer cell lines can predict clinical sensitivity to these drugs. Methods To test if an irinotecan signature and a SN-38 signature could identify patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. Results There was no statistically significant association between the irinotecan or SN-38 profiles and benefit from irinotecan. The 5-FU sensitivity profile showed a statistically significant association with relapse free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.54 (0.41–0.71), p<1e-05) and overall survival (HR = 0.47 (0.34–0.63), p<1e-06) in the PETACC-3 subpopulation. The effect of the 5-FU profile remained significant in a multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards model, adjusting for several relevant clinicopathological parameters. No statistically significant effect of the 5-FU profile was observed in the untreated cohort of 359 patients (relapse free survival, p = 0.671). Conclusion The irinotecan predictor had no predictive value. The 5-FU predictor was prognostic in stage III patients in PETACC-3 but not in stage II patients with no adjuvant therapy. This suggests a potential predictive ability of the 5-FU sensitivity profile to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences

  2. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  3. In vitro activities of native and designed peptide antibiotics against drug sensitive and resistant tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Sukwon S; Bang, Yung Jue; Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2003-07-01

    In order to develop peptide agents with reduced length and enhanced tumoricidal activity, we have designed gaegurin 6 (GGN6) derivatives through deletions and/or substitutions of amino acids. The deletion of hydrophobic amino terminal region completely abolished antitumor activity whereas the deletion of carboxy terminal region had little influence on antitumor activity. Antitumor activity of the PTP peptides did not correlate with antibacterial activity. PTP7, the most potent derivative, was found to have comparable antitumor activity to GGN6 in spite of reduced number of amino acids which is about half the size of gaegurin 6; furthermore, it showed little cytotoxicity on PBMCs and RBCs. GGN6 and PTP7 also showed equivalent cytotoxicity against drug sensitive (MCF-7) and multidrug-resistant cell lines (MCF-7/DOX). Plasma membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation of peptide-treated tumor cells indicated that the peptides could induce apoptosis in tumor cells. These results suggest that GGN6 and its derivatives can be developed as new anticancer agents and may provide a new strategy for overcoming MDR which is a major problem in cancer therapy.

  4. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity.

  5. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world’s major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml) and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month. PMID:26221566

  6. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world's major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml) and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  7. [Study on preparation of the pH sensitive hydroxyethyl chitin/poly (acrylic acid) hydrogel and its drug release property].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guohua; Sun, Mingkun; Jin, Zhitao; Gao, Congjie

    2006-04-01

    Hydroxyethyl chitin (HECH) is a water soluble chitin derivative made by etherification of chitin, ethylene chlorohydrin was used as etherification reagent in this reaction. A novel interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) composed of HECH/PAA was prepared. The IR spectra confirmed that HECH/PAA was formed through chemical bond interaction. The sensitivity of this hydrogel to temperature and pH was studied. The swelling ratio of this hydrogel in artificial intestinal juice is much greater than that in artificial gastric juice. The IPN hydrogel exhibited a typical pH-sensitivity, and its degree of swelling ratio increased with the increase of temperature. The sustained-release drug system of Dichlofenac potassium was prepared by using HECH/PAA as the drug carrier. The release experiment showed a perfect release behavior in artificial intestinal juice. This IPN is expected to be used as a good drug delivery system of enteric medicine. PMID:16706361

  8. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice in thermo-sensitive liposomes group and doxorubicin group were significantly smaller than those of N.S. group. Meanwhile, the combination of near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm significantly enhanced the tumor growth inhibition both on SMMC-7721 cells and the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice. The quality of life such as body weight, mental state, food and water intake of sarcomaia 180 tumor-bearing mice treated with doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes were much higher than those treated with doxorubicin. In conclusion, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes combined with near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm may potentially provide viable clinical strategies for targeting delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Effect of anti-hyperlipidemia drugs on the alpha-tocopherol concentration and their potential for murine malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Kume, Aiko; Herbas, Maria Shirley; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The current preventions of malaria are protection against mosquito bites and taking chemoprophylactic anti-malarial drugs. However, drug therapies are usually associated with adverse events and emergency of drug-resistant malaria parasites. Previous study showed that host plasma alpha-tocopherol deficiency enhanced resistance against malaria infection in mice. Here, we report a new prevention strategy against malaria by using anti-hyperlipidemia drugs, ezetimibe, berberine, cholestyramine, and probucol to modify the host plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration. The drugs were mixed with diet and fed to C57BL/6J mice for 2 weeks. Although all drugs reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration after 2 weeks of feeding, probucol-treated mice showed 90 % reduction and it was the lowest alpha-tocopherol concentration among the four drugs. Ezetimibe, berberine, and combination of ezetimibe and berberine pretreatment for 2 weeks were not effective against infection of Plasmodium yoelii XL17, a lethal strain, for survival and parasitemia in mice. Two-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection of cholestyramine had also no effect on malaria infection. Survival rates of cholestyramine, ezetimibe, and/or berberine treated mice were 0-22 %. However, probucol caused significant decrease in parasitemia and increased in mice survival following 2-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection. All control mice died while all probucol treated mice survived during the course of infection. Thus, probucol which reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration was effective in enhancing the host to resist malaria infection in mice. Our finding indicates that plasma alpha-tocopherol reducing drugs like probucol might be a candidate for beneficial prevention strategy for travelers from malaria-free area.

  10. Solid-state probe based electrochemical aptasensor for cocaine: a potentially convenient, sensitive, repeatable, and integrated sensing platform for drugs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Chen, Chaogui; Yin, Jianyuan; Li, Bingling; Zhou, Ming; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2010-02-15

    Aptamers, which are artificial oligonucleotides selected in vitro, have been employed to design novel biosensors (i.e., aptasensors). In this work, we first constructed a label-free electrochemical aptasensor introducing a probe immobilization technique by the use of a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled multilayer with ferrocene-appended poly(ethyleneimine) (Fc-PEI) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) array electrode for detection of cocaine. The Fc-PEI and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were LBL assembled on the electrode surface via electrostatic interaction. Then, cocaine aptamer fragments, SH-C2, were covalently labeled onto the outermost AuNP layer. When the target cocaine and cocaine aptamer C1 were present simultaneously, the SH-C2 layer hybridized partly with C1 to bind the cocaine, which led to a decreased differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal of Fc-PEI. This DPV signal change could be used to sensitively detect cocaine with the lowest detectable concentration down to 0.1 microM and the detection range up to 38.8 microM, which falls in the the expected range for medical use of detecting drug abuse involving cocaine. Meanwhile, the sensor was specific to cocaine in complex biologic fluids such as human plasma, human saliva, etc. The sensing strategy had general applicability, and the detection of thrombin could also be realized, displayed a low detection limit, and exhibited worthiness to other analytes. The aptasensor based on the array electrode held promising potential for integration of the sensing ability in multianalysis for simultaneous detection.

  11. Topographical and drug specific sensitivity of hair cells of the zebrafish larvae to aminoglycoside-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Giuseppe; Abbate, Francesco; Levanti, Maria Beatrice; Germanà, Germana Patrizia; Laurà, Rosaria; Ciriaco, Emilia; Vega, José A; Germanà, Antonino

    2014-07-01

    The hair cells of the lateral line system of fishes are morphologically and physiologically similar to the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear, also sharing its molecular characteristics. For this reason, it has been used as a powerful animal model to analyze in vivo ototoxicity. In this work, we examined the dose-dependent effects of two potent ototoxic aminoglycosides, neomycin and gentamicin, on the hair cells of two selected neuromasts (L1 and T1, the first of the trunk and the terminal located in the fin, respectively) of the lateral line in the ET4 transgenic zebrafish line. The hair cells of this strain selectively and constitutively display fluorescence. The fish were treated for 24 h at different doses (1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 100 μM levels) of both aminoglycosides. Immediately after treatment the morphology and the number of cells in L1 and T were analyzed under a fluorescence microscope. The results show that neomycin and gentamicin have different effects on the hair cell death at the same concentration, showing also different toxicity in L1 and T1 neuromasts. The toxicity observed in the hair cells of T1 neuromast was less than in L1 especially for the gentamicin treatment. These results demonstrate different sensitivity of hair cells of the lateral line to ototoxic drugs according to topographical localization and suggest the in vivo assay of the L1 neuromast of zebrafish larva and low doses of neomycin as an ideal model to study ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides.

  12. Overexpression of PIAS3 suppresses cell growth and restores the drug sensitivity of human lung cancer cells in association with PI3-K/Akt inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Tadashi; Naka, Tetsuji; Iwahori, Kota; Furukawa, Mitsugi; Nagatomo, Izumi; Kijima, Takashi; Kumagai, Toru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Isao; Kawase, Ichiro

    2006-10-01

    Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) are reported to cause uncontrolled transmission of growth signals. In this study, we analyzed the roles of an inhibitor of STAT, protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) 3, in the development of lung cancer. Treatment with an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, LY294002, retarded the growth of human lung cancer cells and rendered them more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the inhibition of JAK/STAT by AG490 significantly suppressed cell growth but did not increase drug sensitivity at all. Overexpression of PIAS3 not only significantly inhibited cell growth but also rendered cancer cells up to 12.0-fold more sensitive to the above drugs, which was associated with the suppression of Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of PIAS3 with small interfering RNA, nevertheless, led cancer cells to accelerate cell proliferation, deteriorate chemosensitivity, and augment Akt phosphorylation. Although the overexpression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 in cancer cells also inhibited cell growth and STAT3 phosphorylation, it neither increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs nor affected the phosphorylation of Akt. These results indicate that PIAS3 may be an attractive candidate for targeting the JAK/STAT and PI3-K/Akt signaling pathways in cancer treatment.

  13. Novel pH-sensitive IPNs of polyacrylamide-g-gum ghatti and sodium alginate for gastro-protective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Boppana, Rashmi; Krishna Mohan, G; Nayak, Usha; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sa, Biswanath; Kulkarni, Raghavendra V

    2015-04-01

    This article reports the development of pH-sensitive interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) microbeads using polyacrylamide-grafted-gum ghatti (PAAm-g-GG) and sodium alginate (SA) for gastro-protective controlled delivery of ketoprofen. We have synthesized PAAm-grafted-GG copolymer under microwave irradiation using cerric ammonium nitrate as reaction initiator; further, the PAAm-g-GG was converted to pH-sensitive copolymer through alkaline hydrolysis. Sophisticated instrumentation techniques were used to characterize PAAm-g-GG. The IPN microbeads of PAAm-g-GG and SA, pre-loaded with ketoprofen were prepared by dual crosslinking using Ca(2+) ions and glutaraldehyde (GA). The IPN microbeads demonstrated excellent pH-sensitive behavior as noted in the pulsatile swelling test and scanning electron microscopy. IPN microbeads also showed larger amount of drug release in buffer solution of pH 7.4 as compared to drug release in solution of pH 1.2. The in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and stomach histopathology studies conducted on wistar rats confirmed the pH-sensitive controlled release of ketoprofen; IPN microbeads retarded the drug release in stomach resulting in reduced adverse effects of ketoprofen. PMID:25623023

  14. Novel pH-sensitive IPNs of polyacrylamide-g-gum ghatti and sodium alginate for gastro-protective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Boppana, Rashmi; Krishna Mohan, G; Nayak, Usha; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sa, Biswanath; Kulkarni, Raghavendra V

    2015-04-01

    This article reports the development of pH-sensitive interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) microbeads using polyacrylamide-grafted-gum ghatti (PAAm-g-GG) and sodium alginate (SA) for gastro-protective controlled delivery of ketoprofen. We have synthesized PAAm-grafted-GG copolymer under microwave irradiation using cerric ammonium nitrate as reaction initiator; further, the PAAm-g-GG was converted to pH-sensitive copolymer through alkaline hydrolysis. Sophisticated instrumentation techniques were used to characterize PAAm-g-GG. The IPN microbeads of PAAm-g-GG and SA, pre-loaded with ketoprofen were prepared by dual crosslinking using Ca(2+) ions and glutaraldehyde (GA). The IPN microbeads demonstrated excellent pH-sensitive behavior as noted in the pulsatile swelling test and scanning electron microscopy. IPN microbeads also showed larger amount of drug release in buffer solution of pH 7.4 as compared to drug release in solution of pH 1.2. The in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and stomach histopathology studies conducted on wistar rats confirmed the pH-sensitive controlled release of ketoprofen; IPN microbeads retarded the drug release in stomach resulting in reduced adverse effects of ketoprofen.

  15. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery.

  16. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  17. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  18. Amphiphilic polymer-mediated formation of laponite-based nanohybrids with robust stability and pH sensitivity for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Maciel, Dina; Wu, Yilun; Rodrigues, João; Shi, Xiangyang; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng; Tomás, Helena; Li, Yulin

    2014-10-01

    The development of pH-sensitive drug delivery nanosystems that present a low drug release at the physiological pH and are able to increase the extent of the release at a lower pH value (like those existent in the interstitial space of solid tumors (pH 6.5) and in the intracellular endolysosomal compartments (pH 5.0)) is very important for an efficient and safe cancer therapy. Laponite (LP) is a synthetic silicate nanoparticle with a nanodisk structure (25 nm in diameter and 0.92 nm in thickness) and negative-charged surface, which can be used for the encapsulation of doxorubicin (DOX, a cationic drug) through electrostatic interactions and exhibit good pH sensitivity in drug delivery. However, the colloidal instability of LP still limits its potential clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrate an elegant strategy to develop stable Laponite-based nanohybrids through the functionalization of its surface with an amphiphile PEG-PLA copolymer by a self-assembly process. The hydrophobic block of PEG-PLA acts as an anchor that binds to the surface of drug-loaded LP nanodisks, maintaining the core structure, whereas the hydrophilic PEG part serves as a protective stealth shell that improves the whole stability of the nanohybrids under physiological conditions. The resulting nanocarriers can effectively load the DOX drug (the encapsulation efficiency is 85%), and display a pH-enhanced drug release behavior in a sustained way. In vitro biological evaluation indicated that the DOX-loaded nanocarriers can be effectively internalized by CAL-72 cells (an osteosarcoma cell line), and exhibit a remarkable higher anticancer cytotoxicity than free DOX. The merits of Laponite/PEG-PLA nanohybrids, such as good cytocompatibility, excellent physiological stability, sustained pH-responsive release properties, and improved anticancer activity, make them a promising platform for the delivery of other therapeutic agents beyond DOX. PMID:25167168

  19. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Tuberculosis: A Historical Cohort Study in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Vania Celina Dezoti; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, stratified by level of drug resistance. Methods This was a historical cohort study based on data from the II National Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Survey (2006–2007) collected at eight participating health care facilities in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The cohort was followed for 3 years after the start of treatment. Results Of 299 cases of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis included in the study, 216 (72.2%) were diagnosed at five public primary health care units and 83 (27.8%) at three public hospitals. Among these cases, the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis was 14.4%, and that of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was 4.7%. Overall, 32.0% of drug-resistant and 2.0% of multidrug-resistant cases occurred in previously treated patients. The most common comorbidity in the sample was HIV infection (26.2%). There was no association between drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and sociodemographic variables. Cure was achieved in 66.7% of patients, and the default rate was 21.2%. The 2-month sputum conversion rate was 34.2%, and the relapse rate was 16.9%. Patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis had lower rates of cure (45.2%) and 2-month sputum conversion (25%), as well as a higher relapse rate (30.7%). Conclusion These results highlight the urgent need for a more effective TB control program in this geographical setting, with a major emphasis on treatment of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:27505633

  20. Improving sensitivity by large-volume sample stacking using the electroosmotic flow pump to analyze some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by capillary electrophoresis in water samples.

    PubMed

    Macià, Alba; Borrull, Francesc; Aguilar, Carme; Calull, Marta

    2003-08-01

    Large-volume sample stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump (LVSEP) has been used to analyze some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples. With methanol as the run buffer solvent to suppress the EOF, sensitivity was enhanced by 80-100-fold. The sample for the analysis of real water sample was pretreated by solid-phase extraction (SPE). When the method was based on off-line SPE-LVSEP-CE, sensitivity improved by as much as 1000 times.

  1. Ex vivo cultures of glioblastoma in three-dimensional hydrogel maintain the original tumor growth behavior and are suitable for preclinical drug and radiation sensitivity screening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiguet Jiglaire, Carine; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Denicolaï, Emilie; Barets, Doriane; Metellus, Philippe; and others

    2014-02-15

    Identification of new drugs and predicting drug response are major challenges in oncology, especially for brain tumors, because total surgical resection is difficult and radiation therapy or chemotherapy is often ineffective. With the aim of developing a culture system close to in vivo conditions for testing new drugs, we characterized an ex vivo three-dimensional culture system based on a hyaluronic acid-rich hydrogel and compared it with classical two-dimensional culture conditions. U87-MG glioblastoma cells and seven primary cell cultures of human glioblastomas were subjected to radiation therapy and chemotherapy drugs. It appears that 3D hydrogel preserves the original cancer growth behavior and enables assessment of the sensitivity of malignant gliomas to radiation and drugs with regard to inter-tumoral heterogeneity of therapeutic response. It could be used for preclinical assessment of new therapies. - Highlights: • We have compared primary glioblastoma cell culture in a 2D versus 3D-matrix system. • In 3D morphology, organization and markers better recapitulate the original tumor. • 3D-matrix culture might represent a relevant system for more accurate drug screening.

  2. Carbon Dots Embedded Magnetic Nanoparticles @Chitosan @Metal Organic Framework as a Nanoprobe for pH Sensitive Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Singh, Tanya; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOFs) have been demonstrated as a promising carrier for drug delivery, as they possess many advantages like large surface area, high porosity, and tunable functionality. However, there are no reports about the functionalization of NMOFs, which combines cancer-targeted drug delivery/imaging, magnetic property, high drug loading content, and pH-sensitive drug release into one system. Existing formulations for integrating target molecules into NMOF are based on multistep synthetic processes. However, in this study, we report an approach that combines NMOF (IRMOF-3) synthesis and target molecule (Folic acid) encapsulation on the surface of chitosan modified magnetic nanoparticles in a single step. A noticeable feature of chitosan is control and pH responsive drug release for several days. More importantly, doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into magnetic NMOF formulation and showed high drug loading (1.63 g DOX g(-1) magnetic NMOFs). To demonstrate the optical imaging, carbon dots (CDs) are encapsulated into the synthesized magnetic NMOF, thereby endowing fluorescence features to the nanoparticles. These folate targeted magnetic NMOF possess more specific cellular internalization toward folate-overexpressed cancer (HeLa) cells in comparison to normal (L929) cells.

  3. Delayed photolysis of liposomes: a strategy for the precision timing of bolus drug release using ex-vivo photochemical sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for metastatic cancer. However drug toxicity limits the dosage that can safely be used, thus reducing treatment efficacy. Drug carrier particles, like liposomes, can help reduce toxicity by shielding normal tissue from drug and selectively depositing drug in tumors. Over years of development, liposomes have been optimized to avoid uptake by the Reticuloendothelial System (RES) as well as effectively retain their drug content during circulation. As a result, liposomes release drug passively, by slow leakage, but this uncontrolled drug release can limit treatment efficacy as it can be difficult to achieve therapeutic concentrations of drug at tumor sites even with tumor-specific accumulation of the carriers. Lipid membranes can be photochemically lysed by both Type I (photosensitizer-substrate) and Type II (photosensitizer-oxygen) reactions. It has been demonstrated in red blood cells (RBCs) in vitro that these photolysis reactions can occur in two distinct steps: a light-initiated reaction followed by a thermally-initiated reaction. These separable activation steps allow for the delay of photohemolysis in a controlled manner using the irradiation energy, temperature and photosensitizer concentration. In this work we have translated this technique from RBCs to liposomal nanoparticles. To that end, we present in vitro data demonstrating this delayed bolus release from liposomes, as well as the ability to control the timing of this event. Further, we demonstrate for the first time the improved delivery of bioavailable cargo selectively to target sites in vivo.

  4. Radiation survival parameters of antineoplastic drug-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines and their modification by buthionine sulfoximine

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.G.; Behrens, B.C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Hamilton, T.C.; Grotzinger, K.R.; McKoy, W.M.; Winker, M.A.; Ozols, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The optimum integration of chemotherapy and irradiation is of potential clinical significance in the treatment of ovarian cancer. A series of human ovarian cancer cell lines have been developed in which dose-response relationships to standard anticancer drugs have been determined, and the patterns of cross-resistance between these drugs and irradiation have been established. By stepwise incubation with drugs, sublines of A2780, a drug-sensitive cell line, have been made 100-fold, 10-fold, and 10-fold more resistant to Adriamycin (2780AD), melphalan (2780ME), and cisplatin (2780CP). Two additional cell lines, NIH:OVCAR-3nu(Ag+) and NIH:OVCAR-4(Ag+), were established from drug-refractory patients. 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) are all cross-resistant to irradiation, with DOS of 146, 187, 143, and 203, respectively. However, 2780AD remains sensitive to radiation, with a DO of 111, which is similar to that of A2780 (101). Glutathione (GSH) levels are elevated in 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) to 4.58, 6.13, 12.10, and 15.14 nmol/10(6) cells as compared to A2780, with 1.89 nmol/10(6) cells. However, the GSH level in 2780AD is only minimally higher than that in A2780 (2.94 nmol/10(6) cells). Buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, significantly increases the radiation sensitivity of 2780ME (changing the DO from 143 to 95) and 2780CP to a lesser extent, suggesting that intracellular GSH levels may play an important role in the radiation response of certain neoplastic cells.

  5. Identification of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors to sensitize drug resistant side population tumor cells using a cell based assay platform.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, Praveen K; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Chandrika, Bhavya Balan; Varghese, Saneesh; Santhoshkumar, T R; Radhakrishna Pillai, M

    2012-04-01

    Current cancer therapeutics are identified based on initial tumor regression screens that mostly kill differentiated tumor cells, sparing the rare cancer stem cells (CSCs). Being rare and difficult to characterize, it remains a challenge to identify compounds active against them. Side population (SP) cells identified in multiple cancer cell line panels expressing mitochondrial Cytochrome C-EGFP were evaluated for identifying possible drug candidates utilizing high-throughput imaging. We identified heat shock protein 90 inhibitors as potential agents to sensitize SP cells to anticancer drugs. Hsp90 inhibitors induced down regulation of Akt leading to proteasomal degradation of survivin and consequent mitochondrial apoptosis. A successful screening platform for identifying compounds targeting drug resistant side population cells was developed.

  6. Sensitization for death receptor- or drug-induced apoptosis by re-expression of caspase-8 through demethylation or gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulda, S; Küfer, M U; Meyer, E; van Valen, F; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Debatin, K M

    2001-09-13

    Resistance of tumors to treatment with cytotoxic drugs, irradiation or immunotherapy may be due to disrupted apoptosis programs. Here, we report in a variety of different tumor cells including Ewing tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant brain tumors and melanoma that caspase-8 expression acts as a key determinant of sensitivity for apoptosis induced by death-inducing ligands or cytotoxic drugs. In tumor cell lines resistant to TRAIL, anti-CD95 or TNFalpha, caspase-8 protein and mRNA expression was decreased or absent without caspase-8 gene loss. Methylation-specific PCR revealed hypermethylation of caspase-8 regulatory sequences in cells with impaired caspase-8 expression. Treatment with the demethylation agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC) reversed hypermethylation of caspase-8 resulting in restoration of caspase-8 expression and recruitment and activation of caspase-8 at the CD95 DISC upon receptor cross-linking thereby sensitizing for death receptor-, and importantly, also for drug-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity also inhibited apoptosis sensitization by 5-dAzaC. Similar to demethylation, introduction of caspase-8 by gene transfer sensitized for apoptosis induction. Hypermethylation of caspase-8 was linked to reduced caspase-8 expression in different tumor cell lines in vitro and, most importantly, also in primary tumor samples. Thus, these findings indicate that re-expression of caspase-8, e.g. by demethylation or caspase-8 gene transfer, might be an effective strategy to restore sensitivity for chemotherapy- or death receptor-induced apoptosis in various tumors in vivo.

  7. Sensitization for death receptor- or drug-induced apoptosis by re-expression of caspase-8 through demethylation or gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulda, S; Küfer, M U; Meyer, E; van Valen, F; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Debatin, K M

    2001-09-13

    Resistance of tumors to treatment with cytotoxic drugs, irradiation or immunotherapy may be due to disrupted apoptosis programs. Here, we report in a variety of different tumor cells including Ewing tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant brain tumors and melanoma that caspase-8 expression acts as a key determinant of sensitivity for apoptosis induced by death-inducing ligands or cytotoxic drugs. In tumor cell lines resistant to TRAIL, anti-CD95 or TNFalpha, caspase-8 protein and mRNA expression was decreased or absent without caspase-8 gene loss. Methylation-specific PCR revealed hypermethylation of caspase-8 regulatory sequences in cells with impaired caspase-8 expression. Treatment with the demethylation agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC) reversed hypermethylation of caspase-8 resulting in restoration of caspase-8 expression and recruitment and activation of caspase-8 at the CD95 DISC upon receptor cross-linking thereby sensitizing for death receptor-, and importantly, also for drug-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity also inhibited apoptosis sensitization by 5-dAzaC. Similar to demethylation, introduction of caspase-8 by gene transfer sensitized for apoptosis induction. Hypermethylation of caspase-8 was linked to reduced caspase-8 expression in different tumor cell lines in vitro and, most importantly, also in primary tumor samples. Thus, these findings indicate that re-expression of caspase-8, e.g. by demethylation or caspase-8 gene transfer, might be an effective strategy to restore sensitivity for chemotherapy- or death receptor-induced apoptosis in various tumors in vivo. PMID:11593392

  8. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite’s food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M.; Lee, Andrew H.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M.; Daley, Daniel A.; Hoke, Matthew J.; Altenhofen, Lindsey M.; Painter, Heather J.; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J. P.; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E.; Fidock, David A.; Cooper, Roland A.; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  9. Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF) with silver colloids in 96-well plates: Application to ultra fast and sensitive immunoassays, High Throughput Screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Holley, Patrick; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-05-30

    Fluorescence detection is the basis of most assays used in drug discovery and High Throughput Screening (HTS) today. In all of these assays, assay rapidity and sensitivity is a primary concern, the sensitivity determined by both the quantum yield of the fluorophores and efficiency of the detection system, while rapidity is determined by the physical and biophysical parameters of temperature, concentration, assay bioaffinity, etc. In this paper we describe a platform technology that promises to fundamentally address these two physical constraints of sensitivity and rapidity. By combining the use of Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), a near-field effect that can significantly enhance fluorescence signatures, with low power microwave heating, we can significantly increase the sensitivity of surface assays as well as >95% kinetically complete the assay within a few seconds. In addition, the metallic nanostructures used to facilitate MEF appear to be preferentially heated as compared to the surface assay fluid, advantageously localizing the MEF and heating around the nanostructures. To demonstrate proof of principle, a 96-well plate has been functionalized with silver nanostructures, and a model protein avidin-biotin assay studied. In our findings, a greater than 5-fold fluorescence enhancement coupled with a approximately 90-fold increase in assay kinetics was observed, but with no assay washing steps needed due to the silver-enhanced evanescent field mode of excitation. These findings promise to strongly facilitate high throughput fluorescence-based processes, such as in biology, drug discovery and general compound screening.

  10. Sensitive sepiolite-carbon nanotubes based disposable electrodes for direct detection of DNA and anticancer drug-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Arzum; Kuralay, Filiz; Çubukçu, H Evren; Congur, Gulsah; Karadeniz, Hakan; Canavar, Ece

    2012-09-01

    A new surface based on the natural clay mineral sepiolite and a single-walled carbon nanotubes-modified graphite electrode was developed for the electrochemical detection of DNA, and also for anticancer drug-DNA interactions.

  11. Mitoxantrone loaded superparamagnetic nanoparticles for drug targeting: a versatile and sensitive method for quantification of drug enrichment in rabbit tissues using HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In medicine, superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to chemotherapeutics are currently investigated for their feasibility in local tumor therapy. After intraarterial application, these particles can be accumulated in the targeted area by an external magnetic field to increase the drug concentration in the region of interest (Magnetic-Drug-Targeting). We here present an analytical method (HPLC-UV), to detect pure or ferrofluid-bound mitoxantrone in a complex matrix even in trace amounts in order to perform biodistribution studies. Mitoxantrone could be extracted in high yields from different tissues. Recovery of mitoxantrone in liver tissue (5000 ng/g) was 76 +/- 2%. The limit of quantification of mitoxantrone standard was 10 ng/mL +/-12%. Validation criteria such as linearity, precision, and stability were evaluated in ranges achieving the FDA requirements. As shown for pilot samples, biodistribution studies can easily be performed after application of pure or ferrofluid-bound mitoxantrone. PMID:20490266

  12. Neonatal sensitization to ethanol-induced breathing disruptions as a function of late prenatal exposure to the drug in the rat: modulatory effects of ethanol's chemosensory cues.

    PubMed

    Cullere, Marcela; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Haymal, Beatriz; Paradelo, Martin; Langer, Marcos Daniel; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have systematically demonstrated abrupt changes in fetal respiratory patterns when the unborn organism is exposed to the effects of maternal ethanol intoxication. In subprimates, chronic exposure to this drug during gestation and infancy results in marked alterations of the plasticity of the respiratory network. These alterations are manifested in terms of an early incapability to overcome deleterious effects of hypoxic events as well as in terms of sensitization to ethanol's depressant effects upon breathing patterns. It has also been demonstrated that near term rat fetuses process ethanol's chemosensory cues when the drug contaminates the amniotic fluid and that associative learning processes occur due to the temporal contiguity existing between these cues and different ethanol-related physiological effects. In the present study during the course of late gestation (gestational days 17-20), pregnant rats were intragastrically administered with either 0.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Seven-day-old pups derived of these dams were evaluated in terms of respiration rates (breaths/min) and apneas when subjected to different experimental conditions. These conditions were defined by postnatal exposure to the drug (intragastric administrations of either 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol), postadministration time of evaluation (5-10 or 30-35 min) and olfactory context at test (no explicit ambient odor or ethanol ambient odor). The results, obtained via whole body plethysmography, indicated that brief prenatal experience with the drug sensitized the organisms to ethanol's depressant effects particularly when employing the higher ethanol doses. In turn, presence of ethanol odor at test potentiated the above mentioned respiratory alterations. Prenatal treatment with ethanol was not found to alter pharmacokinetic profiles resulting from postnatal exposure to the drug or to affect different morphometric parameters related with lung development. These

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2-sensitive Multifunctional Polymeric Micelles for Tumor-specific Co-delivery of siRNA and Hydrophobic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Perche, Federico; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Co-delivery of hydrophilic siRNA and hydrophobic drugs is one of the major challenges for nanomaterial-based medicine. Here, we present a simple but multifunctional micellar platform constructed by a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive copolymer (PEG-pp-PEI-PE) via self-assembly for tumor-targeted siRNA and drug co-delivery. The micellar nanocarrier possesses several key features for siRNA and drug delivery, including (i) excellent stability; (ii) efficient siRNA condensation by PEI; (iii) hydrophobic drug solubilization in the lipid “core”; (iv) passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; (v) tumor targeting triggered by the up-regulated tumoral MMP2; and (vi) enhanced cell internalization after MMP2-activated exposure of the previously hidden PEI. These cooperative functions ensure the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, and synergistic antitumor activity of co-loaded siRNA and drug. PMID:24529391

  14. Experimental sensitization of guinea pigs by drugs. Comparison of the maximization test with the wholly intradermal test.

    PubMed

    Rantuccio, F; Coviello, C; Sinisi, D; Scardigno, A; Conte, A

    1983-11-01

    The capacity of tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin, tolcyclate and chlorquinaldol to induce delayed-type contact sensitization was studied in guinea pigs in 2 series of tests using the method of Magnusson & Kligman and the authors' modification of the wholly intradermal Draize technique. Histological examination of skin biopsies obtained from the test area demonstrated that tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin and tolcyclate are potential sensitizers. PMID:6653105

  15. Further characterisation of the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) assay for the flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis in drug resistant and drug sensitive leukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.S.; Chresta, C.M.; Herberg, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    Apoptosis, originally defined by specific morphological changes, is characterized biochemically by non-random cleavage of DNA. Depending on cell type, this DNA cleavage proceeds from 300 and 50 kbp fragments prior to, concomitantly with, or in the absence of 180 bp integer fragmentation. Incorporation into fragmented DNA of biotin-labelled nucleotides by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) has recently become a standard flow cytometric assay for the identification and quantitation of apoptosis. Nucleotide incorportion is visualized using avidin-tagged fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Here, we characterize this assay further in three different hemopoietic cell lines. Drug-induced DNA damage is not identified by the TdT assay unless it is coupled to the apoptotic response. This was demonstrated using cells in which activation of the oncogenic Abelson-encoded protein tyrosine kinase suppressed drug-induced apoptosis, but did not inhibit drug-induced DNA damage (by melphalan, hydroxyurea, or etoposide). Furthermore, the TdT assay identifies DNA fragments formed during apoptosis induced by etoposide and N-methylformamide in HL60 and MOLT-4 cells, including those high molecular weight DNA fragments formed in MOLT-4 cells which were not further cleaved to 180-200 bp integer fragments. Our results support the use of flow cytometry and the TdT assay to reliably measure apoptotic cells in heterogeneous cell samples. 55 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase activity in whole blood from aspirin-sensitive asthmatics vs healthy donors

    PubMed Central

    Gray, P A; Warner, T D; Vojnovic, I; Del Soldato, P; Parikh, A; Scadding, G K; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LO) share a common substrate, arachidonic acid. Aspirin and related drugs inhibit COX activity. In a subset of patients with asthma aspirin induces clinical symptoms associated with increased levels of certain LO products, a phenomenon known as aspirin-sensitive asthma. The pharmacological pathways regulating such responses are not known. Here COX-1 and LO activity were measured respectively by the formation of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) or leukotrienes (LT) C4, D4 and E4 in whole blood stimulated with A23187. COX-2 activity was measured by the formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in blood stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 18 h. No differences in the levels of COX-1, COX-2 or LO products or the potency of drugs were found in blood from aspirin sensitive vs aspirin tolerant patients. Aspirin, indomethacin and nimesulide inhibited COX-1 activity, without altering LO activity. Indomethacin, nimesulide and the COX-2 selective inhibitor DFP [5,5-dimethyl-3-(2-isopropoxy)-4-(4-methanesulfonylphenyl)-2(5H)-furanone] inhibited COX-2 activity. NO-aspirin, like aspirin inhibited COX-1 activity in blood from both groups. However, NO-aspirin also reduced LO activity in the blood from both patient groups. Sodium salicylate was an ineffective inhibitor of COX-1, COX-2 or LO activity in blood from both aspirin-sensitive and tolerant patients. Thus, when COX activity in the blood of aspirin-sensitive asthmatics is blocked there is no associated increase in LO products. Moreover, NO-aspirin, unlike other NSAIDs tested, inhibited LO activity in the blood from both aspirin sensitive and aspirin tolerant individuals. This suggests that NO-aspirin may be better tolerated than aspirin by aspirin-sensitive asthmatics. PMID:12429575

  17. A comprehensive and sensitive method for hair analysis in drug-facilitated crimes and incorporation of zolazepam and tiletamine into hair after a single exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Yum, Hyesun; Jang, Moonhee; Shin, Ilchung; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-01

    Hair is a highly relevant specimen that is used to verify drug exposure in victims of drug-facilitated crime (DFC) cases. In the present study, a new analytical method involving ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for determining the presence of model drugs, including zolazepam and tiletamine and their metabolites in hair specimens from DFCs. The incorporation of zolazepam and tiletamine into hair after a single exposure was investigated in Long-Evans rats with the ratio of the hair concentration to the area under the curve. For rapid and simple sample preparation, methanol extraction and protein precipitation were performed for hair and plasma, respectively. No interference was observed in drug-free hair or plasma, except for hair-derived diphenhydramine in blank hair. The coefficients of variance of the matrix effects were below 12%, and the recoveries of the analytes exceeded 70% in all of the matrices. The precision and accuracy results were satisfactory. The limits of quantification ranged from 20 to 50 pg in 10 mg of hair. The drug incorporation rates were 0.03 ± 0.01% for zolazepam and 2.09 ± 0.51% for tiletamine in pigmented hair. We applied the present method to real hair samples in order to determine the drug that was used in seven cases. These results suggest that this comprehensive and sensitive hair analysis method can successfully verify a drug after a single exposure in crimes and can be applied in forensic and clinical toxicology laboratories.

  18. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R. S.; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase

  19. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R S; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase Src as a

  20. Population structure and circulating genotypes of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in São Paulo state, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Maria Conceição; Saraiva Giampaglia, Carmen M.; Oliveira, Rosângela S.; Simonsen, Vera; Latrilha, Fábio Oliveira; Moniz, Letícia Lisboa; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine

    2013-01-01

    São Paulo is the most populous Brazilian state and reports the largest number of tuberculosis cases in the country annually (over 18,500). This study included 193 isolates obtained during the 2nd Nationwide Survey on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Resistance that was conducted in São Paulo state and 547 isolates from a laboratory based study of drug resistance that were analyzed by the Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory at the Institute Adolfo Lutz. Both studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and sought to determine the genetic diversity and pattern of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates (MTC) circulating in São Paulo. The patterns obtained from the spoligotyping analysis demonstrated that 51/740 (6.9%) of the isolates corresponded to orphan patterns and that 689 (93.1%) of the isolates distributed into 144 shared types, including 119 that matched a preexisting shared type in the SITVIT2 database and 25 that were new isolates. A total of 77/144 patterns corresponded to unique isolates, while the remaining 67 corresponded to clustered patterns (n = 612 isolates clustered into groups of 2–84 isolates each). The evolutionarily ancient PGG1 lineages (Beijing, CAS1-DEL, EAI3-IND, and PINI2) were rarely detected in São Paulo and comprised only 13/740, or 1.76%, of the total isolates; all of the remaining 727/740, or 98.24%, of the MTC isolates from São Paulo state were from the recent PGG2/3 evolutionary isolates belonging to the LAM, T, S, X, and Haarlem lineages, i.e., the Euro-American group. This study provides the first overview of circulating genotypes of M. tuberculosis in São Paulo state and demonstrates that the clustered shared types containing seven or more M. tuberculosis isolates that are spread in São Paulo state included both resistant and susceptible isolates. PMID:23201043

  1. Population structure and circulating genotypes of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in São Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria Conceição; Giampaglia, Carmen M Saraiva; Oliveira, Rosângela S; Simonsen, Vera; Latrilha, Fábio Oliveira; Moniz, Letícia Lisboa; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine

    2013-03-01

    São Paulo is the most populous Brazilian state and reports the largest number of tuberculosis cases in the country annually (over 18,500). This study included 193 isolates obtained during the 2nd Nationwide Survey on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Resistance that was conducted in São Paulo state and 547 isolates from a laboratory based study of drug resistance that were analyzed by the Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory at the Institute Adolfo Lutz. Both studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and sought to determine the genetic diversity and pattern of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates (MTC) circulating in São Paulo. The patterns obtained from the spoligotyping analysis demonstrated that 51/740 (6.9%) of the isolates corresponded to orphan patterns and that 689 (93.1%) of the isolates distributed into 144 shared types, including 119 that matched a preexisting shared type in the SITVIT2 database and 25 that were new isolates. A total of 77/144 patterns corresponded to unique isolates, while the remaining 67 corresponded to clustered patterns (n=612 isolates clustered into groups of 2-84 isolates each). The evolutionarily ancient PGG1 lineages (Beijing, CAS1-DEL, EAI3-IND, and PINI2) were rarely detected in São Paulo and comprised only 13/740, or 1.76%, of the total isolates; all of the remaining 727/740, or 98.24%, of the MTC isolates from São Paulo state were from the recent PGG2/3 evolutionary isolates belonging to the LAM, T, S, X, and Haarlem lineages, i.e., the Euro-American group. This study provides the first overview of circulating genotypes of M. tuberculosis in São Paulo state and demonstrates that the clustered shared types containing seven or more M. tuberculosis isolates that are spread in São Paulo state included both resistant and susceptible isolates.

  2. Chitosan-based intelligent theragnosis nanocomposites enable pH-sensitive drug release with MR-guided imaging for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Smart drug delivery systems that are triggered by environmental conditions have been developed to enhance cancer therapeutic efficacy while limiting unwanted effects. Because cancer exhibits abnormally high local acidities compared to normal tissues (pH 7.4) due to Warburg effects, pH-sensitive systems have been researched for effective cancer therapy. Chitosan-based intelligent theragnosis nanocomposites, N-naphthyl-O-dimethymaleoyl chitosan-based drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (NChitosan-DMNPs), were developed in this study. NChitosan-DMNPs are capable of pH-sensitive drug release with MR-guided images because doxorubicin (DOX) and magnetic nanocrystals (MNCs) are encapsulated into the designed N-naphthyl-O-dimethymaleoyl chitosan (N-nap-O-MalCS). This system exhibits rapid DOX release as acidity increases, high stability under high pH conditions, and sufficient capacity for diagnosing and monitoring therapeutic responses. These results demonstrate that NChitosan-DMNPs have potential as theragnosis nanocomposites for effective cancer therapy. PMID:24206754

  3. Self-assembly of pH-sensitive fluorinated peptide dendron functionalized dextran nanoparticles for on-demand intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengnan; Zhou, Jie; Wali, Aisha Roshan Mohamed; He, Yiyan; Xu, Xianghui; Tang, James Zhenggui; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the amphiphilic fluorinated peptide dendrons functionalized dextran (FPD-HZN-Dex) via an acid-sensitive hydrazone linkage was successfully designed and prepared for the first time. We demonstrated a spontaneous self-assembly of amphiphilic FPD-HZN-Dex into the well-defined nanoparticles with the core-shell architecture in aqueous media, which is attributed to the efficient amphiphilic functionalization of dextran by the hydrophobic fluorinated peptide dendrons. The spherical morphology, uniform particle size and good storage stability of the prepared FPD-HZN-Dex nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed a controlled and pH dependent hydrophobic drug release profile. The cell viability assays show excellent biocompatibility of the FPD-HZN-Dex nanoparticles for both normal cells and tumor cells. Moreover, the FPD-HZN-Dex self-assembled systems based on pH-sensitive hydrazone linkage also can serve as stimulus bioresponsive carriers for on-demand intracellular drug delivery. These self-assembled nanoparticles exhibit a stimulus-induced response to endo/lysosome pH (pH 5.0) that causes their disassembly over time, enabling controlled release of encapsulated DOX. This work has unveiled a unique non-covalent interaction useful for engineering amphiphilic dendrons or dendrimers self-assembled systems. PMID:26238777

  4. The Effectiveness and Safety of Fluoroquinolone-Containing Regimen as a First-Line Treatment for Drug-Sensitive Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jung Kyu; Kim, Eunyoung; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolone is recommended as a pivotal antituberculous agent for treating multi-drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. However, its effectiveness as first-line treatment remains controversial. The present study was conducted to validate the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen for drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials until June 5, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared antituberculous regimens containing fluoroquinolone with the standard regimen were included. Results Eleven RCTs that included 6,334 patients were selected. Fluoroquinolone-containing regimens had a higher rate of sputum culture conversion at 2 months of treatment (M-H fixed odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.54). However, the outcomes were less favorable (M-H fixed OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.59–0.82) and the associated total adverse events were more frequent (M-H fixed OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46–2.31) in the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen group, without a significant heterogeneity according to treatment duration. Treatment with the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen for 4 months showed a higher relapse rate. Conclusions Despite a higher culture conversion rate at 2 months of treatment, the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen had limitations, including less favorable outcomes and more adverse events, as the first-line therapy for drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:27455053

  5. [Evaluation of drug sensitivity and biochemical properties of coagulase-negative S. aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Szymanowska, A; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Młynarczyk, A; Młynarczyk, G

    1993-01-01

    20-25% of strains isolated in our hospital in 1991 from clinical specimens and identified as S. aureus were coagulase-negative. These strains were characterized in respect of biochemical properties and resistance to antibacterial drugs. It was shown that the investigated group of strains displayed high drug resistance and particularly high percent of strains were resistant to methicillin (60%). 100% strains were resistant to penicillin and tetracyclines and most of them were resistant to aminocyclitol antibiotics. Coagulase-negative strains, in comparison with coagulase-positive, less frequently produced hemolysins and more frequently staphylokinase.

  6. Simulation of kinetic data on the influx and efflux of chloroquine by erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Evidence for a drug-importer in chloroquine-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, V; Cutler, D J

    1991-12-11

    Literature data on influx and efflux kinetics of chloroquine (CQ) with erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum were simulated using a four-compartment model with first-order exchange between the compartments. The four compartments represent (1) the buffer surrounding the infected erythrocyte; (2) the cytosol of the host erythrocyte; (3) the parasite cytosol; and (4) the food vacuole. Simulations showed that basal membrane transport of CQ, estimated from data on influx of CQ into uninfected red cells, largely accounts for uptake and release of CQ by erythrocytes infected with two different CQ-resistant (CQ-R) parasite strains. In contrast, the rate of uptake of CQ by erythrocytes infected with a CQ-sensitive (CQ-S) strain is substantially higher than predicted by uptake with membrane transfer by basal diffusion of CQ. Simulations also indicate that the difference in kinetics of CQ uptake by erythrocytes infected with the CQ-S and CQ-R strains can be explained by a net increase in the inward permeability coefficient at the host erythrocyte membrane, the composite membrane surrounding the parasite or the food vacuole membrane. The results are consistent with the presence of a drug-importer for CQ in erythrocytes infected with sensitive strains, which is absent in those infected with resistant strains. They are not consistent with the hypothesis that CQ resistance is attributable to a drug-exporter in resistant cells which is lacking in sensitive cells.

  7. Improvement of insulin sensitivity by a novel drug, BGP-15, in insulin-resistant patients: a proof of concept randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Literáti-Nagy, B; Kulcsár, E; Literáti-Nagy, Zs; Buday, B; Péterfai, E; Horváth, T; Tory, K; Kolonics, A; Fleming, A; Mandl, J; Korányi, L

    2009-05-01

    The efficacy and safety of the new drug, BGP-15, were compared with placebo in insulin-resistant patients in a 28-day dose-ranging study. Forty-seven nondiabetic patients with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of treatment with 200 or 400 mg of BGP-15 or placebo. Insulin resistance was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique and homeostasis model assessment method, and beta-cell function was measured by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Each BGP-15 dose significantly increased whole body insulin sensitivity (M-1, p=0.032), total body glucose utilization (M-2, p=0.035), muscle tissue glucose utilization (M-3, p=0.040), and fat-free body mass glucose utilization (M-4, p=0.038) compared to baseline and placebo. No adverse drug effects were observed during treatment. BGP-15 at 200 or 400 mg significantly improved insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic patients during treatment compared to placebo and was safe and well-tolerated. This was the first clinical study demonstrating the insulin-sensitizing effect of a molecule, which is considered as a co-inducer of heat shock proteins.

  8. Triplet-sensitized photodegradation of sulfa drugs containing six-membered heterocyclic groups: identification of an SO2 extrusion photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Boreen, Anne L; Arnold, William A; McNeill, Kristopher

    2005-05-15

    The aquatic photochemical behavior of a class of sulfa drugs containing six-membered heterocyclic substituents (sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine, sulfachloropyridazine, and sulfadimethoxine) was investigated. Photodegradation of the sulfa drugs in a natural water sample was significantly enhanced relative to the degradation in deionized water, with the exception of sulfadimethoxine. This indicated an indirect photochemical process that was identified through the use of quenchers to be attributable to interaction with triplet excited-state dissolved organic matter (3DOM). The direct photolysis rate constant and quantum yield for both the neutral and anionic species of each sulfa drug were calculated using matrix deconvolution methods. The quantum yield values range from 0.01 x 10(-3) for the neutral form of sulfadimethoxine to 5 x 10(-3) for the anionic form of sulfamethazine and are significantly lower than those observed in a previous study for sulfa drugs containing five-membered heterocyclic substituents, although the rate constants are of similar magnitude. The primary product formed in both direct and indirect photodegradation for all five compounds was identified as a sulfur dioxide extrusion product. The predicted environmental half-lives solely attributable to direct photolysis range from 8.6 h in midsummer at 30 degrees latitude in pH 7 surface water for sulfachloropyridazine to 420 h in midwinter at 45 degrees in pH 7 surface water for sulfadimethoxine. These half-lives, except for sulfadimethoxine, will be decreased by interaction with 3DOM.

  9. Impact of hydrogenation on physicochemical and biomedical properties of pH-sensitive PMAA-b-HTPB-b-PMAA triblock copolymer drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Xu, Jing-Wen; Luo, Yan-Ling

    2016-05-01

    pH-Sensitive poly(methacrylic acid)-block-hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA-b-HTPB-b-PMAA) was synthesized and then hydrogenated in this work. The chain structure, phase behavior and thermal properties were characterized by(1)H NMR, FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, etc., and the physicochemical and biomedical properties were investigated via fluorescence spectroscopy, TEM, DLS, loading and release of drug and MTT, and so on. The experimental results indicated that the hydrogenation led to the change in the chain aggregate structure of hydrophobic HTPB blocks and the formation of more stable spherical core-shell micelle aggregates, and the critical micelle concentration decreased from 41.8 mg L(-1)before hydrogenation to 4.4 mg L(-1)after hydrogenation. The hydrogenated block copolymer micelle aggregates exhibited pH-triggered response, and could entrap twice as much hydrophobic drug as the unhydrided counterparts and the encapsulation efficiency was significantly improved, which makes them fine to meet the requirements for drug carriers. Therefore, the hydrogenated PMAA-b-HTPB-b-PMAA copolymer micelles as drug target release carriers can be well used in the field of prevention and treatment of cancers. PMID:26939939

  10. A facile one-pot synthesis of starch functionalized graphene as nano-carrier for pH sensitive and starch-mediated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Li, Huiming; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-04-01

    A fast, green and facile method was developed to prepare starch functionalized graphene nanosheets (starch-GNS) via the reduction of exfoliated graphene oxides by soluble starch, which acted both as a reductant and as a functionalization reagent for capping graphene nanosheets to prevent aggregation. The as-prepared starch-GNS exhibited good biocompatibility, which was deemed crucial for the biomedical application of graphene. Cellular toxicity tests suggested that the starch-GNS was nontoxic to SW-620 cells even at the relatively concentration of 200 μg mL(-1). After the loading of the commonly used anticancer drug hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) via physisorption on starch-GNS, the HCPT@starch-GNS composite exhibited a high drug loading capacity and was therefore used for cellular imaging and drug delivery studies. Through the nonspecific endocytosis effect, the HCPT@starch-GNS composite was encapsulated into cytoplasm by SW-620 cancer cells. With the double action of an acid microenvironment and the diastase in SW-620 cells, the HCPT@starch-GNS composite showed high toxicity to the SW-620 cells and experienced a pH sensitive as well as a starch-mediated in vitro sustained release process, which had the potential advantage of improving therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, the starch-GNS composite could be used as an ideal nano-carrier for drug delivery and offered a new avenue for broadening the application of graphene in biomedicine.

  11. Effect of Metformin Glycinate on Glycated Hemoglobin A1c Concentration and Insulin Sensitivity in Drug-Naive Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Robles-Cervantes, José A.; Ramos-Zavala, Maria G.; Barrera-Durán, Carmelita; González-Canudas, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim This study evaluated the effect of metformin glycinate on glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) concentration and insulin sensitivity in drug-naive adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects and Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 20 patients with drug-naive T2DM. Ten subjects received metformin glycinate (1,050.6 mg) once daily during the first month and force-titrated twice daily during the second month. Ten additional patients received placebo as the control group. Before and after the intervention, metabolic profile including A1C and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) was estimated. Results A1C concentrations decreased significantly with metformin glycinate administration (8.0±0.7% vs. 7.1±0.9%, P=0.008) before and after the intervention, respectively. There were significant differences in changes from baseline of A1C between groups (0.0±0.7% vs. −1.0±0.5% for placebo and metformin glycinate groups, respectively; P=0.004). A reduction of ≥1% in A1C levels was reached in 60.0% of patients with metformin glycinate administration (P=0.02). Insulin sensitivity was not modified by the intervention. Conclusions Administration of metformin glycinate during a 2-month period showed a greater decrease in A1C concentrations than placebo in a selected group of drug-naive adult patients with T2DM. PMID:22974412

  12. The novel pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine, PBOX-6, synergistically enhances the apoptotic effects of carboplatin in drug sensitive and multidrug resistant neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Jennifer C; Bright, Sandra A; Carroll, Eilis; Butini, Stefania; Campiani, Giuseppe; O'Meara, Anne; Williams, D Clive; Zisterer, Daniela M

    2014-02-15

    Neuroblastoma, a malignancy of neuroectoderrmal origin, accounts for 15% of childhood cancer deaths. Despite advances in understanding the biology, it remains one of the most difficult paediatric cancers to treat. A major obstacle in the effective treatment of neuroblastoma is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). There is thus a compelling demand for new treatment strategies for this cancer that can bypass such resistance mechanisms. The pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine (PBOX) compounds are a series of novel microtubule-targeting agents that potently induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, ex vivo patient samples and in vivo cancer models. In this study we examined the ability of two members, PBOX-6 and -15, to exhibit anti-cancer effects in a panel of drug sensitive and MDR neuroblastoma cell lines. The PBOX compounds potently reduced the viability of all neuroblastoma cells examined and exhibited a lower fold resistance in MDR cells when compared to standard chemotherapeutics. In addition, the PBOX compounds synergistically enhanced apoptosis induced by etoposide, carboplatin and doxorubicin. Exposure of drug sensitive and resistant cell lines to PBOX-6/carboplatin induced cleavage of Bcl-2, a downregulation of Mcl-1 and a concomitant increase in Bak. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 was demonstrated. Finally, gene silencing of Mcl-1 by siRNA was shown to sensitise both drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cells to carboplatin-induced apoptosis demonstrating the importance of Mcl-1 downregulation in the apoptotic pathway mediated by the PBOX compounds in neuroblastoma. In conclusion, our findings indicate the potential of the PBOX compounds in enhancing chemosensitivity in neuroblastoma.

  13. Nanoscale Drug Delivery and Hyperthermia: The Materials Design and Preclinical and Clinical Testing of Low Temperature-Sensitive Liposomes Used in Combination with Mild Hyperthermia in the Treatment of Local Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Chelsea D.; Park, Ji-Young; Needham, David; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The overall objective of liposomal drug delivery is to selectively target drug delivery to diseased tissue, while minimizing drug delivery to critical normal tissues. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of temperature-sensitive liposomes in general and the Low Temperature-Sensitive Liposome (LTSL) in particular. We give a brief description of the material design of LTSL and highlight the likely mechanism behind temperature-triggered drug release. A complete review of the progress and results of the latest preclinical and clinical studies that demonstrate enhanced drug delivery with the combined treatment of hyperthermia and liposomes is provided as well as a clinical perspective on cancers that would benefit from hyperthermia as an adjuvant treatment for temperature-triggered chemotherapeutics. This review discusses the ideas, goals, and processes behind temperature-sensitive liposome development in the laboratory to the current use in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:23807899

  14. A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay amplified by biotin-streptavidin system for detecting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Bu, Dan; Zhuang, Hui S; Yang, Guang X

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive biotin-streptavidin-amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BA-ELISA) method was developed for detecting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen. Compared with traditional ELISA method, the sensitivity of proposed immunoassay was enhanced by the biotin-streptavidin system. Under the optimal condition, the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.25 ng mL(-1), with minor cross-reactivity to a number of structural analogs. This developed assay was successfully applied to detect the ketoprofen residues in different fish samples, and good recoveries (72.6-105.5%) were obtained. The results indicated that this immunoassay method could specifically detect trace ketoprofen residues and could be widely used for routine monitoring of food samples.

  15. Presence of the minor EGFR T790M mutation is associated with drug-sensitive EGFR mutations in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Soh, Junichi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Furukawa, Masashi; Shien, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Hagiwara, Koichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2014-07-01

    The T790M mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is known to be associated with the acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinoma patients to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The minor T790M mutant allele is occasionally detected in EGFR-TKI-naive tumor samples, yet findings concerning the clinical impact of the minor T790M mutation vary among previous studies. In the present study, we assessed the clinical impact of the minor T790M mutation using a novel, highly sensitive assay combining high-resolution melting (HRM), mutant-enriched PCR and co-amplification at a lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR. We determined the T790M mutational status in 146 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas without a history of EGFR-TKI treatment using mutant-enriched COLD-HRM (MEC-HRM) and standard HRM assays. The sensitivities of the MEC-HRM and standard HRM assays for the detection of T790M-mutant alleles among wild-type alleles were 0.01 and 10%, respectively. Although the T790M mutation was not detected using a standard HRM assay, we identified 19 (13%) T790M mutations using the MEC-HRM assay and defined these 19 mutations as minor T790M mutations. The proportion of T790M alleles was <0.1% in 17 (84%) of the 19 samples. Multivariate analyses revealed that a minor T790M mutation was significantly associated with the presence of EGFR exon 19 deletions or the L858R mutation (both of which are drug-sensitive EGFR mutations) (P=0.04). In conclusion, the minor EGFR T790M mutations were present in 13% of EGFR-TKI-naive surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and were associated with drug-sensitive EGFR mutations.

  16. Carbon paste- and PVC membrane electrodes as sensitive sensors for the determination of antidiabetic drugs for type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Waheed A; El-Ries, Mohammed A; Mahdi, Inas M

    2009-12-01

    Carbon paste- and polyvinyl chloride membrane electrodes are simple, precise, rapid and selective sensors for the determination of antidiabetic drugs for type 2 diabetic patients. These electrodes were successfully used for the potentiometric determination of rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, glimepiride and glyburide in their standard forms and also as pharmaceutical preparations. The preparation of these ion-selective electrodes for the potentiometric determination of the drug is based on the construction of a 10% standard drug-ion pair with reineckate or tungstophosphate imbedded as an electro-active material in the carbon paste or in the polyvinyl chloride membrane. The prepared ion-selective electrodes showed a Nernstian response with a limit of detection amounting to 10(-6) M in a pH range of 3 to 5. A good selectivity coefficient and long term stability could be achieved. The developed potentiometric method based on the CPE and PVC sensors is economic and less time consuming compared to the conventionally used high performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, methods.

  17. Asparagine and glycine metabolism in rat liver mitochondria and in mouse L5178Y lymphoma cells resistant or sensitive to the anticancer drug L-asparaginase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, J.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver mitochondrial asparagine was found to be degraded via an aminotransferase and omega-amidase. Evidence includes oxaloacetate production from asparagine only when glyoxylate was added and production of radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-ketosuccinamate via metabolism of (U-/sup 14/C)asparagine. In the cytosol, asparagine is degraded primarily via asparaginase and subsequent transamination. A new HPLC technique for separation of citric acid cycle intermediates was developed using: ion pairing with 20 mM each to tetrabutylammonium hydroxide and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; pH 7.0; isocratic elution; and detection at 210 nm. Amino acid content of mouse lymphoma cells either sensitive (L5178Y) or resistant (L5178Y/L-ASE) to the anticancer drug L-asparaginase was studied. The concentration of asparagine was 1.5 times higher and the concentrations of the essential amino acids histidine, methionine, valine and phenylalanine were two times higher in asparaginase-resistant than sensitive cells. In vivo but not in vitro studies indicated that glucine decreases in sensitive but not resistant cells upon asparaginase treatment. Asparagine and glycine metabolism was further studied using /sup 14/C radiolabel conversion of asparagine, glyoxylate, glycine and serine. Glycine metabolism is especially important in lymphomas and leukemias because these cells contain higher concentrations of glycine that other cancer and normal cells. Therefore, glycine levels were studied and were found to decrease in sensitive but not resistant cells upon asparaginase administration.

  18. Micelles Based on Acid Degradable Poly(acetal urethane): Preparation, pH-Sensitivity, and Triggered Intracellular Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fushi; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-07-13

    Polyurethanes are a unique class of biomaterials that are widely used in medical devices. In spite of their easy synthesis and excellent biocompatibility, polyurethanes are less explored for controlled drug delivery due to their slow or lack of degradation. In this paper, we report the design and development of novel acid degradable poly(acetal urethane) (PAU) and corresponding triblock copolymer micelles for pH-triggered intracellular delivery of a model lipophilic anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX). PAU with Mn ranging from 4.3 to 12.3 kg/mol was conveniently prepared from polycondensation reaction of lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and a novel diacetal-containing diol, terephthalilidene-bis(trimethylolethane) (TPABTME) using dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The thiol-ene click reaction of Allyl-PAU-Allyl with thiolated PEG (Mn = 5.0 kg/mol) afforded PEG-PAU-PEG triblock copolymers that readily formed micelles with average sizes of about 90-120 nm in water. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed fast swelling and disruption of micelles under acidic pH. UV/vis spectroscopy corroborated that acetal degradation was accelerated at pH 4.0 and 5.0. The in vitro release studies showed that doxorubicin (DOX) was released in a controlled and pH-dependent manner, in which ca. 96%, 73%, and 30% of drug was released within 48 h at pH 4.0, 5.0, and 7.4, respectively. Notably, MTT assays displayed that DOX-loaded PEG-PAU-PEG micelles had a high in vitro antitumor activity in both RAW 264.7 and drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry experiments demonstrated that PEG-PAU-PEG micelles mediated efficient cytoplasmic delivery of DOX. Importantly, blank PEG-PAU-PEG micelles were shown to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 and MCF-7/ADR cells even at a high concentration of 1.5 mg/mL. Hence, micelles based on poly(acetal urethane) have appeared as a new class of biocompatible and acid

  19. Embedding fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles into biocompatible nanogels for tumor cell imaging and thermo/pH-sensitive in vitro drug release.

    PubMed

    Gui, Rijun; Wang, Yanfeng; Sun, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Thermo/pH-sensitive/fluorescent/biocompatible nanospheres consisting of quantum dots-embedded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Q-MS) as a core and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM))-graft-chitosan (CS) nanogels as a shell (PNIPAM-g-CS) were prepared via temperature-regulated one-pot copolymerization of NIPAM monomer and CS in the presence of Q-MS. The prepared nanospheres exhibited remarkable fluorescence/thermo/pH-sensitivity. HepG2 cells treated with nanospheres displayed bright fluorescence imaging. Loading efficiency and capacity of Doxorubicin (Dox) into nanospheres were regularly increased with the increment of Dox concentration. At a high temperature and a low pH, cumulative in vitro release of Dox from Dox-loaded nanospheres was much great and fast. Released Dox still retained high anticancer activity, and blank nanosphere carriers produced neglectful toxicity to HepG2 cells. The multifunctional nanospheres could be further developed toward temperature/pH-regulated drug carriers for in vivo tumor therapy with a rapid drug release and fluorescence imaging in targeted tissues.

  20. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, L.; Shelmerdine, H.; Hughes, M. P.; Coley, H. M.; Hübner, Y.; Labeed, F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)—the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields—has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K+ and Ca2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl- were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function.

  1. An increase in sensitivity of rat cingulate cortical neurones to substance P occurs following withdrawal of chronic administration of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. S.; Olpe, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of neurones in the cingulate cortex of the rat to iontophoretically applied substance P (SP) was tested one hour after a single dose of various antidepressant drugs and also 1 day following the termination of a chronic dosing schedule (14 once daily injections) of the same agents. One hour after a single injection of desipramine (DMI), chlorimipramine (CMI), trimipramine (TMI) or zimelidine ( ZIM ) (all at 10 mg kg-1 i.p.) there was no change in the mean size of excitatory responses to SP compared to those before the injection. There was a tendency towards a decrease in the TMI group. One day following the last of 14 consecutive daily injections (10 mg kg-1 i.p.) of the above agents there was a significant increase in the size of excitatory responses to SP compared to those in rats receiving daily saline injections. However, 14 days of treatment with DMI did not alter the responses to L-glutamate. Similar chronic dosing schedules with either diazepam (5 mg kg-1) or fluphenazine (5 mg kg-1) did not affect the responses to SP. Thus chronic but not acute administration of antidepressant drugs results in an increase in the sensitivity of neurones, in the cingulate cortex of the rat, to SP. PMID:6202353

  2. ZEB1 knockdown mediated using polypeptide cationic micelles inhibits metastasis and effects sensitization to a chemotherapeutic drug for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shengtao; Wu, Lei; Li, Mingxing; Yi, Huqiang; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced metastasis in the lung. When DOX and siRNA were co-delivered by the nanocarriers (siRNA-DOX-NP), a synergistic therapeutic effect was observed, resulting in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in a H460 xenograft model. These results demonstrated that the siRNA-NP or siRNA-DOX-NP complex targeting ZEB1 could be developed into a new therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment.Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced

  3. Sensitivity of human prostate cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs depends on EndoG expression regulated by promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoying; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Shah, Sudhir V.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Basnakian, Alexei G.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of promoter sequences of all known human cytotoxic endonucleases showed that endonuclease G (EndoG) is the only endonuclease that contains a CpG island, a segment of DNA with high G+C content and a site for methylation, in the promoter region. A comparison of three human prostate cancer cell lines showed that EndoG is highly expressed in 22Rv1 and LNCaP cells. In PC3 cells, EndoG was not expressed and the EndoG CpG island was hypermethylated. The expression of EndoG correlated positively with sensitivity to cisplatin and etoposide, and the silencing of EndoG by siRNA decreased the sensitivity of the cells to the chemotherapeutic agents in the two EndoG-expressing cell lines. 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine caused hypomethylation of the EndoG promoter in PC3 cells, induced EndoG mRNA and protein expression, and made the cells sensitive to both cisplatin and etoposide. The acetylation of histones by trichostatin A, the histone deacetylase inhibitor, induced EndoG expression in 22Rv1 cells, while it had no such effect in PC3 cells. These data are the first indication that EndoG may be regulated by methylation of its gene promoter, and partially by histone acetylation, and that EndoG is essential for prostate cancer cell death in the used models. PMID:18565644

  4. Spectrofluorometric determination of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cells using the 2‧,7‧-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loetchutinat, Chatchanok; Kothan, Suchart; Dechsupa, Samarn; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Mankhetkorn, Samlee

    2005-02-01

    This article examines a non-invasive spectrofluorometric method using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCHF-DA) assay for quantifying the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS i) produced in four cultured cancer cell lines: drug-sensitive (K562) and drug-resistant (K562/ adr) human erythromyelogenous leukemia cell lines, and drug-sensitive (GLC4) and drug-resistant (GLC4/ adr) human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. The oxidation of the probe to the fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) was continuously monitored by following the DCF fluorescence intensity as a function of time using a standard spectrofluorometer in the presence of an extracellular DCF fluorescence quencher (Co 2+). By fitting the spectrofluorometric data to a kinetic model based on the following two reactions: (i) deacetylation of DCHF-DA to the oxidant-sensitive compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCHF) by cellular esterase enzymes (pseudo-first-order rate constant: ke) and (ii) oxidation of DCHF by ROS i (second-order rate constant: k2), the parameters intervening in DCF formation, ke and the product of k2 by the ROS i concentration, were quantitatively determined for the different cell lines studied. The results revealed that the intracellular esterase content or activity is similar in K562, K562/ adr, and GLC4 cells, but 5-fold higher in GLC4/ adr cells. The product k2[ROS i] was found to be similar in the four cell lines considered, with a mean value of (5.3±0.9)×10 -7 cell -1 s -1. Assuming that H 2O 2 (in combination with peroxidases) is the primary responsible species for DCHF oxidation in intact cells, and using the rate constant value k2=790±62 M s established in our laboratory for the reaction of DCHF with H 2O 2 in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, the mean value of the intracellular levels of ROS i in those cells was estimated to be 0.67±0.16 nM per cell. Such a value compares favorably to H 2O 2 intracellular steady-state concentrations that have been

  5. Covalent attachment of Mn-porphyrin onto doxorubicin-loaded poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lijia; Liang, Xiaolong; Li, Xiaoda; Yang, Yongbo; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, theranostic nanoparticles (MnP-DOX NPs) were fabricated by conjugating Mn-porphyrin onto the surface of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (DOX NPs) for potential T1 magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery. An in vitro drug release study showed that the release rate of DOX from MnP-DOX NPs was slow at neutral pH but accelerated significantly in acidic conditions. It was found that MnP-DOX NPs could be easily internalized by HeLa cells and effectively suppressed the growth of HeLa cells and HT-29 cells due to the accelerated drug release in acidic lysosomal compartments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning analysis demonstrated that MnP-DOX NPs had much higher longitudinal relaxivity in water (r1 value of 27.8 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)) than Mn-porphyrin (Mn(III)TPPS3NH2; r1 value of 6.70 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)), behaving as an excellent contrast agent for T1-weighted MRI both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, such a smart and promising nanoplatform integrates multiple capabilities for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  7. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro drug release behavior of glutathione-sensitive long-circulation micelles based on polyethylene glycol prodrug.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liyan; Ding, Kaikai; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Zeng, Tian; Yin, Yihua; Zheng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a kind of glutathione-sensitive polymeric micelles was prepared through assembling in aqueous solution of an amphiphilic polymeric prodrug which was synthesized by linkage of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether using propiolic acid as a connecting arm. The glutathione (GSH)-sensitive strategy is based on a Michael addition-elimination reaction, that is the amphiphilic polymeric prodrug which contains α, β-unsaturated carbonyl group acts as a Michael acceptor to receive the attack of nucleophile - glutathione, and undergoes elimination reaction to release the original drug. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that the polymeric micelles (PMs) had a spherical-like morphology with a mean diameter of 28 ± 3.2 nm. The dynamic light scattering investigation data exhibited that the size and distribution changes of PMs are negligible after being placed for 15 days. In vitro drug release study indicated that only less than 13% of 6-MP was released from the micelles under GSH stimulation at micromolar level, while 34.5, 53.7, and 77.8% accumulative release rates were achieved under GSH stimulation at millimolar level (1, 2 and 10 mM), respectively. The cell inhibition rate of PM solution against HL-60 cells carried out by MTT method reached 85%. The cellular uptake and the intracellular drug release of PMs in HL-60 cells were observed through determining the intracellular 6-MP content by UV-vis spectrophotometer. In vitro macrophage uptake study showed a low phagocytosis rate, indicating the long-circulation ability of the PMs. PMID:26764973

  8. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  9. Yolk-shell hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic and pH-sensitive properties for controlled anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunxing; Zheng, Jianzhong; Chen, Dejian; Wu, Yijin; Zhang, Wuxiang; Zheng, Fengying; Cao, Jing; Ma, Heran; Liu, Yaling

    2013-11-01

    A facile and effective way for the preparation of nano-sized Fe3O4@graphene yolk-shell nanoparticles via a hydrothermal method is developed. Moreover, the targeting properties of the materials for anticancer drug (doxorubicin hydrochloride) delivery are investigated. Excitingly, these hybrid materials possess favorable dispersibility, good superparamagnetism (the magnetic saturation value is 45.740 emu g-1), high saturated loading capacity (2.65 mg mg-1), and effective loading (88.3%). More importantly, the composites exhibit strong pH-triggered drug release response (at the pH value of 5.6 and 7.4, the release rate was 24.86% and 10.28%, respectively) and good biocompatibility over a broad concentration range of 0.25-100 μg mL-1 (the cell viability was 98.52% even at a high concentration of 100 μg mL-1) which sheds light on their potentially bright future for bio-related applications.

  10. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  11. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds. PMID:26296082

  12. Quantitative evaluation of cellular uptake, DNA incorporation and adduct formation in cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines: Comparison of different Pt-containing drugs.

    PubMed

    Corte-Rodríguez, M; Espina, M; Sierra, L M; Blanco, E; Ames, T; Montes-Bayón, M; Sanz-Medel, A

    2015-11-01

    The use of Pt-containing compounds as chemotherapeutic agents facilitates drug monitoring by using highly sensitive elemental techniques like inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). However, methodological problems arise when trying to compare different experiments due to the high variability of biological parameters. In this work we have attempted to identify and correct such variations in order to compare the biological behavior of cisplatin, oxaliplatin and pyrodach-2 (a novel platinum-containing agent). A detailed study to address differential cellular uptake has been conducted in three different cell lines: lung adenocarcinoma (A549); cisplatin-sensitive ovarian carcinoma (A2780); and cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma (A2780cis). The normalization of Pt results to cell mass, after freeze-drying, has been used to minimize the errors associated with cell counting. Similarly, Pt accumulation in DNA has been evaluated by referencing the Pt results to the DNA concentration, as measured by (31)P monitoring using flow-injection and ICP-MS detection. These strategies have permitted to address significantly lower Pt levels in the resistant cells when treated with cisplatin or oxaliplatin as well as an independent behaviour from the cell type (sensitive or resistant) for pyrodach-2. Similarly, different levels of incorporation in DNA have been found for the three drugs depending on the cell model revealing a different behavior regarding cell cisplatin resistance. Further speciation experiments (by using complementary HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS) have shown that the main target in DNA is still the N7 of the guanine but with different kinetics of the ligand exchange mechanism for each of the compounds under evaluation.

  13. A highly sensitive prenylation assay reveals in vivo effects of bisphosphonate drug on the Rab prenylome of macrophages outside the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naveid; Jurczyluk, Julie; Shay, Gemma; Tnimov, Zakir; Alexandrov, Kirill; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Pavlos, Nathan J; Rogers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonate drugs such as zoledronic acid (ZOL), used for the treatment of common bone disorders, target the skeleton and inhibit bone resorption by preventing the prenylation of small GTPases in bone-destroying osteoclasts. Increasing evidence indicates that bisphosphonates also have pleiotropic effects outside the skeleton, most likely via cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage exposed to nanomolar circulating drug concentrations. However, no effects of such low concentrations of ZOL have been reported using existing approaches. We have optimized a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay utilizing recombinant geranylgeranyltransferases to enable the detection of subtle effects of ZOL on the prenylation of Rab- and Rho-family GTPases. Using this assay, we found for the first time that concentrations of ZOL as low as 10nM caused inhibition of Rab prenylation in J774 macrophages following prolonged cell culture. By combining the assay with quantitative mass spectrometry we identified an accumulation of 18 different unprenylated Rab proteins in J774 cells after nanomolar ZOL treatment, with a >7-fold increase in the unprenylated form of Rab proteins associated with the endophagosome pathway (Rab1, Rab5, Rab6, Rab7, Rab11, Rab14 and Rab21). Finally, we also detected a clear effect of subcutaneous ZOL administration in vivo on the prenylation of Rab1A, Rab5B, Rab7A and Rab14 in mouse peritoneal macrophages, confirming that systemic treatment with bisphosphonate drug can inhibit prenylation in myeloid cells in vivo outside the skeleton. These observations begin a new era in defining the precise pharmacological actions of bisphosphonate drugs on the prenylation of small GTPases in vivo. PMID:26399387

  14. A highly sensitive prenylation assay reveals in vivo effects of bisphosphonate drug on the Rab prenylome of macrophages outside the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ali, Naveid; Jurczyluk, Julie; Shay, Gemma; Tnimov, Zakir; Alexandrov, Kirill; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Pavlos, Nathan J; Rogers, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Bisphosphonate drugs such as zoledronic acid (ZOL), used for the treatment of common bone disorders, target the skeleton and inhibit bone resorption by preventing the prenylation of small GTPases in bone-destroying osteoclasts. Increasing evidence indicates that bisphosphonates also have pleiotropic effects outside the skeleton, most likely via cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage exposed to nanomolar circulating drug concentrations. However, no effects of such low concentrations of ZOL have been reported using existing approaches. We have optimized a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay utilizing recombinant geranylgeranyltransferases to enable the detection of subtle effects of ZOL on the prenylation of Rab- and Rho-family GTPases. Using this assay, we found for the first time that concentrations of ZOL as low as 10nM caused inhibition of Rab prenylation in J774 macrophages following prolonged cell culture. By combining the assay with quantitative mass spectrometry we identified an accumulation of 18 different unprenylated Rab proteins in J774 cells after nanomolar ZOL treatment, with a >7-fold increase in the unprenylated form of Rab proteins associated with the endophagosome pathway (Rab1, Rab5, Rab6, Rab7, Rab11, Rab14 and Rab21). Finally, we also detected a clear effect of subcutaneous ZOL administration in vivo on the prenylation of Rab1A, Rab5B, Rab7A and Rab14 in mouse peritoneal macrophages, confirming that systemic treatment with bisphosphonate drug can inhibit prenylation in myeloid cells in vivo outside the skeleton. These observations begin a new era in defining the precise pharmacological actions of bisphosphonate drugs on the prenylation of small GTPases in vivo.

  15. Are standard tests sensitive enough to evaluate effects of human pharmaceuticals in aquatic biota? Facing changes in research approaches when performing risk assessment of drugs.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, G V; Owuor, M A; Garrido-Pérez, C; Salamanca, M J; Del Valls, T A; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, the presence of pharmaceutical products in aquatic environments is not only common, but is also of significant concern regarding the adverse effect they may produce to aquatic biota. In order to determine the adverse effects of caffeine (CAF), ibuprofen (IBU), carbamazepine (CBZ) and novobiocin (NOV), at environmental occurring concentrations, standardized endpoints applied in current guidelines were evaluated in four organisms including bioluminescence response in Vibrio fischeri, growth inhibition in Isochrysis galbana (marine water) and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (fresh water) and fertilization and embryo-larval development in Paracentrotus lividus. To reach this aim bioassays were implemented by exposing organisms to water spiked with drugs dissolved in DMSO (0.001% v/v). Risk characterization was performed, calculating the environmental impact of drugs by calculating environmental concentration and predicted no effect concentration ratio (MEC/PNEC). Results indicate that acute toxicity was found above environmental concentrations in the order of mg L(-1) for bacteria bioluminescence, microalgae growth inhibition and sea urchin fertilization. However, teratogenicity was observed on sea urchin after exposure to environmental concentrations of drugs at 0.00001 mg L(-1); at this concentration CBZ and IBU were found to reduce significantly the embryo-larval development compared to controls (p<0.01). The risk calculated for selected drugs suggested they are harmless for aquatic environment except when applying the embryo-larval development endpoint. Endpoints applied in this study showed the necessity of using more sensitive responses, when assessing risk of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments, since endpoints applied in current guidelines may not be suitable.

  16. Highly sensitive on-site detection of drugs adulterated in botanical dietary supplements using thin layer chromatography combined with dynamic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Qi, Yunpeng; Lu, Feng; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of botanical dietary supplements (BDS) doped with illegal adulterants has become a serious problem all over the world, which could cause great threat to human's health. Therefore, it is of great value to identify BDS. Herein, we put forward a highly sensitive method for on-site detection of antitussive and antiasthmatic drugs adulterated in BDS using thin layer chromatography (TLC) combined with dynamic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (DSERS). Adulterants in BDS were separated on a TLC plate and located under UV illumination. Then DSERS detection was performed using a portable Raman spectrometer with 50% glycerol silver colloid serving as DSERS active substrate. Here, the effects of different solvents on detection efficacy were evaluated using phenformin hydrochloride (PHE) as a probe. It was shown that 50% glycerol resulted in higher SERS enhancement and relatively higher stability. Moreover, practical application of this novel TLC-DSERS method was demonstrated with rapid analysis of real BDS samples and one sample adulterated with benproperine phosphate (BEN) was found. Furthermore, the obtained result was verified by ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS). The sensitivity of the TLC-DSERS technique is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of TLC-SERS technique. The results turned out that this combined method would have good prospects for on-site and sensitive detection of adulterated BDS.

  17. Highly sensitive on-site detection of drugs adulterated in botanical dietary supplements using thin layer chromatography combined with dynamic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Qi, Yunpeng; Lu, Feng; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of botanical dietary supplements (BDS) doped with illegal adulterants has become a serious problem all over the world, which could cause great threat to human's health. Therefore, it is of great value to identify BDS. Herein, we put forward a highly sensitive method for on-site detection of antitussive and antiasthmatic drugs adulterated in BDS using thin layer chromatography (TLC) combined with dynamic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (DSERS). Adulterants in BDS were separated on a TLC plate and located under UV illumination. Then DSERS detection was performed using a portable Raman spectrometer with 50% glycerol silver colloid serving as DSERS active substrate. Here, the effects of different solvents on detection efficacy were evaluated using phenformin hydrochloride (PHE) as a probe. It was shown that 50% glycerol resulted in higher SERS enhancement and relatively higher stability. Moreover, practical application of this novel TLC-DSERS method was demonstrated with rapid analysis of real BDS samples and one sample adulterated with benproperine phosphate (BEN) was found. Furthermore, the obtained result was verified by ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS). The sensitivity of the TLC-DSERS technique is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of TLC-SERS technique. The results turned out that this combined method would have good prospects for on-site and sensitive detection of adulterated BDS. PMID:26695274

  18. Effects of perinatal exposure to palatable diets on body weight and sensitivity to drugs of abuse in rats.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Barson, Jessica R; Hauca, Jenna M; Hoebel, Bartley G; Leibowitz, Sarah F; Avena, Nicole M

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of fat- and sugar-rich diets in utero and during the pre-weaning period on bodyweight and responses to drugs of abuse. In Exp. 1, dams were fed a balanced control diet or high-fat diet (HFD), and female offspring were cross-fostered to dams consuming the balanced diet. The HFD-exposed offspring, compared to controls, were heavier in body weight, had increased circulating triglyceride levels, and consumed more alcohol and HFD in adulthood. In Exp. 2, dams were fed standard chow alone or standard chow plus a 16% high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or 10% sucrose solution. Sets of offspring from each group were cross-fostered to dams in the other groups, allowing for the effects of HFCS or sucrose exposure during the gestational period or pre-weaning period to be determined. The offspring (both female and male) exposed to HFCS or sucrose in utero had higher body weights in adulthood and exhibited increased alcohol intake as shown in female offspring and increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity as shown in males. Exposure to HFCS or sucrose only during the pre-weaning period had a similar effect of increasing amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in males, but produced no change in circulating triglycerides or alcohol intake. Collectively, these data suggest that prenatal as well as pre-weaning exposure to fat- and sugar-rich diets, in addition to increasing body weight, can affect responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:22564493

  19. Effects of perinatal exposure to palatable diets on body weight and sensitivity to drugs of abuse in rats.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Barson, Jessica R; Hauca, Jenna M; Hoebel, Bartley G; Leibowitz, Sarah F; Avena, Nicole M

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of fat- and sugar-rich diets in utero and during the pre-weaning period on bodyweight and responses to drugs of abuse. In Exp. 1, dams were fed a balanced control diet or high-fat diet (HFD), and female offspring were cross-fostered to dams consuming the balanced diet. The HFD-exposed offspring, compared to controls, were heavier in body weight, had increased circulating triglyceride levels, and consumed more alcohol and HFD in adulthood. In Exp. 2, dams were fed standard chow alone or standard chow plus a 16% high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or 10% sucrose solution. Sets of offspring from each group were cross-fostered to dams in the other groups, allowing for the effects of HFCS or sucrose exposure during the gestational period or pre-weaning period to be determined. The offspring (both female and male) exposed to HFCS or sucrose in utero had higher body weights in adulthood and exhibited increased alcohol intake as shown in female offspring and increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity as shown in males. Exposure to HFCS or sucrose only during the pre-weaning period had a similar effect of increasing amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in males, but produced no change in circulating triglycerides or alcohol intake. Collectively, these data suggest that prenatal as well as pre-weaning exposure to fat- and sugar-rich diets, in addition to increasing body weight, can affect responses to drugs of abuse.

  20. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl